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Sample records for tacstd2 mutation identified

  1. Infection with hepatitis C virus depends on TACSTD2, a regulator of claudin-1 and occludin highly downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Vandana; Pollicino, Teresa; Diaz, Giacomo; Engle, Ronald E; Alayli, Farah; Melis, Marta; Kabat, Juraj; Tice, Ashley; Pomerenke, Anna; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Zamboni, Fausto; Lusso, Paolo; Emerson, Suzanne U; Farci, Patrizia

    2018-03-14

    Entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV) into hepatocytes is a complex process that involves numerous cellular factors, including the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1), the tetraspanin CD81, and the tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN). Despite expression of all known HCV-entry factors, in vitro models based on hepatoma cell lines do not fully reproduce the in vivo susceptibility of liver cells to primary HCV isolates, implying the existence of additional host factors which are critical for HCV entry and/or replication. Likewise, HCV replication is severely impaired within hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue in vivo, but the mechanisms responsible for this restriction are presently unknown. Here, we identify tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2), one of the most downregulated genes in primary HCC tissue, as a host factor that interacts with CLDN1 and OCLN and regulates their cellular localization. TACSTD2 gene silencing disrupts the typical linear distribution of CLDN1 and OCLN along the cellular membrane in both hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes, recapitulating the pattern observed in vivo in primary HCC tissue. Mechanistic studies suggest that TACSTD2 is involved in the phosphorylation of CLDN1 and OCLN, which is required for their proper cellular localization. Silencing of TACSTD2 dramatically inhibits HCV infection with a pan-genotype effect that occurs at the level of viral entry. Our study identifies TACSTD2 as a novel regulator of two major HCV-entry factors, CLDN1 and OCLN, which is strongly downregulated in malignant hepatocytes. These results provide new insights into the complex process of HCV entry into hepatocytes and may assist in the development of more efficient cellular systems for HCV propagation in vitro.

  2. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  3. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Monoallelic mutation analysis (MAMA) for identifying germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N; Leach, F S; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1995-09-01

    Dissection of germline mutations in a sensitive and specific manner presents a continuing challenge. In dominantly inherited diseases, mutations occur in only one allele and are often masked by the normal allele. Here we report the development of a sensitive and specific diagnostic strategy based on somatic cell hybridization termed MAMA (monoallelic mutation analysis). We have demonstrated the utility of this strategy in two different hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, one caused by a defective tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 5 (familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP) and the other caused by a defective mismatch repair gene on chromosome 2 (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, HNPCC).

  5. Feline polycystic kidney disease mutation identified in PKD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Biller, David S; Erdman, Carolyn A; Lipinski, Monika J; Young, Amy E; Roe, Bruce A; Qin, Baifang; Grahn, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a commonly inherited disorder in humans that causes the formation of fluid-filled renal cysts, often leading to renal failure. PKD1 mutations cause 85% of ADPKD. Feline PKD is autosomal dominant and has clinical presentations similar to humans. PKD affects approximately 38% of Persian cats worldwide, which is approximately 6% of cats, making it the most prominent inherited feline disease. Previous analyses have shown significant linkage between the PKD phenotype and microsatellite markers linked to the feline homolog for PKD1. In this report, the feline PKD1 gene was scanned for causative mutations and a C>A transversion was identified at c.10063 (human ref NM_000296) in exon 29, resulting in a stop mutation at position 3284, which suggests a loss of approximately 25% of the C-terminus of the protein. The same mutation has not been identified in humans, although similar regions of the protein are truncated. The C>A transversion has been identified in the heterozygous state in 48 affected cats examined, including 41 Persians, a Siamese, and several other breeds that have been known to outcross with Persians. In addition, the mutation is segregating concordantly in all available PKD families. No unaffected cats have been identified with the mutation. No homozygous cats have been identified, supporting the suggestion that the mutation is embryonic lethal. These data suggest that the stop mutation causes feline PKD, providing a test to identify cats that will develop PKD and demonstrating that the domestic cat is an ideal model for human PKD.

  6. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M; Brash, Douglas E; Stern, David F; Materin, Miguel A; Lo, Roger S; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K; Hayward, Nicholas K; Lifton, Richard P; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-09-01

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1(P29S)) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1(P29S) showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  7. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth (Yale-MED); (UCLA); (Queens)

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  8. Mutation screening of Chinese Treacher Collins syndrome patients identified novel TCOF1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Guo, Luo; Li, Chen-Long; Shan, Jing; Xu, Hai-Song; Li, Jie-Ying; Sun, Shan; Hao, Shao-Juan; Jin, Lei; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Tian-Yu

    2018-04-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) (OMIM 154500) is a rare congenital craniofacial disorder with an autosomal dominant manner of inheritance in most cases. To date, three pathogenic genes (TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C) have been identified. In this study, we conducted mutational analysis on Chinese TCS patients to reveal a mutational spectrum of known causative genes and show phenotype-genotype data to provide more information for gene counselling and future studies on the pathogenesis of TCS. Twenty-two TCS patients were recruited from two tertiary referral centres, and Sanger sequencing for the coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C was performed. For patients without small variants, further copy number variations (CNVs) analysis was conducted using high-density SNP array platforms. The Sanger sequencing overall mutation detection rate was as high as 86.3% (19/22) for our cohort. Fifteen TCOF1 pathogenic variants, including ten novel mutations, were identified in nineteen patients. No causative mutations in POLR1D and POLR1C genes and no CNVs mutations were detected. A suspected autosomal dominant inheritance case that implies germinal mosaicism was described. Our study confirmed that TCOF1 was the main disease-causing gene for the Chinese TCS population and revealed its mutation spectrum. We also addressed the need for more studies of mosaicism in TCS cases, which could explain the mechanism of autosomal dominant inheritance in TCS cases and benefit the prevention of TCS.

  9. Using exome data to identify malignant hyperthermia susceptibility mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Stephen G; Ng, David; Johnston, Jennifer J; Teer, Jamie K; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Mullikin, James C; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2013-11-01

    Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a life-threatening, inherited disorder of muscle calcium metabolism, triggered by anesthetics and depolarizing muscle relaxants. An unselected cohort was screened for MHS mutations using exome sequencing. The aim of this study was to pilot a strategy for the RYR1 and CACNA1S genes. Exome sequencing was performed on 870 volunteers not ascertained for MHS. Variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S were annotated using an algorithm that filtered results based on mutation type, frequency, and information in mutation databases. Variants were scored on a six-point pathogenicity scale. Medical histories and pedigrees were reviewed for malignant hyperthermia and related disorders. The authors identified 70 RYR1 and 53 CACNA1S variants among 870 exomes. Sixty-three RYR1 and 41 CACNA1S variants passed the quality and frequency metrics but the authors excluded synonymous variants. In RYR1, the authors identified 65 missense mutations, one nonsense, two that affected splicing, and one non-frameshift indel. In CACNA1S, 48 missense, one frameshift deletion, one splicing, and one non-frameshift indel were identified. RYR1 variants predicted to be pathogenic for MHS were found in three participants without medical or family histories of MHS. Numerous variants, previously described as pathogenic in mutation databases, were reclassified by the authors as being of unknown pathogenicity. Exome sequencing can identify asymptomatic patients at risk for MHS, although the interpretation of exome variants can be challenging. The use of exome sequencing in unselected cohorts is an important tool to understand the prevalence and penetrance of MHS, a critical challenge for the field.

  10. Exome sequencing identifies ZNF644 mutations in high myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Myopia is the most common ocular disorder worldwide, and high myopia in particular is one of the leading causes of blindness. Genetic factors play a critical role in the development of myopia, especially high myopia. Recently, the exome sequencing approach has been successfully used for the disease gene identification of Mendelian disorders. Here we show a successful application of exome sequencing to identify a gene for an autosomal dominant disorder, and we have identified a gene potentially responsible for high myopia in a monogenic form. We captured exomes of two affected individuals from a Han Chinese family with high myopia and performed sequencing analysis by a second-generation sequencer with a mean coverage of 30× and sufficient depth to call variants at ∼97% of each targeted exome. The shared genetic variants of these two affected individuals in the family being studied were filtered against the 1000 Genomes Project and the dbSNP131 database. A mutation A672G in zinc finger protein 644 isoform 1 (ZNF644 was identified as being related to the phenotype of this family. After we performed sequencing analysis of the exons in the ZNF644 gene in 300 sporadic cases of high myopia, we identified an additional five mutations (I587V, R680G, C699Y, 3'UTR+12 C>G, and 3'UTR+592 G>A in 11 different patients. All these mutations were absent in 600 normal controls. The ZNF644 gene was expressed in human retinal and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Given that ZNF644 is predicted to be a transcription factor that may regulate genes involved in eye development, mutation may cause the axial elongation of eyeball found in high myopia patients. Our results suggest that ZNF644 might be a causal gene for high myopia in a monogenic form.

  11. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  12. [Suspected pathogenic mutation identified in two cases with oculocutaneous albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangmei; Zheng, Meiling; Zhang, Guilin; Hua, Ailing

    2015-08-01

    To detect potential mutations in genes related with non-syndromic oculocutaneous albinism I-IV and ocular albinism type I in two couples who had given births to children with albinism. All exons of the non-syndromic albinism related genes TYR, OCA2, TYRP-1, MITF, SLC45A2 and GPR143 were subjected to deep sequencing. The results were verified with Sanger sequencing. For the two female carriers, the coding region of the TYR gene was found to harbor a frameshift mutation c.925_926insC, which was also suspected to have been pathogenic. In one of the male partners, a nonsense mutations c.832C>T was found, which was also known to be pathogenic. Another male partner was found to harbor a TYR gene mutation c.346C>T, which was also known to be a pathogenic nonsense mutation. The coding region of the TYR gene c.925_926insC (p.Thr309ThrfsX9) probably underlies the OCA1 disease phenotype.

  13. Hotspots of missense mutation identify novel neurodevelopmental disorder genes and functional domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisheker, Madeleine R.; Heymann, Gabriel; Wang, Tianyun; Coe, Bradley P.; Turner, Tychele N.; Stessman, Holly A.F.; Hoekzema, Kendra; Kvarnung, Malin; Shaw, Marie; Friend, Kathryn; Liebelt, Jan; Barnett, Christopher; Thompson, Elizabeth M.; Haan, Eric; Guo, Hui; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Nordgren, Ann; Lindstrand, Anna; Vandeweyer, Geert; Alberti, Antonino; Avola, Emanuela; Vinci, Mirella; Giusto, Stefania; Pramparo, Tiziano; Pierce, Karen; Nalabolu, Srinivasa; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Santen, Gijs W.E.; Peeters, Hilde; Hakonarson, Hakon; Courchesne, Eric; Romano, Corrado; Kooy, R. Frank; Bernier, Raphael A.; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Gecz, Jozef; Xia, Kun; Zweifel, Larry S.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2017-01-01

    Although de novo missense mutations have been predicted to account for more cases of autism than gene-truncating mutations, most research has focused on the latter. We identified the properties of de novo missense mutations in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) and highlight 35 genes with excess missense mutations. Additionally, 40 amino acid sites were recurrently mutated in 36 genes, and targeted sequencing of 20 sites in 17,689 NDD patients identified 21 new patients with identical missense mutations. One recurrent site (p.Ala636Thr) occurs in a glutamate receptor subunit, GRIA1. This same amino acid substitution in the homologous but distinct mouse glutamate receptor subunit Grid2 is associated with Lurcher ataxia. Phenotypic follow-up in five individuals with GRIA1 mutations shows evidence of specific learning disabilities and autism. Overall, we find significant clustering of de novo mutations in 200 genes, highlighting specific functional domains and synaptic candidate genes important in NDD pathology. PMID:28628100

  14. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a recurrent functional synonymous mutation in melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gartner, Jared J.; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Prickett, Todd D.; Dutton-Regester, Kenneth Adam; Stitzel, Michael L.; Lin, Jimmy C.; Davis, Sean; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Jha, Sujata; Katagiri, Nobuko; Gotea, Valer; Teer, Jamie K.; Wei, Xiaomu; Morken, Mario A.; Bhanot, Umesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Synonymous mutations, which do not alter the protein sequence, have been shown to affect protein function [Sauna ZE, Kimchi-Sarfaty C (2011) Nat Rev Genet 12(10):683–691]. However, synonymous mutations are rarely investigated in the cancer genomics field. We used whole-genome and -exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in 29 melanoma samples. Validation of one synonymous somatic mutation in BCL2L12 in 285 samples identified 12 cases that harbored the recurrent F17F mutation. This muta...

  15. ASPM mutations identified in patients with primary microcephaly and seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, J; Eyaid, W; Mochida, G; Al-Moayyad, F; Bodell, A; Woods, C; Walsh, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Human autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a heterogeneous disorder with at least six genetic loci (MCPH1–6), with MCPH5, caused by ASPM mutation, being the most common. Despite the high prevalence of epilepsy in microcephaly patients, microcephaly with frequent seizures has been excluded from the ascertainment of MCPH. Here, we report a pedigree with multiple affected individuals with microcephaly and seizures.

  16. Identifying and calling insertions, deletions, and single-base mutations efficiently from sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole genome sequencing studies can directly identify causative mutations for subsequent use in genomic evaluations, but sequence variant identification is a lengthy and sometimes inaccurate process. The speed and accuracy of identifying small insertions and deletions of sequence, collectively terme...

  17. Sex-related hearing impairment in Wolfram syndrome patients identified by inactivating WFS1 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, RJE; Huygen, PLM; van den Ouweland, JMW; Cryns, K; Dikkeschei, LD; Van Camp, G; Cremers, CWRJ

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the audiovestibular profile of 11 Wolfram syndrome patients (4 males, 7 females) from 7 families, with identified WFS1 mutations, and the audiometric profile of 17 related heterozygous carriers of WFS1 mutations. Patients with Wolfram syndrome showed a downsloping audiogram and

  18. Sex-related hearing impairment in Wolfram syndrome patients identified by inactivating WFS1 mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Cryns, K.; Dikkeschei, L.D.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the audiovestibular profile of 11 Wolfram syndrome patients (4 males, 7 females) from 7 families, with identified WFS1 mutations, and the audiometric profile of 17 related heterozygous carriers of WFS1 mutations. Patients with Wolfram syndrome showed a downsloping audiogram and

  19. Deep mutational scanning identifies sites in influenza nucleoprotein that affect viral inhibition by MxA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orr Ashenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The innate-immune restriction factor MxA inhibits influenza replication by targeting the viral nucleoprotein (NP. Human influenza virus is more resistant than avian influenza virus to inhibition by human MxA, and prior work has compared human and avian viral strains to identify amino-acid differences in NP that affect sensitivity to MxA. However, this strategy is limited to identifying sites in NP where mutations that affect MxA sensitivity have fixed during the small number of documented zoonotic transmissions of influenza to humans. Here we use an unbiased deep mutational scanning approach to quantify how all single amino-acid mutations to NP affect MxA sensitivity in the context of replication-competent virus. We both identify new sites in NP where mutations affect MxA resistance and re-identify mutations known to have increased MxA resistance during historical adaptations of influenza to humans. Most of the sites where mutations have the greatest effect are almost completely conserved across all influenza A viruses, and the amino acids at these sites confer relatively high resistance to MxA. These sites cluster in regions of NP that appear to be important for its recognition by MxA. Overall, our work systematically identifies the sites in influenza nucleoprotein where mutations affect sensitivity to MxA. We also demonstrate a powerful new strategy for identifying regions of viral proteins that affect inhibition by host factors.

  20. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP Screening Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon A. Lorentzen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF , and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years. Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  1. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Xose S.; Pinyol, Magda; Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Villamor, Neus; Escaramis, Georgia; Jares, Pedro; Beà, Sílvia; González-Díaz, Marcos; Bassaganyas, Laia; Baumann, Tycho; Juan, Manel; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Tubío, José M. C.; López, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Tornador, Cristian; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Hernández, Jesús M.; Puente, Diana A.; Freije, José M. P.; Velasco, Gloria; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Carrió, Anna; Guijarro, Sara; Enjuanes, Anna; Hernández, Lluís; Yagüe, Jordi; Nicolás, Pilar; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Castillo, Ester; Dohm, Juliane C.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; de Alava, Enrique; Miguel, Jesús San; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L.; Torrents, David; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Guigó, Roderic; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Klatt, Peter; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; Estivill, Xavier; Montserrat, Emili; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent leukaemia in adults in Western countries, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical presentation and evolution1,2. Two major molecular subtypes can be distinguished, characterized respectively by a high or low number of somatic hypermutations in the variable region of immunoglobulin genes3,4. The molecular changes leading to the pathogenesis of the disease are still poorly understood. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of four cases of CLL and identified 46 somatic mutations that potentially affect gene function. Further analysis of these mutations in 363 patients with CLL identified four genes that are recurrently mutated: notch 1 (NOTCH1), exportin 1 (XPO1), myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) and kelch-like 6 (KLHL6). Mutations in MYD88 and KLHL6 are predominant in cases of CLL with mutated immunoglobulin genes, whereas NOTCH1 and XPO1 mutations are mainly detected in patients with unmutated immunoglobulins. The patterns of somatic mutation, supported by functional and clinical analyses, strongly indicate that the recurrent NOTCH1, MYD88 and XPO1 mutations are oncogenic changes that contribute to the clinical evolution of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of CLL combining whole-genome sequencing with clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes. It highlights the usefulness of this approach for the identification of clinically relevant mutations in cancer. PMID:21642962

  2. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... comprises several regions and domains for interaction with other proteins, and specific clinical manifestations are associated with the mutation assignment to one of these regions or domains. AIMS: The phenotype in patients without an identified causative APC mutation was compared with the phenotype...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...

  3. Screening for ATM Mutations in African American Population to Identify a Predictor of Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry

    2004-01-01

    ... haplotype, compared to African-American women without breast cancer. An additional objective is to determine the functional impact upon the protein encoded by the ATM gene for each mutation identified. Specific Aims...

  4. Deep sequencing of uveal melanoma identifies a recurrent mutation in PLCB4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Peter; Aoude, Lauren G; Wadt, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of uveal melanoma (UM) samples has identified a number of recurrent oncogenic or loss-of-function mutations in key driver genes including: GNAQ, GNA11, EIF1AX, SF3B1 and BAP1. To search for additional driver mutations in this tumor type we carried out whole-genome or wh......Next generation sequencing of uveal melanoma (UM) samples has identified a number of recurrent oncogenic or loss-of-function mutations in key driver genes including: GNAQ, GNA11, EIF1AX, SF3B1 and BAP1. To search for additional driver mutations in this tumor type we carried out whole......, instead, a BRCA mutation signature predominated. In addition to mutations in the known UM driver genes, we found a recurrent mutation in PLCB4 (c.G1888T, p.D630Y, NM_000933), which was validated using Sanger sequencing. The identical mutation was also found in published UM sequence data (1 of 56 tumors...

  5. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a recurrent functional synonymous mutation in melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Jared J.; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Prickett, Todd D.; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Stitzel, Michael L.; Lin, Jimmy C.; Davis, Sean; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Jha, Sujata; Katagiri, Nobuko; Gotea, Valer; Teer, Jamie K.; Morken, Mario A.; Bhanot, Umesh K.; Chen, Guo; Elnitski, Laura L.; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Carter, Hannah; Karchin, Rachel; Robinson, William; Robinson, Steven; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Collins, Francis S.; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Komar, Anton A.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Margulies, Elliott H.; Samuels, Yardena

    2013-01-01

    Synonymous mutations, which do not alter the protein sequence, have been shown to affect protein function [Sauna ZE, Kimchi-Sarfaty C (2011) Nat Rev Genet 12(10):683–691]. However, synonymous mutations are rarely investigated in the cancer genomics field. We used whole-genome and -exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in 29 melanoma samples. Validation of one synonymous somatic mutation in BCL2L12 in 285 samples identified 12 cases that harbored the recurrent F17F mutation. This mutation led to increased BCL2L12 mRNA and protein levels because of differential targeting of WT and mutant BCL2L12 by hsa-miR-671–5p. Protein made from mutant BCL2L12 transcript bound p53, inhibited UV-induced apoptosis more efficiently than WT BCL2L12, and reduced endogenous p53 target gene transcription. This report shows selection of a recurrent somatic synonymous mutation in cancer. Our data indicate that silent alterations have a role to play in human cancer, emphasizing the importance of their investigation in future cancer genome studies. PMID:23901115

  6. A novel PCCB mutation in a Thai patient with propionic acidemia identified by exome sequencing.

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    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2015-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn error of metabolism, caused by mutations in either the PCCA or PCCB gene, leading to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Here we report a 6-year-old Thai boy with PA who was born to consanguineous parents. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous frameshift insertion (c.379_380insA; p.T127NfsX160) in the PCCB gene, expanding its mutational spectrum.

  7. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1......, the presumed significance of the missense mutations was predicted in silico using the align GVGD algorithm. In conclusion, the mutation screening identified 40 novel variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and thereby extends the knowledge of the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation spectrum. Nineteen of the mutations were...

  8. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic NOTCH2 mutations in splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

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    Kiel, Mark J; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Betz, Bryan L; Zhao, Lili; Weigelin, Helmut G; Chiang, Mark Y; Huebner-Chan, David R; Bailey, Nathanael G; Yang, David T; Bhagat, Govind; Miranda, Roberto N; Bahler, David W; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J

    2012-08-27

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), the most common primary lymphoma of spleen, is poorly understood at the genetic level. In this study, using whole-genome DNA sequencing (WGS) and confirmation by Sanger sequencing, we observed mutations identified in several genes not previously known to be recurrently altered in SMZL. In particular, we identified recurrent somatic gain-of-function mutations in NOTCH2, a gene encoding a protein required for marginal zone B cell development, in 25 of 99 (∼25%) cases of SMZL and in 1 of 19 (∼5%) cases of nonsplenic MZLs. These mutations clustered near the C-terminal proline/glutamate/serine/threonine (PEST)-rich domain, resulting in protein truncation or, rarely, were nonsynonymous substitutions affecting the extracellular heterodimerization domain (HD). NOTCH2 mutations were not present in other B cell lymphomas and leukemias, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; n = 15), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL; n = 15), low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 44), hairy cell leukemia (HCL; n = 15), and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 14). NOTCH2 mutations were associated with adverse clinical outcomes (relapse, histological transformation, and/or death) among SMZL patients (P = 0.002). These results suggest that NOTCH2 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of SMZL and are associated with a poor prognosis.

  9. Bcl11b mutations identified in murine lymphomas increase the proliferation rate of hematopoietic progenitor cells

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    Söderkvist Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The telomeric region of mouse chromosome 12 has previously shown frequent allelic loss in murine lymphoma. The Bcl11b gene has been identified and suggested as a candidate tumor suppressor gene within this region. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Bcl11b is mutated in lymphomas with allelic loss, and whether the mutations we detected conferred any effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods Mouse lymphomas induced by 1,3-butadiene or 2',3'-dideoxycytidine were analysed for mutations in the Bcl11b gene using single strand conformation analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Effects on cell proliferation by the detected mutations were studied by expressing wild-type and mutant Bcl11b in the cytokine-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line FDC-P1, lacking endogenous Bcl11b expression. Results Missense and frameshift (FS mutations were identified in 7 of 47 tumors (15%. Interestingly, all mutations were found between amino acids 778–844 which encode the three C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. In FDC-P1 cells, wild-type Bcl11b suppressed cell proliferation, whereas the mutated versions (S778N, K828T, Y844C and FS823 enhanced proliferation several-fold. Conclusion The genetic alterations detected in this study suggest that the three C-terminal zinc fingers of Bcl11b are important for the DNA-binding. Cell proliferation was suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Bcl11b but enhanced by mutant Bcl11b, indicating that these mutations may be an important contributing factor to lymphomagenesis in a subset of tumors.

  10. Ethnic disparity in 21-hydroxylase gene mutations identified in Pakistani congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients

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    Jabbar Abdul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in the steroid 21 hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2. We studied the spectrum of mutations in CYP21A2 gene in a multi-ethnic population in Pakistan to explore the genetics of CAH. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for the identification of mutations CYP21A2 and their phenotypic associations in CAH using ARMS-PCR assay. Results Overall, 29 patients were analyzed for nine different mutations. The group consisted of two major forms of CAH including 17 salt wasters and 12 simple virilizers. There were 14 phenotypic males and 15 females representing all the major ethnic groups of Pakistan. Parental consanguinity was reported in 65% cases and was equally distributed in the major ethnic groups. Among 58 chromosomes analyzed, mutations were identified in 45 (78.6% chromosomes. The most frequent mutation was I2 splice (27% followed by Ile173Asn (26%, Arg 357 Trp (19%, Gln319stop, 16% and Leu308InsT (12%, whereas Val282Leu was not observed in this study. Homozygosity was seen in 44% and heterozygosity in 34% cases. I2 splice mutation was found to be associated with SW in the homozygous. The Ile173Asn mutation was identified in both SW and SV forms. Moreover, Arg357Trp manifested SW in compound heterozygous state. Conclusion Our study showed that CAH exists in our population with ethnic difference in the prevalence of mutations examined.

  11. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Kerry; Wang, Yanhua; Huizing, Marjan; Sutton, Elie; White, James G.; Gahl, William A.; Moody, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C > T (p.Q1208X) and c.11002G > T (p.E3668X). Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS. PMID:20368792

  12. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

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    Kerry Morrone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C>T (p.Q1208X and c.11002G>T (p.E3668X. Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS.

  13. Simulated Annealing Based Algorithm for Identifying Mutated Driver Pathways in Cancer

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    Hai-Tao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, large-scale cancer genomics projects can be implemented to help researchers to identify driver genes, driver mutations, and driver pathways, which promote cancer proliferation in large numbers of cancer patients. Hence, one of the remaining challenges is to distinguish functional mutations vital for cancer development, and filter out the unfunctional and random “passenger mutations.” In this study, we introduce a modified method to solve the so-called maximum weight submatrix problem which is used to identify mutated driver pathways in cancer. The problem is based on two combinatorial properties, that is, coverage and exclusivity. Particularly, we enhance an integrative model which combines gene mutation and expression data. The experimental results on simulated data show that, compared with the other methods, our method is more efficient. Finally, we apply the proposed method on two real biological datasets. The results show that our proposed method is also applicable in real practice.

  14. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-06-19

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential.

  15. Mutational analysis of EGFR and related signaling pathway genes in lung adenocarcinomas identifies a novel somatic kinase domain mutation in FGFR4.

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    Jenifer L Marks

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of lung adenocarcinomas harbor somatic mutations in six genes that encode proteins in the EGFR signaling pathway, i.e., EGFR, HER2/ERBB2, HER4/ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, and KRAS. We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this signaling pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis.We analyzed genomic DNA from a total of 261 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. The coding sequences of 39 genes were screened for somatic mutations via high-throughput dideoxynucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified gene products. Mutations were considered to be somatic only if they were found in an independent tumor-derived PCR product but not in matched normal tissue. Sequencing of 9MB of tumor sequence identified 239 putative genetic variants. We further examined 22 variants found in RAS family genes and 135 variants localized to exons encoding the kinase domain of respective proteins. We identified a total of 37 non-synonymous somatic mutations; 36 were found collectively in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. One somatic mutation was a previously unreported mutation in the kinase domain (exon 16 of FGFR4 (Glu681Lys, identified in 1 of 158 tumors. The FGFR4 mutation is analogous to a reported tumor-specific somatic mutation in ERBB2 and is located in the same exon as a previously reported kinase domain mutation in FGFR4 (Pro712Thr in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line.This study is one of the first comprehensive mutational analyses of major genes in a specific signaling pathway in a sizeable cohort of lung adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest the majority of gain-of-function mutations within kinase genes in the EGFR signaling pathway have already been identified. Our findings also implicate FGFR4 in the pathogenesis of a subset of lung adenocarcinomas.

  16. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

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    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  17. Targeted next generation sequencing identifies clinically actionable mutations in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeck, William R; Parker, Joel; Carson, Craig C; Shields, Janiel M; Sambade, Maria J; Peters, Eldon C; Burd, Christin E; Thomas, Nancy E; Chiang, Derek Y; Liu, Wenjin; Eberhard, David A; Ollila, David; Grilley-Olson, Juneko; Moschos, Stergios; Neil Hayes, D; Sharpless, Norman E

    2014-07-01

    Somatic sequencing of cancers has produced new insight into tumorigenesis, tumor heterogeneity, and disease progression, but the vast majority of genetic events identified are of indeterminate clinical significance. Here, we describe a NextGen sequencing approach to fully analyzing 248 genes, including all those of known clinical significance in melanoma. This strategy features solution capture of DNA followed by multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing and was evaluated in 31 melanoma cell lines and 18 tumor tissues from patients with metastatic melanoma. Mutations in melanoma cell lines correlated with their sensitivity to corresponding small molecule inhibitors, confirming, for example, lapatinib sensitivity in ERBB4 mutant lines and identifying a novel activating mutation of BRAF. The latter event would not have been identified by clinical sequencing and was associated with responsiveness to a BRAF kinase inhibitor. This approach identified focal copy number changes of PTEN not found by standard methods, such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Actionable mutations were found in 89% of the tumor tissues analyzed, 56% of which would not be identified by standard-of-care approaches. This work shows that targeted sequencing is an attractive approach for clinical use in melanoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Analysis of KERA in four families with cornea plana identifies two novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudakova, Lubica; Vercruyssen, Jang Hee J; Balikova, Irina; Postolache, Lavina; Leroy, Bart P; Skalicka, Pavlina; Liskova, Petra

    2018-02-01

    To identify the molecular genetic cause in four families of various ethnic backgrounds with cornea plana. Detailed ophthalmological examination and direct sequencing of the KERA coding region in five patients of Czech and Turkish origin and their available family members. Compound heterozygosity for a novel missense mutation c.209C>T; p.(Pro70Leu) and a novel splice site mutation c.887-1G>A in KERA were detected in two affected siblings of Czech origin. In silico analysis supported the pathogenicity of both variants. The second proband of Czech origin harboured c.835C>T; p.(Arg279*) in a homozygous state. Homozygous mutations c.740A>G; p.(Asn247Ser) and c.674C>T; p.(Ile225Thr) were identified in the Turkish probands, both born out of consanguineous marriages. Observed ocular phenotypes were typical of cornea plana with the exception of one Czech patient who also had marked thinning and protrusion in the superior part of the left cornea (mean keratometry 47.2 D). No corneal endothelial cell pathology was found by specular microscopy in seven eyes, in three eyes visualization of the posterior corneal surface was unsuccessful. KERA mutation c.740A>G has been identified to date in three different populations, which makes it the most frequently occurring mutation in patients with cornea plana. Marked corneal thinning and ectasia are a very rare finding in this disorder and longitudinal follow-up needs to be performed to determine its potential progressive nature. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

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    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  20. Reconstructing pedigrees: some identifiability questions for a recombination-mutation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Bhalchandra D

    2013-01-01

    Pedigrees are directed acyclic graphs that represent ancestral relationships between individuals in a population. Based on a schematic recombination process, we describe two simple Markov models for sequences evolving on pedigrees--Model R (recombinations without mutations) and Model RM (recombinations with mutations). For these models, we ask an identifiability question: is it possible to construct a pedigree from the joint probability distribution of extant sequences? We present partial identifiability results for general pedigrees: we show that when the crossover probabilities are sufficiently small, certain spanning subgraph sequences can be counted from the joint distribution of extant sequences. We demonstrate how pedigrees that earlier seemed difficult to distinguish are distinguished by counting their spanning subgraph sequences.

  1. Targeted parallel sequencing of large genetically-defined genomic regions for identifying mutations in Arabidopsis

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    Liu Kun-hsiang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large-scale genetic screens in Arabidopsis are a powerful approach for molecular dissection of complex signaling networks. However, map-based cloning can be time-consuming or even hampered due to low chromosomal recombination. Current strategies using next generation sequencing for molecular identification of mutations require whole genome sequencing and advanced computational devises and skills, which are not readily accessible or affordable to every laboratory. We have developed a streamlined method using parallel massive sequencing for mutant identification in which only targeted regions are sequenced. This targeted parallel sequencing (TPSeq method is more cost-effective, straightforward enough to be easily done without specialized bioinformatics expertise, and reliable for identifying multiple mutations simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate its use by identifying three novel nitrate-signaling mutants in Arabidopsis.

  2. Functional study of NIPA2 mutations identified from the patients with childhood absence epilepsy.

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    Han Xie

    Full Text Available Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2 is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE. In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES, MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE.

  3. Mutation in CYP27A1 identified in family with coronary artery disease.

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    Inanloorahatloo, Kolsoum; Zand Parsa, Amir Farhang; Huse, Klaus; Rasooli, Paniz; Davaran, Saeid; Platzer, Matthias; Fan, Jian-Bing; Amini, Sasan; Steemers, Frank; Elahi, Elahe

    2013-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Myocardial infarction is the most severe outcome of CAD. Despite extensive efforts, the genetics of CAD is poorly understood. We aimed to identify the genetic cause of CAD in a pedigree with several affected individuals. Exome sequencing led to identification of a mutation in CYP27A1 that causes p.Arg225His in the encoded protein sterol 27-hydroxylase as the likely cause of CAD in the pedigree. The enzyme is multifunctional, and several of its functions including its functions in vitamin D metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) are relevant to the CAD phenotype. Measurements of vitamin D levels suggested that the mutation does not affect CAD by affecting this parameter. We suggest that the mutation may cause CAD by affecting RCT. Screening of all coding regions of the CYP27A1 in 100 additional patients led to finding four variations (p.Arg14Gly, p.Arg26Lys, p.Ala27Arg, and p.Val86Met) in seven patients that may contribute to their CAD status. CYP27A1 is the known causative gene of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, a disorder which is sometimes accompanied by early onset atherosclerosis. This and the observation of potentially harmful variations in unrelated CAD patients provide additional evidence for the suggested causative role of the p.Arg225His mutation in CAD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2011-01-01

    and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1......Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... synonymous variant. The remaining 24 variants were identified in BRCA2, including 10 deleterious mutants (6 frame-shift and 4 nonsense), 2 intronic variants, 10 missense mutations and 2 synonymous variants. The frequency of the variants of unknown significance was examined in control individuals. Moreover...

  5. Exome sequencing identifies truncating mutations in human SERPINF1 in autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jutta; Semler, Oliver; Gilissen, Christian; Li, Yun; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Giunta, Cecilia; Bergmann, Carsten; Rohrbach, Marianne; Koerber, Friederike; Zimmermann, Katharina; de Vries, Petra; Wirth, Brunhilde; Schoenau, Eckhard; Wollnik, Bernd; Veltman, Joris A; Hoischen, Alexander; Netzer, Christian

    2011-03-11

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single individual who has a severe form of the disease and whose parents are second cousins. A total of 26,922 variations from the human reference genome sequence were subjected to several filtering steps. In addition, we extracted the genotypes of all dbSNP130-annotated SNPs from the exome sequencing data and used these 299,494 genotypes as markers for the genome-wide identification of homozygous regions. A single homozygous truncating mutation, affecting SERPINF1 on chromosome 17p13.3, that was embedded into a homozygous stretch of 2.99 Mb remained. The mutation was also homozygous in the affected brother of the index patient. Subsequently, we identified homozygosity for two different truncating SERPINF1 mutations in two unrelated patients with OI and parental consanguinity. All four individuals with SERPINF1 mutations have severe OI. Fractures of long bones and severe vertebral compression fractures with resulting deformities were observed as early as the first year of life in these individuals. Collagen analyses with cultured dermal fibroblasts displayed no evidence for impaired collagen folding, posttranslational modification, or secretion. SERPINF1 encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a secreted glycoprotein of the serpin superfamily. PEDF is a multifunctional protein and one of the strongest inhibitors of angiogenesis currently known in humans. Our data provide genetic evidence for PEDF involvement in human bone homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    ). We specifically addressed anticipation in phenotypic HNPCC families without disease-predisposing mismatch repair (MMR) defects since risk estimates and age at onset are particularly difficult to determine in this cohort. The national Danish HNPCC register was used to identify families who fulfilled...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  7. Mosaic and Intronic Mutations in TSC1/TSC2 Explain the Majority of TSC Patients with No Mutation Identified by Conventional Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczy, Magdalena E; Dies, Kira A; Glass, Jennifer; Camposano, Susana; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Thorner, Aaron R; Lin, Ling; Krueger, Darcy; Franz, David N; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sahin, Mustafa; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2015-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor suppressor gene syndrome due to germline mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. 10-15% of TSC individuals have no mutation identified (NMI) after thorough conventional molecular diagnostic assessment. 53 TSC subjects who were NMI were studied using next generation sequencing to search for mutations in these genes. Blood/saliva DNA including parental samples were available from all subjects, and skin tumor biopsy DNA was available from six subjects. We identified mutations in 45 of 53 subjects (85%). Mosaicism was observed in the majority (26 of 45, 58%), and intronic mutations were also unusually common, seen in 18 of 45 subjects (40%). Seventeen (38%) mutations were seen at an allele frequency mutation detection, show that analysis of TSC-related tumors can increase the mutation detection rate, indicate that it is not likely that a third TSC gene exists, and enable provision of genetic counseling to the substantial population of TSC individuals who are currently NMI.

  8. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel cases of D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria with IDH1 or IDH2 mosaic mutations identified by amplicon deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nota, Benjamin; Hamilton, Eline M; Sie, Daoud

    2013-01-01

    as a cause of D-2HGA. Here we describe three cases: one MC-HGA case with IDH1 mosaic mutations, and two D-2HGA type II cases. In one D-2HGA case we identified mosaicism for an IDH2 mutation as the genetic cause of this disorder; the other D-2HGA case was caused by a heterozygous IDH2 mutation, while...

  10. Novel Heterogenous CHS1 Mutations Identified in Five Japanese Patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Tanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent bacterial infections and progressive neurological dysfunction. We demonstrate novel heterogenous mutations of CHS1, the responsive gene of CHS, identified in five Japanese patients with CHS. Patients 1, 2, and 3 were siblings, and they had albinism of the skin and hair. They all had a heterogenous two-base deletion (c.5541-5542 del AA, p.Q1847fsX1850 in exon 18. Patient 4 had a heterogenous single-base insertion (c.3944-3945 ins C, p.T1315fsX1331 in exon 10. The patient exhibited severe early-onset phenotype and suffered from hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Patient 5 had two heterogenous nonsense mutations; c.7982C>G, p.S2661X in exon 30 and c.8281A>T, p.R2761X in exon 31. The patient suffered from infections in childhood and had visual disturbance and albinism of the skin and hair. The CHS1 mutations described here have not been reported previously.

  11. Novel Heterogenous CHS1 Mutations Identified in Five Japanese Patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Fuminori; Kasai, Hirotake; Morimoto, Michiko; Oh, Shigeharu; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Ito, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent bacterial infections and progressive neurological dysfunction. We demonstrate novel heterogenous mutations of CHS1, the responsive gene of CHS, identified in five Japanese patients with CHS. Patients 1, 2, and 3 were siblings, and they had albinism of the skin and hair. They all had a heterogenous two-base deletion (c.5541-5542 del AA, p.Q1847fsX1850) in exon 18. Patient 4 had a heterogenous single-base insertion (c.3944-3945 ins C, p.T1315fsX1331) in exon 10. The patient exhibited severe early-onset phenotype and suffered from hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Patient 5 had two heterogenous nonsense mutations; c.7982C>G, p.S2661X in exon 30 and c.8281A>T, p.R2761X in exon 31. The patient suffered from infections in childhood and had visual disturbance and albinism of the skin and hair. The CHS1 mutations described here have not been reported previously. PMID:21209802

  12. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies RAI1 Mutation in a Morbidly Obese Child Diagnosed With ROHHAD Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kristyn M.; Towne, Meghan C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; James, Philip M.; Crowley, Laura; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Beggs, Alan H.; Picker, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Context: The current obesity epidemic is attributed to complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, a limited number of cases, especially those with early-onset severe obesity, are linked to single gene defects. Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is one of the syndromes that presents with abrupt-onset extreme weight gain with an unknown genetic basis. Objective: To identify the underlying genetic etiology in a child with morbid early-onset obesity, hypoventilation, and autonomic and behavioral disturbances who was clinically diagnosed with ROHHAD syndrome. Design/Setting/Intervention: The index patient was evaluated at an academic medical center. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband and his parents. Genetic variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results: We identified a novel de novo nonsense mutation, c.3265 C>T (p.R1089X), in the retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) gene in the proband. Mutations in the RAI1 gene are known to cause Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). On further evaluation, his clinical features were not typical of either SMS or ROHHAD syndrome. Conclusions: This study identifies a de novo RAI1 mutation in a child with morbid obesity and a clinical diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome. Although extreme early-onset obesity, autonomic disturbances, and hypoventilation are present in ROHHAD, several of the clinical findings are consistent with SMS. This case highlights the challenges in the diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome and its potential overlap with SMS. We also propose RAI1 as a candidate gene for children with morbid obesity. PMID:25781356

  14. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated......Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... an effect from anticipation with cancer diagnosed mean 11.4 years (t-test, p

  15. Three novel mutations in the CFTR gene identified in Galician patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana-Díez, P; Colón, C; Alonso-Fernández, J R; Solar, A; Barros-Tizón, J C; Barros-Casas, D; Sirvent, J; Carracedo, A; Barros, F

    2008-11-01

    We report three novel CFTR missense mutations detected in Spanish patients from Galicia (North West of Spain). In the first case, a patient homozygous for a novel S1045Y mutation died due to pulmonary problems. In the other two cases, both heterozygous for novel mutations combined with the F508del mutation, clinical symptoms were different depending on the mutation, detected as M595I and A107V.

  16. A novel mouse model identifies cooperating mutations and therapeutic targets critical for chronic myeloid leukemia progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotopoulos, George; van der Weyden, Louise; Osaki, Hikari; Rust, Alistair G.; Gallipoli, Paolo; Meduri, Eshwar; Horton, Sarah J.; Chan, Wai-In; Foster, Donna; Prinjha, Rab K.; Pimanda, John E.; Tenen, Daniel G.; Vassiliou, George S.; Koschmieder, Steffen; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of highly selective ABL-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has revolutionized therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, TKIs are only efficacious in the chronic phase of the disease and effective therapies for TKI-refractory CML, or after progression to blast crisis (BC), are lacking. Whereas the chronic phase of CML is dependent on BCR-ABL, additional mutations are required for progression to BC. However, the identity of these mutations and the pathways they affect are poorly understood, hampering our ability to identify therapeutic targets and improve outcomes. Here, we describe a novel mouse model that allows identification of mechanisms of BC progression in an unbiased and tractable manner, using transposon-based insertional mutagenesis on the background of chronic phase CML. Our BC model is the first to faithfully recapitulate the phenotype, cellular and molecular biology of human CML progression. We report a heterogeneous and unique pattern of insertions identifying known and novel candidate genes and demonstrate that these pathways drive disease progression and provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Our model greatly informs the biology of CML progression and provides a potent resource for the development of candidate therapies to improve the dismal outcomes in this highly aggressive disease. PMID:26304963

  17. Screening for ATM Mutations in an African American Population to Identify a Predictor of Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry S

    2005-01-01

    ... ATM haplotype, compared to African-American women without breast cancer. An additional objective is to determine the functional impact upon the protein encoded by the ATM gene for each mutation identified. Specific Aims...

  18. Screening for ATM Mutations in an African-American Population to Identify a Predictor of Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry S

    2006-01-01

    ... ATM haplotype compared to African-American women without breast cancer. An additional objective is to determine the functional impact upon the protein encoded by the ATM gene for each mutation identified. Specific Aims...

