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Sample records for t-stage node-positive oropharyngeal

  1. [Radiotherapy in node-positive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, D; Bartkowiak, D; Bolenz, C; Wiegel, T

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous randomized trials to guide the management of patients with localized (and metastatic) prostate cancer, but only a few (mostly retrospective) studies have specifically addressed node-positive patients. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding optimal treatment in this situation. Current guidelines recommend long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone or radiotherapy plus long-term ADT as treatment options. This overview summarizes the existing literature on the use of radiotherapy for node-positive prostate cancer as definitive treatment and as adjuvant or salvage therapy after radical prostatectomy. In this context, we also discuss several PET tracers in the imaging evaluation of patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. As for definitive treatment, retrospective studies suggest that ADT plus radiotherapy improves overall survival compared with ADT alone. These studies also consistently demonstrated that many patients with node-positive prostate cancer can achieve long-term survival - and are likely curable - with aggressive therapy. The beneficial impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on survival in patients with pN1 prostate cancer seems to be highly influenced by tumor characteristics. Men with ≤ 2 positive lymph nodes in the presence of intermediate- to high-grade disease, or positive margins, and those with 3 or 4 positive lymph nodes are the ideal candidates for adjuvant radiotherapy (plus long-term ADT) after surgery. There is a need for randomized trials to further examine the potential role of radiotherapy as either definitive or adjuvant treatment, for patients with node-positive prostate cancer.

  2. Effects of population source and node position on rhizome bud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of population source (agro-ecozone) and node position on bud distribution in mature (determinate) rhizome of first- (from natural vegetati on) and second- (from screenhouse-grown plants) generation speargrass (Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel) from the derived savanna (DS), southern Guinea savanna (SGS) ...

  3. Oropharyngeal candidiasis and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinel, B.; Cassou-Mounat, T.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The oropharyngeal candidiasis is a common condition in cancer patients treated by irradiation, during and after their treatment. For example, almost 70% of patients treated with chemo-radiation for head and neck cancer are colonized, and 40% of symptomatic patients have an oropharyngeal candidiasis. Furthermore, we noticed an increase in non-albicans Candida strains, which are present in almost 50% of samples. Cancer treatments, especially radiation therapy, and co-morbidities are risk factors of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oropharyngeal candidiasis has substantial effects on quality of life, and may limit treatment. Epidemiologic data, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis criteria, consequences and treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis will be discussed in this article. (authors)

  4. Tumor load in lymph node positive melanoma: Classification systems, prognostication models and management recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.T. van der Ploeg (Augustinus)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The incidence and mortality of melanoma, the most malignant type of skin cancer, is increasing worldwide. The sentinel node procedure is accepted as a diagnostic procedure for patients with primary melanoma > 1mm. The prognosis of the group of sentinel node-positive

  5. [Oropharyngeal candidiasis and radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinel, B; Cassou-Mounat, T; Bensadoun, R-J

    2012-05-01

    The oropharyngeal candidiasis is a common condition in cancer patients treated by irradiation, during and after their treatment. For example, almost 70% of patients treated with chemoradiation for head and neck cancer are colonized, and 40% of symptomatic patients have an oropharyngeal candidiasis. Furthermore, we noticed an increase in non-albicans Candida strains, which are present in almost 50% of samples. Cancer treatments, especially radiation therapy, and comorbidities are risk factors of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oropharyngeal candidiasis has substantial effects on quality of life, and may limit treatment. Epidemiologic data, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis criteria, consequences and treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis will be discussed in this article. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiotherapy for stage IV oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kaori; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Motegi, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with stage IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy in our facility from January 1993 to August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. The age of the patients was 34-84 (median 62) years old. Thirty-four were male and 14 were female. Subsite of the tumor was anterior: 16, lateral: 39, posterior: 1, and superior: 1. Forty-nine patients were treated with chemotherapy. Induction chemotherapy (ICT) was done in 25 patients, ICT+concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in 15 patients, and CCRT in 9 patients. A dose of 60-82 Gy (median 72 Gy) by hyperfractionated radiotherapy, at 1.2 Gy/fraction twice a day, was delivered in 37 patients, and 60-72 Gy (median 66 Gy) with a conventional daily fractionation in 20 patients. Salvage surgery was performed in 5 patients as a part of primary treatment after radiotherapy. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate and disease-free survival rate were 52.9% and 51.4%, respectively. By univariate analysis, the impact of age, sex, T-stage, N-stage, histological differentiation, chemotherapy and fractionation of radiation therapy on survivals were evaluated. T-stage, N-stage and histological differentiation were significantly covariate correlated with survival. The treatment results were not satisfactory. Further investigation of the treatment strategy to improve the treatment outcome of advanced oropharyngeal cancer is desired. (author)

