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Sample records for t1 relaxation processes

  1. Changes in T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow following treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, K.E.; Thomsen, C.; Henriksen, O.; Hertz, H.; Johansen, H.K.; Yssing, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T 1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow were performed in 11 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. Nine of the children were re-examined after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with histological data from bone marrow biopsies obtained in close association to the MR examinations. Ten age matched children were examined as a control group. A 1.5 Tesla whole body scanner was used for the measurements. The pretreatment T 1 relaxation times of the bone marrow were significantly prolonged, compared to the age matched controls. After chemotherapy the T 1 relaxation times of the children with ALL decreased significantly towards or into the normal range. A significant correlation was found between the T 1 relaxation time and the content of malignant blast cells in the bone marrow. (orig.)

  2. In vivo measurements of the T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Nielsen, H; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    Nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow in a 1.5 tesla whole body scanner. Two patients underwent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and were evaluated at follow...

  3. Changes in T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow following treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow were performed in 11 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. Nine of the children were re-examined after chemotherapeutic treatment. The results were compared with histological...

  4. Determination of T1- and T2-relaxation times in the spleen of patients with splenomegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Josephsen, P; Karle, H

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients with known splenomegaly and seven healthy volunteers were examined. The T1 and T2 relaxation times were read out from a region of interest centrally in the spleen. Even though different mean T1 and T2 relaxation times were found between the groups, the great scatter and the c......Twenty-nine patients with known splenomegaly and seven healthy volunteers were examined. The T1 and T2 relaxation times were read out from a region of interest centrally in the spleen. Even though different mean T1 and T2 relaxation times were found between the groups, the great scatter...

  5. Prolonged bone marrow T1-relaxation in acute leukaemia. In vivo tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Sørensen, P G; Karle, H

    1987-01-01

    osseous tissue. Nine patients with acute leukaemia, one patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, and ten normal volunteers were included in the study. The T1- and T2-relaxation processes were measured in the lumbar spine bone marrow using a wholebody superconductive MR-scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla...

  6. Prolonged T1 relaxation of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with chronic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, K.E.; Soerensen, P.G.; Thomsen, C.; Christoffersen, P.; Henriksen, O.; Karle, H.; Hvidovre Hospital; Hvidovre Hospital; Gentofte Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with chronic leukemia (7 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) were evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1 relaxation time measurements by use of a 1.5 tesla whole body MR scanner. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained from the posterior iliac crest (within 72 hours of the MR examination) in order to provide data on bone marrow cellularity and differential counts. The patients with chronic leukemia all showed a significant prolongation of the T1 relaxation times compared with the normal range for hemopoietic bone marrow. (orig.)

  7. Prolonged T1 relaxation of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with chronic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Sørensen, P G; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with chronic leukemia (7 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) were evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1 relaxation time measurements by use of a 1.5 tesla whole body MR scanner. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained from the posterior...... iliac crest (within 72 hours of the MR examination) in order to provide data on bone marrow cellularity and differential counts. The patients with chronic leukemia all showed a significant prolongation of the T1 relaxation times compared with the normal range for hemopoietic bone marrow....

  8. Normal-appearing brain t1 relaxation time predicts disability in early primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredonia, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Olga; Khaleeli, Zhaleh; Tozer, Daniel J; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J

    2007-03-01

    To investigate whether patients with early primary progressive multiple sclerosis show changes in T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and normal-appearing gray matter (NAGM) during 2 years and whether T1-RT at baseline predicts disability. Twenty-one patients and 12 control subjects were studied at baseline and after 2 years. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) scores were assessed. T1 relaxation time histograms of NAWM and NAGM were obtained in all subjects, and mean, peak height, and peak location of the histograms were measured. Paired t tests were used to compare baseline and 2-year histogram values in patients and control subjects. To investigate whether T1-RT predicted clinical changes, multiple linear regression analysis was used. Patients showed increases in NAWM and NAGM T1-RT mean and peak location during follow-up, and significant decreases in NAWM and NAGM peak height. Baseline NAWM T1-RT mean values and peak height predicted disability at 2 years, as measured with the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score. T1 relaxometry is a good marker of disease progression and has prognostic potential in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

  9. Prolonged T1 relaxation of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with chronic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Sørensen, P G; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with chronic leukemia (7 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) were evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1 relaxation time measurements by use of a 1.5 tesla whole body MR scanner. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained from the posterior...

  10. In vivo measurements of T1 relaxation times of 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    The T1 relaxation times were estimated for 31P-metabolites in human skeletal muscle. Five healthy volunteers were examined in a 1.5 Tesla wholebody imaging system using an inversion recovery pulse sequence. The calculated T1 relaxation times ranged from 5.517 sec for phosphocreatine to 3.603 sec...

  11. Blood longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation time constants at 11.7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Qin, Qin; Zhao, Xia; Duong, Timothy Q

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to determine blood T(1) and T(2) values as functions of oxygen saturation (Y), temperature (Temp) and hematocrit (Hct) at an ultrahigh MR field (11.7 T) and explore their impacts on physiological measurements, including cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV) and oxygenation determination. T(1) and T(2) were simultaneously measured. Temperature was adjusted from 25 to 40°C to determine Temp dependence; Hct of 0.17-0.51 to evaluate Hct dependence at 25 and 37°C; and Y of 40-100% to evaluate Y dependence at 25 and 37°C. Comparisons were made with published data obtained at different magnetic field strengths (B(0)). T(1) was positively correlated with Temp, independent of Y, and negatively correlated with Hct. T(2) was negatively correlated with Temp and Hct, but positively correlated with Y, in a non-linear fashion. T(1) increased linearly with B(0), whereas T(2) decreased exponentially with B(0). This study reported blood T(1) and T(2) measurements at 11.7 T for the first time. These blood relaxation data could have implications in numerous functional and physiological MRI studies at 11.7 T.

  12. T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of hyperpolarized sodium and cesium hydrogencarbonate-13 C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Santiesteban, Francisco M; Dang, Thien Phuoc; Lim, Heeseung; Chen, Albert P; Scholl, Timothy J

    2017-09-01

    In vivo pH mapping in tissue using hyperpolarized hydrogencarbonate- 13 C has been proposed as a method to study tumor growth and treatment and other pathological conditions related to pH changes. The finite spin-lattice relaxation times (T 1 ) of hyperpolarized media are a significant limiting factor for in vivo imaging. Relaxation times can be measured at standard magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3.0 T etc.), but no such data are available at low fields, where T 1 values can be significantly shorter. This information is required to determine the potential loss of polarization as the agent is dispensed and transported from the polarizer to the MRI scanner. The purpose of this study is to measure T 1 dispersion from low to clinical magnetic fields (0.4 mT to 3.0 T) of different hyperpolarized hydrogencarbonate formulations previously proposed in the literature for in vivo pH measurements. 13 C-enriched cesium and sodium hydrogencarbonate preparations were hyperpolarized using dynamic nuclear polarization, and the T 1 values of different samples were measured at different magnetic field strengths using a fast field-cycling relaxometer and a 3.0 T clinical MRI system. The effects of deuterium oxide as a dissolution medium for sodium hydrogencarbonate were also analyzed. This study finds that the cesium formulation has slightly shorter T 1 values compared with the sodium preparation. However, the higher solubility of cesium hydrogencarbonate- 13 C means it can be polarized at greater concentration, using less trityl radical than sodium hydrogencarbonate- 13 C. This study also establishes that the preparation and handling of sodium hydrogencarbonate formulations in relation to cesium hydrogencarbonate is more difficult, due to the higher viscosity and lower achievable concentrations, and that deuterium oxide significantly increases the T 1 of sodium hydrogencarbonate solutions. Finally, this work also investigates the influence of pH on the spin-lattice relaxation of cesium

  13. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemen, L. [Univ Cincinnati (United States)

    2015-06-15

    can be introduced with either of two approaches. In the first, one thinks (loosely) of the nuclei of hydrogen atoms as (rotating and charged and therefore) magnetic objects, whose spin-axes tend to align in a strong external magnetic field, much like a compass needle. As with the Bohr atom, this spin-up/spin-down picture is a highly abridged version of the full quantum mechanical treatment, but still it leads to some useful, legitimate pictures of the NMR process occurring within a voxel: When RF photons of the correct (Larmor) frequency elevate protons in a fixed magnetic field out of their lower-energy spin state into the upper, the NMR phenomenon is indicated by the detectable absorption of RF power. With the addition of a linear gradient field along a multi-voxel, one-dimensional patient/phantom, as well, we can determine the water content of each compartment – an example of a real MRI study, albeit in 1D. Part I concludes with a discussion of the net magnetization at position x, m0(x), under conditions of dynamic thermal equilibrium, which leads into: Part II. Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t); T1-MRI; The MRI Device (Lemen), investigates the biophysics of the form of proton spin relaxation process characterized by the time T1. It then moves on to the creation of an MR image that displays the spatial variation in the values of this clinically relevant parameter, again in 1D. Finally, the design and workings of a clinical MRI machine are sketched, in preparation for: Part III. ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space (Yanasak) presents the second standard approach to NMR and MRI, the classical model. It focuses on the time dependence of the net nuclear magnetization, m(x,t), the overall magnetic field generated by the cohort of protons in the voxel at position x. Quite remarkably, this nuclear net magnetization itself acts in a strong magnetic field like a gyroscope in a gravitational field. This tack is better for explaining Free Induction Decay (FID

  14. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemen, L.

    2015-01-01

    can be introduced with either of two approaches. In the first, one thinks (loosely) of the nuclei of hydrogen atoms as (rotating and charged and therefore) magnetic objects, whose spin-axes tend to align in a strong external magnetic field, much like a compass needle. As with the Bohr atom, this spin-up/spin-down picture is a highly abridged version of the full quantum mechanical treatment, but still it leads to some useful, legitimate pictures of the NMR process occurring within a voxel: When RF photons of the correct (Larmor) frequency elevate protons in a fixed magnetic field out of their lower-energy spin state into the upper, the NMR phenomenon is indicated by the detectable absorption of RF power. With the addition of a linear gradient field along a multi-voxel, one-dimensional patient/phantom, as well, we can determine the water content of each compartment – an example of a real MRI study, albeit in 1D. Part I concludes with a discussion of the net magnetization at position x, m0(x), under conditions of dynamic thermal equilibrium, which leads into: Part II. Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t); T1-MRI; The MRI Device (Lemen), investigates the biophysics of the form of proton spin relaxation process characterized by the time T1. It then moves on to the creation of an MR image that displays the spatial variation in the values of this clinically relevant parameter, again in 1D. Finally, the design and workings of a clinical MRI machine are sketched, in preparation for: Part III. ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space (Yanasak) presents the second standard approach to NMR and MRI, the classical model. It focuses on the time dependence of the net nuclear magnetization, m(x,t), the overall magnetic field generated by the cohort of protons in the voxel at position x. Quite remarkably, this nuclear net magnetization itself acts in a strong magnetic field like a gyroscope in a gravitational field. This tack is better for explaining Free Induction Decay (FID

  15. Quantitative Study of Longitudinal Relaxation (T 1) Contrast Mechanisms in Brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu

    Longitudinal relaxation (T1) contrast in MRI is important for studying brain morphology and is widely used in clinical applications. Although MRI only detects signals from water hydrogen ( 1H) protons (WPs), T1 contrast is known to be influenced by other species of 1H protons, including those in macromolecules (MPs), such as lipids and proteins, through magnetization transfer (MT) between WPs and MPs. This complicates the use and quantification of T1 contrast for studying the underlying tissue composition and the physiology of the brain. MT contributes to T1 contrast to an extent that is generally dependent on MT kinetics, as well as the concentration and NMR spectral properties of MPs. However, the MP spectral properties and MT kinetics are both difficult to measure directly, as the signal from MPs is generally invisible to MRI. Therefore, to investigate MT kinetics and further quantify T1 contrast, we first developed a reliable way to indirectly measure the MP fraction and their exchange rate with WPs, with minimal dependence on the spectral properties of MPs. For this purpose, we used brief, highpower radiofrequency (RF) NMR excitation pulses to almost completely saturate the magnetization of MPs. Based on this, both MT kinetics and the contribution of MPs to T1 contrast through MT were studied. The thus obtained knowledge allowed us to subsequently infer the spectral properties of MPs by applying low-power, frequencyselective off-resonance RF pulses and measuring the offset-frequency dependent effect of MPs on the WP MRI signal. A two-pool exchange model was used in both cases to account for direct effects of the RF pulse on WP magnetization. Consistent with earlier works using MRI at low-field and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue, our novel measurement approach found that MPs constitute an up to 27% fraction of the total 1H protons in human brain white matter, and their spectrum follows a super-Lorentzian line with a T2 of 9.6+/-0.6 mus and a resonance

  16. Relaxation time T1, T2 and proton density images in NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaoka, Hideto; Hirata, Takaaki; Matsuura, Hiroyuki

    1987-01-01

    Pure T 1 , T 2 and proton density (ρ) images can be computed from three or more different NMR images. Computed images can be useful for several reasons: a) they are objective, since they are independent of pulse sequence and scan parameters. b) arbitrary composite images can be synthesized from computed images. c) biochemical information can be obtained from relaxation times, so quantitative diagnosis is possible using T 1 and T 2 images. For these reasons, several methods of producing computed images have been tried. However, with these methods, there are several practical problems such as large systematic error and long total scan time. This paper describes how several sets of NMR pulse sequences and scan parameters were investigated, keeping total scan time constant, to find which of them gave computed images with best resolution and minimum systematic error for a given scan time. Pulse sequences and scan parameters were optimized to yield minimum variance of computed images, using the law of error propagation, for a given range of T 1 , T 2 and ρ. We found that theoretically the combination Inversion Recovery 3 Spin Echo and Saturation Recovery 4 Spin Echo pulse sequence gave the best compromise between scan time and resolution. The effect of slice profile and errors in RF pulses - causes of systematic error - were analyzed in order to find ways to remove or reduce them. Using this method computed T 1 , T 2 and ρ images were obtained for the human head and for various phantoms. Computed values agreed closely with values measured using analytical methods. We conclude from these results that the combination Inversion Recovery 3 Spin Echo and Saturation Recovery 4 Spin Echo pulse sequence gives the best compromise between scan time, resolution and error. (author)

  17. THEORY OF RELAXATION PROCESSES IN FERROMAGNETIC INSULATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: Simplified description of ferromagnetic relaxation Detailed treatment of magnons Relaxation frequency calculations Summary of relaxation processes in YIG Summary of experimental results for YIG

  18. Relationship between aging and T1relaxation time in deep gray matter: A voxel-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Gosuke; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tsutomu; Murata, Katsutoshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-09-01

    To investigate age-related changes in T 1 relaxation time in deep gray matter structures in healthy volunteers using magnetization-prepared 2 rapid acquisition gradient echoes (MP2RAGE). In all, 70 healthy volunteers (aged 20-76, mean age 42.6 years) were scanned at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A MP2RAGE sequence was employed to quantify T 1 relaxation times. After the spatial normalization of T 1 maps with the diffeomorphic anatomical registration using the exponentiated Lie algebra algorithm, voxel-based regression analysis was conducted. In addition, linear and quadratic regression analyses of regions of interest (ROIs) were also performed. With aging, voxel-based analysis (VBA) revealed significant T 1 value decreases in the ventral-inferior putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala, whereas T 1 values significantly increased in the thalamus and white matter as well (P VBA result. T 1 values in the thalamus (P < 0.0001), substantia nigra (P = 0.0003), and globus pallidus (P < 0.0001) had a best fit to quadratic curves, with the minimum T 1 values observed between 30 and 50 years of age. Age-related changes in T 1 relaxation time vary by location in deep gray matter. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:724-731. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Intraindividual comparison of T1 relaxation times after gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA administration for cardiac late enhancement imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeblin, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.doeblin@charite.de [Department of Cardiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schilling, Rene, E-mail: rene.schilling@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Luhur, Reny, E-mail: renyluhur@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.huppertz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Taupitz, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.taupitz@harite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate T1-relaxation times of chronic myocardial infarction (CMI) using gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) over time and to determine the optimal imaging window for late enhancement imaging with both contrast agents. Material and methods: Twelve patients with CMI were prospectively included and examined on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) system using relaxivity-adjusted doses of gadobutrol (0.15 mmol/kg) and Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) in random order. T1-relaxation times of remote myocardium (RM), infarcted myocardium (IM), and left ventricular cavity (LVC) were assessed from short-axis TI scout imaging using the Look–Locker approach and compared intraindividually using a Wilcoxon paired signed-rank test (α < 0.05). Results: Within 3 min of contrast agent administration (CA), IM showed significantly lower T1-relaxation times than RM with both contrast agents, indicating beginning cardiac late enhancement. Differences between gadobutrol and Gd-DTPA in T1-relaxation times of IM and RM were statistically not significant through all time points. However, gadobutrol led to significantly higher T1-relaxation times of LVC than Gd-DTPA from 6 to 9 min (220 ± 15 ms vs. 195 ± 30 ms p < 0.01) onwards, resulting in a significantly greater ΔT1 of IM to LVC at 9–12 min (−20 ± 35 ms vs. 0 ± 35 ms, p < 0.05) and 12–15 min (−25 ± 45 ms vs. −10 ± 60 ms, p < 0.05). Using Gd-DTPA, comparable ΔT1 values were reached only after 25–35 min. Conclusion: This study indicates good delineation of IM to RM with both contrast agents as early as 3 min after administration. However, we found significant differences in T1 relaxation times with greater ΔT1 IM–LVC using 0.15 mmol/kg gadobutrol compared to 0.20 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA after 9–15 min post-CA suggesting earlier differentiability of IM and LVC using gadobutrol.

  20. Relaxation processes in Aeolian transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selmani Houssem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate experimentally the relaxation process toward the equilibrium regime of saltation transport in the context of spatial inhomogeneous conditions. The relaxation length associated to this process is an important length in aeolian transport. This length stands for the distance needed for the particle flux to adapt to a change in flow conditions or in the boundary conditions at the bed. Predicting the value of this length under given conditions of transport remains an open and important issue. We conducted wind tunnel experiments to document the influence of the upstream particle flux and wind speed on the relaxation process toward the saturated transport state. In the absence of upstream particle flux, data show that the relaxation length is independent of the wind strength (except close to the threshold of transport. In contrast, in the case of a finite upstream flux, the relaxation length exhibits a clear increase with increasing air flow velocity. Moreover, in the latter the relaxation is clearly non-monotonic and presents an overshoot.

  1. In-vivo measurement of proton relaxation time (T1 and T2) in paediatric brain by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumura, Michio

    1986-01-01

    The clinical application of MRI led to the detailed imaging of the three-dimentional structure of the brain. Thus, significant information has been obtained with respect to the diagnosis of various diseases, rating severity, evaluation of curative effects, etc. On the other hand, the proportion of the comparative length of the relaxation time to the signal intensity of the images (especially the Spin-Echo image) was not necessarily linear. Consquently, the evaluation of severity was not easy to make. However, if we can obtain T 1 and T 2 precisely as the parameters costituting the images, it will be possible to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties. Further, the usefulness of MRI in activities such as determining the water metabolism of the brain is expected to increase even more. By means of VISTA-MR (0.15 Tesla, resistive magnet ; Picker International Co.) we measured the proton relaxation time (spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ) and spin-spin relaxation time (T 2 )) of various intracerebral lesions in paediatric cases. As the control group, 43 children, 4 adolescents and 6 adults were used. The T 1 and T 2 in the normal infantile cases prolonged significantly as compared with adult case. Thereafter, they become shortened by aging. In the age of two or three years, they reach the normal level of adult case. In the cases of degenerative disease, brain tumor, and cerebral contusion, the remarkable prolongation of both T 1 and T 2 , compared with normal value of the same age was observed. In the cases of brain atrophy and epilepsy, T 1 and T 2 were slightly short or within normal value of the same age. In the cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, T 1 was shortened. The in-vivo proton relaxation time obtained by MRI have various limits, but they can be a noninvasive and useful index in evaluation of severity or curative effects in various cerebral diseases. (author)

  2. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kenji, E-mail: Kenji-am@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Hashimoto, Sanshiro, E-mail: info@msorc.jp [Minami-Shinjuku Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Clinic, 2-16-7 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakamura@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Mori, Atsushi, E-mail: atsu@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Sato, Akiko, E-mail: akiko-sato@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Majima, Tokifumi, E-mail: tkmajima@iuhw.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasu-shiobara, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan); Takai, Shinro, E-mail: takai-snr@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis.

  3. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Mori, Atsushi; Sato, Akiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis

  4. Magic angle effect plays a major role in both T1rho and T2 relaxation in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H; Pauli, C; Li, S; Ma, Y; Tadros, A S; Kavanaugh, A; Chang, E Y; Tang, G; Du, J

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sample orientation on T1rho and T2 values of articular cartilage in histologically confirmed normal and abnormal regions using a whole-body 3T scanner. Eight human cadaveric patellae were evaluated using a 2D CPMG sequence for T2 measurement as well as a 2D spin-locking prepared spiral sequence and a 3D magnetization-prepared angle-modulated partitioned-k-space spoiled gradient echo snapshots (3D MAPSS) sequence for T1rho measurement. Each sample was imaged at six angles from 0° to 100° relative to the B 0 field. T2 and T1rho values were measured for three regions (medial, apex and lateral) with three layers (10% superficial, 60% middle, 30% deep). Multiple histopathologically confirmed normal and abnormal regions were used to evaluate the angular dependence of T2 and T1rho relaxation in articular cartilage. Our study demonstrated a strong magic angle effect for T1rho and T2 relaxation in articular cartilage, especially in the deeper layers of cartilage. On average, T2 values were increased by 231.8% (72.2% for superficial, 237.6% for middle, and 187.9% for deep layers) while T1rho values were increased by 92% (31.7% for superficial, 69% for middle, and 140% for deep layers) near the magic angle. Both normal and abnormal cartilage showed similar T1rho and T2 magic angle effect. Changes in T1rho and T2 values due to the magic angle effect can be several times more than that caused by degeneration, and this may significantly complicate the clinical application of T1rho and T2 as an early surrogate marker for degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents at 7 Tesla: in vitro T1 relaxivities in human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Juras, Vladimír; Kraff, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE/INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the T1 relaxivities (r1) of 8 gadolinium (Gd)-based MR contrast agents in human blood plasma at 7 Tesla, compared with 3 Tesla. Eight commercially available Gd-based MR contrast agents were diluted in human blood plasma to concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/L. In vitro measurements were performed at 37 degrees C, on a 7 Tesla and on a 3 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scanner. For the determination of T1 relaxation times, Inversion Recovery Sequences with inversion times from 0 to 3500 ms were used. The relaxivities were calculated. The r1 relaxivities of all agents, diluted in human blood plasma at body temperature, were lower at 7 Tesla than at 3 Tesla. The values at 3 Tesla were comparable to those published earlier. Notably, in some agents, a minor negative correlation of r1 with a concentration of up to 2 mmol/L could be observed. This was most pronounced in the agents with the highest protein-binding capacity. At 7 Tesla, the in vitro r1 relaxivities of Gd-based contrast agents in human blood plasma are lower than those at 3 Tesla. This work may serve as a basis for the application of Gd-based MR contrast agents at 7 Tesla. Further studies are required to optimize the contrast agent dose in vivo.

  6. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is hampered by several potential sources of error. This study focused on the influence of the radiofrequency pulse sequences applied with special attention to the significance of the repetition time (TR......). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...

  7. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  8. Real T1 relaxation time measurement and diurnal variation analysis of intervertebral discs in a healthy population of 50 volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galley, J., E-mail: galleyjulien@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, HFR Fribourg, Hôpital Cantonal (Switzerland); Maestretti, G. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, HFR Fribourg, Hôpital Cantonal (Switzerland); Koch, G.; Hoogewoud, H-M. [Department of Radiology, HFR Fribourg, Hôpital Cantonal (Switzerland)

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: To measure the real T1 relaxation time of the lumbar intervertebral discs in a young and healthy population, using different inversion recovery times, and assess diurnal variation. Material and methods: Intervertebral discs from D12 to S1 of 50 healthy volunteers from 18 to 25 years old were evaluated twice the same day, in the morning and in the late afternoon. Dedicated MRI sequences with different inversion recovery times (from 100 to 2500 ms) were used to calculate the real T1 relaxation time. Three regions of interest (ROIs) were defined in each disc, the middle representing the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the outer parts the annulus fibrosus (AF) anterior and posterior. Diurnal variation and differences between each disc level were analyzed. Results: T1 mean values in the NP were 1142 ± 12 ms in the morning and 1085 ± 13 ms in the afternoon, showing a highly significant decrease of 57 ms (p < 0.001). A highly significant difference between the levels of the spine was found. The mean T1 of the anterior part of the AF was 577 ± 9 ms in the morning and 554 ± 8 ms in the afternoon. For the posterior part, the mean values were 633 ± 8 ms in the morning and 581 ± 7 ms in the evening. It shows a highly significant decrease of 23 ms for the anterior part and 51 ms for the posterior part (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: T1 mapping is a promising method of intervertebral disc evaluation. Significant diurnal variation and difference between levels of the lumbar spine were demonstrated. A potential use for longitudinal study in post-operative follow up or sport medicine needs to be evaluated.

  9. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting using echo-planar imaging: Joint quantification of T1and T2∗ relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Benedikt; Zimmer, Fabian; Zapp, Jascha; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-11-01

    To develop an implementation of the magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) paradigm for quantitative imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) for simultaneous assessment of T 1 and T2∗. The proposed MRF method (MRF-EPI) is based on the acquisition of 160 gradient-spoiled EPI images with rapid, parallel-imaging accelerated, Cartesian readout and a measurement time of 10 s per slice. Contrast variation is induced using an initial inversion pulse, and varying the flip angles, echo times, and repetition times throughout the sequence. Joint quantification of T 1 and T2∗ is performed using dictionary matching with integrated B1+ correction. The quantification accuracy of the method was validated in phantom scans and in vivo in 6 healthy subjects. Joint T 1 and T2∗ parameter maps acquired with MRF-EPI in phantoms are in good agreement with reference measurements, showing deviations under 5% and 4% for T 1 and T2∗, respectively. In vivo baseline images were visually free of artifacts. In vivo relaxation times are in good agreement with gold-standard techniques (deviation T 1 : 4 ± 2%, T2∗: 4 ± 5%). The visual quality was comparable to the in vivo gold standard, despite substantially shortened scan times. The proposed MRF-EPI method provides fast and accurate T 1 and T2∗ quantification. This approach offers a rapid supplement to the non-Cartesian MRF portfolio, with potentially increased usability and robustness. Magn Reson Med 78:1724-1733, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Enhancement of T1 and T2 relaxation by paramagnetic silica-coated nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, D; Herberg, J; Gjersing, E; Ramon, E; Maxwell, R; Gray, J W; Budinger, T F; Chen, F F

    2006-08-28

    We present the first comprehensive investigation on water-soluble nanoparticles embedded into a paramagnetic shell and their properties as an MRI contrast agent. The nanoprobes are constructed with an inorganic core embedded into an ultra-thin silica shell covalently linked to chelated Gd{sup 3+} paramagnetic ions that act as an MRI contrast agent. The chelator contains the molecule DOTA and the inorganic core contains a fluorescent CdSe/ZnS qdots in Au nanoparticles. Optical properties of the cores (fluorescence emission or plasmon position) are not affected by the neither the silica shell nor the presence of the chelated paramagnetic ions. The resulting complex is a MRI/fluorescence probe with a diameter of 8 to 15 nm. This probe is highly soluble in high ionic strength buffers at pH ranging from {approx}4 to 11. In MRI experiments at clinical field strengths of 60 MHz, the QDs probes posses spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and a spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxivities of 1018.6 +/- 19.4 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2438.1 +/- 46.3 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} respectively for probes having {approx}8 nm. This increase in relaxivity has been correlated to the number of paramagnetic ions covalently linked to the silica shell, ranging from approximately 45 to over 320. We found that each bound chelated paramagnetic species contributes by over 23 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 1} and by over 54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 2} relaxivity respectively. The contrast power is modulated by the number of paramagnetic moieties linked to the silica shell and is only limited by the number of chelated paramagnetic species that can be packed on the surface. So far, the sensitivity of our probes is in the 100 nM range for 8-10 nm particles and reaches 10 nM for particles with approximately 15-18 nm in diameter. The sensitivities values in solutions are equivalent of those obtained with small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter clustered into a 100 nm polymeric

  11. Cellular compartmentalization of internalized paramagnetic liposomes strongly influences both T1 and T2 relaxivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Maarten B.; Hak, Sjoerd; Mulder, Willem J. M.; van der Schaft, Daisy W. J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, numerous Gd(3+)-based contrast agents have been developed to enable target-specific MR imaging of in vivo processes at the molecular level. The combination of powerful contrast agents and amplification strategies, aimed at increasing the contrast agent dose at the target site, is an

  12. A general model to calculate the spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time of blood, accounting for haematocrit, oxygen saturation and magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Patrick W; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Christopher A

    2016-02-01

    Many MRI techniques require prior knowledge of the T1-relaxation time of blood (T1bl). An assumed/fixed value is often used; however, T1bl is sensitive to magnetic field (B0), haematocrit (Hct), and oxygen saturation (Y). We aimed to combine data from previous in vitro measurements into a mathematical model, to estimate T1bl as a function of B0, Hct, and Y. The model was shown to predict T1bl from in vivo studies with a good accuracy (± 87 ms). This model allows for improved estimation of T1bl between 1.5-7.0 T while accounting for variations in Hct and Y, leading to improved accuracy of MRI-derived perfusion measurements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Native T1 Relaxation Time and Extracellular Volume Fraction as Accurate Markers of Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Valve Disease - Comparison With Targeted Left Ventricular Myocardial Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockova, Radka; Kacer, Petr; Pirk, Jan; Maly, Jiri; Sukupova, Lucie; Sikula, Viktor; Kotrc, Martin; Barciakova, Lucia; Honsova, Eva; Maly, Marek; Kautzner, Josef; Sedmera, David; Penicka, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived native T1 relaxation time and myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) fraction and the extent of diffuse myocardial fibrosis (DMF) on targeted myocardial left ventricular (LV) biopsy. The study population consisted of 40 patients (age 63±8 years, 65% male) undergoing valve and/or ascending aorta surgery for severe aortic stenosis (77.5%), root dilatation (7.5%) or valve regurgitation (15%). The T1 relaxation time was assessed in the basal interventricular septum pre- and 10-min post-contrast administration using the modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery sequence prior to surgery. LV myocardial biopsy specimen was obtained during surgery from the basal interventricular septal segment matched with the T1 mapping assessment. The percentage of myocardial collagen was quantified using picrosirius red staining. The average percentage of myocardial collagen was 22.0±14.8%. Both native T1 relaxation time with cutoff value ≥1,010 ms (sensitivity=90%, specificity=73%, area under the curve=0.82) and ECV with cutoff value ≥0.32 (sensitivity=80%, specificity=90%, area under the curve=0.85) showed high accuracy to identify severe (>30%) DMF. The native T1 relaxation time showed significant correlation with LV mass (Pmarkers of DMF. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1202-1209).

  14. Relaxation processes connected with electron localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews a series of recent theoretical papers worked out in the Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Lodz. Poland. These papers are mainly devoted to various relaxation processes connected with electron localization in irradiated disordered media as well as to the construction of the models of trapped or solvated electron. The models reviewed in this paper (the first part of the review) concern: (1) electron trap relaxation via electron tunnelling followed by molecular reorientation: (2) molecular structure of alcohol-hydrocarbon mixtures and electron localization in these matrices: (3) the glass relaxation effect on trapped electron reactions. (author)

  15. Multiscale approach to mechanical behavior of polymeric nanocomposites: an application of T1.rho.(13C) relaxation experiments at variable spin-locking fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 9 (2014), s. 662-666 ISSN 0032-2725 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-29009S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyamide 6 * nanocomposite * T1ρ(13C) relaxation Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.633, year: 2014

  16. T1rho and T2 relaxation times of the normal adult knee meniscus at 3T: analysis of zonal differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Shoichiro; Nguyen, Tan B; Yu, Hon J; Hagiwara, Shigeo; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Nozaki, Taiki; Iwamoto, Seiji; Otomo, Maki; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-05-18

    Prior studies describe histological and immunohistochemical differences in collagen and proteoglycan content in different meniscal zones. The aim of this study is to evaluate horizontal and vertical zonal differentiation of T1rho and T2 relaxation times of the entire meniscus from volunteers without symptom and imaging abnormality. Twenty volunteers age between 19 and 38 who have no knee-related clinical symptoms, and no history of prior knee surgeries were enrolled in this study. Two T1rho mapping (b-FFE T1rho and SPGR T1rho) and T2 mapping images were acquired with a 3.0-T MR scanner. Each meniscus was divided manually into superficial and deep zones for horizontal zonal analysis. The anterior and posterior horns of each meniscus were divided manually into white, red-white and red zones for vertical zonal analysis. Zonal differences of average relaxation times among each zone, and both inter- and intra-observer reproducibility were statistically analyzed. In horizontal zonal analysis, T1rho relaxation times of the superficial zone tended to be higher than those of the deep zone, and this difference was statistically significant in the medial meniscal segments (84.3 ms vs 76.0 ms on b-FFE, p meniscus (88.4 ms vs 77.1 ms on b-FFE, p meniscus, p = 0.011). T2 relaxation times of the white zone were significantly higher than those of the red zone in the medial meniscus posterior horn (96.8 ms vs 84.3 ms, p meniscus anterior horn (104.6 ms vs 84.2 ms, p 0.74) or good (0.60-0.74) in all meniscal segments on both horizontal and vertical zonal analysis, except for inter-class correlation coefficients of the lateral meniscus on SPGR. Compared with SPGR T1rho images, b-FFE T1rho images demonstrated more significant zonal differentiation with higher inter- and intra-observer reproducibility. There are zonal differences in T1rho and T2 relaxation times of the normal meniscus.

  17. T1 relaxivities of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents in human whole blood at 1.5, 3, and 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yaqi; Goerner, Frank L; Snyder, Christopher; Morelli, John N; Hao, Dapeng; Hu, Daoyu; Li, Xiaoming; Runge, Val M

    2015-05-01

    Calculation of accurate T1 relaxivity (r1) values for gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents (GBCAs) is a complex process. As such, often referenced r1 values for the GBCAs at 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T are based on measurements obtained in media that are not clinically relevant, derived from only a small number of concentrations, or available for only a limited number of GBCAs. This study derives the r1 values of the 8 commercially available GBCAs in human whole blood at 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. Eight GBCAs were serially diluted in human whole blood, at 7 concentrations from 0.0625 to 4 mM. A custom-built phantom held the dilutions in air-tight cylindrical tubes maintained at 37 ± 0.5°C by a heat-circulating system. Images were acquired using inversion recovery sequences with inversion times from 30 milliseconds to 10 seconds at 1.5 T and 3 T as well as 60 milliseconds to 5 seconds at 7 T. A custom MATLAB program was used to automate signal intensity measurements from the images acquired of the phantom. SigmaPlot was used to calculate T1 relaxation times and, finally, r1. Measured r1 values in units of s⁻¹·mM⁻¹ at 1.5 T (3 T/7 T) were 3.9 ± 0.2 (3.4 ± 0.4/2.8 ± 0.4) for Gd-DOTA, 4.6 ± 0.2 (4.5 ± 0.3/4.2 ± 0.3) for Gd-DO3A-butrol, 4.3 ± 0.4 (3.8 ± 0.2/3.1 ± 0.4) for Gd-DTPA, 6.2 ± 0.5 (5.4 ± 0.3/4.7 ± 0.1) for Gd-BOPTA, 4.5 ± 0.1 (3.9 ± 0.2/3.7 ± 0.2) for Gd-DTPA-BMA, 4.4 ± 0.2 (4.2 ± 0.2/4.3 ± 0.2) for Gd-DTPA-BMEA, 7.2 ± 0.2 (5.5 ± 0.3/4.9 ± 0.1) for Gd-EOB-DTPA, and 4.4 ± 0.6 (3.5 ± 0.6/3.4 ± 0.1) for Gd-HP-DO3A. The agents can be stratified by relaxivity, with a significant additional dependency on field strength. This report quantifies, for the first time, T1 relaxivity for all 8 gadolinium chelates in common clinical use worldwide, at current relevant field strengths, in human whole blood at physiological temperature (37°C). The measured r1 values differ to a small degree from previously published values, where such

  18. 1/T1 nuclear relaxation time of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl : effects of magnetic frustration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, I J; Trumper, A E; Wzietek, P; Lefebvre, S; Manuel, L O

    2005-01-01

    We study the role played by the magnetic frustration in the antiferromagnetic phase of the organic salt κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu[N(CN) 2 ]Cl. Using the spatially anisotropic triangular Heisenberg model we analyse previous and newly performed NMR experiments. We compute the 1/T 1 relaxation time by means of the modified spin wave theory. The strong suppression of the nuclear relaxation time observed experimentally under varying pressure and magnetic field is qualitatively well reproduced by the model. Our results suggest the existence of a close relation between the effects of pressure and magnetic frustration

  19. 1/T1 nuclear relaxation time of κ-(BEDT TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl : effects of magnetic frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, I. J.; Trumper, A. E.; Wzietek, P.; Lefebvre, S.; Manuel, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    We study the role played by the magnetic frustration in the antiferromagnetic phase of the organic salt κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl. Using the spatially anisotropic triangular Heisenberg model we analyse previous and newly performed NMR experiments. We compute the 1/T1 relaxation time by means of the modified spin wave theory. The strong suppression of the nuclear relaxation time observed experimentally under varying pressure and magnetic field is qualitatively well reproduced by the model. Our results suggest the existence of a close relation between the effects of pressure and magnetic frustration.

  20. Relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* of apples, pears, citrus fruits, and potatoes with a comparison to human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werz, Karin; Braun, Hans; Vitha, Dominik; Bruno, Graziano; Martirosian, Petros; Steidle, Guenter; Schick, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the project was a systematic assessment of relaxation times of different fruits and vegetables and a comparison to values of human tissues. Results provide an improved basis for selection of plant phantoms for development of new MR techniques and sequences. Vessels filled with agar gel are mostly used for this purpose, preparation of which is effortful and time-consuming. In the presented study apples, (malus, 8 species), pears, (pyrus, 2 species), citrus fruits (citrus, 5 species) and uncooked potatoes (solanum tuberosum, 8 species) from the supermarket were examined which are easily available nearly all-the-year. T1, T2 and T2 * relaxation times of these nature products were measured on a 1.5 Tesla MR system with adapted examination protocols and mono-exponential fitting, and compared to literature data of human parenchyma tissues, fatty tissue and body fluid (cerebrospinal fluid). Resulting values were as follows: apples: T1: 1486 - 1874 ms, T2: 163 - 281 ms, T2 * : 2,3 - 3,2 ms; pears: T1: 1631 - 1969 ms, T2: 119 - 133 ms, T2 * : 10,1 - 10,6 ms, citrus fruits (pulp) T1: 2055 - 2632 ms, T2: 497 - 998 ms, T2 * : 151 - 182 ms; citrus fruits (skin) T1: 561 - 1669 ms, T2: 93 - 119 ms; potatoes: T1: 1011 - 1459 ms, T2: 166 - 210 ms, T2 * : 20 - 30 ms. All T1-values of the examined objects (except for potatoes and skins of citrus fruits) were longer than T1 values of human tissues. Also T2 values (except for pears and skins of citrus fruits) of the fruits and the potatoes tended to be longer. T2 * values of apples, pears and potatoes were shorter than in healthy human tissue. Results show relaxation values of many fruits to be not exactly fitting to human tissue, but with suitable selection of the fruits and optionally with an adaption of measurement parameters one can achieve suitable contrast and signal characteristics for some purposes. (orig.)

  1. Heteronuclear relaxation in time-dependent spin systems: 15N-T1ρ dispersion during adiabatic fast passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrat, Robert; Tollinger, Martin

    1999-01-01

    A novel NMR experiment comprising adiabatic fast passage techniques for the measurement of heteronuclear self-relaxation rates in fully 15N-enriched proteins is described. Heteronuclear self-relaxation is monitored by performing adiabatic fast passage (AFP) experiments at variable adiabaticity (e.g., variation of RF spin-lock field intensity). The experiment encompasses gradient- selection and sensitivity-enhancement. It is shown that transverse relaxation rates derived with this method are in good agreement with the ones measured by the classical Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences. An application of this method to the study of the carboxyl-terminal LIM domain of quail cysteine and glycine-rich protein qCRP2(LIM2) is presented

  2. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    ). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...

  3. Tuning the relaxation rates of dual-mode T1/T2 nanoparticle contrast agents: a study into the ideal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keasberry, Natasha A.; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Wood, Christopher; Stasiuk, Graeme. J.; Gallo, Juan; Long, Nicholas. J.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent imaging modality. However the low sensitivity of the technique poses a challenge to achieving an accurate image of function at the molecular level. To overcome this, contrast agents are used; typically gadolinium based agents for T1 weighted imaging, or iron oxide based agents for T2 imaging. Traditionally, only one imaging mode is used per diagnosis although several physiological situations are known to interfere with the signal induced by the contrast agents in each individual imaging mode acquisition. Recently, the combination of both T1 and T2 imaging capabilities into a single platform has emerged as a tool to reduce uncertainties in MR image analysis. To date, contradicting reports on the effect on the contrast of the coupling of a T1 and T2 agent have hampered the application of these specialised probes. Herein, we present a systematic experimental study on a range of gadolinium-labelled magnetite nanoparticles envisioned to bring some light into the mechanism of interaction between T1 and T2 components, and advance towards the design of efficient (dual) T1 and T2 MRI probes. Unexpected behaviours observed in some of the constructs will be discussed. In this study, we demonstrate that the relaxivity of such multimodal probes can be rationally tuned to obtain unmatched potentials in MR imaging, exemplified by preparation of the magnetite-based nanoparticle with the highest T2 relaxivity described to date.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent imaging modality. However the low sensitivity of the technique poses a challenge to achieving an accurate image of function at the molecular level. To overcome this, contrast agents are used; typically gadolinium based agents for T1 weighted imaging, or iron oxide based agents for T2 imaging. Traditionally, only one imaging mode is used per diagnosis although several physiological situations are known to interfere with the signal induced by the contrast agents in

  4. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    Despite the complexity of biologic tissues, a monoexponential behaviour is usually assumed when estimating relaxation processes in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to evaluate the potential of biexponential decomposition of T1 and T2 relaxation curves obtained at 1.......5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...

  5. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.; Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion.

  6. Cluster analysis of quantitative MRI T2and T1ρrelaxation times of cartilage identifies differences between healthy and ACL-injured individuals at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monu, U D; Jordan, C D; Samuelson, B L; Hargreaves, B A; Gold, G E; McWalter, E J

    2017-04-01

    To identify focal lesions of elevated MRI T 2 and T 1ρ relaxation times in articular cartilage of an ACL-injured group using a novel cluster analysis technique. Eighteen ACL-injured patients underwent 3T MRI T 2 and T 1ρ relaxometry at baseline, 6 months and 1 year and six healthy volunteers at baseline, 1 day and 1 year. Clusters of contiguous pixels above or below T 2 and T 1ρ intensity and area thresholds were identified on a projection map of the 3D femoral cartilage surface. The total area of femoral cartilage plate covered by clusters (%CA) was split into areas above (%CA+) and below (%CA-) the thresholds and the differences in %CA(+ or -) over time in the ACL-injured group were determined using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. %CA+ was greater in the ACL-injured patients than the healthy volunteers at 6 months and 1 year with average %CA+ of 5.2 ± 4.0% (p = 0.0054) and 6.6 ± 3.7% (p = 0.0041) for T 2 and 6.2 ± 7.1% (p = 0.063) and 8.2 ± 6.9% (p = 0.042) for T 1ρ , respectively. %CA- at 6 months and 1 year was 3.0 ± 1.8% (p > 0.1) and 5.9 ± 5.0% (p > 0.1) for T 2 and 4.4 ± 4.9% (p > 0.1) and 4.5 ± 4.6% (p > 0.1) for T 1ρ , respectively. With the proposed cluster analysis technique, we have quantified cartilage lesion coverage and demonstrated that the ACL-injured group had greater areas of elevated T 2 and T 1ρ relaxation times as compared to healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature dependence of viscosity, relaxation times (T1, T2) and simulated contrast for potential perfusates in post-mortem MR angiography (PMMRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Bridgette; Widek, Thomas; Neumayer, Bernhard; Bruguier, Christine; Scheicher, Sylvia; Sprenger, Hanna; Grabherr, Silke; Schwark, Thorsten; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2017-05-01

    Developments in post-mortem imaging increasingly focus on addressing recognised diagnostic weaknesses, especially with regard to suspected natural deaths. Post-mortem MR angiography (PMMRA) may offer additional diagnostic information to help address such weaknesses, specifically in the context of sudden cardiac death. Complete filling of the coronary arteries and acceptable contrast with surrounding tissue are essential for a successful approach to PMMRA. In this work, the suitability of different liquids for inclusion in a targeted PMMRA protocol was evaluated. Factors influencing cooling of paraffinum liquidum + Angiofil® (6 %) in cadavers during routine multiphase post-mortem CT angiography were investigated. The temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity (8-20 °C), longitudinal (T 1 ) and transverse (T 2 ) relaxation (1-23 °C) of the proposed liquids was quadratically modelled. The relaxation behaviour of these liquids and MR scan parameters were further investigated by simulation of a radiofrequency (RF)-spoiled gradient echo (GRE) sequence to estimate potentially achievable contrast between liquids and post-mortem tissue at different temperatures across a forensically relevant temperature range. Analysis of the established models and simulations indicated that based on dynamic viscosity (27-33 mPa · s), short T 1 relaxation times (155-207 ms) and a minimal temperature dependence over the investigated range of these parameters, paraffin oil and a solution of paraffin oil + Angiofil® (6 %) would be most suitable for post-mortem reperfusion and examination in MRI.

  8. Spatial characterization of T1 and T2 relaxation times and the water apparent diffusion coefficient in rabbit Achilles tendon subjected to tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, J; Helmer, K G; Grigg, P; Sotak, C H

    2005-03-01

    Tendons exhibit viscoelastic mechanical behavior under tensile loading. The elasticity arises from the collagen chains that form fibrils, while the viscous response arises from the interaction of the water with the solid matrix. Therefore, an understanding of the behavior of water in response to the application of a load is crucial to the understanding of the origin of the viscous response. Three-dimensional MRI mapping of rabbit Achilles tendons was performed at 2.0 T to characterize the response of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water to tensile loading. The ADC was measured in directions both parallel (ADC( parallel)) and perpendicular (ADC( perpendicular)) to the long axis of the tendon. At a short diffusion time (5.8 ms) MR parameter maps showed the existence of two regions, here termed "core" and "rim", that exhibited statistically significant differences in T(1), T(2), and ADC( perpendicular) under the baseline loading condition. MR parameter maps were also generated at a second loading condition of approximately 1 MPa. At a diffusion time of 5.8 ms, there was a statistically significant increase in the rim region for both ADC( perpendicular) (57.5%) and ADC( parallel) (20.5%) upon tensile loading. The changes in core ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)), as well as the relaxation parameters in both core and rim regions, were not statistically significant. The effect of diffusion time on the ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values was investigated by creating maps at three additional diffusion times (50.0, 125.0, 250.0 ms) using a diffusion-weighted, stimulated-echo (DW-STE) pulse sequence. At longer diffusion times, ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values increased rather than approaching a constant value. This observation was attributed to T(1) spin-editing during the DW-STE pulse sequence, which resulted in the loss of short-T(1) components (with correspondingly lower ADCs) at longer diffusion times

  9. Modern pulsed spectrometer EPR for longitudinal relaxation time (T1) investigation - computer programs for measurement and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilnicki, J.; Koziol, J.; Galinski, W.; Oles, T.; Kostrzewa, J.; Froncisz, W.

    1994-01-01

    The computerized control and data processing systems for new spectrometer designed for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological samples are presented. Both programs were written for INTEL 386 processor and they works under the Windows 3.0 environment

  10. Models for multiple relaxation processes in collagen fiber

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... originate from stress strain induced changes in hydrogen bond network whereas the other seems to be more strongly coupled to salt like bridges and electrostatic interactions. Urea alters the activation energy for one relaxation step while pH and solvent dielectric constant alter the relaxation behavior one set of processes.

  11. SirT1—A Sensor for Monitoring Self-Renewal and Aging Process in Retinal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hsien Peng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinal stem cells bear potency of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into many retinal cells. Utilizing appropriate sensors one can effectively detect the self-renewal and aging process abilities. Silencing information regulator (SirT1, a member of the sirtuin family, is a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase and an essential mediator for longevity in normal cells by calorie restriction. We firstly investigate the SirT1 mRNA expression in retinal stem cells from rats and 19 human eyes of different ages. Results revealed that SirT1 expression was significantly decreased in in vivo aged eyes, associated with poor self-renewal abilities. Additionally, SirT1 mRNA levels were dose-dependently increased in resveratrol- treated retinal stem cells. The expression of SirT1 on oxidative stress-induced damage was significantly decreased, negatively correlated with the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with resveratrol could effectively further reduce oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment in retinal stem cells. Importantly, the anti-oxidant effects of resveratrol in H2O2-treated retinal stem cells were significantly abolished by knockdown of SirT1 expression (sh-SirT1. SirT1 expression provides a feasible sensor in assessing self-renewal and aging process in retinal stem cells. Resveratrol can prevent reactive oxygen species-induced damages via increased retinal SirT1 expression.

  12. The data processing and analysis for the CE-5T1 GNSS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huicui; Cao, Jianfeng; Cheng, Xiao; Peng, Jing; Tang, Geshi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the performance of a high sensitivity GPS/GLONASS receiver mounted on CE-5T1 Service Module is studied and the data received on the first Earth-lunar transfer orbit is processed and analyzed. At least four GLONASS satellites are visible for 46% of the data span while for 98% of the data span at least four GPS satellites are visible. GLONASS serves as a necessary supplement to GPS in real time positioning whenever less than four GPS satellites are tracked, and helps to optimize the observation geometry by reducing the Position Dilution of Precision (PDOP) values by up to 77%. However, noisier GLONASS pseudorange data should be properly weighted in order not to deteriorate the positioning accuracy. Studies indicate that when the inverse square of the pseudorange measurement error of each satellite is applied as the weight value, single point positioning (SPP) accuracy improves from 57.7 m (RMS) with GPS data alone to 44.6 m (RMS) with the addition of GLONASS data. Transmitter antenna Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP)s of all the four blocks of GPS satellites as well as GLONASS satellites are derived from the received C/N0 data and show significant variance in sidelobe power patterns. In general, the EIRP patterns of GPS Block IIR-M and GLONASS satellite antennas have a comparatively flat power level of around 10 dB W within the off-boresight angle range of 30-80° and roll off at the off-boresight angle of about 80°, offering deep space applications greater benefits than the other three blocks of GPS satellites. In addition, an interesting close encounter happens between CE-5T1 spacecraft and GLONASS satellite R06. Investigations indicate that the PDOP value increases up to 1.4 times and the SPP accuracy deteriorates by more than 142% if satellite R06 is excluded in the positioning computation.

  13. The influence of microvascular injury on native T1 and T2* relaxation values after acute myocardial infarction: implications for non-contrast-enhanced infarct assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbers, Lourens F H J; Nijveldt, Robin; Beek, Aernout M; Teunissen, Paul F A; Hollander, Maurits R; Biesbroek, P Stefan; Everaars, Henk; van de Ven, Peter M; Hofman, Mark B M; van Royen, Niels; van Rossum, Albert C

    2018-02-01

    Native T1 mapping and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging offer detailed characterisation of the myocardium after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We evaluated the effects of microvascular injury (MVI) and intramyocardial haemorrhage on local T1 and T2* values in patients with a reperfused AMI. Forty-three patients after reperfused AMI underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 4 [3-5] days, including native MOLLI T1 and T2* mapping, STIR, cine imaging and LGE. T1 and T2* values were determined in LGE-defined regions of interest: the MI core incorporating MVI when present, the core-adjacent MI border zone (without any areas of MVI), and remote myocardium. Average T1 in the MI core was higher than in the MI border zone and remote myocardium. However, in the 20 (47%) patients with MVI, MI core T1 was lower than in patients without MVI (MVI 1048±78ms, no MVI 1111±89ms, p=0.02). MI core T2* was significantly lower in patients with MVI than in those without (MVI 20 [18-23]ms, no MVI 31 [26-39]ms, pvalues. T2* mapping suggested that this may be the result of intramyocardial haemorrhage. These findings have important implications for the interpretation of native T1 values shortly after AMI. • Microvascular injury after acute myocardial infarction affects local T1 and T2* values. • Infarct zone T1 values are lower if microvascular injury is present. • T2* mapping suggests that low infarct T1 values are likely haemorrhage. • T1 and T2* values are complimentary for correctly assessing post-infarct myocardium.