  19. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Comeron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1 genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2 identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3 screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  20. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-04-05

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  1. Novel mutations causing biotinidase deficiency in individuals identified by newborn screening in Michigan including an unique intronic mutation that alters mRNA expression of the biotinidase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Spencer, L; Nahhas, F; Miller, J; Fribley, A; Feldman, G; Conway, R; Wolf, B

    2014-07-01

    Biotinidase deficiency (BD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in the inability to recycle the vitamin biotin. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency can develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms if they are not treated with biotin. To date, more than 165 mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) have been reported. Essentially all the mutations result in enzymatic activities with less than 10% of mean normal serum enzyme activity (profound biotinidase deficiency) with the exception of the c.1330G>C (p.D444H) mutation, which results in an enzyme having 50% of mean normal serum activity and causes partial biotinidase deficiency (10-30% of mean normal serum biotinidase activity) if there is a mutation for profound biotinidase deficiency on the second allele. We now reported eight novel mutations in ten children identified by newborn screening in Michigan from 1988 to the end of 2012. Interestingly, one intronic mutation, c.310-15delT, results in an approximately two-fold down-regulation of BTD mRNA expression by Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). This is the first report of an intronic mutation in the BTD gene with demonstration of its effect on enzymatic activity by altering mRNA expression. This study identified three other mutations likely to cause partial biotinidase deficiency. These results emphasize the importance of full gene sequencing of BTD on patients with biotinidase deficiency to better understand the genotype and phenotype correlation in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Frameshift mutational target gene analysis identifies similarities and differences in constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletzki, Claudia; Huehns, Maja; Bauer, Ingrid; Ripperger, Tim; Mork, Maureen M; Vilar, Eduardo; Klöcking, Sabine; Zettl, Heike; Prall, Friedrich; Linnebacher, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Mismatch-repair deficient (MMR-D) malignancies include Lynch Syndrome (LS), which is secondary to germline mutations in one of the MMR genes, and the rare childhood-form of constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D); caused by bi-allelic MMR gene mutations. A hallmark of LS-associated cancers is microsatellite instability (MSI), characterized by coding frameshift mutations (cFSM) in target genes. By contrast, tumors arising in CMMR-D patients are thought to display a somatic mutation pattern differing from LS. This study has the main goal to identify cFSM in MSI target genes relevant in CMMR-D and to compare the spectrum of common somatic mutations, including alterations in DNA polymerases POLE and D1 between LS and CMMR-D. CMMR-D-associated tumors harbored more somatic mutations compared to LS cases, especially in the TP53 gene and in POLE and POLD1, where novel mutations were additionally identified. Strikingly, MSI in classical mononucleotide markers BAT40 and CAT25 was frequent in CMMR-D cases. MSI-target gene analysis revealed mutations in CMMR-D-associated tumors, some of them known to be frequently hit in LS, such as RNaseT2, HT001, and TGFβR2. Our results imply a general role for these cFSM as potential new drivers of MMR-D tumorigenesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mesut Erzurumluoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software. This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess “just enough” knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders.

  4. A high frequent BRCA1 founder mutation identified in the Greenlandic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Theresa Larriba; Eiberg, Hans; Kern, Peder

    2009-01-01

    occurring mutations, but founder mutations have been described. In this study we describe a founder mutation with wide spread presence in the Inuit population. We have screened 2,869 persons from Greenland for the presence of a BRCA1 mutation (p.Cys39Gly) only found in the Inuit population. The overall...... carrier frequency was 1.6% in the general population, but the frequency differs geographically from 0.6% on the West coast to 9.7% in the previously isolated population of the East coast. This is to our knowledge the highest population frequency of a BRCA1 mutation ever to be described. To determine...... the clinical relevance of the mutation, we have examined ten breast cancer patients and nine ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for the presence of the p.Cys39Gly mutation. We found three ovarian cancer patients (33%) and one breast cancer patient (10%) carrying the mutation. The high number of women...

  5. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Watanabe, Daisaku; Watanabe, Toshio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase) c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu) substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome). In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu) mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79) had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  6. Whole-genome sequencing in autism identifies hot spots for de novo germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, Jacob J.; Shi, Yujian; Gujral, Madhusudan

    2012-01-01

    De novo mutation plays an important role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Notably, pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) are characterized by high mutation rates. We hypothesize that hypermutability is a property of ASD genes and may also include nucleotide-substitution hot spots. We...... of mutations within individual genomes were attributable to compound mutation or gene conversion. Hypermutability was a characteristic of genes involved in ASD and other diseases. In addition, genes impacted by mutations in this study were associated with ASD in independent exome-sequencing data sets. Our...

  7. Identifying EGFR-Expressed Cells and Detecting EGFR Multi-Mutations at Single-Cell Level by Microfluidic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ren; Zhou, Mingxing; Li, Jine; Wang, Zihua; Zhang, Weikai; Yue, Chunyan; Ma, Yan; Peng, Hailin; Wei, Zewen; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2018-03-01

    EGFR mutations companion diagnostics have been proved to be crucial for the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeted cancer therapies. To uncover multiple mutations occurred in minority of EGFR-mutated cells, which may be covered by the noises from majority of un-mutated cells, is currently becoming an urgent clinical requirement. Here we present the validation of a microfluidic-chip-based method for detecting EGFR multi-mutations at single-cell level. By trapping and immunofluorescently imaging single cells in specifically designed silicon microwells, the EGFR-expressed cells were easily identified. By in situ lysing single cells, the cell lysates of EGFR-expressed cells were retrieved without cross-contamination. Benefited from excluding the noise from cells without EGFR expression, the simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing, but not the expensive deep sequencing of the whole cell population, was used to discover multi-mutations. We verified the new method with precisely discovering three most important EGFR drug-related mutations from a sample in which EGFR-mutated cells only account for a small percentage of whole cell population. The microfluidic chip is capable of discovering not only the existence of specific EGFR multi-mutations, but also other valuable single-cell-level information: on which specific cells the mutations occurred, or whether different mutations coexist on the same cells. This microfluidic chip constitutes a promising method to promote simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing to be a routine test before performing targeted cancer therapy.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Exome Sequencing and Functional Validation in Zebrafish Identify GTDC2 Mutations as a Cause of Walker-Warburg Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, M. Chiara; Tambunan, Dimira E.; Hill, R. Sean; Yu, Tim W.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Stevens, Christine R.; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Barry, Brenda J.; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Vandana A.; Al-Qudah, Abdel-Karim; Eyaid, Wafaa M.; Friedman, Jan M.; Salih, Mustafa A.; Clark, Robin; Moroni, Isabella; Mora, Marina; Beggs, Alan H.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES), which analyzes the coding sequence of most annotated genes in the human genome, is an ideal approach to studying fully penetrant autosomal-recessive diseases, and it has been very powerful in identifying disease-causing mutations even when enrollment of affected individuals is limited by reduced survival. In this study, we combined WES with homozygosity analysis of consanguineous pedigrees, which are informative even when a single affected individual is available, to identify genetic mutations responsible for Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), a genetically heterogeneous autosomal-recessive disorder that severely affects the development of the brain, eyes, and muscle. Mutations in seven genes are known to cause WWS and explain 50%–60% of cases, but multiple additional genes are expected to be mutated because unexplained cases show suggestive linkage to diverse loci. Using WES in consanguineous WWS-affected families, we found multiple deleterious mutations in GTDC2 (also known as AGO61). GTDC2’s predicted role as an uncharacterized glycosyltransferase is consistent with the function of other genes that are known to be mutated in WWS and that are involved in the glycosylation of the transmembrane receptor dystroglycan. Therefore, to explore the role of GTDC2 loss of function during development, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of its zebrafish ortholog, gtdc2. We found that gtdc2 knockdown in zebrafish replicates all WWS features (hydrocephalus, ocular defects, and muscular dystrophy), strongly suggesting that GTDC2 mutations cause WWS. PMID:22958903

  9. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel MAP3K14 Mutation in Recessive Atypical Combined Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Schlechter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs render patients vulnerable to infection with a wide range of microorganisms and thus provide good in vivo models for the assessment of immune responses during infectious challenges. Priming of the immune system, especially in infancy, depends on different environmental exposures and medical practices. This may determine the timing and phenotype of clinical appearance of immune deficits as exemplified with early exposure to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccination and dissemination in combined immunodeficiencies. Varied phenotype expression poses a challenge to identification of the putative immune deficit. Without the availability of genomic diagnosis and data analysis resources and with limited capacity for functional definition of immune pathways, it is difficult to establish a definitive diagnosis and to decide on appropriate treatment. This study describes the use of exome sequencing to identify a homozygous recessive variant in MAP3K14, NIKVal345Met, in a patient with combined immunodeficiency, disseminated BCG-osis, and paradoxically elevated lymphocytes. Laboratory testing confirmed hypogammaglobulinemia with normal CD19, but failed to confirm a definitive diagnosis for targeted treatment decisions. NIKVal345Met is predicted to be deleterious and pathogenic by two in silico prediction tools and is situated in a gene crucial for effective functioning of the non-canonical nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. Functional analysis of NIKVal345Met- versus NIKWT-transfected human embryonic kidney-293T cells showed that this mutation significantly affects the kinase activity of NIK leading to decreased levels of phosphorylated IkappaB kinase-alpha (IKKα, the target of NIK. BCG-stimulated RAW264.7 cells transfected with NIKVal345Met also presented with reduced levels of phosphorylated IKKα, significantly increased p100 levels and significantly decreased p52 levels compared to cells transfected

  10. Whole exome sequencing identifies novel mutation in eight Chinese children with isolated tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Hong-Dan; Cui, Cun-Ying; Qin, Yun-Yun; Fan, Tai-Bing; Peng, Bang-Tian; Zhang, Lian-Zhong; Wang, Cheng-Zeng

    2017-12-05

    Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common cyanotic congenital heart disease. However, its pathogenesis remains to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic variants in Tetralogy of Fallot by whole exome sequencing. Whole exome sequencing was performed among eight small families with Tetralogy of Fallot. Differential single nucleotide polymorphisms and small InDels were found by alignment within families and between families and then were verified by Sanger sequencing. Tetralogy of Fallot-related genes were determined by analysis using Gene Ontology /pathway, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, PubMed and other databases. A total of sixteen differential single nucleotide polymorphisms loci and eight differential small InDels were discovered. The sixteen differential single nucleotide polymorphisms loci were located on Chr 1, 2, 4, 5, 11, 12, 15, 22 and X. Among the sixteen single nucleotide polymorphisms loci, six has not been reported. The eight differential small InDels were located on Chr 2, 4, 9, 12, 17, 19 and X, whereas of the eight differential small InDels, two has not been reported. Analysis using Gene Ontology /pathway, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, PubMed and other databases revealed that PEX5 , NACA , ATXN2 , CELA1 , PCDHB4 and CTBP1 were associated with Tetralogy of Fallot. Our findings identify PEX5 , NACA , ATXN2 , CELA1 , PCDHB4 and CTBP1 mutations as underlying genetic causes of isolated tetralogy of Fallot.

  11. Systematic review of allelic exchange experiments aimed at identifying mutations that confer drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Jacobson, Karen R; Farhat, Maha R; Murray, Megan B

    2014-02-01

    Improving our understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will aid the development of more accurate molecular diagnostics for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Studies that use direct genetic manipulation to identify the mutations that cause M. tuberculosis drug resistance are superior to associational studies in elucidating an individual mutation's contribution to the drug resistance phenotype. We systematically reviewed the literature for publications reporting allelic exchange experiments in any of the resistance-associated M. tuberculosis genes. We included studies that introduced single point mutations using specialized linkage transduction or site-directed/in vitro mutagenesis and documented a change in the resistance phenotype. We summarize evidence supporting the causal relationship of 54 different mutations in eight genes (katG, inhA, kasA, embB, embC, rpoB, gyrA and gyrB) and one intergenic region (furA-katG) with resistance to isoniazid, the rifamycins, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. We observed a significant role for the strain genomic background in modulating the resistance phenotype of 21 of these mutations and found examples of where the same drug resistance mutations caused varying levels of resistance to different members of the same drug class. This systematic review highlights those mutations that have been shown to causally change phenotypic resistance in M. tuberculosis and brings attention to a notable lack of allelic exchange data for several of the genes known to be associated with drug resistance.

  12. Exome sequencing identifies highly recurrent MED12 somatic mutations in breast fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Weng Khong; Ong, Choon Kiat; Tan, Jing; Thike, Aye Aye; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Myint, Swe Swe; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Nasir, Nur Diyana Md; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Poore, Gregory; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Wei Siong; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Hartman, Mikael; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita K T; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2014-08-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common breast tumors in women under 30 (refs. 1,2). Exome sequencing of eight fibroadenomas with matching whole-blood samples revealed recurrent somatic mutations solely in MED12, which encodes a Mediator complex subunit. Targeted sequencing of an additional 90 fibroadenomas confirmed highly frequent MED12 exon 2 mutations (58/98, 59%) that are probably somatic, with 71% of mutations occurring in codon 44. Using laser capture microdissection, we show that MED12 fibroadenoma mutations are present in stromal but not epithelial mammary cells. Expression profiling of MED12-mutated and wild-type fibroadenomas revealed that MED12 mutations are associated with dysregulated estrogen signaling and extracellular matrix organization. The fibroadenoma MED12 mutation spectrum is nearly identical to that of previously reported MED12 lesions in uterine leiomyoma but not those of other tumors. Benign tumors of the breast and uterus, both of which are key target tissues of estrogen, may thus share a common genetic basis underpinned by highly frequent and specific MED12 mutations.

  13. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peifer, Martin; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L.; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Mueller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmueller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Boehm, Diana; Ansen, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Gruetter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Saenger, Joerg; Clement, Joachim H.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M.; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Nuernberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Brindle, Paul K.; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K.

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis(1-3). We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4 +/- 1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated

  14. Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: CERS3 mutations identified by a next generation sequencing panel targeting ichthyosis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Mahmoudi, Hamidreza; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Adams, Rebecca; Ghanadan, Alireza; Zeinali, Sirous; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-11-01

    There are at least 38 mutant genes known to be associated with the ichthyosis phenotypes, and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a specific subgroup caused by mutations in 13 different genes. Mutations in some of these genes, such as CERS3 with only two previous reports, are rare. In this study, we identified mutations in candidate genes in consanguineous families with ARCI with a next generation sequencing (NGS) array that incorporates 38 ichthyosis associated genes. We applied this sequencing array to DNA from 140 ichthyosis families with high prevalence of consanguinity. Among these patients we identified six distinct, previously unreported mutations in CERS3 in six Iranian families. These mutations in each family co-segregated with the ichthyosis phenotype. The patients demonstrated collodion membrane at birth, acrogeria, generalized scaling, and hyperlinearity of the palms and soles. The presence of a significant percentage of CERS3 mutations in our cohort depicts a marked difference between the etiology of ichthyoses in genetically poorly characterized regions and well-characterized western populations. Also, it shows that rare alleles are more prevalent in the gene pool of consanguineous populations and emphasizes the importance of these population studies for better understanding of ichthyosis pathogenesis.

  15. Cross-comparison of the genome sequences from human, chimpanzee, Neanderthal and a Denisovan hominin identifies novel potentially compensated mutations

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    Zhang Guojie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent publication of the draft genome sequences of the Neanderthal and a ~50,000-year-old archaic hominin from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia has ushered in a new age in molecular archaeology. We previously cross-compared the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to a set of disease-causing/disease-associated missense and regulatory mutations (Human Gene Mutation Database and succeeded in identifying genetic variants which, although apparently pathogenic in humans, may represent a 'compensated' wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Here, in an attempt to identify further 'potentially compensated mutations' (PCMs of interest, we have compared our dataset of disease-causing/disease-associated mutations with their corresponding nucleotide positions in the Denisovan hominin, Neanderthal and chimpanzee genomes. Of the 15 human putatively disease-causing mutations that were found to be compensated in chimpanzee, Denisovan or Neanderthal, only a solitary F5 variant (Val1736Met was specific to the Denisovan. In humans, this missense mutation is associated with activated protein C resistance and an increased risk of thromboembolism and recurrent miscarriage. It is unclear at this juncture whether this variant was indeed a PCM in the Denisovan or whether it could instead have been associated with disease in this ancient hominin.

  16. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutation of LRRC6 in a Chinese Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patient

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    Lv Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a clinical rare peculiar disorder, mainly featured by respiratory infection, tympanitis, nasosinusitis, and male infertility. Previous study demonstrated it is an autosomal recessive disease and by 2017 almost 40 pathologic genes have been identified. Among them are the leucine-rich repeat- (LRR- containing 6 (LRRC6 codes for a 463-amino-acid cytoplasmic protein, expressed distinctively in motile cilia cells, including the testis cells and the respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with PCD-known genes filtering to explore the genetic lesion of a PCD patient. A novel compound heterozygous mutation in LRRC6 (c.183T>G/p.N61K; c.179-1G>A was identified and coseparated in this family. The missense mutation (c.183T>G/p.N61K may lead to a substitution of asparagine by lysine at position 61 in exon 3 of LRRC6. The splice site mutation (c.179-1G>A may cause a premature stop codon in exon 4 and decrease the mRNA levels of LRRC6. Both mutations were not present in our 200 local controls, dbSNP, and 1000 genomes. Three bioinformatics programs also predicted that both mutations are deleterious. Our study not only further supported the importance of LRRC6 in PCD, but also expanded the spectrum of LRRC6 mutations and will contribute to the genetic diagnosis and counseling of PCD patients.

  17. A novel common large genomic deletion and two new missense mutations identified in the Romanian phenylketonuria population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Iorgulescu, Daniela; Mager, Monica Alina; Anton-Paduraru, Dana; Vulturar, Romana; Thöny, Beat

    2016-01-15

    The mutation spectrum for the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene was investigated in a cohort of 84 hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) patients from Romania identified through newborn screening or neurometabolic investigations. Differential diagnosis identified 81 patients with classic PAH deficiency while 3 had tetrahydropterin-cofactor deficiency and/or remained uncertain due to insufficient specimen. PAH-genetic analysis included a combination of Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries, MLPA and NGS with genomic DNA, and cDNA analysis from immortalized lymphoblasts. A diagnostic efficiency of 99.4% was achieved, as for one allele (out of a total of 162 alleles) no mutation could be identified. The most prevalent mutation was p.Arg408Trp which was found in ~ 38% of all PKU alleles. Three novel mutations were identified, including the two missense mutations p.Gln226Lys and p.Tyr268Cys that were both disease causing by prediction algorithms, and the large genomic deletion EX6del7831 (c.509 + 4140_706 + 510del7831) that resulted in skipping of exon 6 based on PAH-cDNA analysis in immortalized lymphocytes. The genomic deletion was present in a heterozygous state in 12 patients, i.e. in ~ 8% of all the analyzed PKU alleles, and might have originated from a Romanian founder.

  18. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature

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    Dudding Tracy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1 gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other, resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57% occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  19. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  20. Molecular Analysis of a Recurrent Sarcoma Identifies a Mutation in FAF1

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    Georg F. Weber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient presented with a recurrent sarcoma (diagnosed as leiomyosarcoma 12 years after the removal of an initial cancer (diagnosed as extracompartmental osteosarcoma distally on the same limb. Following surgery, the sarcoma and unaffected muscle and bone were subjected to measurements of DNA exome sequence, RNA and protein expression, and transcription factor binding. The investigation provided corroboration of the diagnosis leiomyosarcoma, as the major upregulations in this tumor comprise muscle-specific gene products and calcium-regulating molecules (calcium is an important second messenger in smooth muscle cells. A likely culprit for the disease is the point mutation S181G in FAF1, which may cause a loss of apoptotic function consecutive to transforming DNA damage. The RNA levels of genes for drug transport and metabolism were extensively skewed in the tumor tissue as compared to muscle and bone. The results suggest that the tumor represents a recurrence of a dormant metastasis from an originally misdiagnosed neoplasm. A loss of FAF1 function could cause constitutive WNT pathway activity (consistent with the downstream inductions of IGF2BP1 and E2F1 in this cancer. While the study has informed on drug transport and drug metabolism pharmacogenetics, it has fallen short of identifying a suitable target for molecular therapy.

  1. A familial study of azoospermic men identifies three novel causative mutations in three new human azoospermia genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoni, Moran; Hauser, Ron; Yogev, Leah; Lehavi, Ofer; Azem, Foad; Yavetz, Haim; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Kleiman, Sandra E

    2017-09-01

    Up to 1% of all men experience azoospermia, a condition of complete absence of sperm in the semen. The mechanisms and genes involved in spermatogenesis are mainly studied in model organisms, and their relevance to humans is unclear because human genetic studies are very scarce. Our objective was to uncover novel human mutations and genes causing azoospermia due to testicular meiotic maturation arrest. Affected and unaffected siblings from three families were subjected to whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing, followed by comprehensive bioinformatics analyses to identify mutations suspected to cause azoospermia. These likely mutations were further screened in azoospermic and normozoospermic men and in men proven to be fertile, as well as in a reference database of local populations. We identified three novel likely causative mutations of azoospermia in three genes: MEIOB, TEX14, and DNAH6. These genes are associated with different meiotic processes: meiotic crossovers, daughter cell abscission, and possibly rapid prophase movements. The genes and pathways we identified are fundamental for delineating common causes of azoospermia originating in mutations affecting diverse meiotic processes and have great potential for accelerating approaches to diagnose, treat, and prevent infertility.Genet Med advance online publication 16 February 2017.

  2. Functional analysis of novel sonic hedgehog gene mutations identified in basal cell carcinomas from xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvé-Privat, Sophie; Le Bret, Marc; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Queille, Sophie; Coulombe, Josée; Bouadjar, Bakar; Avril, Marie Françoise; Ruat, Martial; Sarasin, Alain; Daya-Grosjean, Leela

    2004-05-15

    Altered sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is crucial in the development of basal cell carcinomas (BCC), the most common human cancer. Mutations in SHH signal transducers, PATCHED and SMOOTHENED, have already been identified, but SHH mutations are extremely rare; only 1 was detected in 74 sporadic BCCs. We present data showing unique SHH mutations in BCCs from repair-deficient, skin cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients, which are characterized by high levels of UV-specific mutations in key genes involved in skin carcinogenesis, including PATCHED and SMOOTHENED. Thus, 6 UV-specific SHH mutations were detected in 5 of 33 XP BCCs. These missense SHH alterations are not activating mutations for its postulated proto-oncogene function, as the mutant SHH proteins do not show transforming activity and induce differentiation or stimulate proliferation to the same level as the wild-type protein. Structural modeling studies of the 4 proteins altered at the surface residues, G57S, G64K, D147N, and R155C, show that they do not effect the protein conformation. Interestingly, they are all located on one face of the compact SHH protein suggesting that they may have altered affinity for different partners, which may be important in altering other functions. Additional functional analysis of the SHH mutations found in vivo in XP BCCs will help shed light on the role of SHH in skin carcinogenesis. In conclusion, we report for the first time, significant levels of SHH mutations found only in XP BCCs and none in squamous cell carcinomas, indicating their importance in the specific development of BCCs.

  3. Functional characterization of a CRH missense mutation identified in an ADNFLE family.

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    Veronica Sansoni

    Full Text Available Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy has been historically considered a channelopathy caused by mutations in subunits of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor or in a recently reported potassium channel. However, these mutations account for only a minority of patients, and the existence of at least a new locus for the disease has been demonstrated. In 2005, we detected two nucleotide variations in the promoter of the CRH gene coding for the corticotropin releasing hormone in 7 patients. These variations cosegregated with the disease and were demonstrated to alter the cellular levels of this hormone. Here, we report the identification in an Italian affected family of a novel missense mutation (hpreproCRH p.Pro30Arg located in the region of the CRH coding for the protein pro-sequence. The mutation was detected in heterozygosity in the two affected individuals. In vitro assays demonstrated that this mutation results in reduced levels of protein secretion in the short time thus suggesting that mutated people could present an altered capability to respond immediately to stress agents.

  4. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Whole exome sequencing identifies three recessive FIG4 mutations in an apparently dominant pedigree with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Manoj P; Waddell, Leigh; Lenk, Guy M; Kaur, Simranpreet; MacArthur, Daniel G; Meisler, Miriam H; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous and classification based on motor nerve conduction velocity and inheritance is used to direct genetic testing. With the less common genetic forms of CMT, identifying the causative genetic mutation by Sanger sequencing of individual genes can be time-consuming and costly. Next-generation sequencing technologies show promise for clinical testing in diseases where a similar phenotype is caused by different genes. We report the unusual occurrence of CMT4J, caused by mutations in FIG4, in a apparently dominant pedigree. The affected proband and her mother exhibit different disease severities associated with different combinations of compound heterozygous FIG4 mutations, identified by whole exome sequencing. The proband was also shown to carry a de novo nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, which may contribute to her more severe phenotype. This study is a cautionary reminder that in families with two generations affected, explanations other than dominant inheritance are possible, such as recessive inheritance due to three mutations segregating in the family. It also emphasises the advantages of next-generation sequencing approaches that screen multiple CMT genes at once for patients in whom the common genes have been excluded. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

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    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  7. Novel noncontiguous duplications identified with a comprehensive mutation analysis in the DMD gene by DMD gene-targeted sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Huanhuan; Xiao, Bing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yu; Ye, Hui; Ying, Xiaomin; Chen, Yingwei; Liu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Xing; Sun, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Genomic rearrangements, such as intragenic deletions and duplications, are the most prevalent types of mutation in the DMD gene, and DMD mutations underlie Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Using multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and DMD gene-targeted sequencing, we performed a molecular characterization of two cases of complex noncontiguous duplication rearrangements that involved inverted duplications. The breakpoint sequences were analyzed to investigate the mechanisms of the rearrangement. The two cases shared the same duplication events (Dup-nml-Dup/inv), and both involved microhomology and small insertions at the breakpoints. Additionally, in case 1, SNP sequencing results indicated that the de novo duplication mutation arose in the allele that originated from the grandfather. This study has identified a novel type of DMD complex rearrangement and provides insight into the molecular basis of this genomic rearrangement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. A novel nonsense mutation of the GPR143 gene identified in a Chinese pedigree with ocular albinism.

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    Naihong Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis of ocular albinism type I in a Chinese pedigree. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complete ophthalmologic examinations were performed on 4 patients, 7 carriers and 17 unaffected individuals in this five-generation family. All coding exons of four-point-one (4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7 and G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with a reference database. Ocular albinism and nystagmus were found in all patients of this family. Macular hypoplasia was present in the patients including the proband. A novel nonsense hemizygous mutation c.807T>A in the GPR143 gene was identified in four patients and the heterozygous mutation was found in seven asymptomatic individuals. This mutation is a substitution of tyrosine for adenine which leads to a premature stop codon at position 269 (p.Y269X of GPR143. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that p.Y269X mutation of GPR143 gene is responsible for the pathogenesis of familial ocular albinism. These results expand the mutation spectrum of GPR143, and demonstrate the clinical characteristics of ocular albinism type I in Chinese population.

  9. Somatic mutation profiles of MSI and MSS colorectal cancer identified by whole exome next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Timmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is with approximately 1 million cases the third most common cancer worldwide. Extensive research is ongoing to decipher the underlying genetic patterns with the hope to improve early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this direction, the recent progress in next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the field of cancer genomics. However, one caveat of these studies remains the large amount of genetic variations identified and their interpretation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the first work on whole exome NGS of primary colon cancers. We performed 454 whole exome pyrosequencing of tumor as well as adjacent not affected normal colonic tissue from microsatellite stable (MSS and microsatellite instable (MSI colon cancer patients and identified more than 50,000 small nucleotide variations for each tissue. According to predictions based on MSS and MSI pathomechanisms we identified eight times more somatic non-synonymous variations in MSI cancers than in MSS and we were able to reproduce the result in four additional CRCs. Our bioinformatics filtering approach narrowed down the rate of most significant mutations to 359 for MSI and 45 for MSS CRCs with predicted altered protein functions. In both CRCs, MSI and MSS, we found somatic mutations in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A, BMPR1A, a gene where so far germline mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome, and show that the mutations functionally impair the protein function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that with deep sequencing of tumor exomes one may be able to predict the microsatellite status of CRC and in addition identify potentially clinically relevant mutations.

  10. Exome sequencing identifies truncating mutations in human SERPINF1 in autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, J.; Semler, O.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Li, Y.; Bolz, H.J.; Giunta, C.; Bergmann, C.; Rohrbach, M.; Koerber, F.; Zimmermann, K.; Vries, P.F. de; Wirth, B.; Schoenau, E.; Wollnik, B.; Veltman, J.A.; Hoischen, A.; Netzer, C.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single

  11. A targeted analysis identifies a high frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers in women with ovarian cancer from a founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Moria H; Dolman, Lena; Arcand, Suzanna L; Shen, Zhen; Chong, George; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Tonin, Patricia N

    2015-03-27

    The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients varies depending on histological subtype and population investigated. The six most commonly recurring BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations previously identified in a founder French Canadian population were investigated in 439 histologically defined ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer cases that were ascertained at one hospital servicing French Canadians. To further assess the frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, a defined subgroup of 116 cases were investigated for all mutations previously reported in this population. A PCR-based assay was used to screen 439 ovarian, fallopian tube or extra-ovarian cancers comprised of serous, high grade endometrioid and mixed cell adenocarcinomas with serous components for specific BRCA1: C4446T and 2953delGTAinsC and BRCA2: 8765delAG, G6085T, 3398del5 and E3002K mutations. A multiplex bead-array-based Luminex assay was used to evaluate 19 specific mutations that have ever been reported in French Canadians, which included the six mutations assayed by PCR, in 116 cases representing all women ascertained within a defined 3-year window. A targeted analysis of six mutations identified 34/439 (7.7%) mutation carriers and at least two mutation carriers for each mutation screened were found. The BRCA1:C4446T mutation was the most frequently identified variant (15/34, 44.1%) among mutation-positive cases. The expanded mutation screen that also included 13 additional variants identified 19/116 (16.4%) mutation carriers, where C4446T was the most common variant (8/19, 42.1%) identified among mutation-positive carriers in this subgroup. Mutations were identified in women with serous, endometrioid, mixed cell, and undifferentiated adenocarcinomas. Within this subgroup there were 73 high-grade (G3) serous ovarian carcinomas, the most common subtype, with mutations identified in 19.2% (n = 14) serous cases. Our results reaffirm that specific BRCA1 and BRCA2

  12. Novel Mutation of LRP6 Identified in Chinese Han Population Links Canonical WNT Signaling to Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiwen; Yang, Xueyan; Li, Bin-Bin; Chen, Shuxia; Yang, Luming; Cheng, Liangping; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Hongyan; Zheng, Yufang

    2018-01-15

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most frequent cause of human congenital abnormalities, are debilitating birth defects due to failure of neural tube closure. It has been shown that noncanonical WNT/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is required for convergent extension (CE), the initiation step of neural tube closure (NTC). But the effect of canonical WNT//β-catenin signaling during NTC is still elusive. LRP6 (low density lipoprotein receptor related proteins 6) was identified as a co-receptor for WNT/β-catenin signaling, but recent studies showed that it also can mediate WNT/PCP signaling. In this study, we screened mutations in the LRP6 gene in 343 NTDs and 215 ethnically matched normal controls of Chinese Han population. Three rare missense mutations (c.1514A>G, p.Y505C); c.2984A>G, p.D995G; and c.4280C>A, p.P1427Q) of the LRP6 gene were identified in Chinese NTD patients. The Y505C mutation is a loss-of-function mutation on both WNT/β-catenin and PCP signaling. The D995G mutation only partially lost inhibition on PCP signaling without affecting WNT/β-catenin signaling. The P1427Q mutation dramatically increased WNT/β-catenin signaling but only mildly loss of inhibition on PCP signaling. All three mutations failed to rescue CE defects caused by lrp6 morpholino oligos knockdown in zebrafish. Of interest, when overexpressed, D995G did not induce any defects, but Y505C and P1427Q caused more severe CE defects in zebrafish. Our results suggested that over-active canonical WNT signaling induced by gain-of-function mutation in LRP6 could also contribute to human NTDs, and a balanced WNT/β-catenin and PCP signaling is probably required for proper neural tube development. Birth Defects Research 110:63-71, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mutations in NMNAT1 cause Leber congenital amaurosis and identify a new disease pathway for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenekoop, Robert K; Wang, Hui; Majewski, Jacek; Wang, Xia; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Fishman, Gerald A; Genead, Mohammed; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Solanki, Naimesh; Traboulsi, Elias I; Cheng, Jingliang; Logan, Clare V; McKibbin, Martin; Hayward, Bruce E; Parry, David A; Johnson, Colin A; Nageeb, Mohammed; Poulter, James A; Mohamed, Moin D; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R; Keser, Vafa; Mardon, Graeme; Xu, Huidan; Inglehearn, Chris F; Fu, Qing; Toomes, Carmel; Chen, Rui

    2012-09-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a blinding retinal disease that presents within the first year after birth. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase gene NMNAT1 encoding nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 in eight families with LCA, including the family in which LCA was originally linked to the LCA9 locus. Notably, all individuals with NMNAT1 mutations also have macular colobomas, which are severe degenerative entities of the central retina (fovea) devoid of tissue and photoreceptors. Functional assays of the proteins encoded by the mutant alleles identified in our study showed that the mutations reduce the enzymatic activity of NMNAT1 in NAD biosynthesis and affect protein folding. Of note, recent characterization of the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wld(s)) mouse model, in which prolonged axonal survival after injury is observed, identified NMNAT1 as a neuroprotective protein when ectopically expressed. Our findings identify a new disease mechanism underlying LCA and provide the first link between endogenous NMNAT1 dysfunction and a human nervous system disorder.

  14. Exome Sequencing Identifies Truncating Mutations in Human SERPINF1 in Autosomal-Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Jutta; Semler, Oliver; Gilissen, Christian; Li, Yun; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Giunta, Cecilia; Bergmann, Carsten; Rohrbach, Marianne; Koerber, Friederike; Zimmermann, Katharina; de Vries, Petra; Wirth, Brunhilde; Schoenau, Eckhard; Wollnik, Bernd; Veltman, Joris A.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures after minimal trauma. After mutations in all known OI genes had been excluded by Sanger sequencing, we applied next-generation sequencing to analyze the exome of a single individual who has a severe form of the disease and whose parents are second cousins. A total of 26,922 variations from the human reference genome sequence were subjected to several filtering steps...

  15. Toward Universal Forward Genetics: Using a Draft Genome Sequence of the Nematode Oscheius tipulae To Identify Mutations Affecting Vulva Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Fabrice; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Dieudonné, Sana; Blaxter, Mark; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Mapping-by-sequencing has become a standard method to map and identify phenotype-causing mutations in model species. Here, we show that a fragmented draft assembly is sufficient to perform mapping-by-sequencing in nonmodel species. We generated a draft assembly and annotation of the genome of the free-living nematode Oscheius tipulae, a distant relative of the model Caenorhabditis elegans. We used this draft to identify the likely causative mutations at the O. tipulae cov-3 locus, which affect vulval development. The cov-3 locus encodes the O. tipulae ortholog of C. elegans mig-13, and we further show that Cel-mig-13 mutants also have an unsuspected vulval-development phenotype. In a virtuous circle, we were able to use the linkage information collected during mutant mapping to improve the genome assembly. These results showcase the promise of genome-enabled forward genetics in nonmodel species. PMID:28630114

  16. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  17. Massively parallel DNA sequencing successfully identifies new causative mutations in deafness genes in patients with cochlear implantation and EAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Miyagawa

    Full Text Available Genetic factors, the most common etiology in severe to profound hearing loss, are one of the key determinants of Cochlear Implantation (CI and Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS outcomes. Satisfactory auditory performance after receiving a CI/EAS in patients with certain deafness gene mutations indicates that genetic testing would be helpful in predicting CI/EAS outcomes and deciding treatment choices. However, because of the extreme genetic heterogeneity of deafness, clinical application of genetic information still entails difficulties. Target exon sequencing using massively parallel DNA sequencing is a new powerful strategy to discover rare causative genes in Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We used massive sequencing of the exons of 58 target candidate genes to analyze 8 (4 early-onset, 4 late-onset Japanese CI/EAS patients, who did not have mutations in commonly found genes including GJB2, SLC26A4, or mitochondrial 1555A>G or 3243A>G mutations. We successfully identified four rare causative mutations in the MYO15A, TECTA, TMPRSS3, and ACTG1 genes in four patients who showed relatively good auditory performance with CI including EAS, suggesting that genetic testing may be able to predict the performance after implantation.

  18. Functional analysis of a nonstop mutation in MITF gene identified in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Hao, Ziqi; Luo, Hunjin; He, Chufeng; Mei, Lingyun; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Xueping; Niu, Zhijie; Chen, Hongsheng; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2017-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurogenic disorder with the combination of various degrees of sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities affecting the skin, hair and eye. The four subtypes of WS were defined on the basis of the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutation of human microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene gives rise to WS2. Here, we identified a novel WS-associated mutation at the stop codon of MITF (p.X420Y) in a Chinese WS2 patient. This mutation resulted in an extension of extra 33 amino-acid residues in MITF. The mutant MITF appeared in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, whereas the wild-type MITF was localized in the nucleus exclusively. The mutation led to a reduction in the transcriptional activities, whereas the DNA-binding activity was not altered. We show that the foremost mechanism was haploinsufficiency for the mild phenotypes of WS2 induced in X420Y MITF.

  19. A novel mutation in the WFS1 gene identified in a Taiwanese family with low-frequency hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Shing-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolfram syndrome gene 1 (WFS1 accounts for most of the familial nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL which is characterized by sensorineural hearing losses equal to and below 2000 Hz. The current study aimed to contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of LFSNHL in an affected Taiwanese family. Methods The Taiwanese family with LFSNHL was phenotypically characterized using audiologic examination and pedigree analysis. Genetic characterization was performed by direct sequencing of WFS1 and mutation analysis. Results Pure tone audiometry confirmed that the family members affected with LFSNHL had a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss equal to or below 2000 Hz. The hearing loss threshold of the affected members showed no progression, a characteristic that was consistent with a mutation in the WFS1 gene located in the DFNA6/14/38 locus. Pedigree analysis showed a hereditarily autosomal dominant pattern characterized by a full penetrance. Among several polymorphisms, a missense mutation Y669H (2005T>C in exon 8 of WFS1 was identified in members of a Taiwanese family diagnosed with LFSNHL but not in any of the control subjects. Conclusion We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 (i.e., Y669H which is likely responsible for the LFSNHL phenotype in this particular Taiwanese family.

  20. Whole exome sequencing identifies the first STRADA point mutation in a patient with polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Glass, Ian A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Sun, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is an ultra rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe, infantile-onset intractable epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, macrocephaly, and craniofacial dysmorphism. The molecular diagnosis of this condition has thus far only been made in 16 Old Order Mennonite patients carrying a homozygous 7 kb founder deletion of exons 9-13 of STRADA. We performed clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) on a 4-year-old Indian male with global developmental delay, history of failure to thrive, infantile spasms, repetitive behaviors, hypotonia, low muscle mass, marked joint laxity, and dysmorphic facial features including tall forehead, long face, arched eyebrows, small chin, wide mouth, and tented upper lip. A homozygous single nucleotide duplication, c.842dupA (p.D281fs), in exon 10 of STRADA was identified. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the individual and identified both parents as carriers. In light of the molecular discoveries, the patient's clinical phenotype was considered to be a good fit for PMSE. We identified for the first time a homozygous point mutation in STRADA causing PMSE. Additional bi-allelic mutations related to PMSE thus far have not been observed in Baylor ∼6,000 consecutive clinical WES cases, supporting the rarity of this disorder. Our findings may have treatment implications for the patient since previous studies have shown rapamycin as a potential therapeutic agent for the seizures and cognitive problems in PMSE patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E−05 and 1E−07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr = 5.98E−06 and pFecXO = 2.55E−08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS = 2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS = 1.93±0.42, p<1E−03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR = 3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR = 2.02±0.47, p<1E−03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  2. Diagnostic value of plasma and urinary 2-hydroxyglutarate to identify patients with isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Giuseppe; Corona, Giuseppe; Bellu, Luisa; Della Puppa, Alessandro; Pambuku, Ardi; Fiduccia, Pasquale; Bertorelle, Roberta; Gardiman, Marina Paola; D'Avella, Domenico; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Zagonel, Vittorina

    2015-05-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1/2 enzymes can convert α-ketoglutarate into 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). The aim of the present study was to explore whether 2HG in plasma and urine could predict the presence of IDH1/2 mutations in patients with glioma. All patients had histological confirmation of glioma and a recent brain magnetic resonance imaging scan showing the neoplastic lesion. Plasma and urine samples were taken from all patients, and the 2HG concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 84 patients were enrolled: 38 with R132H-IDH1 mutated and 46 with wild type. Among the 38 patients with mutant IDH1, 21 had high-grade glioma and 17 had low-grade glioma. Among the 46 patients with IDH1 wild-type glioma, 35 and 11 had high- and low-grade glioma, respectively. In all patients, we analyzed the mean 2HG concentration in the plasma, urine, and plasma/urine ratio (Ratio_2HG). We found a significant difference in the Ratio_2HG between patients with and without an IDH1 mutation (22.2 ± 8.7 vs. 15.6 ± 6.8; p value for Ratio_2HG to identify IDH1 mutation was 19 (sensitivity, 63%; specificity, 76%; accuracy, 70%). In the patients with high-grade glioma only, the optimal cutoff value was 20 (sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 89%; accuracy, 84%; positive predictive value, 80%; negative predictive value, 86%). In 7 of 7 patients with high-grade glioma, we found a correlation between the Ratio_2HG value and the response to treatment. Ratio_2HG might be a predictor of the presence of IDH1 mutation. The measurement of 2HG could be useful for disease monitoring and also to assess the treatment effects in these patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  3. Analysis of 30 putative BRCA1 splicing mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families identifies exonic splice site mutations that escape in silico prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wappenschmidt

    Full Text Available Screening for pathogenic mutations in breast and ovarian cancer genes such as BRCA1/2, CHEK2 and RAD51C is common practice for individuals from high-risk families. However, test results may be ambiguous due to the presence of unclassified variants (UCV in the concurrent absence of clearly cancer-predisposing mutations. Especially the presence of intronic or exonic variants within these genes that possibly affect proper pre-mRNA processing poses a challenge as their functional implications are not immediately apparent. Therefore, it appears necessary to characterize potential splicing UCV and to develop appropriate classification tools. We investigated 30 distinct BRCA1 variants, both intronic and exonic, regarding their spliceogenic potential by commonly used in silico prediction algorithms (HSF, MaxEntScan along with in vitro transcript analyses. A total of 25 variants were identified spliceogenic, either causing/enhancing exon skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites, or both. Except from a single intronic variant causing minor effects on BRCA1 pre-mRNA processing in our analyses, 23 out of 24 intronic variants were correctly predicted by MaxEntScan, while HSF was less accurate in this cohort. Among the 6 exonic variants analyzed, 4 severely impair correct pre-mRNA processing, while the remaining two have partial effects. In contrast to the intronic alterations investigated, only half of the spliceogenic exonic variants were correctly predicted by HSF and/or MaxEntScan. These data support the idea that exonic splicing mutations are commonly disease-causing and concurrently prone to escape in silico prediction, hence necessitating experimental in vitro splicing analysis.

  4. Acquired RhD mosaicism identifies fibrotic transformation of thrombopoietin receptor-mutated essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Coward, Rebecca; Albitar, Maher; Udani, Rupa; Jain, Prachi; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Battiwalla, Minoo; Keel, Siobán; Klein, Harvey G; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa

    2017-09-01

    Acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity has been described in myeloid malignant progression with an otherwise normal karyotype. A 65-year-old woman with MPL-mutated essential thrombocythemia and progression to myelofibrosis was noted upon routine pretransplant testing to have mixed field reactivity with anti-D and an historic discrepancy in RhD type. The patient had never received transfusions or transplantation. Gel immunoagglutination revealed group A red blood cells and a mixed-field reaction for the D phenotype, with a predominant D-negative population and a small subset of circulating red blood cells carrying the D antigen. Subsequent genomic microarray single nucleotide polymorphism profiling revealed copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 1 p36.33-p34.2, a known molecular mechanism underlying fibrotic progression of MPL-mutated essential thrombocythemia. The chromosomal region affected by this copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity encompassed the RHD, RHCE, and MPL genes. We propose a model of chronological molecular events that is supported by RHD zygosity assays in peripheral lymphoid and myeloid-derived cells. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity events that lead to clonal selection and myeloid malignant progression may also affect the expression of adjacent unrelated genes, including those encoding for blood group antigens. Detection of mixed-field reactions and investigation of discrepant blood typing results are important for proper transfusion support of these patients and can provide useful surrogate markers of myeloproliferative disease progression. © 2017 AABB.