  7. The value of level III clearance in patients with axillary and sentinel node positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, Mary F

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of level III axillary clearance is contentious, with great variance worldwide in the extent and levels of clearance performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine rates of level III positivity in patients undergoing level I-III axillary clearance, and identify which patients are at highest risk of involved level III nodes. METHODS: From a database of 2850 patients derived from symptomatic and population-based screening service, 1179 patients who underwent level I-III clearance between the years 1999-2007 were identified. The pathology, surgical details, and prior sentinel nodes biopsies of patients were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven hundred seventy nine patients had level I-III axillary clearance. Of the patients, 63% (n = 747) were node positive. Of patients with node positive disease, 23% (n = 168) were level II positive and 19% (n = 141) were level III positive. Two hundred fifty patients had positive sentinel node biopsies prior to axillary clearance. Of these, 12% (n = 30) and 9% (n = 22) were level II and level III positive, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of level III involvement in patients with node positive disease were tumor size (P < 0.001, OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.2-1.5), invasive lobular disease (P < 0.001, OR = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.9-6.95), extranodal extension (P < 0.001, OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.18-0.4), and lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.04, OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-1). Lobular invasive disease (P = 0.049, OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1-16.8), extranodal spread (P = 0.003, OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.06-0.57), and having more than one positive sentinel node (P = 0.009, OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 1.5-16.1) were predictive of level III involvement in patients with sentinel node positive disease. CONCLUSION: Level III clearance has a selective but definite role to play in patients who have node positive breast carcinoma. Pathological characteristics of the primary tumor are of particular use in identifying those who are at various risk of level III nodal

  8. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Treatment (Adult) (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Oropharyngeal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Oropharyngeal Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Rachid; Schultz, Robert; Fedorak, Richard N

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Classically the disease has a predilection for the distal small bowel and colon and presents with dominant symptoms of abdominal pain and diarrhea. This case report describes a 38-year-old woman with Crohn's disease who presented with odynophagia. Direct visualization of the oropharynx revealed a large serpiginous Crohn's disease ulcer. A precipitous drop in hemoglobin prompted a series of gastroenterologic investigations that confirmed both ileal and oropharyngeal Crohn's disease. This manuscript describes the presentation of oropharyngeal Crohn's and reviews previous reports and management options.

  10. Extra-nodal extension is a significant prognostic factor in lymph node positive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sura Aziz

    Full Text Available Presence of lymph node (LN metastasis is a strong prognostic factor in breast cancer, whereas the importance of extra-nodal extension and other nodal tumor features have not yet been fully recognized. Here, we examined microscopic features of lymph node metastases and their prognostic value in a population-based cohort of node positive breast cancer (n = 218, as part of the prospective Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program NBCSP (1996-2009. Sections were reviewed for the largest metastatic tumor diameter (TD-MET, nodal afferent and efferent vascular invasion (AVI and EVI, extra-nodal extension (ENE, number of ENE foci, as well as circumferential (CD-ENE and perpendicular (PD-ENE diameter of extra-nodal growth. Number of positive lymph nodes, EVI, and PD-ENE were significantly increased with larger primary tumor (PT diameter. Univariate survival analysis showed that several features of nodal metastases were associated with disease-free (DFS or breast cancer specific survival (BCSS. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an independent prognostic value of PD-ENE (with 3 mm as cut-off value in predicting DFS and BCSS, along with number of positive nodes and histologic grade of the primary tumor (for DFS: P = 0.01, P = 0.02, P = 0.01, respectively; for BCSS: P = 0.02, P = 0.008, P = 0.02, respectively. To conclude, the extent of ENE by its perpendicular diameter was independently prognostic and should be considered in line with nodal tumor burden in treatment decisions of node positive breast cancer.