  14. Relaxation cracking in the process industry, an underestimated problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, J.C. van [TNO Institute of Industrial Technology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    Austenitic components, operating between 500 and 750 deg C, can fail within 1 year service while the ordinary mechanical properties after failure are still within the code requirements. The intergranular brittle failures are situated in the welded or cold deformed areas. This type of cracking has many names, showing the uncertainty concerning the mechanism for the (catastrophical) failures. A just finished investigation showed that it is a relaxation crack problem, introduced by manufacturing processes, especially welding and cold rolling. Cracking/failures can be expected after only 0.1- 0.2 % relaxation strain. These low strain values can already be generated during relaxation of the welding stresses. Especially coarse grained `age hardening` materials are susceptible. Stabilising and Postweld Heat Treatments are very effective to avoid relaxation crack problems during operation. After these heat treatments the components can withstand more than 2 % relaxation strain. At temperatures between 500 and 750 deg C relaxation cracking is the predominant factor for the safety and lifetime of welded austenitic components. (orig.) 12 refs.

  15. The Effect of Phonon Relaxation Process on Absorption Spectra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work we study the effect of phonon relaxation process on the absorption spectra using the Green's function technique. The Green's function technique which is widely used in many particle problems is used to solve the Kubo formula which describes the optical absorption process. Finally the configurational diagram is ...

  16. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Matthias A; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of parametric MR based lesion detection and

  17. Coherence and relaxation in energy transfer processes in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelby, R.M.

    1978-03-01

    Investigations of electronic triplet and vibrational energy transfer dynamics and relaxation processes are presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of coherence and interactions which tend to destroy the coherence. In the case of triplet excitons at low temperatures, the importance of coherence in energy migration can be established, and the average coherence parameters can be experimentally determined. In the case of vibrational excitations, both picosecond spectroscopic studies of vibrational relaxation and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the dynamics and give increased insight into the nature of the mechanisms responsible for vibrational dephasing. The design and operation of the picosecond apparatus used in these experiments is also described

  18. An approach to the magnetic relaxation processes in lithium ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, C.; Gonzalez Arias, A.; Hernandez-Gomez, P.; Francisco, C. de; Alejos, O.; Munoz, J.M.; Zazo, M.

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation of the initial magnetic permeability has been measured in polycrystalline Li x Fe 3- x O 4 samples, with x ranging from 0 to 0.5, by means of the magnetic disaccommodation (DA) technique. We have found that there is no abrupt transition for a given composition, but there is a progressive modification of the characteristic relaxation processes of magnetite. These results have been interpreted on the basis of the increasing amount of Li ions in the spinel lattice and hence, the resulting modifications on their proximities

  19. Electronic relaxation processes in poly(p-phenylene)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butlers, P.I.; Knoblikh, G.

    1987-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the electronic relaxation processes in X-irradiated solid films of poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) by the fractional glow technique are presented. The obtained results suggest two temperature regions of the relaxation: a low-temperature region (T 170 K) where the interpolaron hopping occurs, and a high-temperature one (T 170 K) where the relaxation is due to thermally activated interchain polaron hopping which results in the formation and radiative recombination of the self-localized (polaronic) exciton. The activation energy and the frequency factor of the interchain polaron hopp in the PPP have the values about 0.65 eV and 5x10 13 s -1 , respectively

  20. Microscopic dynamics and relaxation processes in liquid hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, R.; Giura, P.; Monaco, G.; Sette, F.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2004-01-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and Brillouin light scattering measurements of the dynamic structure factor of liquid hydrogen fluoride have been performed in the temperature range T=214-283 K. The data, analyzed using a viscoelastic model with a two time-scale memory function, show a positive dispersion of the sound velocity c(Q) between the low frequency value c 0 (Q) and the high frequency value c ∞α (Q). This finding confirms the existence of a structural (α) relaxation directly related to the dynamical organization of the hydrogen bonds network of the system. The activation energy E a of the process has been extracted by the analysis of the temperature behavior of the relaxation time τ α (T) that follows an Arrhenius law. The obtained value for E a , when compared with that observed in another hydrogen bond liquid as water, suggests that the main parameter governing the α-relaxation process is the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule

  1. Relaxation processes and physical aging in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, B.; Pineda, E.; Evenson, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Since their discovery in the 1960s, metallic glasses have continuously attracted much interest across the physics and materials science communities. In the forefront are their unique properties, which hold the alluring promise of broad application in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental science and engineering. However, a major obstacle to their wide-spread commercial use is their inherent temporal instability arising from underlying relaxation processes that can dramatically alter their physical properties. The result is a physical aging process which can bring about degradation of mechanical properties, namely through embrittlement and catastrophic mechanical failure. Understanding and controlling the effects of aging will play a decisive role in our on-going endeavor to advance the use of metallic glasses as structural materials, as well as in the more general comprehension of out-of-equilibrium dynamics in complex systems. This review presents an overview of the current state of the art in the experimental advances probing physical aging and relaxation processes in metallic glasses. Similarities and differences between other hard and soft matter glasses are highlighted. The topic is discussed in a multiscale approach, first presenting the key features obtained in macroscopic studies, then connecting them to recent novel microscopic investigations. Particular emphasis is put on the occurrence of distinct relaxation processes beyond the main structural process in viscous metallic melts and their fate upon entering the glassy state, trying to disentangle results and formalisms employed by the different groups of the glass-science community. A microscopic viewpoint is presented, in which physical aging manifests itself in irreversible atomic-scale processes such as avalanches and intermittent dynamics, ascribed to the existence of a plethora of metastable glassy states across a complex energy landscape. Future experimental challenges and the comparison with

  2. T1 relaxation time constants, influence of oxygen, and the oxygen transfer function of the human lung at 1.5 T—A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Olaf, E-mail: od@dtrx.net [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany); Gaass, Thomas [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany); Comprehensive Pneumology Center, German Center for Lung Research, Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To pool and summarize published data from magnetic resonance longitudinal relaxation measurements of the human lung at 1.5 T to provide a reliable basis of T{sub 1} relaxation time constants of healthy lung tissue both under respiration of room air and of pure oxygen. In particular, the oxygen-induced shortening of T{sub 1} was evaluated. Materials and methods: The PubMed database was comprehensively searched up to June 2016 for original publications in English containing quantitative T{sub 1} data (at least mean values and standard deviations) of the lung parenchyma of healthy subjects (minimum subject number: 3) at 1.5 T. From all included publications, T{sub 1} values of the lung of healthy subjects were extracted (inhaling room air and, if available, inhaling pure oxygen). Weighted mean values and standard deviations of all extracted data and the oxygen transfer function (OTF) were calculated. Results: 22 publications were included with a total number of 188 examined healthy subjects. 103 of these subjects (from 13 studies) were examined while breathing pure oxygen and room air; 85 subjects were examined only under room-air conditions. The weighted mean value (weighted sample standard deviation) of the room-air T{sub 1} values over all 22 studies was 1196 ms (152 ms). Based on studies with room-air and oxygen results, the mean T{sub 1} value at room-air conditions was 1172 ms (161 ms); breathing pure oxygen, the mean T{sub 1} value was reduced to 1054 ms (138 ms). This corresponds to a mean T{sub 1} reduction by 118 ms (35 ms) or 10.0 % (2.3 %) and to a mean OTF value of 1.22 (0.32) × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}/(%O{sub 2}). Conclusion: This meta-analysis with data from 188 subjects indicates that the average T{sub 1} relaxation time constant of healthy lung tissue at 1.5 T is distributed around 1200 ms with a standard deviation of about 150 ms; breathing pure oxygen reduces this value significantly by 10 % to about 1050 ms.

  3. A Block-Asynchronous Relaxation Method for Graphics Processing Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antz, Hartwig [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Tomov, Stanimire [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Heuveline, Vincent [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    In this paper, we analyze the potential of asynchronous relaxation methods on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For this purpose, we developed a set of asynchronous iteration algorithms in CUDA and compared them with a parallel implementation of synchronous relaxation methods on CPU-based systems. For a set of test matrices taken from the University of Florida Matrix Collection we monitor the convergence behavior, the average iteration time and the total time-to-solution time. Analyzing the results, we observe that even for our most basic asynchronous relaxation scheme, despite its lower convergence rate compared to the Gauss-Seidel relaxation (that we expected), the asynchronous iteration running on GPUs is still able to provide solution approximations of certain accuracy in considerably shorter time then Gauss- Seidel running on CPUs. Hence, it overcompensates for the slower convergence by exploiting the scalability and the good fit of the asynchronous schemes for the highly parallel GPU architectures. Further, enhancing the most basic asynchronous approach with hybrid schemes – using multiple iterations within the ”subdomain” handled by a GPU thread block and Jacobi-like asynchronous updates across the ”boundaries”, subject to tuning various parameters – we manage to not only recover the loss of global convergence but often accelerate convergence of up to two times (compared to the effective but difficult to parallelize Gauss-Seidel type of schemes), while keeping the execution time of a global iteration practically the same. This shows the high potential of the asynchronous methods not only as a stand alone numerical solver for linear systems of equations fulfilling certain convergence conditions but more importantly as a smoother in multigrid methods. Due to the explosion of parallelism in todays architecture designs, the significance and the need for asynchronous methods, as the ones described in this work, is expected to grow.

  4. [Brain activity during different stages of the relaxation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    gorev, A S; Kovaleva, A V; Panova, E N; Gorbacheva, A K

    2012-01-01

    A group of adults participated in experiment in which they were asked to reach relaxed state by using relaxation techniques (active relaxation) and to maintain this state without any technique (passive relaxation). Some changes of EEG-characteristics during relaxation were analyzed. This experiment includes four situations (different functional states): baselinel, active relaxation, passive relaxation, baseline2. EEG was recorded from 10 cortical leads: O1, O2, TPO (left and right), P3, P4, C3, C4, F3 and F4. A comparative EEG analysis was done for 10 frequency bands from 5 to 40 Hz. In each experimental situation we revealed general trends for EEG parameters and also some specific changes in EEG, which characterized brain organization during passive and active relaxed states.

  5. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  6. Shape Control of Vesicle by Reverse Process Method of Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Tamotsu

    2018-03-01

    We consider a reverse process of relaxation and obtain a necessary condition under which the reverse process proceeds. Applying this method to fluid vesicle dynamics, which is derived by Onsager's variational principle, we derive the necessary equations for spontaneous curvature and anisotropic bending rigidity distributions that are induced by the proteins attached to the membrane of the vesicle. Numerical schemes to obtain the distributions of the protein properties are proposed and applied to spheroid vesicles. It is shown that proteins with an anisotropic spontaneous curvature deviator are effective in forming a long prolate spheroid. We conclude that the proposed method may become a useful tool to study the protein distribution in the membrane of a vesicle with a measured shape.

  7. Sound therapy induced relaxation: down regulating stress processes and pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Elliott; Kim, Minsun; Beaulieu, John; Stefano, George B

    2003-05-01

    The use of music as a means of inducing positive emotions and subsequent relaxation has been studied extensively by researchers. A great deal of this research has centered on the use of music as a means of reducing feelings of anxiety and stress as well as aiding in the relief of numerous pathologies. The precise mechanism responsible for these mediated effects has never been truly determined. In the current report we propose that nitric oxide (NO) is the molecule chiefly responsible for these physiological and psychological relaxing effects. Furthermore this molecules importance extends beyond the mechanistic, and is required for the development of the very process that it mediates. Nitric oxide has been determined to aid in the development of the auditory system and participate in cochlear blood flow. We show that NO is additionally responsible for the induced exhibited physiological effects. We proceed to outline the precise neurochemical pathway leading to these effects. Furthermore we explore the interrelationship between the varying emotion centers within the central nervous system and explain how the introduction of music can mediate its effects via NO coupled to these complex pathways.

  8. Synthesis of Tumor-avid Photosensitizer-Gd(III)DTPA conjugates: impact of the number of gadolinium units in T1/T2 relaxivity, intracellular localization, and photosensitizing efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Lalit N; White, William H; Spernyak, Joseph A; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Chen, Yihui; Missert, Joseph R; Morgan, Janet; Mazurchuk, Richard; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2010-05-19

    To develop novel bifunctional agents for tumor imaging (MR) and photodynamic therapy (PDT), certain tumor-avid photosensitizers derived from chlorophyll-a were conjugated with variable number of Gd(III)aminobenzyl DTPA moieties. All the conjugates containing three or six gadolinium units showed significant T(1) and T(2) relaxivities. However, as a bifunctional agent, the 3-(1'-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) containing 3Gd(III) aminophenyl DTPA was most promising with possible applications in tumor-imaging and PDT. Compared to HPPH, the corresponding 3- and 6Gd(III)aminobenzyl DTPA conjugates exhibited similar electronic absorption characteristics with a slightly decreased intensity of the absorption band at 660 nm. However, compared to HPPH, the excitation of the broad "Soret" band (near 400 nm) of the corresponding 3Gd(III)aminobenzyl-DTPA analogues showed a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity at 667 nm.

  9. On the invariance of spatially inhomogeneous relaxation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo [Department of Technology Management, Holon Institute of Technology, PO Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Benichou, Olivier, E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il, E-mail: benichou@lptmc.jussieu.fr [UPMC Universite de Paris 06, UMR 7600 Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2012-01-13

    We consider a general relaxation model based on an ensemble of particles propagating randomly in a general space. The particles' trajectories are independent and identically distributed copies of an arbitrary random spatial curve, and each particle has its own parameter triplet: initiation epoch, velocity and relaxation coefficient. The relaxation rate of each particle is dynamic-depending on its spatial location and quantified by an arbitrary spatial 'landscape function'. We study the relaxation rate of the entire ensemble and characterize the class of Poissonian randomizations of the particles' parameters that render the ensemble's relaxation rate invariant with respect to both the particles' trajectories and the landscape function. The invariant relaxation rates turn out to be governed by power laws and display a statistical behavior analogous to anomalous diffusion. Applications range from chemical reactions to target search and intelligence sifting. (paper)

  10. Electronic relaxation processes in polyatomic molecules. Progress report, October 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, E.C.

    1976-09-01

    Excitation energy dependence of radiationless decay rate under collision-free conditions was utilized as a probe of intramolecular vibrational relaxation in tetracene and pentacene. The results give evidence of vibrational relaxation which competes with electronic relaxation. The substitution dependence of T 1 (nπ*) → S 0 radiationless transition in monocyclic diazines and the temperature dependence of S 1 non-radiative decay rate in alcoholic solutions of polycyclic monoazines indicate that the vibronic interaction between the lowest energy nπ* and ππ* states leads to a rapid radiationless deactivation of the lower of the two electronic states. Finally, a photon-counting spectrofluorometer of very high sensitivity was constructed, and it was used to record T 2 → T 1 fluorescence in bromoanthracenes and S 2 → S 1 fluorescence in azulene. These spectra represent the first bona-fide, or the most convincing, observation of fluorescence between excited electronic states

  11. Anomalous relaxation and self-organization in nonequilibrium processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatkullin, Ibrahim; Kladko, Konstantin; Mitkov, Igor; Bishop, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    We study thermal relaxation in ordered arrays of coupled nonlinear elements with external driving. We find that our model exhibits dynamic self-organization manifested in a universal stretched-exponential form of relaxation. We identify two types of self-organization, cooperative and anticooperative, which lead to fast and slow relaxation, respectively. We give a qualitative explanation for the behavior of the stretched exponent in different parameter ranges. We emphasize that this is a system exhibiting stretched-exponential relaxation without explicit disorder or frustration

  12. Continuous relaxation time spectrum of α-process in glass-like B2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Lomovskij, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    α-process of relaxation of glass-like B 2 O 3 was investigated in a wide temperature range. Continuous spectrum of relaxation times H(τ) for this process was constructed, using data of dynamic methods of investigation. It is shown that increase of temperature of α-process investigation leads to change of glass-like BaO 3 structure in such a way, that H(τ) spectrum tends to the maxwell one with a unit relaxation time

  13. Stretched exponential relaxation processes in hydrogenated amorphous and polymorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigaki, Kazuo [Department of Electrical and Digital-System Engineering, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Hikita, Harumi [Physics Laboratory, Meikai University, Urayasu, Chiba 279-8550 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Stretched exponential relaxation has been observed in various phenomena of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H). As an example, we take light-induced defect creation in a-Si:H and pm-Si:H, in which defect-creation process and defect-annihilation process via hydrogen movement play important roles. We have performed the Monte Carlo simulation for hydrogen movement. Hydrogen movement exhibits anomalous diffusion. In our model of light-induced defect creation in a-Si:H, a pair of two types of dangling bonds, i.e., a normal dangling bond and a hydrogen-related dangling bond, that is a dangling bond having hydrogen in the nearby site, are created under illumination, and hydrogen dissociated from the hydrogen-related dangling bond terminates a normal dangling bond via hydrogen movement. The amorphous network reflects on the dispersive parameter of the stretched exponential function in the light-induced defect creation. We discuss this issue, taking into account the difference in the amorphous network between a-Si:H and pm-Si:H (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Relaxation process of self-trapping exciton in C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.; Zhang, G.P.; Ma, Y.S.; Fu, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    When C 60 is photoexcited, a self-trapping exciton (STE) is formed. The bond structure is distorted while the states A 1u and A 2u are pulled into the energy gap from HOMO and LUMO respectively. A dynamical scheme is employed to simulate the relaxation of STE. The evolutions of both bond structure and electronic states show that the relaxation time for STE is about 100 fs. It is noticed that this relaxation time is much shorter than that of the charge transfer in C 60 , and the origin for this big difference is discussed. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs

  15. Some kinetic and spectroscopic evidence on intramolecular relaxation processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quack, M.

    1983-01-01

    The description and definition of intramolecular vibrational relaxation processes is discussed within the framework of the quantum mechanical and statistical mechanical equations of motion. The evidence from quite different experimental sources is summarized under the common aspect of vibrational relaxation. Although much of the evidence remains ambiguous, there is good indication that a localized vibrational excitation relaxes typically in 0.1 to 10 picoseconds, which is long compared to many optical and reactive processes

  16. Daclizumab high-yield process reduced the evolution of new gadolinium-enhancing lesions to T1 black holes in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radue, E-W; Sprenger, T; Vollmer, T; Giovannoni, G; Gold, R; Havrdova, E; Selmaj, K; Stefoski, D; You, X; Elkins, J

    2016-02-01

    In the SELECT study, treatment with daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) versus placebo reduced the frequency of gadolinium-enhancing (Gd(+) ) lesions in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The objective of this post hoc analysis of SELECT was to evaluate the effect of DAC HYP on the evolution of new Gd(+) lesions to T1 hypointense lesions (T1 black holes). SELECT was a randomized double-blind study of subcutaneous DAC HYP 150 or 300 mg or placebo every 4 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed at baseline and weeks 24, 36 and 52 in all patients and monthly between weeks 4 and 20 in a subset of patients. MRI scans were evaluated for new Gd(+) lesions that evolved to T1 black holes at week 52. Data for the DAC HYP groups were pooled for analysis. Daclizumab high-yield process reduced the number of new Gd(+) lesions present at week 24 (P = 0.005) or between weeks 4 and 20 (P = 0.014) that evolved into T1 black holes at week 52 versus placebo. DAC HYP treatment also reduced the percentage of patients with Gd(+) lesions evolving to T1 black holes versus placebo. Treatment with DAC HYP reduced the evolution of Gd(+) lesions to T1 black holes versus placebo, suggesting that inflammatory lesions that evolved during DAC HYP treatment are less destructive than those evolving during placebo treatment. © 2016 EAN.

  17. Coulomb collisional relaxation process of ion beams in magnetized plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Y.

    2010-01-01

    An orbit following code is developed to calculate ion beam trajectories in magnetized plasmas. The equation of motion (the Newton's equation) is solved including the Lorentz force term and Coulomb collisional relaxation term. Furthermore, a new algorithm is introduced by applying perturbation method regarding the collision term as a small term. The reduction of computation time is suggested.

  18. Algorithm for capturing primary relaxation processes in excitable gases by two-frequency acoustic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ke-Sheng; Wang, Shu; Zhu, Ming; Ding, Yi

    2013-01-01

    It is still a challenge to employ the acoustic method to investigate the molecular relaxation phenomena in excitable gases. Here we present an algorithm to capture the primary relaxation processes by only measuring the sound absorption and sound speed of two operating frequencies at a single pressure, without the necessity of detecting the gas density. This algorithm is developed from the fact that the frequency-dependent sound absorption curve due to a single-relaxation process can be reconstructed from the two values of the relaxation frequency and the maximum relaxational absorption, and they can be synthesized by the acoustic measurements at two frequencies. Moreover, by acquiring the high-frequency sound speed, those two synthesized values can be used to reconstruct the sound dispersion curve. The simulations demonstrate the validity of the proposed algorithm and its robustness against errors of acoustic measurements. (paper)

  19. Relaxation process of coherent transients in the presence of an adjacent strongly driven transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiaomin; Yang Lijun; Li Xiaoli; Zhang Lianshui; Han Li; Guo Qinglin; Fu Guangsheng

    2007-01-01

    Coherent transient occurs when a two-level transition is subjected to pulsed laser excitation. The relaxation process of coherent transient depends on both the longitudinal and transverse relaxation parameters of the two-level transition, which is related to the population and coherence decay rates. In this paper we study relaxation process of a new type coherent transients observed by applying a pulsed laser excitation to a two-level transition in the presence of a second strong continuous-wave (cw) coherent field coupling one of the two levels to a third level, that is, in a three-level double-resonance configuration. The relaxation process of coherent transients is studied as a function of relaxation parameters of both the two-level transition excited by the pulsed laser field and the transition coupled by the cw laser field. It is shown that by involving a third level with coherent field the relaxation process of coherent transients of a two-level transition can be modified. Our study illustrates a new way of controlling relaxation process of coherent transients in a two-level transition by a second coherent laser and this has important implication for quantum information storage and quantum computing

  20. Evaluation of MRI sequences for quantitative T1 brain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsialios, P.; Thrippleton, M.; Glatz, A.; Pernet, C.

    2017-11-01

    T1 mapping constitutes a quantitative MRI technique finding significant application in brain imaging. It allows evaluation of contrast uptake, blood perfusion, volume, providing a more specific biomarker of disease progression compared to conventional T1-weighted images. While there are many techniques for T1-mapping there is a wide range of reported T1-values in tissues, raising the issue of protocols reproducibility and standardization. The gold standard for obtaining T1-maps is based on acquiring IR-SE sequence. Widely used alternative sequences are IR-SE-EPI, VFA (DESPOT), DESPOT-HIFI and MP2RAGE that speed up scanning and fitting procedures. A custom MRI phantom was used to assess the reproducibility and accuracy of the different methods. All scans were performed using a 3T Siemens Prisma scanner. The acquired data processed using two different codes. The main difference was observed for VFA (DESPOT) which grossly overestimated T1 relaxation time by 214 ms [126 270] compared to the IR-SE sequence. MP2RAGE and DESPOT-HIFI sequences gave slightly shorter time than IR-SE (~20 to 30ms) and can be considered as alternative and time-efficient methods for acquiring accurate T1 maps of the human brain, while IR-SE-EPI gave identical result, at a cost of a lower image quality.

  1. CdZnTe quantum dots study: energy and phase relaxation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viale, Yannick

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the electron-hole pair energy and phase relaxation processes in a CdTe/ZnTe heterostructure, in which quantum dots are embedded. CdZnTe quantum wells with a high Zinc concentration, separated by ZnTe barriers, contain islands with a high cadmium concentration. In photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy experiments, we evidence two types of electron hole pair relaxation processes. After being excited in the CdZnTe quantum well, the pairs relax their energy by emitting a cascade of longitudinal optical phonons until they are trapped in the quantum dots. Before their radiative recombination follows an intra-dot relaxation, which is attributed to a lattice polarization mechanism of the quantum dots. It is related to the coupling between the electronic and the vibrational states. Both relaxation mechanisms are reinforced by the strong polar character of the chemical bond in II-VI compounds. Time resolved measurements of transmission variations in a pump-probe configuration allowed us to investigate the population dynamics of the electron-hole pairs during the relaxation process. We observe a relaxation time of about 2 ps for the longitudinal phonon emission cascade in the quantum well before a saturation of the quantum dot transition. We also measured an intra-box relaxation time of 25 ps. The comparison of various cascades allows us to estimate the emission time of a longitudinal optical phonon in the quantum well to be about 100 fs. In four waves mixing experiments, we observe oscillations that we attribute to quantum beats between excitonic and bi-excitonic transitions. The dephasing times that we measure as function of the density of photons shows that excitons are strongly localized in the quantum dots. The excitonic dephasing time is much shorter than the radiative lifetime and is thus controlled by the intra-dot relaxation time. (author) [fr

  2. Direct simulation Monte Carlo modeling of relaxation processes in polyatomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Nizenkov, P.; Mirza, A.; Fasoulas, S.

    2016-02-01

    Relaxation processes of polyatomic molecules are modeled and implemented in an in-house Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code in order to enable the simulation of atmospheric entry maneuvers at Mars and Saturn's Titan. The description of rotational and vibrational relaxation processes is derived from basic quantum-mechanics using a rigid rotator and a simple harmonic oscillator, respectively. Strategies regarding the vibrational relaxation process are investigated, where good agreement for the relaxation time according to the Landau-Teller expression is found for both methods, the established prohibiting double relaxation method and the new proposed multi-mode relaxation. Differences and applications areas of these two methods are discussed. Consequently, two numerical methods used for sampling of energy values from multi-dimensional distribution functions are compared. The proposed random-walk Metropolis algorithm enables the efficient treatment of multiple vibrational modes within a time step with reasonable computational effort. The implemented model is verified and validated by means of simple reservoir simulations and the comparison to experimental measurements of a hypersonic, carbon-dioxide flow around a flat-faced cylinder.

  3. Probing of structural relaxation times in the glassy state of sucrose and trehalose based on dynamical properties of two secondary relaxation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.; Kaminska, E.

    2011-01-01

    Time-dependent isothermal dielectric measurements were carried out deeply in the glassy state on two very important saccharides: sucrose and trehalose. In both compounds two prominent secondary relaxation processes were identified. The faster one is an inherent feature of the whole family of carbohydrates. The slower one can also be detected in oligo- and polysaccharides. It was shown earlier that the β process is the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation coupled to motions of the glycosidic linkage, while the γ relaxation originates from motions of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl unit. Recently, it was shown that the JG relaxation process can be used to determine structural relaxation times in the glassy state [R. Casalini and C. M. Roland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 035701 (2009)]. In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the data obtained during aging using two independent approaches. The first was proposed by Casalini and Roland, and the second one is based on the variation of the dielectric strength of the secondary relaxation process during aging [J. K. Vij and G. Power, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 783 (2011)]. Surprisingly, we found that the estimated structural relaxation times in the glassy state of both saccharides are almost the same, independent of the type of secondary mode. This finding calls into question the common view that secondary modes of intramolecular origin do not provide information about the dynamics of the glassy state.

  4. Analysis of the kinetics of the fragile fracture process in Mo monocrystals in quasi-relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamayo Meza, Pedro; Bautista Godinez, Eric Gustavo; Yermishkin, Viacheslav

    2008-01-01

    The method of quasi-relaxation, generally known as the force relaxation method, has been widely applied in the study of elementary dislocational processes. It is essential for the study and analysis of thermoactivated mechanisms, for the determination of the energy of interaction between dislocations and inclusions, in the definition of the dislocational constants, to predict the development of creep, and even for the study of fracture kinetics. For the first time the use of the quasi-relaxation method for evaluating the fragile fracture tendency was presented in the work. However, as usually carried out, the use of mass specimens and the development of a considerable plastic deformation in the vertex of the crack-notch sample limits the possibilities for this method. Many studies analyze the theoretical aspects of the fracture process, and the obtention of reliable quantitative information about the behavior of the dislocation based on an analytical description of the process, and how and when it influences the conditions under which the final catastrophic fracture occurs. This work proposes a new method to analyze the effect of a tension concentrator on the surface of Mo monocrystal specimens. The relaxation of the force and the increase in the crack opening is related to the development of the plastic zone in its vertex with the help of the Irwin correction. During the relaxation, the crack-groove grows until it attains the length of the plastic zone. Specimens with and without force concentrators were tested in quasi-relaxation. The cracks appearing under these conditions are analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crack appearing in the specimens under load conditions, whose development produced heavy force relaxation, allowed the force relaxation value to be defined and compared in the specimens with and without tension concentrators (au)

  5. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  6. Real-time observation of cascaded electronic relaxation processes in p-Fluorotoluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiaoli; Deng, Xulan; Long, Jinyou; Wang, Yanmei; Abulimiti, Bumaliya; Zhang, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Ultrafast electronic relaxation processes following two photoexcitation of 400 nm in p-Fluorotoluene (pFT) have been investigated utilizing time-resolved photoelectron imaging coupled with time-resolved mass spectroscopy. Cascaded electronic relaxation processes started from the electronically excited S2 state are directly imaged in real time and well characterized by two distinct time constants of 85 ± 10 fs and 2.4 ± 0.3 ps. The rapid component corresponds to the lifetime of the initially excited S2 state, including the structure relaxation from the Franck-Condon region to the conical intersection of S2/S1 and the subsequent internal conversion to the highly excited S1 state. While, the slower relaxation constant is attributed to the further internal conversion to the high levels of S0 from the secondarily populated S1 locating in the channel three region. Moreover, dynamical differences with benzene and toluene of analogous structures, including, specifically, the slightly slower relaxation rate of S2 and the evidently faster decay of S1, are also presented and tentatively interpreted as the substituent effects. In addition, photoelectron kinetic energy and angular distributions reveal the feature of accidental resonances with low-lying Rydberg states (the 3p, 4s and 4p states) during the multi-photon ionization process, providing totally unexpected but very interesting information for pFT.

  7. Energy thresholds of discrete breathers in thermal equilibrium and relaxation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Ling, Dong-Bo; Li, Hui-Min; Ding, Ze-Jun

    2017-06-01

    So far, only the energy thresholds of single discrete breathers in nonlinear Hamiltonian systems have been analytically obtained. In this work, the energy thresholds of discrete breathers in thermal equilibrium and the energy thresholds of long-lived discrete breathers which can remain after a long time relaxation are analytically estimated for nonlinear chains. These energy thresholds are size dependent. The energy thresholds of discrete breathers in thermal equilibrium are the same as the previous analytical results for single discrete breathers. The energy thresholds of long-lived discrete breathers in relaxation processes are different from the previous results for single discrete breathers but agree well with the published numerical results known to us. Because real systems are either in thermal equilibrium or in relaxation processes, the obtained results could be important for experimental detection of discrete breathers.

  8. Atomistic simulation of processes in Ni-base alloys with account for local relaxations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursik, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Ordering in Ni-base superalloys is the crucial process controlling the development of the characteristic two-phase microstructure and subsequently the mechanical properties. Systems containing up to six alloying elements typical of advanced Ni-based superalloys are modelled in this work using a Monte Carlo approach with phenomenological Lennard-Jones pair potentials and interactions up to the third coordination sphere. Three-dimensional crystal block is used with over 10 5 atoms. Molecular dynamics approach is used to relax local atomic positions in course of ordering processes under applied stress. The importance of taking into account both relaxation of modelled block dimensions and relaxation of local atomic positions is discussed

  9. Effects of distribution function nonequilibrium tails on relaxation and transfer processes in rarefied gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryev, Yu.N.; Mikhalitsyn, A.N.; Yanenko, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative characteristics of the nonmonotone relaxation process are studied in a gas of pseudo-Maxwell molecules. Basic results are obtained by a direct numerical integration of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation. The evolution of initial distributions being finite or having exponential asymptotics of tails was researched. In particular, initial data obtained by selective excitation (absorption) against the Maxwell background encountered in laser physics problems have been considered. It is shown that under conditions of a developed effect of nonmonotone relaxation the overpopulation in the velocity range 4 <= upsilon <= 10 exceeds on the average 2-3 times the equilibrium value. For the given particles energy the excitation is preserved during t = 5/6 and the total relaxation time of the overpopulation wave reaches t asymptotically equals 20. The amplitudes and the relaxation time of overpopulation in the ''cupola'' region of distribution are substantially lower than in the case of a developed effect in the tail. The influence of the effect on the kinetics of threshold chemical reaction is studied. From the results it follows that in the process of nonmonotone relaxation the mean rates of binary threshold reactions can exceed more than twice the equilibrium values. This estimate is valid for all power like intermolecular repulsive potentials from the pseudo-Maxwell model up to rigid spheres. Time intervals over which the mean reaction rate exceeds considerably the equilibrium one make from 5 to 15 mean free path times increasing with the decrease in the potential ''rigidity''. (author)

  10. The Stress Relaxation Process in Sutures Tied with a Surgeon's Knot in a Simulated Biological Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber-Kneć, Aneta; Łagan, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    The exact characteristics of sutures are not only the basis for selecting from among different types of suture, but also provide the necessary information for the design of new surgical sutures. Apart from information relating to the breaking load of a suture reported in pharmacopoeias, the viscoelastic properties of sutures can be an additional selection criterium - one that influences stitching quality, especially when there is a risk of wound dehiscence. The aim of the study was to assess the stress relaxation process for 3 polymeric sutures in an environment simulating the conditions in a living organism and (for comparison) in room conditions. Stress relaxation testing was carried out on 3 polymeric sutures: polypropylene (PP), polydioxanone (PDS) and polyglycolic acid (PGA). To identify the mechanical properties of the sutures, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted according to the Polish Pharmacopoeia. The relaxation test was carried out in room conditions and in the bath simulating a biological environment. The sutures being tested were tied with a surgeon's knot. The PP suture exhibited the greatest stress relaxation (18% of the initial stress in room conditions and 21% of the initial stress in the bath). The PGA suture exhibited the least stress relaxation (approximately 60% of the initial stress in room conditions and 59% of the initial stress in the bath). The PDS suture was tested at a lower strain level and showed stress relaxation similar to the PGA suture (approximately 63% of the initial stress in room conditions and 55% in the bath). Multifilament braided absorbable (PGA) sutures and monofilament absorbable (PDS) sutures had a higher stress relaxation ratio over time than monofilament non-absorbable (PP) sutures. These findings may indicate higher stress maintained over time in PDS and PGA sutures, and thus higher tension at wound edges, sufficient to resist wound dehiscence.

  11. Relaxation processes in a lower disorder order transition diblock copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, Alejandro; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Nogales, Aurora; Hernández, Rebeca; Sprung, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of lower disorder-order temperature diblock copolymer leading to phase separation has been observed by X ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Two different modes have been characterized. A non-diffusive mode appears at temperatures below the disorder to order transition, which can be associated to compositional fluctuations, that becomes slower as the interaction parameter increases, in a similar way to the one observed for diblock copolymers exhibiting phase separation upon cooling. At temperatures above the disorder to order transition T ODT , the dynamics becomes diffusive, indicating that after phase separation in Lower Disorder-Order Transition (LDOT) diblock copolymers, the diffusion of chain segments across the interface is the governing dynamics. As the segregation is stronger, the diffusive process becomes slower. Both observed modes have been predicted by the theory describing upper order-disorder transition systems, assuming incompressibility. However, the present results indicate that the existence of these two modes is more universal as they are present also in compressible diblock copolymers exhibiting a lower disorder-order transition. No such a theory describing the dynamics in LDOT block copolymers is available, and these experimental results may offer some hints to understanding the dynamics in these systems. The dynamics has also been studied in the ordered state, and for the present system, the non-diffusive mode disappears and only a diffusive mode is observed. This mode is related to the transport of segment in the interphase, due to the weak segregation on this system

  12. Relaxation processes in a lower disorder order transition diblock copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Alejandro; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Nogales, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC. C/ Serrano 121, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Hernández, Rebeca [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC. C/ Juan de la Cierva 3, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Sprung, Michael [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-14

    The dynamics of lower disorder-order temperature diblock copolymer leading to phase separation has been observed by X ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Two different modes have been characterized. A non-diffusive mode appears at temperatures below the disorder to order transition, which can be associated to compositional fluctuations, that becomes slower as the interaction parameter increases, in a similar way to the one observed for diblock copolymers exhibiting phase separation upon cooling. At temperatures above the disorder to order transition T{sub ODT}, the dynamics becomes diffusive, indicating that after phase separation in Lower Disorder-Order Transition (LDOT) diblock copolymers, the diffusion of chain segments across the interface is the governing dynamics. As the segregation is stronger, the diffusive process becomes slower. Both observed modes have been predicted by the theory describing upper order-disorder transition systems, assuming incompressibility. However, the present results indicate that the existence of these two modes is more universal as they are present also in compressible diblock copolymers exhibiting a lower disorder-order transition. No such a theory describing the dynamics in LDOT block copolymers is available, and these experimental results may offer some hints to understanding the dynamics in these systems. The dynamics has also been studied in the ordered state, and for the present system, the non-diffusive mode disappears and only a diffusive mode is observed. This mode is related to the transport of segment in the interphase, due to the weak segregation on this system.

  13. Decay of Metastable State with Account of Agglomeration and Relaxation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kurasov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical description of the metastable phase decay kinetics in the presence of specific connections between the embryos of small sizes has been given. The theory of the decay kinetics in the presence of relaxation processes is constructed in analytical manner. The m-mers nucleation is investigated and the global kinetics of decay is also constructed in this case analytically.

  14. Non-equilibrium reacting gas flows kinetic theory of transport and relaxation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Nagnibeda, Ekaterina; Nagnibeda, Ekaterina

    2009-01-01

    This volume develops the kinetic theory of transport phenomena and relaxation processes in the flows of reacting gas mixtures. The theory is applied to the modeling of non-equilibrium flows behind strong shock waves, in the boundary layer, and in nozzles.

  15. Relaxation of the electron spin in quantum dots via one- and two-phonon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calero, C.; Chudnovsky, E.M.; Garanin, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied direct and Raman processes of the decay of electron spin states in a quantum dot via radiation of phonons corresponding to elastic twists. Universal dependence of the spin relaxation rate on the strength and direction of the magnetic field has been obtained in terms of the electron gyromagnetic tensor and macroscopic elastic constants of the solid

  16. Relaxation of the electron spin in quantum dots via one- and two-phonon processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calero, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, NY 10468-1589 (United States)]. E-mail: carlos.calero-borrallo@lehman.cuny.edu; Chudnovsky, E.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, NY 10468-1589 (United States); Garanin, D.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, NY 10468-1589 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    We have studied direct and Raman processes of the decay of electron spin states in a quantum dot via radiation of phonons corresponding to elastic twists. Universal dependence of the spin relaxation rate on the strength and direction of the magnetic field has been obtained in terms of the electron gyromagnetic tensor and macroscopic elastic constants of the solid.

  17. Numerical methods for TVD transport and coupled relaxing processes in gases and plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    The construction of second-order upwind schemes for nonequilibrium plasmas, for both one- and two-fluid formulations is demonstrated. Coupled relaxation processes, including ionization kinetics and radiative processes and their algorithms for nonequilibrium, multiple temperature conditions are described as well. The paper applies the numerical techniques on some simple test cases, points out critical problems and their solutions, and makes qualitative comparisons with known results, whenever possible.

  18. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Wu, E-mail: zwwang@semi.ac.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Department of Physics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China); Li, Shu-Shen [Institute of Semiconductor, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  19. Relaxation processes in optically excites metal clusters; Relaxationsprozesse in optisch angeregten Metallclustern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzel, J.

    2007-08-10

    The present work is concerned with the dynamics of optically excited metal clusters in the gas phase. Small mass-selected gold and tungsten cluster anions (Au{sup -}{sub n}, n=5-8, 14, 20 and W{sup -}{sub n}, n=3-14) are studied using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Depending on the electronic structure in the valence region as well as on the optical excitation energy fundamentally different relaxation processes are observed. In small gold cluster anions excited with 1.56 eV an isolated electronically excited state is populated. The time-dependent measurements are strongly sizedependent and open insights into photoinduced geometry changes of the nuclear framework. Oscillatory vibrational wavepacket motion in Au{sup -}{sub 5}, an extremely longlived ({tau} >90 ns) electronically excited state in Au{sup -}{sub 6} as well as photoinduced melting in Au{sup -}{sub 7} and Au{sup -}{sub 8} is monitored in real time. By increasing the OPTICAL excitation energy to 3.12 eV a completely different scenario is observed. A multitude of electronically excited states can be reached upon optical excitation and as a consequence electronic relaxation processes that take place on a time scale of 1 ps are dominating. This is shown for Au{sup -}{sub 7}, Au{sup -}{sub 14} and Au{sup -}{sub 20}. Compared to gold clusters, tungsten clusters are characterized by a significantly higher electronic density of states in the valence region. Therefore electronic relaxation processes are much more likely and take place on a significantly faster time scale. The fast electronic relaxation processes are distinguished from pure vibrational relaxation. It is shown that already in the four atomic tungsten cluster W{sup -}{sub 4} electronic relaxation processes take place on a time scale of 30 fs. In all investigated tungsten cluster anions (W{sup -}{sub n}, n=3-14) an equilibrium between electronic and vibrational system is reached within around 1 ps after optical excitation which

  20. Single-shot T1 mapping of the corpus callosum: A rapid characterization of fiber bundle anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eHofer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Using diffusion-tensor MRI and fiber tractography the topographic organization of the corpus callosum (CC has been described to comprise 5 segments with fibers projecting into prefrontal (I, premotor and supplementary motor (II, primary motor (III, and primary sensory areas (IV, as well as into parietal, temporal, and occipital cortical areas (V. In order to more rapidly characterize the underlying anatomy of these segments, this study used a novel single-shot T1 mapping method to quantitatively determine T1 relaxation times in the human CC. A region-of-interest analysis revealed a tendency for the lowest T1 relaxation times in the genu and the highest T1 relaxation times in the somatomotor region of the CC. This observation separates regions dominated by myelinated fibers with large diameters (somatomotor area from densely packed smaller axonal bundles (genu with less myelin. The results indicate that characteristic T1 relaxation times in callosal profiles provide an additional means to monitor differences in fiber anatomy, fiber density, and gray matter in respective neocortical areas. In conclusion, rapid T1 mapping allows for a characterization of the axonal architecture in an individual CC in less than 10 s. The approach emerges as a valuable means for studying neocortical brain anatomy with possible implications for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative processes.

  1. Glass transition and relaxation processes of polymers studied by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science

    1996-10-01

    The glass transition and relaxation processes of polymers were studied by the positron annihilation technique. A positron implanted into polymers might annihilate from positronium (Ps) states in open spaces. Ps is a bound state between a positron and an electron, and its nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is practically identical to that of a hydrogen atom. The lifetime of Ps can be associated with the size of the open spaces, and the formation probability of Ps provides information of motions of molecules. Since the glass transition or relaxation processes affect behavior of open spaces, one can study these phenomena through the detection of the open spaces using the positron annihilation technique. In the present paper, we report studies of the glass transition and relaxation processes in polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene by measurements of lifetime spectra of positrons and those of Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation. For these specimens, by measurements of the lifetime of Ps, {tau}{sub 3}, as a function of temperature, the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, was determined as an onset temperature of the increase in the temperature coefficient of {tau}{sub 3}. Below T{sub g}, local motions of molecules were detected by measurements of the formation probability of Ps. The positron annihilation as a tool for the characterization of polymers was discussed. (author). 51 refs.

  2. Uncertainty management by relaxation of conflicting constraints in production process scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Juergen; Slany, Wolfgang; Stary, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical-analytical methods as used in Operations Research approaches are often insufficient for scheduling problems. This is due to three reasons: the combinatorial complexity of the search space, conflicting objectives for production optimization, and the uncertainty in the production process. Knowledge-based techniques, especially approximate reasoning and constraint relaxation, are promising ways to overcome these problems. A case study from an industrial CIM environment, namely high-grade steel production, is presented to demonstrate how knowledge-based scheduling with the desired capabilities could work. By using fuzzy set theory, the applied knowledge representation technique covers the uncertainty inherent in the problem domain. Based on this knowledge representation, a classification of jobs according to their importance is defined which is then used for the straightforward generation of a schedule. A control strategy which comprises organizational, spatial, temporal, and chemical constraints is introduced. The strategy supports the dynamic relaxation of conflicting constraints in order to improve tentative schedules.

  3. Simulation study of MHD relaxation and reconnection processes in RFP plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Kanya; Kunimoto, Kaito; Suzuki, Yoshio; Tamano, Teruo; Sato, Tetsuya

    1991-01-01

    The authors have studied several nonlinear processes in RFP plasma through the use of 3D MHD simulations. In particular, they have shed light on: (1) dynamo and self-sustainment in reversed-field pinch (RFP), (2) phase locking process in MHD relaxation, and (3) the heating and acceleration in magnetic reconnection process. First, the contributions of the kink (m = 1) mode (linearly unstable) and of the m = 0 mode (driven by nonlinear coupling) to the dynamo are qualitatively evaluated using a high accuracy simulation. It is found that, if the free energy to drive kink instabilities is as small as that in the actual experimental plasma, the m = 0 modes, driven nonlinearly, play a more important role for the flux generation than the kink modes. Secondly, numerical simulations of the self-sustainment process in a RFP are performed. It is confirmed that the self-sustainment process is a coherent oscillating process composed of the MHD relaxation and the resistive diffusion processes. Toroidal phase locking process of kink modes is numerically observed in simulations of self-reversal and self-sustainment processes. It has characteristics similar to the slinky mode observed in the OHTE experiment. A detailed investigation reveals that nonlinear coupling between the most unstable two kink modes governs the entire dynamics in all kink modes and leads to the phase locking process. They find that reconnection can accelerate plasma over a local Alfven speed. This is a result of the fact that the magnetic field in the downstream area plays a similar role to de Laval nozzle. They also investigate the heating mechanisms in reconnection process. It is revealed that the viscous heating rate is as large as the joule heating rate in the reconnection process. This result implies that the viscous heating in the reconnection process is an important candidate for the mechanism to explain the RFP experiments where the ion temperatures is higher than the electron temperature

  4. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Pagano

    Full Text Available Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast left ventricular (LV T1 (longitudinal relaxation time with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement.Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI, interventricular septum (IVS, and inferior LV (LVI in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons, independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms. RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness.Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis.

  5. Superionic phase transitions and nuclear spin phonon relaxation by Raman processes in Me3H(SeO4)2 (Me = Na, K, and Rb) single crystals by 1H and Me NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2007-01-01

    Me 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 (Me = Na, K, and Rb) single crystals were grown by the slow evaporation method, and the relaxation times of the 1 H and Me nuclei in these crystals were investigated using FT NMR spectrometry. The 1 H T 1 NMR results for K 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 and Rb 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 single crystals were very different from those for Na 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals. Short 1 H relaxation times were found for K 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 and Rb 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 at high temperatures, but not for Na 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 , which are attributed to the destruction and reconstruction of hydrogen bonds; thus K 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 and Rb 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 have superionic phases, whereas Na 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 does not. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate for the 23 Na nucleus in Na 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals was in accord with a Raman process for nuclear spin-lattice relaxation (T 1 -1 ∝T 2 . In contrast, the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the 39 K and 87 Rb nuclei in K 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 and Rb 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 single crystals exhibited a very strong temperature dependence, T 1 -1 ∝T 7 . The motions giving rise to this strong temperature dependence may be related to the high electrical conductivities of these crystals at high temperatures

  6. 1T1R Nonvolatile Memory with Al/TiO₂/Au and Sol-Gel-Processed Insulator for Barium Zirconate Nickelate Gate in Pentacene Thin Film Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ke-Jing; Chang, Yu-Chi; Lee, Cheng-Jung; Wang, Li-Wen; Wang, Yeong-Her

    2017-12-09

    A one-transistor and one-resistor (1T1R) architecture with a resistive random access memory (RRAM) cell connected to an organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) device is successfully demonstrated to avoid the cross-talk issues of only one RRAM cell. The OTFT device, which uses barium zirconate nickelate (BZN) as a dielectric layer, exhibits favorable electrical properties, such as a high field-effect mobility of 5 cm²/Vs, low threshold voltage of -1.1 V, and low leakage current of 10 -12 A, for a driver in the 1T1R operation scheme. The 1T1R architecture with a TiO₂-based RRAM cell connected with a BZN OTFT device indicates a low operation current (10 μA) and reliable data retention (over ten years). This favorable performance of the 1T1R device can be attributed to the additional barrier heights introduced by using Ni (II) acetylacetone as a substitute for acetylacetone, and the relatively low leakage current of a BZN dielectric layer. The proposed 1T1R device with low leakage current OTFT and excellent uniform resistance distribution of RRAM exhibits a good potential for use in practical low-power electronic applications.

  7. Understanding charge carrier relaxation processes in terbium arsenide nanoparticles using transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoef, Laura R.

    Erbium arsenide nanoparticles epitaxially grown within III-V semiconductors have been shown to improve the performance of devices for applications ranging from thermoelectrics to THz pulse generation. The small size of rare-earth nanoparticles suggests that interesting electronic properties might emerge as a result of both spatial confinement and surface states. However, ErAs nanoparticles do not exhibit any signs of quantum confinement or an emergent bandgap, and these experimental observations are understood from theory. The incorporation of other rare-earth monopnictide nanoparticles into III-V hosts is a likely path to engineering carrier excitation, relaxation and transport dynamics for optoelectronic device applications. However, the electronic structure of these other rare-earth monopnictide nanoparticles remains poorly understood. The objective of this research is to explore the electronic structure and optical properties of III-V materials containing novel rare-earth monopnictides. We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of TbAs nanoparticles in III-V hosts. We start with TbAs:GaAs, which was expected to be similar to ErAs:GaAs. We study the dynamics of carrier relaxation into the TbAs states using optical pump terahertz probe transient absorption spectroscopy. By analyzing how the carrier relaxation rates depend on pump fluence and sample temperature, we conclude that the TbAs states are saturable. Saturable traps suggest the existence of a bandgap for TbAs nanoparticles, in sharp contrast with previous results for ErAs. We then apply the same experimental technique to two samples of TbAs nanoparticles in InGaAs with different concentrations of TbAs. We observe similar relaxation dynamics associated with trap saturation, though the ability to resolve these processes is contingent upon a high enough TbAs concentration in the sample. We have also constructed an optical pump optical probe transient absorption

  8. Influence of relaxation processes on the evaluation of the metastable defect density in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciaszek, M.; Zabierowski, P. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warszawa 00 662 (Poland)

    2016-06-07

    In this contribution, we investigated by means of numerical simulations the influence of relaxation processes related to metastable defects on electrical characteristics of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}. In particular, we analyzed the relaxation of a metastable state induced by illumination at a fixed temperature as well as the dependence of the hole concentration on the temperature during cooling. The knowledge of these two relaxation processes is crucial in the evaluation of the hole concentration in the relaxed state and after light soaking. We have shown that the distribution of the metastable defects can be considered frozen below 200 K. The hole capture cross section was estimated as ∼3 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}. It was shown that the usually used cooling rates may lead to relevant changes of the hole concentration. We calculated the lower limit of the hole concentration after cooling, and we presented how it depends on densities of shallow acceptors and metastable defects. Moreover, we proposed a method which allows for the evaluation of shallow acceptor and metastable defect densities from two capacitance-voltage profiles measured in the relaxed and light soaking states. Finally, we indicated experimental conditions in which the influence of relaxation processes on the accuracy of this method is the smallest.

  9. Uncovering Molecular Relaxation Processes with Nonlinear Spectroscopies in the Deep UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brantley Andrew

    Conical intersections mediate internal conversion dynamics that compete with even the fastest nuclear motions in molecular systems. Traditional kinetic models do not apply in this regime of commensurate electronic and nuclear motion because the surroundings do not maintain equilibrium throughout the relaxation process. This dissertation focuses on uncovering the physics associated with vibronic interactions at conical intersections. Of particular interest are coherent nuclear motions driven by steep excited state potential energy gradients. Technical advances have only recently made these dynamics accessible in many systems including DNA nucleobases and cyclic polyene molecules. Optical analogues of multidimensional NMR spectroscopies have recently yielded transformative insight in relaxation processes ranging from energy transfer in photosynthesis to bond making and breaking in liquids. Prior to the start of this research, such experiments had only been conducted at infrared and visible wavelengths. Applications in the ultraviolet were motivated by studies of numerous biological systems (e.g., DNA, proteins), but had been challenged by technical issues. The work presented in this dissertation combines pulse generation techniques developed in the optical physics community with spectroscopic techniques largely pioneered by physical chemists to implement two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy (2DUV). This technique is applied at the shortest wavelengths and with the best signal-to-noise ratios reported to date. Sub-picosecond excited state deactivation processes provide photo stability to the DNA double helix. Vibrational energy transfer from the solute to surrounding solvent enables relaxation of the highly non-equilibrium ground state produced by fast internal conversion. In this dissertation, nonlinear spectroscopies carried out at cryogenic temperatures are used to uncover the particular nuclear modes in the solvent that primarily accept vibrational energy from

  10. Rational extended thermodynamics of a rarefied polyatomic gas with molecular relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Takashi; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    We present a more refined version of rational extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases in which molecular rotational and vibrational relaxation processes are treated individually. In this case, we need a triple hierarchy of the moment system and the system of balance equations is closed via the maximum entropy principle. Three different types of the production terms in the system, which are suggested by a generalized BGK-type collision term in the Boltzmann equation, are adopted. In particular, the rational extended thermodynamic theory with seven independent fields (ET7) is analyzed in detail. Finally, the dispersion relation of ultrasonic wave derived from the ET7 theory is confirmed by the experimental data for CO2, Cl2, and Br2 gases.