  5. Whole exome sequencing identifies driver mutations in asymptomatic computed tomography-detected lung cancers with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Elena; Veronesi, Giulia; Rotta, Luca; Volorio, Sara; Sardella, Domenico; Bernard, Loris; Pece, Salvatore; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Fumagalli, Caterina; Barberis, Massimo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Riva, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of curative surgery for lung cancer could be largely improved by non-invasive screening programs, which can detect the disease at early stages. We previously showed that 18% of screening-identified lung cancers demonstrate a normal karyotype and, following high-density genome scanning, can be subdivided into samples with 1) numerous; 2) none; and 3) few copy number alterations. Whole exome sequencing was applied to the two normal karyotype, screening-detected lung cancers, constituting group 2, as well as normal controls. We identified mutations in both tumors, including KEAP1 (commonly mutated in lung cancers) in one, and TP53, PMS1, and MSH3 (well-characterized DNA-repair genes) in the other. The two normal karyotype screening-detected lung tumors displayed a typical lung cancer mutational profile that only next generation sequencing could reveal, which offered an additional contribution to the over-diagnosis bias concept hypothesized within lung cancer screening programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole-exome sequencing identifies tetratricopeptide repeat domain 7A (TTC7A) mutations for combined immunodeficiency with intestinal atresias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Giliani, Silvia; Lanzi, Gaetana; Mias, George I; Lonardi, Silvia; Dobbs, Kerry; Manis, John; Im, Hogune; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Phanstiel, Douglas H; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lacroute, Philippe; Bettinger, Keith; Moratto, Daniele; Weinacht, Katja; Montin, Davide; Gallo, Eleonora; Mangili, Giovanna; Porta, Fulvio; Notarangelo, Lucia D; Pedretti, Stefania; Al-Herz, Waleed; Alfahdli, Wasmi; Comeau, Anne Marie; Traister, Russell S; Pai, Sung-Yun; Carella, Graziella; Facchetti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari C; Snyder, Michael; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2013-09-01

    Combined immunodeficiency with multiple intestinal atresias (CID-MIA) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by intestinal obstructions and profound immune defects. We sought to determine the underlying genetic causes of CID-MIA by analyzing the exomic sequences of 5 patients and their healthy direct relatives from 5 unrelated families. We performed whole-exome sequencing on 5 patients with CID-MIA and 10 healthy direct family members belonging to 5 unrelated families with CID-MIA. We also performed targeted Sanger sequencing for the candidate gene tetratricopeptide repeat domain 7A (TTC7A) on 3 additional patients with CID-MIA. Through analysis and comparison of the exomic sequence of the subjects from these 5 families, we identified biallelic damaging mutations in the TTC7A gene, for a total of 7 distinct mutations. Targeted TTC7A gene sequencing in 3 additional unrelated patients with CID-MIA revealed biallelic deleterious mutations in 2 of them, as well as an aberrant splice product in the third patient. Staining of normal thymus showed that the TTC7A protein is expressed in thymic epithelial cells, as well as in thymocytes. Moreover, severe lymphoid depletion was observed in the thymus and peripheral lymphoid tissues from 2 patients with CID-MIA. We identified deleterious mutations of the TTC7A gene in 8 unrelated patients with CID-MIA and demonstrated that the TTC7A protein is expressed in the thymus. Our results strongly suggest that TTC7A gene defects cause CID-MIA. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene expression profiling and candidate gene resequencing identifies pathways and mutations important for malignant transformation caused by leukemogenic fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Rachel L; Harper, David P; Caudell, David; Slape, Christopher; Beachy, Sarah H; Aplan, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) and CALM-AF10 (CA10) are oncogenic fusion proteins produced by recurrent chromosomal translocations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transgenic mice that express these fusions develop AML with a long latency and incomplete penetrance, suggesting that collaborating genetic events are required for leukemic transformation. We employed genetic techniques to identify both preleukemic abnormalities in healthy transgenic mice as well as collaborating events leading to leukemic transformation. Candidate gene resequencing revealed that 6 of 27 (22%) CA10 AMLs spontaneously acquired a Ras pathway mutation and 8 of 27 (30%) acquired an Flt3 mutation. Two CA10 AMLs acquired an Flt3 internal-tandem duplication, demonstrating that these mutations can be acquired in murine as well as human AML. Gene expression profiles revealed a marked upregulation of Hox genes, particularly Hoxa5, Hoxa9, and Hoxa10 in both NHD13 and CA10 mice. Furthermore, mir196b, which is embedded within the Hoxa locus, was overexpressed in both CA10 and NHD13 samples. In contrast, the Hox cofactors Meis1 and Pbx3 were differentially expressed; Meis1 was increased in CA10 AMLs but not NHD13 AMLs, whereas Pbx3 was consistently increased in NHD13 but not CA10 AMLs. Silencing of Pbx3 in NHD13 cells led to decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased colony formation in vitro, suggesting a previously unexpected role for Pbx3 in leukemic transformation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies Novel Compound Heterozygous Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator Gene Mutations Associated with Autosomal Recessive Chediak-Higashi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Senfen; Chen, Feng; Gu, Yang; Hong, Enyu; Yu, Yongbo; Ni, Xin; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Tieliu; Xu, Zigang

    2017-02-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, and a mild bleeding tendency, with late neurologic dysfunction. This syndrome is molecularly characterized by pathognomonic mutations in the LYST (lysosomal trafficking regulator). Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) we attempted to identify novel mutations of CHS based on a family of CHS with atypical symptoms. The two patients demonstrated a phenotypic constellation including partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequency upper respiratory infection or a marginal intelligence, without bleeding tendency and severe immunodeficiency. WGS revealed two compound LYST mutations including a maternally inherited chr1:235969126G > A (rs80338652) and a novel paternally inherited chr1: 235915327A > AT, associated with autosomal recessive CHS. These two variants fall in the coding regions of LYST, resulting in premature truncation of LYST due to R1104X/N2535KfsX2 induced incomplete translation. Notably, the heterozygous carriers (i.e. parents) were unaffected. Our finding also reveals decreased plasma serotonin levels in patients with CHS compared with unaffected individuals for the first time. The present study contributes to improved understanding of the causes of this disease and provides new ideas for possible treatments.

  9. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Stewart Gillmor

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125, and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development. No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms.

  10. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy.......5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 27 July 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.99....

  11. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    -based linkage analysis and follow up microsatellite markers to identify a novel locus (DFNA66) on chromosome 6q15-21 (LOD 5.1) in a large Danish family with dominantly inherited NSHI. By locus specific capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a c.574C>T heterozygous nonsense mutation (p.R192......*) in CD164. This gene encodes a 197 amino acid transmembrane sialomucin (known as endolyn, MUC-24 or CD164), which is widely expressed and involved in cell adhesion and migration. The mutation segregated with the phenotype and was absent in 1200 Danish control individuals and in databases with whole......-lysosomal compartments, implicating failed endocytosis as a possible disease mechanism. In the mouse ear, we found CD164 expressed in the inner and outer hair cells of the organ of Corti, as well as in other locations in the cochlear duct. In conclusion, we have identified a new DFNA locus located on chromosome 6q15...

  12. Failure to Identify Somatic Mutations in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Schizophrenia by Whole Exome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lyu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study is not alone in the failure to identify pathogenic somatic variations in MZ twins, suggesting that exonic somatic variations are extremely rare. Further efforts are warranted to explore the potential genetic mechanism of SCZ.

  13. Exome sequencing analysis identifies compound heterozygous mutation in ABCA4 in a Chinese family with Stargardt disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhou

    Full Text Available Stargardt disease is the most common cause of juvenile macular dystrophy. Five subjects from a two-generation Chinese family with Stargardt disease are reported in this study. All family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations. Patients of the family initiated the disease during childhood, developing progressively impaired central vision and bilateral atrophic macular lesions in the retinal pigmental epithelium (RPE that resembled a "beaten-bronze" appearance. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from all patients and their family members for genetic analysis. Exome sequencing was used to analyze the exome of two patients II1, II2. A total of 50709 variations shared by the two patients were subjected to several filtering steps against existing variation databases. Identified variations were verified in all family members by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Compound heterozygous variants p.Y808X and p.G607R of the ATP-binding cassette, sub-family A (ABC1, member 4 (ABCA4 gene, which encodes the ABCA4 protein, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transport superfamily, were identified as causative mutations for Stargardt disease of this family. Our findings provide one novel ABCA4 mutation in Chinese patients with Stargardt disease.

  14. Twenty-one novel mutations in the GLB1 gene identified in a large group of GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B patients: possible common origin for the prevalent p.R59H mutation among gypsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Raül; Chabás, Amparo; Coll, Maria Josep; Miranda, Clara Sa; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease are rare lysosomal storage disorders caused by beta-galactosidase deficiency due to mutations in the GLB1 gene. Three major clinical forms of GM1-gangliosidosis have been established on the basis of age of onset and severity of symptoms: infantile, late infantile/juvenile, and adult. We performed mutation analysis on 30 GM1-gangliosidosis and five Morquio B patients, mainly of Spanish origin, and all the causative mutations were identified. Thirty different mutations were found, 21 of which were novel. With the exception of two adults and one juvenile patient, all the GM1-gangliosidosis patients were affected by the infantile form. Clinical findings are presented for all patients. We report the association of the novel mutations p.T420K and p.L264S with the adult form and the juvenile form, respectively. In addition, the novel mutation p.Y83C was associated with Morquio B disease. Among the 30 GM1-gangliosidosis patients, 6 were of Gypsy origin (Roma). Moreover, those six Gypsy patients shared not only the same mutation (p.R59H) but also a common haplotype. This observation indicates a possible founder effect in this group and suggests that screening of the p.R59H mutation may be appropriate in GM1-gangliosidosis patients of Gypsy origin. This is the first exhaustive mutational analysis performed in a large group of Iberian GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B patients.

  15. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Hofree, M.; Kim, S.; Scott, E.; Copeland, B.; Romani, M.; Silhavy, J.L.; Rosti, R.O.; Schroth, J.; Mazza, T.; Miccinilli, E.; Zaki, M.S.; Swoboda, K.J.; Milisa-Drautz, J.; Dobyns, W.B.; Mikati, M.A.; Incecik, F.; Azam, M.; Borgatti, R.; Romaniello, R.; Boustany, R.M.; Clericuzio, C.L.; D'Arrigo, S.; Stromme, P.; Boltshauser, E.; Stanzial, F.; Mirabelli-Badenier, M.; Moroni, I.; Bertini, E.; Emma, F.; Steinlin, M.; Hildebrandt, F.; Johnson, C.A.; Freilinger, M.; Vaux, K.K.; Gabriel, S.B.; Aza-Blanc, P.; Heynen-Genel, S.; Ideker, T.; Dynlacht, B.D.; Lee, J.E.; Valente, E.M.; Kim, J.; Gleeson, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as

  16. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify ...

  17. Exome-wide rare variant analysis identifies TUBA4A mutations associated with familial ALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Bradley N.; Ticozzi, Nicola; Fallini, Claudia; Gkazi, Athina Soragia; Topp, Simon; Kenna, Kevin P.; Scotter, Emma L.; Kost, Jason; Keagle, Pamela; Miller, Jack W.; Calini, Daniela; Vance, Caroline; Danielson, Eric W.; Troakes, Claire; Tiloca, Cinzia; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lewis, Elizabeth A.; King, Andrew; Colombrita, Claudia; Pensato, Viviana; Castellotti, Barbara; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Baas, Frank; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L. M. A.; Sapp, Peter C.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; McLaughlin, Russell L.; Polak, Meraida; Asress, Seneshaw; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luis; Simpson, Michael; van Rheenen, Wouter; Diekstra, Frank P.; Lauria, Giuseppe; Duga, Stefano; Corti, Stefania; Cereda, Cristina; Corrado, Lucia; Sorarù, Gianni; Morrison, Karen E.; Williams, Kelly L.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; Dion, Patrick A.; Leblond, Claire S.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Hardiman, Orla; Veldink, Jan H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Pall, Hardev; Shaw, Pamela J.; Turner, Martin R.; Talbot, Kevin; Taroni, Franco; García-Redondo, Alberto; Wu, Zheyang; Glass, Jonathan D.; Gellera, Cinzia; Ratti, Antonia; Brown, Robert H.; Silani, Vincenzo; Shaw, Christopher E.; Landers, John E.; D'alfonso, Sandra; Mazzini, Letizia; Comi, Giacomo P.; del Bo, Roberto; Ceroni, Mauro; Gagliardi, Stella; Querin, Giorgia; Bertolin, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing is an effective strategy for identifying human disease genes. However, this methodology is difficult in late-onset diseases where limited availability of DNA from informative family members prohibits comprehensive segregation analysis. To overcome this limitation, we performed an

  18. TP53 mutations identify younger mantle cell lymphoma patients who do not benefit from intensive chemoimmunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskelund, Christian W.; Dahl, Christina; Hansen, Jakob W.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances in lymphoma treatment, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains incurable, and we are still unable to identify patients who will not benefit from the current standard of care. Here, we explore the prognostic value of recurrent genetic aberrations in diagnostic bone marrow (BM...

  19. Novel EDA or EDAR Mutations Identified in Patients with X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia or Non-Syndromic Tooth Agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binghui Zeng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Both X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED and non-syndromic tooth agenesis (NSTA result in symptoms of congenital tooth loss. This study investigated genetic causes in two families with XLHED and four families with NSTA. We screened for mutations of WNT10A, EDA, EDAR, EDARADD, PAX9, MSX1, AXIN2, LRP6, and WNT10B through Sanger sequencing. Whole exome sequencing was performed for the proband of NSTA Family 4. Novel mutation c.1051G>T (p.Val351Phe and the known mutation c.467G>A (p.Arg156His of Ectodysplasin A (EDA were identified in families with XLHED. Novel EDA receptor (EDAR mutation c.73C>T (p.Arg25*, known EDA mutation c.491A>C (p.Glu164Ala, and known Wnt family member 10A (WNT10A mutations c.511C>T (p.Arg171Cys and c.742C>T (p.Arg248* were identified in families with NSTA. The novel EDA and EDAR mutations were predicted as being pathogenic through bioinformatics analyses and structural modeling. Two variants of WNT10A, c.374G>A (p.Arg125Lys and c.125A>G (p.Asn42Ser, were found in patients with NSTA. The two WNT10A variants were predicted to affect the splicing of message RNA, but minigene experiments showed normal splicing of mutated minigenes. This study uncovered the genetic foundations with respect to six families with XLHED or NSTA. We identified six mutations, of which two were novel mutations of EDA and EDAR. This is the first report of a nonsense EDAR mutation leading to NSTA.

  20. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gasse

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene (MMP20 produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues, pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  1. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in the gene TTC7A in French-Canadian cases with hereditary multiple intestinal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Mark E; Majewski, Jacek; Alirezaie, Najmeh; Fernandez, Isabel; Casals, Ferran; Patey, Natalie; Decaluwe, Hélène; Gosselin, Isabelle; Haddad, Elie; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Marchand, Valerie; Michaud, Jacques L; Rodrigue, Marc-André; Desjardins, Sylvie; Dubois, Stéphane; Le Deist, Francoise; Awadalla, Philip; Raymond, Vincent; Maranda, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Congenital multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a severe, fatal neonatal disorder, involving the occurrence of obstructions in the small and large intestines ultimately leading to organ failure. Surgical interventions are palliative but do not provide long-term survival. Severe immunodeficiency may be associated with the phenotype. A genetic basis for MIA is likely. We had previously ascertained a cohort of patients of French-Canadian origin, most of whom were deceased as infants or in utero. The goal of the study was to identify the molecular basis for the disease in the patients of this cohort. We performed whole exome sequencing on samples from five patients of four families. Validation of mutations and familial segregation was performed using standard Sanger sequencing in these and three additional families with deceased cases. Exon skipping was assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Five patients from four different families were each homozygous for a four base intronic deletion in the gene TTC7A, immediately adjacent to a consensus GT splice donor site. The deletion was demonstrated to have deleterious effects on splicing causing the skipping of the attendant upstream coding exon, thereby leading to a predicted severe protein truncation. Parents were heterozygous carriers of the deletion in these families and in two additional families segregating affected cases. In a seventh family, an affected case was compound heterozygous for the same 4bp deletion and a second missense mutation p.L823P, also predicted as pathogenic. No other sequenced genes possessed deleterious variants explanatory for all patients in the cohort. Neither mutation was seen in a large set of control chromosomes. Based on our genetic results, TTC7A is the likely causal gene for MIA.

  2. Driver mutations among never smoking female lung cancer tissues in China identify unique EGFR and KRAS mutation pattern associated with household coal burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgood, H Dean; Pao, William; Rothman, Nathaniel; Hu, Wei; Pan, Yumei Helen; Kuchinsky, Kyle; Jones, Kirk D; Xu, Jun; Vermeulen, Roel; Simko, Jeff; Lan, Qing

    2013-11-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers, which has been partially attributed to household solid fuel use (i.e., coal), is etiologically and clinically different from lung cancer attributed to tobacco smoking. To explore the spectrum of driver mutations among lung cancer tissues from never smokers, specifically in a population where high lung cancer rates have been attributed to indoor air pollution from domestic coal use, multiplexed assays were used to detect >40 point mutations, insertions, and deletions (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, HER2, NRAS, PIK3CA, MEK1, AKT1, and PTEN) among the lung tumors of confirmed never smoking females from Xuanwei, China [32 adenocarcinomas (ADCs), 7 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 1 adenosquamous carcinoma (ADSC)]. EGFR mutations were detected in 35% of tumors. 46% of these involved EGFR exon 18 G719X, while 14% were exon 21 L858R mutations. KRAS mutations, all of which were G12C_34G>T, were observed in 15% of tumors. EGFR and KRAS mutations were mutually exclusive, and no mutations were observed in the other tested genes. Most point mutations were transversions and were also found in tumors from patients who used coal in their homes. Our high mutation frequencies in EGFR exon 18 and KRAS and low mutation frequency in EGFR exon 21 are strikingly divergent from those in other smoking and never smoking populations from Asia. Given that our subjects live in a region where coal is typically burned indoors, our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of lung cancer among never smoking females exposed to indoor air pollution from coal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Whole exome sequencing identifies a pathogenic mutation in WFS1 in two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant all-frequency hearing loss and prenatal counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongbo; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Wenbin; Meng, Qingxia; Wang, Fuxin; Liu, Minjuan; Mao, Jun; Shi, Yichao; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong

    2018-03-01

    To identify the pathogenic mutation and provide prenatal counseling and diagnosis in two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant all-frequency hearing loss. Whole exome sequencing technology was used to identify the pathogenic mutation of the two families. In addition, 298 patients with sporadic hearing loss and 400 normal controls were studied to verify the mutation/polymorphism nature of the identified variant. Prenatal diagnosis was carried out. A rare missense mutation c.2389G > A (p.D572N) in the Wolframin syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene was identified. It was reported in only one previous Chinese study, and never in other populations/ethnicities. The mutation was also found in one patient with sporadic hearing loss (1/298, 0.3%). A healthy baby was born after prenatal diagnosis. Our findings strongly suggest that the c.2389G > A mutation in WFS1 is associated with all-frequency hearing loss, rather than low- or high-frequency loss. So far, the mutation is only reported in Chinese. Prenatal diagnosis and prenatal counseling is available for these two Chinese families. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  5. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vigorito

    Full Text Available Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16. These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6. The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  6. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  7. Next generation sequencing identifies mutations in Atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) in families with global eye developmental defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamron; Logan, Clare V.; McKibbin, Martin; Sheridan, Eamonn; Elçioglu, Nursel H.; Yenice, Ozlem; Parry, David A.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Abdelhamed, Zakia I.A.; Al-Maskari, Ahmed; Poulter, James A.; Mohamed, Moin D.; Carr, Ian M.; Morgan, Joanne E.; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Taylor, Graham R.; Johnson, Colin A.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2012-01-01

    The atonal homolog 7 (ATOH7) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in determining the fate of retinal progenitor cells and is particularly required for optic nerve and ganglion cell development. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we have identified homozygous mutations in this gene, p.E49V and p.P18RfsX69, in two consanguineous families diagnosed with multiple ocular developmental defects, including severe vitreoretinal dysplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia, persistent fetal vasculature, microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, microcornea, corneal opacity and nystagmus. Most of these clinical features overlap with defects in the Norrin/β-catenin signalling pathway that is characterized by dysgenesis of the retinal and hyaloid vasculature. Our findings document Mendelian mutations within ATOH7 and imply a role for this molecule in the development of structures at the front as well as the back of the eye. This work also provides further insights into the function of ATOH7, especially its importance in retinal vascular development and hyaloid regression. PMID:22068589

  8. Transcriptional profile analysis of RPGRORF15 frameshift mutation identifies novel genes associated with retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genini, Sem; Zangerl, Barbara; Slavik, Julianna; Acland, Gregory M; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2010-11-01

    To identify genes and molecular mechanisms associated with photoreceptor degeneration in a canine model of XLRP caused by an RPGR exon ORF15 microdeletion. Methods. Expression profiles of mutant and normal retinas were compared by using canine retinal custom cDNA microarrays. qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were applied to selected genes, to confirm and expand the microarray results. At 7 and 16 weeks, respectively, 56 and 18 transcripts were downregulated in the mutant retinas, but none were differentially expressed (DE) at both ages, suggesting the involvement of temporally distinct pathways. Downregulated genes included the known retina-relevant genes PAX6, CHML, and RDH11 at 7 weeks and CRX and SAG at 16 weeks. Genes directly or indirectly active in apoptotic processes were altered at 7 weeks (CAMK2G, NTRK2, PRKCB, RALA, RBBP6, RNF41, SMYD3, SPP1, and TUBB2C) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and NKAP). Furthermore, the DE genes at 7 weeks (ELOVL6, GLOD4, NDUFS4, and REEP1) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and TARS2) are related to mitochondrial functions. qRT-PCR of 18 genes confirmed the microarray results and showed DE of additional genes not on the array. Only GFAP was DE at 3 weeks of age. Western blot and IHC analyses also confirmed the high reliability of the transcriptomic data. Several DE genes were identified in mutant retinas. At 7 weeks, a combination of nonclassic anti- and proapoptosis genes appear to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration, whereas at both 7 and 16 weeks, the expression of mitochondria-related genes indicates that they may play a relevant role in the disease process.

  9. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press

  10. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J

    2013-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomic...

  11. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic mutations in EIF1AX and SF3B1 in uveal melanoma with disomy 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marcel; Maßhöfer, Lars; Temming, Petra; Rahmann, Sven; Metz, Claudia; Bornfeld, Norbert; van de Nes, Johannes; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Zeschnigk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression profiles and chromosome 3 copy number divide uveal melanomas into two distinct classes correlating with prognosis1–3. Using exome sequencing, we identified recurrent somatic mutations in EIF1AX and SF3B1, specifically occurring in uveal melanomas with disomy 3, which rarely metastasize. Targeted resequencing showed that 24 of 31 tumors with disomy 3 (77%) had mutations in either EIF1AX (15; 48%) or SF3B1 (9; 29%). Mutations were infrequent (2/35; 5.7%) in uveal melanomas with monosomy 3, which are associated with poor prognosis2. Resequencing of 13 uveal melanomas with partial monosomy 3 identified 8 tumors with a mutation in either SF3B1 (7; 54%) or EIF1AX (1; 8%). All EIF1AX mutations caused in-frame changes affecting the N terminus of the protein, whereas 17 of 19 SF3B1 mutations encoded an alteration of Arg625. Resequencing of ten uveal melanomas with disomy 3 that developed metastases identified SF3B1 mutations in three tumors, none of which targeted Arg625. PMID:23793026

  12. Gain-of-function mutation in TRPV4 identified in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Wayne; Sonkusare, Swapnil K; Wang, Tracy; Azeddine, Bouziane; Pupavac, Mihaela; Carrot-Zhang, Jian; Hong, Kwangseok; Majewski, Jacek; Harvey, Edward J; Russell, Laura; Chalk, Colin; Rosenblatt, David S; Nelson, Mark T; Séguin, Chantal

    2016-10-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a debilitating disease that involves impaired blood supply to the femoral head and leads to femoral head collapse. We use whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing to analyse a family with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and fluorescent Ca(2+) imaging to functionally characterise the variant protein. We report a family with four siblings affected with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and the identification of a c.2480_2483delCCCG frameshift deletion followed by a c.2486T>A substitution in one allele of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene. TRPV4 encodes a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel known to play a role in vasoregulation and osteoclast differentiation. While pathogenic TRPV4 mutations affect the skeletal or nervous systems, association with osteonecrosis of the femoral head is novel. Functional measurements of Ca(2+) influx through mutant TRPV4 channels in HEK293 cells and patient-derived dermal fibroblasts identified a TRPV4 gain of function. Analysis of channel open times, determined indirectly from measurement of TRPV4 activity within a cluster of TRPV4 channels, revealed that the TRPV4 gain of function was caused by longer channel openings. These findings identify a novel TRPV4 mutation implicating TRPV4 and altered calcium homeostasis in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis while reinforcing the importance of TRPV4 in bone diseases and vascular endothelium. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Molecular mechanisms of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations identified in tumors: The role of size and hydrophobicity at residue 132 on catalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellaneda Matteo, Diego; Grunseth, Adam J; Gonzalez, Eric R; Anselmo, Stacy L; Kennedy, Madison A; Moman, Precious; Scott, David A; Hoang, An; Sohl, Christal D

    2017-05-12

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) catalyzes the reversible NADP + -dependent conversion of isocitrate (ICT) to α-ketoglutarate (αKG) in the cytosol and peroxisomes. Mutations in IDH1 have been implicated in >80% of lower grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas and primarily affect residue 132, which helps coordinate substrate binding. However, other mutations found in the active site have also been identified in tumors. IDH1 mutations typically result in a loss of catalytic activity, but many also can catalyze a new reaction, the NADPH-dependent reduction of αKG to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG). D2HG is a proposed oncometabolite that can competitively inhibit αKG-dependent enzymes. Some kinetic parameters have been reported for several IDH1 mutations, and there is evidence that mutant IDH1 enzymes vary widely in their ability to produce D2HG. We report that most IDH1 mutations identified in tumors are severely deficient in catalyzing the normal oxidation reaction, but that D2HG production efficiency varies among mutant enzymes up to ∼640-fold. Common IDH1 mutations have moderate catalytic efficiencies for D2HG production, whereas rarer mutations exhibit either very low or very high efficiencies. We then designed a series of experimental IDH1 mutants to understand the features that support D2HG production. We show that this new catalytic activity observed in tumors is supported by mutations at residue 132 that have a smaller van der Waals volume and are more hydrophobic. We report that one mutation can support both the normal and neomorphic reactions. These studies illuminate catalytic features of mutations found in the majority of patients with lower grade gliomas. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Prognostic value of IDH1 mutations identified with PCR-RFLP assay in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed, Gh.M.; Zaher, A.; Elnoshokaty, E.H.; Nassar, H.R.; Moneer, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (1DH1) gene occur frequently in primary brain tumors. Recently theses mutations were demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). So far, assessment of these mutations relied on the DNA sequencing technique. Aim of the work: The aim of this study was to detect somatic mutations in IDH1 gene using mismatched primers suitable for endonuclease based detection, without the need for DNA sequencing, and to estimate its prognostic value, on patients with de novo AML. Methods: Residual DNA extracted from pretreatment bone marrow (BM) samples of 100 patients with de novo AML was used. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP) was adapted to IDHl gene, codon 132 mutations screening. Results: The frequency of IDH1 mutations was 13%. In the non-acute promyelocytic leukemia group (non-APL), IDH1 mutations were significantly associated with FLT3-ITD negative patients (p = 0.03). Patients with 1DH1 mutations did not achieve complete remission (CR). There was a trend for shorter overall survival (OS) in patients with IDH1 mutation compared to those with wild type (p = 0.08). Conclusion: IDH1 mutations are recurring genetic alterations in AML and they may have unfavorable impact on clinical outcome in adult AML. The PCR-RFLP method allows for a fast, inexpensive, and sensitive method for the detection of IDF11 mutations in AML.

  15. Elevated expression of Ki-67 identifies aggressive prostate cancers but does not distinguish BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, A V; Jameson, C; Barbachano, Y

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancers in men with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more aggressive than morphologically similar cancers in men without these mutations. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that enhanced expression of Ki-67, as a surrogate of cell proliferation, is a characteristic...... feature of prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study cohort comprised 20 cases of prostate cancer in mutation carriers and 126 control sporadic prostate cancers. Of the combined sample cohort, 65.7% stained only within malignant tissues while 0.7% stained in both malignant...... a background of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations or as sporadic disease. The data suggest that, since elevated Ki-67 does not distinguish prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers from sporadic prostatic malignancies, the effects of these genetic mutations are probably independent. While all...

  16. A founder AGL mutation causing glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit identified through whole-exome sequencing: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau-Nepton, Isabelle; Okubo, Minoru; Grabs, Rosemarie; Mitchell, John; Polychronakos, Constantin; Rodd, Celia

    2015-02-03

    Glycogen storage disease type III is caused by mutations in both alleles of the AGL gene, which leads to reduced activity of glycogen-debranching enzyme. The clinical picture encompasses hypoglycemia, with glycogen accumulation leading to hepatomegaly and muscle involvement (skeletal and cardiac). We sought to identify the genetic cause of this disease within the Inuit community of Nunavik, in whom previous DNA sequencing had not identified such mutations. Five Inuit children with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type IIIa were recruited to undergo genetic testing: 2 underwent whole-exome sequencing and all 5 underwent Sanger sequencing to confirm the identified mutation. Selected DNA regions near the AGL gene were also sequenced to identify a potential founder effect in the community. In addition, control samples from 4 adults of European descent and 7 family members of the affected children were analyzed for the specific mutation by Sanger sequencing. We identified a homozygous frame-shift deletion, c.4456delT, in exon 33 of the AGL gene in 2 children by whole-exome sequencing. Confirmation by Sanger sequencing showed the same mutation in all 5 patients, and 5 family members were found to be carriers. With the identification of this mutation in 5 probands, the estimated prevalence of genetically confirmed glycogen storage disease type IIIa in this region is among the highest worldwide (1:2500). Despite identical mutations, we saw variations in clinical features of the disease. Our detection of a homozygous frameshift mutation in 5 Inuit children determines the cause of glycogen storage disease type IIIa and confirms a founder effect. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  17. Novel mutations in ADSL for Adenylosuccinate Lyase Deficiency identified by the combination of Trio-WES and constantly updated guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao; Li, Kai; Tang, Beisha; Luo, Yang; Ding, Dongxue; Zhao, Yuwen; Wang, Chunrong; Zhou, Xiaoting; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Puzhi; Xu, Qian; Sun, Qiying; Xia, Kun; Yan, Xinxiang; Jiang, Hong; Lu, Shen; Guo, Jifeng

    2017-05-09

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES), one of the next-generation sequencing (NGS), has become a powerful tool to identify exonic variants. Investigating causality of the sequence variants in human disease becomes an important part in NGS for the research and clinical applications. Recently, important guidelines on them have been published and will keep on updating. In our study, two Chinese families, with the clinical diagnosis of "Epilepsy", which presented with seizures, psychomotor retardation, hypotonia and etc. features, were sequenced by Trio-WES (including the proband and the unaffected parents), and a standard interpretation of the identified variants was performed referring to the recently updated guidelines. Finally, we identified three novel mutations (c.71 C > T, p.P24L; c.1387-1389delGAG, p.E463-; c.134 G > A, p.W45*; NM_000026) in ADSL in the two Chinese families, and confirmed them as the causal variants to the disease-Adenylosuccinate Lyase Deficiency. Previous reported specific therapy was also introduced to the patients after our refined molecular diagnosis, however, the effect was very limited success. In summary, our study demonstrated the power and advantages of WES in exploring the etiology of human disease. Using the constantly updated guidelines to conduct the WES study and to interpret the sequence variants are a necessary strategy to make the molecular diagnosis and to guide the individualized treatment of human disease.

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel splice-site mutation in ADAMTS17 in an Indian family with Weill-Marchesani syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohd Hussain; Bhat, Vishwanath; Shetty, Jyoti S; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a rare connective tissue disorder, characterized by short stature, microspherophakic lens, and stubby hands and feet (brachydactyly). WMS is caused by mutations in the FBN1, ADAMTS10, and LTBP2 genes. Mutations in the LTBP2 and ADAMTS17 genes cause a WMS-like syndrome, in which the affected individuals show major features of WMS but do not display brachydactyly and joint stiffness. The main purpose of our study was to determine the genetic cause of WMS in an Indian family. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was used to identify the genetic cause of WMS in the family. The cosegregation of the mutation was determined with Sanger sequencing. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis was used to assess the effect of a splice-site mutation on splicing of the ADAMTS17 transcript. The WES analysis identified a homozygous novel splice-site mutation c.873+1G>T in a known WMS-like syndrome gene, ADAMTS17, in the family. RT-PCR analysis in the patient showed that exon 5 was skipped, which resulted in the deletion of 28 amino acids in the ADAMTS17 protein. The mutation in the WMS-like syndrome gene ADAMTS17 also causes WMS in an Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the number of mutations of this gene to six.

  19. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  20. Whole exome sequencing identifies a POLRID mutation segregating in a father and two daughters with findings of Klippel-Feil and Treacher Collins syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampietro, Philip F; Armstrong, Linlea; Stoddard, Alex; Blank, Robert D; Livingston, Janet; Raggio, Cathy L; Rasmussen, Kristen; Pickart, Michael; Lorier, Rachel; Turner, Amy; Sund, Sarah; Sobrera, Nara; Neptune, Enid; Sweetser, David; Santiago-Cornier, Alberto; Broeckel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We report on a father and his two daughters diagnosed with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) but with craniofacial differences (zygomatic and mandibular hypoplasia and cleft palate) and external ear abnormalities suggestive of Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). The diagnosis of KFS was favored, given that the neck anomalies were the predominant manifestations, and that the diagnosis predated later recognition of the association between spinal segmentation abnormalities and TCS. Genetic heterogeneity and the rarity of large families with KFS have limited the ability to identify mutations by traditional methods. Whole exome sequencing identified a nonsynonymous mutation in POLR1D (subunit of RNA polymerase I and II): exon2:c.T332C:p.L111P. Mutations in POLR1D are present in about 5% of individuals diagnosed with TCS. We propose that this mutation is causal in this family, suggesting a pathogenetic link between KFS and TCS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Genotyping of Vaginal Candida glabrata Isolates Using Microsatellite Marker Analysis and DNA Sequencing to Identify Mutations Associated with Antifungal Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döğen, Aylin; Durukan, Hüseyin; Güzel, Ahmet Barış; Oksüz, Zehra; Kaplan, Engin; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Serin, Ayşe; Emekdaş, Gürol; Aslan, Gönül; Tezcan, Seda; Kalkancı, Ayşe; Ilkit, Macit

    2013-01-01

    strain was found to be susceptible to all the antifungals tested, while one of (%2.9) 34 vaginal C.glabrata isolates was found to be dose-dependent susceptible to fluconazole, 13 (38.2%) to itraconazole and 3 (8.8%) to voriconazole. No resistant strain were detected in the study population. Only three isolates were found to be resistant to clotrimazole (8.8%), however no relationship was identified between the genotypes and phenotypic resistance (p> 0.05). Thirteen genotypes were detected by microsatellite marker analysis, with high discrimination power (DP= 0.877). As a result, microsatellite marker analysis was validated as a rapid, reliable method for genotyping C.glabrata strains with good, but not optimal discriminatory power. Further studies examining larger numbers of isolates are needed to verify possible relationships between mutations and phenotypic resistance.

  2. Germline APC mutation spectrum derived from 863 genomic variations identified through a 15-year medical genetics service to French patients with FAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Arnaud; Rouleau, Etienne; Ferrari, Anthony; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Qiu, Jinghua; Briaux, Adrien; Bourdon, Violaine; Rémy, Virginie; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Adélaïde, José; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lidereau, Rosette; Sobol, Hagay; Olschwang, Sylviane

    2010-10-01

    Heterozygous APC germline alteration is responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis, a colon cancer predisposition with almost complete penetrance. Point mutations generally lead to truncated proteins or no protein at all. They mainly involve exon 3 to codon 1700 (exon 15). The work presented here delineates precisely the APC mutation spectrum from 15 years of systematic molecular screening which identified 863 independent alterations in the French population.

  3. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, J

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers respectively...... of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 x 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest...

  4. Mutational analysis to identify the residues essential for the inhibition of N-acetyl glutamate kinase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Hongming; Li, Cheng; Han, Shuangyan; Lin, Ying; Zheng, Suiping

    2015-09-01

    N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of L-arginine that is inhibited by its end product L-arginine in Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum). In this study, the potential binding sites of arginine and the residues essential for its inhibition were identified by homology modeling, inhibitor docking, and site-directed mutagenesis. The allosteric inhibition of NAGK was successfully alleviated by a mutation, as determined through analysis of mutant enzymes, which were overexpressed in vivo in C. glutamicum ATCC14067. Analysis of the mutant enzymes and docking analysis demonstrated that residue W23 positions an arginine molecule, and the interaction between arginine and residues L282, L283, and T284 may play an important role in the remote inhibitory process. Based on the results of the docking analysis of the effective mutants, we propose a linkage mechanism for the remote allosteric regulation of NAGK activity, in which residue R209 may play an essential role. In this study, the structure of the arginine-binding site of C. glutamicum NAGK (CgNAGK) was successfully predicted and the roles of the relevant residues were identified, providing new insight into the allosteric regulation of CgNAGK activity and a solid platform for the future construction of an optimized L-arginine producing strain.

  5. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Beesley, J.; Adlard, J.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arun, B.K.; Barjhoux, L.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Berger, A.; Bojesen, A.; Bonanni, B.; Brewer, C.; Caldes, T.; Caligo, M.A.; Campbell, I.; Chan, S.B.; Claes, K.B.; Cohn, D.E.; Cook, J.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Pauw, A. de; Delnatte, C.; Diez, O.; Domchek, S.M.; Dumont, M.; Durda, K.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, C.; Eeles, R.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ellis, S.; Evans, D.G.; Feliubadalo, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Gaddam, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Garcia-Barberan, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Giraud, S.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Hake, C.R.; Hansen, T.V.; Healey, S.; Hodgson, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Houdayer, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Izquierdo, A.; Jacobs, L; Jakubowska, A.; Janavicius, R.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Vijai, J.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kast, K.; Khan, S.; Kwong, A.; Laitman, Y.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lubinski, J.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mazoyer, S.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Montagna, M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.R.; Osorio, A.; Park, S.K.; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peterlongo, P.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  6. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  7. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Smith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  8. A case-control collapsing analysis identifies epilepsy genes implicated in trio sequencing studies focused on de novo mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trio exome sequencing has been successful in identifying genes with de novo mutations (DNMs causing epileptic encephalopathy (EE and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we evaluate how well a case-control collapsing analysis recovers genes causing dominant forms of EE originally implicated by DNM analysis. We performed a genome-wide search for an enrichment of "qualifying variants" in protein-coding genes in 488 unrelated cases compared to 12,151 unrelated controls. These "qualifying variants" were selected to be extremely rare variants predicted to functionally impact the protein to enrich for likely pathogenic variants. Despite modest sample size, three known EE genes (KCNT1, SCN2A, and STXBP1 achieved genome-wide significance (p<2.68×10-6. In addition, six of the 10 most significantly associated genes are known EE genes, and the majority of the known EE genes (17 out of 25 originally implicated in trio sequencing are nominally significant (p<0.05, a proportion significantly higher than the expected (Fisher's exact p = 2.33×10-17. Our results indicate that a case-control collapsing analysis can identify several of the EE genes originally implicated in trio sequencing studies, and clearly show that additional genes would be implicated with larger sample sizes. The case-control analysis not only makes discovery easier and more economical in early onset disorders, particularly when large cohorts are available, but also supports the use of this approach to identify genes in diseases that present later in life when parents are not readily available.

  9. Genomic profiling identifies novel mutations and SNPs in ABCD1 gene: a molecular, biochemical and clinical analysis of X-ALD cases in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encode the peroxisomal membrane protein. We conducted a genomic and protein expression study of susceptibility gene with its clinical and biochemical analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first preliminary comprehensive study in Indian population that identified novel mutations and SNPs in a relatively large group. We screened 17 Indian indigenous X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cases and 70 controls for mutations and SNPs in the exonic regions (including flanking regions of ABCD1 gene by direct sequencing with ABI automated sequencer along with Western blot analysis of its endogenous protein, ALDP, levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Single germ line mutation was identified in each index case in ABCD1 gene. We detected 4 novel mutations (2 missense and 2 deletion/insertion and 3 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms. We observed a variable protein expression in different patients. These findings were further extended to biochemical and clinical observations as it occurs with great clinical expression variability. This is the first major study in this population that presents a different molecular genetic spectrum as compared to Caucasian population due to geographical distributions of ethnicity of patients. It enhances our knowledge of the causative mutations of X-ALD that grants holistic base to develop effective medicine against X-ALD.

  10. Genomic profiling identifies novel mutations and SNPs in ABCD1 gene: a molecular, biochemical and clinical analysis of X-ALD cases in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Taneja, Krishna Kant; Kalra, Veena; Behari, Madhuri; Aneja, Satinder; Bansal, Surendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encode the peroxisomal membrane protein. We conducted a genomic and protein expression study of susceptibility gene with its clinical and biochemical analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first preliminary comprehensive study in Indian population that identified novel mutations and SNPs in a relatively large group. We screened 17 Indian indigenous X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cases and 70 controls for mutations and SNPs in the exonic regions (including flanking regions) of ABCD1 gene by direct sequencing with ABI automated sequencer along with Western blot analysis of its endogenous protein, ALDP, levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Single germ line mutation was identified in each index case in ABCD1 gene. We detected 4 novel mutations (2 missense and 2 deletion/insertion) and 3 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms. We observed a variable protein expression in different patients. These findings were further extended to biochemical and clinical observations as it occurs with great clinical expression variability. This is the first major study in this population that presents a different molecular genetic spectrum as compared to Caucasian population due to geographical distributions of ethnicity of patients. It enhances our knowledge of the causative mutations of X-ALD that grants holistic base to develop effective medicine against X-ALD.

  11. Exome Sequencing and cis-Regulatory Mapping Identify Mutations in MAK, a Gene Encoding a Regulator of Ciliary Length, as a Cause of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgül, Rıza Köksal; Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Yücel, Didem; Myers, Connie A.; Collin, Rob W.J.; Zonneveld, Marijke N.; Beryozkin, Avigail; Banin, Eyal; Hoyng, Carel B.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Bose, Ron; Shen, Wei; Sharon, Dror; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in analyzing exome-sequence data is distinguishing pathogenic mutations from background polymorphisms. To address this problem in the context of a genetically heterogeneous disease, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), we devised a candidate-gene prioritization strategy called cis-regulatory mapping that utilizes ChIP-seq data for the photoreceptor transcription factor CRX to rank candidate genes. Exome sequencing combined with this approach identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in male germ cell-associated kinase (MAK) in the single affected member of a consanguineous Turkish family with RP. MAK encodes a cilium-associated mitogen-activated protein kinase whose function is conserved from the ciliated alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to humans. Mutations in MAK orthologs in mice and other model organisms result in abnormally long cilia and, in mice, rapid photoreceptor degeneration. Subsequent sequence analyses of additional individuals with RP identified five probands with missense mutations in MAK. Two of these mutations alter amino acids that are conserved in all known kinases, and an in vitro kinase assay indicates that these mutations result in a loss of kinase activity. Thus, kinase activity appears to be critical for MAK function in humans. This study highlights a previously underappreciated role for CRX as a direct transcriptional regulator of ciliary genes in photoreceptors. In addition, it demonstrates the effectiveness of CRX-based cis-regulatory mapping in prioritizing candidate genes from exome data and suggests that this strategy should be generally applicable to a range of retinal diseases. PMID:21835304

  12. An ENU mutagenesis screen in zebrafish for visual system mutants identifies a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in Colobomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwoon; Cox, Ben D; Daly, Christina M S; Lee, Chanjae; Nuckels, Richard J; Tittle, Rachel K; Uribe, Rosa A; Gross, Jeffrey M

    2012-12-13

    To identify recessive mutations affecting development and/or maintenance of the zebrafish visual system. A three-generation ENU (N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea)-based forward genetic screen was performed. F3 embryos were screened visually from 1 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf) for ocular abnormalities, and 5 dpf embryos were fixed and processed for cryosectioning, after which eye sections were screened for defects in cellular organization within the retina, lens, and cornea. A combination of PCR and DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and pharmacological treatments were used to clone and characterize a coloboma mutant. A total of 126 F2 families were screened, and, from these, 18 recessive mutations were identified that affected eye development. Phenotypes included lens malformations and cataracts, photoreceptor defects, oculocutaneous albinism, microphthalmia, and colobomas. Analysis of one such coloboma mutant, uta(1), identified a splice-acceptor mutation in the patched2 gene that resulted in an in-frame deletion of 19 amino acids that are predicted to contribute to the first extracellular loop of Patched2. ptch2(uta1) mutants possessed elevated Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activity, and blocking the Hh pathway with cyclopamine prevented colobomas in ptch2(uta1) mutant embryos. We have identified 18 recessive mutations affecting development of the zebrafish visual system and we have characterized a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in enhanced Hh pathway activity and colobomas.

  13. A novel deletion mutation and structural abnormality in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene identified in a Chinese patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shifu; Lu, Yanqin; Li, Hu; Wang, Zhaoxia; Mo, Xinkai; Chai, Zhengbin; Han, Jinxiang

    2014-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a heritable primary immune deficiency disorder caused by mutation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. The main clinical characteristics of XLA are recurrent respiratory tract infections and profoundly low serum immunoglobulin levels and B cells. The clinical characteristics of a five-year-old Chinese boy with XLA were described. Mutations of BTK genes were identified by traditional DNA sequencing based on PCR. A three-dimensional model of the truncated BTK protein was constructed. Molecular analysis showed a point deletion of an adenine nucleotide at position 1427 (p.Tyr476Ser), which would cause a frameshift and premature termination at codon 484. Three-dimensional analysis showed that the truncated protein had lost the functional region for both ATP and substrate binding such that tyrosine kinase activity would be affected. The study identified a novel BTK mutation of one Chinese XLA patient. The truncated BTK model identified the loss of a functional domain.