  11. VMAT techniques for lymph node-positive left sided breast cancer

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    Pasler, Marlies; Lutterbach, Johannes; Bjoernsgard, Mari; Reichmann, Ursula; Bartelt, Susanne [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the plan quality of two different volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques for lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer. Two VMAT plans were generated for 10 lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer patients: one plan using one single segment of a full rotation, typically an arc segment of 230 (1s-VMAT); and a second plan consisting of 2 small tangential arc segments of about 50 (2s-VMAT). For plan comparison, various dose and dose volume metrics (D{sub mean}, D{sub 98%}, D{sub 2%} for target volumes, D{sub 2%}, D{sub mean} and V{sub x%} for organs at risk (OAR)) were evaluated. Both techniques fulfilled both clinical target dose and OAR goals. 1s-VMAT achieved a slightly better homogeneity and better target coverage (D{sub 2%} = 54.2 ± 0.7 Gy, D{sub 98%} = 30.3 ± 1.8 Gy) compared to 2s-VMAT (D{sub 2%} = 55.0 ± 1.1 Gy, D{sub 98%} = 29.9 ± 1.7 Gy). For geometrical reasons, OAR sparing was noticeable but not significant better using 2s-VMAT, particularly heart and contralateral breast. The heart received a mean dose of 4.4 ± 0.8 Gy using 1s-VMAT and 3.3 ± 1.0 Gy using 2s-VMAT; the contralateral breast received 1.5 ± 0.3 Gy and 0.9 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. A VMAT technique based on two small tangential arc segments enables improved OAR sparing; the differences between the two techniques in target coverage and homogeneity are minor. Patient age and -anatomy must be considered for each individual case when deciding which technique to be used.

  12. The value of external beam radiation in pathologic node positive prostate cancer: a multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Astrid D.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Althausen, Alex F.; Heney, Niall M.; Kaufman, Donald S.; Shipley, William U.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of local/regional treatment, particularly external beam radiation alone versus radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy in patients with pathologic node positive prostate cancer on survival. The effect of delayed vs. immediate endocrine therapy on patients treated with radiation alone was also examined. Methods: Medical records of all 116 patients who received their initial treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 1996 for adenocarcinoma of the prostate with pathologic confirmed nodal metastasis and no distant disease were reviewed. The mean follow up was 5.5 years. Disease specific survival, time to PSA failure on endocrine therapy, and time to first intervention were evaluated. PSA failure was defined as two consecutive post-nadir rises following the first use of endocrine therapy. Intervention was defined as any surgical or radiotherapeutic procedure required for relief of symptoms related to local/regional recurrence. Survival comparisons were made between any local/regional treatment vs. none, radiation therapy alone vs. prostatectomy with radiation therapy, and immediate vs. delayed endocrine therapy. The effect of the different treatment options on survival were compared using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models to simultaneously adjust for patient and tumor characteristics (tumor stage, Gleason grade, number of positive nodes) that might influence survival. Results: The combined patient population had a 5 year disease specific survival of 74% and a 10 year disease specific survival of 48%. The comparison groups for local/regional treatment had the following adjusted outcomes. In a subgroup analysis of patients with clinical T1-T2 and clinical T3-T4 disease, local/regional treatment continued to confer a disease specific survival advantage over no local regional treatment in both subgroups (p=0.05 and p=0.02, respectively). PSA failure on endocrine therapy was

  13. Overview of oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nader Marta

    2013-09-01

    Head and neck cancer designates a variety of neoplasms that are originated in the head and neck region, which involves the oropharinx, nasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, among other organs and tissues. The worldwide incidence of head and neck cancer exceeds half a million cases per year, being it ranked as the fifth most common tumor worldwide. This article's purpose is to describe the main concepts of anatomy, pathology, risk factors, clinical features and diagnosis of oropharyngeal cancer.

  14. Prognostic value of lymph node ratio in node-positive breast cancer in Egyptian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhodary, T.R.; Ebrahim, M.A.; Hatata, E.E.; Niazy, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer in Egypt is the most common cancer among women and is the leading cause of cancer mortality. Traditionally, axillary lymph node involvement is considered among the most important prognostic factors in breast cancer. Nonetheless, accumulating evidence suggests that axillary lymph node ratio should be considered as an alternative to classical pN classification. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with operable node positive breast cancer, to investigate the prognostic significance of axillary lymph node ratio. Results: Five-hundred patients were considered eligible for the analysis. Median follow-up was 35 months (95% Cl 32-37 months), the median disease-free survival (DFS) was 49 months (95% Cl, 46.4-52.2 months). The classification of patients based on pN staging system failed to prognosticate DFS in the multivariate analysis. Conversely, grade 3 tumors, and the intermediate (> 0.20 to <0.65) and high (>0.65) LNR were the only variables that were independently associated with adverse DFS. The overall survival (OS) in this series was 69 months (95% Cl 60-77). Conclusion: The analysis of outcome of patients with early breast cancer in Egypt identified the adverse prognostic effects of high tumor grade, ER negativity and intermediate and high LNR on DFS. If the utility of the LNR is validated in other studies, it may replace the use of absolute number of axillary lymph nodes.