  11. Investigations of effect of phase change mass transfer rate on cavitation process with homogeneous relaxation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhixia; Zhang, Liang; Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Duan, Lian; Wang, Qian

    2017-12-01

    The super high fuel injection pressure and micro size of nozzle orifice has been an important development trend for the fuel injection system. Accordingly, cavitation transient process, fuel compressibility, amount of noncondensable gas in the fuel and cavitation erosion have attracted more attention. Based on the fact of cavitation in itself is a kind of thermodynamic phase change process, this paper takes the perspective of the cavitation phase change mass transfer process to analyze above mentioned phenomenon. The two-phase cavitating turbulent flow simulations with VOF approach coupled with HRM cavitation model and U-RANS of standard k-ε turbulence model were performed for investigations of cavitation phase change mass transfer process. It is concluded the mass transfer time scale coefficient in the Homogenous Relaxation Model (HRM) representing mass transfer rate should tend to be as small as possible in a condition that ensured the solver stable. At very fast mass transfer rate, the phase change occurs at very thin interface between liquid and vapor phase and condensation occurs more focused and then will contribute predictably to a more serious cavitation erosion. Both the initial non-condensable gas in fuel and the fuel compressibility can accelerate the cavitation mass transfer process.

  12. Anomalous relaxation and self-organization in non-equilibrium processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fatkullin, Ibrahim; Kladko, Konstantin; Mitkov, Igor; Bishop, A. R.

    2000-01-01

    We study thermal relaxation in ordered arrays of coupled nonlinear elements with external driving. We find, that our model exhibits dynamic self-organization manifested in a universal stretched-exponential form of relaxation. We identify two types of self-organization, cooperative and anti-cooperative, which lead to fast and slow relaxation, respectively. We give a qualitative explanation for the behavior of the stretched exponent in different parameter ranges. We emphasize that this is a sys...

  13. The exchange narrowing of T1 in solid helium-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Abe, Takayuki; Izuyama, Takeo.

    1989-01-01

    The exchange narrowing of the nuclear magnetic relaxation time T 1 of bcc 3 He is investigated. it is found that multiple exchange models with two and three parameters may explain the T 1 data observed in the region 0.2 m = 24.2 cm 3 /mol. We investigate further the narrowing in hcp 3 He. Based on the multiple exchange model with the exchange parameters J 1 , J 1 ', J 2 , and K sq , we obtain a theoretical expression for T 1 . (author)

  14. PANDA-T1ρ: Integrating principal component analysis and dictionary learning for fast T1ρ mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjie; Zhang, Qinwei; Liu, Qiegen; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Long scanning time greatly hinders the widespread application of spin-lattice relaxation in rotating frame (T1ρ) in clinics. In this study, a novel method is proposed to reconstruct the T1ρ-weighted images from undersampled k-space data and hence accelerate the acquisition of T1ρ imaging. The proposed approach (PANDA-T1ρ) combined the benefit of PCA and dictionary learning when reconstructing image from undersampled data. Specifically, the PCA transform was first used to sparsify the image series along the parameter direction and then the sparsified images were reconstructed by means of dictionary learning and finally solved the images. A variation of PANDA-T1ρ was also developed for the heavy noise case. Numerical simulation and in vivo experiments were carried out with the accelerating factor from 2 to 4 to verify the performance of PANDA-T1ρ. The reconstructed T1ρ maps using the PANDA-T1ρ method were found to be comparable to the reference at all verified acceleration factors. Moreover, the variation exhibited better performance than the original version when the k-space data were contaminated by heavy noise. PANDA-T1ρ can significantly reduce the scanning time of T1ρ by integrating PCA and dictionary learning and provides better parameter estimation than the state-of-art methods for a fixed acceleration factor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dynamic relaxation processes in compressible multiphase flows. Application to evaporation phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Métayer O.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase changes and heat exchanges are examples of physical processes appearing in many industrial applications involving multiphase compressible flows. Their knowledge is of fundamental importance to reproduce correctly the resulting effects in simulation tools. A fine description of the flow topology is thus required to obtain the interfacial area between phases. This one is responsible for the dynamics and the kinetics of heat and mass transfer when evaporation or condensation occurs. Unfortunately this exchange area cannot be obtained easily and accurately especially when complex mixtures (drops, bubbles, pockets of very different sizes appear inside the transient medium. The natural way to solve this specific trouble consists in using a thin grid to capture interfaces at all spatial scales. But this possibility needs huge computing resources and can be hardly used when considering physical systems of large dimensions. A realistic method is to consider instantaneous exchanges between phases by the way of additional source terms in a full non-equilibrium multiphase flow model [2,15,17]. In this one each phase obeys its own equation of state and has its own set of equations and variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, energy, entropy,.... When enabling the relaxation source terms the multiphase mixture instantaneously tends towards a mechanical or thermodynamic equilibrium state at each point of the flow. This strategy allows to mark the boundaries of the real flow behavior and to magnify the dominant physical effects (heat exchanges, evaporation, drag,... inside the medium. A description of the various relaxation processes is given in the paper. Les changements de phase et les transferts de chaleur sont des exemples de phénomènes physiques présents dans de nombreuses applications industrielles faisant intervenir des écoulements compressibles multiphasiques. La connaissance des mécanismes associés est primordiale afin de reproduire

  16. Anisotropy and relaxation processes of uniaxially oriented CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles dispersed in PDMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonel, P.S.; Negri, R.M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Av. Cantilo s/n (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Leyva, A.G. [Grupo de Materia Condensada, Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499 (1650) San Martin, Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina - Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM (Argentina); Jorge, G.A., E-mail: gjorge@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, Av. Cantilo s/n (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    When a uniaxial magnetic field is applied to a non-magnetic dispersive medium filled with magnetic nanoparticles, they auto-assemble into thin needles parallel to the field direction, due to the strong dipolar interaction among them. We have prepared in this way magnetically oriented nanocomposites of nanometer-size CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles in a polydimethylsiloxane polymer matrix, with 10% w/w of magnetic particles. We present the characteristic magnetic relaxation curves measured after the application of a magnetic field forming an angle {alpha} with respect to the needle direction. We show that the magnetic viscosity (calculated from the logarithmic relaxation curves) as a function of {alpha} presents a minimum at {alpha}=0, indicating slower relaxation processes associated with this configuration of fields. The results seems to point out that the local magnetic anisotropy of the nanoparticles is oriented along the needles, resulting in the macroscopic magnetic anisotropy observed in our measurements.

  17. Anisotropy and relaxation processes of uniaxially oriented CoFe2O4 nanoparticles dispersed in PDMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonel, P.S.; Negri, R.M.; Leyva, A.G.; Jorge, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    When a uniaxial magnetic field is applied to a non-magnetic dispersive medium filled with magnetic nanoparticles, they auto-assemble into thin needles parallel to the field direction, due to the strong dipolar interaction among them. We have prepared in this way magnetically oriented nanocomposites of nanometer-size CoFe 2 O 4 particles in a polydimethylsiloxane polymer matrix, with 10% w/w of magnetic particles. We present the characteristic magnetic relaxation curves measured after the application of a magnetic field forming an angle α with respect to the needle direction. We show that the magnetic viscosity (calculated from the logarithmic relaxation curves) as a function of α presents a minimum at α=0, indicating slower relaxation processes associated with this configuration of fields. The results seems to point out that the local magnetic anisotropy of the nanoparticles is oriented along the needles, resulting in the macroscopic magnetic anisotropy observed in our measurements.

  18. Measurements of spin-lattice relaxation time in mixed alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannus, A.

    1983-01-01

    Using magneto-optic techniques the ground state spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of 'F' centers in mixed Alkali Halide cristals (KCl-KBr), was studied. A computer assisted system to optically measure short relaxation times (approx. = 1mS), was described. The technique is based on the measurement of the Magnetic Circular Dicroism (MCD) presented by F centers. The T1 magnetic field dependency at 2 K (up to 65 KGauss), was obtained as well as the MCD spectra for different relative concentration at the mixed matrices. The theory developed by Panepucci and Mollenauer for F centers spin-lattice relaxation in pure matrices was modified to explain the behaviour of T1 in mixed cristals. The Direct Process results (T approx. = 2.0 K) compared against that theory shows that the main relaxation mecanism, up to 25 KGauss, continues to be phonon modulation of the hiperfine iteraction between F electrons and surrounding nuclei. (Author) [pt

  19. Diffusional mechanisms augment the fluorine MR relaxation in paramagnetic perfluorocarbon nanoparticles that provides a "relaxation switch" for detecting cellular endosomal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingzhi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Junjie; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2011-09-01

    To develop a physical model for the (19)F relaxation enhancement in paramagnetic perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (PFC NP) and demonstrate its application in monitoring cellular endosomal functionality through a "(19)F relaxation switch" phenomenon. An explicit expression for (19)F longitudinal relaxation enhancement was derived analytically. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to confirm the gadolinium-induced magnetic field inhomogeneity inside the PFC NP. Field-dependent T(1) measurements for three types of paramagnetic PFC NPs were carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. Based on the physical model, (19)F and (1)H relaxation properties of macrophage internalized paramagnetic PFC NPs were measured to evaluate the intracellular process of NPs by macrophages in vitro. The theoretical description was confirmed experimentally by field-dependent T(1) measurements. The shortening of (19)F T(1) was found to be attributed to the Brownian motion of PFC molecules inside the NP in conjunction with their ability to permeate into the lipid surfactant coating. A dramatic change of (19)F T(1) was observed upon endocytosis, revealing the transition from intact bound PFC NP to processed constituents. The proposed first-principle analysis of (19)F spins in paramagnetic PFC NP relates their structural parameters to the special MR relaxation features. The demonstrated "(19)F relaxation switch" phenomenon is potentially useful for monitoring cellular endosomal functionality. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Vib--rotational energy distributions and relaxation processes in pulsed HF chemical lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shaul, A.; Kompa, K.L.; Schmailzl, U.

    1976-01-01

    The rate equations governing the temporal evolution of photon densities and level populations in pulsed F+H 2 →HF+H chemical lasers are solved for different initial conditions. The rate equations are solved simultaneously for all relevant vibrational--rotational levels and vibrational--rotational P-branch transitions. Rotational equilibrium is not assumed. Approximate expressions for the detailed state-to-state rate constants corresponding to the various energy transfer processes (V--V, V--R,T, R--R,T) coupling the vib--rotational levels are formulated on the basis of experimental data, approximate theories, and qualitative considerations. The main findings are as follows: At low pressures, R--T transfer cannot compete with the stimulated emission, and the laser output largely reflects the nonequilibrium energy distribution in the pumping reaction. The various transitions reach threshold and decay almost independently and simultaneous lasing on several lines takes place. When a buffer gas is added in excess to the reacting mixture, the enhanced rotational relaxation leads to nearly single-line operation and to the J shift in lasing. Laser efficiency is higher at high inert gas pressures owing to a better extraction of the internal energy from partially inverted populations. V--V exchange enhances lasing from upper vibrational levels but reduces the total pulse intensity. V--R,T processes reduce the efficiency but do not substantially modify the spectral output distribution. The photon yield ranges between 0.4 and 1.4 photons/HF molecule depending on the initial conditions. Comparison with experimental data, when available, is fair

  1. A post-processing method for multiexponential spin-spin relaxation analysis of MRI signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensanne, D [Laboratoire de Chimie Bioinorganique Medicale, Imagerie therapeutique et diagnostique, CNRS FR 2599, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Josse, G [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Evaluation sur la Peau et les Epitheliums de Revetement, Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, 2, rue Viguerie, BP 3071 31025 Toulouse Cedex 3 (France); Lagarde, J M [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Evaluation sur la Peau et les Epitheliums de Revetement, Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, 2, rue Viguerie, BP 3071 31025 Toulouse Cedex 3 (France); Vincensini, D [Laboratoire de Chimie Bioinorganique Medicale, Imagerie therapeutique et diagnostique, CNRS FR 2599, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2005-08-21

    Quantitative MR imaging is a potential tool for tissue characterization; in particular, proton density and proton relaxation times can be derived from MR signal analysis. However, MR image noise affects the accuracy of measurements and the number of tissue parameters that can be reliably estimated. Filtering can be used to limit image noise; however this reduces spatial resolution. In this work we studied, using both simulations and experiments, a filter called a 'selective blurring filter'. Compared to other classical filters, this filter achieves the best compromise between spatial resolution and noise reduction. The filter was specifically used to reliably determine the bi-component transverse relaxation of protons in adipose tissue. Long and short relaxation times and the relative proton fraction of each component were obtained with a degree of uncertainty of less than 10% and an accuracy of 95%.

  2. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    .5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...

  3. Ultrafast Physics Behind the Nonradiative Relaxation Process of Chromium Ions in Forsterite Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros Gregorios

    The nonradiative relaxation following photoexcitation has been studied in Cr^{4+} -doped forsterite (Mg_2SiO _4) using picosecond laser excitation and ultrasensitive photon counting detection. The experimental techniques utilized were time resolved antiStokes Raman scattering and up-converted hot and ordinary luminescence. The up-converted hot luminescence technique allowed the investigation of the upper state nonradiative relaxation of the excited state manifold of Cr^{4+ }-doped forsterite. The excitation involves the absorption of two photons per photoexcited ion in a two-step absorption. Discrete peaks are observed in the hot up-converted luminescence spectrum and are attributed to the population of nonequilibrium vibronic levels during the deexcitation of the ions by phonon emission. This work reveals that the phonon modes participating in the initial steps of the nonradiative relaxation of the photoexcited ions have energies 218 +/- 20, 325 +/- 20, 365 +/- 20 and 513 +/- 12 cm^ {-1}. The shape of the luminescence spectral envelope suggests two electronic bottlenecks at ~2.1 and ~2.45 eV associated with slower rates of vibrational relaxation at different parts of the excited state manifold. Time resolved measurements indicated that the average time for phonon emission is of the order of hundreds of fs. Information on the nonequilibrium phonon dynamics of the 225, 335 and 370 cm^{-1} modes of forsterite has been obtained using time resolved Raman scattering. Laser pulses of 450 fs in duration and 590 nm in wavelength were used to excite the Cr ions 2.1 eV above the ground state. The probe pulses (obtained from the same laser) are monitoring the nonequilibrium phonon population through the intensity of the antiStokes Raman lines at various pump-probe delay times. Experiments were performed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The observed nonequilibrium phonon populations are associated with the overall complex nonradiative decay following the excitation of

  4. Study of conduction mechanisms and relaxation processes in NiCl2-PVA composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, A.F.; Amin, M.; Abdel Samad, H.A.

    1985-07-01

    Electric conduction measurements were made at different temperatures and fields on thin films NiCl 2 -PVA composites prepared by casting. The conduction is assumed to be generally ionic in nature and polarization contribution is suggested to operate mainly at higher temperatures. Space-charge limited conduction and relaxation phenomena have been observed. The obtained results made it possible to determine a complete set of conduction parameters including carrier mobility, carrier concentration, traps density, Fermi energy, activation energy, etc. (author)

  5. Time-Dependent Changes in T1 during Fracture Healing in Juvenile Rats: A Quantitative MR Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Baron

    Full Text Available Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI offers several advantages in imaging and determination of soft tissue alterations when compared to qualitative imaging techniques. Although applications in brain and muscle tissues are well studied, its suitability to quantify relaxation times of intact and injured bone tissue, especially in children, is widely unknown. The objective observation of a fracture including its age determination can become of legal interest in cases of child abuse or maltreatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is the determination of time dependent changes in intact and corresponding injured bones in immature rats via qMRI, to provide the basis for an objective and radiation-free approach for fracture dating. Thirty-five MR scans of 7 Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 4 weeks old, 100 ± 5 g were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner (TimTrio, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany after the surgical infliction of an epiphyseal fracture in the tibia. The images were taken at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 82 post-surgery. A proton density-weighted and a T1-weighted 3D FLASH sequence were acquired to calculate the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of the fractured region and the surrounding tissues. The calculation of T1 in intact and injured bone resulted in a quantitative observation of bone development in intact juvenile tibiae as well as the bone healing process in the injured tibiae. In both areas, T1 decreased over time. To evaluate the differences in T1 behaviour between the intact and injured bone, the relative T1 values (bone-fracture were calculated, showing clear detectable alterations of T1 after fracture occurrence. These results indicate that qMRI has a high potential not only for clinically relevant applications to detect growth defects or developmental alterations in juvenile bones, but also for forensically relevant applications such as the dating of fractures in cases of child abuse or maltreatment.

  6. Process of optical excitation and relaxation of color center in synthetic diamond and its application to optoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yoshio

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of high-pressure synthesized diamond is carried out by using a nuclear reactor or a linac. Then, the effect of annealing on the color centers is observed. A study is made to identify different color centers and to provide techniques to control their introduction. Investigations cover the relation of color center formation with annealing temperature, dependence of color center formation on radiation dose, migration of H3 center and hydrogen, and applicability of five different color centers to optoelectronics. Next, a study is made of the formation and relaxation of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in a metastable excited state produced by optical excitation. An optical gain is essential to provide laser. Optical amplification is measured at the vibronic emission band of the NV center. An increase in absorption is detected, indicating that the NV center will not provide laser. In the optical excitation-relaxation process, the relaxation proceeds via a metastable state. Finally, hole burning of ZPL of the NV center is observed in the temperature range from 20K to 80K, and some of its features are described. (N.K.)

  7. Influence of Na doping on the magnetic relaxation processes of magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, C.; Arias, A. Gonzalez; Hisatake, K.; Francisco, C. de; Hernandez-Gomez, P.; Kim, C.O.; Kim, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation of the initial magnetic permeability was measured in polycrystalline Na-doped magnetite samples, with nominal composition Na x Fe 3- x O 4 (x ranging from 0 to 0.05), by means of the magnetic disaccommodation (DA) technique. We found that the increasing amount of Na ions modifies the DA spectra and a very different behaviour depending on the sintering atmosphere. These results were discussed in terms of the presence of Na ions in the magnetite lattice, giving rise to certain modifications in their neighbourhood

  8. Relaxation processes and conduction mechanism in bismuth ferrite lead titanate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Truptimayee; Behera, Banarji

    2018-02-01

    In this study, samarium (Sm)-doped multiferroic composites of 0.8BiSmxFe1-xO3-0.2PbTiO3 where x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20 were prepared via the conventional solid state reaction route. The electrical properties of these composites were analyzed using an impedance analyzer over a wide range of temperatures and frequencies (102-106 Hz). The impedance and modulus analyses confirmed the presence of both bulk and grain boundary effects in the materials. The temperature dependence of impedance and modulus spectrum indicated the negative temperature coefficient of resistance behavior. The dielectric relaxation exhibited non-Debye type behavior and it was temperature dependent. The relaxation time (τ) and DC conductivity followed an Arrhenius type behavior. The frequency-dependent AC conductivity obeyed Jonscher's power law. The correlated barrier hopping model was appropriate to understand the conduction mechanism in the composites considered.

  9. Photon drag investigations of current relaxation processes in a two-dimensional electron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, S; Kohler, K U; Bachtold, W

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the photon drag current that is excited by an infrared laser beam in the plane of the two-dimensional electron gas of GaAs/Al/sub 0.35/Ga/sub 0.65/As multiple-quantum-well systems. An analysis of the spectral response, measured with the picosecond infrared pulses of the wavelength-tunable free electron laser source FELIX, is presented for different doping schemes and examined as a function of temperature and intensity. The influence of the subband- selective scattering by a delta doping is explored, which demonstrates that the photon drag spectral response allows the determination of the momentum relaxation time ratio, R= tau /sub 1// tau /sub 2/, of the electrons in the ground and excited subbands. The relaxation time ratio is found to be surprisingly constant over a large temperature range. The variation of the ratio with intensity can be attributed to heating of the electron gas, whose temperature exceeds 1000 K at saturation intensity. (41 refs).

  10. Automated measurement of nuclear relaxation times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, A.G.; Mazitov, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a method for determination of nuclear relaxation times T 1 and T 2 that is based on the linear relationship between these times and the areas bounded by the relaxation curves. A circuit for automated measurement of time T 1 using a B3-35 microcalculator is presented. They have used the described method for a number of years to measure the relaxation times of various nuclei in solutions - in particular, those of 7 Li and 133 Cs in aqueous solutions. The method has proven to be highly effective and accurate and has greatly reduced the measurement time, especially in the case of long T 1

  11. Formation and relaxation processes of photoinduced defects in a Ge-doped SiO2 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Saito, K.; Ikushima, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The defect centers induced by ArF laser irradiation in Ge-doped SiO 2 have been investigated by the electron-spin resonance method. In order to observe formation and relaxation processes of the defects, step annealing has been carried out after the irradiation at 77 K. The thermally induced decay of the self-trapped hole (STH) and formation of the so-called Ge(2) centers have been observed with increasing temperature. The result suggests that the holes are transferred from the STH to the Ge(2)

  12. Self-similarly evolving and minimally dissipated stable states of plasmas realized after relaxation and self-organization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Hakoiwa, Toru; Okada, Akihito; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2006-01-01

    A novel set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations having dissipative terms are derived to find self-similarly evolving and minimally dissipated stable states of plasmas realized after relaxation and self-organization processes. By numerically solving the set of eigenvalue equations in a cylindrical model, typical spatial profiles of plasma parameters, electric and magnetic fields and diffusion factors are presented, all of which determine self-consistently with each other by physical laws and mutual relations among them, just as in experimental plasmas. (author)

  13. Guinea-pig interpubic joint (symphysis pubica relaxation at parturition: Underlying cellular processes that resemble an inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-de-Toro Mónica

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At term, cervical ripening in coordination with uterine contractions becomes a prerequisite for a normal vaginal delivery. Currently, cervical ripening is considered to occur independently from uterine contractions. Many evidences suggest that cervical ripening resembles an inflammatory process. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the increased flexibility of the pelvic symphysis that occurs in many species to enable safe delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the guinea-pig interpubic joint relaxation process observed during late pregnancy and parturition resembles an inflammatory process. Methods Samples of pubic symphysis were taken from pregnant guinea-pigs sacrificed along gestation, parturition and postpartum. Serial sections of paraffin-embedded tissues were used to measure the interpubic distance on digitalized images, stained with Giemsa to quantify leukocyte infiltration and to describe the vascular area changes, or studied by the picrosirius-polarization method to evaluate collagen remodeling. P4 and E2 serum levels were measured by a sequential immunometric assay. Results Data showed that the pubic relaxation is associated with an increase in collagen remodeling. In addition, a positive correlation between E2 serum levels and the increase in the interpubic distance was found. On the other hand, a leukocyte infiltration in the interpubic tissue around parturition was described, with the presence of almost all inflammatory cells types. At the same time, histological images show an increase in vascular area (angiogenesis. Eosinophils reached their highest level immediately before parturition; whereas for the neutrophilic and mononuclear infiltration higher values were recorded one day after parturition. Correlation analysis showed that eosinophils and mononuclear cells were positively correlated with E2 levels, but only eosinophilic infiltration was associated with collagen remodeling

  14. Assessment of demyelination, edema, and gliosis by in vivo determination of T1 and T2 in the brain of patients with acute attack of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Frederiksen, J; Petersen, J

    1989-01-01

    This study intended to investigate the possibility of magnetic resonance (MR) to characterize the acute plaque due to multiple sclerosis (MS). To obtain information, in vivo measurements of relaxation processes were performed in 10 patients with known acute MS plaques, using a whole-body supercon......This study intended to investigate the possibility of magnetic resonance (MR) to characterize the acute plaque due to multiple sclerosis (MS). To obtain information, in vivo measurements of relaxation processes were performed in 10 patients with known acute MS plaques, using a whole......-body superconductive MR-scanner, operating at 1.5 T. The measurements were repeated several times, from onset of the disease and during remission by use of six-point partial saturation inversion recovery and 32-echo multiple spin-echo sequences, giving T1 and T2, respectively. We also focused on the issue, whether T1...

  15. Volumetric T1 and T2 magnetic resonance brain toolkit for relaxometry mapping simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos da Silva Senra Filho

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Relaxometry images are an important magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique in the clinical routine. Many diagnoses are based on the relaxometry maps to infer abnormal state in the tissue characteristic relaxation constant. In order to study the performance of these image processing approaches, a controlled simulated environment is necessary. However, a simulated relaxometry image tool is still lacking. This study proposes a computational anatomical brain phantom for MRI relaxometry images, which aims to offer an easy and flexible toolkit to test different image processing techniques, applied to MRI relaxometry maps in a controlled simulated environment. Methods A pipeline of image processing techniques such as brain extraction, image segmentation, normalization to a common space and signal relaxation decay simulation, were applied to a brain structural ICBM brain template, on both T1 and T2 weighted images, in order to simulate a volumetric brain relaxometry phantom. The FMRIB Software Library (FSL toolkits were used here as the base image processing needed to all the relaxometry reconstruction. Results All the image processing procedures are performed using automatic algorithms. In addition, different artefact levels can be set from different sources such as Rician noise and radio-frequency inhomogeneity noises. Conclusion The main goal of this project is to help researchers in their future image processing analysis involving MRI relaxometry images, offering reliable and robust brain relaxometry simulation modelling. Furthermore, the entire pipeline is open-source, which provides a wide collaboration between researchers who may want to improve the software and its functionality.

  16. New evidence for the idea of timescale invariance of relaxation processes in simple liquids: the case of molten sodium

    CERN Document Server

    Yulmetyev, R M; Scopigno, T; Hänggi, P

    2003-01-01

    The idea of the timescale invariance of relaxation processes in liquids (Yulmetyev et al 2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 057101; 2002 JETP Lett. 76 147) is used to analyse the short-wave collective excitation in liquid sodium, as recently measured by means of very-high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (Scopigno et al 2002 Phys. Rev. E 65 031205). The dynamic structure factor, S(Q, omega), calculated on the basis of this idea is in very good agreement with the experimental data in the wavevector range from 1.5 to 14.6 nm sup - sup 1 , where pronounced collective excitations exist. The frequency dependence of the non-Markovity parameter epsilon sub i (Q, omega) (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) allows us to reveal the alternation of the amplification and the decay of non-Markovity effects for the observed region of wavevector Q.

  17. Effect of radiation and non-Maxwellian electron distribution on relaxation processes in an atmospheric cesium seeded argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, C.A.; Veefkind, A.; Wetzer, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    A model, describing the time dependent behaviour of a noble gas MHD generator plasma, has been set up. With this model it is possible to calculate the relaxation for ionization or recombination as a response to a stepwise temperature development, once the initial and final conditions are given. In model radiative transitions and a deviation from Maxwellian electron distribution are included. Radiation causes an enhancement of both the ionization relaxation time and the recombination relaxation time. A non-Maxwellian electron distribution results in an increase of the relaxation time for an ionizing plasma because of an underpopulation of the high energy electrons. A decrease of the relaxation time for a recombining plasma is caused by an overpopulation of high energy electrons. The relaxation time is strongly dependent on the seed ratio and the temperature step. (Auth.)

  18. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation time in a quantum limit using a state-independent projection reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2018-02-01

    A new formula for determining the electron spin relaxation time in a system of electrons interacting with acoustic deformation phonons through phonon-modulated spin–orbit coupling is derived using the state-independent projection reduction method. The spin flip and conserving processes are explained in an organized manner because the obtained results properly contain the distribution functions for electrons and phonons. The electron spin relaxation time is calculated directly from the lineshape function without calculating the magnetic susceptibility. The temperature (T) and magnetic field (B) dependences of the electron spin relaxation time (T 1) in Si are shown by T 1 ≈ T ‑1.55 and T 1 ≈ B ‑1.96 in the quantum limit, respectively.

  19. Quantitative T1 mapping under precisely controlled graded hyperoxia at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Alex A; Siero, Jeroen Cw; Zwanenburg, Jaco; Luijten, Peter R; Philippens, Marielle Ep; Hoogduin, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the concentration of oxygen dissolved in water is known to increase the recovery rate (R1 = 1/T1) of longitudinal magnetization (T1 relaxation). Direct T1 changes in response to precise hyperoxic gas challenges have not yet been quantified and the actual effect of increasing arterial oxygen concentration on the T1 of brain parenchyma remains unclear. The aim of this work was to use quantitative T1 mapping to measure tissue T1 changes in response to precisely targeted hyperoxic respiratory challenges ranging from baseline end-tidal oxygen (PetO 2 ) to approximately 500 mmHg. We did not observe measureable T1 changes in either gray matter or white matter parenchymal tissue. The T1 of peripheral cerebrospinal fluid located within the sulci, however, was reduced as a function of PetO 2 . No significant T1 changes were observed in the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid under hyperoxia. Our results indicate that care should be taken to distinguish actual T1 changes from those which may be related to partial volume effects with cerebrospinal fluid, or regions with increased fluid content such as edema when examining hyperoxia-induced changes in T1 using methods based on T1-weighted imaging.

  20. The role of non-equilibrium fluxes in the relaxation processes of the linear chemical master equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luciana Renata; Bazzani, Armando; Giampieri, Enrico; Castellani, Gastone C

    2014-08-14

    We propose a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description in terms of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) to characterize the dynamics of a chemical cycle chain reaction among m different species. These systems can be closed or open for energy and molecules exchange with the environment, which determines how they relax to the stationary state. Closed systems reach an equilibrium state (characterized by the detailed balance condition (D.B.)), while open systems will reach a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). The principal difference between D.B. and NESS is due to the presence of chemical fluxes. In the D.B. condition the fluxes are absent while for the NESS case, the chemical fluxes are necessary for the state maintaining. All the biological systems are characterized by their "far from equilibrium behavior," hence the NESS is a good candidate for a realistic description of the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of living organisms. In this work we consider a CME written in terms of a discrete Kolmogorov forward equation, which lead us to write explicitly the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes. For systems in NESS, we show that there is a non-conservative "external vector field" whose is linearly proportional to the chemical fluxes. We also demonstrate that the modulation of these external fields does not change their stationary distributions, which ensure us to study the same system and outline the differences in the system's behavior when it switches from the D.B. regime to NESS. We were interested to see how the non-equilibrium fluxes influence the relaxation process during the reaching of the stationary distribution. By performing analytical and numerical analysis, our central result is that the presence of the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes reduces the characteristic relaxation time with respect to the D.B. condition. Within a biochemical and biological perspective, this result can be related to the "plasticity property" of biological systems and to their

  1. The role of non-equilibrium fluxes in the relaxation processes of the linear chemical master equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciana Renata de; Bazzani, Armando; Giampieri, Enrico; Castellani, Gastone C., E-mail: Gastone.Castellani@unibo.it [Physics and Astronomy Department, Bologna University and INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2014-08-14

    We propose a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description in terms of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) to characterize the dynamics of a chemical cycle chain reaction among m different species. These systems can be closed or open for energy and molecules exchange with the environment, which determines how they relax to the stationary state. Closed systems reach an equilibrium state (characterized by the detailed balance condition (D.B.)), while open systems will reach a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). The principal difference between D.B. and NESS is due to the presence of chemical fluxes. In the D.B. condition the fluxes are absent while for the NESS case, the chemical fluxes are necessary for the state maintaining. All the biological systems are characterized by their “far from equilibrium behavior,” hence the NESS is a good candidate for a realistic description of the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of living organisms. In this work we consider a CME written in terms of a discrete Kolmogorov forward equation, which lead us to write explicitly the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes. For systems in NESS, we show that there is a non-conservative “external vector field” whose is linearly proportional to the chemical fluxes. We also demonstrate that the modulation of these external fields does not change their stationary distributions, which ensure us to study the same system and outline the differences in the system's behavior when it switches from the D.B. regime to NESS. We were interested to see how the non-equilibrium fluxes influence the relaxation process during the reaching of the stationary distribution. By performing analytical and numerical analysis, our central result is that the presence of the non-equilibrium chemical fluxes reduces the characteristic relaxation time with respect to the D.B. condition. Within a biochemical and biological perspective, this result can be related to the “plasticity property” of biological

  2. MR T1{rho} as an imaging biomarker for monitoring liver injury progression and regression: an experimental study in rats with carbon tetrachloride intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Yuan, Jing; Deng, Min; Ahuja, Anil T. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wong, Hing Lok [School of Public Health and Primary Care, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chu, Eagle S.H.; Go, Minnie Y.Y.; Yu, Jun [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Institute of Digestive Disease and Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Hong Kong SAR (China); Teng, Gao-Jun [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing (China)

    2012-08-15

    Recently it was shown that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1{rho} value increased with the severity of liver fibrosis in rats with bile duct ligation. Using a rat carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) liver injury model, this study further investigated the merit of T1{rho} relaxation for liver fibrosis evaluation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injection of 2 ml/kg CCl{sub 4} twice weekly for up to 6 weeks. Then CCl{sub 4} was withdrawn and the animals were allowed to recover. Liver T1{rho} MRI and conventional T2-weighted images were acquired. Animals underwent MRI at baseline and at 2 days, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 6 weeks post CCl{sub 4} injection, and they were also examined at 1 week and 4 weeks post CCl{sub 4} withdrawal. Liver histology was also sampled at these time points. Liver T1{rho} values increased slightly, though significantly, on day 2, and then increased further and were highest at week 6 post CCl{sub 4} insults. The relative liver signal intensity change on T2-weighted images followed a different time course compared with that of T1{rho}. Liver T1{rho} values decreased upon the withdrawal of the CCl{sub 4} insult. Histology confirmed the animals had typical CCl{sub 4} liver injury and fibrosis progression and regression processes. MR T1{rho} imaging can monitor CCl{sub 4}-induced liver injury and fibrosis. (orig.)

  3. Simultaneous multislice triple-echo steady-state (SMS-TESS) T1 , T2 , PD, and off-resonance mapping in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heule, Rahel; Celicanin, Zarko; Kozerke, Sebastian; Bieri, Oliver

    2018-02-21

    To investigate the ability of simultaneous multislice triple-echo steady-state (SMS-TESS) imaging to provide quantitative maps of multiple tissue parameters, i.e., longitudinal and transverse relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ), proton density (PD), and off-resonance (ΔB 0 ), in the human brain at 3T from a single scan. TESS acquisitions were performed in 2D mode to reduce motion sensitivity and accelerated by an SMS excitation scheme (CAIPIRINHA) with SENSE reconstruction. SMS-acceleration factors (R) of 2 and 4 were evaluated. The in vitro and in vivo validation process included standard reference scans to analyze the accuracy of T 1 , T 2 , and ΔB 0 estimates, as well as single-slice TESS measurements. For R = 2, the quantification of T 1 , T 2 , PD, and ΔB 0 was overall reliable with marginal noise enhancement. T 1 and T 2 values were in good agreement with the reference measurements and single-slice TESS. For R = 4, the agreement of ΔB 0 with the standard reference was excellent and the determination of T 1 , T 2 , and PD was reproducible; however, increased variations in T 1 and T 2 values with respect to single-slice TESS were observed. SMS-TESS has shown potential to offer rapid simultaneous T 1 , T 2 , PD, and ΔB 0 mapping of human brain tissues. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Solvent dynamical effects in electron transfer: Predicted consequences of non-Debye relaxation processes and some comparisons with experimental kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManis, George E.; Weaver, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The consequences of non-Debye solvent relaxation upon the barrier-crossing dynamics of adiabatic electron-transfer processes have been explored numerically using a rate formulation due to Hynes for several common forms of the dielectric response function Ê(s), with the objective of assessing the likely experimental importance of such effects. For the ``multiple Debye'' form of Ê(s), analytic expressions for the required time-correlation function can be obtained, whereas for the Davidson-Cole and Cole-Cole forms numerical solutions to the inverse Laplace transform were required. Illustrative numerical results are presented of the increases in the adiabatic barrier-crossing frequency, νn, predicted to be engendered by the presence of higher-frequency relaxation components for dielectric conditions of likely experimental relevance. Substantial (five- to ten fold) rate enhancements are often obtained, resulting from the disproportionately large influence upon νn predicted to arise from the higher-frequency components of Ê(s). Neither νn, nor the non-Debye influence upon νn, are found to be affected greatly by alterations in the shape of the barrier top caused by variations in the electronic coupling matrix element. Comparisons between these numerical predictions and corresponding experimental solvent-dependent νn values extracted from metallocene self-exchange kinetics indicate that the former can account for a substantial fraction of the νn accelerations observed in alcohols and other non-Debye solvents. Roughly concordant non-Debye effects are also predicted from some other, but not all, recent rate formulations. The desirability of utilizing subpicosecond dynamical solvation information from fluorescence Stokes shifts to predict non-Debye effects upon electron-transfer barrier-crossing frequencies is pointed out.

  5. Process of advective diffusive enrichment using differential gradients and the effects of variations in relaxation times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola R.; Bernasconi, G.; Bertolotti, Angel

    1995-01-01

    A multicomponent solution is considered in advective diffusion chambers between two half-permeable barriers. A mathematical model is developed to calculate the concentration fields in the chamber. A new enrichment process is proposed and assessed using a digital simulation of space-time dynamics, based on the analytical solution of the model

  6. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses; Processus electroniques d'excitation et de relaxation dans les solides dielectriques excites par des impulsions IR et XUV ultracourtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, J

    2005-11-15

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  7. In vivo determination of T1 and T2 in the brain of patients with severe but stable multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Frederiksen, J; Kjaer, L

    1988-01-01

    In vivo measurements of relaxation processes in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be important for evaluation of the disease activity in individual MS plaques. To obtain information of presumably chronic plaques, 10 patients with severe, but stable MS were...... investigated, using a whole-body superconductive MR scanner, operating at 1.5 T. By employing 12-point (or 6-point) partial saturation inversion recovery (PSIR) and 32-echo multiple spin-echo sequences we measured T1 and T2 in MS plaques, white matter, and cortical gray matter. We also focused on the issue...

  8. Influence of SnO2 nanoparticles on the relaxation dynamics of the conductive processes in polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Bhattacharya, Subhratanu

    2017-10-01

    The effect of stannic oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity relaxation and distribution of relaxation times within the 4-Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) doped polyaniline (Pani) was investigated using electrical impedance spectroscopy. A temperature dependent Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) type temporal relaxation function in the time domain was generated from the analysis of the frequency dependence of the dielectric modulus (imaginary component). The thermal evolution of the characteristics parameters of the KWW function was evaluated and using these parameters the temperature dependent average conductivity relaxation time and associated macroscopic conductivity of different samples were estimated. The study revealed that SnO2 nanoparticles within the polyaniline matrix induced faster relaxation of charge carriers that essentially enhanced the conductivity of the nanocomposite. The observed phenomena were well supported by the observed improvement of the localization length of the charge carriers within the nanocomposite.

  9. Influence of relaxation processes in polymers on energy transfer by triplet levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibraev, N.Kh.; Zhunusbekov, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Temperature influence on triplet-triplet (T-T) energy transfer between molecules of eosin and 3,4-benzopyrene is studied. Polyvenylbuteryl films have been used in capacity of polymer matrix. Calculation has being carried out on spectral-kinetic unit. It is revealed, that 3,4-benzopyrene triplets have been formed in polymer matrix after end of T-T energy transfer. These triplets join in a reaction of mixed triplet-triplet annihilation with non-blow out triplets of eosin and its sensitize slowed fluorescence (SF) of donor. This explains non-exponent character of eosin's dumping kinetics. Non-linear dependence of SF output ration to eosin phosphorescence output under presence of 3,4-benzopyrene molecules in film indicates on process of mixed annihilation. Fractal character of SF donor and acceptor has been evidenced about microscopical distribution of phosphor in polymer. 13 refs., 5 figs

  10. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warntjes, Marcel JB; Kihlberg, Johan; Engvall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T 1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T 1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR). Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R 1 relaxation rate (1/T 1 ) over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T 1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T 1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s -1 , increasing to 6 - 7 s -1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s -1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s -1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T 1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T 1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold

  11. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warntjes Marcel JB

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR. Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. Methods The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R1 relaxation rate (1/T1 over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. Results The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s-1, increasing to 6 - 7 s-1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s-1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s-1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. Conclusions The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold.

  12. Effects of electric paravertebral muscle relaxation processes in the athletes heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Syshko

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of paravertebrals miorelaxation on electric processes in a heart at sportsmen is studied. Paravertebrals miorelaxation was the complex of exercises in a water environment directed on the decline of tone of paravertebral muscles. Before and after it was used of paravertebrals miorelaxation registered the indexes of electrocardiography at the sportsmen engaged in the Greek-Roman fight (n=22 by football (n=24 and heavy athletics (n=25. It is got, that at the sportsmen of engaged in the Greek -Roman fight after paravertebrals miorelaxation QRS and QT were it was increased, and R-R and PQ went down. At the sportsmen of engaged in heavy athletics HR and PQ went down after paravertebrals miorelaxation, R-R, QRS and QT were it was increased. At the sportsmen of getting busy by football the PQ interval shortened, and QRS and QT has multiplied. Findings testify to the presence of different mechanisms of adaptation of the conducting system of heart in the conditions of influencing of paravertebrals miorelaxation. These distinctions are fated by two basic factors: by the functional being of the cardio-vessels system on the whole and functional being of sine knot and conducting system of heart in particular.

  13. Processes of Molecular Relaxation in Binary Crystalline Systems KNO3-KClO4, KNO3-KNO2, and K2CO3-K2SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, A. R.; Akhmedov, I. R.; Kakagasanov, M. G.; Aliev, Z. A.; Gafurov, M. M.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Amirov, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The processes of molecular relaxation in binary crystalline systems KNO3-KClO4, KNO3-KNO2, and K2CO3-K2SO4 are studied via differential thermal analysis and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the relaxation time of the vibrations ν1( A) of anions NO- 3 and CO2- 3 in systems KNO3-KClO4, KNO3-KNO2, and K2CO3-K2SO4 is less than that in KNO3 and K2CO3, respectively. It is shown that the increased rate of relaxation is explained by an additional relaxation mechanism presented in the system. This mechanism is associated with the excitation of vibrations of anions ClO- 4, NO- 2, and SO2- 4 and the lattice phonons that emerge. It is found that this relaxation mechanism requires correspondence of the frequency difference of these vibrations to the region of sufficiently high density of states of the phonon spectrum.

  14. T1 mapping of the ischemic myocardium: Review of potential clinical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, Jan, E-mail: baxaj@fnplzen.cz [Department of Imaging Methods, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague and University Hospital Pilsen (Czech Republic); Ferda, Jiří [Department of Imaging Methods, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague and University Hospital Pilsen (Czech Republic); Hromádka, Milan [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • T1 mapping is a feasible method for detailed characterization of the myocardium. • Non-contrast T1 mapping has potential for precise quantification of myocardial edema in acute infarction. • Evaluation of non-contrast T1 maps and extracellular volume improve detection of the area at risk and final infarct size. • T1 mapping could be beneficial in the quantification of chronic fibrous scar of the myocardium. - Abstract: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is an indispensable part of the diagnostic algorithm in cardiology. CMR has become a gold standard in various disorders; moreover, it is well established also as a surrogate end-point in experimental and clinical studies. Particularly, the ability to directly display myocardial injury is a unique feature in comparison with other methods. The mapping of magnetic relaxation properties (T1, T2 and T2* relaxation times) are still relatively new techniques, but promising to improve the robustness of CMR and add new appropriate indications. The high potential of T1 mapping in the diagnostic of myocardial ischemic involvement has been highlighted in several experimental and clinical studies, but the use in clinical routine was limited due to the shortcomings in scanning and image evaluation. However, the quantitative technique of T1 mapping is now commercially available and its simple use, good reproducibility and limited subjectivity allow its incorporation into routine CMR protocols. This review article is aimed to summarise existing results and clinical experience with T1 mapping in patients with ischemic cardiac disease.

  15. 1T1R Nonvolatile Memory with Al/TiO2/Au and Sol-Gel-Processed Insulator for Barium Zirconate Nickelate Gate in Pentacene Thin Film Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Jing Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A one-transistor and one-resistor (1T1R architecture with a resistive random access memory (RRAM cell connected to an organic thin-film transistor (OTFT device is successfully demonstrated to avoid the cross-talk issues of only one RRAM cell. The OTFT device, which uses barium zirconate nickelate (BZN as a dielectric layer, exhibits favorable electrical properties, such as a high field-effect mobility of 2.5 cm2/Vs, low threshold voltage of −2.8 V, and low leakage current of 10−12 A, for a driver in the 1T1R operation scheme. The 1T1R architecture with a TiO2-based RRAM cell connected with a BZN OTFT device indicates a low operation current (10 μA and reliable data retention (over ten years. This favorable performance of the 1T1R device can be attributed to the additional barrier heights introduced by using Ni (II acetylacetone as a substitute for acetylacetone, and the relatively low leakage current of a BZN dielectric layer. The proposed 1T1R device with low leakage current OTFT and excellent uniform resistance distribution of RRAM exhibits a good potential for use in practical low-power electronic applications.

  16. Relationship between the catalytic activity of Pt/alumina and the relaxation process of the photoexcited electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Junji; Hanaki, Yasunari; Shen, Qing; Toyoda, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We determined the decay time of photoexcited electrons of Pt/Al 2 O 3 . ► Faster decay of excited electrons in Pt/Al 2 O 3 leads to its faster oxidation rate. ► Decreasing excited electron lifetime in Pt/Al 2 O 3 may decrease Pt consumption in catalytic convertors. - Abstract: In order to decrease the consumption of precious metals used in the catalytic converters used in automobiles, we studied the relationship between the catalytic activity of Pt/alumina (Pt/Al 2 O 3 ) and the relaxation process of photoexcited electrons. Firstly, we studied the relationship between the size of the Pt particles in Pt/Al 2 O 3 and catalytic performance. Secondly, the relationship between the size of the Pt particles in Pt/Al 2 O 3 and the decay time of the excited electrons was studied using an improved transient grating (TG) technique. The results showed that faster decay of the excited electrons leads to greater oxidation rates. The decay time obtained with the improved TG technique gives an indication of the time that the exited electrons take to return to the ground state. According to studies utilizing FT-IR, one of the processes necessary for quickly generating CO 2 with Pt is that the electron in the Pt-O bond moves to the Pt side and that the Pt + becomes Pt metal. Thus, the decay time obtained with the improved TG technique corresponds to the process whereby Pt + returns to Pt metal. Thus, we found that the consumption of precious metals can be reduced by increasing the speed of the decay of the excited electrons.

  17. Functional lung MRI in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: comparison of T1 mapping, oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram J Jobst

    Full Text Available Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI.20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1, oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1 and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach.Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001, and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001. In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1. The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05, ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05 and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05 showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage.Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast.

  18. Caffeine intake inverts the effect of adenosine on myocardial perfusion during stress as measured by T1 mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Prakken, Niek H.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Dijkman, Paul R. M.; van der Harst, Pim; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine intake before adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging may cause false negative findings. We hypothesized that the antagonistic effect of caffeine can be measured by T1 relaxation times in rest and adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), as T1 mapping techniques are

  19. Nuclear Spin Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In the context of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the term relaxation indicates the process by which the magnetic atomic nuclei reach thermal equilibrium with the chaotic molecular environment. In NMR, this process can be very slow, requiring between a fraction of a second to many minutes, depending on the.

  20. Prolonged T1 in patients with liver cirrhosis: an in vivo MRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Christoffersen, P; Henriksen, O

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen patients with liver cirrhosis and two control groups were examined. The first control group consisted of 7 healthy volunteers, and the second group of 17 patients with nonfocal liver diseases. The T1 and T2 relaxation times were calculated from signal intensities read out from a region...

  1. Gleaning multicomponent T1 and T2 information from steady-state imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoni, Sean C L; Rutt, Brian K; Arun, Tarunya; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Jones, Derek K

    2008-12-01

    The driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T(1) (DESPOT1) and T(2) (DESPOT2) are rapid, accurate, and precise methods for voxelwise determination of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times. A limitation of the methods, however, is the inherent assumption of single-component relaxation. In a variety of biological tissues, in particular human white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM), the relaxation has been shown to be more completely characterized by a summation of two or more relaxation components, or species, each believed to be associated with unique microanatomical domains or water pools. Unfortunately, characterization of these components on a voxelwise, whole-brain basis has traditionally been hindered by impractical acquisition times. In this work we extend the conventional DESPOT1 and DESPOT2 approaches to include multicomponent relaxation analysis. Following numerical analysis of the new technique, renamed multicomponent driven equilibrium single pulse observation of T(1)/T(2) (mcDESPOT), whole-brain multicomponent T(1) and T(2) quantification is demonstrated in vivo with clinically realistic times of between 16 and 30 min. Results obtained from four healthy individuals and two primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients demonstrate the future potential of the approach for identifying and assessing tissue changes associated with several neurodegenerative conditions, in particular those associated with WM. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Optimized efficient liver T1ρ mapping using limited spin lock times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Feng; Griffith, James F.; Chan, Queenie; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.

    2012-03-01

    T1ρ relaxation has recently been found to be sensitive to liver fibrosis and has potential to be used for early detection of liver fibrosis and grading. Liver T1ρ imaging and accurate mapping are challenging because of the long scan time, respiration motion and high specific absorption rate. Reduction and optimization of spin lock times (TSLs) are an efficient way to reduce scan time and radiofrequency energy deposition of T1ρ imaging, but maintain the near-optimal precision of T1ρ mapping. This work analyzes the precision in T1ρ estimation with limited, in particular two, spin lock times, and explores the feasibility of using two specific operator-selected TSLs for efficient and accurate liver T1ρ mapping. Two optimized TSLs were derived by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations first, and tested experimentally by in vivo rat liver T1ρ imaging at 3 T. The simulation showed that the TSLs of 1 and 50 ms gave optimal T1ρ estimation in a range of 10-100 ms. In the experiment, no significant statistical difference was found between the T1ρ maps generated using the optimized two-TSL combination and the maps generated using the six TSLs of [1, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50] ms according to one-way ANOVA analysis (p = 0.1364 for liver and p = 0.8708 for muscle).

  3. Elucidation of Dual Magnetic Relaxation Processes in Dinuclear Dysprosium(III) Phthalocyaninato Triple-Decker Single-Molecule Magnets Depending on the Octacoordination Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Keiichi; Aizawa, Yu; Morita, Takaumi; Breedlove, Brian K; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2017-11-02

    When applying single-molecule magnets (SMMs) to spintronic devices, control of the quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) as well as a spin-lattice interactions are important. Attempts have been made to use not only coordination geometry but also magnetic interactions between SMMs as an exchange bias. In this manuscript, dinuclear dysprosium(III) (Dy III ) SMMs with the same octacoordination geometry undergo dual magnetic relaxation processes at low temperature. In the dinuclear Dy III phthalocyaninato (Pc 2- ) triple-decker type complex [(Pc)Dy(ooPc)Dy(Pc)] (1) (ooPc 2- =2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)phthalocyaninato) with a square-antiprismatic (SAP) geometry, the ground state is divided by the Zeeman effect, and level intersection occurs when a magnetic field is applied. Due to the ground state properties of 1, since the Zeeman diagram where the levels intersect in an H dc of 2500 Oe, two kinds of QTM and direct processes occur. However, dinuclear Dy III -Pc systems with C 4 geometry, which have a twist angle (ϕ) of less than 45° do not undergo dual magnetic relaxation processes. From magnetic field and temperature dependences, the dual magnetic relaxation processes were clarified. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Assessment of myocardial fibrosis with T1 mapping MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R J; Stirrat, C G; Semple, S I R; Newby, D E; Dweck, M R; Mirsadraee, S

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial fibrosis can arise from a range of pathological processes and its presence correlates with adverse clinical outcomes. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can provide a non-invasive assessment of cardiac structure, function, and tissue characteristics, which includes late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) techniques to identify focal irreversible replacement fibrosis with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility. Importantly the presence of LGE is consistently associated with adverse outcomes in a range of common cardiac conditions; however, LGE techniques are qualitative and unable to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis, which is an earlier form of fibrosis preceding replacement fibrosis that may be reversible. Novel T1 mapping techniques allow quantitative CMR assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis with the two most common measures being native T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. Native T1 differentiates normal from infarcted myocardium, is abnormal in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and may be particularly useful in the diagnosis of Anderson-Fabry disease and amyloidosis. ECV is a surrogate measure of the extracellular space and is equivalent to the myocardial volume of distribution of the gadolinium-based contrast medium. It is reproducible and correlates well with fibrosis on histology. ECV is abnormal in patients with cardiac failure and aortic stenosis, and is associated with functional impairment in these groups. T1 mapping techniques promise to allow earlier detection of disease, monitor disease progression, and inform prognosis; however, limitations remain. In particular, reference ranges are lacking for T1 mapping values as these are influenced by specific CMR techniques and magnetic field strength. In addition, there is significant overlap between T1 mapping values in healthy controls and most disease states, particularly using native T1, limiting the clinical application of these techniques at present. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College

  5. Assessment of myocardial fibrosis with T1 mapping MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everett, R.J.; Stirrat, C.G.; Semple, S.I.R.; Newby, D.E.; Dweck, M.R.; Mirsadraee, S.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis can arise from a range of pathological processes and its presence correlates with adverse clinical outcomes. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can provide a non-invasive assessment of cardiac structure, function, and tissue characteristics, which includes late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) techniques to identify focal irreversible replacement fibrosis with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility. Importantly the presence of LGE is consistently associated with adverse outcomes in a range of common cardiac conditions; however, LGE techniques are qualitative and unable to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis, which is an earlier form of fibrosis preceding replacement fibrosis that may be reversible. Novel T1 mapping techniques allow quantitative CMR assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis with the two most common measures being native T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. Native T1 differentiates normal from infarcted myocardium, is abnormal in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and may be particularly useful in the diagnosis of Anderson–Fabry disease and amyloidosis. ECV is a surrogate measure of the extracellular space and is equivalent to the myocardial volume of distribution of the gadolinium-based contrast medium. It is reproducible and correlates well with fibrosis on histology. ECV is abnormal in patients with cardiac failure and aortic stenosis, and is associated with functional impairment in these groups. T1 mapping techniques promise to allow earlier detection of disease, monitor disease progression, and inform prognosis; however, limitations remain. In particular, reference ranges are lacking for T1 mapping values as these are influenced by specific CMR techniques and magnetic field strength. In addition, there is significant overlap between T1 mapping values in healthy controls and most disease states, particularly using native T1, limiting the clinical application of these techniques at present.