  14. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 are identified in individuals with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Plummer, Lacey; Chung, Wilson; Feng, Bihua; Beenken, Andrew; Clarke, Jeff; Pers, Tune H; Dworzynski, Piotr; Keefe, Kimberley; Niedziela, Marek; Raivio, Taneli; Crowley, William F; Seminara, Stephanie B; Quinton, Richard; Hughes, Virginia A; Kumanov, Philip; Young, Jacques; Yialamas, Maria A; Hall, Janet E; Van Vliet, Guy; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Rubenstein, John; Mohammadi, Moosa; Tsai, Pei-San; Sidis, Yisrael; Lage, Kasper; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2013-05-02

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ~12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 signaling and can be mutated in CHH. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in genes encoding a broader range of modulators of the FGFR1 pathway might contribute to the genetics of CHH as causal or modifier mutations. Thus, we aimed to (1) investigate whether CHH individuals harbor mutations in members of the so-called "FGF8 synexpression" group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS predicted FGF17 and IL17RD as the two top candidates in the entire proteome on the basis of a statistical test of their protein-protein interaction patterns to proteins known to be altered in CHH. Most of the FGF17 and IL17RD mutations altered protein function in vitro. IL17RD mutations were found only in KS individuals and were strongly linked to hearing loss (6/8 individuals). Mutations in genes encoding components of the FGF pathway are associated with complex modes of CHH inheritance and act primarily as contributors to an oligogenic genetic architecture underlying CHH. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present. PMID:20869441

  16. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Heterozygous Mutation in HMBS Gene in a Chinese Patient With Acute Intermittent Porphyria With Rare Type of Mild Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjiang Zheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is a rare hereditary metabolic disease with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Germline mutations of HMBS gene causes AIP. Mutation of HMBS gene results into the partial deficiency of the heme biosynthetic enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase. AIP is clinically manifested with abdominal pain, vomiting, and neurological complaints. Additionally, an extreme phenotypic heterogeneity has been reported in AIP patients with mutations in HMBS gene. Here, we investigated a Chinese patient with AIP. The proband is a 28-year-old Chinese male manifested with severe stomach ache, constipation, nausea and depression. Proband’s father and mother is normal. Proband’s blood sample was collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified a heterozygous novel single nucleotide deletion (c.809delC in exon 12 of HMBS gene in the proband. This mutation leads to frameshift followed by formation of a truncated (p.Ala270Valfs∗2 HMBS protein with 272 amino acids comparing with the wild type HMBS protein of 361 amino acids. This mutation has not been found in proband’s unaffected parents as well as in 100 healthy normal control. According to the variant interpretation guidelines of American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG, this variant is classified as “likely pathogenic” variant. Our findings expand the mutational spectra of HMBS gene related AIP which are significant for screening and genetic diagnosis for AIP.

  17. Novel DDR2 mutation identified by whole exome sequencing in a Moroccan patient with spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Maria; Kayserili, Hülya; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Nishimura, Gen; Iida, Aritoshi; Lyahyai, Jaber; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED, SL-AC), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder with various skeletal changes characterized by premature calcification leading to severe disproportionate short stature. Twenty-two patients have been reported until now, but only five mutations (four missense and one splice-site) in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene has been identified. We report here a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.370C > T (p.Arg124Trp) in a Moroccan girl with SMED, SL-AC, identified by whole exome sequencing. Our study has expanded the mutational spectrum of this rare disease and it has shown that exome sequencing is a powerful and cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of clinically heterogeneous disorders such as SMED. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Screening for ATM Mutations in an African-American Population to Identify a Predictor of Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis being tested in this project is that a greater proportion of African-Americans with breast cancer harbor germline mutation in the ATM gene compared to African-American women without breast cancer...

  19. A Novel PRKAR1A Mutation Identified in a Patient with Isolated Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sira Korpaisarn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD is a rare cause of Cushing syndrome, especially the isolated form without Carney complex, associated with germline mutations in PRKAR1A, the protein kinase A regulatory subunit type 1 alpha gene. We report a 31-year-old female who presented with secondary amenorrhea, cushingoid appearance, and hypertension without Carney complex. Biochemical laboratory examinations confirmed the ACTH-independent adrenal Cushing syndrome with negative Liddle test. A small right adrenal adenoma of 0.8 cm was shown on computed tomography while magnetic resonance imaging revealed nodularity of both adrenal glands. The histological report confirmed PPNAD using laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and subsequent left adrenalectomy was performed 6 months later. She had inherited heterozygosity of a novel germline mutation of the PRKAR1A gene (g.114213T>G or c.709-5T>G. This splice site mutation results in exon 8 skipping. Her father carrying the same mutation had no clinical features of either PPNAD or Carney complex. This novel PRKAR1A gene mutation, c.709-5T>G, is reported here for the first time manifesting as an incomplete clinical expression of the isolated form of PPNAD and being inherited with low penetrance unlike other inherited mutations of the Carney complex which have a penetrance of almost 100%.

  20. TBX1 mutation identified by exome sequencing in a Japanese family with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome-like craniofacial features and hypocalcemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Ogata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although TBX1 mutations have been identified in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS-like phenotypes including characteristic craniofacial features, cardiovascular anomalies, hypoparathyroidism, and thymic hypoplasia, the frequency of TBX1 mutations remains rare in deletion-negative patients. Thus, it would be reasonable to perform a comprehensive genetic analysis in deletion-negative patients with 22q11.2DS-like phenotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied three subjects with craniofacial features and hypocalcemia (group 1, two subjects with craniofacial features alone (group 2, and three subjects with normal phenotype within a single Japanese family. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis excluded chromosome 22q11.2 deletion, and genomewide array comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed no copy number change specific to group 1 or groups 1+2. However, exome sequencing identified a heterozygous TBX1 frameshift mutation (c.1253delA, p.Y418fsX459 specific to groups 1+2, as well as six missense variants and two in-frame microdeletions specific to groups 1+2 and two missense variants specific to group 1. The TBX1 mutation resided at exon 9C and was predicted to produce a non-functional truncated protein missing the nuclear localization signal and most of the transactivation domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clinical features in groups 1+2 are well explained by the TBX1 mutation, while the clinical effects of the remaining variants are largely unknown. Thus, the results exemplify the usefulness of exome sequencing in the identification of disease-causing mutations in familial disorders. Furthermore, the results, in conjunction with the previous data, imply that TBX1 isoform C is the biologically essential variant and that TBX1 mutations are associated with a wide phenotypic spectrum, including most of 22q11.2DS phenotypes.

  1. Complete direct sequencing of the entire AR gene in 45 unrelated patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome: Mutations identified in 32 patients (18 novel mutations), no mutation detected in 13 other patients (29%)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mebarki, F.; Forest, M.G.; Josso, N. [Hospital Debrousse, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The androgen insensivity syndrome (AIS) is a recessive X-linked disorder resulting from a deficient function of the androgen receptor (AR). The human AR gene has 3 functional domains: N-terminal encoded by exon 1, DNA-binding domain encoded by exons 2 and 3, and androgen-binding domain encoded by exons 4 to 8. In order to characterize the molecular defects of the AR gene in AIS, the entire coding regions and the intronic bording sequences of the AR gene were amplified by PCR before automatic direct sequencing in 45 patients. Twenty seven different point mutations were found in 32 unrelated AIS patients: 18 with a complete form (CAIS), 14 with a partial form (PAIS); 18 of these mutations are novel mutations, not published to date. Only 3 mutations were repeatedly found: R804H in 3 families; M780I in 3 families and R774C in 2 families. For 26 patients out of the 32 found to have a mutation, maternal DNA was collected and sequenced: 6 de novo mutations were detected (i.e. 23% of the cases). Finally, no mutation was detected in 13 patients (29%): 7 with CAIS and 6 familial severe PAIS. The latter all presented with perineal hypospadias, micropenis, 4 out of 6 being raised as girl. Diagnosis of AIS in these 13 families in whom no mutation was detected is supported by the following criteria: clinical data, familial history (2 or 3 index cases in the same family), familial segregation of the polymorphic CAG repeat of the AR gene. Mutations in intronic regions or the promoter of the AR gene could not explain all cases of AIS without mutations in the AR coding regions, because AR binding (performed in 9 out of 13) was normal in 6, suggesting the synthesis of an AR protein. This situation led us to speculate that another X-linked factor associated with the AR could be implicated in some cases of AIS.

  2. A pseudo-full mutation identified in fragile X assay reveals a novel base change abolishing an EcoRI restriction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Bass, Harold N; Gao, Hanlin; Astbury, Caroline; Jamehdor, Mehdi R; Qu, Yong

    2008-09-01

    Diagnostic testing for the fragile X syndrome is designed to detect the most common mutation, a CGG expansion in the 5'-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation (FMRI) gene. PCR can determine the number of CGG repeats less than 100, whereas Southern analysis can detect large premutations, full mutations, and their methylation status. Bands larger than 5.8 kb observed via Southern analysis are usually considered a methylated full mutation, causing fragile X syndrome in males and varied clinical presentations in females. We observed a 10.9-kb band on a Southern blot assay from an autistic girl with language delay. Further investigation identified a novel G-to-A transition at an EcoRI cleavage site, upstream of the CGG repeat region of the FMRI gene. This base change abolished the EcoRI restriction site, resulting in a 10.9-kb pseudo-full mutation. This G-to-A base change has not been previously reported and was not identified in a subsequent analysis of 105 male and 30 female patient samples. The clear 10.9-kb band detected on a Southern blot assay for fragile X syndrome mimics a large, methylated full mutation, which could result in a misdiagnosis without the benefit of family studies and further testing.

  3. Zebrafish mutations in gart and paics identify crucial roles for de novo purine synthesis in vertebrate pigmentation and ocular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Anthony; Uribe, Rosa A; Yieh, Leah; Nuckels, Richard; Gross, Jeffrey M

    2009-08-01

    Although purines and purinergic signaling are crucial for numerous biochemical and cellular processes, their functions during vertebrate embryonic development have not been well characterized. We analyze two recessive zebrafish mutations that affect de novo purine synthesis, gart and paics. gart encodes phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase, phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, a trifunctional enzyme that catalyzes steps 2, 3 and 5 of inosine monophosphate (IMP) synthesis. paics encodes phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase, a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes steps 6 and 7 of this process. Zygotic gart and paics mutants have pigmentation defects in which xanthophore and iridophore pigmentation is almost completely absent, and melanin-derived pigmentation is significantly decreased, even though pigment cells are present in normal amounts and distributions. Zygotic gart and paics mutants are also microphthalmic, resulting from defects in cell cycle exit of proliferative retinoblasts within the developing eye. Maternal-zygotic and maternal-effect mutants demonstrate a crucial requirement for maternally derived gart and paics; these mutants show more severe developmental defects than their zygotic counterparts. Pigmentation and eye growth phenotypes in zygotic gart and paics mutants can be ascribed to separable biosynthetic pathways: pigmentation defects and microphthalmia result from deficiencies in a GTP synthesis pathway and an ATP synthesis pathway, respectively. In the absence of ATP pathway activity, S phase of proliferative retinoblasts is prolonged and cell cycle exit is compromised, which results in microphthalmia. These results demonstrate crucial maternal and zygotic requirements for de novo purine synthesis during vertebrate embryonic development, and identify independent functions for ATP and GTP pathways in mediating eye growth and pigmentation

  4. Virulence-Associated Genome Mutations of Murine Rotavirus Identified by Alternating Serial Passages in Mice and Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although significant clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed in many countries, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a cell culture-adapted murine rotavirus EB strain in mouse pups or in cell cultures alternately and repeatedly and fully sequenced all 11 genes of 21 virus samples passaged in mice or in cell cultures. Sequence analysis revealed that mouse-passaged viruses that regained virulence almost consistently acquired four kinds of amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP4 and substitution in aa 37 (Val to Ala) in NSP4. In addition, they gained and invariably conserved the 3′ consensus sequence in NSP1. The molecular changes occurred along with the acquisition of virulence during passages in mice and then disappeared following passages in cell cultures. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed the aa 37 site as important for its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. IMPORTANCE Serial passage of a virulent wild-type virus in vitro often results in loss of virulence of the virus in an original animal host, while serial passage of a cell culture-adapted avirulent virus in vivo often gains virulence in an animal host. Actually, live attenuated virus vaccines were originally produced by serial passage in cell cultures. Although clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a murine rotavirus by alternating switch of host (mice or cell cultures) repeatedly and sequenced the eleven genes of the passaged viruses to identify mutations associated with the emergence or disappearance of virulence. Sequence analysis revealed that changes in three genes (VP4, NSP1, and NSP4) were associated with virulence in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed its

  5. Association between GWAS-identified lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci and EGFR mutations in never-smoking Asian women, and comparison with findings from Western populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seow, Wei Jie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shiraishi, Kouya; Song, Minsun; Kim, Hee Nam; Wong, Maria Pik; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Wang, Zhaoming; Chang, I-Shou; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Hu; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Zheng, Wei; Kim, Jin Hee; Zhou, Baosen; Caporaso, Neil E; Albanes, Demetrius; Shin, Min-Ho; Chung, Lap Ping; An, She-Juan; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Hong; Yatabe, Yasushi; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Kim, Young Tae; Shu, Xiao Ou; Kim, Young-Chul; Bassig, Bryan A.; Chang, Jiang; Ho, James Chung Man; Ji, Bu Tian; Kubo, Michiaki; Daigo, Yataro; Ito, Hidemi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Honda, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Shingo; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Yin, Zhihua; Shi, Jianxin; Takahashi, Atsushi; Goto, Akiteru; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Tanaka, Kazumi; Wu, Tangchun; Wei, Fusheng; Wong, Jason Y Y; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Su, Jian; Kim, Yeul Hong; Oh, In-Jae; Song, Fengju; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Seow, Adeline; Park, Jae Yong; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Haixin; Gao, Yu Tang; Wu, Chen; Qian, Biyun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chung, Charles C.; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Hutchinson, Amy; Berndt, Sonja I.; He, Xingzhou; Wu, Wei; Wang, Junwen; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Yu, Chong-Jen; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Liu, Jie; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Hicks, Belynda; Wyatt, Kathleen; Li, Shengchao A; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Cui, Ping; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Wu, Guoping; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Yu, Jinming; Stevens, Victoria L; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Marconett, Crystal N; Lin, Dongxin; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Yi-Long; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kohno, Takashi; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lan, Qing

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate associations by EGFR mutation status for lung adenocarcinoma risk among never-smoking Asian women, we conducted a meta-analysis of 11 loci previously identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Genotyping in an additional 10,780 never-smoking cases and 10,938 never-smoking

  6. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in ABCD1 and DACH2 in two brothers with a distinct phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Liu, Yanhui; Li, Ya; Duan, Yong; Zhang, Keyun; Wang, Junwang; Dai, Yong

    2014-09-19

    We report on two brothers with a distinct syndromic phenotype and explore the potential pathogenic cause. Cytogenetic tests and exome sequencing were performed on the two brothers and their parents. Variants detected by exome sequencing were validated by Sanger sequencing. The main phenotype of the two brothers included congenital language disorder, growth retardation, intellectual disability, difficulty in standing and walking, and urinary and fecal incontinence. To the best of our knowledge, no similar phenotype has been reported previously. No abnormalities were detected by G-banding chromosome analysis or array comparative genomic hybridization. However, exome sequencing revealed novel mutations in the ATP-binding cassette, sub-family D member 1 (ABCD1) and Dachshund homolog 2 (DACH2) genes in both brothers. The ABCD1 mutation was a missense mutation c.1126G > C in exon 3 leading to a p.E376Q substitution. The DACH2 mutation was also a missense mutation c.1069A > T in exon 6, leading to a p.S357C substitution. The mother was an asymptomatic heterozygous carrier. Plasma levels of very-long-chain fatty acids were increased in both brothers, suggesting a diagnosis of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD); however, their phenotype was not compatible with any reported forms of ALD. DACH2 plays an important role in the regulation of brain and limb development, suggesting that this mutation may be involved in the phenotype of the two brothers. The distinct phenotype demonstrated by these two brothers might represent a new form of ALD or a new syndrome. The combination of mutations in ABCD1 and DACH2 provides a plausible mechanism for this phenotype.

  7. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  8. Exome sequencing identifies a novel missense mutation of WFS1 as the cause of non-syndromic low-frequency hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijie; Feng, Yong; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Jiada; Sun, Jie; Chen, Hongsheng; He, Chufeng; Wang, Xueping; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Yalan; Cai, Xinzhang; Wang, Lili; Cai, Yuxiang; Liu, Xuezhong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-09-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) DFNA6/14/38 is an uncommon type of hearing loss that classically affects low frequencies of 2000 Hz and below, demonstrating an ascending configuration. The current study aimed to investigate the cause of LFSNHL in a five-generation Chinese family. The phenotype of the Chinese family was characterized using audiologic testing and pedigree analysis. The combined approach of array screening and whole-exome sequencing was used to identify the disease-causing gene in this family. This pedigree, in which the affected subjects presented isolated low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment with childhood onset, was associated with autosomal dominant inheritance of the c.2591A > G mutation in exon 8 of the Wolframin syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene which was not present in 286 unrelated controls with matched ancestry and is highly conserved across species. In addition, several mutations affecting the Glu864 residue have been previously identified in different populations, suggesting that this site is likely to be a mutational hot spot. We identified a novel substitution, Glu864Gly, of WFS1 as the causative variant for this pedigree. Our data extend the mutation spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Chinese individuals and may contribute to establishing a better genotype-phenotype correlation for LFSNHL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. De novo SCN8A mutation identified by whole-exome sequencing in a boy with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, multiple congenital anomalies, and movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaher, Ulvi; Nõukas, Margit; Nikopensius, Tiit; Kals, Mart; Annilo, Tarmo; Nelis, Mari; Ounap, Katrin; Reimand, Tiia; Talvik, Inga; Ilves, Pilvi; Piirsoo, Andres; Seppet, Enn; Metspalu, Andres; Talvik, Tiina

    2014-12-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, majority of which are of unknown etiology. We used whole-exome sequencing of a parent-offspring trio to identify the cause of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy in a boy with neonatal seizures, movement disorders, and multiple congenital anomalies who died at the age of 17 months because of respiratory illness and identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation (c.3979A>G; p.Ile1327Val) in SCN8A (voltage-gated sodium-channel type VIII alpha subunit) gene. The variant was confirmed in the proband with Sanger sequencing. Because the clinical phenotype associated with SCN8A mutations has previously been identified only in a few patients with or without epileptic seizures, these data together with our results suggest that mutations in SCN8A can lead to early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with a broad phenotypic spectrum. Additional investigations will be worthwhile to determine the prevalence and contribution of SCN8A mutations to epileptic encephalopathies. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Arte

    Full Text Available Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%, with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34. Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes.

  11. Candidate Gene Analysis of Tooth Agenesis Identifies Novel Mutations in Six Genes and Suggests Significant Role for WNT and EDA Signaling and Allele Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  12. ATRX mutation in two adult brothers with non-specific moderate intellectual disability identified by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncini, S; Bedeschi, M F; Castronovo, P; Crippa, M; Calvello, M; Garghentino, R R; Scuvera, G; Finelli, P; Venturin, M

    2013-12-01

    In this report, we describe two adult brothers affected by moderate non-specific intellectual disability (ID). They showed minor facial anomalies, not clearly ascribable to any specific syndromic patterns, microcephaly, brachydactyly and broad toes. Both brothers presented seizures. Karyotype, subtelomeric and FMR1 analysis were normal in both cases. We performed array-CGH analysis that revealed no copy-number variations potentially associated with ID. Subsequent exome sequence analysis allowed the identification of the ATRX c.109C>T (p.R37X) mutation in both the affected brothers. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation in the brothers and showed that the mother is a healthy carrier. Mutations in the ATRX gene cause the X-linked alpha thalassemia/mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome (MIM #301040), a severe clinical condition usually associated with profound ID, facial dysmorphism and alpha thalassemia. However, the syndrome is clinically heterogeneous and some mutations, including the c.109C>T, are associated with a broad phenotypic spectrum, with patients displaying a less severe phenotype with only mild-moderate ID. In the case presented here, exome sequencing provided an effective strategy to achieve the molecular diagnosis of ATR-X syndrome, which otherwise would have been difficult to consider due to the mild non-specific phenotype and the absence of a family history with typical severe cases.

  13. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  14. Whole exome sequencing identifies a germline MET mutation in two siblings with hereditary wild-type RET medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponziello, Marialuisa; Benvenuti, Silvia; Gentile, Alessandra; Pecce, Valeria; Rosignolo, Francesca; Virzì, Anna Rita; Milan, Melissa; Comoglio, Paolo M; Londin, Eric; Fortina, Paolo; Barnabei, Agnese; Appetecchia, Marialuisa; Marandino, Ferdinando; Russo, Diego; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo; Verrienti, Antonella

    2018-03-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) was used to investigate two Italian siblings with wild-type RET genotype, who developed medullary thyroid cancers (MTCs) and, later, primary prostate and breast cancers, respectively. The proband's MTC harbored a p.Met918Thr RET mutation; his sister's MTC was RET/RAS wild-type. Both siblings had a germline mutation (p.Arg417Gln) in the extracellular Sema domain of the proto-oncogene MET. Experiments involving ectopic expression of MET p.Arg417Gln in MET-negative T47D breast cancer cells documented the mutant receptor's functionality and its ability to enhance cell migration and invasion. Our findings highlight a possible link between MET germline mutations and MTCs and suggest that MET p. Arg417Gln may promote an invasive malignant phenotype. The possibility that MTC can be driven/co-driven by a MET mutation has potential management implications, since the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor cabozantinib-approved for treating advanced MTCs-is a specific MET inhibitor. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Novel Leptin Receptor Mutations Identified in Two Girls with Severe Obesity Are Associated with Increased Bone Mineral Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Hannema (Sabine); Wit, J.M. (Jan M.); E.C.A.M. Houdijk (Mieke); A. van Haeringen (Arie); E.C. Bik (Elsa); A. Verkerk; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.G. Kant (Sarina); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); E. Bakker (Egbert); H.A. Delemarre-van de Waal (Henriette); M. Losekoot (Monique)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recessive mutations in the leptin receptor (LEPR) are a rare cause of hyperphagia and severe early-onset obesity. To date, the phenotype has only been described in 25 obese children, some of whom also had altered immune function, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, reduced growth

  16. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  17. TumorTracer: a method to identify the tissue of origin from the somatic mutations of a tumor specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquard, Andrea Marion; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Thomas, Cecilia Engel

    2015-01-01

    ) frequencies of the 96 classes of single-nucleotide substitution determined by the flanking bases, and 3) copy number profiles, if available. We used publicly available somatic mutation data from the COSMIC database to train random forest classifiers to distinguish among those tissues of origin for which...... to aid clinical diagnosis of cancers of unknown primary origin....

  18. T1 measurements identify extracellular volume expansion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy sarcomere mutation carriers with and without left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Abbasi, Siddique A; Neilan, Tomas G; Shah, Ravi V; Chen, Yucheng; Heydari, Bobak; Cirino, Allison L; Lakdawala, Neal K; Orav, E John; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Díez, Javier; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2013-05-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and a potential substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. Sarcomere mutations seem to induce profibrotic changes before left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) develops. To further evaluate these processes, we used cardiac magnetic resonance with T1 measurements on a genotyped HCM population to quantify myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Sarcomere mutation carriers with LVH (G+/LVH+, n=37) and without LVH (G+/LVH-, n=29), patients with HCM without mutations (sarcomere-negative HCM, n=11), and healthy controls (n=11) underwent contrast cardiac magnetic resonance, measuring T1 times pre- and postgadolinium infusion. Concurrent echocardiography and serum biomarkers of collagen synthesis, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury were also available in a subset. Compared with controls, ECV was increased in patients with overt HCM, as well as G+/LVH- mutation carriers (ECV=0.36±0.01, 0.33±0.01, 0.27±0.01 in G+/LVH+, G+/LVH-, controls, respectively; P≤0.001 for all comparisons). ECV correlated with N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide levels (r=0.58; P60% of overt patients with HCM but absent from G+/LVH- subjects. Both ECV and late gadolinium enhancement were more extensive in sarcomeric HCM than sarcomere-negative HCM. Myocardial ECV is increased in HCM sarcomere mutation carriers even in the absence of LVH. These data provide additional support that fibrotic remodeling is triggered early in disease pathogenesis. Quantifying ECV may help characterize the development of myocardial fibrosis in HCM and ultimately assist in developing novel disease-modifying therapy, targeting interstitial fibrosis.

  19. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel single base pair insertion mutation in the EYS gene in a six generation family with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Jamil Amjad; Albarry, Maan Abdullah; Almatrafi, Ahmed M; Albalawi, Alia M; Mahmood, Amer; Basit, Sulman

    2018-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited progressive retinal dystrophies (RD) and is characterized by photoreceptor degeneration. RP is clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. More than 70 genes are known and, thus, identification of causative genes and mutations in known genes is challenging. This study was designed to identify the underlying genetic defect in a large extended Saudi family with multiple RP affected members. Fundus photography, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and visual field perimetry were performed for affected individuals. Whole exome sequencing was used to detect the underlying genetic defect in a large family with 12 affected individuals showing autosomal recessive isolated RP. WES data analysis identified a novel insertion mutation in the EYS (eyes shut homolog) gene (c.910_911insT; p.Trp304LeufsTer8). Sanger sequencing validates the variant discovered through exome in all 12 affected individuals and showed that this mutation is segregating with RP phenotype in an autosomal recessive manner in 51 individuals of the family tested here. Our study expands the mutation spectrum of EYS gene in RP patients and extends the body of evidence that supports the importance of EYS gene in eye development. © 2017 Japanese Teratology Society.

  20. Newly identified mutations at the CSN1S1 gene in Ethiopian goats affect casein content and coagulation properties of their milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestawet, T A; Girma, A; Adnøy, T; Devold, T G; Vegarud, G E

    2013-08-01

    Very high casein content and good coagulation properties previously observed in some Ethiopian goat breeds led to investigating the αs1-casein (CSN1S1) gene in these breeds. Selected regions of the CSN1S1 gene were sequenced in 115 goats from 5 breeds (2 indigenous: Arsi-Bale and Somali, 1 exotic: Boer, and 2 crossbreeds: Boer × Arsi-Bale and Boer × Somali). The DNA analysis resulted in 35 new mutations: 3 in exons, 3 in the 5' untranslated region (UTR), and 29 in the introns. The mutations in exons that resulted in an amino acid shift were then picked to evaluate their influence on individual casein content (αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-CN), micellar size, and coagulation properties in the milk from the 5 goat breeds. A mutation at nucleotide 10657 (exon 10) involved a transversion: CAG→CCG, resulting in an amino acid exchange Gln77→Pro77. This mutation was associated with the indigenous breeds only. Two new mutations, at nucleotide 6072 (exon 4) and 12165 (exon 12), revealed synonymous transitions: GTC→GTT in Val15 and AGA→AGG in Arg100 of the mature protein. Transitions G→A and C→T at nucleotides 1374 and 1866, respectively, occurred in the 5' UTR, whereas the third mutation involved a transversion T→G at nucleotide location 1592. The goats were grouped into homozygote new (CC), homozygote reference (AA), and heterozygote (CA) based on the nucleotide that involved the transversion. The content of αs1-CN (15.32g/kg) in milk samples of goats homozygous (CC) for this newly identified mutation, Gln77→Pro77 was significantly higher than in milks of heterozygous (CA; 9.05g/kg) and reference (AA; 7.61g/kg) genotype animals. The αs2-, β-, and κ-CN contents showed a similar pattern. Milk from goats with a homozygous new mutation had significantly lower micellar size. Milk from both homozygote and heterozygote new-mutation goats had significantly shorter coagulation rate and stronger gel than the reference genotype. Except the transversion, the

  1. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy.

  2. A novel DICER1 mutation identified in a female with ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and multinodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Juul, Anders

    2014-01-01

    ) of Danish ethnicity presented with both an ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and a multinodular goiter at the age of 13 years. In addition, family history included a male sibling (case 2 patient) who also had a multinodular goiter and had undergone a hemithyroidectomy at the age of 14 years. Subsequent......INTRODUCTION: Germ-line mutations in the micro-ribonucleic acid processing gene DICER1 have been shown to predispose to a subset of benign tumors susceptible to malignant transformation, including ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor, nontoxic multinodular goiter, multilocular cystic nephroma...... and pleuropulmonary blastoma, which can occur in children and young adults. This may be due to reduced Dcr-1 homolog expression in carriers of germline mutations, which causes impairment of micro-ribonucleic acid processing and deregulates the growth and differentiation of target cells, leading to an increased risk...

  3. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dussaillant Catalina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel. Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  4. Genetic screening of the FLCN gene identify six novel variants and a Danish founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria; Albrechtsen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) tumor suppressor gene predispose to Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disease characterized by the development of cutaneous hamartomas (fibrofolliculomas), multiple lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothoraces and renal cell cancer. In this study...... understanding of BHD syndrome and management of BHD patients.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 13 October 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.118....

  5. Accurate mitochondrial DNA sequencing using off-target reads provides a single test to identify pathogenic point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Helen R; Pyle, Angela; Blakely, Emma L; Alston, Charlotte L; Duff, Jennifer; Hudson, Gavin; Horvath, Rita; Wilson, Ian J; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a common cause of inherited metabolic disease and can be due to mutations affecting mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA. The current diagnostic approach involves the targeted resequencing of mitochondrial DNA and candidate nuclear genes, usually proceeds step by step, and is time consuming and costly. Recent evidence suggests that variations in mitochondrial DNA sequence can be obtained from whole-exome sequence data, raising the possibility of a comprehensive single diagnostic test to detect pathogenic point mutations. We compared the mitochondrial DNA sequence derived from off-target exome reads with conventional mitochondrial DNA Sanger sequencing in 46 subjects. Mitochondrial DNA sequences can be reliably obtained using three different whole-exome sequence capture kits. Coverage correlates with the relative amount of mitochondrial DNA in the original genomic DNA sample, heteroplasmy levels can be determined using variant and total read depths, and-providing there is a minimum read depth of 20-fold-rare sequencing errors occur at a rate similar to that observed with conventional Sanger sequencing. This offers the prospect of using whole-exome sequence in a diagnostic setting to screen not only all protein coding nuclear genes but also all mitochondrial DNA genes for pathogenic mutations. Off-target mitochondrial DNA reads can also be used to assess quality control and maternal ancestry, inform on ethnic origin, and allow genetic disease association studies not previously anticipated with existing whole-exome data sets.

  6. Novel mutation identified in severe early-onset tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Suhas M; Grimm, Amy; Broderick, Lori

    2017-04-20

    Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) is the second most common heritable autoinflammatory disease, typically presenting in pre-school aged children with fever episodes lasting 1-3 weeks. Systemic symptoms can include rash, myalgia, ocular inflammation, and serositis. Here we report an unusual presentation of TRAPS in a 7 month old girl who presented with only persistent fever. She was initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki Disease and received IVIG and infliximab; however, her fevers quickly recurred. Subsequent testing revealed a urinary tract infection, but she did not improve despite appropriate therapy. As fever continued, she developed significant abdominal distension with imaging concerning for appendicitis, followed by hyperthermia and hemodynamic instability. Given her protracted clinical course and maternal history of a poorly defined inflammatory condition, an autoinflammatory disease was considered. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, resulting in rapid resolution of fever and normalization of inflammatory markers. She was found to have a previously unreported mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene associated with TRAPS. This novel mutation was also confirmed in the patient's mother and maternal uncle. This report reviews a severe case of TRAPS in infancy associated with a novel mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene, and emphasizes that autoinflammatory disease should be considered in the differential of infants with fever of unknown origin.

  7. Prevalence of mutations and functional analyses of melanocortin 4 receptor variants identified among 750 men with juvenile-onset obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lesli H; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) are associated with the most common monogenic form of obesity. We examined 750 Danish men with juvenile-onset obesity (body mass index 33.3 +/- 2.4 kg/m(2)) and 706 control subjects (body mass index 21.4 +/- 2.1 kg/m(2)) for mutati...... in the Danish population. This study shows a carrier frequency of 2.5% of pathogenic mutations in the MC4R gene in a population-based study of obese men. Thus, variation in this gene is the most common known specific genetic cause of obesity among Scandinavian men.......Mutations in the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) are associated with the most common monogenic form of obesity. We examined 750 Danish men with juvenile-onset obesity (body mass index 33.3 +/- 2.4 kg/m(2)) and 706 control subjects (body mass index 21.4 +/- 2.1 kg/m(2...

  8. Exome sequencing identifies a novel EP300 frame shift mutation in a patient with features that overlap Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan A; Robinson, Haynes B; Kohler, Lisa J; Agamanolis, Dimitris; Sterbenz, George; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) and Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) are genetically heterogeneous multiple anomalies syndromes, each having a distinctive facial gestalt. Two genes (CREBBP and EP300) are known to cause RTS, and five (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8) have been associated with CdLS. A diagnosis of RTS or CdLS is molecularly confirmed in only 65% of clinically identified cases, suggesting that additional causative genes exist for both conditions. In addition, although EP300 and CREBBP encode homologous proteins and perform similar functions, only eight EP300 positive RTS patients have been reported, suggesting that patients with EP300 mutations might be escaping clinical recognition. We report on a child with multiple congenital abnormalities and intellectual disability whose facial features and complex phenotype resemble CdLS. However, no mutations in CdLS-related genes were identified. Rather, a novel EP300 mutation was found on whole exome sequencing. Possible links between EP300 and genes causing CdLS are evident in the literature. Both EP300 and HDAC8 are involved in the regulation of TP53 transcriptional activity. In addition, p300 and other chromatin associated proteins, including NIPBL, SMCA1, and SMC3, have been found at enhancer regions in different cell types. It is therefore possible that EP300 and CdLS-related genes are involved in additional shared pathways, producing overlapping phenotypes. As whole exome sequencing becomes more widely utilized, the diverse phenotypes associated with EP300 mutations should be better understood. In the meantime, testing for EP300 mutations in those with features of CdLS may be warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in the DMP1 gene identified by a genome-wide association study is responsible for inherited rickets in Corriedale sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    Full Text Available Inherited rickets of Corriedale sheep is characterized by decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Previous outcross and backcross studies implicate inheritance as a simple autosomal recessive disorder. A genome wide association study was conducted using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip on 20 related sheep comprising 17 affected and 3 carriers. A homozygous region of 125 consecutive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci was identified in all affected sheep, covering a region of 6 Mb on ovine chromosome 6. Among 35 candidate genes in this region, the dentin matrix protein 1 gene (DMP1 was sequenced to reveal a nonsense mutation 250C/T on exon 6. This mutation introduced a stop codon (R145X and could truncate C-terminal amino acids. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP for this mutation showed all 17 affected sheep were "T T" genotypes; the 3 carriers were "C T"; 24 phenotypically normal related sheep were either "C T" or "C C"; and 46 unrelated normal control sheep from other breeds were all "C C". The other SNPs in DMP1 were not concordant with the disease and can all be ruled out as candidates. Previous research has shown that mutations in the DMP1 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans. Dmp1_knockout mice exhibit rickets phenotypes. We believe the R145X mutation to be responsible for the inherited rickets found in Corriedale sheep. A simple diagnostic test can be designed to identify carriers with the defective "T" allele. Affected sheep could be used as animal models for this form of human rickets, and for further investigation of the role of DMP1 in phosphate homeostasis.

  10. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  11. Reduction in hepatic drug metabolizing CYP3A4 activities caused by P450 oxidoreductase mutations identified in patients with disordered steroid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland); Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), metabolizes 50% of drugs in clinical use and requires NADPH-P450 reductase (POR). {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. {yields} We are reporting that mutations in POR may reduce CYP3A4 activity. {yields} POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X lost 99%, while A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% CYP3A4 activity. {yields} Reduction of CYP3A4 activity may cause increased risk of drug toxicities/adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major P450 present in human liver metabolizes approximately half the drugs in clinical use and requires electrons supplied from NADPH through NADPH-P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. In this study we examined the effect of mutations in POR on CYP3A4 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified CYP3A4 to perform kinetic studies. We are reporting that mutations in POR identified in patients with disordered steroidogenesis/Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) may reduce CYP3A4 activity, potentially affecting drug metabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had more than 99% loss of CYP3A4 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% activity. Loss of CYP3A4 activity may result in increased risk of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations.

  12. Reduction in hepatic drug metabolizing CYP3A4 activities caused by P450 oxidoreductase mutations identified in patients with disordered steroid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.; Pandey, Amit V.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), metabolizes 50% of drugs in clinical use and requires NADPH-P450 reductase (POR). → Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. → We are reporting that mutations in POR may reduce CYP3A4 activity. → POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X lost 99%, while A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% CYP3A4 activity. → Reduction of CYP3A4 activity may cause increased risk of drug toxicities/adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major P450 present in human liver metabolizes approximately half the drugs in clinical use and requires electrons supplied from NADPH through NADPH-P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. In this study we examined the effect of mutations in POR on CYP3A4 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified CYP3A4 to perform kinetic studies. We are reporting that mutations in POR identified in patients with disordered steroidogenesis/Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) may reduce CYP3A4 activity, potentially affecting drug metabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had more than 99% loss of CYP3A4 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% activity. Loss of CYP3A4 activity may result in increased risk of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies MEN1 and MAX Mutations and a Neuroendocrine-Like Molecular Heterogeneity in Quadruple WT GIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Urbini, Milena; Indio, Valentina; Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; De Luca, Matilde; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Angelini, Sabrina; Gronchi, Alessandro; Vincenzi, Bruno; Grignani, Giovanni; Colombo, Chiara; Fumagalli, Elena; Gatto, Lidia; Saponara, Maristella; Ianni, Manuela; Paterini, Paola; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, M Giulia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Altimari, Annalisa; Gruppioni, Elisa; Renne, Salvatore L; Collini, Paola; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Brandi, Giovanni; Casali, Paolo G; Pinna, Antonio D; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido

    2017-05-01

    Quadruple wild-type (WT) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a genomic subgroup lacking KIT/PDGFRA/RAS pathway mutations, with an intact succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex. The aim of this work is to perform a wide comprehensive genomic study on quadruple WT GIST to improve the characterization of these patients. We selected 14 clinical cases of quadruple WT GIST, of which nine cases showed sufficient DNA quality for whole exome sequencing (WES). NF1 alterations were identified directly by WES. Gene expression from whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS) and miRNA profiling were performed using fresh-frozen, quadruple WT GIST tissue specimens and compared with SDH and KIT/PDGFRA-mutant GIST. WES identified an average of 18 somatic mutations per sample. The most relevant somatic oncogenic mutations identified were in TP53, MEN1, MAX, FGF1R, CHD4, and CTDNN2. No somatic alterations in NF1 were identified in the analyzed cohort. A total of 247 mRNA transcripts and 66 miRNAs were differentially expressed specifically in quadruple WT GIST. Overexpression of specific molecular markers (COL22A1 and CALCRL) and genes involved in neural and neuroendocrine lineage (ASCL1, Family B GPCRs) were detected and further supported by predicted miRNA target analysis. Quadruple WT GIST show a specific genetic signature that deviates significantly from that of KIT/PDGFRA-mutant and SDH-mutant GIST. Mutations in MEN1 and MAX genes, a neural-committed phenotype and upregulation of the master neuroendocrine regulator ASCL1, support a genetic similarity with neuroendocrine tumors, with whom they also share the great variability in oncogenic driver genes. Implications: This study provides novel insights into the biology of quadruple WT GIST that potentially resembles neuroendocrine tumors and should promote the development of specific therapeutic approaches. Mol Cancer Res; 15(5); 553-62. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Identification of three novel OA1 gene mutations identified in three families misdiagnosed with congenital nystagmus and carrier status determination by real-time quantitative PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is caused by mutations in OA1 gene, which encodes a membrane glycoprotein localised to melanosomes. OA1 mainly affects pigment production in the eye, resulting in optic changes associated with albinism including hypopigmentation of the retina, nystagmus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, abnormal crossing of the optic fibers and reduced visual acuity. Affected Caucasian males usually appear to have normal skin and hair pigment. Results We identified three previously undescribed mutations consisting of two intragenic deletions (one encompassing exon 6, the other encompassing exons 7–8, and a point mutation (310delG in exon 2. We report the development of a new method for diagnosis of heterozygous deletions in OA1 gene based on measurement of gene copy number using real-time quantitative PCR from genomic DNA. Conclusion The identification of OA1 mutations in families earlier reported as families with hereditary nystagmus indicate that ocular albinism type 1 is probably underdiagnosed. Our method of real-time quantitative PCR of OA1 exons with DMD exon as external standard performed on the LightCycler™ allows quick and accurate carrier-status assessment for at-risk females.

  15. Novel mutation of FKBP10 in a pediatric patient with osteogenesis imperfecta type XI identified by clinical exome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Harvy Mauricio; Morales, Jessica L

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary disease characterized by bone fragility caused by mutations in the proteins that support the formation of the extracellular matrix in the bone. The diagnosis of OI begins with clinical suspicion, from phenotypic findings at birth, low-impact fractures during childhood or family history that may lead to it. However, the variability in the semiology of the disease does not allow establishing an early diagnosis in all cases, and unfortunately, specific clinical data provided by the literature only report 28 patients with OI type XI. This information is limited and heterogeneous, and therefore, detailed information on the natural history of this disease is not yet available. This paper reports the case of a male patient who, despite undergoing multidisciplinary management, did not have a diagnosis for a long period of time, and could only be given one with the use of whole-exome sequencing. The use of the next-generation sequencing in patients with ultrarare genetic diseases, including skeletal dysplasias, should be justified when clear clinical criteria and an improvement in the quality of life of the patients and their families are intended while reducing economic and time costs. Thus, this case report corresponds to the 29th patient affected with OI type XI, and the 18th mutation in FKBP10, causative of this pathology. PMID:29158687

  16. Association between GWAS-identified lung adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci and EGFR mutations in never-smoking Asian women, and comparison with findings from Western populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Wei Jie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shiraishi, Kouya; Song, Minsun; Kim, Hee Nam; Wong, Maria Pik; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Wang, Zhaoming; Chang, I-Shou; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Hu; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Zheng, Wei; Kim, Jin Hee; Zhou, Baosen; Caporaso, Neil E; Albanes, Demetrius; Shin, Min-Ho; Chung, Lap Ping; An, She-Juan; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Hong; Yatabe, Yasushi; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Kim, Young Tae; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Young-Chul; Bassig, Bryan A; Chang, Jiang; Ho, James Chung Man; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kubo, Michiaki; Daigo, Yataro; Ito, Hidemi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Honda, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Shingo; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Yin, Zhihua; Shi, Jianxin; Takahashi, Atsushi; Goto, Akiteru; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Tanaka, Kazumi; Wu, Tangchun; Wei, Fusheng; Wong, Jason Y Y; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Su, Jian; Kim, Yeul Hong; Oh, In-Jae; Song, Fengju; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Seow, Adeline; Park, Jae Yong; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Haixin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Wu, Chen; Qian, Biyun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chung, Charles C; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hutchinson, Amy; Berndt, Sonja I; He, Xingzhou; Wu, Wei; Wang, Junwen; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Yu, Chong-Jen; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Liu, Jie; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Hicks, Belynda; Wyatt, Kathleen; Li, Shengchao A; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Cui, Ping; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Wu, Guoping; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Yu, Jinming; Stevens, Victoria L; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Marconett, Crystal N; Lin, Dongxin; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Yi-Long; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kohno, Takashi; Chanock, Stephen J; Lan, Qing

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate associations by EGFR mutation status for lung adenocarcinoma risk among never-smoking Asian women, we conducted a meta-analysis of 11 loci previously identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Genotyping in an additional 10,780 never-smoking cases and 10,938 never-smoking controls from Asia confirmed associations with eight known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two new signals were observed at genome-wide significance (P Asian women and highlight the importance of how the germline could inform risk for specific tumour mutation patterns, which could have important translational implications. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  18. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hane James K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. Results DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP. In this study, we apply deRIP to the genome of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum SN15 and predict the origin of several previously uncharacterised classes of repetitive DNA. Conclusions Five new classes of transposon repeats and four classes of endogenous gene repeats were identified after deRIP. The deRIP process is a new tool for fungal genomics that facilitates the identification and understanding of the role and origin of fungal repetitive DNA. DeRIP is open-source and is available as part of the RIPCAL suite at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/ripcal.