  15. Survival benefits from postoperative radiation therapy on lymph node positive patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zuguang; Jia, Xiaoyan; Chen, Kai; Li, Dapeng; Xie, Jing; Xu, Hong; Mao, Yixiang

    2016-07-19

    The benefit of combining postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) with chemotherapy for resected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is controversial. We sought to determine the effects of PORT on survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent primary site surgery. Patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma receiving primary tumor surgery between 1988 and 2012 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. We estimated the association between PORT and other clinicopathologic factors and survival. In total, 5304 patients were identified who underwent pancreatic resection including 2093 patients who had PORT and 3211 patients who had no PORT. Median overall, cancer-specific, and other-cause survival were 19.0, 20.0, and 196.0 months, respectively, with PORT versus 14.0, 15.0, and 163.0 months, respectively, without PORT (all P benefit of PORT was limited to patients with N1 disease. Median overall, cancer-specific, and other-cause survival for patients with N1 disease were 18.0, 18.0, and NA months, respectively, with PORT versus 12.0, 13.0, and 154.0 months, respectively, without PORT (all P benefits might be obtained from PORT on lymph node positive patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  16. Node-positive cervical cancer: impact of pelvic irradiation and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Chen, Alex S. J.; Flickinger, John C.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Seski, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The roles of postoperative pelvic and prophylactic paraaortic irradiation in pelvic node positive cervical cancer are currently controversial. A retrospective study was undertaken to examine the effect of pelvic irradiation on pelvic control and survival and to analyze the patterns of recurrence to determine whether indications exist for prophylactic paraaortic irradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1964 to 1991, 143 cases of FIGO Stage I and II cervical cancer undergoing exploratory laparotomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and radical hysterectomy had positive pelvic lymph nodes. Postoperatively, 108 cases were treated with whole pelvic irradiation while 35 patients were observed. Prophylactic paraaortic irradiation was not given. Results: Patients who received postoperative whole pelvic irradiation compared with those treated with radical hysterectomy alone had a significantly improved pelvic control rate, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival. The 5-year actuarial pelvic control rate was 78% vs. 45% (p = <0.0001), respectively. The 5-year actuarial DFS was 65% vs. 41% (p = 0.0004). The 5-year actuarial overall survival was 58% vs. 46% (p 0.02). In multivariate analysis, pelvic irradiation continued to show a positive effect on DFS (p = 0.0001) and overall survival (p = 0.0035). Lymphatic invasion and the total number of positive lymph nodes were the only other independent predictors of overall survival and DFS. The actuarial 5-year pelvic, paraaortic, and distant failure rates were 30%, 10%, and 28%, respectively. An isolated first recurrence in the paraaortic nodes occurred in only three cases. Conclusion: Postoperative pelvic irradiation significantly improves pelvic control, DFS, and overall survival, and should be used in patients with early stage cervical cancer and pathologically proven pelvic nodal metastases. The low incidence of isolated paraaortic nodal failure calls into question the value of routine prophylactic paraaortic

  17. Whole pelvis radiotherapy for pathological node-positive prostate cancer. Oncological outcome and prognostic factors

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    Poelaert, Filip; Decaestecker, Karel; Claeys, Tom; Dhondt, Bert; Lumen, Nicolaas [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Urology, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valerie; Ost, Piet [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Troyer, Bart de [AZ Nikolaas, Department of Urology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Meerleer, Gert de [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Visschere, Pieter de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    The goal of this work was to investigate the oncological outcome of whole pelvis radiotherapy (wpRT) in pathologic pelvic lymph node-positive (pN1) prostate cancer (PCa), evaluate the location of relapse, and identify potential prognostic factors. All patients undergoing pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) since the year 2000 at a single tertiary care center were evaluated. A total of 154 patients with pN1 PCa were treated with wpRT (39 in an adjuvant setting) and 2-3 years of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to estimate biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (CSS). Uni- and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors. Estimated bRFS was 67%, cPFS was 71%, and CSS was 96% at 5 years. Median follow-up was 55 months (interquartile range 25-87). Multivariate analysis identified having only 1 positive lymph node, a shorter time between diagnosis and PLND, and older age as independent favorable prognostic factors for biochemical and clinical recurrence. The number of positive lymph nodes was prognostic for CSS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.54) and OS (HR 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.36). Bone metastases were the most frequent location of PCa relapse (n = 32, 64%). Patients with pN1 PCa treated with wpRT and 2-3 years ADT have an encouraging 5-year CSS. Understaging of the disease extent may be the most important enemy in definitive pN1 PCa treatment. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war es, das onkologische Outcome der Bestrahlung des gesamten Beckens (wpRT) beim histologisch gesicherten nodal metastasierten Prostatakarzinom zu untersuchen, die Lokalisation eines eventuellen Rezidivs zu charakterisieren und moegliche prognostische Faktoren zu identifizieren. Alle Patienten, bei denen seit dem Jahr 2000 eine pelvine Lymphknotendissektion (PLND) durchgefuehrt worden war