  6. Gluon fragmentation in T(1S) decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienlein, J.K.

    1983-05-01

    In T(1S) decays most observables (sphericity, charged multiplicity, photonic energy fraction, inclusive spectra) can be understood assuming that gluons fragment like quarks. New results from LENA use the (axis-independent) Fox-Wolfram moments for the photonic energy deposition. Continuum reactions show 'standard' Field-Feynman fragmentation. T(1S) decays show a significant difference in the photonic energy topology. It is more isotropic than with the Field-Feynman fragmentation scheme. Gluon fragmentation into isoscalar mesons (a la Peterson and Walsh) is excluded. But if one forces the leading particle to be isoscalar, one gets good agreement with the data. (orig.)

  7. Deuteron relaxation in the system Arkopal 9-D2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasterna, G.; Kupka, T.; Weglarz, W.; Blicharski, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The NMR spectra and relaxation time T 1 for D 2 O - polyether liquid crystal solutions have been performed. The concentration and temperature changes in liquid crystal structure have been observed and discussed

  8. Contribution of proton NMR relaxation to the investigation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    001 Lisboa, Portugal. *Author for correspondence. Abstract. We present in this work a review concerning wide frequency range T1 proton NMR relaxation studies performed in compounds exhibiting columnar mesophases, namely the Col ho.

  9. Under which conditions does T1 difficulty affect T2 performance in the attentional blink?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias Søren

    2009-01-01

    When two visual targets (T1 & T2) are presented in rapid succession, performance of T2 suffers up to 900 ms. One theory of this attentional blink (Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992) propose that T1 and T2 compete for limited processing resources (Chun & Potter, 1995), and predict that prolonging...... exposure duration was the same as in the hard condition while T1 contrast was adjusted individually to reach the same performance on the T1 identification task as obtained in the long duration condition. Six observers completed 260 trials in each of the three conditions. We found a strong effect of T1–T2...... latency on performance in the T2 identification task in all conditions, replicating the finding of an attentional blink. However, we found no difference in the attentional blink between conditions. We conclude that increasing the perceptual difficulty of T1 either by decreasing T1 contrast or T1 exposure...

  10. T1 difficulty modulates the attentional blink only when T1 is unmasked

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Andersen, Tobias

    with contrast and exposure. We suggested that the use of pattern masks might have compromised ours, and similar studies. In a new set of experiments we test this hypothesis and vary T1 difficulty with contrast, only this time we omit T1's mask. We find significant AB interference from manipulating T1....... In the easy condition (high contrast) we observe an increase in AB magnitude for SOA's of 200 ms. These findings supports the hypothesis that visual masking has an antagonistic influence on the AB effects of T1 difficulty. The result however, is the opposite of what we should expect from the two stage theory...

  11. Average beta measurement in EXTRAP T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, E.R.

    1988-12-01

    Beginning with the ideal MHD pressure balance equation, an expression for the average poloidal beta, Β Θ , is derived. A method for unobtrusively measuring the quantities used to evaluate Β Θ in Extrap T1 is described. The results if a series of measurements yielding Β Θ as a function of externally applied toroidal field are presented. (author)

  12. Natural relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  13. Actuality the process of relaxation on the lessons of physical training on the current stage of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vankova A.U.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Facilities are considered of making healthy for the improvement of ability to resist stress situations of students. Engaged in a physical culture in the net of educational clock must be conducted in the institute of higher before and after the special disciplines. Application of method of relaxation together with musical accompaniment promote claim of higher type of pedagogical organization of employments. A chronic mental overstrain without the sufficient physical discharging results in a nervous overstrain, negative emotions, deficit of time, violation of the mode of labour and rest, reduction of possibility of physical activity.

  14. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  15. T1 difficulty modulates the attentional blink only when T1 is unmasked

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Andersen, Tobias S

    The attentional blink (AB) is consistently observed when people are required to identify or detect two consecutive targets (T1 and T2). T2 suffers in performance when it is presented less than 500 ms after T1. The two stage theory (Chun & Potter, 1995) proposes that the AB is caused by limited pr...

  16. Quantitative T1-mapping detects cloudy-enhancing tumor compartments predicting outcome of patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Jurcoane, Alina; Kebir, Sied; Ditter, Philip; Schrader, Felix; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Tzaridis, Theophilos; Mädler, Burkhard; Schild, Hans H; Glas, Martin; Hattingen, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Contrast enhancement of glioblastomas (GBM) is caused by the decrease in relaxation time, T1. Here, we demonstrate that the quantitative measurement of T1 (qT1) discovers a subtle enhancement in GBM patients that is invisible in standard MRI. We assessed the volume change of this "cloudy" enhancement during radio-chemotherapy and its impact on patients' progression-free survival (PFS). We enrolled 18 GBM patients in this observational, prospective cohort study and measured 3T-MRI pre- and post contrast agent with standard T1-weighted (T1w) and with sequences to quantify T1 before radiation, and at 6-week intervals during radio-chemotherapy. We measured contrast enhancement by subtracting pre from post contrast contrast images, yielding relative signal increase ∆T1w and relative T1 shortening ∆qT1. On ∆qT1, we identified a solid and a cloudy-enhancing compartment and evaluated the impact of their therapy-related volume change upon PFS. In ∆qT1 maps cloudy-enhancing compartments were found in all but two patients at baseline and in all patients during therapy. The qT1 decrease in the cloudy-enhancing compartment post contrast was 21.64% versus 1.96% in the contralateral control tissue (P < 0.001). It was located at the margin of solid enhancement which was also seen on T1w. In contrast, the cloudy-enhancing compartment was visually undetectable on ∆T1w. A volume decrease of more than 21.4% of the cloudy-enhancing compartment at first follow-up predicted longer PFS (P = 0.038). Cloudy-enhancing compartment outside the solid contrast-enhancing area of GBM is a new observation which is only visually detectable with qT1-mapping and may represent tumor infiltration. Its early volume decrease predicts a longer PFS in GBM patients during standard radio-chemotherapy. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of irreversible change in brain edema by T1 value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiyama, Minoru; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro; Izawa, Akira; Kanaoke, Yoshiki.

    1990-01-01

    Study of the time course of T 1 value was performed on 6 patients with cerebral infarction, 18 patients with cerebral hemorrhage and 21 patients with cerebral tumor. The measuring points were settled on the ischemic lesions of the cerebral infarctions and the edematous areas of the other intracranial lesions. The T 1 values were calculated from the direct spinlattice relaxation curve by FONAR QED-alpha system (static magnetic field: 433 Gauss). In the acute stage (within 7 days after stroke), more apparent prolongations of T 1 values in infarcted lesions were observed, as compared to the other edematous areas. And in the chronic stage, marked prolongations of T 1 values were recognized on infarcted lesions, often exceeding 1000 msec. From the T 1 values, the water contents of the tissues were calculated by the two state model. The water content of infarcted lesion in acute stage was 86.5%. The water contents of the other edematous areas, on the other, were all under 80%. In the prospect of prognostic values, it is our assumption that, considering that the marked prolongations of the T 1 values on the infarcted lesions are convincingly the tissue degeneration and necrosis, the boundary between the irreversible ischemic change and the edema can be prosumed in the acute stage by T 1 value of about 490 msec, i.e. the water content is about 85%. (author)

  18. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  19. Predicting acoustic relaxation absorption in gas mixtures for extraction of composition relaxation contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhu, Ming

    2017-12-01

    The existing molecular relaxation models based on both parallel relaxation theory and series relaxation theory cannot extract the contributions of gas compositions to acoustic relaxation absorption in mixtures. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to predict acoustic relaxation absorption and clarify composition relaxation contributions based on the rate-determining energy transfer processes in molecular relaxation in excitable gases. By combining parallel and series relaxation theory, the proposed model suggests that the vibration-translation process of the lowest vibrational mode in each composition provides the primary deexcitation path of the relaxation energy, and the rate-determining vibration-vibration processes between the lowest mode and others dominate the coupling energy transfer between different modes. Thus, each gas composition contributes directly one single relaxation process to the molecular relaxation in mixture, which can be illustrated by the decomposed acoustic relaxation absorption spectrum of the single relaxation process. The proposed model is validated by simulation results in good agreement with experimental data such as N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , CH 4 and their mixtures.

  20. Simultaneous acquisition for T2 -T2 Exchange and T1 -T2 correlation NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrazi, Elton T.; Lucas-Oliveira, Everton; Araujo-Ferreira, Arthur G.; Barsi-Andreeta, Mariane; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2018-04-01

    The NMR measurements of longitudinal and transverse relaxation times and its multidimensional correlations provide useful information about molecular dynamics. However, these experiments are very time-consuming, and many researchers proposed faster experiments to reduce this issue. This paper presents a new way to simultaneously perform T2 -T2 Exchange and T1 -T2 correlation experiments by taking the advantage of the storage time and the two steps phase cycling used for running the relaxation exchange experiment. The data corresponding to each step is either summed or subtracted to produce the T2 -T2 and T1 -T2 data, enhancing the information obtained while maintaining the experiment duration. Comparing the results from this technique with traditional NMR experiments it was possible to validate the method.

  1. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system.

  2. QM/MM studies on the excited-state relaxation mechanism of a semisynthetic dTPT3 base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Teng-Shuo; Fang, Wei-Hai; Cui, Ganglong

    2018-02-14

    Semisynthetic alphabets can potentially increase the genetic information stored in DNA through the formation of unusual base pairs. Recent experiments have shown that near-visible-light irradiation of the dTPT3 chromophore could lead to the formation of a reactive triplet state and of singlet oxygen in high quantum yields. However, the detailed excited-state relaxation paths that populate the lowest triplet state are unclear. Herein, we have for the first time employed the QM(MS-CASPT2//CASSCF)/MM method to explore the spectroscopic properties and excited-state relaxation mechanism of the aqueous dTPT3 chromophore. On the basis of the results, we have found that (1) the S 2 ( 1 ππ*) state of dTPT3 is the initially populated excited singlet state upon near-visible light irradiation; and (2) there are two efficient relaxation pathways to populate the lowest triplet state, i.e. T 1 ( 3 ππ*). In the first one, the S 2 ( 1 ππ*) system first decays to the S 1 ( 1 nπ*) state near the S 2 /S 1 conical intersection, which is followed by an efficient S 1 → T 1 intersystem crossing process at the S 1 /T 1 crossing point; in the second one, an efficient S 2 → T 2 intersystem crossing takes place first, and then, the T 2 ( 3 nπ*) system hops to the T 1 ( 3 ππ*) state through an internal conversion process at the T 2 /T 1 conical intersection. Moreover, an S 2 /S 1 /T 2 intersection region is found to play a vital role in the excited-state relaxation. These new mechanistic insights help in understanding the photophysics and photochemistry of unusual base pairs.

  3. Steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamic modeling of the relaxation process of isolated chemically reactive systems using density of states and the concept of hypoequilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the nonequilibrium relaxation process of chemically reactive systems using steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT). The trajectory of the chemical reaction, i.e., the accessible intermediate states, is predicted and discussed. The prediction is made using a thermodynamic-ensemble approach, which does not require detailed information about the particle mechanics involved (e.g., the collision of particles). Instead, modeling the kinetics and dynamics of the relaxation process is based on the principle of steepest-entropy ascent (SEA) or maximum-entropy production, which suggests a constrained gradient dynamics in state space. The SEAQT framework is based on general definitions for energy and entropy and at least theoretically enables the prediction of the nonequilibrium relaxation of system state at all temporal and spatial scales. However, to make this not just theoretically but computationally possible, the concept of density of states is introduced to simplify the application of the relaxation model, which in effect extends the application of the SEAQT framework even to infinite energy eigenlevel systems. The energy eigenstructure of the reactive system considered here consists of an extremely large number of such levels (on the order of 10^{130}) and yields to the quasicontinuous assumption. The principle of SEA results in a unique trajectory of system thermodynamic state evolution in Hilbert space in the nonequilibrium realm, even far from equilibrium. To describe this trajectory, the concepts of subsystem hypoequilibrium state and temperature are introduced and used to characterize each system-level, nonequilibrium state. This definition of temperature is fundamental rather than phenomenological and is a generalization of the temperature defined at stable equilibrium. In addition, to deal with the large number of energy eigenlevels, the equation of motion is formulated on the basis of the density of states and a set

  4. Low frequency dielectric relaxation processes and ionic conductivity of montmorillonite clay nanoparticles colloidal suspension in poly(vinyl pyrrolidone−ethylene glycol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric dispersion behaviour of montmorillonite (MMT clay nanoparticles colloidal suspension in poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-ethylene glycol (PVP-EG blends were investigated over the frequency range 20 Hz to 1 MHz at 30°C. The 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 wt% MMT clay concentration of the weight of total solute (MMT+PVP were prepared in PVP-EG blends using EG as solvent. The complex relative dielectric function, alternating current (ac electrical conductivity, electric modulus and impedance spectra of these materials show the relaxation processes corresponding to the micro-Brownian motion of PVP chain, ion conduction and electrode polarization phenomena. The real part of ac conductivity spectra of these materials obeys Jonscher power law σ′(ω =σdc + Aωn in upper frequency end of the measurement, whereas dispersion in lower frequency end confirms the presence of electrode polarization effect. It was observed that the increase of clay concentration in the PVP-EG blends significantly increases the ac conductivity values, and simultaneously reduces the ionic conductivity relaxation time and electric double layer relaxation time, which suggests that PVP segmental dynamics and ionic motion are strongly coupled. The intercalation of EG structures in clay galleries and exfoliation of clay sheets by adsorption of PVP-EG structures on clay surfaces are discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding interactions between the hydroxyl group (–OH of EG molecules, carbonyl group (C=O of PVP monomer units, and the hydroxylated aluminate surfaces of the MMT clay particles. Results suggest that the colloidal suspension of MMT clay nano particles in the PVP-EG blends provide a convenient way to obtain an electrolyte solution with tailored electrical conduction properties.

  5. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p1500 ms (Expanded Disability Status Scale vs. lesion volume: rBHvis = 0.442 and rtotal-FLAIR = 0.497, p<0.05; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite vs. lesion volume: rBHvis = -0.53 and rtotal-FLAIR = -0.627, p<0.05). Clinical-radiological correlations in MS patients are

  6. ACTS T1-VSAT - The intelligent earth station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, John R.; Spiegler, Jeffrey D.; Lowry, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    The functional design of the software for NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) T1-VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal) is described. The design provides a flexible interface to allow customized control of a satellite network and to provide external processes with access to network capabilities without requiring modification to the network hardware or software. Some of the envisioned features are: automatic number location; dynamic reconfiguration of the number plan tables; security features of call priority, call preemption, and remote verification; automatic reconfiguration of least cost routing tables; circuit availability verification prior to call setup; audio and video conferencing; on demand broadband dial-up service; on demand dial-up broadband broadcast service; and ISDN. A brief review is also given of the ACTS satellite and network, the network management, and the ACTS T1-VSAT earth station.

  7. Sandpile model for relaxation in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, A.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Brouers, F.

    1997-10-01

    The relaxation in complex systems is, in general, nonexponential. After an initial rapid decay the system relaxes slowly following a long time tail. In the present paper a sandpile moderation of the relaxation in complex systems is analysed. Complexity is introduced by a process of avalanches in the Bethe lattice and a feedback mechanism which leads to slower decay with increasing time. In this way, some features of relaxation in complex systems: long time tails relaxation, aging, and fractal distribution of characteristic times, are obtained by simple computer simulations. (author)

  8. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the S0 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and of dinuclear manganese model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, L V; Lubitz, W; Messinger, J

    2005-07-05

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 was measured for the S0 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II and for two dinuclear manganese model complexes by pulse EPR using the inversion-recovery method. For [Mn(III)Mn(IV)(mu-O)2 bipy4]ClO4, the Raman relaxation process dominates at temperatures below 50 K. In contrast, Orbach type relaxation was found for [Mn(II)Mn(III)(mu-OH)(mu-piv)2(Me3 tacn)2](ClO4)2 between 4.3 and 9 K. For the latter complex, an energy separation of 24.7-28.0 cm(-1) between the ground and the first excited electronic state was determined. In the S0 state of photosystem II, the T1 relaxation times were measured in the range of 4.3-6.5 K. A comparison with the relaxation data (rate and pre-exponential factor) of the two model complexes and of the S2 state of photosystem II indicates that the Orbach relaxation process is dominant for the S0 state and that its first excited state lies 21.7 +/- 0.4 cm(-1) above its ground state. The results are discussed with respect to the structure of the OEC in photosystem II.

  9. Quantitative T1 and T2 mapping in recurrent glioblastomas under bevacizumab: earlier detection of tumor progression compared to conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescher, Stephanie; Jurcoane, Alina; Veit, Andreas [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Baehr, Oliver [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology, Dr. Senckenberg Institute of Neurooncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Deichmann, Ralf [Brain Imaging Center, Center for Imaging in Neuroscience, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hattingen, Elke [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hospital of University Bonn, Instiute of Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Treatment with the humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab in glioblastoma patients suppresses contrast enhancement via the reduction of vascular permeability, which does not necessarily indicate real reduction of tumor cell mass. Therefore, other imaging criteria are needed to recognize tumor growth under bevacizumab more reliably. It is still unknown, whether quantitative T1 mapping is useful to monitor the effects of anti-angiogenic therapy or to indicate a tumor progression earlier and more reliable compared to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. This raised the question whether quantitative T1 mapping is more suitable to monitor treatment effects of bevacizumab. Conventional and quantitative MRI was performed on six consecutive patients with recurrent glioblastoma before treatment with bevacizumab and every 8 weeks thereafter until further tumor progression. Quantitative T1 maps before and after intravenous application of contrast agent and quantitative T2 maps were performed to calculate serial differential maps and subtraction maps from one time point, subtracting contrast-enhanced T1 maps from non-contrast T1 maps. In five illustrative cases, tumor progression was documented earlier in differential T1 relaxation time (DiffT1) and T2 relaxation time (DiffT2) maps before changes in the conventional MRI studies were obvious. Four patients showed previous prolongation of T1 relaxation time in the DiffT1 maps, suggesting tumor progression, and subtraction maps revealed faint contrast enhancement matching with the areas of T1 prolongation. Our results emphasize that quantitative relaxation time mapping could be a promising method for tumor monitoring in glioblastoma patients under anti-angiogenic therapy. Quantitative T1 mapping seems to detect enhancing tumor earlier than conventional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. (orig.)

  10. Relaxation Pathways in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    At temperatures below the glass transition temperature, physical properties of metallic glasses, such as density, viscosity, electrical resistivity or enthalpy, slowly evolve with time. This is the process of physical aging that occurs among all types of glasses and leads to structural changes at the microscopic level. Even though the relaxation pathways are ruled by thermodynamics as the glass attempts to re-attain thermodynamic equilibrium, they are steered by sluggish kinetics at the microscopic level. Understanding the structural and dynamic pathways of the relaxing glassy state is still one of the grand challenges in materials physics. We review some of the recent experimental advances made in understanding the nature of the relaxation phenomenon in metallic glasses and its implications to the macroscopic and microscopic properties changes of the relaxing glass.

  11. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Erick

    characterization technique is comprised of three main components: experimental measurements, fitting of configurational length change, and description of glass behavior by analysis of fitting parameters. N-BK7 optical glass from Schott was used as the proof of concept glass but the main scientific interest was in three chalcogenide glasses: As40Se 60, As20Se80, and Ge17.9As19.7 Se62.4. The dilatometric experiments were carried out using a thermomechanical analyzer (TMA) on glass sample that were synthesized by the author, in all cases except N-BK7. Isothermal structural relaxation measurements were done on (12 mm tall x 3 mm x 3 mm) beams placed vertically in the TMA. The samples were equilibrated at a starting temperature (T 0) until structural equilibrium was reached then a temperature down step was initiated to the final temperature (T 1) and held isothermally until relaxation concluded. The configurational aspect of length relaxation, and therefore volume relaxation was extracted and fit with a Prony series. The Prony series parameters indicated a number of relaxation events occurring within the glass on timescales typically an order of magnitude apart in time. The data analysis showed as many as 4 discrete relaxation times at lower temperatures. The number of discrete relaxation decreased as the temperature increased until just one single relaxation was left in the temperature range just at or above Tg. In the case of N-BK7 these trends were utilized to construct a simple model that could be applied to glass manufacturing in the areas of annealing or PGM. A future development of a rather simple finite element model (FEM) would easily be able to use this model to predict the exponential-like, temperature and time dependent relaxation behaviors of the glass. The predictive model was not extended to the chalcogenide glass studied here, but could easily be applied to them in the future. The relaxation time trends versus temperature showed a definite region of transition between a

  12. Effect of structural relaxation of glassy PET on crystallization process observed by the simultaneous DSC-XRD and DSC-FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Kawai, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The effect of structural relaxation of the glassy poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) caused by annealing below its glass transition temperature (T g ) on the cold-crystallization observed was investigated by the simultaneous DSC-FTIR and DSC-XRD methods. The nucleation and the conformational ordering processes proceeded faster by annealing. From the relationship between the absorbance change and the exothermic heat during the cold-crystallization, the heat of cold-crystallization for the unannealed PET was caused mainly by the conformational ordering. For the annealed PET, the long range ordering contributed to the heat of crystallization in the late stage of cold-crystallization, which was also confirmed by the DSC-XRD method

  13. 55Mn nuclear spin relaxation and lifetime of magnons in MnF2 near the spin-flop transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, J.P.; King, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    A divergence in the nuclear relaxation rate (T 1 -1 ) of 55 Mn is observed in MnF 2 when the magnetic field approaches the field of the spin-flop transition (H=92.94Oe). The field dependence of T 1 -1 at 4.2 and 2K was studied together with its temperature dependence at 92.4 and 85 kOe. Near the transition, T 1 -1 is governed, below 8K, by the processes induced by the dipolar coupling and, above 8K, by those induced by exchange interactions. On the contrary, in weaker fields (H=85Oe), the only exchange induced processes are important [fr

  14. Postseismic relaxation process and lithospheric rheology inferred from eight years of postseismic deformation after the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B.; Burgmann, R.; Rui, X.; Wang, D.; Yu, J.; He, K.

    2017-12-01

    Current inferences of postseismic deformation mechanisms and lithospheric rheology in the eastern Tibetan Plateau strongly depend on spatial and temporal observations of postseismic transients following the 2008 Mw=7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. We processed regional continuously operating and survey-mode GPS data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China and Sichuan Continuous Operation Reference System. These data cover a broad region and time intervals of up to eight years. The determined amplitude of postseismic displacements show clear contrast between the Sichuan Basin and eastern Tibet. In addition to significant amounts of deformation in the region between the Longmen Shan and Longriba fault, reliable deformation transients are also visible in the far field, such as regions to the west of the Longriba fault and along the left-lateral Xianshuihe fault. In contrast, no more than 10 mm of postseismic transients are observed in the Sichuan Basin. Guided by previous studies, we conducted multiple-mechanism models of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. We first explored a series of forward viscoelastic relaxation models using a heterogeneous rheological earth structure, and then inverted corresponding afterslip distributions on the shallowly dipping detachment to explain the remaining residuals. Our preliminary results indicate the viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust and upper mantle dominantly contributed to the mid- and far-field observations, whereas afterslip below the coseismic asperities and on small patches near the surface can explain the near-field measurements. Time-dependent slip inversions illustrate that afterslip decays more rapidly on the shallow portions of the fault interface than on the shallowly dipping detachment. Relatively long-lived right-lateral afterslip is revealed in the north segment of the Beichuan fault, suggesting variations of frictional properties along strike of the fault zone. Our results also support previous

  15. Evaluation of MR imaging with T1 and T2* mapping for the determination of hepatic iron overload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, B.; Kremser, C.; Rauch, S.; Eder, R.; Schocke, M. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Zoller, H.; Finkenstedt, A. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Michaely, H.J. [Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate MRI using T1 and T2* mapping sequences in patients with suspected hepatic iron overload (HIO). Twenty-five consecutive patients with clinically suspected HIO were retrospectively studied. All underwent MRI and liver biopsy. For the quantification of liver T2* values we used a fat-saturated multi-echo gradient echo sequence with 12 echoes (TR = 200 ms, TE = 0.99 ms + n x 1.41 ms, flip angle 20 ). T1 values were obtained using a fast T1 mapping sequence based on an inversion recovery snapshot FLASH sequence. Parameter maps were analysed using regions of interest. ROC analysis calculated cut-off points at 10.07 ms and 15.47 ms for T2* in the determination of HIO with accuracy 88 %/88 %, sensitivity 84 %/89.5 % and specificity 100 %/83 %. MRI correctly classified 20 patients (80 %). All patients with HIO only had decreased T1 and T2* relaxation times. There was a significant difference in T1 between patients with HIO only and patients with HIO and steatohepatitis (P = 0.018). MRI-based T2* relaxation diagnoses HIO very accurately, even at low iron concentrations. Important additional information may be obtained by the combination of T1 and T2* mapping. It is a rapid, non-invasive, accurate and reproducible technique for validating the evidence of even low hepatic iron concentrations. (orig.)

  16. Alterations of the cerebellum and basal ganglia in bipolar disorder mood states detected by quantitative T1ρ mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Casey P; Christensen, Gary E; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Mani, Merry; Shaffer, Joseph J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Wemmie, John A

    2018-01-07

    Quantitative mapping of T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1ρ) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique sensitive to pH and other cellular and microstructural factors, and is a potentially valuable tool for identifying brain alterations in bipolar disorder. Recently, this technique identified differences in the cerebellum and cerebral white matter of euthymic patients vs healthy controls that were consistent with reduced pH in these regions, suggesting an underlying metabolic abnormality. The current study built upon this prior work to investigate brain T1ρ differences across euthymic, depressed, and manic mood states of bipolar disorder. Forty participants with bipolar I disorder and 29 healthy control participants matched for age and gender were enrolled. Participants with bipolar disorder were imaged in one or more mood states, yielding 27, 12, and 13 imaging sessions in euthymic, depressed, and manic mood states, respectively. Three-dimensional, whole-brain anatomical images and T1ρ maps were acquired for all participants, enabling voxel-wise evaluation of T1ρ differences between bipolar mood state and healthy control groups. All three mood state groups had increased T1ρ relaxation times in the cerebellum compared to the healthy control group. Additionally, the depressed and manic groups had reduced T1ρ relaxation times in and around the basal ganglia compared to the control and euthymic groups. The study implicated the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and its mood states, the roles of which are relatively unexplored. These findings motivate further investigation of the underlying cause of the abnormalities, and the potential role of altered metabolic activity in these regions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Proton NMR relaxation in hydrous melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, J.; Bacarella, A.L.; Benjamin, B.M.; Brown, L.L.; Girard, C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse and continuous wave NMR measurements are reported for protons in hydrous melts of calcium nitrate at temperatures between -4 and 120 0 C. Although measured in different temperature ranges, spin-lattice (T 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times appear to be nearly equal to each other and proportional to the self-diffusion coefficients of solute metal cations such as Cd 2+ . At temperatures near 50 0 C, mean Arrhenius coefficients Δ H/sub T 1 / (kcal/mol) are 7.9, 7.3, and 4.8, respectively, for melts containing 2.8, 4.0, and 8.0 moles of water per mole of calcium nitrate, compared to 4.6 kcal/mol for pure water. Temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -2.8 H 2 O between -4 and 120 0 C are non-Arrhenius and can be represented by a Fulcher-type equation with a ''zero mobility temperature'' (T 0 ) of 225 0 K, close to the value of T 0 for solute diffusion, electrical conductance and viscosity. Resolution of the relaxation rates into correlation times for intramolecular (rotational) and intermolecular (translational) diffusional motion is discussed in terms of the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound and more recent models for dipolar relaxation

  18. Under which conditions does T1 difficulty affect T2 performance in the attentional blink?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias

    When two visual targets (T1 & T2) are presented in rapid succession, performance of T2 suffers up to 900 ms. One theory of this attentional blink (Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992) propose that T1 and T2 compete for limited processing resources (Chun & Potter, 1995), and predict that prolonging...... exposure duration was the same as in the hard condition while T1 contrast was adjusted individually to reach the same performance on the T1 identification task as obtained in the long duration condition. Six observers completed 260 trials in each of the three conditions. We found a strong effect of T1-T2...... latency on performance in the T2 identification task in all conditions, replicating the finding of an attentional blink. However, we found no difference in the attentional blink between conditions. We conclude that increasing the perceptual difficulty of T1 either by decreasing T1 contrast or T1 exposure...

  19. Phonon-bottlenecked spin relaxation of Er3+:Y2SiO5 at sub-kelvin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoyo, Rangga P.; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Toida, Hiraku; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Munro, William J.; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro

    2018-04-01

    We report on electron spin relaxation measurements of Er3+ dopants in a Y2SiO5 crystal using an electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer based on a Josephson bifurcation amplifier. We observed the change in the induced flux as a function of time for two spin transitions (at different crystallographic sites) after an excitation microwave pulse or a change in the static magnetic field. Low-microwave-power measurements showed relaxation times of approximately 10 h at 20 mK, and 1/T 1 followed a T 2 dependence between 30 and 200 mK. We observed no difference in behavior between the two transitions. The microwave power and temperature dependences suggest that a phonon-bottleneck-like process limits relaxation.

  20. Proton relaxation relationships of human and animal tissues in vitro. Changes due to autolysis and fixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodd, W.; Schmitt, W.G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of measurements of proton relaxation times of various tissues from rats, pigs and humans are reported; these were obtained by a resonance spectroscope at 20 MHz and 40 0 C. There were specific differences in both relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) of the liver and spleen. There was a difference of more than 150 ms in the longitudinal relaxation time between grey and white cerebral tissue. Autolytic changes show an increase in both relaxation times. Fixation produced a reduction in T 1 only. The significance of these findings for NMR tomography is discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Cadmium-113 NMR spin-lattice relaxation and exchange kinetics in concanavalin A: A double saturation transfer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Yang, Ping P.; Palmert, Allen R.

    The field dependence of the 113Cd relaxation rate in cadmium-substituted Concanavalin A was investigated at three magnetic field strengths, 2.3, 4.7, and 9.4 T. Because of the anomalously large relaxation rate observed for the resonance corresponding to free cadmium in the system and our prior knowledge that cadmium is undergoing chemical exchange in this system, a detailed analysis was undertaken of the relaxation data obtained at 9.4 T to investigate the relative importance of chemical exchange dynamics upon the observed relaxation time constants. The differential equations for the resulting restricted three-site exchange network can be solved in closed form by employing a double saturation transfer experiment in conjunction with a saturation-recovery T1 experiment. The analysis of these data demonstrate that chemical exchange processes contribute 14, 75, and 20% to the observed relaxation time constants for the 113Cd resonances for the S1 site, free cadmium and the S2 site respectively. If the possibility of exchange contributions to the NOE were ignored, then the observed field dependence of T1 could not be discussed in terms of conventional single correlation time theories of relaxation. In this case the data could be discussed in terms of correlation times involving overall motion of the protein coupled with correlation times describing "internal motions." These internal motions may be the result of the formation of "abortive" complexes with exogenous ligands for those metalloproteins where the metal can be readily removed from the protein. However, for Con A, it is shown that the weak field dependence observed for the heteronuclear NOE is not due to internal motions, but rather to exchange processes.

  2. Relaxation of nuclear spin on holes in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gr'ncharova, E.I.; Perel', V.I.

    1977-01-01

    The longitudienal relaxation time T 1 of nuclear spins due to dipole-dipole interaction with holes in semiconductors is calculated. Expressions for T 1 in cubic and uniaxial semiconductors are obtained for non-degenerate and degenerate cases. On the basis of comparison with available experimental data for silicon the agreement with the theoretical results is obtained. It is demonstrated that in uniaxial semiconductors the time of relaxation on holes for a nuclear spin directed along the c axis is considerably greater than that for a spin in the normal direction

  3. Fast T1 and T2 mapping methods: the zoomed U-FLARE sequence compared with EPI and snapshot-FLASH for abdominal imaging at 11.7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Géraldine; Jiménez-González, María; Plaza-García, Sandra; Beraza, Marta; Reese, Torsten

    2017-06-01

    A newly adapted zoomed ultrafast low-angle RARE (U-FLARE) sequence is described for abdominal imaging applications at 11.7 Tesla and compared with the standard echo-plannar imaging (EPI) and snapshot fast low angle shot (FLASH) methods. Ultrafast EPI and snapshot-FLASH protocols were evaluated to determine relaxation times in phantoms and in the mouse kidney in vivo. Owing to their apparent shortcomings, imaging artefacts, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and variability in the determination of relaxation times, these methods are compared with the newly implemented zoomed U-FLARE sequence. Snapshot-FLASH has a lower SNR when compared with the zoomed U-FLARE sequence and EPI. The variability in the measurement of relaxation times is higher in the Look-Locker sequences than in inversion recovery experiments. Respectively, the average T1 and T2 values at 11.7 Tesla are as follows: kidney cortex, 1810 and 29 ms; kidney medulla, 2100 and 25 ms; subcutaneous tumour, 2365 and 28 ms. This study demonstrates that the zoomed U-FLARE sequence yields single-shot single-slice images with good anatomical resolution and high SNR at 11.7 Tesla. Thus, it offers a viable alternative to standard protocols for mapping very fast parameters, such as T1 and T2, or dynamic processes in vivo at high field.

  4. Design Consideration on the ACTS T1-VSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Richard D.; Robinson, Dennis D.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was developed by NASA as an experimental platform to demonstrate to industry the high risk technologies need for the next generation of communication satellites. The ACTS contains many state-of-the-art technologies including time division multiple accessing, adaptive error correction coding, multiple electronically steerable hopping beam antennas, spectrally efficient SMSK modulation, demand assignment multiple access protocol and on-board baseband circuit switching. An integral part of this testbed is the ACTS T1-very small aperture terminal (VSAT). The requirements imposed on the T1-VSAT demanded numerous design tradeoffs; balancing risk, cost, and implementation. Some of these considerations include: the method used for determining link quality, the development of a low cost and reliable Ka-band high power amplifier, the integration and testing environment for use in development and production and the low cost signal processing solution to high rate burst data. This paper discusses the tradeoffs considered in the selected implementation and the results obtained over the past two years of operation. Recommendations for improvements are also included.

  5. Bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia on T1-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seung Kug; Ahn, Woo Hyun; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Gi

    1994-01-01

    Bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images is unusual, the purpose of this study is to describe the pattern of high signal intensity and underlying disease. During the last three years, 8 patients showed bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted image, as compared with cerebral white matter. Authors analyzed the images and underlying causes retrospectively. Of 8 patients, 5 were male and 3 were female. The age ranged from 15 days to 79 years. All patient were examined by a 0.5T superconductive MRI. Images were obtained by spin echo multislice technique. Underlying causes were 4 cases of hepatopathy, 2 cases of calcium metabolism disorder, and one case each of neurofibromatosis and hypoxic brain injury. These process were bilateral in all cases and usually symmetric. In all cases the hyperintense areas were generally homogenous without mass effect or edema, although somewhat nodular appearance was seen in neurofibromatosis. Lesions were located in the globus pallidus and internal capsule in hepatopathy and neurofibromatosis, head of the caudate nucleus in disorder of calcum metabolism, and the globus pallidus in hypoxic brain injury. Although this study is limited by its patient population, bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia is associated with various disease entities. On analysis of hyperintense basal ganglia lesion, the knowledge of clinical information improved diagnostic accuracy

  6. Synthesis of Long-T1 Silicon Nanoparticles for Hyperpolarized 29Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Tonya M.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP. PMID:23350651

  7. A mixed relaxed clock model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  8. Quantitative assessment of hepatic function: modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence for T1 mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Munyoung [Siemens Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To determine whether multislice T1 mapping of the liver using a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a quantitative tool to estimate liver function and predict the presence of oesophageal or gastric varices. Phantoms filled with gadoxetic acid were scanned three times using MOLLI sequence to test repeatability. Patients with chronic liver disease or liver cirrhosis who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI including MOLLI sequence at 3 T were included (n = 343). Pre- and postcontrast T1 relaxation times of the liver (T1liver), changes between pre- and postcontrast T1liver (ΔT1liver), and adjusted postcontrast T1liver (postcontrast T1liver-T1spleen/T1spleen) were compared among Child-Pugh classes. In 62 patients who underwent endoscopy, all T1 parameters and spleen sizes were correlated with varices. Phantom study showed excellent repeatability of MOLLI sequence. As Child-Pugh scores increased, pre- and postcontrast T1liver were significantly prolonged (P < 0.001), and ΔT1liver and adjusted postcontrast T1liver decreased (P< 0.001). Adjusted postcontrast T1liver and spleen size were independently associated with varices (R{sup 2} = 0.29, P < 0.001). T1 mapping of the liver using MOLLI sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI demonstrated potential in quantitatively estimating liver function, and adjusted postcontrast T1liver was significantly associated with varices. (orig.)

  9. Regulatory and policy issues for T1DM immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The development of immunotherapies for T1DM has lagged the development T2DM drugs, but with more clarity around regulatory requirements, large pharmaceutical companies have recently entered the field to support late stage programs. This clarity around regulatory expectations has emerged because of the convergence among regulators and clinical experts in how efficacy of these therapies should be assessed. The key agreement is that the primary efficacy endpoint for treatments directed at the underlying autoimmune cause of T1DM should be endogenous insulin secretion as reflected by standardized C-peptide measurements. Important secondary endpoints include glycemic control, total daily insulin dose, and hypoglycemia rates. Most T1DM therapeutic development efforts are directed at new onset disease, which represents a small proportion of the entire T1DM population. A new frontier in T1DM therapeutic development is emerging around combination treatment of established T1DM, a population that far outnumbers those with new onset T1DM. Fully effective therapies of new onset or established T1DM will almost certainly require a combination of two or more therapies. A T1DM prevention vaccine will not be feasible until after extensive experience with the agent as a treatment of new onset and/or established T1DM.

  10. Molecular motions in thermotropic liquid crystals studied by NMR spin-lattice relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamar, R.C.; Gonzalez, C.E.; Mensio, O.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments with field cycling techniques proved to be a valuable tool for studying molecular motions in liquid crystals, allowing a very broad Larmor frequency variation, sufficient to separate the cooperative motions from the liquid like molecular diffusion. In new experiments combining NMR field cycling with the Jeener-Broekaert order-transfer pulse sequence, it is possible to measure the dipolar order relaxation time (T 1D ), in addition to the conventional Zeeman relaxation time (T 1Z ) in a frequency range of several decades. When applying this technique to nematic thermotropic liquid crystals, T 1D showed to depend almost exclusively on the order fluctuation of the director mechanism in the whole frequency range. This unique characteristic of T 1D makes dipolar order relaxation experiments specially useful for studying the frequency and temperature dependence of the spectral properties of the collective motions. (author)

  11. T1 VSAT Fade Compensation Statistical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra K.; Acosta, Roberto; Ugweje, Oke

    2000-01-01

    New satellite communication systems are steadily seeking to use higher frequency bands to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band. the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). launched in September 1993, is the first U.S. communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including on-board baseband processing. multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this paper is to characterize the method used by the ACTS TI Very Small Aperture Terminal (TI VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program was used to validate the compensation technique. A software process was developed and demonstrated to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka band system are offered.

  12. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  13. Low-Field NMR Spectrometry of Chalk and Argillaceous Sandstones: Rock-Fluid Affinity Assessed from T-1/T-2 Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Saidian, Milad; Prasad, Manika

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) procedure typically minimizes the effects of external magnetic field gradients on the transverse relaxation. Thus, longitudinal, and transverse, T-2, relaxation times should in principle be similar. However, internal magnetic field gradients related to minerals can....... In all samples with irreducible water saturation, water shows surface relaxation, whereas oil shows bulk relaxation. In line with this observation D-T-2 maps of these samples show field gradient effects in the oil, but not in the water indicating that the water is trapped between solid and oil due...... shorten T-2, as compared to provided the saturating fluid has high affinity to the solid. Consequently, the T-1/T-2 ratio should quantify the affinity between the mineral and wetting pore fluid, so we estimate wettability from logging data by comparing the T-1/T-2 ratio of oil and water peaks...

  14. Native T1 mapping of the heart - a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Philippe; El Ghannudi, Soraya; Jeung, Mi-Young; Ohlmann, Patrick; Epailly, Eric; Roy, Catherine; Gangi, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping is now a clinically feasible method, providing pixel-wise quantification of the cardiac structure's T1 values. Beyond focal lesions, well depicted by late gadolinium enhancement sequences, it has become possible to discriminate diffuse myocardial alterations, previously not assessable by noninvasive means. The strength of this method includes the high reproducibility and immediate clinical applicability, even without the use of contrast media injection (native or pre-contrast T1). The two most important determinants of native T1 augmentation are (1) edema related to tissue water increase (recent infarction or inflammation) and (2) interstitial space increase related to fibrosis (infarction scar, cardiomyopathy) or to amyloidosis. Conversely, lipid (Anderson-Fabry) or iron overload diseases are responsible for T1 reduction. In this pictorial review, the main features provided by native T1 mapping are discussed and illustrated, with a special focus on the awaited clinical purpose of this unique, promising new method.

  15. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, D.; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, J.; Mokhov, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation "sandwich method" (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 1017 cm-3 at T = 10-40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic "k1" and "k2" sites (Nk1,k2) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T9, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T1-1 for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal ("h") site (Nh) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (Tm-1) with the temperature increase for the Nh donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the Nk1,k2 donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time Tm for the Nk1,k2 donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at Nh and Nk1,k2 sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  16. Accelerating 3D-T1ρmapping of cartilage using compressed sensing with different sparse and low rank models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibetti, Marcelo V W; Sharafi, Azadeh; Otazo, Ricardo; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2018-02-25

    To evaluate the feasibility of using compressed sensing (CS) to accelerate 3D-T 1ρ mapping of cartilage and to reduce total scan times without degrading the estimation of T 1ρ relaxation times. Fully sampled 3D-T 1ρ datasets were retrospectively undersampled by factors 2-10. CS reconstruction using 12 different sparsifying transforms were compared, including finite differences, temporal and spatial wavelets, learned transforms using principal component analysis (PCA) and K-means singular value decomposition (K-SVD), explicit exponential models, low rank and low rank plus sparse models. Spatial filtering prior to T 1ρ parameter estimation was also tested. Synthetic phantom (n = 6) and in vivo human knee cartilage datasets (n = 7) were included. Most CS methods performed satisfactorily for an acceleration factor (AF) of 2, with relative T 1ρ error lower than 4.5%. Some sparsifying transforms, such as spatiotemporal finite difference (STFD), exponential dictionaries (EXP) and low rank combined with spatial finite difference (L+S SFD) significantly improved this performance, reaching average relative T 1ρ error below 6.5% on T 1ρ relaxation times with AF up to 10, when spatial filtering was used before T 1ρ fitting, at the expense of smoothing the T 1ρ maps. The STFD achieved 5.1% error at AF = 10 with spatial filtering prior to T 1ρ fitting. Accelerating 3D-T 1ρ mapping of cartilage with CS is feasible up to AF of 10 when using STFD, EXP or L+S SFD regularizers. These three best CS methods performed satisfactorily on synthetic phantom and in vivo knee cartilage for AFs up to 10, with T 1ρ error of 6.5%. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Implicit alcohol-relaxation associations in frequently drinking adolescents with high levels of neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemink, E; van Lier, P A C; Meeus, W; Raaijmakers, S F; Wiers, R W

    2015-06-01

    Most individuals start drinking during adolescence, a period in which automatically activated or implicit cognitive processes play an important role in drinking behavior. The aim of this study was to examine personality-related antecedents of implicit associations between alcohol and positive or negative reinforcement motives in adolescents. It was hypothesized that frequent alcohol consumption in combination with specific personality traits (neuroticism for negative reinforcement and extraversion for positive reinforcement) could predict specific implicit alcohol-relaxation and arousal associations. Participants completed a brief Big Five Questionnaire and alcohol use questions at T1. Approximately eight months later (T2), two Brief Implicit Association Tests were completed to assess alcohol-relaxation (negative reinforcement, n=222) and alcohol-arousal (positive reinforcement, n=248) associations. Results indicated that frequently drinking adolescents who scored high on neuroticism had the strongest alcohol-relaxation associations eight months later. No significant predictors were observed for alcohol-arousal associations. The current study identified precursors of strong implicit alcohol-relaxation associations (i.e., high levels of neuroticism in combination with frequent alcohol consumption) which can inform future prevention and intervention studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relaxation of Anisotropic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, Joachim; Martin, Birgit; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2004-01-01

    . When the load was removed at room temperature a permanent optical anisotropy (birefringence) was observed only perpendicular to cylinder axis and the pressure direction indicating complete elimination of thermal stresses. Relaxation of structural anisotropy was studied from reheating experiments using...... the energy release, thermo-mechanical and optical relaxation behaviour are drawn....

  19. Contribution of proton NMR relaxation to the investigation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada (UL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1699 Lisboa Cedex, Portugal. IST (UTL), Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal. *Author for correspondence. Abstract. We present in this work a review concerning wide frequency range T1 proton NMR relaxation studies performed in compounds ...

  20. Myocardial T1 mapping and determination of partition coefficients at 3 tesla: comparison between gadobenate dimeglumine and gadofosveset trisodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Souto Nacif

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare an albumin-bound gadolinium chelate (gadofosveset trisodium and an extracellular contrast agent (gadobenate dimeglumine, in terms of their effects on myocardial longitudinal (T1 relaxation time and partition coefficient. Materials and Methods: Study subjects underwent two imaging sessions for T1 mapping at 3 tesla with a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI pulse sequence to obtain one pre-contrast T1 map and two post-contrast T1 maps (mean 15 and 21 min, respectively. The partition coefficient was calculated as ΔR1myocardium /ΔR1blood , where R1 is 1/T1. Results: A total of 252 myocardial and blood pool T1 values were obtained in 21 healthy subjects. After gadolinium administration, the myocardial T1 was longer for gadofosveset than for gadobenate, the mean difference between the two contrast agents being −7.6 ± 60 ms (p = 0.41. The inverse was true for the blood pool T1, which was longer for gadobenate than for gadofosveset, the mean difference being 56.5 ± 67 ms (p < 0.001. The partition coefficient (λ was higher for gadobenate than gadofosveset (0.41 vs. 0.33, indicating slower blood pool washout for gadofosveset than for gadobenate. Conclusion: Myocardial T1 times did not differ significantly between gadobenate and gadofosveset. At typical clinical doses of the contrast agents, partition coefficients were significantly lower for the intravascular contrast agent than for the extravascular agent.

  1. Repeatability of magnetic resonance fingerprinting T1and T2estimates assessed using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Keenan, Kathryn E; Stupic, Karl F; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate accuracy and repeatability of T 1 and T 2 estimates of a MR fingerprinting (MRF) method using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom. The ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom contains multiple compartments with standardized T 1 , T 2 , and proton density values. Conventional inversion-recovery spin echo and spin echo methods were used to characterize the T 1 and T 2 values in the phantom. The phantom was scanned using the MRF-FISP method over 34 consecutive days. The mean T 1 and T 2 values were compared with the values from the spin echo methods. The repeatability was characterized as the coefficient of variation of the measurements over 34 days. T 1 and T 2 values from MRF-FISP over 34 days showed a strong linear correlation with the measurements from the spin echo methods (R 2  = 0.999 for T 1 ; R 2  = 0.996 for T 2 ). The MRF estimates over the wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values have less than 5% variation, except for the shortest T 2 relaxation times where the method still maintains less than 8% variation. MRF measurements of T 1 and T 2 are highly repeatable over time and across wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values. Magn Reson Med 78:1452-1457, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel; Wacker, Frank; Hartung, Dagmar [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Peperhove, Matti; Tewes, Susanne; Barrmeyer, Amelie [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Rong, Song [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zunyi Medical College, Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Zunyi (China); Gerstenberg, Jessica; Haller, Herman; Gueler, Faikah [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Mengel, Michael [University of Alberta, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Edmonton (Canada); Meier, Martin [Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Institute for Animal Science, Hannover (Germany); Chen, Rongjun [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zhejiang University, The Kidney Disease Center of the First Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  3. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel; Wacker, Frank; Hartung, Dagmar; Peperhove, Matti; Tewes, Susanne; Barrmeyer, Amelie; Rong, Song; Gerstenberg, Jessica; Haller, Herman; Gueler, Faikah; Mengel, Michael; Meier, Martin; Chen, Rongjun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  4. Enthalpy relaxation and annealing effect in polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    The effects of thermal history on the enthalpy relaxation in polystyrene are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of the specific heat in the liquid and the glassy states, that of relaxation time, and the exponent of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function are determined by measurements of the thermal response against sinusoidal temperature variation. A phenomenological model equation previously proposed to interpret the memory effect in the frozen state is applied to the enthalpy relaxation and the evolution of entropy under a given thermal history is calculated. The annealing below the glass transition temperature produces two effects on enthalpy relaxation: the decay of excess entropy with annealing time in the early stage of annealing and the increase in relaxation time due to physical aging in the later stage. The crossover of these effects is reflected in the variation of temperature of the maximum specific heat observed in the heating process after annealing and cooling.

  5. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...

  6. On resonance phase alternated CWFP sequences for rapid and simultaneous measurement of relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaretto, Tatiana; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Souza, Andre Alves; deAzevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2015-10-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation times have been frequently used as probes for physical-chemical properties in several time-domain NMR applications (TD-NMR) such as food, polymers and petroleum industries. T2 measurements are usually achieved using the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence because it is a fast and robust method. On the other hand, the traditional methods for determining T1, i.e., inversion and saturation recovery, are time-consuming, driving several authors to develop rapid 1D and 2D methods to obtain T1 and T2 or T1/T2 ratio. However, these methods usually require sophisticated processing and/or high signal to noise ratio (SNR). This led us to develop simple methods for rapid and simultaneous determination of T1 and T2 using Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) and Carr-Purcell Continuous Wave Free Precession (CP-CWFP) pulse sequences. Nevertheless, a drawback of these sequences is that they require specific adjustment of the frequency offset or the time interval between pulses (Tp). In this paper we present an alternative form of these sequences, named CWFPx-x, CP-CWFPx-x, where a train of π/2 pulses with phases alternated by π enable performing the experiments on-resonance and independently of Tp, when Tp type sequence with π/2 refocusing pulses shows similar results to CP-CWFP when the pulses are alternated between y and -y axis, CPMG90y-y. In these approaches, the relaxation times are determined using the magnitude of the signals after the first pulse |M0| and in the steady-state |Mss|, as well as the exponential time constant T∗ to reach the steady-state regime, as in conventional CWFP. CP-CWFPx-x shows the highest dynamic range to measure T∗ among CWFP sequences and, therefore, is the best technique to measure T1 and T2 since it is less susceptible to SNR and can be performed for any T1/T2 ratio.