  19. Robust full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 2a and 2b infectious cultures using mutations identified by a systematic approach applicable to patient strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Mikkelsen, Lotte; Purcell, Robert H; Bukh, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, but treatment options are limited. Basic HCV research required for vaccine and drug development has been hampered by inability to culture patient isolates, and to date only the JFH1 (genotype 2a) recombinant replicates spontaneously in hepatoma cells and releases infectious virus. A JFH1 chimera with the 5' end through NS2 from another genotype 2a strain, J6, had enhanced infectivity. However, the full-length J6 clone (J6CF), which we previously found to be fully functional in vivo, was replication incompetent in vitro. Through a systematic approach of culturing J6 with minimal JFH1 sequences, we identified three mutations in NS3, NS4A, and NS5B that permitted full-length J6 propagation and adaptation with infectivity titers comparable to JFH1-based systems. The most efficient recombinant, J6cc, had six adaptive mutations and did not accumulate additional changes following viral passage. We demonstrated that HCV NS3/NS4A protease-, NS5A- and NS5B polymerase-directed drugs respectively inhibited full-length J6 infection dose dependently. Importantly, the three J6-derived mutations enabled culture adaptation of the genetically divergent isolate J8 (genotype 2b), which differed from the J6 nucleotide sequence by 24%. The most efficient recombinant, J8cc, had nine adaptive mutations and was genetically stable after viral passage. The availability of these robust JFH1-independent genotype 2a and 2b culture systems represents an important advance, and the approach used might permit culture development of other isolates, with implications for improved individualized treatments of HCV patients and for development of broadly efficient vaccines.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  1. High-Throughput Genetic Screening of 51 Pediatric Cataract Genes Identifies Causative Mutations in Inherited Pediatric Cataract in South Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Javadiyan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cataract is a leading cause of childhood blindness. This study aimed to determine the genetic cause of pediatric cataract in Australian families by screening known disease-associated genes using massively parallel sequencing technology. We sequenced 51 previously reported pediatric cataract genes in 33 affected individuals with a family history (cases with previously known or published mutations were excluded using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Variants were prioritized for validation if they were predicted to alter the protein sequence and were absent or rare with minor allele frequency 60% of familial pediatric cataract in Australia, indicating that still more causative genes remain to be identified.

  2. The Y42H mutation in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, which is prevalent in babies identified by MS/MS-based newborn screening, is temperature sensitive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Reilly, Linda; Bross, Peter; Corydon, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a homotetrameric flavoprotein which catalyses the initial step of the beta-oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. Mutations in MCAD may cause disease in humans. A Y42H mutation is frequently found in babies identified by newborn screening with MS...

  3. Molecular basis of pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase deficiency caused by 3 newly identified missense mutations (c.187T>C, c.469G>C and c.740T>C) and a tabulation of known mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Laurent R; Morera, Simone M; Galizzi, Alessandro; Fermo, Elisa; Zanella, Alberto; Valentini, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase deficiency is the most frequent enzymopathy of red blood cell nucleotide metabolism that causes hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia. The disease is usually characterized by mild-to-moderate hemolytic anemia, reticulocytosis and hyperbilirubinemia. To date, diagnosis ultimately depends upon demonstration of a reduced level of pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase type-I (P5'N-1) activity in red cells and detection of mutations in the P5'N-1 gene. To unravel the causes of the P5'N deficiency and to obtain data for a definitive diagnosis three newly described missense mutations (c.187T>C, c.469G>C and c.740T>C) identified in patients with hemolytic anemia have been characterized at protein level. The mutant enzymes (C63R, G157R and I247T) were obtained as recombinant forms and purified to homogeneity. The enzymes were altered, although to a different extent, in both thermal stability and catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of all mutants was reduced especially towards UMP (up to more than 200 times), owing to the increased Km values (approximately, 10-25 times higher). The G157R enzyme was severely heat unstable and lost half of its activity after about 23 min of incubation at 37 degrees C. At higher temperature C63R and I247T mutants as well were less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, although the mutations targeted different regions of the P5'N-1 structure, they produced similar effects on the molecular properties of the enzyme. Thus, all affected amino acids are functionally and structurally important for preserving the enzyme activity during the red cell life span.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmana, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Leone, Melanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Zlowocka-Perlowska, Elzbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jonson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Angel Pujana, Miquel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  5. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Lee (Andrew); C. Olswold (Curtis); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Dennis (Joe); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); E. Dicks (Ed); M. Kosel (Matthew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Peock (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. Jakubowska (Anna); P. Radice (Paolo); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Piedmonte (Marion); C.F. Singer (Christian); E. Friedman (Eitan); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M.H. Greene (Mark); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Garber; C. Phelan (Catherine); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Montagna (Marco); E. Olah; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); D. Goldgar (David); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); A. Osorio (Ana); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); U. Hamann (Ute); S.J. Ramus (Susan); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M.A. Caligo (Maria); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); N. Tung (Nadine); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.S. Beattie (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); E.M. John (Esther); A. Kwong (Ava); O. Diez (Orland); J. Balmana (Judith); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Rennert (Gad); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); I. Campbell (Ian); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.J. Gille (Johan); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); M.J. Blok (Marinus); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Verhoef; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); D. Frost (Debra); S. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (C.); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Houghton (Catherine); M.T. Rogers (Mark); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Eason (Jacqueline); H. Gregory (Helen); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); A. Calender (Alain); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Nogues (Catherine); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Sobol (Hagay); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Castera (Laurent); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); M. Léone (Mélanie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); G. Melloni (Giulia); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); N. Arnold (Norbert); C.W. Engel (Christoph); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Ditsch (Nina); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); S. Engert (Stefanie); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); D.E. Cohn (David); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); M. Friedlander (Michael); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; N.M. Lindor (Noralane); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Shimon Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); L. Jønson (Lars); M.K. Andersen (Mette); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. Steele (Linda); L. Foretova (Lenka); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); S. Narod (Steven); J. Herzog (Josef); S.R. Sand (Sharon); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); T. Vaszko (Tibor); J. Weaver (JoEllen); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); S.S. Buys (Saundra); A. Romero (Alfonso); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); M. Durán (Mercedes); W.K. Chung (Wendy); A. Lasa (Adriana); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); A. Miron (Alexander); J. Benítez (Javier); L. Senter (Leigha); D. Huo (Dezheng); S. Chan (Salina); A. Sokolenko (Anna); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K.H. Lu (Karen); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); P.A. James (Paul ); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Y. Tessier (Yann); J. Cunningham (Jane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Wang (Chen); S. Hart (Stewart); K. Stevens (Kristen); J. Simard (Jacques); T. Pastinen (Tomi); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson; H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); K. Harbst (Katja); M. Soller (Maria); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M. Nordling (Margareta); P. Karlsson (Per); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); G.B. Bustinza; J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); C.E. Ardnor (Christina Edwinsdotter); M. Emanuelsson (Monica); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.H. Pigg (Maritta ); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); M.A. Rookus (M.); S. Verhoef (S.); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); J.L. de Lange (J.); J.M. Collée (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); T.C.T.E.F. van Cronenburg; C.M. Kets; A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B. Gomez Garcia (Encarna); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); M.J. Mourits (Marjan); G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); S.D. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); M. James (Margaret); J. Paterson (Joan); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Anna); M.J. Kennedy (John); D.E. Barton (David); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); L. Izatt (Louise); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A.F. Brady (Angela); S.A. Melville (Scott); K. Randhawa (Kashmir); J. Barwell (Julian); G. Serra-Feliu (Gemma); I.O. Ellis (Ian); F. Lalloo (Fiona); J. Taylor (James); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); R. Collier (Rebecca); F. Douglas (Fiona); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); A. Stormorken (Astrid); E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); S.R. Killick; S. Martin (Sue); D. Rea (Dan); A. Kulkarni (Anjana); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lehmann (Anna); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gabe); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); S. Giraud (Sophie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); A. de Pauw (Antoine); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); S. Handallou (Sandrine); A. hardouin (Agnès); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); F. Eisinger (François); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); P. Vennin (Philippe); C. Adenis (Claude); R. Lidereau (Rosette); L. Demange (Liliane); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); M. Peysselon (Magalie); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); S.F. Ferrer; M. Frenay (Marc); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); G.S. Dite (Gillian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer),

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; McGuffog, L.; Lee, A.; Olswold, C.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Fredericksen, Z.; Barrowdale, D.; Dennis, J.; Gaudet, M.M.; Dicks, E.; Kosel, M.; Healey, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Bacot, F.; Vincent, D.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Peock, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Jakubowska, A.; Radice, P.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Domchek, S.M.; Piedmonte, M.; Singer, C.F.; Friedman, E.; Thomassen, M.; Hansen, T.V.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Szabo, C.I.; Blanco, I.; Greene, M.H.; Karlan, B.Y.; Garber, J.; Phelan, C.M.; Weitzel, J.N.; Montagna, M.; Olah, E.; Andrulis, I.L.; Godwin, A.K.; Yannoukakos, D.; Goldgar, D.E.; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Osorio, A.; Terry, M.B.; Daly, M.B.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Hamann, U.; Ramus, S.J.; Ewart Toland, A.; Caligo, M.A.; Olopade, O.I.; Tung, N.; Claes, K.; Beattie, M.S.; Southey, M.C.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Tischkowitz, M.; Janavicius, R.; John, E.M.; Kwong, A.; Diez, O.; Balmana, J.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Arun, B.K.; Rennert, G.; Teo, S.H.; Ganz, P.A.; Campbell, I.; Hout, A.H. van der; Deurzen, C.H. van; Seynaeve, C.; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Gille, J.J.P.; Ausems, M.G.; Blok, M.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Verhoef, S.; Os, T.A. van; Wijnen, J.T.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.; Fineberg, E.; Platte, R.; Evans, D.G.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.A.; Adlard, J.; Eccles, D.M.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Douglas, F.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P.J.; Side, L.E.; Donaldson, A.; Houghton, C.; Rogers, M.T.; Dorkins, H.; Eason, J.; Gregory, H.; McCann, E.; Murray, A.; Calender, A.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Delnatte, C.; Nogues, C.; Lasset, C.; Houdayer, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Prieur, F.; Damiola, F.; Sobol, H.; Coupier, I.; Venat-Bouvet, L.; Castera, L.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Leone, M.; Pujol, P.; Mazoyer, S.; Bignon, Y.J.; Zlowocka-Perlowska, E.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska, K.; Huzarski, T.; Spurdle, A.B.; Viel, A.; Peissel, B.; Bonanni, B.; Melloni, G.; Ottini, L.; Papi, L.; Varesco, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Peterlongo, P.; Volorio, S.; Manoukian, S.; Pensotti, V.; Arnold, N.; Engel, C.; Deissler, H.; Gadzicki, D.; Gehrig, A.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Meindl, A.; Niederacher, D.; Ditsch, N.; Plendl, H.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Engert, S.; Sutter, C.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Weber, B.H.; Arver, B.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Einbeigi, Z.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Blank, S.V.; Cohn, D.E.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Small, L.; Friedlander, M.; Bae-Jump, V.L.; Fink-Retter, A.; Rappaport, C.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Lindor, N.M.; Kaufman, B.; Shimon Paluch, S.; Laitman, Y.; Skytte, A.B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Pedersen, I.S.; Moeller, S.T.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Vijai, J.; Sarrel, K.; Robson, M.; Kauff, N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Jonson, L.; Andersen, M.K.; Ding, Y.C.; Steele, L.; Foretova, L.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Brunet, J.; Pujana, M.A.; Mai, P.L.; Loud, J.T.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Narod, S.A.; Herzog, J.; Sand, S.R.; Tognazzo, S.; Agata, S.; Vaszko, T.; Weaver, J.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Buys, S.S.; Romero, A.; Hoya, M. de la; Aittomaki, K.; Muranen, T.A.; Duran, M.; Chung, W.K.; Lasa, A.; Dorfling, C.M.; Miron, A.; Benitez, J.; Senter, L.; Huo, D.; Chan, S.B.; Sokolenko, A.P.; Chiquette, J.; Tihomirova, L.; Friebel, T.M.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Lu, K.H.; Lejbkowicz, F.; James, P.A.; Hall, P.; Dunning, A.M.; Tessier, D.; Cunningham, J.; Slager, S.L.; Wang, C.; Hart, S.; Stevens, K.; Simard, J.; Pastinen, T.; Pankratz, V.S.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  8. A novel KCNQ1 missense mutation identified in a patient with juvenile-onset atrial fibrillation causes constitutively open IKs channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kanae; Ohno, Seiko; Ashihara, Takashi; Itoh, Hideki; Ding, Wei-Guang; Toyoda, Futoshi; Makiyama, Takeru; Aoki, Hisaaki; Nakamura, Yoshihide; Delisle, Brian P; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Horie, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common cardiac arrhythmias. In some patients, the disease is inheritable; however, hereditary aspects of AF remain not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic backgrounds that contribute to juvenile-onset AF and to define the mechanism. In 30 consecutive juvenile-onset AF patients (onset age KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1-3, KCNE5, KCNJ2, SCN5A). We analyzed the function of mutant channels using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques and computer simulations. Among the juvenile-onset AF patients, we identified three mutations (10%): SCN5A-M1875T, KCNJ2-M301K, and KCNQ1-G229D. Because KCNQ1 variant (G229D) identified in a 16-year-old boy was novel, we focused on the proband. The G229D-IKs was found to induce a large instantaneous activating component without deactivation after repolarization to -50 mV. In addition, wild-type (WT)/G229D-IKs (WT and mutant coexpression) displayed both instantaneous and time-dependent activating currents. Compared to WT-IKs, the tail current densities in WT/G229D-IKs were larger at test potentials between -130 and -40 mV but smaller at test potentials between 20 and 50 mV. Moreover, WT/G229D-IKs resulted in a negative voltage shift for current activation (-35.2 mV) and slower deactivation. WT/G229D-IKs conducted a large outward current induced by an atrial action potential waveform, and computer simulation incorporating the WT/G229D-IKs results revealed that the mutation shortened atrial but not ventricular action potential. A novel KCNQ1-G229D mutation identified in a juvenile-onset AF patient altered the IKs activity and kinetics, thereby increasing the arrhythmogenicity to AF. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society Published by Heart Rhythm Society All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus J Couch

    Full Text Available BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20. In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38 and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38. The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4. These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  11. Cryptic splice activation but not exon skipping is observed in minigene assays of dystrophin c.9361+1G>A mutation identified by NGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Nishida, Atsushi; Tran, Van Khanh; Vu, Dung Chi; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Hisahide; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) discloses nucleotide changes in the genome. Mutations at splicing regulatory elements are expected to cause splicing errors, such as exon skipping, cryptic splice site activation, partial exon loss or intron retention. In dystrophinopathy patients, prediction of splicing outcomes is essential to determine the phenotype: either severe Duchenne or mild Becker muscular dystrophy, based on the reading frame rule. In a Vietnamese patient, NGS identified a c.9361+1G>A mutation in the dystrophin gene and an additional DNA variation of A>G at +117 bases in intron 64. To ascertain the consequences of these DNA changes on dystrophin splicing, minigene constructs were prepared inserting dystrophin exon 64 plus various lengths of intron 64. Exon 64 skipping was observed in the minigene construct with 160 nucleotide (nt) of intron 64 sequence with both c.9361+1A and +117G. In contrast, minigene constructs with larger flanking intronic domains resulted in cryptic splice site activation rather than exon skipping. Meanwhile, the cryptic splice site activation was induced even in +117G when intron 64 was elongated to 272 nt and longer. It was expected that cryptic splice site activation is an in vivo splicing outcome.

  12. Exome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas genome editing identify mutations of ZAK as a cause of limb defects in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Malte; Kakar, Naseebullah; Tayebi, Naeimeh; Leettola, Catherine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Sowada, Nadine; Lupiáñez, Darío G; Harabula, Izabela; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Horn, Denise; Chan, Wing Lee; Wittler, Lars; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; van Bokhoven, Hans; Schwartz, Charles E; Nürnberg, Peter; Bowie, James U; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian; Mundlos, Stefan; Borck, Guntram

    2016-02-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology enables targeted genome editing and the rapid generation of transgenic animal models for the study of human genetic disorders. Here we describe an autosomal recessive human disease in two unrelated families characterized by a split-foot defect, nail abnormalities of the hands, and hearing loss, due to mutations disrupting the SAM domain of the protein kinase ZAK. ZAK is a member of the MAPKKK family with no known role in limb development. We show that Zak is expressed in the developing limbs and that a CRISPR/Cas-mediated knockout of the two Zak isoforms is embryonically lethal in mice. In contrast, a deletion of the SAM domain induces a complex hindlimb defect associated with down-regulation of Trp63, a known split-hand/split-foot malformation disease gene. Our results identify ZAK as a key player in mammalian limb patterning and demonstrate the rapid utility of CRISPR/Cas genome editing to assign causality to human mutations in the mouse in <10 wk. © 2016 Spielmann et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. RET germline mutations identified by exome sequencing in a Chinese multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A/familial medullary thyroid carcinoma family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ping Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole exome sequencing provides a labor-saving and direct means of genetic diagnosis of hereditary disorders in which the pathogenic gene harbors a large cohort of exons. We set out to demonstrate a suitable example of genetic diagnosis of MEN 2A/FMTC (multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2/familial medullary thyroid carcinoma using this approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced the whole exome of six individuals from a large Chinese MEN2A/FMTC pedigree to identify the variants of the RET (REarranged during Transfection protooncogene and followed this by validation. Then prophylactic or surgical thyroidectomy with modified or level VI lymph node dissection and adrenalectomy were performed for the carriers. The cases were closely followed up. Massively parallel sequencing revealed four missense mutations of RET. We unexpectedly discovered that the proband's daughter with MEN 2A-related MTC presented a novel p.C634Y/V292M/R67H/R982C compound mutation, due to the involvement of p.C634Y in the proband with MEN 2A and p.V292M/R67H/R982C in the proband's husband with FMTC. In the maternal origin, p.C634Y caused bilateral MTC in all 5 cases and bilateral pheochromocytoma in 2 of the 5; the earliest onset age was 28 years. In the paternal origin, one of the six p.V292M/R67H/R982C carriers presented bilateral MTC (70 years old, one only had bilateral C-cell hyperplasia (44 years, two had bilateral multi-nodules (46 and 48 years and two showed no abnormality (22 and 19 years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results confirmed the successful clinical utility of whole exome sequencing, and our data suggested that the p.C634Y/V292M/R67H/R982C mutation of RET exhibited a more aggressive clinical phenotype than p.C634Y or p.V292M/R67H/R982C, while p.V292M/R67H/R982C presented a relatively milder pathogenicity of MTC and likely predisposed to FMTC.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-12-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant 'Blondee' (BLO) and its red-skin parent 'Kidd's D-8' (KID), the original name of 'Gala', to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10(-13)) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Exome analysis identified a novel mutation in the RBP4 gene in a consanguineous pedigree with retinal dystrophy and developmental abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Cukras

    Full Text Available Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP is a common form of retinal degeneration characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE atrophy causing loss of visual field and acuities. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous splice site variant (c.111+1G>A in the gene encoding retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4. This change segregated with early onset, progressive, and severe autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP in an eight member consanguineous pedigree of European ancestry. Additionally, one patient exhibited developmental abnormalities including patent ductus arteriosus and chorioretinal and iris colobomas. The second patient developed acne from young age and extending into the 5(th decade. Both patients had undetectable levels of RBP4 in the serum suggesting that this mutation led to either mRNA or protein instability resulting in a null phenotype. In addition, the patients exhibited severe vitamin A deficiency, and diminished serum retinol levels. Circulating transthyretin levels were normal. This study identifies the RBP4 splice site change as the cause of RP in this pedigree. The presence of developmental abnormalities and severe acne in patients with retinal degeneration may indicate the involvement of genes that regulate vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism.

  16. Genome-wide profiling identifies a DNA methylation signature that associates with TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Fazila; Punj, Vasu; Christensen, Jesper Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that the Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) hydroxylases cause DNA demethylation has fundamentally changed the notion of how DNA methylation is regulated. Clonal analysis of the hematopoetic stem cell compartment suggests that TET2 mutations can be early events in hematologic cancers...... and recent investigations have shown TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the detection rates and the types of TET2 mutations vary, and the relation to global methylation patterns has not been investigated. Here, we show TET2 mutations in 12 of 100 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with 7...

  17. A founder synonymous COL7A1 mutation in three Danish families with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa identifies exonic regulatory sequences required for exon 87 splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covaciu, C; Grosso, F; Pisaneschi, E

    2011-01-01

    shoulders. DEB-Pr is caused by either dominant (DDEB-Pr) or recessive mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen (COLVII). The full spectrum of COL7A1 mutations in DEB-Pr remains elusive and the genotype-phenotype correlation is largely incomplete. Here, we report and functionally characterize...

  18. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) mutations identified by MS/MS-based prospective screening of newborns differ from those observed in patients with clinical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Dobrowolski, S F; O'Reilly, L

    2001-01-01

    that the MS/MS-based method is excellent for detection of MCAD deficiency but that the frequency of the 985A-->G mutant allele in newborns with a positive acylcarnitine profile is much lower than that observed in clinically affected patients. Our identification of a new mutation, 199T-->C, which has never......Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most frequently diagnosed mitochondrial beta-oxidation defect, and it is potentially fatal. Eighty percent of patients are homozygous for a common mutation, 985A-->G, and a further 18% have this mutation in only one disease allele....... In addition, a large number of rare disease-causing mutations have been identified and characterized. There is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation. High 985A-->G carrier frequencies in populations of European descent and the usual avoidance of recurrent disease episodes by patients diagnosed with MCAD...

  19. FOXL2 402C>G Mutation Can Be Identified in the Circulating Tumor DNA of Patients with Adult-Type Granulosa Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färkkilä, Anniina; McConechy, Melissa K; Yang, Winnie; Talhouk, Aline; Ng, Ying; Lum, Amy; Morin, Ryan D; Bushell, Kevin; Riska, Annika; McAlpine, Jessica N; Gilks, C Blake; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Anttonen, Mikko; Huntsman, David G

    2017-01-01

    Adult granulosa cell tumors (AGCTs) of the ovary are molecularly characterized by the pathognomonic FOXL2 402C>G (C134W) mutation. To improve diagnostics and follow-up, we developed a specific digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) assay to detect the FOXL2 mutation in the circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) of AGCT patients. Optimization of the ddPCR assay was performed using a TaqMan primer/probe with the RainDance RainDrop digital PCR system. The ddPCR assay was performed on circulating cell-free DNA extracted from 120 serial plasma samples collected prospectively from 35 AGCT patients. The ddPCR assay included a preamplification step that is sensitive and specific for detecting the FOXL2-mutated ctDNA at levels as low as 0.05%. FOXL2 ctDNA mutations were detected in the plasma of 12 of 33 AGCT patients (36%), with both primary (6 of 17, 35%) and recurrent (6 of 31, 19%) tumors. The median tumor size was significantly larger in ctDNA mutation-positive compared with mutation-negative samples (13.5 cm versus 7.5 cm; P = 0.003). The ctDNA FOXL2 mutation was detected in four patients without clinical disease, of which one relapsed during follow-up. As proof of concept, we established that specific molecular diagnosis of AGCT and detection of AGCT recurrence can be achieved noninvasively using ctDNA FOXL2 mutation testing. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical value of ctDNA mutation testing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria...... species production, leading to cancer risk. Here we test the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We genotyped 22214 (11421 affected, 10793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2...

  1. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Danieli B; Sosnay, Patrick R; Azen, Colleen; Young, Suzanne; Raraigh, Karen S; Keens, Thomas G; Kharrazi, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California's racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance. We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C); those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC); and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown). Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared. Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78) and 11% of Unknown (27/244) met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing. While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed.

  2. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli B Salinas

    Full Text Available Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California's racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance.We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C; those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC; and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown. Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared.Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78 and 11% of Unknown (27/244 met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing.While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed.

  3. Suppressor mutations identify amino acids in PAA-1/PR65 that facilitate regulatory RSA-1/B″ subunit targeting of PP2A to centrosomes in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen I. Lange

    2012-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is a key mechanism for the spatial and temporal regulation of many essential developmental processes and is especially prominent during mitosis. The multi-subunit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A enzyme plays an important, yet poorly characterized role in dephosphorylating proteins during mitosis. PP2As are heterotrimeric complexes comprising a catalytic, structural, and regulatory subunit. Regulatory subunits are mutually exclusive and determine subcellular localization and substrate specificity of PP2A. At least 3 different classes of regulatory subunits exist (termed B, B′, B″ but there is no obvious similarity in primary sequence between these classes. Therefore, it is not known how these diverse regulatory subunits interact with the same holoenzyme to facilitate specific PP2A functions in vivo. The B″ family of regulatory subunits is the least understood because these proteins lack conserved structural domains. RSA-1 (regulator of spindle assembly is a regulatory B″ subunit required for mitotic spindle assembly in Caenorhabditis elegans. In order to address how B″ subunits interact with the PP2A core enzyme, we focused on a conditional allele, rsa-1(or598ts, and determined that this mutation specifically disrupts the protein interaction between RSA-1 and the PP2A structural subunit, PAA-1. Through genetic screening, we identified a putative interface on the PAA-1 structural subunit that interacts with a defined region of RSA-1/B″. In the context of previously published results, these data propose a mechanism of how different PP2A B-regulatory subunit families can bind the same holoenzyme in a mutually exclusive manner, to perform specific tasks in vivo.

  4. A novel PEX12 mutation identified as the cause of a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder with mild clinical phenotype, mild biochemical abnormalities in fibroblasts and a mosaic catalase immunofluorescence pattern, even at 40 degrees C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeharia, Avraham; Ebberink, Merel S.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Gutman, Alisa; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Korman, Stanley H.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in 12 different PEX genes can cause a generalized peroxisomal biogenesis disorder with clinical phenotypes ranging from Zellweger syndrome to infantile Refsum disease. To identify the specific PEX gene to be sequenced, complementation analysis is first performed in fibroblasts using

  5. Combination of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation and podoplanin expression in brain tumors identifies patients at high or low risk of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir Seyed Nazari, Pegah; Riedl, Julia; Preusser, Matthias; Posch, Florian; Thaler, Johannes; Marosi, Christine; Birner, Peter; Ricken, Gerda; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2018-04-19

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication in primary brain tumor patients. Independent studies revealed that podoplanin expression in brain tumors is associated with increased VTE risk, while the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation is associated with very low VTE risk. To investigate the interrelation between intratumoral podoplanin expression and IDH1 mutation, and their mutual impact on VTE development. In a prospective cohort study, intratumoral IDH1 R132H mutation and podoplanin were determined in brain tumor specimens (mainly glioma) by immunohistochemistry. Primary endpoint of the study was symptomatic VTE during a 2-year follow-up. All brain tumors that expressed podoplanin to a medium-high extent showed also an IDH1 wildtype status. A score based on IDH1 status and podoplanin expression levels allowed predicting risk of VTE. Patients with wildtype IDH1 brain tumors and high podoplanin expression had a significantly increased VTE risk compared to those with mutant IDH1 tumors and no podoplanin expression (6-month risk 18.2% vs. 0%). IDH1 mutation and podoplanin overexpression seem to be exclusive. While brain tumor patients with IDH1 mutation are at very low VTE risk, the risk of VTE in patients with IDH1 wildtype tumors is strongly linked to podoplanin expression levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, and interferon-based therapy cures only 40 to 80% of patients, depending on HCV genotype. Research was accelerated by genotype 2a (strain JFH1) infectious cell culture systems. We previously developed viable JFH1-based...... mutations did not adapt to culture. Universal adaptive effects of mutations in NS3 (Q1247L, I1312V, K1398Q, R1408W, and Q1496L) and NS5A (V2418L) were investigated for JFH1-based genotype 1 to 5 core-NS2 recombinants; several mutations conferred adaptation to H77C (1a), J4 (1b), S52 (3a), and SA13 (5a......-specific patterns in HCV disease and control....

  7. Whole-exome-sequencing identifies mutations in histone acetyltransferase gene KAT6B in individuals with the Say-Barber-Biesecker variant of Ohdo syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton-Smith, Jill; O'Sullivan, James; Daly, Sarah; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Day, Ruth; Anderson, Beverley; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim; Biesecker, Leslie G; Smith, Philip; Fryer, Alan; Chandler, Kate E; Kerr, Bronwyn; Tassabehji, May; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; McKee, Shane; Smith, Janine; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Mansour, Sahar; Mohammed, Shehla; Donnai, Dian; Black, Graeme

    2011-11-11

    Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson syndrome (SBBYSS or Ohdo syndrome) is a multiple anomaly syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and a mask-like facial appearance. A number of individuals with SBBYSS also have thyroid abnormalities and cleft palate. The condition usually occurs sporadically and is therefore presumed to be due in most cases to new dominant mutations. In individuals with SBBYSS, a whole-exome sequencing approach was used to demonstrate de novo protein-truncating mutations in the highly conserved histone acetyltransferase gene KAT6B (MYST4/MORF)) in three out of four individuals sequenced. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm truncating mutations of KAT6B, clustering in the final exon of the gene in all four individuals and in a further nine persons with typical SBBYSS. Where parental samples were available, the mutations were shown to have occurred de novo. During mammalian development KAT6B is upregulated specifically in the developing central nervous system, facial structures, and limb buds. The phenotypic features seen in the Qkf mouse, a hypomorphic Kat6b mutant, include small eyes, ventrally placed ears and long first digits that mirror the human phenotype. This is a further example of how perturbation of a protein involved in chromatin modification might give rise to a multisystem developmental disorder. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Germline mutations in BMP9 are not identified in a series of Danish and French patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P. M.; Dupuis-Girod, S.; Giraud, S

    2016-01-01

    undiscovered HHT causative genes. A new vascular-anomaly syndrome caused by mutations in BMP9 has recently been published. Three patients suspected of HHT, with familial nose bleedings and dermal manifestations not characteristic for HHT, were described. Although, it was concluded that these patients probably...

  9. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, S.; Bardel, C.; Danjean, V.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Dennis, J.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Conejero, R.A.; Segota, E.; Weitzel, J.N.; Thelander, M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Bonanni, B.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Manoukian, S.; Varesco, L.; Capone, G.L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Yannoukakos, D.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Garber, J.; Hamann, U.; Donaldson, A.; Brady, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Douglas, F.; Cook, J.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Isaacs, C.; Claes, K.; Leeneer, K. De; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Niederacher, D.; Steinemann, D.; Plendl, H.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Markov, N.B.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Pauw, A. de; Lefol, C.; Lasset, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Damiola, F.; Dreyfus, H.; Barjhoux, L.; Golmard, L.; Uhrhammer, N.; Bonadona, V.; Sornin, V.; Bignon, Y.J.; Carter, J.; Le, L; Piedmonte, M.; DiSilvestro, P.A.; Hoya, M. de la; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Jager, A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Kets, C.M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Hogervorst, F.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Roozendaal, K.E. van; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Olah, E.; Diez, O.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Valle, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Sukiennicki, G.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Maugard, C.; Amadori, A.; Montagna, M.; Teixeira, M.R.; Spurdle, A.B.; Foulkes, W.; Olswold, C.; Lindor, N.M.; Pankratz, V.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Lincoln, A.; Jacobs, L.; Corines, M.; Robson, M.; Vijai, J.; Berger, A.; Fink-Retter, A.; Singer, C.F.; Rappaport, C.; Kaulich, D.G.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Rennert, G.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I.L.; Tchatchou, S.; Toland, A.E.; Pedersen, I.S.; Thomassen, M.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Zidan, J.; Laitman, Y.; Lindblom, A.; Melin, B.; Arver, B.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Ramus, S.J.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Thomas, G; Simard, J.; Couch, F.J.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Mazoyer, S.; Phelan, C.M.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Cox, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  10. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 Are Identified in Individuals with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ∼12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 sig...

  11. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C.W. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of

  12. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  13. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas vO; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria.

  14. Exome sequencing identifies DYNC2H1 mutations as a common cause of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome) without major polydactyly, renal or retinal involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Miriam; Arts, Heleen H; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yap, Zhimin; Oud, Machteld M; Antony, Dinu; Duijkers, Lonneke; Emes, Richard D; Stalker, Jim; Yntema, Jan-Bart L; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Forsythe, Elisabeth; Lausch, Ekkehart; Veltman, Joris A; Roeleveld, Nel; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Kutkowska-Kazmierczak, Anna; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Elçioğlu, Nursel; van Maarle, Merel C; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Smithson, Sarah F; Wellesley, Diana; Verbeek, Nienke E; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kayserili, Hulya; Scambler, Peter J; Beales, Philip L; Knoers, Nine VAM; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2013-01-01

    Background Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) is a rare, often lethal, recessively inherited chondrodysplasia characterised by shortened ribs and long bones, sometimes accompanied by polydactyly, and renal, liver and retinal disease. Mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes cause JATD, including the IFT dynein-2 motor subunit gene DYNC2H1. Genetic heterogeneity and the large DYNC2H1 gene size have hindered JATD genetic diagnosis. Aims and methods To determine the contribution to JATD we screened DYNC2H1 in 71 JATD patients JATD patients combining SNP mapping, Sanger sequencing and exome sequencing. Results and conclusions We detected 34 DYNC2H1 mutations in 29/71 (41%) patients from 19/57 families (33%), showing it as a major cause of JATD especially in Northern European patients. This included 13 early protein termination mutations (nonsense/frameshift, deletion, splice site) but no patients carried these in combination, suggesting the human phenotype is at least partly hypomorphic. In addition, 21 missense mutations were distributed across DYNC2H1 and these showed some clustering to functional domains, especially the ATP motor domain. DYNC2H1 patients largely lacked significant extra-skeletal involvement, demonstrating an important genotype–phenotype correlation in JATD. Significant variability exists in the course and severity of the thoracic phenotype, both between affected siblings with identical DYNC2H1 alleles and among individuals with different alleles, which suggests the DYNC2H1 phenotype might be subject to modifier alleles, non-genetic or epigenetic factors. Assessment of fibroblasts from patients showed accumulation of anterograde IFT proteins in the ciliary tips, confirming defects similar to patients with other retrograde IFT machinery mutations, which may be of undervalued potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:23456818

  15. Clinical flow cytometric screening of SAP and XIAP expression accurately identifies patients with SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Carrie E; Weingartner, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Joyce; Johnson, Judith; Zhang, Kejian; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Bleesing, Jack J; Marsh, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is caused by mutations in two genes, SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4. Flow cytometric methods have been developed to detect the gene products, SAP and XIAP. However, there is no literature describing the accuracy of flow cytometric screening performed in a clinical lab setting. We reviewed the clinical flow cytometric testing results for 656 SAP and 586 XIAP samples tested during a 3-year period. Genetic testing was clinically performed as directed by the managing physician in 137 SAP (21%) and 115 XIAP (20%) samples. We included these samples for analyses of flow cytometric test accuracy. SH2D1A mutations were detected in 15/137 samples. SAP expression was low in 13/15 (sensitivity 87%, CI 61-97%). Of the 122 samples with normal sequencing, SAP was normal in 109 (specificity 89%, CI 82-94%). The positive predictive values (PPVs) and the negative predictive values (NPVs) were 50% and 98%, respectively. XIAP/BIRC4 mutations were detected in 19/115 samples. XIAP expression was low in 18/19 (sensitivity 95%, CI 73-100%). Of the 96 samples with normal sequencing, 59 had normal XIAP expression (specificity 61%, CI 51-71%). The PPVs and NPVs were 33% and 98%, respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was able to improve the specificity to 75%. Clinical flow cytometric screening tests for SAP and XIAP deficiencies offer good sensitivity and specificity for detecting genetic mutations, and are characterized by high NPVs. We recommend these tests for patients suspected of having X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1 (XLP1) or XLP2. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. Compound heterozygous mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase identified in a young Chinese woman with late-onset glutaric aciduria type II

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ying; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Keqin; Li, Ling; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Chen, Liye; Wang, Yuhui; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Glutaric aciduria type II (GA II) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. The late-onset form of GA II disorder is almost exclusively associated with mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene. Till now, the clinical features of late-onset GA II vary widely and pose a great challenge for diagnosis. The aim of the current study is to characterize the clinical phenotypes and genetic basis of a late-onset GAII ...

  17. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Vazquez-Guillen

    Full Text Available Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM's in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI.

  18. Potential Causative Mutation for Melanism in Rats Identified in the Agouti Signaling Protein Gene (Asip) of the Rattus rattus Species Complex on Okinawa Island, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamori, Shoichi; Wiewel, Andrew S; Thomson, Vicki A; Kobayashi, Motoko; Nakata, Katsushi; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of black fur, or melanism, in many mammalian species is known to be linked to DNA sequence variation in the agouti signaling protein (Asip) gene, which is a major determinant of eumelanin and pheomelanin pigments in coat color. We investigated 38 agouti (i.e., banded wildtype) and four melanistic Rattus rattus species complex (RrC) lineage II specimens from Okinawa Island, Ryukyu Islands, Japan, for genetic variation in three exons and associated flanking regions in the Asip gene. On Okinawa, a predicted loss-of-function mutation caused by a cysteine to serine amino acid change at p.124C>S (c.370T>A) in the highly conserved functional domain of Asip was found in melanistic rats, but was absent in agouti specimens, suggesting that the p.124C>S mutation is responsible for the observed melanism. Phylogeographic analysis found that Asip sequences from Okinawan RrC lineage II, including both agouti and melanistic specimens, differed from: 1) both agouti and melanistic RrC lineage I from Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan, and 2) agouti RrC lineages I and II from South Australia. This suggests the possibility of in-situ mutation of the Asip gene, either within the RrC lineage II population on Okinawa or in an unsampled RrC lineage II population with biogeographic links to Okinawa, although incomplete lineage sorting could not be ruled out.

  19. Cross-Neutralising Nanobodies Bind to a Conserved Pocket in the Hemagglutinin Stem Region Identified Using Yeast Display and Deep Mutational Scanning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Gaiotto

    Full Text Available Cross-neutralising monoclonal antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA are of considerable interest as both therapeutics and diagnostic tools. We have recently described five different single domain antibodies (nanobodies which share this cross-neutralising activity and suggest their small size, high stability, and cleft binding properties may present distinct advantages over equivalent conventional antibodies. We have used yeast display in combination with deep mutational scanning to give residue level resolution of positions in the antibody-HA interface which are crucial for binding. In addition, we have mapped positions within HA predicted to have minimal effect on antibody binding when mutated. Our cross-neutralising nanobodies were shown to bind to a highly conserved pocket in the HA2 domain of A(H1N1pdm09 influenza virus overlapping with the fusion peptide suggesting their mechanism of action is through the inhibition of viral membrane fusion. We also note that the epitope overlaps with that of CR6261 and F10 which are human monoclonal antibodies in clinical development as immunotherapeutics. Although all five nanobodies mapped to the same highly conserved binding pocket we observed differences in the size of the epitope footprint which has implications in comparing the relative genetic barrier each nanobody presents to a rapidly evolving influenza virus. To further refine our epitope map, we have re-created naturally occurring mutations within this HA stem epitope and tested their effect on binding using yeast display. We have shown that a D46N mutation in the HA2 stem domain uniquely interferes with binding of R2b-E8. Further testing of this substitution in the context of full length purified HA from 1918 H1N1 pandemic (Spanish flu, 2009 H1N1 pandemic (swine flu and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 demonstrated binding which correlated with D46 whereas binding to seasonal H1N1 strains carrying N46 was absent. In addition, our

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Zaragoza

    Full Text Available The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10 with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85% located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51% variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  1. UV Signature Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  2. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir Inêz Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA. If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil.

  3. Robust full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 2a and 2b infectious cultures using mutations identified by a systematic approach applicable to patient strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, but treatment options are limited. Basic HCV research required for vaccine and drug development has been hampered by inability to culture patient isolates, and to date only the JFH1 (genotype 2a) recombinant...... replicates spontaneously in hepatoma cells and releases infectious virus. A JFH1 chimera with the 5' end through NS2 from another genotype 2a strain, J6, had enhanced infectivity. However, the full-length J6 clone (J6CF), which we previously found to be fully functional in vivo, was replication incompetent...... of the genetically divergent isolate J8 (genotype 2b), which differed from the J6 nucleotide sequence by 24%. The most efficient recombinant, J8cc, had nine adaptive mutations and was genetically stable after viral passage. The availability of these robust JFH1-independent genotype 2a and 2b culture systems...

  4. Whole-exome sequencing and genome-wide methylation analyses identify novel disease associated mutations and methylation patterns in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Sommer Kristensen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) and further optimization of diagnostic work-up procedures are warranted. We analyzed purified eosinophils from patients with IHES by next-generation whole-exome sequencing and compared DNA methylation profiles from...... reactive eosinophilic conditions to known clonal and suspected clonal eosinophilia. Somatic missense mutations in cancer-related genes were detected in three IHES patients. These included the spliceosome gene PUF60 and the cadherin gene CDH17. Furthermore, reactive eosinophilia samples could...... be differentiated from known- and suspected clonal eosinophilia samples based on 285 differentially methylated CpG sites corresponding to 128 differentially methylated genes. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we found that differentially methylated genes were highly enriched in functional pathways such as cancer...

  5. Novel ZBTB24 Mutation Associated with Immunodeficiency, Centromere Instability, and Facial Anomalies Type-2 Syndrome Identified in a Patient with Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Máire A; Dawany, Noor; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Devoto, Marcella; Kelsen, Judith R

    2017-12-01

    Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease, diagnosed in children ≤5 years old, can be the initial presentation of some primary immunodeficiencies. In this study, we describe a 17-month-old boy with recurrent infections, growth failure, facial anomalies, and inflammatory bowel disease. Immune evaluation, whole-exome sequencing, karyotyping, and methylation array were performed to evaluate the child's constellation of symptoms and examination findings. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the child was homozygous for a novel variant in ZBTB24, the gene associated with immunodeficiency, centromere instability, and facial anomalies type-2 syndrome. This describes the first case of inflammatory bowel disease associated with immunodeficiency, centromere instability, and facial anomalies type-2 syndrome in a child with a novel disease-causing mutation in ZBTB24 found on whole-exome sequencing.

  6. Genetic evaluation based on family history and Her2 status correctly identifies TP53 mutations in very early onset breast cancer cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, F; Konstantopoulou, I; Mavroudis, D; Tryfonopoulos, D; Yannoukakos, D; Voutsinas, G E

    2015-04-01

    Currently, hereditary breast cancer is being attributed to more than 20 genes of differing penetrance. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 are still the genes of reference for breast cancer susceptibility, extreme breast cancer phenotypes may be the result of deleterious alleles of other genes. Here, we report three families with early-onset breast cancer that were initially referred for BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing. They were diagnosed with breast cancer at an extraordinarily early age. On the basis of their extensive family history, which included multiple cancer types, and their Her2 status, they were suspected for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Indeed, all three probands were found to harbor TP53 tumor suppressor gene mutations. These included p.C275X, described here for the first time, as well as p.R213X and p.Y220C, which have been described in the past. Our conclusion is that decisions on genetic analysis for inherited early onset breast cancer should always be based on detailed pedigree information, combined with Her2 status. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genotypic resistance test in proviral DNA can identify resistance mutations never detected in historical genotypic test in patients with low level or undetectable HIV-RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccarelli, Mauro; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Armenia, Daniele; Borghi, Vanni; Gennari, William; Gori, Caterina; Forbici, Federica; Bertoli, Ada; Fabeni, Lavinia; Giannetti, Alberto; Cicalini, Stefania; Bellagamba, Rita; Andreoni, Massimo; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Mussini, Cristina; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Perno, Carlo Federico; Antinori, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Beyond the detection of resistant HIV strains found in plasma samples, archival HIV-DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) might represent a reservoir of additional resistance. To characterize the HIV-1 resistance in PBMCs from patients with suppressed or low-level viremia (50-1000 copies/mL) and evaluate its added value compared to the resistance detected in previous plasma genotypic resistance tests (GRTs). HIV-1 infected patients selected for treatment change despite low/undetectable viremia were tested. Number and type of primary resistance mutations (PRMs) detected in PBMCs were compared to those detected in previous plasma GRTs. Logistic regression assessed factors associated with presence of at least one PRM in PBMCs. 468 patients with a PBMC GRT were analyzed; 149 of them had at least 2 plasma GRTs performed before PBMC genotyping. 42.3% of patients showed at least one PRM in PBMCs. The highest proportion of PRMs in PBMCs was observed for NRTI class (30.6%), followed by NNRTI (22.2%), PI (14.1%) and INI (4.9%). In 20.1% of patients, PRMs were detected only in PBMCs and not in any of the plasma GRT previously performed. By using multivariable analysis, a higher number of previous regimens, injecting drug-use route and a lower nadir CD4 were associated with significantly higher risk of detecting PRMs in PBMCs. Our findings support the usage of PBMC GRT in addition to the current recommended plasma RNA test, especially when therapeutic and/or resistance information is not available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTAcontaining venous ...