  18. Proposal for the delineation of the nodal CTV in the node-positive and the post-operative neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, Vincent; Eisbruch, Avraham; Hamoir, Marc; Levendag, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In 2003, a panel of experts published a set of consensus guidelines regarding the delineation of the neck node levels (Radiother Oncol, 2003; 69: 227-36). These recommendations were applicable for the node-negative and the N1-neck, but were found too restrictive for the node-positive and the post-operative neck. Patients and methods: In this framework, using the previous recommendations as a backbone, new guidelines have been proposed taking into account the specificities of the node-positive and the post-operative neck. Results: Inclusion of the retrostyloid space cranially and the supra-clavicular fossa caudally is proposed in case of neck nodes (defined radiologically or on the surgical specimen) located in levels II, and IV or Vb, respectively. When extra-capsular rupture is suspected (on imaging) or demonstrated on the pathological specimen, adjacent muscles should also be included in the CTV. For node(s) located at the boundary between contiguous levels (e.g. levels II and Ib), these two levels should be delineated. In the post-operative setting, the entire 'surgical bed' should be included. Last, the retropharyngeal space should be delineated in case of positive neck from pharyngeal tumors. Conclusions: The objective of the manuscript is to give a comprehensive description of the new set of guidelines for CTV delineation in the node-positive neck and the post-operative neck, with a complementary atlas of the new anatomical structures to be included

  19. Nomogram for prediction of level 2 axillary lymph node metastasis in proven level 1 node-positive breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanlin; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Hao; Ou, Xunyan; Xu, Zhen; Ai, Liping; Sun, Lisha; Liu, Caigang

    2017-09-22

    The current management of the axilla in level 1 node-positive breast cancer patients is axillary lymph node dissection regardless of the status of the level 2 axillary lymph nodes. The goal of this study was to develop a nomogram predicting the probability of level 2 axillary lymph node metastasis (L-2-ALNM) in patients with level 1 axillary node-positive breast cancer. We reviewed the records of 974 patients with pathology-confirmed level 1 node-positive breast cancer between 2010 and 2014 at the Liaoning Cancer Hospital and Institute. The patients were randomized 1:1 and divided into a modeling group and a validation group. Clinical and pathological features of the patients were assessed with uni- and multivariate logistic regression. A nomogram based on independent predictors for the L-2-ALNM identified by multivariate logistic regression was constructed. Independent predictors of L-2-ALNM by the multivariate logistic regression analysis included tumor size, Ki-67 status, histological grade, and number of positive level 1 axillary lymph nodes. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the modeling set and the validation set were 0.828 and 0.816, respectively. The false-negative rates of the L-2-ALNM nomogram were 1.82% and 7.41% for the predicted probability cut-off points of level 1 axillary lymph node metastasis. Patients with a low probability of L-2-ALNM could be spared level 2 axillary lymph node dissection, thereby reducing postoperative morbidity.

  20. Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Shah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal cancer represents a growing proportion of head and neck malignancies. This has been associated with the increase in infection of the oropharynx by oncogenic strains of human papillomavirus (HPV. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS has opened the door for minimally invasive surgery for HPV-related and non-HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Compared to traditional open surgical approaches, TORS has been shown to improve functional outcomes in speech and swallowing, while maintaining good oncologic outcomes.

  1. CDO1 promoter methylation is a biomarker for outcome prediction of anthracycline treated, estrogen receptor-positive, lymph node-positive breast cancer patients.