  7. Relaxation parameter estimation and comparison of NLS and LLS methods for DCE MRI in the cervix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Christian; Kallehauge, Jesper; Tanderup, Kari

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI is a promising tool for tumor treatment planning. However, prior knowledge of the T1 value within each tumor voxel is needed to utilize this technique. Therefore, a T1 relaxation measurement is performed before the DCE experiment to establish a baseline, before...

  8. Relaxation of coupled nuclear spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigsberger, E.

    1985-05-01

    The subject of the present work is the relaxation behaviour of scalarly coupled spin-1/2 systems. In the theoretical part the semiclassical Redfield equations are used. Dipolar (D), Chemical Shift Anisotropy (CSA) and Random Field (RF) interactions are considered as relaxation mechanisms. Cross correlations of dipolar interactions of different nuclei pairs and those between the D and the CSA mechanisms are important. The model of anisotropic molecular rotational relaxation and the extreme narrowing approximation are used to obtain the spectral density functions. The longitudinal relaxation data are analyzed into normal modes following Werbelow and Grant. The time evolution of normal modes is derived for the AX system with D-CSA cross terms. In the experimental part the hypothesis of dimerization in the cinnamic acid and the methyl cinnamate - AMX systems with DD cross terms - is corroborated by T 1 -time measurements and a calculation of the diffusion constants. In pentachlorobenzene - an AX system - taking into account of D-CSA cross terms enables the complete determination of movements anosotropy and the determination of the sign of the indirect coupling constant 1 Jsub(CH). (G.Q.)

  9. Time course of NMR images and T1 values associated with hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inao, Suguru; Furuse, Masahiro; Saso, Katsuyoshi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Kaneoke, Yoshiki; Kamata, Noriko; Izawa, Akira

    1986-01-01

    The present study describes time courses in tissue T 1 values, as well as in NMR imagings, associated with hypertensive intracerebral hematoma (ICH). Non-operative 21 cases of ICH were examined by FONAR QED 80-α NMR system, which possessed dual modes of image display and focal T 1 measurement (static magnetic field : 433 gauss). As the first step of examination SSFP images are displayed and then, at the regions of interest, absolute values of T 1 are measured by field focusing technique. The extent of ICH was revealed as high density zone in NMR imaging, occasionally represented much wider extent of high density area than the finding on X-ray CT. Prolonged T 1 values were obtained from such high density zone. This widespread high density area was regarded to reflect the spread of perifocal brain edema. T 1 value of the hematoma itself was rather shortened in its initial phase within 2 weeks, thereafter followed by prolongation in the time lapse. This seemed to reflect the alterations in the properties of hematoma such as clot formation in earlier phase and resolution in later phase. On the contrary, T 1 in the brain tissue surrounded to hematoma was apparently prolonged in the early phase within 2 weeks, representing the maximal values of 312 msec arround 2 to 4 weeks after the onset, and then gradually normalized in the period over 1 month. This alteration in tissue T 1 likely represents the processes of edema formation and its regression in perifocal zone. T 1 values measured in perifocal region might be available for the evaluation of edema state in association with cerebrovascular accident. (author)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  11. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  12. Relaxation Techniques for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combined with guided imagery and breathing exercises. Self-Hypnosis In self-hypnosis programs, people are taught to produce the relaxation ... have shown that women who were taught self-hypnosis have a decreased need for pain medicine during ...

  13. Preoperative staging and treatment options in T1 rectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Endreseth, Birger H; Isaksen, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    with high-risk T1 cancers should be offered rectum resection, but old and comorbid patients with high-risk T1 cancers should be treated individually according to objective criteria as age, physical performance as well as patient's preference. All patients treated for cure with local resection or non......Background. Major rectal resection for T1 rectal cancer offers more than 95% cancer specific five-year survival to patients surviving the first 30 days after surgery. A significant further improvement by development of the surgical technique may not be possible. Improvements in the total survival....... Results. Local treatment of T1 cancers combined with close follow-up, early salvage surgery or later radical resection of local recurrences or with chemo-radiation may lead to fewer severe complications and comparable, or even better, long-term survival. Accurate preoperative staging and careful selection...

  14. T1 glottis radiotherapy: functional results and patients satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoury, F.; Nasr, E.; Nehme Nasr, D.; Ghorra, C.; Fares, G.; Tabchy, B.; Ghorra, C.; Haddad, A.

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective series confirms the efficiency of the radical radiotherapy for the T1 glottal cancers as well as its satisfying tolerance with a low toxicity; most of patients were satisfied of their voice quality. (N.C.)

  15. Breath-hold MR measurements of fat fraction, T1 , and T2 * of water and fat in vertebral bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ster, Caroline; Gambarota, Giulio; Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Guillin, Raphaël; Decaux, Olivier; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of measuring the fat fraction, T1 and T2 * relaxation times of water and fat signals in vertebral bone marrow using breath-hold magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gradient echo images of the spine. MRI experiments were performed at 1.5T on eight healthy volunteers (35.1 ± 15.7 years, five men and three women) using two sagittal four-echo 3D gradient echo volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE Dixon) sequences acquired at two different flip angles (5° and 15°). The water/fat decomposition was performed in the vertebral bodies of L1 to L5 by fitting the signal to a function that depends on the echo time and the flip angle to calculate the fat fraction (FF) and T1 and T2 * relaxation times of water and fat signals. Repeatability was assessed by scanning one volunteer six times. The mean fat fraction over L1 to L5 was 33 ± 8%. The mean T1 and T2 * of water and fat signals were respectively T1w = 701 ± 151 msec, T2 *w = 13.7 ± 2.9 msec, T1f = 334 ± 113 msec, and T2 *f = 11.4 ± 2.7 msec. When considering each vertebra separately, the fat fraction increased from L1 to L5 and the T1w decreased from L1 to L5. The mean coefficients of variation obtained from the repeatability study were 8% (FF), 11% (T1w ), 17% (T1f ), 8% (T2 *w ), and 27% (T2 *f ). The method introduced in the current study allows for the measurement of the fat fraction and water and fat relaxation times, with a total acquisition time of less than 40 seconds. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:549-555. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. The follow-up of progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using magnetic resonance rotating frame relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Arsalan; Laakso, Hanne; Laidinen, Svetlana; Kettunen, Sanna; Heikura, Tommi; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Liimatainen, Timo

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic resonance rotating frame relaxation times are an alternative non-contrast agent choice for the diagnosis of chronic myocardial infarct. Fibrosis typically occurs in progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Fibrosis has been imaged in myocardial infarcted tissue using rotating frame relaxation times, which provides the possibility to follow up progressive cardiomyopathy without contrast agents. Mild and severe left ventricular hypertrophy were induced in mice by transverse aortic constriction, and the longitudinal rotating frame relaxation times (T 1ρ ) and relaxation along the fictitious field (T RAFF2 , T RAFF3 ) were measured at 5, 10, 24, 62 and 89 days after transverse aortic constriction in vivo. Myocardial fibrosis was verified using Masson's trichrome staining. Increases in the relative relaxation time differences of T 1ρ , together with T RAFF2 and T RAFF3 , between fibrotic and remote tissues over time were observed. Furthermore, T RAFF2 and T RAFF3 showed higher relaxation times overall in fibrotic tissue than T 1ρ . Relaxation time differences were highly correlated with an excess of histologically verified fibrosis. We found that T RAFF2 and T RAFF3 are more sensitive than T 1ρ to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-related tissue changes and can serve as non-invasive diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging markers to follow up the mouse model of progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Relaxation and hypnosis in pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, B

    1996-01-01

    Relaxation and hypnosis are methods which, may solve the problem of extreme dental anxiety, when all other methods, behavioral or pharmacological may not be used. A simple definition of hypnosis is suggestion and repetition. Suggestion is the process whereby an individual accepts a proposition put to him by another, without having the slightest logical reason for doing so. Relaxation is one method of inducing hypnosis. A case of using hypnosis on an 11-year-old boy is described.

  18. Significance of focal relaxation times in head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inao, Suguru; Furuse, Masahiro; Saso, Katsuyoshi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Kaneoke, Yoshiki; Izawa, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Serial examinations by nuclear magnetic resonance-computed tomography were carried out in 35 head-injured patients aged 7 to 77 years. The injuries were classified as cerebral contusion (nine cases), acute epidural hematoma (eight cases), acute cerebral swelling (two cases), and chronic subdural hematoma (16 cases). The results of 92 measurements were divided into two groups: acute stage (within 3 days of injury) and chronic stage (2 weeks or longer after injury). The spin-lattice relaxation times (T 1 ) of brain tissue adjacent to chronic subdural hematoma were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. A Fonar QED 80-alpha system was used for magnetic resonance imaging and measurement of focal T 1 . The T 1 values at the region of interest were measured 3 to 5 times by the field focusing technique (468 gauss in the focused spot), and the mean value was used for evaluation. The standard T 1 values obtained from healthy subjects were 290 ± 41 msec in the cerebral cortex and 230 ± 34 msec in the white matter. Prolongation of T 1 in perifocal brain gradually shortened over time and normalized in the chronic stage. The degree of contusional edema may have been reflected in alterations in T 1 . In contrast, parenchymal injury resulted in a progressive T 1 elevation, which far exceeded 500 msec in the chronic stage. Such time courses of T 1 may indicate irreversible tissue damage. There were no noticeable changes in tissue T 1 over time in patients with acute diffuse cerebral swelling or those who underwent evacuation of acute epidural or chronic subdural hematomas. The underlying pathophysiology in such situations seems to be not brain edema but cerebral hyperemia. In the presence of ischemia, the T 1 value was prolonged in the early stage, reflecting progression of is chemic edema. Remarkable prolongation of T 1 - up to 1,000 msec in the chronic stage - appears to be attributable to post-traumatic degeneration of brain tissue. (author)

  19. Relaxation and exchange dynamics of hyperpolarized 129Xe in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J; Tozer, Gillian M; Wolber, Jan; Wild, Jim M

    2015-08-01

    (129) Xe-blood NMR was performed over the full blood oxygenation range to evaluate (129) Xe relaxation and exchange dynamics in human blood. Hyperpolarized (129) Xe was equilibrated with blood and isolated plasma, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T. The (129) Xe relaxation rate was found to increase nonlinearly with decreasing blood oxygenation. Three constants were extrapolated: rsO2 =  11.1, a "relaxivity index" characterizing the rate of change of (129) Xe relaxation as a function of blood oxygenation, and 1/T1oHb  =  0.13 s(-1) and 1/T1dHb = 0.42 s(-1) , the (129) Xe relaxation rates in oxygenated blood and deoxygenated blood, respectively. In addition, rate constants, ka =  0.022 ms(-1) and kb =  0.062 ms(-1) , were determined for xenon diffusing between red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma (hematocrit  =  48%). The (129) Xe-O2 relaxivity in plasma, rO2 = 0.075 s(-1) mM(-1) , and the (129) Xe relaxation rate in isolated plasma (without dissolved O2 ), 1/T1,b0 = 0.046 s(-1) , were also calculated. Finally, intrinsic (129) Xe-RBC relaxation rates, 1/T1,aoHb = 0.19 s(-1) and 1/T1,adHb = 0.84 s(-1) , in oxygenated blood and deoxygenated blood, respectively, were calculated. The relaxation and exchange analysis performed in this study should provide a sound experimental basis upon which to design future MR experiments for dissolved xenon transport from the lungs to distal tissues. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Local T1-T2distribution measurements in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashaee, S; Li, M; Newling, B; MacMillan, B; Marica, F; Kwak, H T; Gao, J; Al-Harbi, A M; Balcom, B J

    2018-02-01

    A novel slice-selective T 1 -T 2 measurement is proposed to measure spatially resolved T 1 -T 2 distributions. An adiabatic inversion pulse is employed for slice-selection. The slice-selective pulse is able to select a quasi-rectangular slice, on the order of 1 mm, at an arbitrary position within the sample.The method does not employ conventional selective excitation in which selective excitation is often accomplished by rotation of the longitudinal magnetization in the slice of interest into the transverse plane, but rather a subtraction based on CPMG data acquired with and without adiabatic inversion slice selection. T 1 weighting is introduced during recovery from the inversion associated with slice selection. The local T 1 -T 2 distributions measured are of similar quality to bulk T 1 -T 2 measurements. The new method can be employed to characterize oil-water mixtures and other fluids in porous media. The method is beneficial when a coarse spatial distribution of the components is of interest. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fast relaxational motions in polycarbonate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saviot, L.; Duval, E.; Jal, J.F.; Dianoux, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Inelastic neutron scattering from amorphous bis-phenol A polycarbonate was observed as a function of temperature from 15 K to 390 K (Tg = 420 K). The deduced mean square displacement and the vibrational density of states show that relaxational motions exist down to a temperature of 80 K. The relaxational scattering function, S(Q,t), can be described by two different regimes of relaxation: (1) a Debye-like process, with a characteristic time close to 1 ps, which is very weakly thermally activated; (2) a much slower process, which is thermally activated. The contribution of the fastest relaxation is related to the dynamical hole volume measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, as already observed for the poly(methyl methacrylate) glass [1]. The dependence of the momentum transfer will be considered in order to obtain informations on the localization or diffusivity of the oberved different relaxations. This study of relaxation in a polymeric glass will be compared with a previous work [2]. (author)

  2. Relaxation in magnetic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, M.A.; Folly, W.S.D.; Sinnecker, J.P.; Soriano, S.

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured magnetic materials present a wide range of magnetic relaxation phenomena. One problem in studying nanomagnetic granular materials is the strong dependence of the relaxation with the anisotropy barrier which, even for systems with narrow size distributions, brings difficulties in the analysis of the experimental data. Molecular magnetism, with the chemists' bottom-up approach to build molecular nanostructures, provides this field with some beautiful model systems, well ordered crystals of single molecule magnets, single molecule chains, molecular magnetic multilayers and others novelties to appear. Most of these systems present slow relaxation and the study of these well-characterized nanomaterials may elucidate many features that are difficult to grasp in the non molecular materials

  3. Decoupling multimode vibrational relaxations in multi-component gas mixtures: Analysis of sound relaxational absorption spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke-Sheng; Wang Shu; Zhu Ming; Ding Yi; Hu Yi

    2013-01-01

    Decoupling the complicated vibrational—vibrational (V—V) coupling of a multimode vibrational relaxation remains a challenge for analyzing the sound relaxational absorption in multi-component gas mixtures. In our previous work [Acta Phys. Sin. 61 174301 (2012)], an analytical model to predict the sound absorption from vibrational relaxation in a gas medium is proposed. In this paper, we develop the model to decouple the V—V coupled energy to each vibrational—translational deexcitation path, and analyze how the multimode relaxations form the peaks of sound absorption spectra in gas mixtures. We prove that a multimode relaxation is the sum of its decoupled single-relaxation processes, and only the decoupled process with a significant isochoric-molar-heat can be observed as an absorption peak. The decoupling model clarifies the essential processes behind the peaks in spectra arising from the multimode relaxations in multi-component gas mixtures. The simulation validates the proposed decoupling model. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Magneto-dependent stress relaxation of magnetorheological gels

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yangguang

    2017-09-01

    The stress relaxation behaviors of magnetorheological (MR) gels under stepwise shear loading are systematically investigated. The particle-enhanced effect, the magneto-induced effect, and the temperature-enhanced effect on the stress relaxation of MR gels are discussed. For further analysis of the magneto-induced stress relaxation mechanism in MR gels, a phenomenological model is established to describe the stress relaxation behavior of the matrix and the magnetic particle chains. All characteristic parameters introduced in the model, i.e. relaxation time, instantaneous modulus, and stable modulus, have well-defined physical meanings and are fitted based on the experimental results. The influence of each parameter on the macroscopic response is discussed and it is found that the relaxation stress induced by the magneto-mechanical coupling effect plays an important role in the stress relaxation process of MR gels.

  5. The efficacy of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging of the lumbar spine in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saruhashi, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masanobu; Kawasaki, Taku; Ushiyama, Toshio; Takahashi, Shinobu; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Hukuda, Sinsuke

    2004-01-01

    We investigated MR imaging of the lumbar spine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, including T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging in 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 23 controls. Lesions were found at spinous processes, facet joints, spinal bodies, end plates, and the limbus of spinal bodies. At least one lesion was found in 18 patients, and notably, 70% of patients had lesions in the spinous process and 75% of patients in the facet joints. The fat-suppression contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR was very useful in lumbar lesions in RA patients. (author)

  6. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use ε-expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when t → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and when t → ∞ the model exhibits a power-law decay. By analysing the frequency ...

  7. Anti-cytokine therapies in T1D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nepom, Gerald T; Ehlers, Mario; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of proinflammatory cytokines is clinically beneficial in several autoimmune disorders. Several of these cytokines are directly implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, suggesting opportunities for design of clinical trials in type 1 diabetes that incorporate select...... suitable for modulating the immune response in T1D....

  8. Influence of silver nanoparticles on relaxation processes and efficiency of dipole – dipole energy transfer between dye molecules in polymethylmethacrylate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryukhanov, V V; Borkunov, R Yu; Tsarkov, M V [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Konstantinova, E I; Slezhkin, V A [Kaliningrad State Technical University, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    The fluorescence and phosphorescence of dyes in thin polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films in the presence of ablated silver nanoparticles has been investigated in a wide temperature range by methods of femtosecond and picosecond laser photoexcitation. The fluorescence and phosphorescence times, as well as spectral and kinetic characteristics of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules in PMMA films are measured in a temperature range of 80 – 330 K. The temperature quenching activation energy of the fluorescence of R6G molecules in the presence of ablated silver nanoparticles is found. The vibrational relaxation rate of R6G in PMMA films is estimated, the efficiency of the dipole – dipole electron energy transfer between R6G and brilliant green molecules (enhanced by plasmonic interaction with ablated silver nanoparticles) is analysed, and the constants of this energy transfer are determined. (nanophotonics)

  9. Influence of silver nanoparticles on relaxation processes and efficiency of dipole – dipole energy transfer between dye molecules in polymethylmethacrylate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryukhanov, V V; Borkunov, R Yu; Tsarkov, M V; Konstantinova, E I; Slezhkin, V A

    2015-01-01

    The fluorescence and phosphorescence of dyes in thin polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films in the presence of ablated silver nanoparticles has been investigated in a wide temperature range by methods of femtosecond and picosecond laser photoexcitation. The fluorescence and phosphorescence times, as well as spectral and kinetic characteristics of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules in PMMA films are measured in a temperature range of 80 – 330 K. The temperature quenching activation energy of the fluorescence of R6G molecules in the presence of ablated silver nanoparticles is found. The vibrational relaxation rate of R6G in PMMA films is estimated, the efficiency of the dipole – dipole electron energy transfer between R6G and brilliant green molecules (enhanced by plasmonic interaction with ablated silver nanoparticles) is analysed, and the constants of this energy transfer are determined. (nanophotonics)

  10. Whole brain myelin mapping using T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advancements in MR imaging, non-invasive mapping of myelin in the brain still remains an open issue. Here we attempted to provide a potential solution. Specifically, we developed a processing workflow based on T1-w and T2-w MR data to generate an optimized myelin enhanced contrast image. The workflow allows whole brain mapping using the T1-w/T2-w technique, which was originally introduced as a non-invasive method for assessing cortical myelin content. The hallmark of our approach is a retrospective calibration algorithm, applied to bias-corrected T1-w and T2-w images, that relies on image intensities outside the brain. This permits standardizing the intensity histogram of the ratio image, thereby allowing for across-subject statistical analyses. Quantitative comparisons of image histograms within and across different datasets confirmed the effectiveness of our normalization procedure. Not only did the calibrated T1-w/T2-w images exhibit a comparable intensity range, but also the shape of the intensity histograms was largely corresponding. We also assessed the reliability and specificity of the ratio image compared to other MR-based techniques, such as magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), fractional anisotropy (FA), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). With respect to these other techniques, T1-w/T2-w had consistently high values, as well as low inter-subject variability, in brain structures where myelin is most abundant. Overall, our results suggested that the T1-w/T2-w technique may be a valid tool supporting the non-invasive mapping of myelin in the brain. Therefore, it might find important applications in the study of brain development, aging and disease.

  11. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation times of colon cancer metastases in rat liver at 7 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambarota, G.; Veltien, A.; van Laarhoven, H.; Philippens, M.; Jonker, A.; Mook, O. R.; Frederiks, W. M.; Heerschap, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of colon cancer metastases in rat liver at 7 T. A dedicated RF microstrip coil of novel design was built in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and, in combination with respiratory triggering,

  12. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media.

  13. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  14. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  15. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b = Wn/(2We), preserves...... of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14N-relaxation: T1 n = 1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted...... the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in 14N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis...

  16. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  17. Gradient echo single scan inversion recovery: application to proton and fluorine relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, KowsalyaDevi; Ramanathan, K V

    2016-02-01

    Single scan longitudinal relaxation measurement experiments enable rapid estimation of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 ) as the time series of spin relaxation is encoded spatially in the sample at different slices resulting in an order of magnitude saving in time. We consider here a single scan inversion recovery pulse sequence that incorporates a gradient echo sequence. The proposed pulse sequence provides spectra with significantly enhanced signal to noise ratio leading to an accurate estimation of T1 values. The method is applicable for measuring a range of T1 values, thus indicating the possibility of routine use of the method for several systems. A comparative study of different single scan methods currently available is presented, and the advantage of the proposed sequence is highlighted. The possibility of the use of the method for the study of cross-correlation effects for the case of fluorine in a single shot is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Measuring the longitudinal relaxation time of GABA in vivo at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, Nicolaas A J; Barker, Peter B; Edden, Richard A E

    2013-04-01

    To measure the in vivo longitudinal relaxation time T1 of GABA at 3 Tesla (T). J-difference edited single-voxel MR spectroscopy was used to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signals. An increased echo time (80 ms) acquisition was used, accommodating the longer, more selective editing pulses required for symmetric editing-based suppression of co-edited macromolecular signal. Acquiring edited GABA measurements at a range of relaxation times in 10 healthy participants, a saturation-recovery equation was used to model the integrated data. The longitudinal relaxation time of GABA was measured as T(1,GABA) = 1.31 ± 0.16 s. The method described has been successfully applied to measure the T1 of GABA in vivo at 3T. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Relaxation from particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a “Relaxion” solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  20. Momentum constraint relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Full relativistic simulations in three dimensions invariably develop runaway modes that grow exponentially and are accompanied by violations of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Recently, we introduced a numerical method (Hamiltonian relaxation) that greatly reduces the Hamiltonian constraint violation and helps improve the quality of the numerical model. We present here a method that controls the violation of the momentum constraint. The method is based on the addition of a longitudinal component to the traceless extrinsic curvature A ij -tilde, generated by a vector potential w i , as outlined by York. The components of w i are relaxed to solve approximately the momentum constraint equations, slowly pushing the evolution towards the space of solutions of the constraint equations. We test this method with simulations of binary neutron stars in circular orbits and show that it effectively controls the growth of the aforementioned violations. We also show that a full numerical enforcement of the constraints, as opposed to the gentle correction of the momentum relaxation scheme, results in the development of instabilities that stop the runs shortly

  1. Conformation Analysis of T1 Lipase on Alcohols Solvent using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. M.; Sumaryada, T.; Wahyudi, S. T.

    2017-07-01

    Biodiesel usually is produced commercially via a transesterification reaction of vegetable oil with alcohol and alkali catalyst. The alkali catalyst has some drawbacks, such as the soap formation during the reaction. T1 Lipase enzyme had been known as a thermostable biocatalyst which is able to produce biodiesel through a cleaner process. In this paper the performance of T1 lipase enzyme as catalyst for transesterification reaction in pure ethanol, methanol, and water solvents were studied using a Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation at temperature of 300 K for 10 nanoseconds. The results have shown that in general the conformation of T1 lipase enzyme in methanol is more dynamics as shown by the value of root mean square deviation (RMSD), root mean squared fluctuation (RMSF), and radius of gyration. The highest solvent accessible surface area (SASA) total was also found in methanol due to the contribution of non-polar amino acid in the interior of the protein. Analysis of MD simulation has also revealed that the enzyme structure tend to be more rigid in ethanol environment. The analysis of electrostatic interactions have shown that Glu359-Arg270 salt-bridge pair might hold the key of thermostability of T1 lipase enzyme as shown by its strong and stable binding in all three solvents.

  2. Low-field cross spin relaxation of L8i in superconducting NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. D.; Salman, Z.; Wang, D.; Chow, K. H.; Kreitzman, S.; Keeler, T. A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Miller, R. I.; Morris, G. D.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M.; Saadaoui, H.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    A low energy beam of spin polarized L8i has been used to investigate nuclear spin relaxation in the multiband superconductor NbSe2 . In low magnetic fields there is significant cross relaxation between the L8i and the host N93b spins, which is driven by low frequency fluctuations in the nuclear magnetic dipolar interaction. The rate of cross relaxation is strongly field dependent and thus the 1/T1 spin relaxation rate of the L8i is a sensitive monitor of the static local magnetic field B just below the surface. This in turn is used to determine the absolute value of the magnetic penetration depth λ in the Meissner state. The temperature variations in 1/T1 and λ are consistent with a wide distribution of superconducting gaps expected for a multiband superconductor.

  3. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  4. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  5. Spin relaxation of iron in mixed state hemoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajnberg, E.; Kalinowski, H.J.; Bemski, G.; Helman, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    In pure states hemoproteins the relaxation of iron depends on its spin state. It is found that in both mixed state met-hemoglobin and met-myoglobin, the low and high spin states relax through an Orbach-like process. Also, very short (approx. 1 ns) and temperature independent transverse relaxation times T 2 were estimated. This peculiar behaviour of the relaxation may result from the unusual electronic structure of mixed state hemoproteins that allows thermal equilibrium and interconversion of the spin states. (Author) [pt

  6. Simulation study of stepwise relaxation in a spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Uchida, Masaya; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1991-10-01

    The energy relaxation process of a spheromak plasma in a flux conserver is investigated by means of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation. The resistive decay of an initial force-free profile brings the spheromak plasma to an m = 1/n = 2 ideal kink unstable region. It is found that the energy relaxation takes place in two steps; namely, the relaxation consists of two physically distinguished phases, and there exists an intermediate phase in between, during which the relaxation becomes inactive temporarily. The first relaxation corresponds to the transition from an axially symmetric force-free state to a helically symmetric one with an n = 2 crescent magnetic island structure via the helical kink instability. The n = 2 helical structure is nonlinearly sustained in the intermediate phase. The helical twisting of the flux tube creates a reconnection current in the vicinity of the geometrical axis. The second relaxation is triggered by the rapid growth of the n = 1 mode when the reconnection current exceeds a critical value. The helical twisting relaxes through magnetic reconnection toward an axially symmetric force-free state. It is also found that the poloidal flux reduces during the helical twisting in the first relaxation and the generation of the toroidal flux occurs through the magnetic reconnection process in the second relaxation. (author)

  7. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  8. Point defect relaxation in irraddiated B.C.C. metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements in the preparation of samples has led to substantial progress in the field of point defect relaxation processes in b.c.c. irradiated metals. The recent well established experimental phenomena and current interpretations are reviewed, with a special emphasis on iron, which allows simultaneous study of anelastic and magnetic relaxations

  9. Variational formulation of relaxed and multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, R. L.; Yoshida, Z.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hudson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    > Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor relaxation model for formation of macroscopically self-organized plasma equilibrium states, all these constraints are relaxed save for the global magnetic fluxes and helicity. A Lagrangian variational principle is presented that leads to a new, fully dynamical, relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (RxMHD), such that all static solutions are Taylor states but also allows state with flow. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) is developed.

  10. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol.

  11. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    OpenAIRE

    Minutoli, S; Lo Vetere, M; Robutti, E

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast c...

  12. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutoli, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast command. The ROC also provides a spy mezzanine connection based on programmable FPGA and USB2.0 for laboratory and portable DAQ debugging system.

  13. RETRACTED: Relationship between the ACE I/D gene polymorphism and T1DN susceptibility/risk of T1DM developing into T1DN in the Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Guo, Xue-Feng; Jiang, Zongpei; Li, Hong-Yan

    2015-12-01

    The following article has been included in a multiple retraction: Tian-Biao Zhou, Xue-Feng Guo, Zongpei Jiang, and Hong-Yan Li Relationship between the ACE I/D gene polymorphism and T1DN susceptibility/risk of T1DM developing into T1DN in the Caucasian population Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563425, first published on February 1, 2015 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563425 This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors and the Publisher. After conducting a thorough investigation, SAGE found that the submitting authors of a number of papers published in the Journal of the Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System ( JRAAS) (listed below) had supplied fabricated contact details for their nominated reviewers. The Editors accepted these papers based on the reports supplied by the individuals using these fake reviewer email accounts. After concluding that the peer review process was therefore seriously compromised, SAGE and the journal Editors have decided to retract all affected articles. Online First articles (these articles will not be published in an issue) Wenzhuang Tang, Tian-Biao Zhou, and Zongpei Jiang Association of the angiotensinogen M235T gene polymorphism with risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563426, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563426 Tian-Biao Zhou, Hong-Yan Li, Zong-Pei Jiang, Jia-Fan Zhou, Miao-Fang Huang, and Zhi-Yang Zhou Role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in radiation nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563424, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563424 Weiqiang Zhong, Zongpei Jiang, and Tian-Biao Zhou Association between the ACE I/D gene polymorphism and T2DN susceptibility: The risk of T2DM developing into T2DN in the Asian population Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314566019, first published on January

  14. Determination of the magnetic impurities contribution to the nuclear relaxation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The renormalization group techniques developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem are applied, for the first time, to the calculation of nuclear spin relaxation rates in dilute magnetic alloys. A procedure that calculates the longitudinal relaxation time T 1 over the entire temperature range 0 B T 1 is derived; for distances R between the impurity and the nucleus large compared to the inverse Fermi momentum H f , the result is identical to Korringa's expression for the nuclear spin relaxation rate in the pure metal. For smaller k F R, T 1 increases and becomes infinite as k F R→0. A numerical approach, capable of calculating T 1 at finite temperatures, is presented and tested by calculating T 1 for T→0; the numerical results are in excellent agreement with the analytical expression discussed above. Only for k F R→ infinity do the results for T 1 at T=0 agree with those found by Roshen and Saam, who recently analysed this problem in the light of Nozieres's Fermi liquid theory. The reasons for the discrepancy for finite k F R are discussed. (author) [pt

  15. Dynamics of relaxed inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangarife, Walter; Tobioka, Kohsaku; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Volansky, Tomer

    2018-02-01

    The cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale has been proposed as a mechanism to address the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. A field, the relaxion, rolls down its potential and, in doing so, scans the squared mass parameter of the Higgs, relaxing it to a parametrically small value. In this work, we promote the relaxion to an inflaton. We couple it to Abelian gauge bosons, thereby introducing the necessary dissipation mechanism which slows down the field in the last stages. We describe a novel reheating mechanism, which relies on the gauge-boson production leading to strong electro-magnetic fields, and proceeds via the vacuum production of electron-positron pairs through the Schwinger effect. We refer to this mechanism as Schwinger reheating. We discuss the cosmological dynamics of the model and the phenomenological constraints from CMB and other experiments. We find that a cutoff close to the Planck scale may be achieved. In its minimal form, the model does not generate sufficient curvature perturbations and additional ingredients, such as a curvaton field, are needed.

  16. Value of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging T1-relaxometry in predicting contrast-enhancement in glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingen, Elke; Müller, Andreas; Jurcoane, Alina; Mädler, Burkhard; Ditter, Philip; Schild, Hans; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Glas, Martin; Kebir, Sied

    2017-08-08

    The repetitive usage of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) is critical for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of tumor burden in glioblastoma patients. It is also a crucial tool for determination of radiographical response to treatment. GBCA injection, however, comes with a 2.4% rate of adverse events including life-threatening conditions such as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Moreover, GBCA have been shown to be deposited in brain tissue of patients even with an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). The present study explores quantitative T1 relaxometry as an alternative non-invasive imaging technique detection of tumor burden and determination of radiographical response. This technique exploits specific properties of brain tissue with impaired BBB. With a sensitivity and specificity as high as 86% and 80%, respectively, quantitative T1-relaxometry allows for detecting contrast-enhancing areas without the use of GBCA. This method could make it unnecessary to subject patients to the risk of adverse events associated with the use of GBCA. Nonetheless, a large-scale analysis is needed to confirm our findings. Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) are crucial for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based evaluation of tumor burden in glioblastoma (GBM). Serious adverse events of GBCA, even though uncommon, and gadolinium deposition in brain tissue could be avoided by novel imaging techniques not requiring GBCA. Altered tissue composition in areas with impaired blood-brain-barrier also alters the quantified T1 relaxation time (qT1), so that qT1 analysis could replace GBCA-based MRI for the analysis of tumor burden and response. As a part of a prospective pilot MRI-relaxometry trial, patients with newly-diagnosed GBM who relapsed under standard radiochemotherapy were selected for this study. At recurrence, subtraction of qT1 maps pre and post-GBCA application (ΔqT1 maps) was used to determine areas of contrast-enhancement. With the contrast

  17. DNA-gadolinium-gold nanoparticles for in vivo T1 MR imaging of transplanted human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Francesca J; Rotz, Matthew W; Ghuman, Harmanvir; MacRenaris, Keith W; Meade, Thomas J; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The unambiguous imaging of transplanted cells remains a major challenge to understand their biological function and therapeutic efficacy. In vivo imaging of implanted cells is reliant on tagging these to differentiate them from host tissue, such as the brain. We here characterize a gold nanoparticle conjugate that is functionalized with modified deoxythymidine oligonucleotides bearing Gd(III) chelates and a red fluorescent Cy3 moiety to visualize in vivo transplanted human neural stem cells. This DNA-Gd@Au nanoparticle (DNA-Gd@AuNP) exhibits an improved T1 relaxivity and excellent cell uptake. No significant effects of cell uptake have been found on essential cell functions. Although T1 relaxivity is attenuated within cells, it is sufficiently preserved to afford the in vivo detection of transplanted cells using an optimized voxel size. In vivo MR images were corroborated by a post-mortem histological verification of DNA-Gd@AuNPs in transplanted cells. With 70% of cells being correctly identified using the DNA-Gd-AuNPs indicates an overall reliable detection. Less than 1% of cells were false positive for DNA-Gd@AuNPs, but a significant number of 30% false negatives reveals a dramatic underestimation of transplanted cells using this approach. DNA-Gd@AuNPs therefore offer new opportunities to visualize transplanted cells unequivocally using T1 contrast and use cellular MRI as a tool to derive biologically relevant information that allows us to understand how the survival and location of implanted cells determines therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  19. ABC relaxation theory and the factor structure of relaxation states, recalled relaxation activities, dispositions, and motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J C; Wedell, A B; Kolotylo, C J; Lewis, J E; Byers, K Y; Segin, C M

    2000-06-01

    ABC Relaxation Theory proposes 15 psychological relaxation-related states (R-States): Sleepiness, Disengagement, Physical Relaxation, Mental Quiet, Rested/Refreshed, At Ease/At Peace, Energized, Aware, Joy, Thankfulness and Love, Prayerfulness, Childlike Innocence, Awe and Wonder, Mystery, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. The present study summarizes the results of 13 separate factor analyses of immediate relaxation-related states, states associated with recalled relaxation activities, relaxation dispositions, and relaxation motivations on a combined sample of 1,904 individuals (group average ages ranged from 28-40 yr.). Four exploratory factor analyses of Smith Relaxation Inventories yielded 15 items that most consistently and exclusively load (generally at least .70) on six replicated factors. These items included happy, joyful, energized, rested, at peace, warm, limp, silent, quiet, dozing, drowsy, prayerful, mystery, distant, and indifferent. Subsequent factor analyses restricted to these items and specifying six factors were performed on 13 different data sets. Each yielded the same six-factor solution: Factor 1: Centered Positive Affect, Factor 2: Sleepiness, Factor 3: Disengagement, Factor 4: Physical Relaxation, Factor 5: Mental Quiet, and Factor 6: Spiritual. Implications for ABC Relaxation Theory are discussed.

  20. Nuclear paramagnetic spin relaxation theory. Paramagnetic spin probes in homogeneous and micro-heterogeneous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westlund, P.O.

    1994-01-01

    Specific mechanisms of relaxation encountered in paramagnetic systems are described: the T1-NMRD curve and the paramagnetically enhanced nuclear spin relaxation (PER) are first discussed and a general theory of PER is proposed (nuclear paramagnetic spin relaxation theory, lattice operators, decomposition approximation, general expression of dipolar correlation functions for slow tumbling complexes, low-field approach). Numerically calculated NMRD curves are described (reorientation model, pseudo-rotation models, vibration models). Experimental studies are then analyzed: NMRD studies of paramagnetic species in an aqueous system, paramagnetic hydrated metal ions in poly-electrolytes and biochemical systems, lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, polymer solutions. 19 fig., 60 ref

  1. Relaxation and Dephasing in a Two-Electron 13C Nanotube Double Quantum Dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchill, H O H; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Harlow, J W

    2009-01-01

    We use charge sensing of Pauli blockade (including spin and isospin) in a two-electron 13C nanotube double quantum dot to measure relaxation and dephasing times. The relaxation time T1 first decreases with a parallel magnetic field and then goes through a minimum in a field of 1.4 T. We attribute...... both results to the spin-orbit-modified electronic spectrum of carbon nanotubes, which at high field enhances relaxation due to bending-mode phonons. The inhomogeneous dephasing time T2* is consistent with previous data on hyperfine coupling strength in 13C nanotubes....

  2. Relaxation and Meditation with Music

    OpenAIRE

    ČAPKOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The thesis introduces an importance of a mental hygiene and its chosen methods - relaxation and meditation with music. The theoretical part is focused on a description of the basic relaxation and meditation techniques and curative effects of music. It deals with a music therapy, its meaning, types, methods and history in terms of the importance of music healing relaxation effects on the mental, physical as well as spiritual health. The practical part includes a usage of these methods in pract...

  3. Contrast-enhanced 3T MR perfusion of musculoskeletal tumours. T1 value heterogeneity assessment and evaluation of the influence of T1 estimation methods on quantitative parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Leplat, Christophe; Verbizier, Jacques de; Blum, Alain; Chen, Bailiang; Beaumont, Marine; Badr, Sammy; Cotten, Anne

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate intra-tumour and striated muscle T1 value heterogeneity and the influence of different methods of T1 estimation on the variability of quantitative perfusion parameters. Eighty-two patients with a histologically confirmed musculoskeletal tumour were prospectively included in this study and, with ethics committee approval, underwent contrast-enhanced MR perfusion and T1 mapping. T1 value variations in viable tumour areas and in normal-appearing striated muscle were assessed. In 20 cases, normal muscle perfusion parameters were calculated using three different methods: signal based and gadolinium concentration based on fixed and variable T1 values. Tumour and normal muscle T1 values were significantly different (p = 0.0008). T1 value heterogeneity was higher in tumours than in normal muscle (variation of 19.8% versus 13%). The T1 estimation method had a considerable influence on the variability of perfusion parameters. Fixed T1 values yielded higher coefficients of variation than variable T1 values (mean 109.6 ± 41.8% and 58.3 ± 14.1% respectively). Area under the curve was the least variable parameter (36%). T1 values in musculoskeletal tumours are significantly different and more heterogeneous than normal muscle. Patient-specific T1 estimation is needed for direct inter-patient comparison of perfusion parameters. (orig.)

  4. Contrast-enhanced 3T MR perfusion of musculoskeletal tumours. T1 value heterogeneity assessment and evaluation of the influence of T1 estimation methods on quantitative parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Leplat, Christophe; Verbizier, Jacques de; Blum, Alain [Hopital Central, CHRU-Nancy, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Chen, Bailiang; Beaumont, Marine [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Badr, Sammy; Cotten, Anne [CHRU Lille Centre de Consultations et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, Department of Radiology and Musculoskeletal Imaging, Lille (France)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate intra-tumour and striated muscle T1 value heterogeneity and the influence of different methods of T1 estimation on the variability of quantitative perfusion parameters. Eighty-two patients with a histologically confirmed musculoskeletal tumour were prospectively included in this study and, with ethics committee approval, underwent contrast-enhanced MR perfusion and T1 mapping. T1 value variations in viable tumour areas and in normal-appearing striated muscle were assessed. In 20 cases, normal muscle perfusion parameters were calculated using three different methods: signal based and gadolinium concentration based on fixed and variable T1 values. Tumour and normal muscle T1 values were significantly different (p = 0.0008). T1 value heterogeneity was higher in tumours than in normal muscle (variation of 19.8% versus 13%). The T1 estimation method had a considerable influence on the variability of perfusion parameters. Fixed T1 values yielded higher coefficients of variation than variable T1 values (mean 109.6 ± 41.8% and 58.3 ± 14.1% respectively). Area under the curve was the least variable parameter (36%). T1 values in musculoskeletal tumours are significantly different and more heterogeneous than normal muscle. Patient-specific T1 estimation is needed for direct inter-patient comparison of perfusion parameters. (orig.)

  5. The impact of reliable pre-bolus T1 measurements or a fixed T1 value in the assessment of glioma patients with Dynamic Contrast Enhancing MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate quantification of hemodynamic parameters using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE) requires a measurement of tissue T1 prior to contrast injection (T1). We evaluate (i) T1 estimation using the variable flip angle (VFA) and the saturation recovery (SR) techniques and (ii) investi...

  6. Relaxation Techniques for Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland-Coogan, Diane; Davis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Physiological symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifest as increased arousal and reactivity seen as anger outburst, irritability, reckless behavior with no concern for consequences, hypervigilance, sleep disturbance, and problems with focus (American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). In seeking the most beneficial treatment for PTSD, consideration must be given to the anxiety response. Relaxation techniques are shown to help address the physiological manifestations of prolonged stress. The techniques addressed by the authors in this article include mindfulness, deep breathing, yoga, and meditation. By utilizing these techniques traditional therapies can be complemented. In addition, those who are averse to the traditional evidence-based practices or for those who have tried traditional therapies without success; these alternative interventions may assist in lessening physiological manifestations of PTSD. Future research studies assessing the benefits of these treatment modalities are warranted to provide empirical evidence to support the efficacy of these treatments.

  7. OCT-based approach to local relaxations discrimination from translational relaxation motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool for tissue state characterization. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an approach to mapping mechanical properties of tissue based on OCT. One of challenging problems in OCE is elimination of the influence of residual local tissue relaxation that complicates obtaining information on elastic properties of the tissue. Alternatively, parameters of local relaxation itself can be used as an additional informative characteristic for distinguishing the tissue in normal and pathological states over the OCT image area. Here we briefly present an OCT-based approach to evaluation of local relaxation processes in the tissue bulk after sudden unloading of its initial pre-compression. For extracting the local relaxation rate we evaluate temporal dependence of local strains that are mapped using our recently developed hybrid phase resolved/displacement-tracking (HPRDT) approach. This approach allows one to subtract the contribution of global displacements of scatterers in OCT scans and separate the temporal evolution of local strains. Using a sample excised from of a coronary arteria, we demonstrate that the observed relaxation of local strains can be reasonably fitted by an exponential law, which opens the possibility to characterize the tissue by a single relaxation time. The estimated local relaxation times are assumed to be related to local biologically-relevant processes inside the tissue, such as diffusion, leaking/draining of the fluids, local folding/unfolding of the fibers, etc. In general, studies of evolution of such features can provide new metrics for biologically-relevant changes in tissue, e.g., in the problems of treatment monitoring.

  8. Visible spectroscopy at the Extrap-T1 pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, P.; Brzozowski, J.H.; Kaellne, E.; Zaztrow, K.D.

    1991-06-01

    A wide range UV to visible spectrum from 2450 to 8050 Angstrom has been acquired and analysed for the EXTRAP-T1 plasma. The impurity lines in the spectrum are mainly from carbon and oxygen species up to four times ionized, but also nitrogen lines are present. No traces of metal impurity are observed. We have identified most of the spectral lines and compare intensities from several multiplets with predicted values. A spectral range free from line emission is found which is suitable for continuum measurements. Furthermore, line strictures are identified as originating from the CH molecule and are observed both using a center chord line of sight and an edge chord line-of-sight through the plasma. (au)

  9. Plasma position from ring current measurements in Extrap T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Jin Li.

    1989-11-01

    The inductive coupling between the plasma and the four octupole field coils in the Extrap T1 device is utilized as a means of estimating the plasma position. The current in each octupole ring as well as the plasma current is measured by a Rogowski coil and the ring - plasma mutual inductance is then computed assuming axisymmetric plasma displacements. The obtained position is in agreement with internal magnetic probe measurements. The time - evolution of the plasma position for different external vertical and toroidal field strengths is studied. For the present discharge parameter a vertical field of about .008 T is found to give an almost radially stationary plasma. The results are compared with a simple equilibrium model

  10. Quantitative plasma spectroscopy at JET and Extrap-T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastrow, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Studies in quantitative plasma spectroscopy are performed on the Joint European Torus (JET) in Culham, Great-Britain and on the Extrap-T1 reversed-field pinch (RFP) in Stockholm. The model concepts that form the basis of these studies are reviewed. At JET, spectra of He-like nickel are observed with a high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer. The experimental line intensity ratios of satellite lines to the resonance line are compared with theoretical data. The agreement is found to be good, with the exception of the excitation of dipole-forbidden lines. The spectrum is also used to derive central ion temperature, central toroidal rotation and nickel concentration based upon a model for the radial emission. The results are compared with those from an independent diagnostic, charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CWRS). Theoretically predicted cross section effects on the CXRS data are verified. On Extrap-T1, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectra and visible spectra are analysed. From these, thermodynamic quantities of the plasma are derived, like electron temperature, impurity concentrations and particle fluxes. The oxygen ionization balance is measured and compared to calculations with a collisional-dielectronic model with metastable resolution, both in 0-dimensional time-dependent and transport model calculations. The performance of the RFP discharges investigated in terms of radiative power loss and energy and particle confinement properties. The scaling of the energy confinement time with plasma current, pinch parameter and electron density is found to be dominated by the dynamo activity needed to sustain the RFP configuration. The scaling of the particle confinement time, on the other hand, is dominated by pressure-driven activity associated with the regulation of β

  11. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Tomás; Jensen, Sheila I; Nielsen, Alex T; de Lorenzo, Victor; Martínez-García, Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Some strains of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida have become in recent years platforms of choice for hosting biotransformations of industrial interest. Despite availability of many genetic tools for this microorganism, genomic editing of the cell factory P. putida EM42 (a derivative of reference strain KT2440) is still a time-consuming endeavor. In this work we have investigated the in vivo activity of the Ssr protein encoded by the open reading frame T1E_1405 from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, a plausible functional homologue of the β protein of the Red recombination system of λ phage of Escherichia coli. A test based on the phenotypes of pyrF mutants of P. putida (the yeast's URA3 ortholog) was developed for quantifying the ability of Ssr to promote invasion of the genomic DNA replication fork by synthetic oligonucleotides. The efficiency of the process was measured by monitoring the inheritance of the changes entered into pyrF by oligonucleotides bearing mutated sequences. Ssr fostered short and long genomic deletions/insertions at considerable frequencies as well as single-base swaps not affected by mismatch repair. These results not only demonstrate the feasibility of recombineering in P. putida, but they also enable a suite of multiplexed genomic manipulations in this biotechnologically important bacterium. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Spin-flip relaxation via optical phonon scattering in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Wu, E-mail: zwwang@semi.ac.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Department of Physics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China); Li, Shu-Shen [Institute of Semiconductor, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-12-14

    Based on the spin-orbit coupling admixture mechanism, we theoretically investigate the spin-flip relaxation via optical phonon scattering in quantum dots by considering the effect of lattice relaxation due to the electron-acoustic phonon deformation potential coupling. The relaxation rate displays a cusp-like structure (or a spin hot spot) that becomes more clearly with increasing temperature. We also calculate the relaxation rate of the spin-conserving process, which follows a Gaussian form and is several orders of magnitude larger than that of spin-flip process. Moreover, we find that the relaxation rate displays the oscillatory behavior due to the interplay effects between the magnetic and spatial confinement for the spin-flip process not for the spin-conserving process. The trends of increasing and decreasing temperature dependence of the relaxation rates for two relaxation processes are obtained in the present model.

  13. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...

  14. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen diffusion in amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.C. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Hydrogen diffusion is technologically critical to the processing of amorphous Si for solar cell applications. It is shown that this diffusion belongs to a broad class of dielectric relaxation mechanisms which were first studied by Kohlrausch in 1847. A microscopic theory of the Kohlrausch relaxation constant [beta][sub K] is also constructed. This theory explains the values of [beta] observed in many electronic, molecular and polymeric relaxation processes. It is based on two novel concepts: Wiener sausages, from statistical mechanics, and the magic wand, from axiomatic set theory

  15. Characterization Method for the Relaxation Process of Metastable Defect States in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin Films with Photoisothermal Capacitance Transient Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Minemoto, Takashi

    2011-02-01

    A simple, spectroscopic method is proposed for the characterization of metastable defects in semiconductors using modified photoisothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (photo-ICTS). A photo-ICTS method using a weighting function is formularized for the conversion process between two defect states. The potential energy barrier separating two configurations of the metastable defect in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films has been successfully analyzed along with a tentatively determined defect concentration.

  16. Spin-Relaxation Anisotropy in a GaAs Quantum Dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarlino, P.; Kawakami, E.; Stano, P.; Shafiei, M.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    We report that the electron spin-relaxation time T1 in a GaAs quantum dot with a spin-1/2 ground state has a 180° periodicity in the orientation of the in-plane magnetic field. This periodicity has been predicted for circular dots as being due to the interplay of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin orbit

  17. Spin dynamics of the itinerant helimagnet MnSi studied by positive muon spin relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadono, R.; Matsuzaki, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Kreitzman, S.R.; Brewer, J.H.

    1990-03-01

    The local magnetic fields and spin dynamics of the itinerant helimagnet MnSi(T c ≅ 29.5 K) have been studied experimentally using positive muon spin rotation/relaxation (μ + SR) methods. In the ordered phase (T c ), zero-field μSR was used to measure the hyperfine fields at the muon sites as well as the muon spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 μ . Two magnetically inequivalent interstitial μ + sites were found with hyperfine coupling constants A hf (1) = -3.94 kOe/μ B and A hf (2) = -6.94 kOe/μ B , respectively. In the paramagnetic phase (T > T c ), the muon-nuclear spin double relaxation technique was used to simultaneously but independently determine the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 Mn of 55 Mn spins and that of positive muons (T 1 μ ) over a wide temperature range (T c 1 Mn and T 1 μ in both phases shows systematic deviations from the predictions of self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory. (author)

  18. Electron spin-lattice relaxation in fractals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, K.N.

    1986-08-01

    We have developed the theory of the spin-fracton interaction for paramagnetic ions in fractal structures. The interaction is exponentially damped by the self-similarity length of the fractal and by the range dimensionality d Φ . The relaxation time of the spin due to the absorption and emission of the fracton has been calculated for a general dimensionality called the Raman dimensionality d R , which for the fractons differs from the Hausdorff (fractal) dimensionality, D, as well as from the Euclidean dimensionality, d. The exponent of the energy level separation in the relaxation rate varies with d R d Φ /D. We have calculated the spin relaxation rate due to a new type of Raman process in which one fracton is absorbed to affect a spin transition from one electronic level to another and later another fracton is emitted along with a spin transition such that the difference in the energies of the two fractons is equal to the electronic energy level separation. The temperature and the dimensionality dependence of such a process has been found in several approximations. In one of the approximations where the van Vleck relaxation rate for a spin in a crystal is known to vary with temperature as T 9 , our calculated variation for fractals turns out to be T 6.6 , whereas the experimental value for Fe 3+ in frozen solutions of myoglobin azide is T 6.3 . Since we used d R =4/3 and the fracton range dimensionality d Φ =D/1.8, we expect to measure the dimensionalities of the problem by measuring the temperature dependence of the relaxation times. We have also calculated the shift of the paramagnetic resonance transition for a spin in a fractal for general dimensionalities. (author)

  19. Stress relaxation and hillock growth in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.S.; Li, C.Y.

    1978-01-01

    The relaxation of thermal stress in a thin film adhering to a substrate of differing expansion coefficient is discussed. Good agreement is found between literature data on relaxation during isothermal anneals of Pb films at up to 350 0 K and model calculations based on a state variable description of plastic flow. The stress system during relaxation is explored, and the absence of diffusional creep is explained. The plasticity-dominated relaxation process suggested by this analysis is shown to be in good qualitative agreement with data on rapid relaxation over the course of a cycle between room and cryogenic temperatures. The implications of this for long-range material transport in the film are discussed. It is shown that hillock volume should increase over the course of a temperature cycle. Finally, a mechanism for hillock nucleation based on grain boundary sliding is suggested

  20. Dynamical relaxation in 2HDM models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalak, Zygmunt; Markiewicz, Adam

    2018-03-01

    Dynamical relaxation provides an interesting solution to the hierarchy problem in face of the missing signatures of any new physics in recent experiments. Through a dynamical process taking place in the inflationary phase of the Universe it manages to achieve a small electroweak scale without introducing new states observable in current experiments. Appropriate approximation makes it possible to derive an explicit formula for the final vevs in the double-scanning scenario extended to a model with two Higgs doublets (2HDM). Analysis of the relaxation in the 2HDM confirms that in a general case it is impossible to keep vevs of both scalars small, unless fine-tuning is present or additional symmetries are cast upon the Lagrangian. Within the slightly constrained variant of the 2HDM, where odd powers of the fields’ expectation values are not present (which can be easily enforced by requiring that the doublets have different gauge transformations or by imposing a global symmetry) it is shown that the difference between the vevs of two scalars tends to be proportional to the cutoff. The analysis of the relaxation in 2HDM indicates that in a general case the relaxation would be stopped by the first doublet that gains a vev, with the other one remaining vevless with a mass of the order of the cutoff. This happens to conform with the inert doublet model.