  9. Whole-exome sequencing to identify the cause of congenital sensorineural hearing loss in carriers of a heterozygous GJB2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzefall, Thomas; Frohne, Alexandra; Koenighofer, Martin; Kirchnawy, Andreas; Streubel, Berthold; Schoefer, Christian; Frei, Klemens; Lucas, Trevor

    2017-10-01

    Bi-allelic variations in the gap junction protein beta-2 (GJB2) gene cause up to 50% of cases of newborn hearing loss. Heterozygous pathogenic GJB2 variations are also fivefold overrepresented in idiopathic patient groups compared to the normal-hearing population. Whether hearing loss in this group is due to unidentified additional variations within GJB2 or variations in other deafness genes is unknown in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing offers an effective approach in the search for causative variations in patients with Mendelian diseases. In this prospective genetic cohort study, we initially investigated a family of Turkish origin suffering from congenital autosomal recessive hearing loss. An index patient and his normal-hearing father, both bearing a single heterozygous pathogenic c.262G>T (p.Ala88Ser) GJB2 transversion as well as the normal-hearing mother were investigated by means of whole-exome sequencing. Subsequently the genetic screening was extended to a hearing-impaired cohort of 24 families of Turkish origin. A homozygous missense c.5492G>T transversion (p.Gly1831Val) in the Myosin 15a gene, previously linked to deafness, was identified as causative in the index family. This very rare variant is not listed in any population in the Genome Aggregation Database. Subsequent screening of index patients from additional families of Turkish origin with recessive hearing loss identified the c.5492G>T variation in an additional family. Whole-exome sequencing may effectively identify the causes of idiopathic hearing loss in patients bearing heterozygous GJB2 variations.

  10. Mutation analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) and relationships of identified amino acid polymorphisms to Type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, J; Andersen, G; Urhammer, S A

    2001-01-01

    single strand conformational polymorphism analysis followed by nucleotide sequencing. Identified variants were genotyped in an association study comprising 483 Type II diabetic patients and 216 glucose-tolerant control subjects. A replication study was done in an additional 201 Type II diabetic patients...... and 293 glucose-tolerant subjects. Furthermore, a potential interaction between the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-gamma2 and the PGC-1 Gly482Ser variant on risk of Type II diabetes was investigated. RESULTS: A total of seven variants (Ser74Leu, IVS2 + 52C-->A, Thr394Thr, Asp475Asp, Gly482Ser, Thr528Thr.......0007). No interaction between this variant and the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-gamma2 was observed. CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: A widespread Gly482Ser polymorphism of PGC-1 is associated with a 1.34 genotype relative risk of Type II diabetes....

  11. POU4F3 mutation screening in Japanese hearing loss patients: Massively parallel DNA sequencing-based analysis identified novel variants associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Tomohiro; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Moteki, Hideaki; Oda, Kiyoshi; Ohyama, Kenji; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Murata, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Rina; Ohta, Yoko; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kumakawa, Kozo; Furutate, Sakiko; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Ohta, Yumi; Uehara, Natsumi; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    A variant in a transcription factor gene, POU4F3, is responsible for autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hereditary hearing loss, DFNA15. To date, 14 variants, including a whole deletion of POU4F3, have been reported to cause HL in various ethnic groups. In the present study, genetic screening for POU4F3 variants was carried out for a large series of Japanese hearing loss (HL) patients to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of DFNA15 in the Japanese population. Massively parallel DNA sequencing of 68 target candidate genes was utilized in 2,549 unrelated Japanese HL patients (probands) to identify genomic variations responsible for HL. The detailed clinical features in patients with POU4F3 variants were collected from medical charts and analyzed. Novel 12 POU4F3 likely pathogenic variants (six missense variants, three frameshift variants, and three nonsense variants) were successfully identified in 15 probands (2.5%) among 602 families exhibiting autosomal dominant HL, whereas no variants were detected in the other 1,947 probands with autosomal recessive or inheritance pattern unknown HL. To obtain the audiovestibular configuration of the patients harboring POU4F3 variants, we collected audiograms and vestibular symptoms of the probands and their affected family members. Audiovestibular phenotypes in a total of 24 individuals from the 15 families possessing variants were characterized by progressive HL, with a large variation in the onset age and severity with or without vestibular symptoms observed. Pure-tone audiograms indicated the most prevalent configuration as mid-frequency HL type followed by high-frequency HL type, with asymmetry observed in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Analysis of the relationship between age and pure-tone average suggested that individuals with truncating variants showed earlier onset and slower progression of HL than did those with non-truncating variants. The present study showed that variants in POU4F3 were a

  12. POU4F3 mutation screening in Japanese hearing loss patients: Massively parallel DNA sequencing-based analysis identified novel variants associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Kitano

    Full Text Available A variant in a transcription factor gene, POU4F3, is responsible for autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hereditary hearing loss, DFNA15. To date, 14 variants, including a whole deletion of POU4F3, have been reported to cause HL in various ethnic groups. In the present study, genetic screening for POU4F3 variants was carried out for a large series of Japanese hearing loss (HL patients to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of DFNA15 in the Japanese population. Massively parallel DNA sequencing of 68 target candidate genes was utilized in 2,549 unrelated Japanese HL patients (probands to identify genomic variations responsible for HL. The detailed clinical features in patients with POU4F3 variants were collected from medical charts and analyzed. Novel 12 POU4F3 likely pathogenic variants (six missense variants, three frameshift variants, and three nonsense variants were successfully identified in 15 probands (2.5% among 602 families exhibiting autosomal dominant HL, whereas no variants were detected in the other 1,947 probands with autosomal recessive or inheritance pattern unknown HL. To obtain the audiovestibular configuration of the patients harboring POU4F3 variants, we collected audiograms and vestibular symptoms of the probands and their affected family members. Audiovestibular phenotypes in a total of 24 individuals from the 15 families possessing variants were characterized by progressive HL, with a large variation in the onset age and severity with or without vestibular symptoms observed. Pure-tone audiograms indicated the most prevalent configuration as mid-frequency HL type followed by high-frequency HL type, with asymmetry observed in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Analysis of the relationship between age and pure-tone average suggested that individuals with truncating variants showed earlier onset and slower progression of HL than did those with non-truncating variants. The present study showed that variants

  13. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria...

  14. Hybrid Capture-Based Comprehensive Genomic Profiling Identifies Lung Cancer Patients with Well-Characterized Sensitizing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Point Mutations That Were Not Detected by Standard of Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, James H; Schrock, Alexa B; Johnson, Adrienne; Lipson, Doron; Gay, Laurie M; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Elvin, Julia A; Shakir, Abdur; Ruehlman, Peter; Reckamp, Karen L; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M

    2018-03-14

    In our recent study, of cases positive for epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ) exon 19 deletions using comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP), 17/77 (22%) patients with prior standard of care (SOC) EGFR testing results available were previously negative for exon 19 deletion. Our aim was to compare the detection rates of CGP versus SOC testing for well-characterized sensitizing EGFR point mutations (pm) in our 6,832-patient cohort. DNA was extracted from 40 microns of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from 6,832 consecutive cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of various histologies (2012-2015). CGP was performed using a hybrid capture, adaptor ligation-based next-generation sequencing assay to a mean coverage depth of 576×. Genomic alterations (pm, small indels, copy number changes and rearrangements) involving EGFR were recorded for each case and compared with prior testing results if available. Overall, there were 482 instances of EGFR exon 21 L858R (359) and L861Q (20), exon 18 G719X (73) and exon 20 S768I (30) pm, of which 103 unique cases had prior EGFR testing results that were available for review. Of these 103 cases, CGP identified 22 patients (21%) with sensitizing EGFR pm that were not detected by SOC testing, including 9/75 (12%) patients with L858R, 4/7 (57%) patients with L861Q, 8/20 (40%) patients with G719X, and 4/7 (57%) patients with S768I pm (some patients had multiple EGFR pm). In cases with available clinical data, benefit from small molecule inhibitor therapy was observed. CGP, even when applied to low tumor purity clinical-grade specimens, can detect well-known EGFR pm in NSCLC patients that would otherwise not be detected by SOC testing. Taken together with EGFR exon 19 deletions, over 20% of patients who are positive for EGFR -activating mutations using CGP are previously negative by SOC EGFR mutation testing, suggesting that thousands of such patients per year in the U.S. alone could experience improved clinical

  15. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  16. NUP98-NSD1 fusion in association with FLT3-ITD mutation identifies a prognostically relevant subgroup of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients suitable for monitoring by real time quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiki, Susanna; Dyer, Sara A; Grimwade, David; Ivey, Adam; Abou-Zeid, Nervana; Borrow, Julian; Jeffries, Sally; Caddick, Judith; Newell, Hayley; Begum, Suriya; Tawana, Kiran; Mason, Joanne; Velangi, Mark; Griffiths, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The cytogenetically cryptic t(5;11)(q35;p15) leading to the NUP98-NSD1 fusion is a rare but recurrent gene rearrangement recently reported to identify a group of young AML patients with poor prognosis. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to screen retrospectively diagnostic samples from 54 unselected pediatric AML patients and designed a real time quantitative PCR assay to track individual patient response to treatment. Four positive cases (7%) were identified; three arising de novo and one therapy related AML. All had intermediate risk cytogenetic markers and a concurrent FLT3-ITD but lacked NPM1 and CEBPA mutations. The patients had a poor response to therapy and all proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplant. These data lend support to the adoption of screening for NUP98-NSD1 in pediatric AML without otherwise favorable genetic markers. The role of quantitative PCR is also highlighted as a potential tool for managing NUP98-NSD1 positive patients post-treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  18. Detecting clusters of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available Positive selection for protein function can lead to multiple mutations within a small stretch of DNA, i.e., to a cluster of mutations. Recently, Wagner proposed a method to detect such mutation clusters. His method, however, did not take into account that residues with high solvent accessibility are inherently more variable than residues with low solvent accessibility. Here, we propose a new algorithm to detect clustered evolution. Our algorithm controls for different substitution probabilities at buried and exposed sites in the tertiary protein structure, and uses random permutations to calculate accurate P values for inferred clusters. We apply the algorithm to genomes of bacteria, fly, and mammals, and find several clusters of mutations in functionally important regions of proteins. Surprisingly, clustered evolution is a relatively rare phenomenon. Only between 2% and 10% of the genes we analyze contain a statistically significant mutation cluster. We also find that not controlling for solvent accessibility leads to an excess of clusters in terminal and solvent-exposed regions of proteins. Our algorithm provides a novel method to identify functionally relevant divergence between groups of species. Moreover, it could also be useful to detect artifacts in automatically assembled genomes.

  19. Integrated tumor and germline whole-exome sequencing identifies mutations in MAPK and PI3K pathway genes in an adolescent with rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank Y.; Bergstrom, Katie; Person, Richard; Bavle, Abhishek; Ballester, Leomar Y.; Scollon, Sarah; Raesz-Martinez, Robin; Jea, Andrew; Birchansky, Sherri; Wheeler, David A.; Berg, Stacey L.; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; Adesina, Adekunle M.; Eng, Christine; Roy, Angshumoy; Plon, Sharon E.; Parsons, D. Williams

    2016-01-01

    The integration of genome-scale studies such as whole-exome sequencing (WES) into the clinical care of children with cancer has the potential to provide insight into the genetic basis of an individual's cancer with implications for clinical management. This report describes the results of clinical tumor and germline WES for a patient with a rare tumor diagnosis, rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle (RGNT). Three pathogenic gene alterations with implications for clinical care were identified: somatic activating hotspot mutations in FGFR1 (p.N546K) and PIK3CA (p.H1047R) and a germline pathogenic variant in PTPN11 (p.N308S) diagnostic for Noonan syndrome. The molecular landscape of RGNT is not well-described, but these data are consistent with prior observations regarding the importance of the interconnected MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways in this rare tumor. The co-occurrence of FGFR1, PIK3CA, and PTPN11 alterations provides further evidence for consideration of RGNT as a distinct molecular entity from pediatric low-grade gliomas and suggests potential therapeutic strategies for this patient in the event of tumor recurrence as novel agents targeting these pathways enter pediatric clinical trials. Although RGNT has not been definitively linked with cancer predisposition syndromes, two prior cases have been reported in patients with RASopathies (Noonan syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 [NF1]), providing an additional link between these tumors and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In summary, this case provides an example of the potential for genome-scale sequencing technologies to provide insight into the biology of rare tumors and yield both tumor and germline results of potential relevance to patient care. PMID:27626068

  20. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  1. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, exonic substitution and whole-exon deletions identified in genomic DNA of these patients. In addition, this study identified mutations in cases in which no mutations were detectable ...

  2. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T

  3. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Four hundred and eighty eight patients with advanced NSCLC were included. The mutation status was assessed using the cobas EGFR Mutation Test. Erlotinib was administrated (150 mg/d) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicities occurred. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival....... Secondary endpoints were overall survival and response. RESULTS: Biopsies were retrieved from 467 patients, and mutation results obtained for 462. We identified 57 (12%) patients with EGFR mutations: 33 exon 19 deletions, 13 exon 21 mutations, 5 exon 18 mutations, 3 exon 20 insertions, 1 exon 20 point...

  4. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    with atypia. BRAF mutations were identified in 39 of 111 (35%) cases. The rate ratio of BRAF-mutated versus BRAF-wild-type melanoma did not change over time. BRAF mutations were associated with T1 stage (p = 0.007), young age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.02), sun-exposed location (p = 0.01), mixed....../non-pigmented tumour colour (p = 0.02) and nevus origin (p = 0.005), but did not associate with prognosis. BRAF status in conjunctival melanoma and paired premalignant lesions corresponded in 19 of 20 cases. Immunohistochemistry detected BRAF V600E mutations with a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 1...

  5. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  6. Human beta-galactosidase gene mutations in morquio B disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, A; Yoshida, K; Shimmoto, M; Fukuhara, Y; Sakuraba, H; Suzuki, Y

    1991-01-01

    Three different beta-galactosidase gene mutations--a 273Trp----Leu (mutation F) in both families, 482Arg----His (mutation G) in one family, and 509Trp----Cys (mutation H) in the other family--were identified in three patients with Morquio B disease who were from two unrelated families. Restriction-site analysis using StuI, Nsp(7524)I or RsaI confirmed these mutations. In human fibroblasts, mutation F expressed as much as 8% of the normal allele's enzyme activity, but the other mutations expre...

  7. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  8. Calreticulin Mutations in Bulgarian MPN Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Ivan; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Alaikov, Tzvetan; Spassova, Sylva; Stoimenov, Angel; Naumova, Elissaveta; Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena

    2018-01-01

    Somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR are recurrently identified in most of the cases with Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We applied four molecular genetic methods for identification of CALR exon 9 mutations, including high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, Sanger sequencing, semiconductor target genes sequencing and whole exome sequencing. A total of 78 patients with myeloid malignancies were included in the study. We identified 14 CALR exon 9 mutated cases out of 78 studied patients with myeloid malignancies. All mutated patients were diagnosed with MPN being either PMF (n = 7) or ET (n = 7). Nine cases had type 1 mutations and 5 cases had type 2 mutations. CALR exon 9, MPL exon 10 and JAK2 p. V617F were mutually exclusive. There were no statistically significant differences in the hematological parameters between the cases with CALR and JAK2 or MPL mutations. Notably, all four techniques were fully concordant in the detection of CALR mutations. This is one of the few reports on the CALR mutations frequency in South-eastern populations. Our study shows that the frequency and patterns of these mutations is identical to those in the patients' cohorts from Western countries. Besides we demonstrated the utility of four different methods for their detection.

  9. The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) mutation list: a new online resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Amanda B; Miller, Connie H; Kelly, Fiona M; Michael Soucie, J; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-02-01

    Genotyping efforts in hemophilia A (HA) populations in many countries have identified large numbers of unique mutations in the Factor VIII gene (F8). To assist HA researchers conducting genotyping analyses, we have developed a listing of F8 mutations including those listed in existing locus-specific databases as well as those identified in patient populations and reported in the literature. Each mutation was reviewed and uniquely identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards for coding DNA and predicted protein changes as well as traditional nomenclature based on the mature, processed protein. Listings also include the associated hemophilia severity classified by International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) criteria, associations of the mutations with inhibitors, and reference information. The mutation list currently contains 2,537 unique mutations known to cause HA. HA severity caused by the mutation is available for 2,022 mutations (80%) and information on inhibitors is available for 1,816 mutations (72%). The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations for download and search and will be updated quarterly based on periodic literature reviews and submitted reports. Published 2012. This Article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  11. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR, to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence. All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50, none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  12. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  13. Precise estimates of mutation rate and spectrum in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Siegal, Mark L.; Hall, David W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The most direct and unbiased method of studying spontaneous mutations is via mutation accumulation (MA) lines. Until recently, MA experiments were limited by the cost of sequencing and thus provided us with small numbers of mutational events and therefore imprecise estimates of rates and patterns of mutation. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify nearly 1,000 spontaneous mutation events accumulated over ∼311,000 generations in 145 diploid MA lines of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MA experiments are usually assumed to have negligible levels of selection, but even mild selection will remove strongly deleterious events. We take advantage of such patterns of selection and show that mutation classes such as indels and aneuploidies (especially monosomies) are proportionately much more likely to contribute mutations of large effect. We also provide conservative estimates of indel, aneuploidy, environment-dependent dominant lethal, and recessive lethal mutation rates. To our knowledge, for the first time in yeast MA data, we identified a sufficiently large number of single-nucleotide mutations to measure context-dependent mutation rates and were able to (i) confirm strong AT bias of mutation in yeast driven by high rate of mutations from C/G to T/A and (ii) detect a higher rate of mutation at C/G nucleotides in two specific contexts consistent with cytosine methylation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24847077

  14. A DSPP Mutation Causing Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Characterization of the Mutational Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  15. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  16. Screening for calreticulin mutations in a cohort of patients suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 36 types of insertions and deletions identified, type 1 (a. 52-base pair deletion) and type 2 (a 5-base pair insertion) mutations account for >80% of CALR mutations.[7] Phenotypic differences between type 1 and type 2 carriers have been implicated. [3] All recurrent mutations cause a frameshift in the region encoding.

  17. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayley, J.P.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Cascon, A.; Sampietro, M.L.; Gaal, J.; Korpershoek, E.; Hinojar-Gutierrez, A.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hermsen, M.A.; Suarez, C.; Hussain, A.K.; Vriends, A.H.; Hes, F.J.; Jansen, J.C.; Tops, C.M.; Corssmit, E.P.; Knijff, P. de; Lenders, J.W.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Devilee, P.; Dinjens, W.N.; Krijger, R.R. de; Robledo, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation

  18. Calpain-3 mutations in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Burcu; Aurino, Stefania; Haliloglu, Göknur; Talim, Beril; Erdem, Sevim; Akcören, Zuhal; Tan, Ersin; Caglar, Melda; Richard, Isabelle; Nigro, Vincenzo; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2006-05-01

    Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2s) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by progressive involvement of the proximal limb girdle muscles; the group includes at least 10 different genetic entities. The calpainopathies (LGMD2A), a subgroup of LGMD2s, are estimated to be the most common forms of LGMD2 in all populations so far investigated. LGMD2A is usually characterized by symmetrical and selective atrophy of pelvic, scapular and trunk muscles and a moderate to gross elevation of serum CK. However, the course is highly variable. It is caused by mutations in the CAPN3 gene, which encodes for the calpain-3 protein. Until now, 161 pathogenic mutations have been found in the CAPN3 gene. In the present study, through screening of 93 unrelated LGMD2 families, we identified 29 families with LGMD2A, 21 (22.6%) of which were identified as having CAPN3 gene mutations. We detected six novel (p.K211N, p.D230G, p.Y322H, p.R698S, p.Q738X, c.2257delGinsAA) and nine previously reported mutations (c.550delA, c.19_23del, c.1746-20C>G, p.R49H, p.R490Q, p.Y336N, p.A702V, p.Y537X, p.R541Q) in the CAPN3 gene. There may be a wide variety of mutations, but clustering of specific mutations (c.550delA: 40%, p.R490Q: 10%) could be used in the diagnostic scheme in Turkey.

  19. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  20. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  1. Expanding the keratin mutation database: novel and recurrent mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in 28 patients with epidermolytic ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, M J; Oji, V; Emmert, S; Hausser, I; Traupe, H; Krieg, T; Grimberg, G

    2011-02-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) is a hereditary keratinization disorder caused by mutations in the keratin 1 (KRT1) or keratin 10 (KRT10) genes. In most cases of severe EI, heterozygous single point mutations are found at the highly conserved helix boundary motifs of KRT1 and KRT10 that play a critical role in filament formation. The presence of palmoplantar keratoderma suggests KRT1 mutations, whereas KRT10 mutations in most instances give rise to the nonpalmoplantar variants. To identify the underlying mutations in patients with EI and to correlate genotype and phenotype. Mutation analysis was performed in 28 patients with EI by direct sequencing of KRT1 and KRT10 genes. We identified 14 different mutations, of which four have not been published previously. Identification of novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in EI allows improved understanding of disease pathogenesis as well as better patient management. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. Molecular analyses of novel ASAH1 mutations causing Farber lipogranulomatosis: analyses of exonic splicing enhancer inactivating mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, M D; Chaudhary, A K; Kiran, M; Reddy, V; Nagarajaram, H A; Dalal, A; Bashyam, L; Suri, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Kabra, M; Puri, R D; RamaDevi, R; Kapoor, S; Danda, S

    2014-12-01

    Farber lipogranulomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the ASAH1 gene. In the largest ever study, we identified and characterized ASAH1 mutations from 11 independent Farber disease (FD) families. A total of 13 different mutations were identified including 1 splice, 1 polypyrimidine tract (PPT) deletion and 11 missense mutations. Eleven mutations were exclusive to the Indian population. The IVS6+4A>G splice and IVS5-16delTTTTC PPT deletion mutations resulted in skipping of exon 6 precluding thereby the region responsible for cleavage of enzyme precursor. A missense mutation (p.V198A) resulted in skipping of exon 8 due to inactivation of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) element. This is the first report of mutations affecting PPT and ESE in the ASAH1 gene resulting in FD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Bartolo, C.; Pearl, D.K. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5` and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened {approximately} 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3` of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3` mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. 71 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    Danish paternity cases in the period 1999 to 2005 were investigated regarding mutation rates in STR loci. STR-typing was performed by the Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Profiler Plus kit in the period 1999 to early 2005, hereafter named the PP9, and by Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Identifier kit...... for the rest of 2005, hereafter named the IDFL. All cases with one to four genetic inconsistencies were manually inspected by two forensic geneticists and statistically analyzed by five statisticians. We found no significant effect of kits and no interaction of kits and STRA loci, but differences in mutation...... rates on different STR loci. In the cases where mutations had occured, we found no interaction between kits, STRA loci or sexes. However, we found differences in the mutation rates between the sexes, meaning that the differences in male and female mutation rates can be assumed constant over STR loci...

  5. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...... and m.15482T>C; p.S246P were identified. Modeling showed that the p.C93Y mutation leads to disruption of the tertiary structure of Cytb by helix displacement, interfering with protein-heme interaction. The p.S246P mutation induces a diproline structure, which alters local secondary structure and induces...... of HCM patients. We propose that further patients with HCM should be examined for mutations in MT-CYB in order to clarify the role of these variants....

  6. Molecular analysis of mutations in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular nature of mutations and the mechanisms by which mutations are translated into specific (and often complex) phenotypes is a major goal of mammalian biology. Molecular genetic analysis of heritable mouse mutations constitutes a significant, experimentally malleable strategy for relating genomic DNA structure to genic expression and function in mammals. Radiation-induced germ-line mutations, many of which are deletions or chromosomal rearrangements, have assumed important roles in strategies for (1) identifying new genetic loci in specific regions of the genome, (2) obtaining molecular access to these regions, (3) developing detailed molecular maps within regions, and (4) analyzing, at a functional level, the role(s) played by specific segments of genomic DNA in normal development as well as the effect(s) of mutation on biologically significant processes and phenotypes

  7. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  8. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Couzigou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast.

  9. A Site Specific Model And Analysis Of The Neutral Somatic Mutation Rate In Whole-Genome Cancer Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Rasmussen, Malene Juul

    2017-01-01

    Detailed modelling of the neutral mutational process in cancer cells is crucial for identifying driver mutations and understanding the mutational mechanisms that act during cancer development. The neutral mutational process is very complex: whole-genome analyses have revealed that the mutation ra...

  10. Human beta-galactosidase gene mutations in morquio B disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, A; Yoshida, K; Shimmoto, M; Fukuhara, Y; Sakuraba, H; Suzuki, Y

    1991-11-01

    Three different beta-galactosidase gene mutations--a 273Trp----Leu (mutation F) in both families, 482Arg----His (mutation G) in one family, and 509Trp----Cys (mutation H) in the other family--were identified in three patients with Morquio B disease who were from two unrelated families. Restriction-site analysis using StuI, Nsp(7524)I or RsaI confirmed these mutations. In human fibroblasts, mutation F expressed as much as 8% of the normal allele's enzyme activity, but the other mutations expressed no detectable enzyme activity. We conclude that the unique clinical manifestations are specifically associated with mutation F, a common two-base substitution, in this disease.

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  12. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo

    2011-01-01

    , the pentalogy of Cantrell and Limb-Body Wall Complex. Here we present a review of the published mutations in the PORCN gene to date and report on seven new mutations together with the corresponding clinical data. Based on the review we have created a Web-based locus-specific database that lists all identified...... variants and allows the inclusion of future reports. The database is based on the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) software, and is accessible online at http://www.lovd.nl/porcn. At present, the database contains 106 variants, representing 68 different mutations, scattered along the whole...

  13. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  14. Induced mutations in castor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, K.; Javad Hussain, H.S.; Vindhiyavarman, P.

    2001-01-01

    Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is an important oilseed crop in India. To create variability mutations were induced in two cultivars 'TMV5' (maturing in 130-140 days) and 'CO1' (perennial type). Gamma rays and diethyl sulphate and ethidium bromide were used for seed treatment. Ten doses, from 100 to 1000 Gy were employed. For chemical mutagenesis five concentrations of mutagenes from 10 to 50 mM were tried. No economic mutants could be isolated after treatment with the chemical mutagens. The following economic mutants were identified in the dose 300 Gy of gamma rays. Annual types from perennial CO 1 castor CO 1 is a perennial variety (8-10 years) with bold seeds (100 seed weight 90 g) and high oil content (57%). Twenty-one lines were isolated with annual types (160-180 days) with high yield potential as well as bold seeds and high oil content. These mutants, identified in M 3 generation were bred true in subsequent generations up to M 8 generation. Critical evaluation of the mutants in yield evaluation trials is in progress

  15. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  16. 2017 update of the drug resistance mutations in HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Johnson, Victoria A.; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W.; Richman, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    The 2017 edition of the IAS–USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key

  17. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Wang

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas (AS are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA, that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma.Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3 demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage.Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  18. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guannan; Wu, Ming; Maloneyhuss, Martha A; Wojcik, John; Durham, Amy C; Mason, Nicola J; Roth, David B

    2017-01-01

    Angiosarcomas (AS) are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA), that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma. Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3) demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage. Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  19. Characterization of Phenyalanine Hydroxylase Gene Mutations in Chilean PKU Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, V; Santa María, L; Fuenzalida, K; Morales, P; Desviat, L R; Ugarte, M; Pérez, B; Cabello, J F; Cornejo, V

    2017-12-30

    Phenylketonuria (PKU, OMIM 261600) is an autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the Phenylalanine Hydroxylase (PAH) gene situated in chromosome 12q22-q24.2. This gene has 13 exons. To date, 991 mutations have been described. The genotype is one of the main factors that determine the phenotype of this disease. Characterize PKU genotype and phenotype seen in Chilean PKU patients. We studied the PAH gene by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and/or sequencing techniques to identify pathogenic mutations in 71 PKU subjects. We classified the phenotype according to Guldberg predicted value. We identified 26 different mutations in 134 of the 142 alleles studied (94.4%), 88.7% of the subjects had biallelic pathogenic mutations while 11.3% had only one pathogenic mutation identified. Compound heterozygous represented 85.9% of the cases. Exon 7 included the majority of mutations (26.9%) and 50% of mutations were missense. The most frequent mutations were c.1066-11G > A, c.442-?_509+?del and p.Val388Met. The majority of subjects (52.3%) had the classic phenotype. The most frequent mutations in our Chilean PKU population were p.Val388Met, c.442?_509+?del and c.1066-11G > A. It is possible to predict phenotype by detecting the genotype, and use this information to determine disease prognosis and adjust patient's medical and nutritional management accordingly.

  20. Comparison of nodal metastasis between BRCA mutation carriers and non-BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Shahrbanoo F; Gangi, Alexandra; Nelson, Maria E; Choi, Michael; Mirzadehgan, Parisa; Bonk, Alison K; Mirocha, James; Amersi, Farin; Giuliano, Armando E

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluates whether nodal status differs between breast cancer patients with BRCA mutations and those confirmed not to harbor mutations. A prospective database identified patients with breast cancer who underwent genetic testing and axillary staging. Comparative variables included age, as well as tumor characteristics such as size, grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-neu), and nodal status. Overall, 235 patients with breast cancer underwent genetic testing for BRCA mutations from June 2000 to May 2012. Of these patients, 74 (31.4 %) were found to express BRCA 1 and/or 2 mutations, and 161 (68.5 %) patients were verified to have no detectable BRCA mutation. Among the entire 235 patients tested, 92 (39.1 %) were found to have nodal disease. In univariable analysis, only LVI and tumor size correlated with presence of nodal metastasis. Of the 74 BRCA mutation carriers, 34 (45.9 %) had nodal metastasis compared with 58 of the 161 (36 %; p = 0.15) patients without a BRCA mutation. BRCA mutation carriers with nodal disease were more likely to have poorly differentiated tumors than those without mutations who had nodal disease (24/33 [72.7 %] vs. 27/57 [47.4 %]; p = 0.027). BRCA mutations are not themselves predictive of nodal metastasis. Patients with BRCA mutations did not have a statistically significant higher prevalence of nodal metastasis than those without mutations.

  1. Multiple gene mutations, not the type of mutation, are the modifier of left ventricle hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yubao; Wang, Jizheng; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yilu; Chen, Yi; Sun, Kai; Gao, Shuo; Zhang, Channa; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yin; Feng, Xinxing; Song, Ying; Wu, Yajie; Zhang, Hongju; Jia, Lei; Wang, Hu; Wang, Dong; Yan, Chaowu; Lu, Minjie; Zhou, Xianliang; Song, Lei; Hui, Rutai

    2013-06-01

    Genotype-phenotype correlation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been challenging because of the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. To determine the mutation profile of Chinese patients with HCM and to correlate genotypes with phenotypes, we performed a systematic mutation screening of the eight most commonly mutated genes encoding sarcomere proteins in 200 unrelated Chinese adult patients using direct DNA sequencing. A total of 98 mutations were identified in 102 mutation carriers. The frequency of mutations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3 was 26.0, 18.0, 4.0 and 3.5 % respectively. Among the 200 genotyped HCM patients, 83 harbored a single mutation, and 19 (9.5 %) harbored multiple mutations. The number of mutations was positively correlated with the maximum wall thickness. We found that neither particular gene nor specific mutation was correlated to clinical phenotype. In summary, the frequency of multiple mutations was greater in Chinese HCM patients than in the Caucasian population. Multiple mutations in sarcomere protein may be a risk factor for left ventricular wall thickness.

  2. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula

    2010-01-01

    Genetic alterations underlying the development of the cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses (sinonasal cancer, SNC), a rare cancer that can be included in the group of head and neck cancers, are still largely unknown. We recently reported that TP53 mutations are a common feature of SNC......, with an overall frequency of 77%, and they show association to adenocarcinoma and wood-dust exposure [15]. In this study, we report in detail the sequence change for 159 TP53 mutations identified by direct sequencing. More than half of the mutations (60%, 95/159) were missense mutations; there were also 28 (18......%) frameshift or nonsense mutations, and 36 (23%) intronic or silent mutations. In coding region, the most common base change detected was C-->T transition (43/125; 34% of base changes in the coding region). G-->T transversions occurred at a frequency of 10% (12/125), which is less than reported in mutation...

  3. Homozygous Desmocollin-2 Mutations and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Alessandra; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Rigato, Ilaria; Vazza, Giovanni; De Bortoli, Marzia; Calore, Martina; Occhi, Gianluca; Carturan, Elisa; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Cason, Marco; Mazzotti, Elisa; Poloni, Giulia; Mostacciuolo, Maria Luisa; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-10-15

    Dominant mutations in desmocollin-2 (DSC2) gene cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a progressive heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular tachyarrhythmias, heart failure, and risk of juvenile sudden death. Recessive mutations are rare and are associated with a cardiac or cardiocutaneous phenotype. Here, we evaluated the impact of a homozygous founder DSC2 mutation on clinical expression of ACM. An exon-by-exon analysis of the DSC2 coding region was performed in 94 ACM index patients. The c.536A>G (p.D179G) mutation was identified in 5 patients (5.3%), 4 of which resulted to be homozygous carriers. The 5 subjects shared a conserved haplotype, strongly indicating a common founder. Genetic and clinical investigation of probands' families revealed that p.D179G homozygous carriers displayed severe forms of biventricular cardiomyopathy without hair or skin abnormalities. The only heterozygous proband, who carried an additional variant of unknown significance in αT-catenin gene, showed a mild form of ACM without left ventricular involvement. All heterozygous family members were clinically asymptomatic. In conclusion, this is the first homozygous founder mutation in DSC2 gene identified among Italian ACM probands. Our findings provide further evidence of the occurrence of recessive DSC2 mutations in patients with ACM predominantly presenting with biventricular forms of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identifying sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Houles, Mathieu; Vellas, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    The present review describes and discusses the currently available definitions for sarcopenia from consensus studies. Different sarcopenia definitions have been proposed in these last years. Six main approaches to an operative definition of sarcopenia have been identified. Although the first definitions were solely based on the assessment of the amount of muscle mass, current definitions seem to consistently recognize a bi-dimensional nature of sarcopenia. So, these approaches imply the need of simultaneously assessing both age-related quantitative (i.e. amount of muscle mass) and qualitative (i.e. muscle strength and function) declines of skeletal muscle. Although current consensus exists about a bi-dimensional nature, the proposed approaches to measure sarcopenia are characterized by methodological differences. The majority of the operative definitions proposes to assess muscle mass as an index of appendicular muscle mass divided by squared height (evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), assess strength using hand-held dynamometers, and assess function by evaluating gait speed at habitual pace over a short distance. Nevertheless, the clinically relevant thresholds and how to combine the three aspects in an operative definition in order to identify sarcopenia are heterogeneous. A main drawback is that supportive empirical data are missing for these conceptual definitions regarding the risk-assessment of different clinically significant adverse outcomes.

  5. Exome Sequencing Identifies PDE4D Mutations in Acrodysostosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, H.; Graham, J.M.; Rimoin, D.L.; Lachman, R.S.; Krejčí, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2012), s. 746-751 ISSN 0002-9297 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : AUTOSOMAL-DOMINANT TRANSMISSION * PERIPHERAL DYSOSTOSIS * MENTAL-RETARDATION Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 11.202, year: 2012

  6. Identification of mutations including de novo mutations in Korean patients with hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S H; Kim, U K; Chae, J J; Kim, D J; Oh, H Y; Kim, B J; Lee, C C

    2001-05-01

    Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder involving the abnormal function of ion channels and it is characterized by paralysis attacks of varying severity, accompanied by a fall in blood potassium levels. Linkage analysis showed that the candidate locus responsible for hypoPP was localized to chromosome 1q31-32, and this locus encoded the muscle dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel alpha(1)-subunit (CACNA1S). So far, three different mutations in CACNA1S gene have been identified in patients with hypoPP: Arg528His, Arg1239His and Arg1239Gly in Caucasian patients. However, there are few reports about the mutations of CACNA1S gene in other races. In this study, four Korean families with five hypoPP patients were screened for mutations of CACNA1S gene with polymerase chain reaction-based restriction analysis and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. To determine the mode of inheritance, haplotype analysis was done with three microsatellite markers (D1S1726, CACNL1A3, and D1S1723). Arg528His mutation was detected in three families, and one family had no known mutations. Moreover, for the first time, we detected de novo Arg528His mutations in two out of three families with hypoPP. Haplotype analysis using three microsatellite markers (D1S1726, CACNL1A3, and D1S1723) suggested the occurrence of de novo Arg528His mutations in two of the three families with Arg528His mutation. Arg528His mutations of CACNA1S, including de novo Arg528His mutations, were found in Korean patients with hypoPP. These results imply that de novo mutation, in addition to non-penetrance, is one of the genetic mechanisms that can explain the previous clinical observation that hypoPP occurs sporadically without family history.

  7. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagore, Eduardo; Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, Sívaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Soriano, Virtudes; Frank, Christoph; Traves, Victor; Quecedo, Esther; Sanjuan-Gimenez, Josefa; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in targeted therapies, the treatment of advanced melanoma remains an exercise in disease management, hence a need for biomarkers for identification of at-risk primary melanoma patients. In this study, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in primary melanomas. Tumors from 300 patients with stage I/II melanoma were sequenced for TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Cumulative curves were drawn for patients with and without mutations with progression-free and melanoma-specific survival as outcomes. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effect of the mutations on survivals. Individually, presence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations associated with poor disease-free and melanoma-specific survival with modification of the effect by the rs2853669 polymorphism within the TERT promoter. Hazard ratio (HR) for simultaneous occurrence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations for disease-free survival was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.4) and for melanoma-specific survival 5.8 (95% CI 1.9-18.3). The effect of the mutations on melanoma-specific survival in noncarriers of variant allele of the polymorphism was significant (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-15.2) but could not be calculated for the carriers due to low number of events. The variant allele per se showed association with increased survival (HR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The data in this study provide preliminary evidence that TERT promoter mutations in combination with BRAF/NRAS mutations can be used to identify patients at risk of aggressive disease and the possibility of refinement of the classification with inclusion of the rs2853669 polymorphism within TERT promoter. © 2016 UICC.

  8. Improving the Performance of Somatic Mutation Identification by Recovering Circulating Tumor DNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Jovelet, Cécile; Filleron, Thomas; Pedrero, Marion; Motté, Nelly; Boursin, Yannick; Luo, Yufei; Massard, Christophe; Campone, Mario; Levy, Christelle; Diéras, Véronique; Bachelot, Thomas; Garrabey, Julie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lacroix, Ludovic; André, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Celine

    2016-10-15

    DNA extracted from cancer patients' whole blood may contain somatic mutations from circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) fragments. In this study, we introduce cmDetect, a computational method for the systematic identification of ctDNA mutations using whole-exome sequencing of a cohort of tumor and corresponding peripheral whole-blood samples. Through the analysis of simulated data, we demonstrated an increase in sensitivity in calling somatic mutations by combining cmDetect to two widely used mutation callers. In a cohort of 93 breast cancer metastatic patients, cmDetect identified ctDNA mutations in 54% of the patients and recovered somatic mutations in cancer genes EGFR, PIK3CA, and TP53 We further showed that cmDetect detected ctDNA in 89% of patients with confirmed mutated cell-free tumor DNA by plasma analyses (n = 9) within 46 pan-cancer patients. Our results prompt immediate consideration of the use of this method as an additional step in somatic mutation calling using whole-exome sequencing data with blood samples as controls. Cancer Res; 76(20); 5954-61. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Clustered Mutation Signatures Reveal that Error-Prone DNA Repair Targets Mutations to Active Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2017-07-27

    Many processes can cause the same nucleotide change in a genome, making the identification of the mechanisms causing mutations a difficult challenge. Here, we show that clustered mutations provide a more precise fingerprint of mutagenic processes. Of nine clustered mutation signatures identified from >1,000 tumor genomes, three relate to variable APOBEC activity and three are associated with tobacco smoking. An additional signature matches the spectrum of translesion DNA polymerase eta (POLH). In lymphoid cells, these mutations target promoters, consistent with AID-initiated somatic hypermutation. In solid tumors, however, they are associated with UV exposure and alcohol consumption and target the H3K36me3 chromatin of active genes in a mismatch repair (MMR)-dependent manner. These regions normally have a low mutation rate because error-free MMR also targets H3K36me3 chromatin. Carcinogens and error-prone repair therefore redistribute mutations to the more important regions of the genome, contributing a substantial mutation load in many tumors, including driver mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Nuri A; Donohue, Duncan E; Bacolla, Albino; Vasquez, Karen M; Cooper, David N; Mudunuri, Uma; Ivanic, Joseph; Cer, Regina Z; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M; Collins, Jack R; Luke, Brian T

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage in somatic cells originates from both environmental and endogenous sources, giving rise to mutations through multiple mechanisms. When these mutations affect the function of critical genes, cancer may ensue. Although identifying genomic subsets of mutated genes may inform therapeutic options, a systematic survey of tumor mutational spectra is required to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of mutagenesis involved in cancer etiology. Recent studies have presented genome-wide sets of somatic mutations as a 96-element vector, a procedure that only captures the immediate neighbors of the mutated nucleotide. Herein, we present a 32 × 12 mutation matrix that captures the nucleotide pattern two nucleotides upstream and downstream of the mutation. A somatic autosomal mutation matrix (SAMM) was constructed from tumor-specific mutations derived from each of 909 individual cancer genomes harboring a total of 10,681,843 single-base substitutions. In addition, mechanistic template mutation matrices (MTMMs) representing oxidative DNA damage, ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, (5m)CpG deamination, and APOBEC-mediated cytosine mutation, are presented. MTMMs were mapped to the individual tumor SAMMs to determine the maximum contribution of each mutational mechanism to the overall mutation pattern. A Manhattan distance across all SAMM elements between any two tumor genomes was used to determine their relative distance. Employing this metric, 89.5% of all tumor genomes were found to have a nearest neighbor from the same tissue of origin. When a distance-dependent 6-nearest neighbor classifier was used, 10.4% of the SAMMs had an Undetermined tissue of origin, and 92.2% of the remaining SAMMs were assigned to the correct tissue of origin. [corrected]. Thus, although tumors from different tissues may have similar mutation patterns, their SAMMs often display signatures that are characteristic of specific tissues.

  11. Mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juby Mathew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase B gene (ARSB and consequent deficient activity of ARSB, a lysosomal enzyme. We present here the results of a study undertaken to identify the mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India. Around 160 ARSB mutations, of which just 4 are from India, have been reported in the literature. Our study covered nine MPS VI patients from eight families. Both familial mutations were found in seven families, and only one mutation was found in one family. Seven mutations were found — four novel (p.G38_G40del3, p.C91R, p.L98R and p.R315P, two previously reported from India (p.D53N and p.W450C, and one reported from outside India (p.R160Q. One mutation, p.W450C, was present in two families, and the other six mutations were present in one family each. Analysis of the molecular structure of the enzyme revealed that most of these mutations either cause loss of an active site residue or destabilize the structure of the enzyme. The only previous study on mutations in ARSB in Indian MPS VI patients, by Kantaputra et al. 2014 [1], reported four novel mutations of which two (p.D53N and p.W450C were found in our study as well. Till date, nine mutations have been reported from India, through our study and the Kantaputra study. Eight out of these nine mutations have been found only in India. This suggests that the population studied by us might have its own typical set of mutations, with other populations equally likely to have their own set of mutations.

  12. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    -syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non......-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24–0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families...

  13. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  14. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  15. Wilson disease mutation pattern with genotype-phenotype correlations from Western India: confirmation of p.C271* as a common Indian mutation and identification of 14 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Annu; Chandhok, Gursimran; Todorov, Theodor; Parekh, Saloni; Tilve, Sharada; Zibert, Andree; Bhatt, Mohit; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2013-07-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the ATP7B gene, with over 600 mutations described. Identification of mutations has made genetic diagnosis of WD feasible in many countries. The heterogeneity of ATP7B mutants is, however, yet to be identified in the Indian population. We analyzed the mutational pattern of WD in a large region of Western India. We studied patients (n = 52) for ATP7B gene mutations in a cohort of families with WD and also in first-degree relatives (n = 126). All 21 exon-intron boundaries of the WD gene were amplified and directly sequenced. We identified 36 different disease-causing mutations (31 exonic and five intronic splice site variants). Fourteen novel mutations were identified. Exons 2, 8, 13, 14, and 18 accounted for the majority of mutations (86.4%). A previously recognized mutation, p.C271*, and the novel mutation p.E122fs, were the most common mutations with allelic frequencies of 20.2% and 10.6%, respectively. Frequent homozygous mutations (58.9%) and disease severity assessments allowed analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations. Our study significantly adds to the emerging data from other parts of India suggesting that p.C271* may be the most frequent mutation across India, and may harbor a moderate to severely disabling phenotype with limited variability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  16. Mutation Breeding for Crop Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajbir, S. Sangwan

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomes contain genes responsible of different traits of any organism. Induced mutation using chemical mutagens and radiation to modify molecular structure of plants played a major role in the development of high genetic variability and help develop new superior crop varieties. The Mutation Breeding is applicable to all plants and has generated lot of agronomically interesting mutants, both in vegetatively and seed propagated plants. The technique is easy but long and challenging to detect, isolate and characterize the mutant and gene. A specific dose of irradiation has to be used to obtain desired mutants. However, with modern molecular technique, the gene responsible for mutation can be identified. The CRISPR-Cas9 allows the removal of a specific gene which is responsible of unwanted trait and replacing it with a gene which induces a desired trait. There have been more than 2700 officially released mutant varieties from 170 different plant species in more than 60 countries throughout the world and A more participatory approach, involving all stakeholders in plant breeding, is needed to ensure that it is demand/farmers driven.

  17. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  18. A novel germline mutation of PTEN associated with brain tumours of multiple lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.T. Staal (Frank); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); M.R.M. Baert (Miranda); J. van Drunen (J.); H. van Bakel (Harm); E. Peters; I. de Valk (I.); H.K.P. van Amstel; M.J. Taphoorn (Martin); G. Jansen (Gert); C.W.M. van Veelen (C. W M); B.M. Burgering (Boudewijn); G.E.J. Staal (G. E J)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWe have identified a novel germline mutation in the PTEN tumour suppressor gene. The mutation was identified in a patient with a glioma, and turned out to be a heterozygous germline mutation of PTEN (Arg234Gln), without loss of heterozygosity in tumour DNA. The biological consequences of

  19. A Retrospective Study of Clinical and Mutational Findings in 45 Danish Families with Ectodermal Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Henningsen, Emil; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2014-01-01

    covering 17 different diagnoses. Forty-five families were identified of which 26 were sporadic cases with no affected family members. In 27 tested families a disease-causing mutation was identified in 23 families. Eleven mutations were novel mutations. To our knowledge, we present the first large...

  20. Mutation profiles of phenylketonuria in Quebec populations: Evidence of stratification and novel mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, R.; Mascisch, A.; Scriver, C.R. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Lambert, M. (Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal (Canada)); Laframboise, R. (Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-08-01

    Independent phenylketonuria (PKU) chromosomes (n=109) representing 80% of a proband cohort in Quebec province carry 18 different identified mutations in 20 different mutation/haplotype combinations. The study reported here, the third in a series on Quebec populations, was done in the Montreal region and predominantly on French Canadians. It has identified three novel mutations (A309D, D338Y, and 1054/1055delG [352fs]) and one unusual mutation/RFLP haplotype combination (E280K on Hp 2). The relative frequencies and distribution of PKU mutations were then compared in three regions and population subsets (eastern Quebec, French Canadian; western Quebec, French Canadian; and Montreal, non-French Canadian). The distributions of the prevalent and rare mutations are nonrandom and provide evidence for genetic stratification. The latter and the presence of eight unusual mutation/haplotype combinations in Quebec families with European ancestries (the aforementioned four and M1V, 165T, S349P, and R408W on Hp 1) corroborate demographic and anthropologic evidence, from elsewhere, for different origins of French Canadians in eastern and western Quebec. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udhaya H Kotecha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1. We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  2. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  3. Statistical method on nonrandom clustering with application to somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejto Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cancer is caused by the accumulation of tumor-specific mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressors that confer a selective growth advantage to cells. As a consequence of genomic instability and high levels of proliferation, many passenger mutations that do not contribute to the cancer phenotype arise alongside mutations that drive oncogenesis. While several approaches have been developed to separate driver mutations from passengers, few approaches can specifically identify activating driver mutations in oncogenes, which are more amenable for pharmacological intervention. Results We propose a new statistical method for detecting activating mutations in cancer by identifying nonrandom clusters of amino acid mutations in protein sequences. A probability model is derived using order statistics assuming that the location of amino acid mutations on a protein follows a uniform distribution. Our statistical measure is the differences between pair-wise order statistics, which is equivalent to the size of an amino acid mutation cluster, and the probabilities are derived from exact and approximate distributions of the statistical measure. Using data in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database, we have demonstrated that our method detects well-known clusters of activating mutations in KRAS, BRAF, PI3K, and β-catenin. The method can also identify new cancer targets as well as gain-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors. Conclusions Our proposed method is useful to discover activating driver mutations in cancer by identifying nonrandom clusters of somatic amino acid mutations in protein sequences.

  4. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos; Melin, Beatrice; Nordling, Margareta; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Nilbert, Mef

    2016-11-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations. Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369 Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder mutation that accounted for 15% of the families with mutations in MLH1. In conclusion, the Swedish Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum is diverse with private MMR gene mutations in two-thirds of the families, has a significant contribution from internationally recognized mutations and a limited effect from founder mutations.

  5. Induced mutation of soy by ionization mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.L.; Hsu, H.L.

    1975-09-01

    This article presents the results of experiments dealing with how 14 different doses of three types of ionization irradiation-roentgen rays, /sup 60/Co gamma rays, and thermal neutrons affect mutation of 14 types of soy beans and their hybrids. It was learned that with an increased dose the coefficient of seed germination decreases, the cotyledon becomes increasingly thicker, shoots develop more and more slowly, various deformities arise in the stalk, and fertility decreases. As far as M/sub 2/ mutation is concerned, a great variety has been discovered with regard to the height of the stem, the leaf formation, the color of the bloom, the color of the edge, the characteristics of the pod, the size of the seed and the color of the cicatrix. At the same time some specific characteristics having an important economic significance are being revealed, as for example, dwarf stems, the ability to withstand lodging, great pod density, increased inflorescence and short sprouts.

  6. PI3 kinase mutations and mutational load as poor prognostic markers in diffuse glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draaisma, Kaspar; Wijnenga, Maarten M J; Weenink, Bas; Gao, Ya; Smid, Marcel; Robe, P; van den Bent, Martin J; French, Pim J

    2015-12-23

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics allow diffuse gliomas to be classified based on their genetic changes into distinct prognostic subtypes. However, a systematic analysis of all molecular markers has thus far not been performed; most classification schemes use a predefined and select set of genes/molecular markers. Here, we have analysed the TCGA dataset (combined glioblastoma (GBM) and lower grade glioma (LGG) datasets) to identify all prognostic genetic markers in diffuse gliomas in order to generate a comprehensive classification scheme. Of the molecular markers investigated (all genes mutated at a population frequency >1.7 % and frequent chromosomal imbalances) in the entire glioma dataset, 57 were significantly associated with overall survival. Of these, IDH1 or IDH2 mutations are associated with lowest hazard ratio, which confirms IDH as the most important prognostic marker in diffuse gliomas. Subsequent subgroup analysis largely confirms many of the currently used molecular classification schemes for diffuse gliomas (ATRX or TP53 mutations, 1p19q codeletion). Our analysis also identified PI3-kinase mutations as markers of poor prognosis in IDH-mutated + ATRX/TP53 mutated diffuse gliomas, median survival 3.7 v. 6.3 years (P = 0.02, Hazard rate (HR) 2.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.16 - 7.38). PI3-kinase mutations were also prognostic in two independent datasets. In our analysis, no additional molecular markers were identified that further refine the molecular classification of diffuse gliomas. Interestingly, these molecular classifiers do not fully explain the variability in survival observed for diffuse glioma patients. We demonstrate that tumor grade remains an important prognostic factor for overall survival in diffuse gliomas, even within molecular glioma subtypes. Tumor grade was correlated with the mutational load (the number of non-silent mutations) of the tumor: grade II diffuse gliomas harbour fewer genetic changes than grade

  7. Short barb: a feather structure mutation in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J E; Roberts, C W; Nichols, C R; Cheng, K M

    1982-12-01

    A type of feather structure abnormality in Japanese quail resulting in shortened barbs on contour feathers was found to be controlled by a single autosomal recessive gene, sh (short barb). The mutation was first identified in a full-sib family from the University of British Columbia wild type line. Unlike other feather structure mutations in Japanese quail reported previously in literature, the short barb mutation is not associated with poor reproduction.

  8. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A novel gene mutation in a family with X-linked retinoschisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hung Lai

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: We identified a novel RS1 (97delT mutation in a Taiwanese family with XLRS. This finding expands the RS1 mutation spectrum and may help to further understand the molecular pathogenesis of XLRS.

  11. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  12. TET2 gene mutation is unfavorable prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia patients with NPM1+ and FLT3-ITD - mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Xu, Yang; Yin, Jia; Tian, Hong; Chen, Suning; Wu, Depei; Sun, Aining

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (cn-AML) is a group of heterogeneous diseases. Gene mutations are increasingly used to assess the prognosis of cn-AML patients and guide risk-adapted treatment. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular genetics characteristics of 373 adult cn-AML patients and explored the relationship between TET2 gene mutations or different genetic mutation patterns and prognosis. We found that 16.1 % of patients had TET2 mutations, 31.6 % had FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITDs), 6.2 % had FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations, 2.4 % had c-KIT mutations, 37.8 % had NPM1 mutations, 11.3 % had WT1 mutations, 5.9 % had RUNX1 mutations, 11.5 % had ASXL1 mutations, 3.8 % had MLL-PTDs, 7.8 % had IDH1 mutations, 7.8 % had NRAS mutations, 12.3 % had IDH2 mutations, 1.6 % had EZH2 mutations, and 14.7 % had DNMT3A mutations, while none had CBL mutations. Gene mutations were detected in 76.94 % (287/373) of all patients. In the NPM1m(+) patients, those with TET2 mutations were associated with a shorter median overall survival (OS) as compared to TET2 wild-type (wt) patients (9.9 vs. 27.0 months, respectively; P = 0.023); Interestingly, the TET2 mutation was identified as an unfavorable prognostic factor and was closely associated with a shorter median OS as compared to TET2-wt (9.5 vs. 32.2 months, respectively; P = 0.013) in the NPM1m(+)/FLT3-ITDm(-) patient group. Thus, identification of TET2 combined with classic NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations allowed us to stratify cn-AML into distinct subtypes.

  13. WFS1/wolframin mutations, Wolfram syndrome, and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanim, F; Kirk, J; Latif, F; Barrett, T G

    2001-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is the inherited association of juvenile-onset insulin-dependant diabetes mellitus and progressive bilateral optic atrophy. A nuclear gene, WFS1/wolframin, was identified that segregated with disease status and demonstrated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in WS patients has identified mutations in 90% of patients. Most were compound heterozygotes with private mutations distributed throughout the gene with no obvious hotspots. The private nature of the mutations in WS patients and the low frequencies make it difficult to determine the biological or clinical relevance of these mutations. Mutation screening in patients with psychiatric disorders or diabetes mellitus has also been performed to test the hypothesis that heterozygous carriers of WFS1 gene mutations are at an increased risk following the observation that WS first-degree relatives have a higher frequency of these disorders. Most studies showed no association, however two missense mutations were identified that demonstrated significant association with psychiatric disorders and diabetes mellitus. Population association studies and functional studies of these variants will need to be performed to confirm these preliminary results. The elucidation of functions and functional pathways for the WFS1 gene product and variants will shed light on the effect of such disparate mutations on gene function and their role in the resulting clinical phenotype in WS and associated disorders. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangalia, J; Massie, C E; Baxter, E J; Nice, F L; Gundem, G; Wedge, D C; Avezov, E; Li, J; Kollmann, K; Kent, D G; Aziz, A; Godfrey, A L; Hinton, J; Martincorena, I; Van Loo, P; Jones, A V; Guglielmelli, P; Tarpey, P; Harding, H P; Fitzpatrick, J D; Goudie, C T; Ortmann, C A; Loughran, S J; Raine, K; Jones, D R; Butler, A P; Teague, J W; O'Meara, S; McLaren, S; Bianchi, M; Silber, Y; Dimitropoulou, D; Bloxham, D; Mudie, L; Maddison, M; Robinson, B; Keohane, C; Maclean, C; Hill, K; Orchard, K; Tauro, S; Du, M-Q; Greaves, M; Bowen, D; Huntly, B J P; Harrison, C N; Cross, N C P; Ron, D; Vannucchi, A M; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Green, A R

    2013-12-19

    Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay

  15. PIK3CA mutations frequently coexist with RAS and BRAF mutations in patients with advanced cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Janku

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF have been identified in various malignancies, and activate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MEK pathways, respectively. Both pathways are critical drivers of tumorigenesis.Tumor tissues from 504 patients with diverse cancers referred to the Clinical Center for Targeted Therapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center starting in October 2008 were analyzed for PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations using polymerase chain reaction-based DNA sequencing.PIK3CA mutations were found in 54 (11% of 504 patients tested; KRAS in 69 (19% of 367; NRAS in 19 (8% of 225; and BRAF in 31 (9% of 361 patients. PIK3CA mutations were most frequent in squamous cervical (5/14, 36%, uterine (7/28, 25%, breast (6/29, 21%, and colorectal cancers (18/105, 17%; KRAS in pancreatic (5/9, 56%, colorectal (49/97, 51%, and uterine cancers (3/20, 15%; NRAS in melanoma (12/40, 30%, and uterine cancer (2/11, 18%; BRAF in melanoma (23/52, 44%, and colorectal cancer (5/88, 6%. Regardless of histology, KRAS mutations were found in 38% of patients with PIK3CA mutations compared to 16% of patients with wild-type (wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. In total, RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations were found in 47% of patients with PIK3CA mutations vs. 24% of patients wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. PIK3CA mutations were found in 28% of patients with KRAS mutations compared to 10% with wtKRAS (p = 0.001 and in 20% of patients with RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations compared to 8% with wtRAS (KRAS, NRAS or wtBRAF (p = 0.001.PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are frequent in diverse tumors. In a wide variety of tumors, PIK3CA mutations coexist with RAS (KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations.

  16. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, K; Møller, R S; Christensen, J

    2011-01-01

    or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...... described and in addition, recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 including NIPA1 have been identified in patients with IGE. The purpose was to identify NIPA1 mutations in patients with pure and complex HSP. Methods: Fifty-two patients with HSP were screened for mutations in NIPA1. Results: One previously...... reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...

  17. Screening for duplications, deletions and a common intronic mutation detects 35% of second mutations in patients with USH2A monoallelic mutations on Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Luxon, Linda M; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2013-08-08

    Usher Syndrome is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is divided into three subtypes, of which the most common is Usher type 2, and the USH2A gene accounts for 75-80% of cases. Despite recent sequencing strategies, in our cohort a significant proportion of individuals with Usher type 2 have just one heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A, or no convincing disease-causing mutations across nine Usher genes. The purpose of this study was to improve the molecular diagnosis in these families by screening USH2A for duplications, heterozygous deletions and a common pathogenic deep intronic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. Forty-nine Usher type 2 or atypical Usher families who had missing mutations (mono-allelic USH2A or no mutations following Sanger sequencing of nine Usher genes) were screened for duplications/deletions using the USH2A SALSA MLPA reagent kit (MRC-Holland). Identification of USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was achieved by Sanger sequencing. Mutations were confirmed by a combination of reverse transcription PCR using RNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells or fibroblasts, and by array comparative genomic hybridisation with sequencing across the genomic breakpoints. Eight mutations were identified in 23 Usher type 2 families (35%) with one previously identified heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A. These consisted of five heterozygous deletions, one duplication, and two heterozygous instances of the pathogenic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. No variants were found in the 15 Usher type 2 families with no previously identified disease-causing mutations. In 11 atypical families, none of whom had any previously identified convincing disease-causing mutations, the mutation USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was identified in a heterozygous state in one family. All five deletions and the heterozygous duplication we report here are novel. This is the first time that a duplication in USH2A has been reported as a cause of Usher syndrome. We found that 8 of

  18. TERT promoter mutations and their association with BRAF V600E mutation and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Qu, Shen; Liu, Rengyun; Sheng, Chunjun; Shi, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Guangwu; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Hongyu; Wang, Yangang; Sun, Hui; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xing, Mingzhao

    2014-06-01

    Promoter mutations chr5:1,295,228C>T and chr5:1,295,250C>T (termed C228T and C250T, respectively) in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been reported in various cancers and need to be further investigated in thyroid cancer. The aim of the study was to explore TERT promoter mutations in various thyroid tumors and examine their relationship with BRAF V600E mutation, iodine intake, and clinicopathological behaviors of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter and BRAF mutations were identified by sequencing genomic DNA of primary thyroid tumors from normal- and high-iodine regions in China, and clinicopathological correlation was analyzed. The C228T mutation was found in 9.6% (39 of 408) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), C250T was found in 1.7% (7 of 408) of PTC, and they were collectively found in 11.3% (46 of 408) of PTC. C228T was found in 31.8% (7 of 22) and C250T in 4.6% (1 of 22) of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), and they were collectively found in 36.4% (8 of 22) of FTC. No TERT mutation was found in 44 benign thyroid tumors. The two mutations occurred in 3.8% (6 of 158) of BRAF mutation-negative PTC vs 16.0% (40 of 250) of BRAF mutation-positive PTC (P = 5.87 × 10(-4)), demonstrating their association. Unlike BRAF mutation, TERT promoter mutations were not associated with high iodine intake, but they were associated with older patient age, larger tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, and advanced stages III/IV of PTC. Coexisting TERT and BRAF mutations were even more commonly and more significantly associated with clinicopathological aggressiveness. In this large cohort, we found TERT promoter mutations to be common, particularly in FTC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, and associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics.

  19. Homozygous mutation in the NPHP3 gene causing foetal nephronophthisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Uzma; Farooq, Muhammad; Fatima, Ambrin

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of a foetal sonographic finding of hyper-echogenic kidneys, which led to a strategic series of genetic tests and identified a homozygous mutation (c.424C > T, p. R142*) in the NPHP3 gene. Our study provides a rare presentation of NPHP3-related ciliopathy and adds to the mutation...

  20. Screening for germline DND1 mutations in testicular cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, R.H.; Vos, Y.J.; Herkert, J.C.; Bos, K.K.; Holzik, M.F.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Hofstra, R.M.; Hoekstra, H.J.

    Although several observations suggest that a strong genetic predisposition to developing testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) exists, no associated, highly penetrant germline mutations have been identified so far. In the 129/Sv mouse strain, a germline mutation in the DND1 gene has been shown to

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    subsequent DNA sequencing. We found mutations in 17/61 patients, thus bringing the total contribution of BRAC1 and. BRCA2 to 28.0%. The total DNA from one hundred age- matched, unrelated normal controls was tested by CSGE to confirm the absence of the identified mutations in the normal population. In the BRCA1 ...

  2. GBA mutations in Gaucher type I Venezuelan patients: ethnic origins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Venezuela, 20 unrelated index cases with GD type I were assessed for GBA mutation detection and for their in-phase haplotypeidentification, to gather genetic epidemiological data on the disease in the country and of its eventual ethnic origin. Ten missense mutations and two complex alleles were identified. The most ...

  3. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; Harssel, J.J. van; Terhal, P.A.; Lieshout, S. van; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; Heyden, M.A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Smagt, J.J. van der; Nijman, IJ; Kloosterman, W.P.; Haelst, M.M. van; Haaften, G. van; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  4. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; van Harssel, J.J.; Terhal, P.A.; van Lieshout, S.; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; van der Heyden, M.A.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.; van der Smagt, J.J.; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; van Haelst, M.M.; van Haaften, G.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  5. Mutational and phenotypical spectrum of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, A.; Yasmeen, S.; Lund, A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the genotypes of the complete cohort, from 1967 to 2014, of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients in Denmark, in total 376 patients. A total of 752 independent alleles were investigated. Mutations were identified on 744 PKU alleles (98.9%). In total, 82 different mutations were present...

  6. Mutations in TBL1X are associated with central hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, C.A. (Charlotte A.); M. Losekoot (Monique); Sun, Y. (Yu); Watson, P.J. (Peter J.); Fairall, L. (Louise); S.D. Joustra (Sjoerd); N. Zwaveling-Soonawala (Nitash); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica); M. Alders (Mariëlle); G.W.E. Santen (Gijs); R.R. van Rijn (Rick); W.A. Dreschler (Wouter); Surovtseva, O.V. (Olga V.); N.R. Biermasz; R.C.M. Hennekam (Raoul); J.M. Wit (Jan); Schwabe, J.W.R. (John W.R.); A. Boelen (Anita); E. Fliers (Eric); A.S.P. van Trotsenburg (Paul)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Isolated congenital central hypothyroidism (CeH) can result from mutations in TRHR, TSHB, and IGSF1, but its etiology often remains unexplained. We identified a missense mutation in the transducin X-like protein 1, X-linked (TBL1X) gene in three relatives diagnosed with isolated

  7. Isolated congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with TMEM67 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Ott, Peter; Lildballe, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    We report an otherwise healthy 32-year-old man with portal hypertension, variceal bleeding, and congenital hepatic fibrosis with ductal plate malformation. Genetic screening identified two TMEM67 mutations. Biallelic TMEM67 mutations are known to cause Joubert/Meckel syndrome or nephronopthisis...

  8. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient...

  9. Mutation analysis in 54 propionic acidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, J P; Spector, E; Venezia, S; Estes, P; Chiang, P W; Creadon-Swindell, G; Müllerleile, S; de Silva, L; Barth, M; Walter, M; Walter, K; Meissner, T; Lindner, M; Ensenauer, R; Santer, R; Bodamer, O A; Baumgartner, M R; Brunner-Krainz, M; Karall, D; Haase, C; Knerr, I; Marquardt, T; Hennermann, J B; Steinfeld, R; Beblo, S; Koch, H G; Konstantopoulou, V; Scholl-Bürgi, S; van Teeffelen-Heithoff, A; Suormala, T; Ugarte, M; Sperl, W; Superti-Furga, A; Schwab, K O; Grünert, S C; Sass, J O

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCC), a dodecamer of alpha and beta subunits, causes inherited propionic acidemia. We have studied, at the molecular level, PCC in 54 patients from 48 families comprised of 96 independent alleles. These patients of various ethnic backgrounds came from research centers and hospitals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The thorough clinical characterization of these patients was described in the accompanying paper (Grünert et al. 2012). In all 54 patients, many of whom originated from consanguineous families, the entire PCCB gene was examined by genomic DNA sequencing and in 39 individuals the PCCA gene was also studied. In three patients we found mutations in both PCC genes. In addition, in many patients RT-PCR analysis of lymphoblast RNA, lymphoblast enzyme assays, and expression of new mutations in E.coli were carried out. Eight new and eight previously detected mutations were identified in the PCCA gene while 15 new and 13 previously detected mutations were found in the PCCB gene. One missense mutation, p.V288I in the PCCB gene, when expressed in E.coli, yielded 134% of control activity and was consequently classified as a polymorphism in the coding region. Numerous new intronic polymorphisms in both PCC genes were identified. This study adds a considerable amount of new molecular data to the studies of this disease.

  10. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient. ...... features of FTD caused by CHMP2B truncation mutations as well as new brain imaging and neuropathological findings. Finally, we collate the current data on CHMP2B missense mutations, which have been reported in FTD and motor neuron disease....

  11. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  12. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  14. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  15. A glycogene mutation map for discovery of diseases of glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Joshi, Hiren J

    2015-01-01

    homologous families. However, Genome-Wide-Association Studies (GWAS) have identified such isoenzyme genes as candidates for different diseases, but validation is not straightforward without biomarkers. Large-scale whole exome sequencing (WES) provides access to mutations in e.g. glycosyltransferase genes...... in populations, which can be used to predict and/or analyze functional deleterious mutations. Here, we constructed a draft of a Functional Mutational Map of glycogenes, GlyMAP, from WES of a rather homogenous population of 2,000 Danes. We catalogued all missense mutations and used prediction algorithms, manual...... inspection, and in case of CAZy family GT27 experimental analysis of mutations to map deleterious mutations. GlyMAP provides a first global view of the genetic stability of the glycogenome and should serve as a tool for discovery of novel CDGs....

  16. A common Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 RING domain founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.v.O.; Ejlertsen, B.; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We examined 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Whereas no mutations were identified in 19 families, 13 families exhibited a BRCA1...... exon 3 nucleotide 234 T > G mutation, which has not previously been reported in the breast cancer information core (BIC) database. The mutation changes a conserved cysteine 39 to a glycine in the Zn(2+) site II of the RING domain, which is essential for BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity. Eight...... of the families had members with ovarian cancer, suggesting that the RING domain may be an ovarian cancer hotspot. By SNP array analysis, we find that all 13 families share a 4.5 Mb genomic fragment containing the BRCA1 gene, showing that the mutation originates from a founder. Finally, analysis of 1152 Inuit...

  17. Clinical presentation and mutations in Danish patients with Wilson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Horn, Nina; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard

    2011-01-01

    consistently indicative of WND, with the exception of the 24-h urine-Cu test, which is always outside the normal range. Mutations were identified in 100% of the screened ATP7B alleles (70 unrelated), including five novel mutations: p.1021K; p.G1158V; p.L1304F; IVS20-2A>G; Ex5_6del. In all, 70% of mutations...... were found in exons 8, 14, 17, 18, and 20. The most frequent mutation, p.H1069Q, comprised 18%. We propose a new and simple model that correlates genotype and age of onset. By assuming that the milder of two mutations is 'functionally dominant' and determines the age of onset, we classified 25....../27 mutations as either severe (age of onset 20 years), and correctly predicted the age of onset in 37/39 patients. This method should be tested in other Wilson populations....

  18. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism due to Novel FGFR1 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuş, Gamze; Kotan, Leman Damla; Durmaz, Erdem; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Gürbüz, Fatih; Yüksel, Bilgin; Tetiker, Tamer; Topaloğlu, A Kemal

    2017-06-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is heterogeneous. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is pivotal in the ontogeny of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. Loss-of-function mutations in FGFR1 gene cause variable HH phenotypes encompassing pubertal delay to idiopathic HH (IHH) or Kallmann syndrome (KS). As FGFR1 mutations are common, recognizing mutations and associated phenotypes may enhance clinical management. Using a candidate gene approach, we screened 52 IHH/KS patients. We identified three novel (IVS3-1G>C and p.W2X, p.R209C) FGFR1 gene mutations. Despite predictive null protein function, patients from the novel mutation families had normosmic IHH without non-reproductive phenotype. These findings further emphasize the great variability of FGFR1 mutation phenotypes in IHH/KS.

  19. Analysis of time of death of prenatally lethal Steeloid mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Cummings, C.C.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Phipps, E.L.; Stelzner, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Deletion mutations have been extremely useful in initiating the functional and molecular dissections of regions of the mouse genome. For the d-se and c regions, for example, it was observed that radiation mutations carrying lethal factors separable, by complementation analysis, from the primary d, se, or c mutation itself, could often be associated at both the genetic and molecular levels with multilocus chromosomal deletions. Since many of the Oak Ridge Sld mutations arose in radiation mutagenesis experiments, a substantial number may carry chromosomal deletions that involve the Sl locus in chromosome 10. Because of the great value of deletion mutations for the genetic and molecular analysis of chromosomal regions and complex genetic loci, they have initiated a series of experiments designed to test whether radiation-induced Sld mutations carry other lethal factors, in addition to the lethality caused by severe alleles of the Sl locus itself, as one prescreen for identifying Sld's that are caused by deletions

  20. DMD mutation spectrum analysis in 613 Chinese patients with dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruolan; Zhu, Guosheng; Zhu, Huimin; Ma, Ruiyu; Peng, Ying; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophinopathy is a group of inherited diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Within the dystrophinopathy spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are common X-linked recessive disorders that mainly feature striated muscle necrosis. We combined multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification with Sanger sequencing to detect large deletions/duplications and point mutations in the DMD gene in 613 Chinese patients. A total of 571 (93.1%) patients were diagnosed, including 428 (69.8%) with large deletions/duplications and 143 (23.3%) with point mutations. Deletion/duplication breakpoints gathered mostly in introns 44-55. Reading frame rules could explain 88.6% of deletion mutations. We identified seventy novel point mutations that had not been previously reported. Spectrum expansion and genotype-phenotype analysis of DMD mutations on such a large sample size in Han Chinese population would provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanism underlying dystrophinopathies.

  1. Splice site mutations in the ATP7A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Skjørringe

    Full Text Available Menkes disease (MD is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12 mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations identified in 12 patients with milder phenotypes were predicted to have no significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the presence of wild-type transcript in 7 out of 9 patients investigated in vivo. Both the in silico predictions and the in vivo results support the hypothesis previously suggested by us and others, that the presence of some wild-type transcript is correlated to a milder phenotype.

  2. The functional importance of disease-associated mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Teri E

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, scientists believed that point mutations in genes are the genetic switches for somatic and inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria and cancer. Some of these mutations likely alter a protein's function in a manner that is deleterious, and they should occur in functionally important regions of the protein products of genes. Here we show that disease-associated mutations occur in regions of genes that are conserved, and can identify likely disease-causing mutations. Results To show this, we have determined conservation patterns for 6185 non-synonymous and heritable disease-associated mutations in 231 genes. We define a parameter, the conservation ratio, as the ratio of average negative entropy of analyzable positions with reported mutations to that of every analyzable position in the gene sequence. We found that 84.0% of the 231 genes have conservation ratios less than one. 139 genes had eleven or more analyzable mutations and 88.0% of those had conservation ratios less than one. Conclusions These results indicate that phylogenetic information is a powerful tool for the study of disease-associated mutations. Our alignments and analysis has been made available as part of the database at http://cancer.stanford.edu/mut-paper/. Within this dataset, each position is annotated with the analysis, so the most likely disease-causing mutations can be identified.

  3. One third of Danish hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with MYH7 mutations have mutations [corrected] in MYH7 rod region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, Lotte; Havndrup, Ole; Bundgaard, Henning

    2005-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is, in most cases, a disease of the sarcomere, caused by a mutation in one of 10 known sarcomere disease genes. More than 266 mutations have been identified since 1989. The FHC disease gene first characterized MYH7, encodes the cardiac beta-myosin heavy...

  4. PALB2 mutations in BRCA1/2-mutation negative breast and ovarian cancer patients from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Czarny, Katarzyna; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Nowakowska, Dorota; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2017-03-09

    The PALB2 gene encodes a protein that plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic integrity. Germline inactivating mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The prevalence and spectrum of recurrent PALB2 germline mutations in breast and ovarian cancer patients from Poland is not clearly defined. PALB2 exons were amplified from 460 BRCA1/2-mutation negative women with familial breast and/or ovarian cancer and early-onset breast cancer using AmpliSeq technology and sequenced on an Ion Torrent PGM sequencer. In addition, eight selected variants were genotyped using TaqMan assays in 807 BRCA1/2-mutation negative breast cancer patients and 1690 healthy women. Two recurrent PALB2 mutations, c.172_175delTTGT and c.509_510delGA, were identified, along with one novel mutation, c.347insT. In total, PALB2 pathogenic mutations were detected in 7/460 (1.5%) patients. Furthermore, in breast and/or ovarian cancer patients, several single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were detected in the PALB2 coding region. In an additional group of 807 patients, eight (1%) carriers of two pathogenic mutations, c.172_175delTTGT (0.5%) and c.509_510delGA (0.5%), were identified. The c.509_510delGA mutation was not identified in healthy controls, while c.172_175delTTGT was identified in 4/1690 (0.24%) of control women. Germline mutations in the PALB2 gene were observed at a frequency of approximately 1.5% in Polish breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. Our study confirms two recurrent PALB2 mutations; c.172_175delGA and c.509_510delGA.

  5. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viteri Santiago

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93% patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients.

  6. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  7. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  8. Notch1 mutations are drivers of oral tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sian; Brait, Mariana; Agrawal, Nishant; Koch, Wayne; McCord, Christine L.; Riley, David R.; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Jiang, Wei-Wen; Sidransky, David

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of NOTCH1 signaling was recently discovered in head and neck cancer. This study aims to evaluate NOTCH1 alterations in the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and compare the occurrence of these mutations in Chinese and Caucasian populations. We used a high-throughput-PCR-based enrichment technology and next generation sequencing (NGS) to sequence NOTCH1 in 144 samples collected in China. Forty nine samples were normal oral mucosa from patients undergoing oral surgery, 45 were oral leukoplakia biopsies and 50 were chemoradiation naïve OSCC samples with 22 paired-normal tissues from the adjacent unaffected areas. NOTCH1 mutations were found in 54% of primary OSCC and 60% of pre-malignant lesions. Importantly, almost 60% of leukoplakia patients with mutated NOTCH1 carried mutations that were also identified in OSCC, indicating an important role of these clonal events in the progression of early neoplasms. We then compared all known NOTCH1 mutations identified in Chinese OSCC patients with those reported in Caucasians to date. Although we found obvious overlaps in critical regulatory NOTCH1 domains alterations and identified specific mutations shared by both groups, possible gain-of-function mutations were predominantly seen in Chinese population. Our findings demonstrate that pre-malignant lesions display NOTCH1 mutations at an early stage and are thus bona fide drivers of OSCC progression. Moreover, our results reveal that NOTCH1 promotes distinct tumorigenic mechanisms in patients from different ethnical populations. PMID:25406187

  9. GATA2 mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia-paired samples analyses show that the mutation is unstable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Yun-Chu; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Chou, Wen-Chien; Lin, Chien-Chin; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lin, Liang-In; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2015-02-01

    Recently, mutations of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene were identified in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with CEBPA double mutations (CEBPA (double-mut)), but the interaction of this mutation with other genetic alterations and its dynamic changes during disease progression remain to be determined. In this study, 14 different missense GATA2 mutations, which were all clustered in the highly conserved N-terminal zinc finger 1 domain, were identified in 27.4, 6.7, and 1 % of patients with CEBPA (double-mut), CEBPA (single-mut), and CEBPA wild type, respectively. All but one patient with GATA2 mutation had concurrent CEBPA mutation. GATA2 mutations were closely associated with younger age, FAB M1 subtype, intermediate-risk cytogenetics, expression of HLA-DR, CD7, CD15, or CD34 on leukemic cells, and CEBPA mutation, but negatively associated with FAB M4 subtype, favorable-risk cytogenetics, and NPM1 mutation. Patients with GATA2 mutation had significantly better overall survival and relapse-free survival than those without GATA2 mutation. Sequential analysis showed that the original GATA2 mutations might be lost during disease progression in GATA2-mutated patients, while novel GATA2 mutations might be acquired at relapse in GATA2-wild patients. In conclusion, AML patients with GATA2 mutations had distinct clinic-biological features and a favorable prognosis. GATA2 mutations might be lost or acquired at disease progression, implying that it was a second hit in the leukemogenesis of AML, especially those with CEBPA mutation.

  10. [Mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis in families of X-linked agammaglobulinemia caused by BTK gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Mo, Guiling; Liu, Ning; Tian, Peichao; Chen, Minfang

    2014-05-13

    To evaluate the genetic diagnostic feasibility of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene in three families with X-linked agammagobulinemia (XLA) birth history, mutation analysis and prenatal genetic diagnosis of BTK gene for two families with XLA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to amplify the regions of exon and exon-intron boundaries of BTK gene in 3 unrelated patients of XLA and their mothers from January 2011 to June 2012. The PCR products were further analyzed by direct sequencing. Prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed by chorionic villus sampling after genotyping of mothers of probands. Three novel mutations of BTK gene were identified in 3 pedigrees of XLA. A missense mutation c.1117C > A (p.L373I) were detected in pedigree 1. The mutation was possible damage by predicting in sillico. A nonsense mutation c.126T > G (p.Y42X) was found in pedigree 2. A single base deletion mutation c.1679delC (p. P560fsX10) was found in pedigree 3. The three mutations, p.L373I, p.Y42X and p. P560fsX10 were novel. The three novel mutations were absent in the 100 normal controls. The male fetus in pedigree 3 was free of mutations identical to the proband and the female fetus in pedigree 2 was a carrier. The two families continued the pregnancies and the infants showed no symptom of XLA after one year old. Three novel mutations were identified. The mutations of p.Y42X and p. P560fsX10 in BTK gene may be the major causes of pedigrees 2 and 3 with XLA. The mutation p.L373I of BTK gene is possibly the cause of pedigree 1 with XLA, but functional verification is needed. For pedigree of XLA, direct sequencing of BTK gene is available for providing genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis.

  11. The 2588G-->C mutation in the ABCR gene is a mild frequent founder mutation in the Western European population and allows the classification of ABCR mutations in patients with Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, A; van Driel, M A; van de Pol, D J; Klevering, B J; van Haren, F J; Tijmes, N; Bergen, A A; Rohrschneider, K; Blankenagel, A; Pinckers, A J; Dahl, N; Brunner, H G; Deutman, A F; Hoyng, C B; Cremers, F P

    1999-01-01

    In 40 western European patients with Stargardt disease (STGD), we found 19 novel mutations in the retina-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCR) gene, illustrating STGD's high allelic heterogeneity. One mutation, 2588G-->C, identified in 15 (37.5%) patients, shows linkage disequilibrium with a rare polymorphism (2828G-->A) in exon 19, suggesting a founder effect. The guanine at position 2588 is part of the 3' splice site of exon 17. Analysis of the lymphoblastoid cell mRNA of two STGD patients with the 2588G-->C mutation shows that the resulting mutant ABCR proteins either lack Gly863 or contain the missense mutation Gly863Ala. We hypothesize that the 2588G-->C alteration is a mild mutation that causes STGD only in combination with a severe ABCR mutation. This is supported in that the accompanying ABCR mutations in at least five of eight STGD patients are null (severe) and that a combination of two mild mutations has not been observed among 68 STGD patients. The 2588G-->C mutation is present in 1 of every 35 western Europeans, a rate higher than that of the most frequent severe autosomal recessive mutation, the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene mutation DeltaPhe508. Given an STGD incidence of 1/10,000, homozygosity for the 2588G-->C mutation or compound heterozygosity for this and other mild ABCR mutations probably does not result in an STGD phenotype. PMID:10090887

  12. [X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy ABCD1 gene mutation analysis in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hong; Xiong, Hui; Zhang, Yue-hua; Wu, Ye; Bao, Xin-hua; Jiang, Yu-wu; Wu, Xi-ru

    2004-02-01

    To investigate mutations of ABCD1 gene in X- linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) patients in China. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA direct sequencing were employed to analyze the 10 exons of ABCD1 gene in 25 ALD patients. Seventeen mutations in different exons (except exons 4, 9 and 10) were identified in 18 of 25 patients. Most of the mutations were missense mutations, including R182P, G266R, H283D, S404P, N509I, R518G, L520Q, Q556R, S606L and R617C, four (H283D, S40 4P, N509I, R518G) of 10 missense mutations were novel. Also identified were 3 nonsense mutations (W132X, W242X, W595X), 1 dinucleotides deletion mutation (1414 del AG) resulting in frameshift, and 1 base pair deletion at splice acceptor site (IVS5-6 del C). Two synonymous mutations (L516L and V349V) appeared simultaneously in 2 unrelated patients, and no other mutations could be found with them in all 10 exons screened. There were no hot spot mutations in ABCD1 gene in China. Mutations in gene were found over 70% of patients with ALD in China. The ABCD1 gene mutations identified revealed no obvious correlation between the type of mutation and phenotype.

  13. National mutation study among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P M; Brusgaard, K; Ousager, L B

    2014-01-01

    carry mutations in the ENG, ACVRL1 or SMAD4 genes. Here, we report on the genetic heterogeneity in the Danish national HHT population and address the prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). Probands of 107 apparently unrelated families received genetic testing, including sequencing...... and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses of ENG, ACVRL1 and SMAD4. These 107 families included 320 patients confirmed to have HHT either clinically or genetically. In 89% of the probands (n=95), a mutation was identified. We detected 64 unique mutations of which 27 (41%) were novel....... Large deletions were identified in ENG and ACVRL1. The prevalence of PAVM was 52.3% in patients with an ENG mutation and 12.9% in the ACVRL1 mutation carriers. We diagnosed 80% of the patients clinically, fulfilling the Curaçao criteria, and those remaining were diagnosed by genetic testing...

  14. Novel missense MTTP gene mutations causing abetalipoproteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon A; Burnett, John R; Leonis, Mike A; McKnight, C James; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Hooper, Amanda J

    2014-10-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) plays a critical role in the formation of hepatic very low density lipoprotein. Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is a rare, naturally occurring extreme form of MTTP inhibition, which is characterized by the virtual absence of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins in blood. The goal of this study was to examine the effect that four novel MTTP missense mutations had on protein interactions, expression and lipid-transfer activity, and to determine which mutations were responsible for the ABL phenotype observed in two patients. In two patients with ABL, we identified in MTTP a novel frameshift mutation (K35Ffs*37), and four novel missense mutations, namely, G264R, Y528H, R540C, and N649S. When transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, all missense MTTP mutations interacted with apoB17, apoB48, and protein disulfide isomerase. Mutations Y528H and R540C, however, displayed negligible levels of MTTP activity and N649S displayed a partial reduction relative to the wild-type MTTP. In contrast, G264R retained full lipid-transfer activity. These studies indicate that missense mutations Y528H, R540C, and N649S appear to cause ABL by reducing MTTP activity rather than by reducing binding of MTTP with protein disulfide isomerase or apoB. The region of MTTP containing amino acids 528 and 540 constitutes a critical domain for its lipid-transfer activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutations of the SRY-responsive enhancer of SOX9 are uncommon in XY gonadal dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georg, I; Bagheri-Fam, S; Knower, K C; Wieacker, P; Scherer, Gerd; Harley, V R

    2010-01-01

    During mouse sex determination, SRY upregulates the core testis-specific enhancer of Sox9, TESCO. Mutations in human SRY are found in one third of cases with XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (XY GD; Swyer syndrome), while two thirds remain unexplained. Heterozygous SOX9 mutations can cause XY GD in association with the skeletal malformation syndrome campomelic dysplasia. We hypothesized that human TESCO mutations could cause isolated XY GD. Sixty-six XY GD cases with an intact SRY were analyzed for TESCO point mutations or deletions. No mutations were identified. We conclude that TESCO mutations are not a common cause of XY GD. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Latex allergy and filaggrin null mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Hamann, Dathan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Natural rubber latex (NRL) contains over 200 proteins of which 13 have been identified as allergens and the cause of type I latex allergy. Health care workers share a high occupational risk for developing latex allergy. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk of type I sensitizations......, occupationally exposed to latex, were genotyped for filaggrin null mutations R501X and 2282del4. Latex allergy was determined by a positive reaction or a historical positive reaction to a skin prick test with NRL. Results 41 individuals were successfully genotyped. Three individuals were filaggrin mutation...... in the cases in this study may not have occurred through direct skin contact but through the respiratory organs via latex proteins that are absorbed in glove powder and aerosolized...

  17. Presence of a consensus DNA motif at nearby DNA sequence of the mutation susceptible CG nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Kaushik; Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Tanu; Sharma, Ankit; Bhagat, Meenakshi; Kamai, Asangla; Ford, Bridget M; Asthana, Shailendra; Mandal, Chandi C

    2018-01-10

    Complexity in tissues affected by cancer arises from somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications in the genome. The mutation susceptible hotspots present within the genome indicate a non-random nature and/or a position specific selection of mutation. An association exists between the occurrence of mutations and epigenetic DNA methylation. This study is primarily aimed at determining mutation status, and identifying a signature for predicting mutation prone zones of tumor suppressor (TS) genes. Nearby sequences from the top five positions having a higher mutation frequency in each gene of 42 TS genes were selected from a cosmic database and were considered as mutation prone zones. The conserved motifs present in the mutation prone DNA fragments were identified. Molecular docking studies were done to determine putative interactions between the identified conserved motifs and enzyme methyltransferase DNMT1. Collective analysis of 42 TS genes found GC as the most commonly replaced and AT as the most commonly formed residues after mutation. Analysis of the top 5 mutated positions of each gene (210 DNA segments for 42 TS genes) identified that CG nucleotides of the amino acid codons (e.g., Arginine) are most susceptible to mutation, and found a consensus DNA "T/AGC/GAGGA/TG" sequence present in these mutation prone DNA segments. Similar to TS genes, analysis of 54 oncogenes not only found CG nucleotides of the amino acid Arg as the most susceptible to mutation, but also identified the presence of similar consensus DNA motifs in the mutation prone DNA fragments (270 DNA segments for 54 oncogenes) of oncogenes. Docking studies depicted that, upon binding of DNMT1 methylates to this consensus DNA motif (C residues of CpG islands), mutation was likely to occur. Thus, this study proposes that DNMT1 mediated methylation in chromosomal DNA may decrease if a foreign DNA segment containing this consensus sequence along with CG nucleotides is exogenously introduced to dividing

  18. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  19. ABCD1 Gene Mutations in Chinese Patients with ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-two different ABCD1 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products in 34 unrelated Chinese X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD patients examined at Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, PRC.

  20. ABCD1 Gene Mutations in Chinese Patients with ALD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-two different ABCD1 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products in 34 unrelated Chinese X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) patients examined at Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, PRC.

  1. Mutations in POGLUT1, Encoding Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Dowling-Degos Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Basmanav, F. Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M.; Thiele, Holger; Fritz, Günter; Wenzel, Jörg; Größer, Leopold; Wehner, Maria; Wolf, Sabrina; Fagerberg, Christina; Bygum, Anette; Altmüller, Janine; Rütten, Arno; Parmentier, Laurent; El Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To identify additional causes of DDD, we performed exome sequencing in five unrelated affected individuals without mutations in KRT5. Data analysis identified three heterozygous mutations from these individua...