  1. NMR relaxation in spin ice at low temperature due to diffusing emergent monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Christopher L.

    2013-03-01

    At low temperatures, spin dynamics in ideal spin ice is due mainly to dilute, thermally excited magnetic ``monopole'' excitations. I consider how these will affect the longitudinal (T1) and dephasing (T2) relaxation functions of a nuclear spin in the spin-ice pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O4. Up to the time scale for nearby monopoles to be rearranged, a stretched-exponential form of the relaxation functions is expected, due to averaging over nuclei that have different local environments. ror the dephasing (T2) relaxation, the power of time in the stretched exponential is 3/2 in the case of diffusing monopoles, but 1/2 in the case of fixed, fluctuating magnetic impurities. The flip rate and density of fluctuating spins (whatever their nature) can be extracted from the measured relaxation times T1 and T2, and from known parameters. However, the actual experimental relaxation measured by Kitagawa and Takigawa becomes temperature independent in the very low T limit, and the T2 has a power t 1 / 2 in the exponential, neither of which can be explained by monopoles. I suggest the very low T behavior could be due to magnetic impurities on the (normally nonmagnetic) Ti sites. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1005466.

  2. Dynamic properties of water in swollen hypercrosslinked polystyrenes, according to NMR relaxation and diffusion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushkina, T. A.; Novikov, V. V.; Koretskaya, V. S.; Klimova, T. P.; Tsyurupa, M. P.; Blinnikova, Z. K.; Davankov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic properties of the water filling of the internal space of hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks are studied via NMR cryoporometry, spin relaxation, and diffusometry. It is found that in the temperature range of 210-240 K, where frozen water melts in the thin pores of the polymer and seems to become a viscous liquid, the main type of molecular motion is rotational and the main relaxation mechanism ( T 1) is spin-rotational interaction between protons. Above 240 K, dipole-dipole coupling is shown to become the main relaxation mechanism T 1. In the temperature range of 210-295 K, the hypercrosslinked polystyrene matrix displays a set of water spin-spin relaxation rates that suggest the structure has cavities (pores) with different sizes and different conditions for the molecular motion of water. We conclude that the shorter (tens of ms) relaxation times T 1 and T 2 of water in the polymer at the temperature above 265 K compared to free water (2-3 s) indicate features of the dynamic characteristics of water in hydrophobic pores (or thin films on the surfaces of granules) that differ from those of free water. The tortuosity coefficients of the water's path of molecular motion are found to change in a symbate manner with a change in the water content in the hypercrosslinked network.

  3. Early postnatal myelin content estimate of white matter via T1w/T2w ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin; Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Gilmore, John; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Jerod; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Entringer, Sonja; Glasser, Matthew F.; Van Essen, David C.; Buss, Claudia; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    To develop and evaluate a novel processing framework for the relative quantification of myelin content in cerebral white matter (WM) regions from brain MRI data via a computed ratio of T1 to T2 weighted intensity values. We employed high resolution (1mm3 isotropic) T1 and T2 weighted MRI from 46 (28 male, 18 female) neonate subjects (typically developing controls) scanned on a Siemens Tim Trio 3T at UC Irvine. We developed a novel, yet relatively straightforward image processing framework for WM myelin content estimation based on earlier work by Glasser, et al. We first co-register the structural MRI data to correct for motion. Then, background areas are masked out via a joint T1w and T2 foreground mask computed. Raw T1w/T2w-ratios images are computed next. For purpose of calibration across subjects, we first coarsely segment the fat-rich facial regions via an atlas co-registration. Linear intensity rescaling based on median T1w/T2w-ratio values in those facial regions yields calibrated T1w/T2wratio images. Mean values in lobar regions are evaluated using standard statistical analysis to investigate their interaction with age at scan. Several lobes have strongly positive significant interactions of age at scan with the computed T1w/T2w-ratio. Most regions do not show sex effects. A few regions show no measurable effects of change in myelin content change within the first few weeks of postnatal development, such as cingulate and CC areas, which we attribute to sample size and measurement variability. We developed and evaluated a novel way to estimate white matter myelin content for use in studies of brain white matter development.

  4. In vivo relaxation of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine plus phosphocreatine, and choline containing compounds during the course of brain infarction: a proton MRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1992-01-01

    the course of infarction can be explained by changes in T1 and T2 relaxation times, eight patients with acute stroke were studied. STEAM sequences with varying echo delay times and repetition times were used to measure T1 and T2 of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr) and choline...

  5. Biomolecules: Fluctuations and relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, F.; Ostermann, A.; Gassmann, A.; Scherk, C.; Chong, S.-H.; Kidera, A.; Go, N.

    1999-10-01

    The normal-mode refinement of X-ray crystallographic data opened a new possibility to analyze the mean-square displacements in a protein molecule. A comparison of the X-ray structure of myoglobin at several temperatures with Mössbauer data is performed. In the low-temperature regime below 180 K the iron mean-square displacements obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with a normal-mode analysis. The X-ray mean-square displacements at the position of the iron, after the motion originated from the external degrees of freedom are subtracted, have practically the same temperature dependence as those from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The difference between the X-ray mean-square displacements and those predicted by normal-mode analysis measures the distribution of molecules into conformational substates. Above 180 K the Mössbauer effect indicates fluctuations between conformational substates. The relaxation from a Fe(III) conformation to a Fe(II) conformation is shown for superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii.

  6. T1 Colorectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiichi Sugimoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 68-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with a liver tumor. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a liver tumor 30 mm in diameter. On colonoscopy, a pedunculated tumor with a central depression (20 mm in diameter was observed in the ascending colon, and this tumor was considered to be invading deeply into the submucosal layer. Right hemicolectomy with D3 lymphadenectomy and partial hepatectomy were performed simultaneously. On histopathological examination of the resected specimen, the tumor was a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma with 3,000 μm invasion of the submucosal layer. The liver tumor showed histological findings similar to those of the primary colorectal carcinoma. The pathological stage according to the 7th edition of the TNM classification was stage IV (T1N0M1. Nine months after the operation, computed tomography revealed hepatic hilar lymph node metastases and a great deal of ascites. The patient ultimately died 14 months after the operation.

  7. Exchange-mediated spin-lattice relaxation of Fe3+ ions in borate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sushil K; Pilbrow, John R

    2007-03-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of two borate glasses doped with different concentrations of Fe2O3 were measured using the Electron Spin-Echo (ESE) technique at X-band (9.630 GHz) in the temperature range 2-6K. In comparison with a previous investigation of Fe3+-doped silicate glasses, the relaxation rates were comparable and differed by no more than a factor of two. The data presented here extend those previously reported for borate glasses in the 10-250K range but measured using the amplitude-modulation technique. The T1 values were found to depend on temperature (T) as T(n) with n approximately 1 for the 1% and 0.1% Fe2O3-doped glass samples. These results are consistent with spin-lattice relaxation as effected by exchange interaction of a Fe3+ spin exchange-coupled to another Fe3+ spin in an amorphous material.

  8. Comparison of T1-weighted fast spin-echo and T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of the lumbar spine at 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavdas, Eleftherios; Vlychou, Marianna; Arikidis, Nikos; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Roka, Violetta; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Larissa, Medical School of Thessaly, Mezourlo (Greece)), e-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr

    2010-04-15

    Background: T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence has been reported to provide improved contrast between lesions and normal anatomical structures compared to T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging at 1.5T regarding imaging of the lumbar spine. Purpose: To compare T1-weighted FSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging in normal anatomic structures and degenerative and metastatic lesions of the lumbar spine at 3.0T. Material and Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients (19 females, 13 males; mean age 44 years, range 30-67 years) with lesions of the lumbar spine were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the lumbar spine were obtained using T1-weighted FSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and relative contrast (ReCon) between degenerative and metastatic lesions and normal anatomic structures were conducted, comparing these sequences. Results: On quantitative evaluation, SNRs of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root, and fat around the root of fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging were significantly lower than those of T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). CNRs of normal spinal cord/CSF and disc herniation/ CSF for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). ReCon of normal spinal cord/CSF, disc herniation/CSF, and vertebral lesions/CSF for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). On qualitative evaluation, it was found that CSF nulling and contrast at the spinal cord (cauda equina)/CSF interface for T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly superior compared to those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001), and the disc/spinal cord (cauda equina) interface was better for T1-weighted FLAIR images (P<0.05). Conclusion: The T1-weighted FLAIR sequence may be considered as the preferred lumbar spine imaging

  9. Time course of corticospinal excitability and intracortical inhibition just before muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotaka eSuzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI was involved with transient motor cortex excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time, defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80–100 ms before relaxation reaction time, and motor evoked potentials were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60–80 ms period before relaxation reaction time than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase relaxation reaction time. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to motor cortex excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process.

  10. Relaxed states with plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.; Taylor, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the theory of relaxation, a turbulent plasma reaches a state of minimum energy subject to constant magnetic helicity. In this state the plasma velocity is zero. Attempts have been made by introducing a number of different constraints, to obtain relaxed states with plasma flow. It is shown that these alternative constraints depend on two self-helicities, one for ions, and one for electrons. However, whereas there are strong arguments for the effective invariance of the original magnetic-helicity, these arguments do not apply to the self-helicities. Consequently the existence of relaxed states with flow remains in doubt. (author)

  11. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  12. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aparicio, Tomás; Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    of reference strain KT2440) is still a time-consuming endeavor. In this work we have investigated the in vivo activity of the Ssr protein encoded by the open reading frame T1E_1405 from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, a plausible functional homologue of the β protein of the Red recombination system of λ phage...... of Escherichia coli. A test based on the phenotypes of pyrF mutants of P. putida (the yeast’s URA3 ortholog) was developed for quantifying the ability of Ssr to promote invasion of the genomic DNA replication fork by synthetic oligonucleotides. The efficiency of the process was measured by monitoring...

  13. Main-belt Comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Novaković, Bojan; Yang, Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Sonnett, Sarah; Tholen, David J.; Urban, Laurie; Kaiser, Nick; Chambers, K. C.; Burgett, William S.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by ~60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 μm that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q CN 100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the ~155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation, the Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  14. Nuclear spin relaxation/resonance of 8Li in Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Salman, Z.; Chow, K. H.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Keeler, T. A.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Mansour, A. I.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Parolin, T. J.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Song, Q.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2009-04-01

    A low energy beam of spin polarized 8Li has been used to study the behaviour of isolated 8Li implanted into a 150 nm thick film of Al on an MgO substrate. The spin relaxation rate 1/T1 and β-NMR lineshape were measured as a function of temperature in a large magnetic field of 4.1 T. The resonances from different sites are unresolved due to the large nuclear dipolar interaction with the host 27Al magnetic dipole moments. Nevertheless the temperature variation of the site averaged 1/T1 and Knight shift show evidence for a transition between the octahedral O and substitutional S sites at about 150 K, as observed in other fcc metals.

  15. Cartilage quality in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC, {delta}R1 and value of pre-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian; Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, Patric; Quentin, Michael; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Mathys, Christian; Blondin, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [University Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Koerbl, Birthe [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Rheumatology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University, Leibniz Centre for Diabetes Research, Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Orthopaedics, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hofer, Matthias [Heinrich-Heine-University, Medical Education Group, Medical School, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias; Ostendorf, Benedikt [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Rheumatology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    To prospectively evaluate four non-invasive markers of cartilage quality - T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC and {delta}R1 - in healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cartilage of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints II were imaged in 28 consecutive subjects: 12 healthy volunteers [9 women, mean (SD) age 52.67 (9.75) years, range 30-66] and 16 RA patients with MCP II involvement [12 women, mean (SD) age 58.06 (12.88) years, range 35-76]. Sagittal T2* mapping was performed with a multi-echo gradient-echo on a 3 T MRI scanner. For T1 mapping the dual flip angle method was applied prior to native T1 mapping and 40 min after gadolinium application (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, dGEMRIC, T1{sub Gd}). The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rate induced by gadolinium ({delta}R1) was calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) was used to test for differentiation of RA patients from healthy volunteers. dGEMRIC (AUC 0.81) and {delta}R1 (AUC 0.75) significantly differentiated RA patients from controls. T2* mapping (AUC 0.66) and native T1 mapping (AUC 0.66) were not significantly different in RA patients compared to controls. The data support the use of dGEMRIC for the assessment of MCP joint cartilage quality in RA. T2* and native T1 mapping are of low diagnostic value. Pre-contrast T1 mapping for the calculation of {delta}R1 does not increase the diagnostic value of dGEMRIC. (orig.)

  16. In-vivo Intervertebral Disc Characterization using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and T1ρ Imaging: Association with Discography and Oswestry Disability Index and SF-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jin; Joseph, Gabby B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M.; Hu, Serena S.; Berven, Sigurd H.; Kurhanewitz, John; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Study Design An in vivo study of intervertebral disc degeneration using quantitative MRI and MRS. Objective To quantify water and proteoglycan (PG) content in the intervertebral disc using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and to evaluate the relationship between MRS- quantified water/PG content, T1ρ, Pfirrmann score, clinical self-assessment, and discography. Summary of Background Data Previous in vitro studies have investigated the relationship between MRS-quantified water/PG content, and degenerative grade using cadaveric intervertebral discs. T1ρ has been shown to relate to Pfirmann grade and clinical self-assessment. However, the associations between MRS-quantified water/PG content, MR imaging-based T1ρ, self-assessment of health status and clinical response to discography have not been studied in vivo. Methods MRS and MR imaging were performed in 26 patients (70 discs) with symptomatic intervertebral degenerative disc (IVDD) and 23 controls (41 discs). Patients underwent evaluation of intervertebral discs with provocative discography. All subjects completed the SF-36 Health Survey and Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires. Results The water/PG peak area ratio was significantly elevated in a) patients (compared to controls) and in b) discs with positive discography (compared to negative discography). MR T1ρ exhibited similar trends. A significant association was found between T1ρ and normalized PG content (R2 = 0.61, p 0.05). The water/PG peak area ratio, normalized water, normalized PG, and Pfirrmann grade were significantly associated with patient self-assessment of disability and physical composite score, while disc height was not. Conclusion This study demonstrated a relationship between in vivo MRS spectroscopy (water content, PG content), imaging parameters (T1ρ, Pfirrmann Grade), discography results, and clinical self-assessment, suggesting that MRS-quantified water, PG and MR T1ρ relaxation time may potentially serve as

  17. In vivo intervertebral disc characterization using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T1ρ imaging: association with discography and Oswestry Disability Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jin; Joseph, Gabby B; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd H; Kurhanewitz, John; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2012-02-01

    An in vivo study of intervertebral disc degeneration by using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). To quantify water and proteoglycan (PG) content in the intervertebral disc by using in vivo MRS and to evaluate the relationship between MRS-quantified water/PG content, T1ρ, Pfirrmann score, clinical self-assessment, and discography. Previous in vitro studies have investigated the relationship between MRS-quantified water/PG content and degenerative grade by using cadaveric intervertebral discs. T1ρ has been shown to relate to Pfirrmann grade and clinical self-assessment. However, the associations between MRS-quantified water/PG content, MRI-based T1ρ, self-assessment of health status, and clinical response to discography have not been studied in vivo. MRS and MRI were performed in 26 patients (70 discs) with symptomatic intervertebral degenerative disc (IVDD) and 23 controls (41 discs). Patients underwent evaluation of intervertebral discs with provocative discography. All subjects completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey and Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires. The water/PG peak area ratio was significantly elevated in (a) patients (compared with controls) and in (b) discs with positive discography (compared with negative discography). Magnetic resonance (MR) T1ρ exhibited similar trends. A significant association was found between T1ρ and normalized PG content (R = 0.61, P 0.05). The water/PG peak area ratio, normalized water, normalized PG, and Pfirrmann grade were significantly associated with patient self-assessment of disability and physical composite score, while disc height was not. This study demonstrated a relationship between in vivo MRS spectroscopy (water content and PG content), imaging parameters (T1ρ and Pfirrmann grade), discography results, and clinical self-assessment, suggesting that MRS-quantified water, PG, and MR T1ρ relaxation time may potentially serve as biomarkers of

  18. Cartilage quality in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC, ΔR1 and value of pre-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchbender, Christian; Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, Patric; Quentin, Michael; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Mathys, Christian; Blondin, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk; Koerbl, Birthe; Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Hofer, Matthias; Schneider, Matthias; Ostendorf, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate four non-invasive markers of cartilage quality - T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC and ΔR1 - in healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cartilage of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints II were imaged in 28 consecutive subjects: 12 healthy volunteers [9 women, mean (SD) age 52.67 (9.75) years, range 30-66] and 16 RA patients with MCP II involvement [12 women, mean (SD) age 58.06 (12.88) years, range 35-76]. Sagittal T2* mapping was performed with a multi-echo gradient-echo on a 3 T MRI scanner. For T1 mapping the dual flip angle method was applied prior to native T1 mapping and 40 min after gadolinium application (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, dGEMRIC, T1 Gd ). The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rate induced by gadolinium (ΔR1) was calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) was used to test for differentiation of RA patients from healthy volunteers. dGEMRIC (AUC 0.81) and ΔR1 (AUC 0.75) significantly differentiated RA patients from controls. T2* mapping (AUC 0.66) and native T1 mapping (AUC 0.66) were not significantly different in RA patients compared to controls. The data support the use of dGEMRIC for the assessment of MCP joint cartilage quality in RA. T2* and native T1 mapping are of low diagnostic value. Pre-contrast T1 mapping for the calculation of ΔR1 does not increase the diagnostic value of dGEMRIC. (orig.)

  19. PCA based clustering for brain tumor segmentation of T1w MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Irem Ersöz; Pehlivanlı, Ayça Çakmak; Sekizkardeş, Emine Gezmez; Ibrikci, Turgay

    2017-03-01

    Medical images are huge collections of information that are difficult to store and process consuming extensive computing time. Therefore, the reduction techniques are commonly used as a data pre-processing step to make the image data less complex so that a high-dimensional data can be identified by an appropriate low-dimensional representation. PCA is one of the most popular multivariate methods for data reduction. This paper is focused on T1-weighted MRI images clustering for brain tumor segmentation with dimension reduction by different common Principle Component Analysis (PCA) algorithms. Our primary aim is to present a comparison between different variations of PCA algorithms on MRIs for two cluster methods. Five most common PCA algorithms; namely the conventional PCA, Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis (PPCA), Expectation Maximization Based Principal Component Analysis (EM-PCA), Generalize Hebbian Algorithm (GHA), and Adaptive Principal Component Extraction (APEX) were applied to reduce dimensionality in advance of two clustering algorithms, K-Means and Fuzzy C-Means. In the study, the T1-weighted MRI images of the human brain with brain tumor were used for clustering. In addition to the original size of 512 lines and 512 pixels per line, three more different sizes, 256 × 256, 128 × 128 and 64 × 64, were included in the study to examine their effect on the methods. The obtained results were compared in terms of both the reconstruction errors and the Euclidean distance errors among the clustered images containing the same number of principle components. According to the findings, the PPCA obtained the best results among all others. Furthermore, the EM-PCA and the PPCA assisted K-Means algorithm to accomplish the best clustering performance in the majority as well as achieving significant results with both clustering algorithms for all size of T1w MRI images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Trifecta and Pentafecta Outcomes between T1a and T1b Renal Masses following Robot-Assisted Partial Nephrectomy (RAPN with Minimum One Year Follow Up: Can RAPN for T1b Renal Masses Be Feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Keun Kim

    Full Text Available To investigate the feasibility of RAPN on T1b renal mass by assessment of Trifecta and Pentafecta rate between T1a and T1b renal mass.We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 277 cases of RPN performed from 2006 to 2015. Sixty patients with clinically T1b renal masses (> 4 cm and ≤ 7 cm were identified, and from 180 patients with clinically T1a renal mass, 60 patients were matched with T1b renal mass by propensity score. Tumor complexity was investigated according to R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score. "Pentafecta" was defined as achievement of Trifecta (negative surgical margin, no postoperative complications and warm ischemia time of ≤ 25 minutes with addition of over 90% estimated GFR preservation and no chronic kidney disease stage upgrading at 1 year postoperative period. Propensity score matching was performed by OneToManyMTCH. Logistic regression models were used to identify the variables which predict the Trifecta, and Pentafecta ac.Preoperative variables (age, sex, body mass index, ASA score were similar between T1a and T1b after propensity score matching. The median R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score was 8 vs 9 for T1a and T1b respectively (p<0.001. The median warm ischemia time was 20.1 min vs 26.2 min (p<0.001. Positive surgical margin rate was 5% vs 6.6% (p = 0.729 and overall complication rate of 13.3%. vs 15% (p = 0.793. The rate of achievement of Trifecta rate were 65.3% vs 43.3% (p = 0.017 and Pentafecta rate were 38.3% vs 26.7% (p = 0.172. For achievement of Pentafecta, R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score (HR 0.80; 95% CI (0.67-0.97; p = 0.031 was significant predictor of achieving Pentafecta. Subanalyis to assess the component of R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score, L component (location relative to the polar lines, HR 0.63; 95% CI (0.38-1.03; P = 0.064 was relatively important component for Pentafecta achievement.The rate of Pentafecta after RAPN was comparable between T1a and T1b renal masses. RAPN is a feasible modality with excellent

  1. A model for the generic alpha relaxation in viscous liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric measurements on molecular liquids just above the glass transition indicate that alpha relaxation is characterized by a generic high-frequency loss varying as one over square root of frequency, whereas deviations from this come from one or more low-lying beta processes [Olsen et al., Phys...... in the Gaussian approximation, reproduces the generic features of alpha relaxation........ Rev. Lett., 86 (2001) 1271]. Assuming that long-wavelength fluctuations dominate the dynamics, a model for the dielectric alpha relaxation based on the simplest coupling between the density and dipole density fields is proposed here. The model, which is solved in second-order perturbation theory...

  2. Non-monotonic behaviour in relaxation dynamics of image restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, Tomoko; Okada, Masato

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the relaxation dynamics of image restoration through a Bayesian approach. The relaxation dynamics is much faster at zero temperature than at the Nishimori temperature where the pixel-wise error rate is minimized in equilibrium. At low temperature, we observed non-monotonic development of the overlap. We suggest that the optimal performance is realized through premature termination in the relaxation processes in the case of the infinite-range model. We also performed Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations to clarify the underlying mechanism of non-trivial behaviour at low temperature by checking the local field distributions of each pixel

  3. Developing a Learning Algorithm-Generated Empirical Relaxer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Wayne [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Applied Math; Kallman, Josh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Toreja, Allen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gallagher, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, Ming [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Laney, Dan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    One of the main difficulties when running Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations is determining how much to relax the mesh during the Eulerian step. This determination is currently made by the user on a simulation-by-simulation basis. We present a Learning Algorithm-Generated Empirical Relaxer (LAGER) which uses a regressive random forest algorithm to automate this decision process. We also demonstrate that LAGER successfully relaxes a variety of test problems, maintains simulation accuracy, and has the potential to significantly decrease both the person-hours and computational hours needed to run a successful ALE simulation.

  4. An analysis of the NMR-CT image by the measurement of proton-relaxation times in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Chuzo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Nishikawa, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Koji; Kiri, Motosada.

    1984-01-01

    NMR-CT images were analyzed by measuring the proton-relaxation times in tissues. The NMR-CT images were obtained in 10 normal volunteers and 16 patients with brain tumors with a prototype superconducting magnet (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) operating at 0.2 T and 0.375 T. A smooth T 1 relaxation curve was obtained in each part of the brain and the brain tumor by the use of the data of the NMR-CT image; consequently, the in vivo T 1 value was proved to be reliable. The in vivo T 1 value showed the specific value corresponding to each region of the normal brain in all cases. Cerebral gray matter normally had the longest T 1 value, followed by the medulla oblongata, the pons, and white matter. The T 1 value of each region of the brain varied to the same degree in proportion to the strength of the static magnetic field. The in vivo T 1 values of the brain tumor varied with the histological type. All were longer than any part of the brain parenchyma, being between 480 and 780 msec at 0.2 T. The prolongation of the T 1 value does not always correspond to the degree of the malignancy in a tumor. The in vitro T 1 and T 2 values were also prolonged in all tumors. Although the absolute value of T 1 did not coincide between the in vitro and in vivo data, the tendency of the prolongation was the same between them. This result indicated that the NMR-CT images could be analysed by the use of the data of the in vitro T 1 and T 2 values in the tumor tissues. It is important to analyse the NMR-CT image by both in vivo and in vitro examinations of the relaxation times. (J.P.N.)

  5. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  6. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  7. A statistical correlation investigation for the role of surface spins to the spin relaxation of nitrogen vacancy centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuerui Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influence of spins on surface of nanodiamonds (NDs to the longitudinal relaxation time (T1 and transverse relaxation time (T2 of nitrogen vacancy (NV centers in ND. A spherical model of the NDs was suggested to account for the experimental results of T1 and T2, and the density of surface spins was roughly estimated based on the statistical analysis of experimental results of 72 NDs containing a single NV center. For NDs studied here, the T1 of NV center inside is highly dependent to the surface spins of the NDs. However, for the T2 of NV center, intrinsic contributions must be much pronounced than that by surface spins. In other words, T1 of an NV center in NDs is more sensitive to the change of the surface spin density than T2.

  8. Nuclear spin relaxation of methane in solid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takeru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Yamakawa, Koichiro

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear spin relaxation of methane in solid xenon has been studied by infrared spectroscopy. From the analysis of the temporal changes of the rovibrational peaks, the rates of the nuclear spin relaxation of I = 2 ← 1 correlated to the rotational relaxation of J = 0 ← 1 were obtained at temperatures of 5.1-11.5 K. On the basis of the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate, the activation energy of the indirect two-phonon process was determined to be 50 ± 6 K, which is in good agreement with the rotational transition energies of J = 2 ← 1 and J = 3 ← 1. Taking into account this result and the spin degeneracy, we argue that the lowest J = 3 level in which the I = 1 and I = 2 states are degenerate acts as the intermediate point of the indirect process.

  9. Characterization of myocardial T1-mapping bias caused by intramyocardial fat in inversion recovery and saturation recovery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellman, Peter; Bandettini, W Patricia; Mancini, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative measurement of T1 in the myocardium may be used to detect both focal and diffuse disease processes such as interstitial fibrosis or edema. A partial volume problem exists when a voxel in the myocardium also contains fat. Partial volume with fat occurs at tissue boundaries...... imaging protocols using balanced steady state free precession are considered. In-vivo imaging with T1-mapping, water/fat separated imaging, and late enhancement imaging was performed on subjects with chronic myocardial infarction. RESULTS: In n = 17 subjects with chronic myocardial infarction, lipomatous...... agreement with simulation of the specific imaging protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of the myocardial T1 by widely used balanced steady state free precession mapping methods is subject to bias when there is a mixture of water and fat in the myocardium. Intramyocardial fat is frequently present...

  10. Fluorescence energy transfer monitoring of protein-protein interaction in human cells: the Cyclin T1-HIV1 Tat case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cinelli, Riccardo A. G.; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Beltram, Fabio; Marcello, Alessandro; Tyagi, Mudit; Giacca, Mauro

    2001-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein promotes transcriptional elongation of viral RNAs. Here we show that human Cyclin T1 directly binds Tat in cultured cells. By mapping fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in different cellular compartments we shall present a quantitative analysis of this interaction. The matched tagging pair consists of two optically matched variants of the green fluorescent protein: the enhanced GFP and the blue fluorescent protein. Strong energy transfer was observed between Cyclin T1 and Tat both in the cytoplasm and in specific subnuclear regions. We shall argue that such high-resolution optical studies can provide significant new insight in molecular processes and demonstrate that, for the specific case-study presented, they lead to a model by which Tat recruits Cyclin T1 out of the nuclear compartments where the protein resides to promote transcriptional activation.

  11. Effective temperature in relaxation of Coulomb glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, A M; Ortuño, M; Caravaca, M; Pollak, M

    2008-08-01

    We study relaxation in two-dimensional Coulomb glasses up to macroscopic times. We use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm especially designed to escape efficiently from deep valleys around metastable states. We find that, during the relaxation process, the site occupancy follows a Fermi-Dirac distribution with an effective temperature much higher than the real temperature T. Long electron-hole excitations are characterized by T(eff), while short ones are thermalized at T. We argue that the density of states at the Fermi level is proportional to T(eff) and is a good thermometer to measure it. T(eff) decreases extremely slowly, roughly as the inverse of the logarithm of time, and it should affect hopping conductance in many experimental circumstances.

  12. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  13. The structure and function of ribonuclease T1. XXI. Modification of histidine residues in ribonuclease T1 with iodoacetamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K

    1976-12-01

    1. When ribonuclease T1 [EC 3.1.4.8] (0.125% solution) was treated with a 760-fold molar excess of iodoacetamide at pH 8.0 and 37 degrees, about 90% of the original activity was lost in 24 hr. The half-life of the activity was about 8 hr. The binding ability for 3'-GMP was lost simultaneously. Changes were detected only in histidine and the amino-terminal alanine residues upon amino acid analyses of the inactivated protein and its chymotryptic peptides. The inactivation occurred almost in parallel with the loss of two histidine residues in the enzyme. The pH dependences of the rate of inactivation and that of loss of histidine residues were similar and indicated the implication of a histidine residue or residues with pKa 7.5 to 8 in this reaction. 3'-GMP and guanosine showed some protective effect against loss of activity and of histidine residues. The reactivity of histidine residues was also reduced by prior modification of glutamic acid-58 with iodoacetate, of lysine-41 with maleic or cis-aconitic anhydride or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonate or of arginine-77 with ninhydrin. 2. Analyses of the chymotryptic peptides from oxidized samples of the iodoacetamide-inactivated enzyme showed that histidine-92 and histidine-40 reacted with iodoacetamide most rapidly and at similar rates, whereas histidine-27 was least reactive. Alkylation of histidine-92 was markedly slowed down when the Glu58-carboxymethylated enzyme was treated with iodoacetamide. On the other hand, alkylation of histidine-40 was slowed down most in the presence of 3'-GMP. These results suggest that histidine-92 and histidine-40 are involved in the catalytic action, probably forming part of the catalytic site and part of the binding site, respectively, and that histidine-27 is partially buried in the enzyme molecule or interacts strongly with some other residue, thus becoming relatively unreactive.

  14. Prostate cancer detection from model-free T1-weighted time series and diffusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Nandinee F.; Kozlowski, Piotr; Jones, Edward C.; Chang, Silvia D.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The combination of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) images with diffusion MRI has shown great potential in prostate cancer detection. The parameterization of DCE images to generate cancer markers is traditionally performed based on pharmacokinetic modeling. However, pharmacokinetic models make simplistic assumptions about the tissue perfusion process, require the knowledge of contrast agent concentration in a major artery, and the modeling process is sensitive to noise and fitting instabilities. We address this issue by extracting features directly from the DCE T1-weighted time course without modeling. In this work, we employed a set of data-driven features generated by mapping the DCE T1 time course to its principal component space, along with diffusion MRI features to detect prostate cancer. The optimal set of DCE features is extracted with sparse regularized regression through a Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) model. We show that when our proposed features are used within the multiparametric MRI protocol to replace the pharmacokinetic parameters, the area under ROC curve is 0.91 for peripheral zone classification and 0.87 for whole gland classification. We were able to correctly classify 32 out of 35 peripheral tumor areas identified in the data when the proposed features were used with support vector machine classification. The proposed feature set was used to generate cancer likelihood maps for the prostate gland.

  15. Articular cartilage lesions increase early cartilage degeneration in knees treated by anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: T1ρ mapping evaluation and 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Jun; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Nobukazu; Oniki, Yasunari; Nakamura, Eiichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Usuku, Koichiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration can develop after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Although radiological studies have identified risk factors for the progression of degenerative cartilage changes in the long term, risk factors in the early postoperative period remain to be documented. Cartilage lesions that are present at surgery progress to cartilage degeneration in the early phase after ACLR. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. T1ρ is the spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame magnetic resonance imaging. Sagittal T1ρ maps of the femorotibial joint were obtained before and 1 year after ACLR in 23 patients with ACL injuries. Four regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on images of the cartilage in the medial and lateral femoral condyle (MFC, LFC) and the medial and lateral tibia plateau (MTP, LTP). Changes in the T1ρ value (milliseconds) of each ROI were recorded, and differences between patients with and without cartilage lesions were evaluated. The relationship between changes in the T1ρ value and meniscal tears was also studied. Arthroscopy at ACLR detected cartilage lesions in 15 MFCs, 7 LFCs, and 2 LTPs. The baseline T1ρ value of the MFC and LFC was significantly higher in patients with cartilage lesions (MFC, 40.7 ms; LFC, 42.2 ms) than in patients without cartilage lesions (MFC, 38.0 ms, P = .025; LFC, 39.4 ms, P = .010). At 1-year follow-up, the T1ρ value of the MFC and LFC was also significantly higher in patients with lesions (MFC, 43.1 ms; LFC, 42.7 ms) than in patients without such lesions (MFC, 39.1 ms, P = .002; LFC, 40.4 ms, P = .023, respectively). In patients with cartilage injury, the T1ρ value of the MFC increased during the year after treatment (P = .002). There was no significant difference in the baseline and follow-up T1ρ value in patients with or without meniscal tears on each side although the T1ρ value of the MFC, MTP, and LFC increased during the first year after surgery regardless of the presence or

  16. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J Michael; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-03-15

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump-probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations.

  17. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; Cogdell, Richard J.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-22

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub–100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump–probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations.

  18. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  19. Correction with blood T1 is essential when measuring post-contrast myocardial T1 value in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eui-Young; Hwang, Sung Ho; Yoon, Young Won; Park, Chul Hwan; Paek, Mun Young; Greiser, Andreas; Chung, Hyemoon; Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Youn; Min, Pil-Ki; Lee, Byoung Kwon; Hong, Bum-Kee; Rim, Se-Joong; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-19

    Post-contrast T1 mapping by modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence has been introduced as a promising means to assess an expansion of the extra-cellular space. However, T1 value in the myocardium can be affected by scanning time after bolus contrast injection. In this study, we investigated the changes of the T1 values according to multiple slicing over scanning time at 15 minutes after contrast injection and usefulness of blood T1 correction. Eighteen reperfused acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, 13 cardiomyopathy patients and 8 healthy volunteers underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance with 15 minute-post contrast MOLLI to generate T1 maps. In 10 cardiomyopathy cases, pre- and post-contrast MOLLI techniques were performed to generate extracellular volume fraction (Ve). Six slices of T1 maps according to the left ventricular (LV) short axis, from apex to base, were consecutively obtained. Each T1 value was measured in the whole myocardium, infarcted myocardium, non-infarcted myocardium and LV blood cavity. The mean T1 value of infarcted myocardium was significantly lower than that of non-infarcted myocardium (425.4 ± 68.1 ms vs. 540.5 ± 88.0 ms, respectively, p infarcted myocardium increased significantly from apex to base (from 523.1 ± 99.5 ms to 561.1 ± 81.1 ms, p = 0.001), and were accompanied by a similar increase in blood T1 value in LV cavity (from 442.1 ± 120.7 ms to 456.8 ± 97.5 ms, p myocardial T1 values, however, were adjusted by the blood T1 values, they were consistent throughout the slices from apex to base (from 1.17 ± 0.18 to 1.25 ± 0.13, p > 0.05). The Ve did not show significant differences from apical to basal slices. Post-contrast myocardial T1 corrected by blood T1 or Ve, provide more stable measurement of degree of fibrosis in non-infarcted myocardium in short- axis multiple slicing.

  20. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yoga is an ancient practice rooted in Indian philosophy. The practice of yoga combines postures or movements ... Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A. ...

  1. Relaxation time T/sub 1/ and bound water fraction of muscle by NMR imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Yamane, T.; Tateno, Y.; Torii, S.; Matsumura, K.

    1986-05-01

    In order to establish the efficacy of NMR-CT in the diagnostic investigation of muscle disorders, proton NMR-CT imaging was performed and muscle longitudinal relaxation (T1) times were measured in 20 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and normal controls (NC). In addition, the bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the measured T1 value in appropriate cases. Results show that in DMD muscle T1 values were above normal in the early clinical stages, declined rapidly with progress of the disease, and reached the same low level as the subcutaneous fat. This decrease of T1 values was not uniform for all muscles, being most prominent in gluteus maximus and least in sartorius and gracilis. In NC muscle BWF increased with maturation under the age of 10 years, and became fixed beyond that. In the early stages of DMD, BWF was below normal.

  2. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. Longitudinal changes of cortical microstructure in Parkinson's disease assessed with T1 relaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Nürnberger

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In patients with PD, the development of widespread changes in cortical microstructure was observed as reflected by a reduction of cortical T1. The pattern of T1 decrease in PD patients exceeded the normal T1 decrease as found in physiological aging and showed considerable overlap with the pattern of cortical thinning demonstrated in previous PD studies. Therefore, cortical T1 might be a promising additional imaging marker for future longitudinal PD studies. The biological mechanisms underlying cortical T1 reductions remain to be further elucidated.

  4. Off-centre dynamic Jahn-Teller effect studied by electron spin relaxation of Cu2+ ions in SrF2 crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    Temperature cw-EPR and pulsed EPR electron spin echo experiments were performed for a low concentration of Cu 2+ ions in cubic SrF 2 crystals. The well resolved EPR spectrum at low temperatures (below 30 K) with parameters g parallel = 2.493, g perpendicular = 2.083, A parallel = 121, A perpendicular = 8.7, A parallel ( 19 F) = 135, A parallel ( 19 F) = 33.0 (A-values in 10 -4 cm -1 ) is transformed continuously into a single broad line above 225 K on heating, due to the g-factor shift and EPR line broadening. These data along with the angular variation EPR data are described in terms of a pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect of (T 2g +A 2u )x(a 1g +e g +t 1u ) type producing six off-centre positions of the Cu 2+ ion in the fluorine cube. Above 30 K a two-step averaging g -factor process occurs and is governed by vibronic dynamics between potential wells of the off-centre positions. This dynamics governs the electron spin relaxation in the whole temperature range. The electron spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T 1 grows rapidly by six orders of magnitude in the temperature range 30-100 K and is determined by the Orbach-type process with excitations to two excited vibronic levels of energy 83 and 174 cm -1 . For higher temperatures the relaxation is dominated by overbarrier jumps leading to the isotropic EPR spectrum above 225 K. The phase memory time T M has the rigid lattice value 3.5 μs determined by nuclear spectral diffusion and its temperature variation is governed by the vibronic dynamics indicating that the excitations between vibronic levels produce a dephasing of the electron spin precessional motion. (author)

  5. Fingerprinting Molecular Relaxation in Deformed Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Lam, Christopher N.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Wang, Weiyu; Liu, Jianning; Liu, Yun; Porcar, Lionel; Stanley, Christopher B.; Zhao, Zhichen; Hong, Kunlun; Wang, Yangyang

    2017-07-01

    The flow and deformation of macromolecules is ubiquitous in nature and industry, and an understanding of this phenomenon at both macroscopic and microscopic length scales is of fundamental and practical importance. Here, we present the formulation of a general mathematical framework, which could be used to extract, from scattering experiments, the molecular relaxation of deformed polymers. By combining and modestly extending several key conceptual ingredients in the literature, we show how the anisotropic single-chain structure factor can be decomposed by spherical harmonics and experimentally reconstructed from its cross sections on the scattering planes. The resulting wave-number-dependent expansion coefficients constitute a characteristic fingerprint of the macromolecular deformation, permitting detailed examinations of polymer dynamics at the microscopic level. We apply this approach to survey a long-standing problem in polymer physics regarding the molecular relaxation in entangled polymers after a large step deformation. The classical tube theory of Doi and Edwards predicts a fast chain retraction process immediately after the deformation, followed by a slow orientation relaxation through the reptation mechanism. This chain retraction hypothesis, which is the keystone of the tube theory for macromolecular flow and deformation, is critically examined by analyzing the fine features of the two-dimensional anisotropic spectra from small-angle neutron scattering by entangled polystyrenes. We show that the unique scattering patterns associated with the chain retraction mechanism are not experimentally observed. This result calls for a fundamental revision of the current theoretical picture for nonlinear rheological behavior of entangled polymeric liquids.

  6. Fingerprinting Molecular Relaxation in Deformed Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow and deformation of macromolecules is ubiquitous in nature and industry, and an understanding of this phenomenon at both macroscopic and microscopic length scales is of fundamental and practical importance. Here, we present the formulation of a general mathematical framework, which could be used to extract, from scattering experiments, the molecular relaxation of deformed polymers. By combining and modestly extending several key conceptual ingredients in the literature, we show how the anisotropic single-chain structure factor can be decomposed by spherical harmonics and experimentally reconstructed from its cross sections on the scattering planes. The resulting wave-number-dependent expansion coefficients constitute a characteristic fingerprint of the macromolecular deformation, permitting detailed examinations of polymer dynamics at the microscopic level. We apply this approach to survey a long-standing problem in polymer physics regarding the molecular relaxation in entangled polymers after a large step deformation. The classical tube theory of Doi and Edwards predicts a fast chain retraction process immediately after the deformation, followed by a slow orientation relaxation through the reptation mechanism. This chain retraction hypothesis, which is the keystone of the tube theory for macromolecular flow and deformation, is critically examined by analyzing the fine features of the two-dimensional anisotropic spectra from small-angle neutron scattering by entangled polystyrenes. We show that the unique scattering patterns associated with the chain retraction mechanism are not experimentally observed. This result calls for a fundamental revision of the current theoretical picture for nonlinear rheological behavior of entangled polymeric liquids.

  7. The Culture of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 Inhibits Listeria Proliferation in Salmon Fillets and Controls Maturation of Kimchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongho Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the antilisterial effect of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1, which was isolated from kimchi, and to assess its potential for extending the shelf life of salmon and kimchi. Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 culture eff ectively inhibited proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes in a dose-dependent manner in a salmon-based medium. Antilisterial effect of the culture was stronger than that of nisin, an antibacterial peptide, as evidenced by lower minimum inhibitory concentration value (20 mg/mL compared to nisin (over 20 mg/mL. P. pentosaceus T1 culture also effectively inhibited the growth of Listeria in salmon fi llet. In particular, the culture (6 g per 100 mL showed a stronger inhibitory effect than sodium hypochlorite (0.2 mg/mL, a disinfectant used in food processing. In kimchi fermentation, the treatment with P. pentosaceus T1 culture suppressed changes of acidity and pH during maturation. The inhibitory eff ect of the culture on kimchi lactic acid bacteria, which include Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus sakei, led to a drastic decrease in maturation rates of kimchi. Moreover, sensory test on kimchi treated with P. pentosaceus T1 showed that the culture improved overall acceptability of kimchi, which can be observed in higher scores of sourness, texture, off-flavour and mouthfeel compared with untreated kimchi. The results of this study suggest that kimchi-derived P. pentosaceus T1 could be a potential antilisterial agent in fi sh products as well as a starter to control overmaturation of kimchi.

  8. NMR relaxation in systems with magnetic nanoparticles: a temperature study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M; Hejasee, Rola H; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2014-03-01

    To measure and model nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation enhancement due to the presence of gadolinium (Gd)-substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) at different temperatures. Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using fast spin echo (FSE) sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated Mn0.5 Zn0.5 Gd0.02 Fe1.98 O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8-58°C. Physical characterization of the MNPs synthesized using chemical coprecipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Relaxivity (in s(-1) mM(-1) Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8-58°C. T2 data were fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG-coated particles than the uncoated ones. The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Exploring catalyst passivation with NMR relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Neil; Gladden, Lynn F; D'Agostino, Carmine

    2017-10-26

    NMR relaxation has recently emerged as a novel and non-invasive tool for probing the surface dynamics of adsorbate molecules within liquid-saturated mesoporous catalysts. The elucidation of such dynamics is of particular relevance to the study and development of solvated green catalytic processes, such as the production of chemicals and fuels from bio-resources. In this paper we develop and implement a protocol using high field 1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation as a probe of the reorientational dynamics of liquids imbibed within mesoporous oxide materials. The observed relaxation of liquids within mesoporous materials is highly sensitive to the adsorbed surface layer, giving insight into tumbling behaviour of spin-bearing chemical environments at the pore surface. As a prototypical example of relevance to liquid-phase catalytic systems, we examine the mobility of liquid methanol within a range of common catalyst supports. In particular, through the calculation and comparison of a suitable interaction parameter, we assess and quantify changes to these surface dynamics upon replacing surface hydroxyl groups with hydrophobic alkyl chains. Our results indicate that the molecular tumbling of adsorbed methanol is enhanced upon surface passivation due to the suppression of surface-adsorbate hydrogen bonding interactions, and tends towards that of the unrestricted bulk liquid. A complex analysis in which we account for the influence of changing pore structure and surface chemistry upon passivation is discussed. The results presented highlight the use of NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements as a non-invasive probe of molecular dynamics at surfaces of interest to liquid-phase heterogeneous catalysis.

  10. Rotational isomerism and ultrasonic relaxation in 1,2-dibromoethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, K.; Choi, P.-K.; Seki, W.

    1983-07-01

    Three different ultrasonic techniques, pulse echo, HRB (high-resolution Bragg reflection), and Brillouin scattering were used to measure the sound velocity and absorption in 1,2-dibromoethane at 11, 20, and 30 °C over the frequency range from 3 MHz and 6 GHz. The observed results showed a typical spectrum for a single relaxation process, from which the relaxation frequency and strength were determined. The temperature dependence of the relaxation frequency and strength suggested that the activation energy for the gauche molecule is 3.0±0.5 kcal/mol and that the energy difference is 1.3±0.2 kcal/mol, respectively. The magnitude of the relaxation strength was successfully described by taking the effect of the volume change into account, and ΔV/V was estimated to be 0.05.

  11. Influence of Free Radicals on the Intrinsic MRI Relaxation Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, Rong-Wen; Scotti, Alessandro M; Li, Weiguo; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Cai, Kejia

    2017-01-01

    Free radicals are critical contributors in various conditions including normal aging, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and diabetes. Currently there is no non-invasive approach to image tissue free radicals based on endogenous contrast due to their extremely short lifetimes and low in vivo concentrations. In this study we aim at characterizing the influence of free radicals on the MRI relaxation properties. Phantoms containing free radicals were created by treating egg white with various H 2 O 2 concentrations and scanned on a 9.4 T MRI scanner at room temperature. T 1 and T 2 relaxation maps were generated from data acquired with an inversion recovery sequence with varied inversion times and a multi-echo spin echo sequence with varied echo times (TEs), respectively. Results demonstrated that free radicals express a strong shortening effect on T 1 , which was proportional to the H 2 O 2 concentration, and a relatively small reduction in T 2 (free radicals was estimated to be in the pM range that is within the physiological range of in vivo free radical expression. In conclusion, the free radicals show a strong paramagnetic effect that may be utilized as an endogenous MRI contrast for its non-invasive in vivo imaging.

  12. Anatomical variation: T1 spina bifida occulta. Radiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Manenti, MD, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a 26-year-old male patient who was admitted to our emergency department after a traffic accident and who suffered from neck pain. We have found accidentally a dorsal spinous process schisis, a very rare vertebral abnormality, that we recognized in the X-rays imaging performed for the study of the lung parenchyma.

  13. Anatomical variation: T1 spina bifida occulta. Radiological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenti, Guglielmo; Iundusi, Riccardo; Picchi, Eliseo; Marsico, Salvatore; D'Onofrio, Adolfo; Rossi, Giorgia; Tarantino, Umberto; Floris, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    We report a 26-year-old male patient who was admitted to our emergency department after a traffic accident and who suffered from neck pain. We have found accidentally a dorsal spinous process schisis, a very rare vertebral abnormality, that we recognized in the X-rays imaging performed for the study of the lung parenchyma.

  14. Butyrate transcriptionally enhances peptide transporter PepT1 expression and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Dalmasso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PepT1, an intestinal epithelial apical di/tripeptide transporter, is normally expressed in the small intestine and induced in colon during chronic inflammation. This study aimed at investigating PepT1 regulation by butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by commensal bacteria and accumulated inside inflamed colonocyte. RESULTS: We found that butyrate treatment of human intestinal epithelial Caco2-BBE cells increased human PepT1 (hPepT1 promoter activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with maximal activity observed in cells treated with 5 mM butyrate for 24 h. Under this condition, hPepT1 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression levels were increased as assessed by luciferase assay, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. hPepT1 transport activity was accordingly increased by approximately 2.5-fold. Butyrate did not alter hPepT1 mRNA half-life indicating that butyrate acts at the transcriptional level. Molecular analyses revealed that Cdx2 is the most important transcription factor for butyrate-induced increase of hPepT1 expression and activity in Caco2-BBE cells. Butyrate-activated Cdx2 binding to hPepT1 promoter was confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, Caco2-BBE cells overexpressing Cdx2 exhibited greater hPepT1 expression level than wild-type cells. Finally, treatment of mice with 5 mM butyrate added to drinking water for 24 h increased colonic PepT1 mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as enhanced PepT1 transport activity in colonic apical membranes vesicles. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results demonstrate that butyrate increases PepT1 expression and activity in colonic epithelial cells, which provides a new understanding of PepT1 regulation during chronic inflammation.

  15. Topology Synthesis of Structures Using Parameter Relaxation and Geometric Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.

    2007-01-01

    Typically, structural topology optimization problems undergo relaxation of certain design parameters to allow the existence of intermediate variable optimum topologies. Relaxation permits the use of a variety of gradient-based search techniques and has been shown to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and eliminate mesh dependencies. This Technical Publication (TP) will demonstrate the application of relaxation to a control point discretization of the design workspace for the structural topology optimization process. The control point parameterization with subdivision has been offered as an alternative to the traditional method of discretized finite element design domain. The principle of relaxation demonstrates the increased utility of the control point parameterization. One of the significant results of the relaxation process offered in this TP is that direct manufacturability of the optimized design will be maintained without the need for designer intervention or translation. In addition, it will be shown that relaxation of certain parameters may extend the range of problems that can be addressed; e.g., in permitting limited out-of-plane motion to be included in a path generation problem.

  16. Positive-contrast cellular MRI of embryonic stem cells for tissue regeneration using a highly efficient T1MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loai, Sadi; Haedicke, Inga; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A; Zhang, Xiao-An; Cheng, Hai Ling

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of high-sensitivity cellular MRI of embryonic stem (ES) cells using a novel cell permeable and cell retentive T 1 contrast agent. Mouse ES cells were labeled with a novel manganese porphyrin contrast agent, MnAMP, at 0.1 mM over 2 to 24 h and retained in contrast-free medium for up to 24 h postlabeling. MRI was performed on a 3 Tesla clinical scanner; T 1 and T 2 relaxation times were measured. Quantification of manganese content was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Viability and proliferation assays were done for the longest labeling interval. Differentiation capacity was assessed using the hanging drop method to direct differentiation toward cardiomyocytes. MnAMP-labeled ES cells exhibited over a fourfold decrease in T 1 compared with unlabeled cells, and maintained up to a threefold decrease 24 h postlabeling. Viability and proliferation were not affected. Most importantly, labeled ES cells differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes that exhibited normal contractility patterns. MnAMP-based cellular MRI is a very high sensitivity T 1 approach for cellular imaging. It has the potential for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of stem cell therapy in cardiac regeneration and other tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1456-1463. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Effect of thermodynamic history on secondary relaxation in glassy phenolphthalein-dimethyl-ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.; Lucchesi, M.; Rolla, P. A.; Paluch, M.; Pawlus, S.

    2006-03-01

    We present a study of the intermediate secondary relaxation process of phenolphthalein-dimethyl-ether. Though this process is intramolecular in nature, it reveals pronounced pressure dependence. Moreover, its relaxation frequency and intensity exhibit pronounced dependence on the thermal history followed during vitrification. These results suggest that the nonequilibrium nature of the glassy state influences this secondary relaxation principally through the dependence on the specific volume.