  2. Common Variable Immunodeficiency Caused by FANC Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekinaka, Yujin; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mitsui-Sekinaka, Kanako; Honma, Kenichi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Arai, Ayako; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Hira, Asuka; Takata, Minoru; Ohara, Osamu; Ogawa, Seishi; Morio, Tomohiro; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common adult-onset primary antibody deficiency disease due to various causative genes. Several genes, which are known to be the cause of different diseases, have recently been reported as the cause of CVID in patients by performing whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis. Here, we found FANC gene mutations as a cause of adult-onset CVID in two patients. B cells were absent and CD4 + T cells were skewed toward CD45RO + memory T cells. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and signal joint kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (sjKRECs) were undetectable in both patients. Both patients had no anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Using WES, we identified compound heterozygous mutations of FANCE in one patient and homozygous mutation of FANCA in another patient. The impaired function of FANC protein complex was confirmed by a monoubiquitination assay and by chromosome fragility test. We then performed several immunological evaluations including quantitative lymphocyte analysis and TRECs/sjKRECs analysis for 32 individuals with Fanconi anemia (FA). In total, 22 FA patients (68.8%) were found to have immunological abnormalities, suggesting that such immunological findings may be common in FA patients. These data indicate that FANC mutations are involved in impaired lymphogenesis probably by the accumulation of DNA replication stress, leading to CVID. It is important to diagnose FA because it drastically changes clinical management. We propose that FANC mutations can cause isolated immunodeficiency in addition to bone marrow failure and malignancy.

  3. Mutations of alpha-galactosidase A gene in two unusual cases of Fabry disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, EM; Kopishinskaya, SV; Van Amstel, JKP; Tsvetkova, [No Value

    1999-01-01

    The mutation analysis of alpha-galactosidase A gene was carried out in two families with Fabry disease described by us earlier. In the family P. a new point mutation E341K (a G to A transition at position 10999 of the gene) was identified. The mutation causes a Glu341Lys substitution in

  4. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been frequently clinically ...

  5. Mutation of NRAS but not KRAS significantly reduces myeloma sensitivity to single-agent bortezomib therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Mulligan (George); D.I. Lichter (David); A.D. Bacco (Alessandra Di); S.J. Blakemore (Stephen); A. Berger (Allison); E. Koenig (Erik); H. Bernard (Hugues); W.L. Trepicchio (William); B. Li (Bin); R. Neuwirth (Rachel); N. Chattopadhyay (Nibedita); J.B. Bolen (Joseph); A.J. Dorner (Andrew); H. van de Velde (Helgi); D. Ricci (Deborah); S. Jagannath (Sundar); J.R. Berenson (James); P.G. Richardson (Paul Gerard); E.A. Stadtmauer (Edward); R.Z. Orlowski (Robert); S. Lonial (Sagar); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); J.F. San Miguel (Jesús Fernando); D.-L. Esseltine (Dixie-Lee); M. Schu (Matthew)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractVarious translocations and mutations have been identified in myeloma, and certain aberrations, such as t(4;14) and del17, are linked with disease prognosis. To investigate mutational prevalence in myeloma and associations between mutations and patient outcomes, we tested a panel of 41

  6. Homozygous tyrosinase gene mutation in an American black with tyrosinase-negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism.

    OpenAIRE

    Spritz, R A; Strunk, K M; Hsieh, C L; Sekhon, G S; Francke, U

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a tyrosinase gene mutation in an American black with classic, tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism. This mutation results in an amino acid substitution (Cys----Arg) at codon 89 of the tyrosinase polypeptide. The proband is homozygous for the substitution, suggesting that this mutation may be frequently associated with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism in blacks.

  7. Novel NPHS1 gene mutations in a Chinese family with congenital ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to the standard nomenclature (den Dunnen and Antonarakis. 2000). To identify the novel mutations, PCR and sequencing of exons 15–16 were performed on 150 ... mutations, accounting for 39–50% of nonFinnish cases. (Machuca et al. 2010; Schoeb et al. 2010). Until now, only six disease-causing mutations are reported ...

  8. Mutational analysis of the GLA gene in Mexican families with Fabry ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIANCA ETHEL

    Mexican probands with FD, 65 relatives were at risk of carrying a known GLA mutation, and molecular screening identified. 42 individuals with the mutation. Thus, our findings showed that it is important to perform molecular analysis in families with. FD to detect mutations and to provide accurate diagnoses for individuals ...

  9. Common mutations in G6PD of Vietnamese-Kinh deficient patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to identify the common mutations occurring within the G6PD gene in the G6PD - Vietnamese deficient patients, which may be the main causative mutations of the G6PD deficiency in Vietnamese-kinh. Sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the coding region of G6PD gene for 30 ...

  10. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    . Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369...

  11. Brief Report:MECP2 Mutations in People without Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Bernhard; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in "Methyl-CpG-Binding protein 2" ("MECP2") are commonly associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). However, some people with RTT do not have mutations in "MECP2," and interestingly there have been people identified with "MECP2" mutations that do not have the clinical…

  12. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-28

    Apr 28, 2012 ... Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been ...

  13. Mutation status of refractory to imatinib patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Ovsyannikova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutation status of 36 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients in chronic phase with primary and secondary imatinib resistance was analyzed. BCR-ABL mutations identified by direct DNA sequencing. BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations were detected in 30.5 % (11 of 36 of those patients. Most of identified mutations were missense mutations: Q252H, M244V, G250E, Y253F/H, E255K/V, T315I, M351T, F359V, F359C, F486S. Patients with BCR-ABL mutations have significantly lower 4-year event-free survival compared with CML patients without mutations (18 % vs. 53 %; р = 0.003. The results can be used as reference information in deciding on therapy in imatinib resistant CML patients with clinically relevant BCR-ABL mutations.

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  16. Environmental stresses can alleviate the average deleterious effect of mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibler Stanislas

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fundamental questions in evolutionary genetics, including the possible advantage of sexual reproduction, depend critically on the effects of deleterious mutations on fitness. Limited existing experimental evidence suggests that, on average, such effects tend to be aggravated under environmental stresses, consistent with the perception that stress diminishes the organism's ability to tolerate deleterious mutations. Here, we ask whether there are also stresses with the opposite influence, under which the organism becomes more tolerant to mutations. Results We developed a technique, based on bioluminescence, which allows accurate automated measurements of bacterial growth rates at very low cell densities. Using this system, we measured growth rates of Escherichia coli mutants under a diverse set of environmental stresses. In contrast to the perception that stress always reduces the organism's ability to tolerate mutations, our measurements identified stresses that do the opposite – that is, despite decreasing wild-type growth, they alleviate, on average, the effect of deleterious mutations. Conclusions Our results show a qualitative difference between various environmental stresses ranging from alleviation to aggravation of the average effect of mutations. We further show how the existence of stresses that are biased towards alleviation of the effects of mutations may imply the existence of average epistatic interactions between mutations. The results thus offer a connection between the two main factors controlling the effects of deleterious mutations: environmental conditions and epistatic interactions.

  17. Identification of trunk mutations in gastric carcinoma: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhan; Wu, Shanshan; Lai, Jun; Shi, Yuan; Qiu, Chixiao; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Xun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shuqing

    2017-07-17

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) poses an urgent challenge for cancer precision medicine because it can cause drug resistance against cancer target therapy and immunotherapy. The search for trunk mutations that are present in all cancer cells is therefore critical for each patient. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficiency of multiregional sequencing for the identification of trunk mutations present in all regions of a tumor as a case study. We applied multiregional whole-exome sequencing (WES) to investigate the genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity of a case of gastric carcinoma. Approximately 83% of common missense mutations present in two samples and approximately 89% of common missense mutations present in three samples were trunk mutations. Notably, trunk mutations appeared to have higher variant allele frequencies (VAFs) than non-trunk mutations. Our results indicate that small-scale multiregional sampling and subsequent screening of low VAF somatic mutations might be a cost-effective strategy for identifying the majority of trunk mutations in gastric carcinoma.

  18. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L. [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A. [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  19. Activating FGFR2-RAS-BRAF mutations in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Noah A; Rolland, Delphine; McHugh, Jonathan B; Weigelin, Helmut C; Zhao, Lili; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm whose overall mutational landscape has not been well characterized. We sought to characterize pathogenic mutations in ameloblastoma and their clinical and functional significance with an emphasis on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A total of 84 ameloblastomas and 40 non-ameloblastoma odontogenic tumors were evaluated with a combination of BRAF V600E allele-specific PCR, VE1 immunohistochemistry, the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel, and Sanger sequencing. Efficacy of a BRAF inhibitor was evaluated in an ameloblastoma-derived cell line. Somatic, activating, and mutually exclusive RAS-BRAF and FGFR2 mutations were identified in 88% of cases. Somatic mutations in SMO, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, and SMARCB1 were also identified. BRAF V600E was the most common mutation, found in 62% of ameloblastomas and in ameloblastic fibromas/fibrodentinomas but not in other odontogenic tumors. This mutation was associated with a younger age of onset, whereas BRAF wild-type cases arose more frequently in the maxilla and showed earlier recurrences. One hundred percent concordance was observed between VE1 immunohistochemistry and molecular detection of BRAF V600E mutations. Ameloblastoma cells demonstrated constitutive MAPK pathway activation in vitro. Proliferation and MAPK activation were potently inhibited by the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. Our findings suggest that activating FGFR2-RAS-BRAF mutations play a critical role in the pathogenesis of most cases of ameloblastoma. Somatic mutations in SMO, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, and SMARCB1 may function as secondary mutations. BRAF V600E mutations have both diagnostic and prognostic implications. In vitro response of ameloblastoma to a BRAF inhibitor suggests a potential role for targeted therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G; O'Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C P; Green, Anthony R; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-11-21

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic "predestination," in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application.

  1. Exploring background mutational processes to decipher cancer genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Rager, Stephanie L; Li, Minghui; Sang, Qing-Xiang; Rogozin, Igor B; Panchenko, Anna R

    2017-07-03

    Much remains unknown about the progression and heterogeneity of mutational processes in different cancers and their diagnostic and clinical potential. A growing body of evidence supports mutation rate dependence on the local DNA sequence context for various types of mutations. We propose several tools for the analysis of cancer context-dependent mutations, which are implemented in an online computational framework MutaGene. The framework explores DNA context-dependent mutational patterns and underlying somatic cancer mutagenesis, analyzes mutational profiles of cancer samples, identifies the combinations of underlying mutagenic processes including those related to infidelity of DNA replication and repair machinery, and various other endogenous and exogenous mutagenic factors. As a result, the combination of mutagenic processes can be identified in any query sample with subsequent comparison to mutational profiles derived from malignant and benign samples. In addition, mutagen or cancer-specific mutational background models are applied to calculate expected DNA and protein site mutability to decouple relative contributions of mutagenesis and selection in carcinogenesis, thus elucidating the site-specific driving events in cancer. MutaGene is freely available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/mutagene/. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  2. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. TERT promoter mutations are frequent and show association with MED12 mutations in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogawa, Reiko; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Akiko; Kanai, Yae; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Sekine, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast, which carry the potential risk of local recurrence and metastasis. Phyllodes tumors share several histological features with fibroadenomas, and no widely accepted markers for distinguishing these lesions have been identified. Methods: We analyzed molecular abnormalities related to telomere elongation in tumors, including TERT promoter mutations, as well as loss of expression of ATRX and DAXX, in a total of 104 phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas. Results: Sequencing analyses showed that TERT promoter mutations were frequent in phyllodes tumors (30/46, 65%), but rare in fibroadenomas (4/58, 7%). Among phyllodes tumors, the mutations were more frequent in borderline tumors (13/15, 87%), but were also common in benign (9/18, 50%) and malignant tumors (8/13, 62%). Remarkably, all but one TERT promoter-mutated tumor also contained MED12 mutations, indicating that these mutations are strongly associated (P=8.4 × 10−6). Expression of ATRX and DAXX, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry, was retained in all tumors. Conclusions: Our observations suggest a critical role of TERT promoter mutations, in cooperation with MED12 mutations, in the development of phyllodes tumors. Because TERT promoter mutations are rare among fibroadenomas, their detection may be of potential use in discriminating between phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas. PMID:26355235

  5. Mutation analysis in adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency: eight novel mutations in the re-evaluated full ADSL coding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, S; Cuppens, H; Heuterspreute, M; Jaspers, M; Tola, E Z; Gu, X X; Legius, E; Vincent, M F; Jaeken, J; Cassiman, J J; Van den Berghe, G

    1999-01-01

    The deficiency of adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL, also termed adenylosuccinase) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation in body fluids of succinylaminoimidazole-carboxamide riboside (SAICA-riboside) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado). Most ADSL-deficient children display marked psychomotor delay, often accompanied by epilepsy or autistic features, or both, although some patients may be less profoundly retarded. Occasionally, growth retardation and muscular wasting are also present. Up to now, nine missense mutations of the ADSL gene had been reported in six apparently unrelated sibships. In the present study of 10 additional patients with ADSL deficiency, nine point mutations, among which seven unreported missense mutations, and the first splicing error reported in this disorder, have been identified. These mutations have been characterized, taking into account the finding that the cDNA of human ADSL is 75 nucleotides longer at its 5'-end, and encodes a protein of 484 rather than 459 amino acids as previously reported. Five apparently unrelated patients were found to carry a R426H mutation. With the exceptions of the latter mutation, of a R190Q mutation that had been reported previously, and of a K246E mutation that was found in two unrelated patients, all other mutations were found only in a single family.

  6. Cystic fibrosis in Jews: frequency and mutation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerem, B; Chiba-Falek, O; Kerem, E

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cystic fibrosis and the frequency of disease causing mutations varies among different ethnic groups and geographical regions around the world. The Jewish population is comprised of two major ethnic groups. Ashkenazi and Non-Ashkenazi. The latter is further classified according to country of origin. An extreme variability in the disease frequency (from 1:2400-1:39,000) was found among the different Jewish ethnic groups. In the entire Jewish CF population, only 12 mutations were identified that altogether enable the identification of 91% of the CF chromosomes. However, in each Jewish ethnic group, the disease is caused by a different repertoire of a small number of mutations. In several ethnic groups, there is a major CFTR mutation that accounts for at least 48% of the CF chromosomes. High proportion of the CF chromosomes can be identified in Ashkenazi Jews (95%), Jews originating from Tunisia (100%), Libya (91%), Turkey (90%), and Georgia (88%). High frequencies of CFTR mutations were found among infertile males with CBAVD who might not have additional CF clinical characteristics. Of the Jewish males with CBAVD, 77% carried at least one CFTR mutation. The 5T mutation is the major mutation in Jewish CBAVD affecteds accounting for 32% of the chromosomes among Ashkenazi Jews and 36% among the non-Ashkenazi Jews. Five additional CFTR mutations, W1282X (12%), delta F508 (9%), N1303K (3%), D1152H, (5%)), and R117H (1%) were identified among Ashkenazi Jews with CBAVD. Only two mutations, delta F508 and R117H, were found among non-Ashkenazi males with CBAVD. An increased frequency of the 5T allele was also found among Jewish patients with atypical CF presentation, 18% in Ashkenazi, and 10% in non-Ashkenazi Jews. In summary, we present the required information for genetic counseling of Jewish families with typical and atypical CF and for carrier screening of healthy Jewish individuals.

  7. Identification of EGFR Mutations by Immunohistochemistry with EGFR Mutation-Specific Antibodies in Biopsy and Resection Specimens from Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Hong; Kim, Seung Hoon; Park, Sonya Youngju; Yoo, Jinyoung; Kim, Sung Kyoung; Kim, Hoon Kyo

    2015-10-01

    Mutation-specific antibodies have recently been developed for identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations by immunohistochemistry (IHC). This study was designed to investigate whether the type of specimen (biopsy vs. resection) would make a difference in determining mutation status by IHC, and to evaluate whether biopsies are suitable for detection of mutant EGFR protein. IHC was performed using mutation-specific antibodies for E746-A750 deletion (DEL) and L858R point mutation (L858R) in biopsies and tissue microarrays of resected tumors from 154 patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Results were then compared with DNA sequencing data. Molecular-based assays detected EGFR mutations in 62 patients (40.3%), including 14 (9.1%) with DEL, and 31 (20.1%) with L858R. IHC with two mutation-specific antibodies showed a homogeneous staining pattern, and correctly identified EGFR mutation status in 89% (137/154). Overall (biopsy/resection) sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 75.6% (78.3%/72.7%), 94.5% (90.9%/96.3%), 85% (78.3%/88.9%), and 90.4% (90.9%/89.7%), respectively. Our data showed that IHC using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies is useful for detection of EGFR mutations with high specificity and good sensitivity not only for resection specimens but also for biopsy materials. Therefore, IHC using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies may preclude a second biopsy procedure to obtain additional tissues for identification of EGFR mutations by molecular assays in biopsies from advanced cancer, particularly when tumor cells in the samples are limited.

  8. Novel SLC37A4 Mutations in Korean Patients With Glycogen Storage Disease Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung Doo; Ko, Jung Min; Lee, Jeongho; Lee, Dong Hwan; Hong, Suk Jin; Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Soo Youn; Kim, Jong Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2017-05-01

    Molecular techniques are fundamental for establishing an accurate diagnosis and therapeutic approach of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). We aimed to evaluate SLC37A4 mutation spectrum in Korean GSD Ib patients. Nine Korean patients from eight unrelated families with GSD Ib were included. SLC37A4 mutations were detected in all patients with direct sequencing using a PCR method and/or whole-exome sequencing. A comprehensive review of previously reported SLC37A4 mutations was also conducted. Nine different pathogenic SLC37A4 mutations were identified in the nine patients with GSD Ib. Among them, four novel mutations were identified: c.148G>A (pGly50Arg), c.320G>A (p.Trp107*), c.412T>C (p.Trp138Arg), and c.818G>A (p.Gly273Asp). The most common mutation type was missense mutations (66.7%, 6/9), followed by nonsense mutations (22.2%, 2/9) and small deletion mutations (11.1%, 1/9). The most common mutation identified in the Korean population was c.443C>T (p.Ala148Val), which comprised 39.9% (7/18) of all tested alleles. This mutation has not been reported in GSD Ib patients in other ethnic populations. This study expands knowledge of the SLC37A4 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD Ib. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  9. TP53 mutation spectrum in smokers and never smoking lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Rita Halvorsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: TP53 mutations are among the most common mutations found in lung cancers, identified as an independent prognostic factor in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in never-smokers and in different histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: We analysed tumour tissue from 394 non-small cell carcinomas including adenocarcinomas (n=229, squamous cell carcinomas (n=112, large cell carcinomas (n=30 and others (n=23 for mutations in TP53 by the use of Sanger sequencing (n=394 and next generation sequencing (n=100. Results: TP53 mutations were identified in 47.2% of the samples, with the highest frequency (65% of mutations among squamous cell carcinomas. Among never-smokers, 36% carried a TP53 mutation, identified as a significant independent negative prognostic factor in this subgroup. For large cell carcinomas, a significantly prolonged progression free survival was found for those carrying a TP53 mutation. In addition, the frequency of frameshift mutations was doubled in squamous cell carcinomas (20.3% compared to adenocarcinomas (9.1%.Conclusion: TP53 mutation patterns differ between the histological subgroups of lung cancers, as also influenced by smoking history. This indicates that the histological subtypes in lung cancer are genetically different, and that smoking-induced TP53 mutations may have a different biological impact than TP53 mutations occurring in never-smokers.

  10. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    and have limited preliminary data from several pilot experiments. Cell growth and DNA sequence data indicate that we have identified a cell clone that exhibits several suitable characteristics, although further study is required to identify a more optimal cell clone. Conclusions The experimental approach is based on a quantum biological model of basis-dependent selection describing a novel mechanism of adaptive mutation. This project is currently inactive due to lack of funding. However, consistent with the objective of early reports, we describe a proposed study that has not produced publishable results, but is worthy of report because of the hypothesis, experimental design, and protocols. We outline the project’s rationale and experimental design, with its strengths and weaknesses, to stimulate discussion and analysis, and lay the foundation for future studies in this field. PMID:25491410

  11. Structural implications of mutations in the pea SYM8 symbiosis gene, the DMI1 ortholog, encoding a predicted ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Anne; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau; Yousafzai, Faridoon

    2007-01-01

    the aspartate to valine and identified a missense mutation (changing alanine to valine adjacent to the aspartate residues) in this predicted filter region; both mutations caused a loss of function. We also identified a loss-of-function missense mutation (changing arginine to isoleucine) in a domain proposed...

  12. Mutation breeding in pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, S.

    1986-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F 1 hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M 1 effects, handling the treated material in M 1 , M 2 and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  13. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Kunst, Henricus P M; Cascon, Alberto; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gaal, José; Korpershoek, Esther; Hinojar-Gutierrez, Adolfo; Timmers, Henri J L M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Hermsen, Mario A; Suárez, Carlos; Hussain, A Karim; Vriends, Annette H J T; Hes, Frederik J; Jansen, Jeroen C; Tops, Carli M; Corssmit, Eleonora P; de Knijff, Peter; Lenders, Jacques W M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Devilee, Peter; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R; Robledo, Mercedes

    2010-04-01

    Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation carriers, assess the clinical genetic significance of SDHAF2, and describe the associated clinical phenotype. We undertook a multicentre study in Spain and The Netherlands in 443 apparently sporadic patients with paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas who did not have mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB. We analysed DNA of 315 patients for germline mutations of SDHAF2; a subset (n=200) was investigated for gross gene deletions. DNA from a group of 128 tumours was studied for somatic mutations. We also examined a Spanish family with head and neck paragangliomas with a young age of onset for the presence of SDHAF2 mutations, undertook haplotype analysis in this kindred, and assessed their clinical phenotype. We did not identify any germline or somatic mutations of SDHAF2, and no gross gene deletions were noted in the subset of apparently sporadic patients analysed. Investigation of the Spanish family identified a pathogenic germline DNA mutation of SDHAF2, 232G-->A (Gly78Arg), identical to the Dutch kindred. SDHAF2 mutations do not have an important role in phaeochromocytoma and are rare in head and neck paraganglioma. Identification of a second family with the Gly78Arg mutation suggests that this is a crucial residue for the function of SDHAF2. We conclude that SDHAF2 mutation analysis is justified in very young patients with isolated head and neck paraganglioma without mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB, and in individuals with familial antecedents who are negative for mutations in all other risk genes. Dutch Cancer Society, European Union 6th Framework Program, Fondo Investigaciones Sanitarias, Fundación Mutua Madrileña, and Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer. 2010

  14. Mutation selection of strawberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repka, F.; Tsaganova, I.

    1986-01-01

    A brief account is given of the preliminary results of selection work carried out with the aim of deriving a variety of strawberry suitable for mechanized picking. Mutation selection based on irradiation by gamma rays, fast neutrons and a laser beam has been used. The irradiation was performed on strawberry seedlings grown under field conditions and on in vitro cultures at different stages of development. The studies are continuing. (author)

  15. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  16. High throughput parallel analysis of hundreds of patient samples for more than 100 mutations in multiple disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuber, A P; Michalowsky, L A; Nass, G S; Skoletsky, J; Hire, L M; Kotsopoulos, S K; Phipps, M F; Barberio, D M; Klinger, K W

    1997-03-01

    As more mutations are identified in genes of known sequence, there is a crucial need in the areas of medical genetics and genome analysis for rapid, accurate and cost-effective methods of mutation detection. We have developed a multiplex allele-specific diagnostic assay (MASDA) for analysis of large numbers of samples (> 500) simultaneously for a large number of known mutations (> 100) in a single assay. MASDA utilizes oligonucleotide hybridization to interrogate DNA sequences. Multiplex DNA samples are immobilized on a solid support and a single hybridization is performed with a pool of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) probes. Any probes complementary to specific mutations present in a given sample are in effect affinity purified from the pool by the target DNA. Sequence-specific band patterns (fingerprints), generated by chemical or enzymatic sequencing of the bound ASO(s), easily identify the specific mutation(s). Using this design, in a single diagnostic assay, we tested samples for 66 cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations, 14 beta-thalassemia mutations, two sickle cell anemia (SCA) mutations, three Tay-Sachs mutations, eight Gaucher mutations, four mutations in Canavan disease, four mutations in Fanconi anemia, and five mutations in BRCA1. Each mutation was correctly identified. Finally, in a blinded study of 106 of these mutations in > 500 patients, all mutations were properly identified. There were no false positives or false negatives. The MASDA assay is capable of detecting point mutations as well as small insertion or deletion mutations. This technology is amenable to automation and is suitable for immediate utilization for high-throughput genetic diagnostics in clinical and research laboratories.

  17. Mutations targeting the coagulation pathway are enriched in brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Cristina; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Melloni, Giorgio E M; Brescia, Paola; Patanè, Monica; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Mustafa, Dana A M; Kros, Johan M; Pollo, Bianca; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Sciandivasci, Angela; Munzone, Elisabetta; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Riva, Laura; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2017-07-26

    Brain metastases (BMs) are the most common malignancy of the central nervous system. Recently it has been demonstrated that plasminogen activator inhibitor serpins promote brain metastatic colonization, suggesting that mutations in serpins or other members of the coagulation cascade can provide critical advantages during BM formation. We performed whole-exome sequencing on matched samples of breast cancer and BMs and found mutations in the coagulation pathway genes in 5 out of 10 BM samples. We then investigated the mutational status of 33 genes belonging to the coagulation cascade in a panel of 29 BMs and we identified 56 Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs). The frequency of gene mutations of the pathway was significantly higher in BMs than in primary tumours, and SERPINI1 was the most frequently mutated gene in BMs. These findings provide direction in the development of new strategies for the treatment of BMs.

  18. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun Hyun; Hirohata, Kensen; Kohrn, Brendan F.; Fox, Edward J.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic) mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS), which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G) are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G) are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles. PMID:26305705

  19. Rare Noncoding Mutations Extend the Mutational Spectrum in the PGAP3 Subtype of Hyperphosphatasia with Mental Retardation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Alexej; Awaya, Tomonari; Helbig, Ingo; Afawi, Zaid; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Abu‐Rachma, Jubran; Thompson, Miles D.; Cole, David E.; Skinner, Steve; Annese, Fran; Canham, Natalie; Schweiger, Michal R.; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Kinoshita, Taroh; Munnich, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HPMRS or Mabry syndrome is a heterogeneous glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor deficiency that is caused by an impairment of synthesis or maturation of the GPI‐anchor. The expressivity of the clinical features in HPMRS varies from severe syndromic forms with multiple organ malformations to mild nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In about half of the patients with the clinical diagnosis of HPMRS, pathogenic mutations can be identified in the coding region in one of the six genes, one among them is PGAP3. In this work, we describe a screening approach with sequence specific baits for transcripts of genes of the GPI pathway that allows the detection of functionally relevant mutations also including introns and the 5′ and 3′ UTR. By this means, we also identified pathogenic noncoding mutations, which increases the diagnostic yield for HPMRS on the basis of intellectual disability and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. In eight affected individuals from different ethnicities, we found seven novel pathogenic mutations in PGAP3. Besides five missense mutations, we identified an intronic mutation, c.558‐10G>A, that causes an aberrant splice product and a mutation in the 3′UTR, c.*559C>T, that is associated with substantially lower mRNA levels. We show that our novel screening approach is a useful rapid detection tool for alterations in genes coding for key components of the GPI pathway. PMID:27120253

  20. TP53 mutations in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients: longitudinal follow-ups show the mutation is stable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Liu, C-Y; Lin, L-I; Tseng, M-H; Chiang, Y-C; Liu, M-C; Liu, C-W; Tang, J-L; Yao, M; Li, C-C; Huang, S-Y; Ko, B-S; Hsu, S-C; Chen, C-Y; Lin, C-T; Wu, S-J; Tsay, W; Chen, Y-C; Tien, H-F

    2015-07-31

    The TP53 mutation is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with complex karyotype (CK), but the stability of this mutation during the clinical course remains unclear. In this study, TP53 mutations were identified in 7% of 500 patients with de novo AML and 58.8% of patients with CK. TP53 mutations were closely associated with older age, lower white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, FAB M6 subtype, unfavorable-risk cytogenetics and CK, but negatively associated with NPM1 mutation, FLT3/ITD and DNMT3A mutation. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that TP53 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival among the total cohort and the subgroup of patients with CK. A scoring system incorporating TP53 mutation and nine other prognostic factors, including age, WBC counts, cytogenetics and gene mutations, into survival analysis proved to be very useful to stratify AML patients. Sequential study of 420 samples showed that TP53 mutations were stable during AML evolution, whereas the mutation was acquired only in 1 of the 126 TP53 wild-type patients when therapy-related AML originated from different clone emerged. In conclusion, TP53 mutations are associated with distinct clinic-biological features and poor prognosis in de novo AML patients and are rather stable during disease progression.

  1. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations ofTMPRSS3Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3 , one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family.

  2. The impact of rare EGFR mutations on the treatment response of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Mutational activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is implicated in lung cancer; clinical and cancer genome sequencing studies have identified hundreds of mutations in the protein kinase domain. EGFR mutation testing usually focuses on common mutations like the exon 19 deletion and exon 21 point mutation (L858R). However, molecular screening methods have started to extend beyond identification of classic EGFR mutations to prevent exclusion of patients with rare or complex mutations who may benefit from anti-EGFR therapy. Rare EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancers are heterogeneous: exon 20 insertions lack sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors while exon 18 or complex mutations are more sensitive and require individual assessment. Until testing for uncommon EGFR mutations evolves and studies with large number of patients are performed, knowledge of this field will remain limited.

  3. Investigation of CYP21A2 mutations in Turkish patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and a novel founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Bayram; Ökten, Ayşenur; Kalay, Ersan; Karagüzel, Gülay; Dinçer, Tuba; Açıkgöz, Emel Gül; Karagüzel, Ahmet

    2013-01-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by impaired production of adrenal steroids. Approximately 95% of all CAH are caused by mutations of the CYP21A2 that encodes 21-hydroxylase. In this study, mutation analyses of CYP21A2 were performed in 48 CAH patients from 45 Turkish families with the clinical diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). While in 39 (86.7%) of 21OHD patients, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were identified in both alleles, in two 21OHD patients CYP21A2 mutations were identified only in one allele. In four patients, mutation was not detected at all. In total, seventeen known and one novel, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were observed. Among identified mutations, previously described c.293-13C/A>G, large rearrangements and p.Q319X mutations were the most common mutations accounting for 33.3%, 14.4% and 12.2% of all evaluated chromosomes, respectively. In six families (13.3%) a novel founder mutation, c.2T>C (p.M1?), inactivating the translation initiation codon was found. This mutation is not present in pseudogene CYP21A1P and causes the classical form of the disease in six patients. In addition, depending on the nature of the rearrangements CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras were further classified as CH(c/d), and CH-1(c) was shown to be the most prominent chimera in our study group. In conclusion, with this study we identified a novel founder CYP21A2 mutation and suggest a further classification for CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras depending on the combination of junction site position and whether it is occurred as a result of deletion or conversion. Absence of disease causing mutation of CYP21A2 in ten of screened ninety chromosomes suggests the contribution of regulatory elements in occurrences of CAH due to the 21OHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ki Yong; Noh, Byeong-Joo; Sung, Ji-Youn; Kim, Youn Wha; Santini Araujo, Eduardo; Park, Yong-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs.

  6. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Yong Na

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. Methods: This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. Results: We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. Conclusions: This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs.

  7. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk...... in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk...... was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G...

  8. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated with KCNT1, we examined individuals affected with focal epilepsy or an epileptic encephalopathy for mutations in the gene. We identified KCNT1 mutations in 12 previously unreported patients with focal epilepsy, multifocal epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and in a family with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), in addition to patients with NFLE and MMFSI. In contrast to the 100% penetrance so far reported for KCNT1 mutations, we observed incomplete penetrance. It is notable that we report that the one KCNT1 mutation, p.Arg398Gln, can lead to either of the two distinct phenotypes, ADNFLE or MMFSI, even within the same family. This indicates that genotype–phenotype relationships for KCNT1 mutations are not straightforward. We demonstrate that KCNT1 mutations are highly pleiotropic and are associated with phenotypes other than ADNFLE and MMFSI. KCNT1 mutations are now associated with Ohtahara syndrome, MMFSI, and nocturnal focal epilepsy. They may also be associated with multifocal epilepsy and cardiac disturbances. PMID:26122718

  9. Novel FLG null mutations in Korean patients with atopic dermatitis and comparison of the mutational spectra in Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonhong; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Young Min

    2015-09-01

    Filaggrin is essential for the development of the skin barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin have been identified as major predisposing factors for atopic disorders. Molecular analysis of the FLG gene in this study showed nine null and one unclassified mutation in 13 of 81 Korean patients with atopic dermatitis (AD): five novel null mutations (i.e. p.S1405*, c.5671_5672delinsTA, p.W1947*, p.G2025* and p.E3070*); four reported null mutations (i.e. c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022*); and one unclassified mutation (i.e. c.306delAAAGCACAG). These variants are nonsense, premature termination codon or in-frame deletion expected to cause loss-of-function of FLG. Genotype-phenotype correlation is not obvious in Korean AD patients with FLG null mutations. According to a review of the mutational spectra of the FLG gene in the Asian populations, FLG null mutations appeared to be unique in each population but some mutations such as p.R501*, c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022* were commonly found in at least two of the selected Asian populations including Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Singaporean Chinese or Taiwanese. Further investigations on a larger group of Korean AD would be necessary to elucidate its clinical pathogenesis and mutational spectrum related to specific FLG null mutations for AD. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Prevalence and Clinicopathological Characteristics of HER2 and BRAF Mutation in Chinese Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shan

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of BRAF V600E mutation and HER2 exon 20 insertions in Chinese lung adenocarcinoma (ADC patients.Given the fact that the driver mutations are mutually exclusive in lung ADCs, 204 EGFR/KRAS wild-type cases were enrolled in this study. Direct Sanger sequencing was performed to examine BRAF V600E and HER2 exon 20 mutations. The association of BRAF and HER2 mutations with clinicopathological characteristics was statistically analyzed.Among the 204 lung ADCs tested, 11 cases (5.4% carried HER2 exon 20 insertions and 4 cases (2.0% had BRAF V600E mutation. HER2 mutation status was identified to be associated with a non-smoking history (p<0.05. HER2 mutation occurs in 9.4% of never smokers (10/106, 8.7% of female (8/92 and 2.7% of male (3/112 in this selected cohort. All four BRAF mutated patients were women and three of them were never-smokers. No HER2 mutant patients harbor BRAF mutation.HER2 and BRAF mutations identify a distinct subset of lung ADCs. Given the high prevalence of lung cancer and the availability of targeted therapy, Chinese lung ADC patients without EGFR and KRAS mutations are recommended for HER2 and BRAF mutations detection, especially for those never smokers.

  11. NPHS1 gene mutations confirm congenital nephrotic syndrome in four Brazilian cases: A novel mutation is described.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaragna, Mara S; Cleto, Thaís Lira; Souza, Marcela Lopes; Lutaif, Anna Cristina G B; de Castro, Luiz Cláudio Gonçalves; Penido, Maria Goretti Moreira Guimarães; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T; Belangero, Vera M S; Guerra-Junior, Gil; De Mello, Maricilda P

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in NPHS1 gene are a common cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). The disorder is characterized by massive proteinuria that manifests in utero or in the neonatal period during the first 3 months of life. NPHS1 encodes nephrin, a member of the immunoglobulin family of cell adhesion molecules and the main protein expressed at the renal slit diaphragm. Currently, there are approximately 250 mutations described in the NPHS1 gene distributed among all nephrin domains. The main objective of this study was to perform the analysis of the NPHS1 gene in patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome in order to determine the molecular cause of the disease. Direct sequencing of NPHS1 gene in four children was performed. Each patient was heterozygous for two pathogenic mutations disclosing the molecular cause of the disease in 100% of the cases. We identified six different mutations, consisting of one in-frame deletion, one frameshift, and four missense substitutions. The p.Val736Met mutation that is described here for the first time was considered pathogenic by different mutation predictive algorithms. Regardless of the type of mutation, three patients had a bad outcome and died Despite the small size of the cohort, this study contributed to the increasing number of deleterious mutations in the NPHS1 gene by describing a new mutation. Also, since we identified NPHS1 pathogenic mutations as the cause of the disease in all cases analyzed, it might be a frequent cause of CNS in the South Eastern region of Brazil, although the analysis of a larger sample is required to obtain more indicative epidemiological data. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  12. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  13. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    mutations). Additional sequences from 13 patients were included for longitudinal analysis. We assessed positive selection pressure on the gag/protease region using a test for the overall influence of positive selection and a total of five tests to identify positively selected single codons. We found...... that positive selection pressure was the driving evolutionary force for the gag region in all three patient groups. An increase in positive selection was observed in gag cleavage site regions p7/p1/p6 only after the acquisition of major PI mutations, suggesting that amino acids in gag cleavage sites under...... positive selection pressure could function as compensatory mutations for major PI mutations in the protease region. Isolated gag mutations did not appear to confer PI resistance, but mutations in the gag cleavage sites could substitute for minor PI resistance mutations in the protease region Udgivelsesdato...

  14. Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) analysis of point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, S

    2001-05-01

    The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base changes or small deletions. ARMS is based on the use of sequence-specific PCR primers that allow amplification of test DNA only when the target allele is contained within the sample. Following an ARMS reaction the presence or absence of a PCR product is diagnostic for the presence or absence of the target allele. The protocols detailed here outline methods that can be used to analyze human genomic DNA for one or more mutations. The Basic Protocol describes the development and application of an ARMS test for a single mutation; the Alternate Protocol extends this to multiplex ARMS for the analysis of two or more mutations. The Support Protocol describes a rapid DNA extraction method from blood or mouthwash samples that yields DNA compatible with the type of tests described. The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base change The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base change.

  15. ABCD1 mutations and the X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mutation database: role in diagnosis and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, S; Pujol, A; Waterham, H R; van Geel, B M; Boehm, C D; Raymond, G V; Cutting, G R; Wanders, R J; Moser, H W

    2001-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal ABC half-transporter (ALDP) involved in the import of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome. The disease is characterized by a striking and unpredictable variation in phenotypic expression. Phenotypes include the rapidly progressive childhood cerebral form (CCALD), the milder adult form, adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), and variants without neurologic involvement. There is no apparent correlation between genotype and phenotype. In males, unambiguous diagnosis can be achieved by demonstration of elevated levels of VLCFA in plasma. In 15 to 20% of obligate heterozygotes, however, test results are false-negative. Therefore, mutation analysis is the only reliable method for the identification of heterozygotes. Since most X-ALD kindreds have a unique mutation, a great number of mutations have been identified in the ABCD1 gene in the last seven years. In order to catalog and facilitate the analysis of these mutations, we have established a mutation database for X-ALD ( http://www.x-ald.nl). In this review we report a detailed analysis of all 406 X-ALD mutations currently included in the database. Also, we present 47 novel mutations. In addition, we review the various X-ALD phenotypes, the different diagnostic tools, and the need for extended family screening for the identification of new patients. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations: characterization of neuroendocrine phenotypes and novel mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Francou

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH (OMIM #146110. In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. RESULTS: From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%. We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001 higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. CONCLUSION: The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations.

  17. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering whether actionable driver mutations are found in all or a subset of tumor cells will likely be required to improve drug development and precision medicine strategies. We analyzed nine cancer types to determine the subclonal frequencies of driver events, to time mutational processes...... during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal “actionable” mutations, including BRAF (V600E), IDH1 (R132H), PIK3CA (E545K), EGFR (L858R), and KRAS (G12D......), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)–AKT–mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations...

  18. GRIN1 mutations cause encephalopathy with infantile-onset epilepsy, and hyperkinetic and stereotyped movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Chihiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Tohyama, Jun; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Blumkin, Lubov; Lev, Dorit; Mukaida, Souichi; Nozaki, Fumihito; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Onuma, Akira; Kodera, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, de novo mutations in GRIN1 have been identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and epileptic encephalopathy. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis of patients with genetically unsolved epileptic encephalopathies identified four patients with GRIN1 mutations, allowing us to investigate the phenotypic spectrum of GRIN1 mutations. Eighty-eight patients with unclassified early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs) with an age of onset A) with a mutant allele frequency of 16% (in DNA of blood leukocytes) was detected in one patient. Three mutations were located in the transmembrane domain (3/4, 75%), and one in the extracellular loop near transmembrane helix 1. All the mutations were predicted to impair the function of the NMDA receptor. Clinical features of de novo GRIN1 mutations include infantile involuntary movements, seizures, and hand stereotypies, suggesting that GRIN1 mutations cause encephalopathy resulting in seizures and movement disorders. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  20. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. Germline TP53 mutational spectrum in French Canadians with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, Suzanna L; Akbari, Mohammed R; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Foulkes, William D; Narod, Steven A; Tonin, Patricia N

    2015-04-12

    Specific germline mutations in the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility (HBC/HBOC) genes, BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2, have been shown to recur in French Canadians of Quebec, Canada, and this has been attributed to common ancestors. Germline TP53 mutation carriers are known to segregate in Li-Fraumeni syndrome families, which feature young age of onset breast cancer. We have reported rare TP53 mutation carriers in French Canadian HBC families, though none recurred possibly due to the limited number of cancer families investigated. Here we describe TP53 germline mutations found in French Canadian cancer families provided from hereditary cancer clinics; investigate 37 new BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative HBC/HBOC families for the TP53 mutations; and assess the frequency of TP53 mutations in a 1235 French Canadian breast cancer cases not selected for family history of cancer. TP53 mutation-positive pedigrees from French Canadian cancer families were provided from local hereditary cancer clinics. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing of all protein encoding exons of TP53 was performed using peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA from breast/ovarian cancer probands from 37 HBC/HBOC families of French Canadian descent. Targeted bidirectional Sanger sequencing assay of regions containing the identified TP53 mutations was performed on 1235 French Canadian breast cancer cases not selected for family history cancer. Five new TP53 mutations were identified in six pedigrees from hereditary cancer clinics. No deleterious mutations were identified in cancer probands from 37 HBC/HBOC families. A targeted mutation screen of the 1235 breast cancer cases identified a c.844C>T [p.Arg282Trp] mutation carrier. This mutation was also found among the six mutation-positive cancer families provided by the local hereditary cancer clinics. The targeted screen also uncovered a new TP53 mutation, c.685T>C [p.Cys229Arg] that was found in two breast cancer cases. All TP53 mutation carriers were among

  2. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter contains brief articles on the use of radiation to induce mutations in plants; radiation-induced mutants in Chrysanthemum; disrupting the association between oil and protein content in soybean seeds; mutation studies on bougainvillea; a new pepper cultivar; and the use of mutation induction to improve the quality of yam beans. A short review of the seminar on the use of mutation and related biotechnology for crop improvement in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and a description of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on the application of DNA-based marker mutations for the improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop species are also included. Two tables are given: these are based on the ''FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database'' and show the number of mutated varieties and the number of officially released mutant varieties in particular crops/species. Refs and tabs

  3. Rilpivirine resistance mutation E138K in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase predisposed by prevalent polymorphic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Hachiya, Atsuko; Ode, Hirotaka; Nishijima, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Sugiura, Wataru; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Rilpivirine is listed as a recommended or alternative key drug in the current ART guidelines. E138K in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary mutation in resistance to rilpivirine, although in vitro experiments showed it confers only E138K. The objective of this study was to reveal the mechanism amplifying rilpivirine resistance conferred by E138K. HIV-1 RT sequences were compared in patients who failed rilpivirine-containing ART virologically. The effects of mutations commonly identified with E138K on rilpivirine susceptibility were analysed by using recombinant HIV-1 variants. Rilpivirine-containing ART was introduced in 162 HIV-1-infected patients at the outpatient clinic of the AIDS Clinical Center (National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan) between May 2012 and June 2015. Virological treatment failure occurred in six of these patients. E138K emerged in three patients while other rilpivirine resistance mutations emerged in the other three patients. I135T/L were identified in only three patients with E138K and existed before the introduction of rilpivirine-containing ART. Analysis of recombinant HIV-1 variants indicated that E138K conferred low-level rilpivirine resistance and that coexistence of I135T/L with E138K amplified the resistance. I135T/L, escape mutations from HLA-B*51/52-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are prevalent in Japan, may predispose HIV-1 to harbour E138K upon failure of rilpivirine-containing ART. The mutation patterns of drug resistance may vary due to baseline polymorphic mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The mutational spectrum of FOXA2 in endometrioid endometrial cancer points to a tumor suppressor role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B; Neff, R; Cohn, D E; Backes, F J; Suarez, A A; Mutch, D G; Rush, C M; Walker, C J; Goodfellow, P J

    2016-11-01

    Forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2) plays an important in development, cellular metabolism and tumorigenesis. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) identified a modest frequency of FOXA2 mutations in endometrioid endometrial cancers (EEC). The current study sought to determine the relationship between FOXA2 mutation and clinicopathologic features in EEC and FOXA2 expression. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing were used to identify mutations in 542 EEC. Western blot, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to assess expression. Methylation analysis was performed using combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) and sequencing. Chi-squared, Fisher's exact, Student's t- and log-rank tests were performed. Fifty-one mutations were identified in 49 tumors (9.4% mutation rate). The majority of mutations were novel, loss of function (LOF) (78.4%) mutations, and most disrupted the DNA-binding domain (58.8%). Six recurrent mutations were identified. Only two tumors had two mutations and there was no evidence for FOXA2 allelic loss. Mutation status was associated with tumor grade and not associated with survival o