  18. Composition effect of potassium-borate glasses on their relaxation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomovskoj, V.A.; Bartenev, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Relaxation processes in potassium-borate glasses have been investigated in detail for the first time. It is shown that low-temperature β-process of relaxation relating to rotational mobility of the B-O bond is the same for all potassium-borate glasses and B 2 O 3 . The process of β k -relaxation related to diffusion mobility of potassium ions depends on the composition of the glasses in the same way as α-relaxation (glass formation).12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. [The influence of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine on the manifestations of the flexion contracture in the hip joint in the men at the age of 50-60 years following amputation of the lower limb at the hip level in the course of the rehabilitation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaev, M S; Malchevskiy, V A; Prokopev, N Y; Khrupa, D A

    2017-12-28

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the outcome the application of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine and of the lumbosacral junction as a component of the combined rehabilitation on the manifestations of the flexion contracture in the hip joint in the men at the age of 50-60 years following amputation of the lower limb at the hip level throughout the course of the rehabilitative process. A total of 243 patients who had undergone ablation of a femur available for the examination. 153 of them were treatment with the use of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine and of the lumbosacral junction. The control group was comprised of the remaining 90 patients treated without the application of the technique for post-isometric relaxation. The analysis of the degree of flexion contracture of the hip joint on the side of ablation was carried out by means of the Thomas test. The results of the study give evidence that that use of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of muscles of the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint makes it possible to reduce the time needed to decrease the severity of contracture of the hip joint during the rehabilitation process. The data obtained provide a basis for recommending the inclusion of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of muscles of the lumbar spine and the lumbosacral junction into the program of the combined rehabilitation of the patients who had undergone ablation of a femur.

  20. Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The author pretends to present with this article, the therapeutic contributions of Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Mental Health context, making only reference to adults intervention. A brief description of the body, as a biopsychosocial unity, is found in the introduction, which is followed by the explanation of conceptual and interventional models in Clinical Psychomotricity. The author makes reference to psychotherapeutic values of relaxation, giving some examples of techniques and exposing a clinical case. Finally, the author briefly describes her recent experience of Psychomotor intervention in Psychiatric Service of Hospital Fernando Fonseca.

  1. Relaxation Oscillation and Canard Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, M.; Szmolyan, P.

    2001-08-01

    We give a geometric analysis of relaxation oscillations and canard cycles in singularly perturbed planar vector fields. The transition from small Hopf-type cycles to large relaxation cycles, which occurs in an exponentially thin parameter interval, is described as a perturbation of a family of singular cycles. The results are obtained by means of two blow-up transformations combined with standard tools of dynamical systems theory. The efficient use of various charts is emphasized. The results are applied to the van der Pol equation.

  2. Generalized min-max bound-based MRI pulse sequence design framework for wide-range T1 relaxometry: A case study on the tissue specific imaging sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new design strategy for optimizing MRI pulse sequences for T1 relaxometry. The design strategy optimizes the pulse sequence parameters to minimize the maximum variance of unbiased T1 estimates over a range of T1 values using the Cramér-Rao bound. In contrast to prior sequences optimized for a single nominal T1 value, the optimized sequence using our bound-based strategy achieves improved precision and accuracy for a broad range of T1 estimates within a clinically feasible scan time. The optimization combines the downhill simplex method with a simulated annealing process. To show the effectiveness of the proposed strategy, we optimize the tissue specific imaging (TSI sequence. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the optimized TSI sequence yields improved precision and accuracy over the popular driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T1 (DESPOT1 approach for normal brain tissues (estimated T1 700-2000 ms at 3.0T. The relative mean estimation error (MSE for T1 estimation is less than 1.7% using the optimized TSI sequence, as opposed to less than 7.0% using DESPOT1 for normal brain tissues. The optimized TSI sequence achieves good stability by keeping the MSE under 7.0% over larger T1 values corresponding to different lesion tissues and the cerebrospinal fluid (up to 5000 ms. The T1 estimation accuracy using the new pulse sequence also shows improvement, which is more pronounced in low SNR scenarios.

  3. Increased Delay Between Gadolinium Chelate Administration and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Acquisition Increases Contrast-Enhancing Tumor Volumes and T1 Intensities in Brain Tumor Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, Paula L; Bonekamp, David; Sill, Martin; Wick, Antje; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Kickingereder, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of delayed T1-weighted (T1-w) MRI acquisition after gadolinium chelate administration on brain tumor volumes and T1-w intensities. Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed, contrast-enhancing intra-axial brain tumors were analyzed in this prospective test-retest study. Patients underwent 2 consecutive 3 T MRI scans (separated by a 1-minute break) during routine follow-up with contrast-enhanced T1 (ceT1-w), T2, and FLAIR acquisition. Macrocyclic gadolinium chelate-based contrast agent was only administered before the first ceT1-w acquisition; median latency to ceT1-w acquisition was 6.72 minutes (IQR, 6.53-6.92) in the first and 16.27 minutes (IQR, 15.49-17.26) in the second scan. Changes in tumor volumes and relative ceT1-w intensities between the 2 acquisitions were quantitatively assessed following semiautomated tumor segmentation (separately for contrast-enhancement [CE], necrosis [NEC], and nonenhancing [NE] tumor). Semiautomatically segmented CE tumor volumes were significantly larger in the second acquisition (median +32% [1.2 cm]; IQR, 16%-62%; P < 0.01), which corresponded to a 10% increase in CE tumor diameter (+0.3 cm). Contrarily, NEC and NE tumor volumes were significantly smaller (median -24% [IQR, -36% to -54%], P < 0.01 for NEC and -2% [IQR, -1% to -3%], P = 0.02 for NE tumor). Bland-Altman plots confirmed a proportional bias toward higher CE and lower NEC volumes for the second ceT1-w acquisition. Relative ceT1-w intensities for both early- (regions already enhancing in the first scan) and late-enhancing (newly enhancing regions in the second scan) tumor were significantly increased in the second acquisition (by 5.8% and 27.3% [P < 0.01, respectively]). Linear-mixed effects modeling confirmed that the increase in CE volumes and CE intensities is a function of the interval between contrast agent injection and ceT1-w acquisition (P < 0.01 each). Our study indicates that the maximum extent of CE

  4. 31-P Relaxation times of metabolic compounds in tumors grafted in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remy, C.; Benabid, A.L.; Jacrot, M.; Riondel, J.; Albrand, J.P.; Decorps, M.

    1985-08-01

    The observation that water proton relaxation rates were longer in tumors than in normal tissues provided a basis for the detection of human tumors by the NMR imaging technique. To evaluate the potentiality of 31-P NMR spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool of the pathological state of tissues, T1 and T2 relaxation times have been measured for the phosphates of ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphomonoesters (PME) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in the 31-P NMR spectra obtained in vivo for normal rat brain and rat brain tumors implanted in nude mice

  5. Data-driven optimized flip angle selection for T1 estimation from spoiled gradient echo acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Christina M; Hurley, Samuel A; Meyerand, M Elizabeth; Koay, Cheng Guan

    2016-09-01

    Define criteria for selection of optimal flip angle sets for T1 estimation and evaluate effects on T1 mapping. Flip angle sets for spoiled gradient echo-based T1 mapping were selected by minimizing T1 estimate variance weighted by the joint density of M0 and T1 in an initial acquisition. The effect of optimized flip angle selection on T1 estimate error was measured using simulations and experimental data in the human and rat brain. For two-point acquisitions, optimized angle sets were similar to those proposed by other groups and, therefore, performed similarly. For multipoint acquisitions, optimal angle sets for T1 mapping in the brain consisted of a repetition of two angles. Implementation of optimal angles reduced T1 estimate variance by 30-40% compared with a multipoint acquisition using a range of angles. Performance of the optimal angle set was equivalent to that of a repetition of the two-angle set selected using criteria proposed by other researchers. Repetition of two carefully selected flip angles notably improves the precision of resulting T1 estimates compared with acquisitions using a range of flip angles. This work provides a flexible and widely applicable optimization method of particular use for those who repeatedly perform T1 estimation. Magn Reson Med 76:792-802, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  7. Detection of maltodextrin and its discrimination from sucrose are independent of the T1R2 + T1R3 heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly R; Spector, Alan C

    2017-10-01

    Maltodextrins, such as Maltrin and Polycose, are glucose polymer mixtures of varying chain lengths that are palatable to rodents. Although glucose and other sugars activate the T1R2 + T1R3 "sweet" taste receptor, recent evidence from T1R2- or T1R3-knockout (KO) mice suggests that maltodextrins, despite their glucose polymer composition, activate a separate receptor mechanism to generate a taste percept qualitatively distinguishable from that of sweeteners. However, explicit discrimination of maltodextrins from prototypical sweeteners has not yet been psychophysically tested in any murine model. Therefore, mice lacking T1R2 + T1R3 and wild-type controls were tested in a two-response taste discrimination task to determine whether maltodextrins are 1 ) detectable when both receptor subunits are absent and 2 ) perceptually distinct from that of sucrose irrespective of viscosity, intensity, and hedonics. Most KO mice displayed similar Polycose sensitivity as controls. However, some KO mice were only sensitive to the higher Polycose concentrations, implicating potential allelic variation in the putative polysaccharide receptor or downstream pathways unmasked by the absence of T1R2 + T1R3. Varied Maltrin and sucrose concentrations of approximately matched viscosities were then presented to render the oral somatosensory features, intensity, and hedonic value of the solutions irrelevant. Although both genotypes competently discriminated Maltrin from sucrose, performance was apparently driven by the different orosensory percepts of the two stimuli in control mice and the presence of a Maltrin but not sucrose orosensory cue in KO mice. These data support the proposed presence of an orosensory receptor mechanism that gives rise to a qualitatively distinguishable sensation from that of sucrose. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Vasselli, Joseph R.; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. PMID:26157055

  9. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, John I; Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F; Vasselli, Joseph R; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Closed-form expressions for flip angle variation that maximize total signal in T1-weighted rapid gradient echo MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnitzky, Matthias; Klose, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences are commonly employed for T1-weighted structural brain imaging. Following a contrast preparation radiofrequency (RF) pulse, the data acquisition proceeds under nonequilibrium conditions of the relaxing longitudinal magnetization. Variation of the flip angle can be used to maximize total available signal. Simulated annealing or greedy algorithms have so far been published to numerically solve this problem, with signal-to-noise ratios optimized for clinical imaging scenarios by adhering to a predefined shape of the signal evolution. We propose an unconstrained optimization of the MPRAGE experiment that employs techniques from resource allocation theory. A new dynamic programming solution is introduced that yields closed-form expressions for optimal flip angle variation. Flip angle series are proposed that maximize total transverse magnetization (Mxy) for a range of physiologic T1 values. A 3D MPRAGE sequence is modified to allow for a controlled variation of the excitation angle. Experiments employing a T1 contrast phantom are performed at 3T. 1D acquisitions without phase encoding permit measurement of the temporal development of Mxy. Image mean signal and standard deviation for reference flip angle trains are compared in 2D measurements. Signal profiles at sharp phantom edges are acquired to access image blurring related to nonuniform Mxy development. A novel closed-form expression for flip angle variation is found that constitutes the optimal policy to reach maximum total signal. It numerically equals previously published results of other authors when evaluated under their simplifying assumptions. Longitudinal magnetization (Mz) is exhaustively used without causing abrupt changes in the measured MR signal, which is a prerequisite for artifact free images. Phantom experiments at 3T verify the expected benefit for total accumulated k-space signal when compared with published flip angle series. Describing

  11. Parameterization of NMR relaxation curves in terms of logarithmic moments of the relaxation time distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Oleg V.; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-06-01

    This work addresses the problem of a compact and easily comparable representation of multi-exponential relaxation data. It is often convenient to describe such data in a few parameters, all being of physical significance and easy to interpret, and in such a way that enables a model-free comparison between different groups of samples. Logarithmic moments (LMs) of the relaxation time constitute a set of parameters which are related to the characteristic relaxation time on the log-scale, the width and the asymmetry of an underlying distribution of exponentials. On the other hand, the calculation of LMs does not require knowing the actual distribution function and is reduced to a numerical integration of original data. The performance of this method has been tested on both synthetic and experimental NMR relaxation data which differ in a signal-to-noise ratio, the sampling range and the sampling rate. The calculation of two lower-order LMs, the log-mean time and the log-variance, has proved robust against deficiencies of the experiment such as scattered data point and incomplete sampling. One may consider using them as such to monitor formation of a heterogeneous structure, e.g., in phase separation, vitrification, polymerization, hydration, aging, contrast agent propagation processes. It may also assist in interpreting frequency and temperature dependences of relaxation, revealing a crossover from slow to fast exchange between populations. The third LM was found to be a less reliable quantity due to its susceptibility to the noise and must be used with caution.

  12. T1 Mapping in Discrimination of Hypertrophic Phenotypes: Hypertensive Heart Disease and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Findings From the International T1 Multicenter Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojar, Rocio; Varma, Niharika; Child, Nick; Goodman, Benjamin; Jabbour, Andrew; Yu, Chung-Yao; Gebker, Rolf; Doltra, Adelina; Kelle, Sebastian; Khan, Sitara; Rogers, Toby; Arroyo Ucar, Eduardo; Cummins, Ciara; Carr-White, Gerald; Nagel, Eike; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2015-12-01

    The differential diagnosis of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy remains challenging in clinical practice, in particular, between hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and increased LV wall thickness because of systemic hypertension. Diffuse myocardial disease is a characteristic feature in HCM, and an early manifestation of sarcomere-gene mutations in subexpressed family members (G+P- subjects). This study aimed to investigate whether detecting diffuse myocardial disease by T1 mapping can discriminate between HCM versus hypertensive heart disease as well as to detect genetically driven interstitial changes in the G+P- subjects. Patients with diagnoses of HCM or hypertension (HCM, n=95; hypertension, n=69) and G+P- subjects (n=23) underwent a clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol (3 tesla) for cardiac volumes, function, and scar imaging. T1 mapping was performed before and >20 minutes after administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of gadobutrol. Native T1 and extracellular volume fraction were significantly higher in HCM compared with patients with hypertension (P15 mm (P2 SD above the mean of the normal range. Native T1 was an independent discriminator between HCM and hypertension, over and above extracellular volume fraction, LV wall thickness and indexed LV mass. Native T1 was also useful in separating G+P- subjects from controls. Native T1 may be applied to discriminate between HCM and hypertensive heart disease and detect early changes in G+P- subjects. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. The T1R2/T1R3 sweet receptor and TRPM5 ion channel taste targets with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprous, Dennis; Palmer, Kyle R

    2010-01-01

    Taste signaling is a critical determinant of ingestive behaviors and thereby linked to obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Recent evidence of taste signaling pathways in the gut suggests the link to be more direct, raising the possibility that taste receptor systems could be regarded as therapeutic targets. T1R2/T1R3, the G protein coupled receptor that mediates sweet taste, and the TRPM5 ion channel have been the focus of discovery programs seeking novel compounds that could be useful in modifying taste. We review in this chapter the hypothesis of gastrointestinal taste signaling and discuss the potential for T1R2/T1R3 and TRPM5 as targets of therapeutic intervention in obesity and diabetes. Critical to the development of a drug discovery program is the creation of libraries that enhance the likelihood of identifying novel compounds that modulate the target of interest. We advocate a computer-based chemoinformatic approach for assembling natural and synthetic compound libraries as well as for supporting optimization of structure activity relationships. Strategies for discovering modulators of T1R2/T1R3 and TRPM5 using methods of chemoinformatics are presented herein. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultra-fast relaxation kinetics in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is presented a brief description of relaxation processes in highly excited semiconductor plasmas (HESP). Comparison with experimental data obtained by means of ultra-fast laser light spectroscopy (UFLS) is made. Some aspects of response function theory in systems far-from-equilibrium are reviewed in Section II. In Section III some comments on the question of nonequilibrium thermodynamics relevant to the problem to be considered are presented. In last Section a brief summary of the different aspects of the subject is also presented. (Author) [pt

  15. Charge imbalance: its relaxation, diffusion and oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pethick, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this article, the authors use a model for charge density based on two charge components: the normal quasiparticle component and the superfluid/condensate component. Based on the quasiparticle Boltzmann equation, this two-component model, when used in nonequilibrium contexts, is fruitful in describing a variety of charge-imbalance phenomena in superconductors. The authors discuss various methods of generating charge-imbalances, charge-imbalance relaxation processes (such as phonons, impurity scattering and magnetic impurities) and applications of the two-component model of charge imbalance to spatially inhomogeneous conditions

  16. Ultra-fast relaxation kinetics in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is presented a brief description of relaxation processes in highly excited semiconductor plasmas (HESP). Comparison with experimental data obtained by means of ultra-fast laser light spectroscopy (UFLS) is made. Some aspects of response funtion theory in systems far-from-equilibrium are reviewed in Section II. In Section III we present some comments on the question of nonequilibrium thermodynamics relevant to the problem to be considered. In last section we present a brief summary of the different aspects of the subject. (author) [pt

  17. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  18. Tensions relaxation in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuniberti, A.M.; Picasso, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Traction and stress relaxation studies were performed on polycrystalline Zry-4 at room temperature. The effect of loading velocity on the plastic behaviour of the material is discussed, analysing log σ vs. log dε/dt at different deformation levels. The contribution introduced by the testing machine was taken into account in data evaluation. (Author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Stochastic and Chaotic Relaxation Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    For relaxation oscillators stochastic and chaotic dynamics are investigated. The effect of random perturbations upon the period is computed. For an extended system with additional state variables chaotic behavior can be expected. As an example, the Van der Pol oscillator is changed into a

  20. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  1. Relaxation experiments with synchrotron radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leupold, O; Bernhard, A; Gerdau, E; Jaschke, J; Ruter, HD; Shvydko, Y; Alp, EE; Hession, P; Hu, M; Sturhahn, W; Sutter, J; Toellner, T; Chumakov, AI; Metge, J; Ruffer, R

    1998-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena show up in standard energy domain Mossbauer spectra via line broadening. The evaluation of such spectra is in most cases done by adopting the stochastic theory mainly developed in the 60s and 70s. Due to the time structure and the polarization of the synchrotron radiation

  2. Spin relaxation in disordered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzheparov, F S

    2011-01-01

    A review is given on theoretical grounds and typical experimental appearances of spin dynamics and relaxation in solids containing randomly distributed nuclear and/or electronic spins. Brief content is as follows. Disordered and magnetically diluted systems. General outlines of the spin transport theory. Random walks in disordered systems (RWDS). Observable values in phase spin relaxation, free induction decay (FID). Interrelation of longitudinal and transversal relaxation related to dynamics of occupancies and phases. Occupation number representation for equations of motion. Continuum media approximation and inapplicability of moment expansions. Long-range transitions vs percolation theory. Concentration expansion as a general constructive basis for analytical methods. Scaling properties of propagators. Singular point. Dynamical and kinematical memory in RWDS. Ways of regrouping of concentration expansions. CTRW and semi-phenomenology. Coherent medium approximation for nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities. Combining of memory functions and cumulant expansions for calculation of FID. Path integral representations for RWDS. Numerical simulations of RWDS. Spin dynamics in magnetically diluted systems with low Zeeman and medium low dipole temperatures. Cluster expansions, regularization of dipole interactions and spectral dynamics.

  3. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  4. Novel high relaxivity colloidal particles based on the specific phase organisation of amphiphilic gadolinium chelates with cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gløgård, Christian; Stensrud, Gry; Klaveness, Jo

    2003-03-06

    To obtain high T(1)-relaxivity colloidal particles with a simultaneously high loading of amphiphilic Gd-chelates, a novel drug dosage form based on the phase organisation of amphiphilic gadolinium chelates with cholesterol was developed. In order to find a formulation, which exhibit both high T(1)-relaxivity and gives small particles a D-optimal mixture design (experimental design) was applied. Gadolinium 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-10-(2-hydroxyhexadecyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Gd-HHD-DO3A) and cholesterol at approximately equimolar ratio proved to form thermodynamic stable disc-like colloidal particles as seen by cryo-electron micrographs. T(1)-relaxivity of these particles was typically around 20mM(-1)s(-1) and the size below 100 nm (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)). The particles do most probably not interact with blood components as no change in T(1)-relaxivity was observed when the particles were mixed with whole blood. The particles were stable at room temperature for at least 6 months.

  5. Increased native T1-values at the interventricular insertion regions in precapillary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Onno A; Vissers, Loek; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Hofman, Mark B M; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of the pressure overloaded right ventricle (RV) of precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients, exhibits late gadolinium enhancement at the interventricular insertion regions, a phenomenon which has been linked to focal fibrosis. Native T1-mapping is an alternative technique to characterize myocardium and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents. The aim of this study was to characterize the myocardium of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), systemic scleroderma related PH (PAH-Ssc) and chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH) patients using native T1-mapping and to see whether native T1-values were related to disease severity. Furthermore, we compared native T1-values between the different precapillary PH categories. Native T1-mapping was performed in 46 IPAH, 14 PAH-SSc and 10 CTEPH patients and 10 control subjects. Native T1-values were assessed using regions of interest at the RV and LV free wall, interventricular septum and interventricular insertion regions. In PH patients, native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions were significantly higher than the native T1-values of the RV free wall, LV free wall and interventricular septum. Native T1-values at the insertion regions were significantly related to disease severity. Native T1-values were not different between IPAH, PAH-Ssc and CTEPH patients. Native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions are significantly increased in precapillary PH and are related to disease severity. Native T1-mapping can be developed as an alternative technique for the characterization of the interventricular insertion regions and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents.

  6. Wettability of Chalk and Argillaceous Sandstones Assessed from T1/T2 Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Saidian, M.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    with water, oil or oil/water at irreducible water saturation. The T1/T2 ratio obtained from T1-T2 maps reflects the T2-shortening. We compare the T1/T2 ratio for the same type of rock, saturated with different fluids. The chalk shows high affinity for water, Berea sandstone has no clear preference for oil...... and water whereas chloritic greensand shows different behavior for small and large pores...

  7. Effect of carrier relaxation lifetime on the performance of InAs/InP quantum-dash lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2011-12-01

    The effect of carrier relaxation process into the quantum dash (Qdash) ground state (GS) is examined theoretically by carrier-photon rate equation model incorporating the inhomogeneous broadening. Increase in the relaxation time and the inhomogeneous broadening degrades the threshold current density. Moreover, our results show that a relaxation time of less than 2 ps gives optimum laser performance. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. • Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used in emergency settings. • Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. • Magnetic resonance imaging is widely used in pregnant population. • T1 bright appendix sign can be a specific sign representing normal appendix.

  9. The ALADIN System and its canonical model configurations AROME CY41T1 and ALARO CY40T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Termonia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ALADIN System is a numerical weather prediction (NWP system developed by the international ALADIN consortium for operational weather forecasting and research purposes. It is based on a code that is shared with the global model IFS of the ECMWF and the ARPEGE model of Météo-France. Today, this system can be used to provide a multitude of high-resolution limited-area model (LAM configurations. A few configurations are thoroughly validated and prepared to be used for the operational weather forecasting in the 16 partner institutes of this consortium. These configurations are called the ALADIN canonical model configurations (CMCs. There are currently three CMCs: the ALADIN baseline CMC, the AROME CMC and the ALARO CMC. Other configurations are possible for research, such as process studies and climate simulations. The purpose of this paper is (i to define the ALADIN System in relation to the global counterparts IFS and ARPEGE, (ii to explain the notion of the CMCs, (iii to document their most recent versions, and (iv to illustrate the process of the validation and the porting of these configurations to the operational forecast suites of the partner institutes of the ALADIN consortium. This paper is restricted to the forecast model only; data assimilation techniques and postprocessing techniques are part of the ALADIN System but they are not discussed here.

  10. The ALADIN System and its canonical model configurations AROME CY41T1 and ALARO CY40T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termonia, Piet; Fischer, Claude; Bazile, Eric; Bouyssel, François; Brožková, Radmila; Bénard, Pierre; Bochenek, Bogdan; Degrauwe, Daan; Derková, Mariá; El Khatib, Ryad; Hamdi, Rafiq; Mašek, Ján; Pottier, Patricia; Pristov, Neva; Seity, Yann; Smolíková, Petra; Španiel, Oldřich; Tudor, Martina; Wang, Yong; Wittmann, Christoph; Joly, Alain

    2018-01-01

    The ALADIN System is a numerical weather prediction (NWP) system developed by the international ALADIN consortium for operational weather forecasting and research purposes. It is based on a code that is shared with the global model IFS of the ECMWF and the ARPEGE model of Météo-France. Today, this system can be used to provide a multitude of high-resolution limited-area model (LAM) configurations. A few configurations are thoroughly validated and prepared to be used for the operational weather forecasting in the 16 partner institutes of this consortium. These configurations are called the ALADIN canonical model configurations (CMCs). There are currently three CMCs: the ALADIN baseline CMC, the AROME CMC and the ALARO CMC. Other configurations are possible for research, such as process studies and climate simulations. The purpose of this paper is (i) to define the ALADIN System in relation to the global counterparts IFS and ARPEGE, (ii) to explain the notion of the CMCs, (iii) to document their most recent versions, and (iv) to illustrate the process of the validation and the porting of these configurations to the operational forecast suites of the partner institutes of the ALADIN consortium. This paper is restricted to the forecast model only; data assimilation techniques and postprocessing techniques are part of the ALADIN System but they are not discussed here.

  11. Vibrational-rotational relaxation of the simplest hydrogen-containing molecules (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molevich, N.E.; Oraevskii, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    In connection with the development of chemical lasers much attention is now devoted to the study of kinetic processes is gaseous mixtures containing the hydrogen halides. Vibrational relaxation of molecules if primarily studied without specifying its relation to the rational levels. Rotational relaxation is regarded a priori as faster than vibrational relaxation, so that the population of the rotational levels is assumed to be in equilibrium. This approach to the relaxation of hydrogen halide molecules (and other diatomic hydrogen-containing molecules), however, is unable to explain satisfactorily the results of the papers discussed below. An analysis of the data obtained in these papers leads to the conclusion that the general picture of relaxation in diatomic hydrogen-containing molecules must be viewed as a unified process of vibrational and rotational relaxation. It is shown that those effects observed during vibrational relaxation of such molecules which are unusual from the standpoint of the theory of vibrational-translational relaxation are well explained in terms of intermolecular vibrational-rotational relaxation together with pure rotational relaxation

  12. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T 1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T 1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  13. Relaxation time of normal breast tissues. Changes with age and variations during the menstrual cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, K.I.; Majurin, M.L.; Komu, M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of age on the relaxation times of normal breast parenchyma and its surrounding fatty tissue were evaluated, and the variations during a normal menstrual cycle were analyzed using an ultra low field 0.02 T imager. Thirty-nine healthy volunteers aged 21 to 59 years were examined to determine T1 and T2 relaxation times, and 8 of these volunteers were studied once weekly during one menstrual cycle. The only significant trend was an increase in the T2 of breast parenchyma with increasing age. During the menstrual cycle there was a slight but insignificant (p=0.10) increase in T1 of the breast parenchyma values during the latter half of the menstrual cycle, and a corresponding increase in T2 values between the 2nd and 3rd weeks of the menstrual cycle, which was significant. (orig.)

  14. Relaxation time of normal breast tissues. Changes with age and variations during the menstrual cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, K.I. (University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology); Majurin, M.L. (University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology); Komu, M. (University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1994-05-01

    The influence of age on the relaxation times of normal breast parenchyma and its surrounding fatty tissue were evaluated, and the variations during a normal menstrual cycle were analyzed using an ultra low field 0.02 T imager. Thirty-nine healthy volunteers aged 21 to 59 years were examined to determine T1 and T2 relaxation times, and 8 of these volunteers were studied once weekly during one menstrual cycle. The only significant trend was an increase in the T2 of breast parenchyma with increasing age. During the menstrual cycle there was a slight but insignificant (p=0.10) increase in T1 of the breast parenchyma values during the latter half of the menstrual cycle, and a corresponding increase in T2 values between the 2nd and 3rd weeks of the menstrual cycle, which was significant. (orig.).

  15. Global regulation of food supply by Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Craig; Godoy, Patricia; Duque, Estrella; Molina-Henares, M Antonia; de la Torre, Jesús; Del Arco, José María; Herrera, Carmen; Segura, Ana; Guazzaroni, M Eugenia; Ferrer, Manuel; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2010-04-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E was used as a model to develop a "phenomics" platform to investigate the ability of P. putida to grow using different carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur sources and in the presence of stress molecules. Results for growth of wild-type DOT-T1E on 90 different carbon sources revealed the existence of a number of previously uncharted catabolic pathways for compounds such as salicylate, quinate, phenylethanol, gallate, and hexanoate, among others. Subsequent screening on the subset of compounds on which wild-type DOT-TIE could grow with four knockout strains in the global regulatory genes Deltacrc, Deltacrp, DeltacyoB, and DeltaptsN allowed analysis of the global response to nutrient supply and stress. The data revealed that most global regulator mutants could grow in a wide variety of substrates, indicating that metabolic fluxes are physiologically balanced. It was found that the Crc mutant did not differ much from the wild-type regarding the use of carbon sources. However, certain pathways are under the preferential control of one global regulator, i.e., metabolism of succinate and d-fructose is influenced by CyoB, and l-arginine is influenced by PtsN. Other pathways can be influenced by more than one global regulator; i.e., l-valine catabolism can be influenced by CyoB and Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) while phenylethylamine is affected by Crp, CyoB, and PtsN. These results emphasize the cross talk required in order to ensure proper growth and survival. With respect to N sources, DOT-T1E can use a wide variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources. As with the carbon sources, more than one global regulator affected growth with some nitrogen sources; for instance, growth with nucleotides, dipeptides, d-amino acids, and ethanolamine is influenced by Crp, CyoB, and PtsN. A surprising finding was that the Crp mutant was unable to flourish on ammonium. Results for assayed sulfur sources revealed that CyoB controls multiple points in methionine

  16. Effects of progressive relaxation and classical music on measurements of attention, relaxation, and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheufele, P M

    2000-04-01

    The present experiment examined relaxation using different experimental conditions to test whether the effects of individual elements of relaxation could be measured, whether specific effects were revealed, or whether relaxation resulted from a generalized "relaxation response." Sixty-seven normal, male volunteers were exposed to a stress manipulation and then to one of two relaxation (Progressive Relaxation, Music) or control (Attention Control, Silence) conditions. Measurements of attention, relaxation, and stress responses were obtained during each phase of the experiment. All four groups exhibited similar performance on behavioral measures of attention that suggested a reduction in physiological arousal following their relaxation or control condition, as well as a decreased heart rate. Progressive Relaxation, however, resulted in the greatest effects on behavioral and self-report measures of relaxation, suggesting that cognitive cues provided by stress management techniques contribute to relaxation.

  17. Water diffusion-exchange effect on the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in off-resonance rotating frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiming; Xie, Yang; Ji, Tongyu

    2007-06-01

    The off-resonance rotating frame technique based on the spin relaxation properties of off-resonance T1 ρ can significantly increase the sensitivity of detecting paramagnetic labeling at high magnetic fields by MRI. However, the in vivo detectable dimension for labeled cell clusters/tissues in T1 ρ-weighted images is limited by the water diffusion-exchange between mesoscopic scale compartments. An experimental investigation of the effect of water diffusion-exchange between compartments on the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of paramagnetic agent compartment is presented for in vitro/ in vivo models. In these models, the size of paramagnetic agent compartment is comparable to the mean diffusion displacement of water molecules during the long RF pulses that are used to generate the off-resonance rotating frame. The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to qualitatively correlate the effect of water diffusion-exchange with the RF parameters of the long pulse and the rates of water diffusion, (2) to explore the effect of water diffusion-exchange on the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in vitro, and (3) to demonstrate the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in vivo. The in vitro models include the water permeable dialysis tubes or water permeable hollow fibers embedded in cross-linked proteins gels. The MWCO of the dialysis tubes was chosen from 0.1 to 15 kDa to control the water diffusion rate. Thin hollow fibers were chosen to provide sub-millimeter scale compartments for the paramagnetic agents. The in vivo model utilized the rat cerebral vasculatures as a paramagnetic agent compartment, and intravascular agents (Gd-DTPA) 30-BSA were administrated into the compartment via bolus injections. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement is predominant in the T1 ρ-weighted image in the presence of water diffusion-exchange. The T1 ρ contrast has substantially higher sensitivity than the conventional T1

  18. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. II. Secondary relaxation studied by dielectric, 2H NMR, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Bächer, C.; Wagner, E.; Lichtinger, A.; Bock, D.; Kreger, K.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Rössler, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the secondary (β-) relaxations of an asymmetric binary glass former consisting of a spirobichroman derivative (SBC; Tg = 356 K) as the high-Tg component and the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP; Tg = 134 K). The main relaxations are studied in Paper I [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164503 (2017)]. A high Tg contrast of ΔTg = 222 K is put into effect in a non-polymeric system. Component-selective studies are carried out by combining results from dielectric spectroscopy (DS) for mass concentrations cTPP ≥ 60% and those from different methods of 2H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. In the case of NMR, the full concentration range (10% ≤ cTPP ≤ 100%) is covered. The neat components exhibit a β-relaxation (β1 (SBC) and β2 (TPP)). The latter is rediscovered by DS in the mixtures for all concentrations with unchanged time constants. NMR spectroscopy identifies the β-relaxations as being alike to those in neat glasses. A spatially highly restricted motion with angular displacement below ±10° encompassing all molecules is involved. In the low temperature range, where TPP shows the typical 31P NMR echo spectra of the β2-process, very similar spectral features are observed for the (deuterated) SBC component by 2H NMR, in addition to its "own" β1-process observed at high temperatures. Apparently, the small TPP molecules enslave the large SBC molecules to perform a common hindered reorientation. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time of both components is the same and reveals an angular displacement of the SBC molecules somewhat smaller than that of TPP, though the time constants τβ2 are the same. Furthermore, T1(T) of TPP in the temperature region of the β2-process is absolutely the same as in the mixture TPP/polystyrene investigated previously. It appears that the manifestations of the β-process introduced by one component are essentially independent of the second component. Finally, at cTPP ≤ 20% one

  19. Effect of pressure relaxation during the laser heating and electron-ion relaxation stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Hallo, L. [Univ Bordeaux 1, CEA, CNRS, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33 - Talence (France)

    2008-09-15

    The multi-phase equation of state by Bushman et al. (Sov. Tech. Rev. 5:1-44, 2008) is modified to describe states with different electron and ion temperatures and it is applied to the non-equilibrium evolution of an aluminum sample heated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. The sample evolution is described by the two-temperature model for the electron and ion temperatures, while the pressure and density are described by a simplified relaxation equation. The pressure relaxation in the heating stage reduces the binding energy and facilitates the electron-driven ablation. The model is applied to estimate the ablation depth of an Al target irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. It improves the agreement with the experimental data and provides a new explanation of the ablation process. (authors)

  20. Superdomain dynamics in ferroelectric-ferroelastic films: Switching, jamming, and relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. F.; Hershkovitz, A.; Ivry, Y.; Lu, H.; Gruverman, A.; Gregg, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental work shows that ferroelectric switching can occur in large jumps in which ferroelastic superdomains switch together, rather than having the numerous smaller ferroelectric domains switch within them. In this sense, the superdomains play a role analogous to that of Abrikosov vortices in thin superconducting films under the Kosterlitz-Thouless framework, which control the dynamics more than individual Cooper pairs within them do. Here, we examine the dynamics of ferroelastic superdomains in ferroelastic ferroelectrics and their role in switching devices such as memories. Jamming of ferroelectric domains in thin films has revealed an unexpected time dependence of t-1/4 at long times (hours), but it is difficult to discriminate between power-law and exponential relaxation. Other aspects of this work, including spatial period doubling of domains, led to a description of ferroelastic domains as nonlinear processes in a viscoelastic medium, which produce folding and metastable kinetically limited states. This ¼ exponent is a surprising agreement with the well-known value of ¼ for coarsening dynamics in viscoelastic media. We try to establish a link between these two processes, hitherto considered unrelated, and with superdomains and domain bundles. We note also that high-Tc superconductors share many of the ferroelastic domain properties discussed here and that several new solar cell materials and metal-insulator transition systems are ferroelastic.

  1. A suite of Mathematica notebooks for the analysis of protein main chain 15N NMR relaxation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2006-01-01

    A suite of Mathematica notebooks has been designed to ease the analysis of protein main chain 15 N NMR relaxation data collected at a single magnetic field strength. Individual notebooks were developed to perform the following tasks: nonlinear fitting of 15 N-T 1 and -T 2 relaxation decays to a two parameter exponential decay, calculation of the principal components of the inertia tensor from protein structural coordinates, nonlinear optimization of the principal components and orientation of the axially symmetric rotational diffusion tensor, model-free analysis of 15 N-T 1 , -T 2 , and { 1 H}- 15 N NOE data, and reduced spectral density analysis of the relaxation data. The principle features of the notebooks include use of a minimal number of input files, integrated notebook data management, ease of use, cross-platform compatibility, automatic visualization of results and generation of high-quality graphics, and output of analyses in text format

  2. Delta Relaxation Enhanced Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Jamu K.

    Generally speaking, targeted molecular imaging has always been difficult to perform with magnetic resonance. The difficulty does not arise with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique or equipment itself, but rather with the targeted contrast agents, which the method requires. Also referred to as activatable contrast agents, or MRI probes, targeted contrast agents are pharmaceuticals that will selectively bind to a particular biological (target) molecule. They are used to highlight a certain tissue or the difference between healthy and diseased tissue. Unfortunately, nearly all MRI probes are non-specific, causing localized increases in MR image intensity in both the unbound and target-bound states. Therefore, brightening in a conventional MRI image, following probe injection, does not positively indicate the presence of the target molecule. Herein, a novel method known as delta relaxation enhanced magnetic resonance (dreMR, pronounced "dreamer") is presented that utilizes variable magnetic field technology to produce image contrast related to the dependence of the sample's longitudinal relaxation rates upon the strength of the main magnetic field of the MRI scanner. Since only bound contrast agent shows significant magnetic field dependence, it is an indicator of the bound probe, which is in turn a marker for the target molecule. This work details the development of the dreMR method, focusing on the specialized hardware necessary to provide a clinical, static-field MRI the ability to modulate its main magnetic field throughout an MRI sequence. All modifications were performed in such a manner that the host MRI system was not degraded or permanently modified in any way. The three parts of this technology are: the insertable electromagnet, the power supply system and the control system. The insertable electromagnet modifies the magnetic field, the power system drives the electromagnet, and the control system generates the magnetic field waveform envelope and

  3. Impact of T1 slope on surgical and adjacent segment degeneration after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Yongqian; Li, Jia; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated an association between preoperative T1 slope and surgical and adjacent segment degeneration (SASD) after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty (BCDA) in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease. Based on preoperative standing lateral radiographs, 90 patients were classified according to T1 slope that was higher or lower than the 50th percentile (high T1 or low T1, 28 and 62 patients, respectively). Patients were also classified as SASD or non-SASD (38 and 52 patients, respectively) determined by radiographs at final follow-up. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores for neck and arm pain were noted, and changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and FSU range of motion (ROM) were also noted. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for SASD. The overall rate of SASD was 42.2% (38/90). The SACS, FSU angle, FSU ROM, and SASD rates of the high T1 and low T1 slope groups were significantly different at the last follow-up. The NDI and VAS scores of the high T1 slope group were significantly greater than those of the low T1 slope. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that high T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy (ie, residual space behind the prosthesis) were significant risk factors for SASD after BCDA. High T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy were associated with SASD after BCDA. Patients with a high preoperative T1 slope have a smaller FSU angle and more neck pain after BCDA.

  4. Modeling the effect of age in T1-2 breast cancer using the SEER database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-Joon

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling the relationship between age and mortality for breast cancer patients may have important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Methods Data from 9 registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER of the United States were used. This study employed proportional hazards to model mortality in women with T1-2 breast cancers. The residuals of the model were used to examine the effect of age on mortality. This procedure was applied to node-negative (N0 and node-positive (N+ patients. All causes mortality and breast cancer specific mortality were evaluated. Results The relationship between age and mortality is biphasic. For both N0 and N+ patients among the T1-2 group, the analysis suggested two age components. One component is linear and corresponds to a natural increase of mortality with each year of age. The other component is quasi-quadratic and is centered around age 50. This component contributes to an increased risk of mortality as age increases beyond 50. It suggests a hormonally related process: the farther from menopause in either direction, the more prognosis is adversely influenced by the quasi-quadratic component. There is a complex relationship between hormone receptor status and other prognostic factors, like age. Conclusion The present analysis confirms the findings of many epidemiological and clinical trials that the relationship between age and mortality is biphasic. Compared with older patients, young women experience an abnormally high risk of death. Among elderly patients, the risk of death from breast cancer does not decrease with increasing age. These facts are important in the discussion of options for adjuvant treatment with breast cancer patients.

  5. Modeling the effect of age in T1-2 breast cancer using the SEER database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Patricia; Cserni, Gábor; Van De Steene, Jan; Vlastos, Georges; Voordeckers, Mia; Royce, Melanie; Lee, Sang-Joon; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Background Modeling the relationship between age and mortality for breast cancer patients may have important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Methods Data from 9 registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) of the United States were used. This study employed proportional hazards to model mortality in women with T1-2 breast cancers. The residuals of the model were used to examine the effect of age on mortality. This procedure was applied to node-negative (N0) and node-positive (N+) patients. All causes mortality and breast cancer specific mortality were evaluated. Results The relationship between age and mortality is biphasic. For both N0 and N+ patients among the T1-2 group, the analysis suggested two age components. One component is linear and corresponds to a natural increase of mortality with each year of age. The other component is quasi-quadratic and is centered around age 50. This component contributes to an increased risk of mortality as age increases beyond 50. It suggests a hormonally related process: the farther from menopause in either direction, the more prognosis is adversely influenced by the quasi-quadratic component. There is a complex relationship between hormone receptor status and other prognostic factors, like age. Conclusion The present analysis confirms the findings of many epidemiological and clinical trials that the relationship between age and mortality is biphasic. Compared with older patients, young women experience an abnormally high risk of death. Among elderly patients, the risk of death from breast cancer does not decrease with increasing age. These facts are important in the discussion of options for adjuvant treatment with breast cancer patients. PMID:16212670

  6. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization and Relaxation of H and D Atoms in Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Lee, D. M.; Khmelenko, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a study of dynamic nuclear polarization and electron and nuclear spin relaxation of atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid molecular matrices of H2, D2, and HD mixtures. The electron and nuclear spin relaxation times (T_{1e} and T_{1N}) were measured within the temperature range 0.15-2.5 K in a magnetic field of 4.6 T, conditions which ensure a high polarization of electron spins. We found that T_{1e} is nearly temperature independent in this temperature range, while T_{1N} decreased by two orders of magnitude upon raising temperature. Such strong temperature dependence is typical for the nuclear Orbach mechanism of relaxation via the electron spins. We found that the nuclear spins of H atoms in solid D2 and D2{:}HD can be efficiently polarized by the Overhauser effect. Pumping the forbidden transitions of H atoms also leads to DNP, with the efficiency strongly dependent on the concentration of D atoms. This behavior indicates the cross effect mechanism of the DNP and nuclear relaxation, which turns out to be well resolved in the conditions of our experiments. Efficient DNP of H atoms was also observed when pumping the middle D line located in the center of the ESR spectrum. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of clusters or pairs of H atoms with a strong exchange interaction. These clusters have partially allowed transitions in the center of the ESR spectrum, and DNP may be created via the resolved cross effect.

  7. [Plethysmechanomyography (PMG). A simple method for monitoring muscle relaxation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlen, G; Ribeiro, F C; Scheiber, G

    1994-12-01

    supramaximal strength. The PMG was registered by a Siemens Siredoc 220 printer connected to a Siemens Sirecust 1281 anaesthetic monitor. First twitch ratio (T1/T0) and TOF ratio (T4/T1) were calculated from these recordings. The EMG recordings were made by a Datex Relaxograph NMT-100 monitor, which automatically computes T1/T0 and T4/T1. The comparison of EMG and PMG values was carried out by simple linear regression. Statistical evaluation was performed using analysis of variance. RESULTS. A plethysmographically registered graph of the TOF-evoked muscle response is illustrated in Fig. 2. Simultaneous EMG and PMG recordings of onset and recovery from a nondepolarizing blockade are shown in Fig. 3. A strong positive correlation (P < 0.001) of EMG and PMG was found with correlation coefficients of 0.98 for T1/T0 and of 0.97 for T4/T1. The mean difference between values of both methods was 5%, maximally 18% (T1/T0) and 20% (T4/T1). CONCLUSIONS. Mechanomyography and EMG are well established methods of neuromuscular monitoring. Our data demonstrate that PMG provides a reliable measurement of neuromuscular transmission that correlates well with EMG. Since only materials of daily use in anaesthesia are needed, no substantial costs will arise when the plethysmographic method of measurement is used for routine anesthetic monitoring.

  8. Mechanical relaxation in chalcogenide glasses of the Ge-As-S system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilanych, V.S.; Melnychenko, T.D.; Rizak, V.M.; Makauz, I.I.

    2006-01-01

    The temperature and frequency-related dependences of the internal friction and the shear modulus in Ge x As 40-x S 60 glasses have been studied. The maxima of internal friction of both the relaxation and non relaxation types have been found in the low-temperature range. A relaxation maximum has been revealed in the vitrification region, and its parameters have been determined. Possible mechanisms of these processes have been discussed

  9. Effects of thermal relaxation on an amorphous superconducting Zr--Rh alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drehman, A.J.; Johnson, W.L.

    1978-05-01

    The electronic and superconducting properties of an amorphous transition metal alloy are used to evaluate the effects of low temperature annealing. It is observed that the superconducting transition temperature and the electrical resistivity relax exponentially in time from their initial value to a final relaxed value. From this an activation energy for the relaxation process is derived and an explanation is suggested which involves internal stress

  10. Spin-lattice relaxation of magnetic centers in molecular crystals at low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Le Tuan Anh; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2017-01-01

    We study the spin-phonon relaxation rate of both Kramers and non-Kramers molecular magnets in strongly diluted samples at low temperature. Using the "rotational" contribution to the spin-phonon Hamiltonian, universal formulae for the relaxation rate are obtained. Intriguingly, these formulae are all entirely expressed via measurable or \\emph{ab initio} computable physical quantities. Moreover, they are also independent of the energy gaps to excited states involved in the relaxation process. T...

  11. Delivery of Oct4 and SirT1 with cationic polyurethanes-short branch PEI to aged retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chi-Hsien; Cherng, Jong-Yuh; Chiou, Guang-Yuh; Chen, Yu-Chih; Chien, Chen-Hsiu; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chien, Yueh; Chen, Liang-Kung; Liu, Jorn-hon; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2011-12-01

    Cationic polyurethane, a biodegradable non-viral vector, protects DNA from nuclease degradation and helps to deliver genes efficiently. Oct4, a POU-domain transcription factor, is highly expressed in maintaining pluripotency and cellular reprogramming process in stem cells. SirT1, a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, is an essential mediator of cellular longevity. Herein we demonstrated that both Oct4 and SirT1 (Oct4/SirT1) expression was decreased in an age-dependent manner in retina with aged-related macular degeneration and retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPEs). To investigate the possible rescuing role of Oct4/SirT1, polyurethane-short branch polyethylenimine (PU-PEI) was used to deliver Oct4/SirT1 into aged RPEs (aRPEs) or light-injured rat retinas. Oct4/SirT1 overexpression increased the expression of several progenitor-related genes and the self-renewal ability of aRPEs. Moreover, Oct4/SirT1 overexpression resulted in the demethylation of the Oct4 promoter and enhanced the expression of antioxidant enzymes, which was accompanied by a decrease in intracellular ROS production and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Importantly, PU-PEI-mediated Oct4/SirT1 gene transfer rescued retinal cell loss and improved electroretinographic responses in light-injured rat retinas. In summary, these data suggest that PU-PEI-mediated delivery of Oct4/SirT1 reprograms aRPEs into a more primitive state and results in cytoprotection by regulating the antioxidative capabilities of these cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Generalized approach to non-exponential relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Non-exponential relaxation is a universal feature of systems as diverse as glasses, spin glasses, earthquakes, financial markets and the universe. Complex relaxation results from hierarchically constrained dynamics with the strength of the constraints being directly related to the form of the relaxation, which ...

  13. T1 and T2 Mapping in Cardiology: "Mapping the Obscure Object of Desire".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Apostolou, Dimitris; Argyriou, Panayiotis; Velitsista, Stella; Papa, Lilika; Efentakis, Stelios; Vernardos, Evangelos; Kanoupaki, Mikela; Kanoupakis, George; Manginas, Athanassios

    The increasing use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is based on its capability to perform biventricular function assessment and tissue characterization without radiation and with high reproducibility. The use of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) gave the potential of non-invasive biopsy for fibrosis quantification. However, LGE is unable to detect diffuse myocardial disease. Native T1 mapping and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) provide knowledge about pathologies affecting both the myocardium and interstitium that is otherwise difficult to identify. Changes of myocardial native T1 reflect cardiac diseases (acute coronary syndromes, infarction, myocarditis, and diffuse fibrosis, all with high T1) and systemic diseases such as cardiac amyloid (high T1), Anderson-Fabry disease (low T1), and siderosis (low T1). The ECV, an index generated by native and post-contrast T1 mapping, measures the cellular and extracellular interstitial matrix (ECM) compartments. This myocyte-ECM dichotomy has important implications for identifying specific therapeutic targets of great value for heart failure treatment. On the other hand, T2 mapping is superior compared with myocardial T1 and ECM for assessing the activity of myocarditis in recent-onset heart failure. Although these indices can significantly affect the clinical decision making, multicentre studies and a community-wide approach (including MRI vendors, funding, software, contrast agent manufacturers, and clinicians) are still missing. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  15. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  16. Differential transcriptional response to antibiotics by Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Gómez Lozano, María

    2015-01-01

    is of critical importance. Pseudomonas putidaDOT-T1E exhibits an impressive array of RND efflux pumps, which confer this microorganism high resistance to organic solvents and antibiotics that would kill most other microorganisms. We have chosen DOT-T1E as a model microbe to study the microbial responses...

  17. Identification of myocardial diffuse fibrosis by 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliou, Vassilios S; Wassilew, Katharina; Cameron, Donnie

    2017-01-01

    mid ventricular level averaged T 1 maps provided improved precision (Intraclass correlation 0.93 vs 0.84) and correlation with histology (R (2) = 0.83 vs 0.36) for diffuse fibrosis compared to a single mid-ventricular level alone. ECV was more precise and correlated better than native T 1 mapping...

  18. Expression of the G protein gammaT1 subunit during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Leung, Tinchung; Giger, Kathryn E; Stauffer, Anna M; Humbert, Jasper E; Sinha, Soniya; Horstick, Eric J; Hansen, Carl A; Robishaw, Janet D

    2007-04-01

    Here, we report the identification and expression analysis of the zebrafish G protein gammaT1 subunit gene (gngT1) during development. Similar to its human and mouse homologs, we confirm zebrafish gngT1 is expressed in the developing retina, where its transcription overlaps with the photoreceptor cell-specific marker, rhodopsin (rho). Surprisingly, we also show zebrafish gngT1 is expressed in the dorsal diencephalon, where its transcription overlaps with the pineal specific markers, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase-2 (annat-2) and extra-ocular rhodopsin (exorh). Analysis of the proximal promoter sequence of the zebrafish gngT1 gene identifies several conserved binding sites for the cone-rod homeobox/orthodenticle (Crx/Otx) homeodomain family of transcription factors. Using a morpholino anti-sense approach in zebrafish, we show that targeted knockdown of otx5 potently suppresses gngT1 expression in the pineal gland, whereas knockdown of crx markedly reduces gngT1 expression in the retina. Taken together, these data indicate that pineal- and retinal-specific expression of the gngT1 gene are controlled by different transcription factors and exogenous signals.

  19. Measurement of myocardial native T1 in cardiovascular diseases and norm in 1291 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joanna M; Liu, Alexander; Leal, Joana; McMillan, Fiona; Francis, Jane; Greiser, Andreas; Rider, Oliver J; Myerson, Saul; Neubauer, Stefan; Ferreira, Vanessa M; Piechnik, Stefan K

    2017-09-28

    Native T1-mapping provides quantitative myocardial tissue characterization for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), without the need for gadolinium. However, its translation into clinical practice is hindered by differences between techniques and the lack of established reference values. We provide typical myocardial T1-ranges for 18 commonly encountered CVDs using a single T1-mapping technique - Shortened Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (ShMOLLI), also used in the large UK Biobank and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry study. We analyzed 1291 subjects who underwent CMR (1.5-Tesla, MAGNETOM-Avanto, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) between 2009 and 2016, who had a single CVD diagnosis, with mid-ventricular T1-map assessment. A region of interest (ROI) was placed on native T1-maps in the "most-affected myocardium", characterized by the presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), or regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) on cines. Another ROI was placed in the "reference myocardium" as far as possible from LGE/RWMA, and in the septum if no focal abnormality was present. To further define normality, we included native T1 of healthy subjects from an existing dataset after sub-endocardial pixel-erosions. Native T1 of patients with normal CMR (938 ± 21 ms) was similar compared to healthy subjects (941 ± 23 ms). Across all patient groups (57 ± 19 yrs., 65% males), focally affected myocardium had significantly different T1 value compared to reference myocardium (all p Fabry disease (863 ± 23 ms) had the lowest native reference T1 (all p < 0.001). Future studies designed to detect the large T1 differences between affected and reference myocardium are estimated to require small sample-sizes (n < 50). However, studies designed to detect the small T1 differences between reference myocardium in CVDs and healthy controls can require several thousand of subjects. We provide typical T1-ranges for common clinical cardiac conditions in the largest cohort

  20. Regularized Label Relaxation Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Fang, Bingwu

    2018-04-01

    Linear regression (LR) and some of its variants have been widely used for classification problems. Most of these methods assume that during the learning phase, the training samples can be exactly transformed into a strict binary label matrix, which has too little freedom to fit the labels adequately. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a novel regularized label relaxation LR method, which has the following notable characteristics. First, the proposed method relaxes the strict binary label matrix into a slack variable matrix by introducing a nonnegative label relaxation matrix into LR, which provides more freedom to fit the labels and simultaneously enlarges the margins between different classes as much as possible. Second, the proposed method constructs the class compactness graph based on manifold learning and uses it as the regularization item to avoid the problem of overfitting. The class compactness graph is used to ensure that the samples sharing the same labels can be kept close after they are transformed. Two different algorithms, which are, respectively, based on -norm and -norm loss functions are devised. These two algorithms have compact closed-form solutions in each iteration so that they are easily implemented. Extensive experiments show that these two algorithms outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy and running time.

  1. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  2. Predicting the effect of relaxation during frequency-selective adiabatic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Annalise R.; McKee, Cailyn E.; Woelk, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    Adiabatic half and full passages are invaluable for achieving uniform, B1-insensitive excitation or inversion of macroscopic magnetization across a well-defined range of NMR frequencies. To accomplish narrow frequency ranges with adiabatic pulses (computer-calculated data with experimental results demonstrates that, in non-viscous, small-molecule fluids, it is possible to model magnetization and relaxation by considering standard T1 and T2 relaxation in the traditional rotating frame. The proposed model is aimed at performance optimizations of applications in which these pulses are employed. It differs from previous reports which focused on short high-power adiabatic pulses and relaxation that is governed by dipole-dipole interactions, cross polarization, or chemical exchange.

  3. High-relaxivity contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L. [German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Department of Radiology E010, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Mehndiratta, Amit [German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Department of Radiology E010, Heidelberg (Germany); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Essig, Marco [German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Department of Radiology E010, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Evaluation of brain lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information that is critical for accurate diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic intervention and monitoring response. Conventional contrast-enhanced MR neuroimaging using gadolinium (Gd) contrast agents primarily depicts disruption of the blood-brain barrier, demonstrating location and extent of disease, and also the morphological details at the lesion site. However, conventional imaging results do not always accurately predict tumour aggressiveness. Advanced functional MRI techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging utilise contrast agents to convey physiological information regarding the haemodynamics and neoangiogenic status of the lesion that is often complementary to anatomical information obtained through conventional imaging. Most of the Gd contrast agents available have similar T1 and T2 relaxivities, and thus their contrast-enhancing capabilities are comparable. Exceptions are gadobenate-dimeglumine, Gd-EOB-DTPA, Gadobutrol and gadofosveset, which, owing to their transient-protein-binding capability, possess almost twice (and more) the T1 and T2 relaxivities as other agents at all magnetic field strengths. Numerous comparative studies have demonstrated the advantages of the increased relaxivity in terms of enhanced image contrast, image quality and diagnostic confidence. Here we summarise the benefits of higher relaxivity for the most common neuroimaging applications including MRI, perfusion-weighted imaging and MRA for evaluation of brain tumours, cerebrovascular disease and other CNS lesions. (orig.)

  4. The development of the Be Active & Relax “Vitality in Practice” (VIP project and design of an RCT to reduce the need for recovery in office employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffeng Jennifer K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong evidence to suggest that multiple work-related health problems are preceded by a higher need for recovery. Physical activity and relaxation are helpful in decreasing the need for recovery. This article aims to describe (1 the development and (2 the design of the evaluation of a daily physical activity and relaxation intervention to reduce the need for recovery in office employees. Methods/Design The study population will consist of employees of a Dutch financial service provider. The intervention was systematically developed, based on parts of the Intervention Mapping (IM protocol. Assessment of employees needs was done by combining results of face-to-face interviews, a questionnaire and focus group interviews. A set of theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected which resulted in an intervention program consisting of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI supported by a social media platform, and environmental modifications. The Be Active & Relax program will be evaluated in a modified 2 X 2 factorial design. The environmental modifications will be pre-stratified and GMI will be randomised on department level. The program will be evaluated, using 4 arms: (1 GMI and environmental modifications; (2 environmental modifications; (3 GMI; (4 no intervention (control group. Questionnaire data on the primary outcome (need for recovery and secondary outcomes (daily physical activity, sedentary behaviour, relaxation/detachment, work- and health-related factors will be gathered at baseline (T0, at 6 months (T1, and at 12 months (T2 follow-up. In addition, an economic and a process evaluation will be performed. Discussion Reducing the need for recovery is hypothesized to be beneficial for employees, employers and society. It is assumed that there will be a reduction in need for recovery after 6 months and 12 months in the intervention group, compared to the control group. Results are expected in 2013

  5. Holographic thermal relaxation in superfluid turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yiqiang [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Niu, Chao [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Hongbao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-02

    Holographic duality provides a first-principles approach to investigate real time processes in quantum many-body systems, in particular at finite temperature and far-from-equilibrium. We use this approach to study the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid through numerically solving its gravity dual. We find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process, thus confirm the previous suspicion based on the experimental data for turbulent superfluid in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore, the decay rate near the critical temperature is in good agreement with the recently developed effective theory of 2D superfluid turbulence.

  6. An NMR study of 1H, 31P, and 23Na relaxation and molecular dynamics in the polycrystalline sodium salts of adenosine Di- and triphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynhardt, E. C.; Jurga, K.; Andrew, E. R.

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame, T1(H),have been measured as a function of frequency and temperature (333K> T > 80 K). The spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T1 ϱ(H), have been measured at two different rotating fields while M2(H), the proton second moment, has been extracted from the shape of the FID. In addition, T 1( 31P) and T 1( 23Na) have been measured as functions of temperature at 81 and 50 MHz, respectively. The results demonstrate clearly that the water content of the compounds influences the results to a large extent. It seems that water molecules at some of the lattice sites can be removed from the structure by evacuation, while others are more tightly bound to the ADP and ATP molecules. The more loosely bound water molecules are very mobile and dominate the relaxation results in the high-temperature region via the spin-rotation and dipolar mechanisms. The more tightly bound water molecules rotate about their twofold axes and this motion, characterized by a distribution of correlation times, results in a T1(H) minimum in the low-temperature region. The results have been interpreted in terms of a Fuoss-Kirkwood distribution function. The 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rates are dominated by the quadrupolar interactions, which provide a dominating relaxation mechanism for the proton spins in the rotating frame. In the case of Na 2ATP, T1(P) is independent of the degree of hydration of the sample, but the NaADP T1(H), values are influenced strongly by a change in the water content. An X-ray determination of the lengths of the a axes of the unit cells has provided supporting evidence for the interpretation of the NMR results.

  7. Dynamics and relaxation in confined medium. Application to 129Xe magnetic relaxation in Vycor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, Virginie

    1995-01-01

    Porous media morphology and topology drive the exploration of pore space by fluid. So, analysis of transport process, associated with relaxation mechanism, allows indirect study of pore geometry. The purpose of this work is to understand better the relation between geometry and transport. This study involves two parts: a modelization and prediction step is followed by an experimental application of magnetic relaxation. Numerical simulations and analytical models allow to quantify the influence on the solid interface of the dynamical behavior of confined gas in disordered porous media (granular structure and porous network) or in common geometry (cylindrical and lamellar interfaces). The formalism of diffusion propagator is a powerful tool to quantify the influence of the pore geometry on the diffusion of confined gas. The propagator holds all dynamical information on the system; it also predicts the temporal evolution of the autocorrelation functions of the Hamiltonian describing local coupling. In an intermediate time scale, magnetic relaxation shows complex diffusional regime: the autocorrelation functions decrease in a power law with a exponent smaller than d/2 (where d is the Euclidian dimension of the system). This behavior is analogous to dynamic in low-dimensional space, but here arises from surface correlations of the porous media. The long-time behavior of the autocorrelation functions retrieves the asymptotic decrease t -d/2 . Moreover, atypical behavior is observed for the Knudsen diffusion between infinite planes. It turns out that 129 Xe NMR is a appropriate technique to characterize organization and diffusion of gas confined in Vycor. Systematic studies of temperature and pressure effect on the 129 Xe chemical shift allow to specify the Xe/solid interaction. The analysis of the relaxation measurements, thanks to the numerical development, confirms conclusions arising from the study of diffusion propagator. (author) [fr

  8. Low temperature dielectric relaxation and charged defects in ferroelectric thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Artemenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a dielectric relaxation in BaTiO3-based ferroelectric thin films of different composition and with several growth modes: sputtering (with and without magnetron and sol-gel. The relaxation was observed at cryogenic temperatures (T < 100 K for frequencies from 100 Hz up to 10 MHz. This relaxation activation energy is always lower than 200 meV and is very similar to the relaxation that we reported in the parent bulk perovskites. Based on our Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR investigation, we ascribe this dielectric relaxation to the hopping of electrons among Ti3+-V(O charged defects. Being dependent on the growth process and on the amount of oxygen vacancies, this relaxation can be a useful probe of defects in actual integrated capacitors with no need for specific shaping.

  9. Origin and spread of Bos taurus: new clues from mitochondrial genomes belonging to haplogroup T1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bonfiglio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most genetic studies on modern cattle have established a common origin for all taurine breeds in the Near East, during the Neolithic transition about 10 thousand years (ka ago. Yet, the possibility of independent and/or secondary domestication events is still debated and is fostered by the finding of rare mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups like P, Q and R. Haplogroup T1, because of its geographic distribution, has been the subject of several investigations pointing to a possible independent domestication event in Africa and suggesting a genetic contribution of African cattle to the formation of Iberian and Creole cattle. Whole mitochondrial genome sequence analysis, with its proven effectiveness in improving the resolution of phylogeographic studies, is the most appropriate tool to investigate the origin and structure of haplogroup T1. METHODOLOGY: A survey of >2200 bovine mtDNA control regions representing 28 breeds (15 European, 10 African, 3 American identified 281 subjects belonging to haplogroup T1. Fifty-four were selected for whole mtDNA genome sequencing, and combined with ten T1 complete sequences from previous studies into the most detailed T1 phylogenetic tree available to date. CONCLUSIONS: Phylogenetic analysis of the 64 T1 mitochondrial complete genomes revealed six distinct sub-haplogroups (T1a-T1f. Our data support the overall scenario of a Near Eastern origin of the T1 sub-haplogroups from as much as eight founding T1 haplotypes. However, the possibility that one sub-haplogroup (T1d arose in North Africa, in domesticated stocks, shortly after their arrival from the Near East, can not be ruled out. Finally, the previously identified "African-derived American" (AA haplotype turned out to be a sub-clade of T1c (T1c1a1. This haplotype was found here for the first time in Africa (Egypt, indicating that it probably originated in North Africa, reached the Iberian Peninsula and sailed to America, with the first European

  10. Relaxed structure of typical nitro explosives in the excited state: Observation, implication and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Genbai; Yang, Zuhua; Xi, Tao; Xin, Jianting; Zhao, Yongqiang; He, Weihua; Shui, Min; Gu, Yuqiu; Xiong, Ying; Xu, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the structural, geometrical, and chemical changes that occur after an electronic excitation is essential to elucidate the inherent mechanism of nitro explosives. Herein, relaxed structures of typical nitro explosives in the lowest singlet excited state are investigated using time-dependent density functional theory. During the excitation process, the nitro group is activated and relaxes via geometrical change. The five explosives RDX, HMX, CL-20, PETN, and LLM-105 exhibit similar relaxed structures, and the impact sensitivity is related to their excitation energy. High-sensitivity δ-HMX has a lower excitation energy for relaxed structure than β-HMX. This study offers novel insight into energetic materials.

  11. Slowing hot-carrier relaxation in graphene using a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plochocka, P.; Kossacki, P.; Golnik, A.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W. A.; Potemski, M.

    2009-12-01

    A degenerate pump-probe technique is used to investigate the nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in multilayer graphene. Two distinctly different dynamics of the carrier relaxation are observed. A fast relaxation (˜50fs) of the carriers after the initial effect of phase-space filling followed by a slower relaxation (˜4ps) due to thermalization. Both relaxation processes are less efficient when a magnetic field is applied at low temperatures which is attributed to the suppression of the electron-electron Auger scattering due to the nonequidistant Landau-level spacing of the Dirac fermions in graphene.

  12. The relationships between suggestibility, influenceability, and relaxability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polczyk, Romuald; Frey, Olga; Szpitalak, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the relationships between relaxability and various aspects of suggestibility and influenceability. The Jacobson Progressive Muscle Relaxation procedure was used to induce relaxation. Tests of direct suggestibility, relating to the susceptibility of overt suggestions, and indirect suggestibility, referring to indirect hidden influence, as well as self-description questionnaires on suggestibility and the tendency to comply were used. Thayer's Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List, measuring various kinds of activation and used as a pre- and posttest, determined the efficacy of the relaxation procedure. Indirect, direct, and self-measured suggestibility proved to be positively related to the ability to relax, measured by Thayer's subscales relating to emotions. Compliance was not related to relaxability. The results are discussed in terms of the aspects of relaxation training connected with suggestibility.

  13. Hydrodynamic relaxations in dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J. S.; Greenfield, Michael L.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of relaxation phenomena in the standard dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model [R. D. Groot and P. B. Warren, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 4423 (1997)]. Using fluctuating hydrodynamics as the framework of the investigation, we focus on the collective transverse and longitudinal dynamics. It is shown that classical hydrodynamic theory predicts the transverse dynamics at relatively low temperatures very well when compared to simulation data; however, the theory predictions are, on the same length scale, less accurate for higher temperatures. The agreement with hydrodynamics depends on the definition of the viscosity, and here we find that the transverse dynamics are independent of the dissipative and random shear force contributions to the stress. For high temperatures, the spectrum for the longitudinal dynamics is dominated by the Brillouin peak for large length scales and the relaxation is therefore governed by sound wave propagation and is athermal. This contrasts the results at lower temperatures and small length scale, where the thermal process is clearly present in the spectra. The DPD model, at least qualitatively, re-captures the underlying hydrodynamical mechanisms, and quantitative agreement is excellent at intermediate temperatures for the transverse dynamics.

  14. Differentiation of brain tumor-related edema based on 3D T1rho imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Meyer, J E; Barajas, R F; Mabray, M C; Chen, W; Shankaranarayanan, A; Koon, P; Barani, I J; Tihan, T; Cha, S

    2017-06-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is an important source of morbidity. Its type depends largely on the capillary ultra-structures of the histopathologic subtype of underlying brain tumor. The purpose of our study was to differentiate vasogenic edema associated with brain metastases and infiltrative edema related to diffuse gliomas using quantitative 3D T1 rho (T1ρ) imaging. Preoperative MR examination including whole brain 3D T1ρ imaging was performed in 23 patients with newly diagnosed brain tumors (9 with metastasis, 8 with lower grade glioma, LGG, 6 with glioblastoma, GBM). Mean T1ρ values were measured in regions of peritumoral non-enhancing T2 signal hyperintensity, excluding both enhancing and necrotic or cystic component, and normal-appearing white matter. Mean T1ρ values were significantly elevated in the vasogenic edema surrounding intracranial metastases when compared to the infiltrative edema associated with either LGG or GBM (p=0.02 and <0.01, respectively). No significant difference was noted between T1ρ values of infiltrative edema between LGG and GBM (p=0.84 and 0.96, respectively). Our study demonstrates the feasibility and potential diagnostic role of T1ρ in the quantitative differentiation between edema related to intracranial metastases and gliomas and as a potentially complementary tool to standard MR techniques in further characterizing pathophysiology of vasogenic and infiltrative edema. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. How accurate is MOLLI T1 mapping in vivo? Validation by spin echo methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell A Cooper

    Full Text Available T1 mapping is a promising quantitative tool for assessing diffuse cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this study is to quantify in vivo accuracy of the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI cardiac T1 mapping sequence against the spin echo gold standard, which has not been done previously. T1 accuracy of MOLLI was determined by comparing with the gold standard inversion recovery spin echo sequence in the calf muscle, and with a rapid inversion recovery fast spin echo sequence in the heart. T1 values were obtained with both conventional MOLLI fitting and MOLLI fitting with inversion efficiency correction. In the calf (n = 6, conventional MOLLI fitting produced inconsistent T1 values with error ranging from 8.0% at 90° to 17.3% at 30°. Modified MOLLI fitting with inversion efficiency correction improved error to under 7.4% at all flip angles. In the heart (n = 5, modified MOLLI fitting with inversion correction reduced T1 error to 5.5% from 14.0% by conventional MOLLI fitting. This study shows that conventional MOLLI fitting can lead to significant in vivo T1 errors when not accounting for the lower adiabatic inversion efficiency often experienced in vivo.

  16. NMR images and in vivo T1 values associated with cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Kazuhiro; Sao, Katsuyoshi; Inao, Motohide; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kasai, Akira.

    1983-01-01

    NMR images and T 1 values, which were obtained by a Fonar QED 80-α system, were investigated in patients with cerebrovascular disease. In patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, hematoma was seen as high density area on steady state free precession images, and the extension of hematoma and its surrounding edema was also visualized frequently at the onset. T 1 values are generally high in the area of edema. T 1 values and their changes are thus considered useful in selecting the method of treatment. In patients with cerebral infarction, lesions were seen as high density areas. This was noted in serious cases, i.e., the areas corresponding to low density areas on CT were visualized as high density areas on NMR imaging. T 1 values were high especially in the center part of the infarct area, and tended to be prolonged with time. Prolongation of T 1 during the chronic stage seems to provide information concerning degeneration of tissues. Local T 1 values, as well as image findings, have a great significance for the clinical application of NMR technique. Sequential observations of T 1 values seem to make a large contribution to the pathological elucidation. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Assessment of acute kidney injury with T1 mapping MRI following solid organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peperhove, Matti; Vo Chieu, Van Dai; Gutberlet, Marcel; Hartung, Dagmar; Tewes, Susanne; Wacker, Frank; Hueper, Katja; Jang, Mi-Sun; Gwinner, Wilfried; Haller, Hermann; Gueler, Faikah; Warnecke, Gregor; Fegbeutel, Christiane; Haverich, Axel; Lehner, Frank; Braesen, Jan Hinrich

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate T1 mapping as a non-invasive, functional MRI biomarker in patients shortly after solid organ transplantation to detect acute postsurgical kidney damage and to correlate T1 times with renal function. 101 patients within 2 weeks after solid organ transplantation (49 kidney transplantation, 52 lung transplantation) and 14 healthy volunteers were examined by MRI between July 2012 and April 2015 using the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence. T1 times in renal cortex and medulla and the corticomedullary difference were compared between groups using one-way ANOVA adjusted for multiple comparison with the Tukey test, and T1 times were correlated with renal function using Pearson's correlation. Compared to healthy volunteers T1 times were significantly increased after solid organ transplantation in the renal cortex (healthy volunteers 987 ± 102 ms; kidney transplantation 1299 ± 101 ms, p < 0.001; lung transplantation 1058 ± 96 ms, p < 0.05) and to a lesser extent in the renal medulla. Accordingly, the corticomedullary difference was diminished shortly after solid organ transplantation. T1 changes were more pronounced following kidney compared to lung transplantation, were associated with the stage of renal impairment and significantly correlated with renal function. T1 mapping may be helpful for early non-invasive assessment of acute kidney injury and renal pathology following major surgery such as solid organ transplantation. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of acute kidney injury with T1 mapping MRI following solid organ transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peperhove, Matti; Vo Chieu, Van Dai; Gutberlet, Marcel; Hartung, Dagmar; Tewes, Susanne; Wacker, Frank; Hueper, Katja [Hannover Medical School, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Jang, Mi-Sun; Gwinner, Wilfried; Haller, Hermann; Gueler, Faikah [Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Warnecke, Gregor; Fegbeutel, Christiane; Haverich, Axel [Hannover Medical School, Cardiothoracic, Transplantation and Vascular Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Lehner, Frank [Hannover Medical School, General, Abdominal and Transplant Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Braesen, Jan Hinrich [Pathology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate T1 mapping as a non-invasive, functional MRI biomarker in patients shortly after solid organ transplantation to detect acute postsurgical kidney damage and to correlate T1 times with renal function. 101 patients within 2 weeks after solid organ transplantation (49 kidney transplantation, 52 lung transplantation) and 14 healthy volunteers were examined by MRI between July 2012 and April 2015 using the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence. T1 times in renal cortex and medulla and the corticomedullary difference were compared between groups using one-way ANOVA adjusted for multiple comparison with the Tukey test, and T1 times were correlated with renal function using Pearson's correlation. Compared to healthy volunteers T1 times were significantly increased after solid organ transplantation in the renal cortex (healthy volunteers 987 ± 102 ms; kidney transplantation 1299 ± 101 ms, p < 0.001; lung transplantation 1058 ± 96 ms, p < 0.05) and to a lesser extent in the renal medulla. Accordingly, the corticomedullary difference was diminished shortly after solid organ transplantation. T1 changes were more pronounced following kidney compared to lung transplantation, were associated with the stage of renal impairment and significantly correlated with renal function. T1 mapping may be helpful for early non-invasive assessment of acute kidney injury and renal pathology following major surgery such as solid organ transplantation. (orig.)

  19. Normalization of cortical thickness measurements across different T1 magnetic resonance imaging protocols by novel W-Score standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Lee, Peter; Kim, Chan Mi; Roh, Jee Hoon; Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Sang Joon; Seo, Sang Won; Shin, Jeong-Hyeon; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Jeong, Yong

    2017-10-01

    maintaining the AD disease effect. Compared to conventional regression methods, our method showed the best performance for in terms of controlling the protocol effect while preserving disease information. Protocol-specific w-score standardization effectively resolved the concerns of conventional regression methods. It showed the best performance for improving the compatibility of a T1 MR post-processed feature, cortical thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-exponential dynamic relaxation in strongly nonequilibrium nonideal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, I V; Norman, G E

    2003-01-01

    Relaxation of kinetic energy to the equilibrium state is simulated by the molecular dynamics method for nonideal two-component non-degenerate plasmas. Three limiting examples of initial states of strongly nonequilibrium plasma are considered: zero electron velocities, zero ion velocities and zero velocities of both electrons and ions. The initial non-exponential stage, its duration τ nB and subsequent exponential stages of the relaxation process are studied for a wide range of the nonideality parameter and the ion mass

  1. Evaluation of algorithms for analysis of NMR relaxation decay curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van der L.; Vergeldt, F.J.; Jager, de P.A.; As, van H.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative processing of NMR relaxation images depends on the characteristics of the used fitting algorithm. Therefore several common fitting algorithms are compared for decay curves with low signal-to-noise ratios. The use of magnitude data yields a non-zero base line, and is shown to result in

  2. Using Visualization and Relaxation in Learning Basic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles H.

    Educators are beginning to call attention to the failure to integrate right-brain, intuitive, holistic, visual processes into the curriculum. Approaches to right-brain education have characteristically called for the use of slow music, visual imagery, and relaxation techniques. Suggested principles for teaching basic skills include the facts that…

  3. Nonequilibrium relaxation method – An alternative simulation strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the results to infinite system. This equilibrium method traces over the standard theory of the thermal statistical mechanics, and over the idea of the thermodynamic limit. Recently, an alternative simulation strategy has been developed, which analyzes the nonequilibrium relaxation (NER) process. It is called the NER method.

  4. T1 mapping in children and young adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Keyur; Markl, Michael; Deng, Jie; de Freitas, Roger A; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2017-01-01

    To assess the global and segmental left ventricular (LV) native T1 and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in children and young adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) compared to a control cohort. The study population included 21 HCM patients (mean 14.1 ± 4.6 years) and 21 controls (mean 15.7 ± 1.5 years). Native modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence was performed before and after contrast injection in 3 short axis planes. Global and segmental LV native T1 and ECV were quantified and compared between HCM patients and controls. Mean native T1 in HCM patients and controls was 1020.4 ± 41.2 and 965.6 ± 30.2 ms respectively (p < 0.0001). Hypertrophied myocardium had significantly higher native global T1 and global ECV compared to non-hypertrophied myocardium in HCM (p < 0.0001, = 0.14 and 0.048, = 0.01 respectively). In a subset of patients, ECV was higher in LV segments with LGE compared to no LGE (p < 0.0001). No significant correlation was identified between global native T1 and ECV and parameters of LV structure and function. Native T1 cut-off of 987 ms provided the highest sensitivity (95 %) and specificity (91 %) to separate HCM patients from controls. Global and segmental native T1 are elevated in HCM patients. LV segments with hypertrophy and/or LGE had higher ECV in a subset of HCM patients. LV native T1 and ECV do not correlate with parameters of LV structure and function. T1 in children and young adults may be used as a non-invasive tool to assess for HCM and related fibrosis.

  5. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  6. Relaxation approximation to bed-load sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, A. I.; Papoglou, I.

    2008-04-01

    In this work we propose and apply a numerical method based on finite volume relaxation approximation for computing the bed-load sediment transport in shallow water flows, in one and two space dimensions. The water flow is modeled by the well-known nonlinear shallow water equations which are coupled with a bed updating equation. Using a relaxation approximation, the nonlinear set of equations (and for two different formulations) is transformed to a semilinear diagonalizable problem with linear characteristic variablesE A second order MUSCL-TVD method is used for the advection stage while an implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme solves the relaxation stage. The main advantages of this approach are that neither Riemann problem solvers nor nonlinear iterations are required during the solution process. For the two different formulations, the applicability and effectiveness of the presented scheme is verified by comparing numerical results obtained for several benchmark test problems.

  7. A variational approach to relaxation in ultrametric spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appignanesi, Gustavo; Fernández, Ariel

    We investigate the relaxation behavior of complex systems endowed with a rugged free energy landscape from a variational perspective. We focus first on the dynamics in generic ultrametric spaces and then we specialize our generic results to a coarse-grained description of RNA folding, where ultrametricity holds as a limit description of conformation space. Using variational calculus in the generic context, we obtain the brachistochrone or fastest relaxation pathway for the ultrametric distance as a function of the barrier size and conclude that the brachistochrone may only be realized by those systems that follow the exponential or Debye law. Our approach not only reproduces the phenomenological generic relaxation law in the ultrametric limit, but is also justified a posteriori in specialized contexts: It reproduces meaningful folding pathways for the search in conformational space performed by renaturing RNA molecules which are targets of natural selection, reflecting a maximization in the efficiency of the folding process.

  8. Mindfulness meditation and relaxation training increases time sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, S; Fanget, M; Dambrun, M

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effect of mindfulness meditation and relaxation on time perception using a temporal bisection task. In Experiment 1, the participants performed a temporal task before and after exercises of mindfulness meditation or relaxation. In Experiment 2, the procedure was similar than that used in Experiment 1, except that the participants were trained to mediate or relax every day over a period of several weeks. The results showed that mindfulness meditation exercises increased sensitivity to time and lengthened perceived time. However, this temporal improvement with meditation exercises was primarily observed in the experienced meditators. Our results also showed the experienced meditators were less anxious than the novice participants, and that the sensitivity to time increased when the level of anxiety decreased. Our results were explained by the practice of mindfulness technique that had developed individuals' abilities in devoting more attention resources to temporal information processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MRI of spinal bone marrow: part 2, T1-weighted imaging-based differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Christopher J; Shah, Lubdha M

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the structure of bone marrow and the differential diagnosis of bone marrow pathology on the basis of T1-weighted MRI patterns. Bone marrow is an organ that is evaluated routinely during MRI of the spine, particularly lumbar spine evaluation. Thus, it is one of the most commonly performed MRI examinations. T1-weighted MRI is a fundamental sequence in evaluating spinal marrow, and an understanding of T1-weighted MR signal abnormalities is important for the practicing radiologist.

  10. DCE-PWI 3D T1-measurement as function of time or flip angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Peters, David Alberg; Tietze, Anna

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion Weighted Imaging (DCE-PWI) and the preceding T1 measurement is usually performed with a FLASH sequence. For the sake of speed, the 3D T1 measurement is often performed by measuring the signal for a range of flip angles instead of as a function the inversion (or...... saturation) time [1,2]. This work investigates how off-set in flip angles in the presence of B1 inhomogeneities propagates into large errors in the T1 estimates. The errors are markedly reduced when the measurement is performed as a function of time, however this requires signal preparation....

  11. Impact of T1 slope on surgical and adjacent segment degeneration after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang P

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Peng Yang,1 Yongqian Li,2,3 Jia Li,2,3,* Yong Shen2,3,* 1Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Biomechanics of Hebei Province, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This retrospective study investigated an association between preoperative T1 slope and surgical and adjacent segment degeneration (SASD after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty (BCDA in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease.Methods: Based on preoperative standing lateral radiographs, 90 patients were classified according to T1 slope that was higher or lower than the 50th percentile (high T1 or low T1, 28 and 62 patients, respectively. Patients were also classified as SASD or non-SASD (38 and 52 patients, respectively determined by radiographs at final follow-up. Visual analog scale (VAS and Neck Disability Index (NDI scores for neck and arm pain were noted, and changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS, functional spinal unit (FSU angle, and FSU range of motion (ROM were also noted. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for SASD.Results: The overall rate of SASD was 42.2% (38/90. The SACS, FSU angle, FSU ROM, and SASD rates of the high T1 and low T1 slope groups were significantly different at the last follow-up. The NDI and VAS scores of the high T1 slope group were significantly greater than those of the low T1 slope. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that high T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy (ie, residual space behind the prosthesis were significant risk factors for SASD after BCDA.Conclusion: High T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy were associated with SASD after BCDA. Patients with a high preoperative T1

  12. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the α-relaxation

  13. SirT1 knockdown potentiates radiation-induced bystander effect through promoting c-Myc activity and thus facilitating ROS accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuexia [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Central Laboratory, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Tu, Wenzhi; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Ye, Shuang; Dong, Chen [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced bystander effects between hepatoma cells and hepatocyte cells. • SirT1 played a protective role in regulating this bystander effect. • SirT1 contributed to the protective effects via elimination the accumulation of ROS. • The activity of c-Myc is critical for maintaining the protective role of SirT1. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the bystander signaling processes, especially under hypoxic condition, are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia. This bystander response was dramatically diminished or enhanced when the SirT1 gene of irradiated hepatoma cells was overexpressed or knocked down, respectively, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, SirT1 knockdown promoted transcriptional activity for c-Myc and facilitated ROS accumulation. But both of the increased bystander responses and ROS generation due to SirT1-knockdown were almost completely suppressed by c-Myc interference. Moreover, ROS scavenger effectively abolished the RIBE triggered by irradiated hepatoma cells even with SirT1 depletion. These findings provide new insights that SirT1 has a profound role in regulating RIBE where a c-Myc-dependent release of ROS may be involved.

  14. SirT1 knockdown potentiates radiation-induced bystander effect through promoting c-Myc activity and thus facilitating ROS accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yuexia; Tu, Wenzhi; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Ye, Shuang; Dong, Chen; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced bystander effects between hepatoma cells and hepatocyte cells. • SirT1 played a protective role in regulating this bystander effect. • SirT1 contributed to the protective effects via elimination the accumulation of ROS. • The activity of c-Myc is critical for maintaining the protective role of SirT1. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the bystander signaling processes, especially under hypoxic condition, are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia. This bystander response was dramatically diminished or enhanced when the SirT1 gene of irradiated hepatoma cells was overexpressed or knocked down, respectively, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, SirT1 knockdown promoted transcriptional activity for c-Myc and facilitated ROS accumulation. But both of the increased bystander responses and ROS generation due to SirT1-knockdown were almost completely suppressed by c-Myc interference. Moreover, ROS scavenger effectively abolished the RIBE triggered by irradiated hepatoma cells even with SirT1 depletion. These findings provide new insights that SirT1 has a profound role in regulating RIBE where a c-Myc-dependent release of ROS may be involved

  15. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  16. Relaxation laryngoplasty (thyroplasty tipe III)

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Luis Humberto; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Barreto, Tatiana; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure that is indicated in mutational falsetto that does not respond well to voice therapy. By shortening the vocal cords, the fundamental frequency diminishes and gains a more male voice.We present the case of a male patient, with mutational dysphonia characterized with inadequate tone elevation in relation to its gender. We describe the surgical technique and its outcome. La tiroplastia de relajación está indicada en pacientes con alteraciones d...

  17. Post-seismic relaxation from geodetic and seismic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Rodkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the aftershock sequence and the post-seismic deformation process of the Parkfield earthquake (2004, M = 6, California, USA source area using GPS data. This event was chosen because of the possibility of joint analysis of data from the rather dense local GPS network (from SOPAC Internet archive and of the availability of the rather detailed aftershock sequence data (http://www.ncedc.org/ncedc/catalog-search.html. The relaxation process of post-seismic deformation prolongs about the same 400 days as the seismic aftershock process does. Thus, the aftershock process and the relaxation process in deformation could be the different sides of the same process. It should be noted that the ratio of the released seismic energy and of the GPS obtained deformation is quite different for the main shock and for the aftershock stage. The ratio of the released seismic energy to the deformation value decreases essentially for the post-shock process. The similar change in the seismic energy/deformation value ratio is valid in a few other strong earthquakes. Thus, this decrease seems typical of aftershock sequences testifying for decrease of ratio of elastic to inelastic deformation in the process of post-shock relaxation when the source area appears to be mostly fractured after the main shock occurs, but the healing process had no yet sufficient time to develop.

  18. Pseudogap Behavior of the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Rate in FeSe Probed by 77Se-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Anlu; Arai, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Shunsaku; Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Ishida, Kenji; Böhmer, Anna E.; Meingast, Christoph; Wolf, Thomas; Hirata, Michihiro; Sasaki, Takahiko

    2018-01-01

    We conducted 77Se-nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the iron-based superconductor FeSe in magnetic fields of 0.6 to 19 T to investigate the superconducting and normal-state properties. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by the temperature (T1T)-1 increases below the structural transition temperature Ts but starts to be suppressed below T*, well above the superconducting transition temperature Tc(H), resulting in a broad maximum of (T1T)-1 at Tp(H). This is similar to the pseudogap behavior in optimally doped cuprate superconductors. Because T* and Tp(H) decrease in the same manner as Tc(H) with increasing H, the pseudogap behavior in FeSe is ascribed to superconducting fluctuations, which presumably originate from the theoretically predicted preformed pair above Tc(H).

  19. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times of skeletal muscles on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, K.; Nakano, I. (Shimoshizu National Hospital, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Neurology); Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Tateno, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Clinical Research); Aoki, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.).

  20. Myocardial T1 and T2 mapping: Techniques and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Pan Ki; Hong, Yoo Jin; Im, Dong Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is widely used in various medical fields related to cardiovascular diseases. Rapid technological innovations in magnetic resonance imaging in recent times have resulted in the development of new techniques for CMR imaging. T1 and T2 image mapping sequences enable the direct quantification of T1, T2, and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) values of the myocardium, leading to the progressive integration of these sequences into routine CMR settings. Currently, T1, T2, and ECV values are being recognized as not only robust biomarkers for diagnosis of cardiomyopathies, but also predictive factors for treatment monitoring and prognosis. In this study, we have reviewed various T1 and T2 mapping sequence techniques and their clinical applications.

  1. In silico design of small molecule inhibitors of CDK9/cyclin T1 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randjelovic, Jelena; Eric, Slavica; Savic, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    In order to design a small molecule which potentially may interfere with CDK9/cyclin T1 complex formation and therefore influence its physiological role, a computational study of dynamics and druggability of CDK9 binding surface was conducted. Druggability estimates and pocket opening analyses indicated binding regions of cyclin T1 residues, Phe 146 and Lys 6, as starting points for the design of small molecules with the potential to inhibit the CDK9/cyclin T1 association. A pharmacophore model was created, based on these two residues and used to select potential inhibitor structures. Binding energies of the inhibitors were estimated with MM-GBSA. A good correlation of MM-GBSA energies and FTMap druggability predictions was observed. Amongst studied compounds a derivative of 2-amino-8-hydroxyquinoline was identified as the best potential candidate to inhibit CDK9/cyclin T1 interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relaxation in polymer electrolytes on the nanosecond timescale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, G.; Fernandez-Perea, R.; Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Howells, W.S.

    2000-01-01

    The relation between mechanical and electrical relaxation in polymer/lithium-salt complexes is a fascinating and still unresolved problem in condensed-matter physics, yet has an important bearing on the viability of such materials for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries. At room temperature, these materials are biphasic: they consist of both fluid amorphous regions and salt-enriched crystalline regions. Ionic conduction is known to occur predominantly in the amorphous fluid regions. Although the conduction mechanisms are not yet fully understood, it is widely accepted that lithium ions, coordinated with groups of ether oxygen atoms on single or perhaps double polymer chains, move through re-coordination with other oxygen-bearing groups. The formation and disruption of these coordination bonds must be accompanied by strong relaxation of the local chain structure. Here we probe the relaxation on a nanosecond timescale using quasielastic neutron scattering, and we show that at least two processes are involved: a slow process with a translational character and one or two fast processes with a rotational character. Whereas the former reflects the slowing-down of the translational relaxation commonly observed in polyethylene oxide and other polymer melts, the latter appears to be unique to the polymer electrolytes and has not (to our knowledge) been observed before. A clear picture emerges of the lithium cations forming crosslinks between chain segments and thereby profoundly altering the dynamics of the polymer network.

  3. Impact of liver fibrosis and fatty liver on T1rho measurements: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Shuang Shuang; Li, Qing; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Wen [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Yu; Zhuo, Zhi Zheng [Clinical Science, Philips Healthcare, Beijing (China); Zhao, Guiming [Dept. of Hepatology, Tianjin Second People' s Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the liver T1rho values for detecting fibrosis, and the potential impact of fatty liver on T1rho measurements. This study included 18 healthy subjects, 18 patients with fatty liver, and 18 patients with liver fibrosis, who underwent T1rho MRI and mDIXON collections. Liver T1rho, proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and T2* values were measured and compared among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the T1rho values for detecting liver fibrosis. Liver T1rho values were correlated with PDFF, T2* values and clinical data. Liver T1rho and PDFF values were significantly different (p < 0.001), whereas the T2* (p = 0.766) values were similar, among the three groups. Mean liver T1rho values in the fibrotic group (52.6 ± 6.8 ms) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (44.9 ± 2.8 ms, p < 0.001) and fatty liver group (45.0 ± 3.5 ms, p < 0.001). Mean liver T1rho values were similar between healthy subjects and fatty liver group (p = 0.999). PDFF values in the fatty liver group (16.07 ± 10.59%) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (1.43 ± 1.36%, p < 0.001) and fibrosis group (1.07 ± 1.06%, p < 0.001). PDFF values were similar in healthy subjects and fibrosis group (p = 0.984). Mean T1rho values performed well to detect fibrosis at a threshold of 49.5 ms (area under the ROC curve, 0.855), had a moderate correlation with liver stiffness (r = 0.671, p = 0.012), and no correlation with PDFF, T2* values, subject age, or body mass index (p > 0.05). T1rho MRI is useful for noninvasive detection of liver fibrosis, and may not be affected with the presence of fatty liver.

  4. Impact of liver fibrosis and fatty liver on T1rho measurements: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Shuang Shuang; Li, Qing; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Zhuo, Zhi Zheng; Zhao, Guiming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the liver T1rho values for detecting fibrosis, and the potential impact of fatty liver on T1rho measurements. This study included 18 healthy subjects, 18 patients with fatty liver, and 18 patients with liver fibrosis, who underwent T1rho MRI and mDIXON collections. Liver T1rho, proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and T2* values were measured and compared among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the T1rho values for detecting liver fibrosis. Liver T1rho values were correlated with PDFF, T2* values and clinical data. Liver T1rho and PDFF values were significantly different (p < 0.001), whereas the T2* (p = 0.766) values were similar, among the three groups. Mean liver T1rho values in the fibrotic group (52.6 ± 6.8 ms) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (44.9 ± 2.8 ms, p < 0.001) and fatty liver group (45.0 ± 3.5 ms, p < 0.001). Mean liver T1rho values were similar between healthy subjects and fatty liver group (p = 0.999). PDFF values in the fatty liver group (16.07 ± 10.59%) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (1.43 ± 1.36%, p < 0.001) and fibrosis group (1.07 ± 1.06%, p < 0.001). PDFF values were similar in healthy subjects and fibrosis group (p = 0.984). Mean T1rho values performed well to detect fibrosis at a threshold of 49.5 ms (area under the ROC curve, 0.855), had a moderate correlation with liver stiffness (r = 0.671, p = 0.012), and no correlation with PDFF, T2* values, subject age, or body mass index (p > 0.05). T1rho MRI is useful for noninvasive detection of liver fibrosis, and may not be affected with the presence of fatty liver

  5. Kinetics of C3H 10T1/2 mouse cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metting, N.F.; Mortenson, E.; Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The 10T1/2 cell line has been brought to PNL because of its usefulness as an in vitro biological system for transformation assay, and because a fast repair process in response to irradiation has been observed in these cells. Before using the cells in radiobiological studies, it was important to observe the growth kinetics of our cultures and verify their similarity to those reported by other laboratories in which they are used, so that our subsequent measurements could be compared with and added to the body of scientific work already compiled. To become familiar with the cell morphology and cloning characteristics, we conducted an experiment in which a number of flasks were seeded with about 350 cells each. Each day, starting with the second day after plating, a flask was stained and the number of clones plus the number of cells in each clone were counted. There are several types of cell morphologies within the population. Flow cytometry (FCM) studies were used to assess cell cycle characteristics, Again, a number of flasks were seeded, but this time with a large number of exponentially growing cells. Measurements indicated that the cultures were probably more or less synchronized at their initiation by plating efficiency effects, that they maintained a loose synchrony by phases through about the eighth day and that before at least the eleventh day they began to pile up in G1 phase

  6. Temperature effects on the kinetic properties of the rabbit intestinal oligopeptide cotransporter PepT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Elena; Cherubino, Francesca; Margheritis, Eleonora; Oyadeyi, Ayodele Stephen; Vollero, Alessandra; Peres, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The effects of temperature on the functional properties of the intestinal oligopeptide transporter PepT1 from rabbit have been investigated using electrophysiological methods. The dipeptide Gly-Gln at pH 6.5 or 7.5 was used as substrate. Raising the temperature in the range 20-30 °C causes an increase in the maximal transport-associated current (I (max)) with a Q (10) close to 4. Higher temperatures accelerate the rate of decline of the presteady-state currents observed in the absence of organic substrate. The voltage dependencies of the intramembrane charge movement and of the time constant of decline are both shifted towards more negative potentials by higher temperatures. The shift is due to a stronger action of temperature on the outward rate of charge movement compared to the inward rate, indicating a lower activation energy for the latter process. Consistently, the activation energy for the complete cycle is similar to that of the inward rate of charge movement. Temperature also affects the binding rate of the substrate: the K (0.5) -V curve is shifted to more negative potentials by higher temperatures, resulting in a lower apparent affinity in the physiological range of potentials. The overall efficiency of transport, estimated as the I (max)/K (0.5) ratio is significantly increased at body temperature.

  7. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  8. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    We reexamine the foundations of Lynden-Bell's statistical mechanical discussion of violent relaxation in collisionless stellar systems. We argue that Lynden-Bell's formulation in terms of a continuum description introduces unnecessary complications, and we consider a more conventional formulation in terms of particles. We then find the exclusion principle discovered by Lynden-Bell to be quantitatively important only at phase densities where two-body encounters are no longer negligible. Since the edynamical basis for the exclusion principle vanishes in such cases anyway, Lynden-Bell statistics always reduces in practice to Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics when applied to stellar systems. Lynden-Bell also found the equilibrium distribution function generally to be a sum of Maxwellians with velocity dispersions dependent on the phase density at star formation. We show that this difficulty vanishes in the particulate description for an encounterless stellar system as long as stars of different masses are initially well mixed in phase space. Our methods also demonstrate the equivalence between Gibbs's formalism which uses the microcanonical ensemble and Boltzmann's formalism which uses a coarse-grained continuum description. In addition, we clarify the concept of irreversible behavior on a macroscopic scale for an encounterless stellar system. Finally, we comment on the use of unusual macroscopic constraints to simulate the effects of incomplete relaxation

  9. Anelastic relaxation in irradiated Cu-Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Wiedersich, H.; Granato, A.V.

    1985-05-01

    Ultrasonic velocity measurements were made after thermal neutron irradiation of single-crystal Cu specimens containing 700 or 3700 appM Be. Ultrasonic attenuation was measured in similar specimens after 3 MeV electron irradiation. Three anelastic relaxation processes due to self-interstitial-Be complexes were observed. Cu-Be 1 was found to occur near liquid helium temperature; the temperature dependence of the velocity change suggests that reorientation of the Cu-Be 1 complex may involve quantum mechanical tunneling. Cu-Be produced an attenuation peak at approx.2.5 K at a frequency of 10 MHz. Cu-Be 3 appeared simultaneously with 2 as a shoulder on the high temperature side of the 2.5 K attenuation peak

  10. Native T1 Relaxation Time and Extracellular Volume Fraction as Accurate Markers of Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Valve Disease - Comparison With Targeted Left Ventricular Myocardial Biopsy -

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočková, Radka; Kačer, P.; Pirk, J.; Malý, J.; Sukupová, L.; Sikula, V.; Kotrc, M.; Barciaková, L.; Honsová, E.; Malý, M.; Kautzner, J.; Sedmera, David; Penicka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 5 (2016), s. 1202-1209 ISSN 1346-9843 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardiac magnetic resonance imaging * echocardiography * fibrosis * speckle tracking * valvular disease Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.544, year: 2016

  11. Proton NMR relaxation of hydrated insulin powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanches, R.; Donoso, J.P.; Mascarenhas, S.; Panepucci, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Water proton nuclear magnetic relaxation measurements were obtained for hydrated insulin powder as a function of the water content. For samples containing enough water to complete the hydration shell, the data for the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times are consistent with a model in which water molecules exist in two phases, one exhibiting restricted motion and identified with water of hydration and another identified as free water with motions similar to ordinary water. For samples containing only water of hydration, a model for the spin-spin relaxation time is discussed, in which the water molecules relaxation is described in terms for four relaxation times. Estimates are obtained for these relaxation times, in good agreement with the experimental data. (Author) [pt

  12. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  13. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahiran Basri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically.

  14. Comparison of a T1-weighted inversion-recovery-, gradient-echo- and spin-echo sequence for imaging of the brain at 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, C.; Niederstadt, T.; Kraemer, S.; Kugel, H.; Schwindt, W.; Heindel, W.; Bachmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The increased T1 relaxation times at 3.0 Tesla lead to a reduced T1 contrast, requiring adaptation of imaging protocols for high magnetic fields. This prospective study assesses the performance of three techniques for T1-weighted imaging (T1w) at 3.0 T with regard to gray-white differentiation and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients were examined at a 3.0 T system with axial T1 w inversion recovery (IR), spin-echo (SE) and gradient echo (GE) sequences and after contrast enhancement (CE) with CE-SE and CE-GE sequences. For qualitative analysis, the images were ranked with regard to artifacts, gray-white differentiation, image noise and overall diagnostic quality. For quantitative analysis, the CNR was calculated, and cortex and basal ganglia were compared with the white matter. Results: In the qualitative analysis, IR was judged superior to SE and GE for gray-white differentiation, image noise and overall diagnostic quality, but inferior to the GE sequence with regard to artifacts. CE-GE proved superior to CE-SE in all categories. In the quantitative analysis, CNR of the based ganglia was highest for IR, followed by GE and SE. For the CNR of the cortex, no significant difference was found between IR (16.9) and GE (15.4) but both were superior to the SE (9.4). The CNR of the cortex was significantly higher for CE-GE compared to CE-SE (12.7 vs. 7.6, p<0.001), but the CNR of the basal ganglia was not significantly different. Conclusion: For unenhanced T1w imaging at 3.0 T, the IR technique is, despite increased artifacts, the method of choice due to its superior gray-white differentiation and best overall image quality. For CE-studies, GE sequences are recommended. For cerebral imaging, SE sequences give unsatisfactory results at 3.0 T. (orig.)

  15. (39) K and (23) Na relaxation times and MRI of rat head at 21.1 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Armin M; Umathum, Reiner; Rösler, Manuela B; Ladd, Mark E; Litvak, Ilya; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Schepkin, Victor D

    2016-06-01

    At ultrahigh magnetic field strengths (B0  ≥ 7.0 T), potassium ((39) K) MRI might evolve into an interesting tool for biomedical research. However, (39) K MRI is still challenging because of the low NMR sensitivity and short relaxation times. In this work, we demonstrated the feasibility of (39) K MRI at 21.1 T, determined in vivo relaxation times of the rat head at 21.1 T, and compared (39) K and sodium ((23) Na) relaxation times of model solutions containing different agarose gel concentrations at 7.0 and 21.1 T. (39) K relaxation times were markedly shorter than those of (23) Na. Compared with the lower field strength, (39) K relaxation times were up to 1.9- (T1 ), 1.4- (T2S ) and 1.9-fold (T2L ) longer at 21.1 T. The increase in the (23) Na relaxation times was less pronounced (up to 1.2-fold). Mono-exponential fits of the (39) K longitudinal relaxation time at 21.1 T revealed T1  = 14.2 ± 0.1 ms for the healthy rat head. The (39) K transverse relaxation times were 1.8 ± 0.2 ms and 14.3 ± 0.3 ms for the short (T2S ) and long (T2L ) components, respectively. (23) Na relaxation times were markedly longer (T1  = 41.6 ± 0.4 ms; T2S  = 4.9 ± 0.2 ms; T2L  = 33.2 ± 0.2 ms). (39) K MRI of the healthy rat head could be performed with a nominal spatial resolution of 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3) within an acquisition time of 75 min. The increase in the relaxation times with magnetic field strength is beneficial for (23) Na and (39) K MRI at ultrahigh magnetic field strength. Our results demonstrate that (39) K MRI at 21.1 T enables acceptable image quality for preclinical research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  17. [Autocontrol of muscle relaxation with vecuronium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilla, C; Zatelli, R; Marchi, M; Zago, M

    1990-01-01

    The optimal conditions for maintaining desired levels of muscle relaxation with vecuronium are obtained by means of the continuous infusion (I.V.) technique. A frequent correction of the infusion flow is required, since it is impossible to predict the exact amount for the muscle relaxant in single case. In order to overcome such limits the authors propose a very feasible infusion system for the self-control of muscle relaxation; furthermore they positively consider its possible daily clinical application.

  18. Relaxation dynamics of a single DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshen, E.; Zhao, W. Z.; Carmon, G.; Rosen, S.; Granek, R.; Feingold, M.

    2005-06-01

    The relaxation of a single DNA molecule is studied. The experimental system consists of optical tweezers and a micron-sized bead that is tethered to the bottom of the sample by a single double-stranded DNA molecule. The bead slows down the DNA relaxation from a strongly stretched configuration such that it is passing through stretched equilibrium states. This allows for a theoretical description of the relaxation trajectory, which is in good agreement with experiment.

  19. Relaxation schemes for the shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, A. I.; Katsaounis, Th.

    2003-03-01

    We present a class of first and second order in space and time relaxation schemes for the shallow water (SW) equations. A new approach of incorporating the geometrical source term in the relaxation model is also presented. The schemes are based on classical relaxation models combined with Runge-Kutta time stepping mechanisms. Numerical results are presented for several benchmark test problems with or without the source term present.

  20. Technological patterns of preventive relaxation of workings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, L.L.; Bakhtin, A.F.; Zel' vyanskii, M.Sh. (Donetskaya Proektnaya Kontora (USSR))

    1991-09-01

    Presents stress relaxation patterns of workings. The patterns are used at horizon layouts and panel development of mine-take in stone inclines, boundary entries, mine drainage galleries and main galleries. The stress relaxation variants are: stress relaxing longwalls with complete mining with two or three winning galleries, longwalls worked by long pillars on the strike, and longwalls worked with advance mining on the strike. The individual variants differ by the ventilation system adopted.