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    Dietrich, Dimo; Krispin, Manuel; Dietrich, Jörn; Fassbender, Anne; Lewin, Jörn; Harbeck, Nadia; Schmitt, Manfred; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Vuaroqueaux, Vincent; Spyratos, Frédérique; Foekens, John A; Lesche, Ralf; Martens, John W M

    2010-06-01

    Various biomarkers for prediction of distant metastasis in lymph-node negative breast cancer have been described; however, predictive biomarkers for patients with lymph-node positive (LNP) disease in the context of distinct systemic therapies are still very much needed. DNA methylation is aberrant in breast cancer and is likely to play a major role in disease progression. In this study, the DNA methylation status of 202 candidate loci was screened to identify those loci that may predict outcome in LNP/estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients with adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Quantitative bisulfite sequencing was used to analyze DNA methylation biomarker candidates in a retrospective cohort of 162 LNP/ER+ breast cancer patients, who received adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy. First, twelve breast cancer specimens were analyzed for all 202 candidate loci to exclude genes that showed no differential methylation. To identify genes that predict distant metastasis, the remaining loci were analyzed in 84 selected cases, including the 12 initial ones. Significant loci were analyzed in the remaining 78 independent cases. Metastasis-free survival analysis was conducted by using Cox regression, time-dependent ROC analysis, and the Kaplan-Meier method. Pairwise multivariate regression analysis was performed by linear Cox Proportional Hazard models, testing the association between methylation scores and clinical parameters with respect to metastasis-free survival. Of the 202 loci analysed, 37 showed some indication of differential DNA methylation among the initial 12 patient samples tested. Of those, 6 loci were associated with outcome in the initial cohort (n = 84, log rank test, p Promoter DNA methylation of cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) was confirmed in univariate and in pairwise multivariate analysis adjusting for age at surgery, pathological T stage, progesterone receptor status, grade, and endocrine therapy as a strong and independent

  2. Oropharyngeal Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Mohamed

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Rachid Mohamed, Robert Schultz, Richard N FedorakDivision of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AlbertaAbstract: Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Classically the disease has a predilection for the distal small bowel and colon and presents with dominant symptoms of abdominal pain and diarrhea. This case report describes a 38-year-old woman with Crohn’s disease who presented with odynophagia. Direct visualization of the oropharynx revealed a large serpiginous Crohn’s disease ulcer. A precipitous drop in hemoglobin prompted a series of gastroenterologic investigations that confirmed both ileal and oropharyngeal Crohn’s disease. This manuscript describes the presentation of oropharyngeal Crohn’s and reviews previous reports and management options.Keywords: Crohn’s disease, odynophagia, immunomodulatory therapy, oropharyngeal Crohn’s disease, aphthous ulcer, gastroscopy

  3. Prognostic Value of Bismuth Typing and Modified T-stage in Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

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    Shengen Yi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The majority of our patients with HCC were characterized as Subtype IV in Bismuth typing and Stage T3 in modified T-stage. Both Bismuth typing and modified T-stage showed prognostic value in HCC. Compared with Bismuth typing, modified T-stage is a better indicator of the resectability of HCC.

  4. The Impact of Definitive Local Therapy for Lymph Node-Positive Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusthoven, Chad G.; Carlson, Julie A.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Raben, David; Dewitt, Peter E.; Crawford, E. David; Maroni, Paul D.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival outcomes for patients with lymph node-positive, nonmetastatic prostate cancer undergoing definitive local therapy (radical prostatectomy [RP], external beam radiation therapy [EBRT], or both) versus no local therapy (NLT) in the US population in the modern prostate specific antigen (PSA) era. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for patients with T1-4N1M0 prostate cancer diagnosed from 1995 through 2005. To allow comparisons of equivalent datasets, patients were analyzed in separate clinical (cN+) and pathologically confirmed (pN+) lymph node-positive cohorts. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) estimates were generated, with accompanying univariate log-rank and multivariate Cox proportional hazards comparisons. Results: A total of 796 cN+ and 2991 pN+ patients were evaluable. Among cN+ patients, 43% underwent EBRT and 57% had NLT. Outcomes for cN+ patients favored EBRT, with 10-year OS rates of 45% versus 29% (P<.001) and PCSS rates of 67% versus 53% (P<.001). Among pN+ patients, 78% underwent local therapy (RP 57%, EBRT 10%, or both 11%) and 22% had NLT. Outcomes for pN+ also favored local therapy, with 10-year OS rates of 65% versus 42% (P<.001) and PCSS rates of 78% versus 56% (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, local therapy in both the cN+ and pN+ cohorts remained independently associated with improved OS and PCSS (all P<.001). Local therapy was associated with favorable hazard ratios across subgroups, including patients aged ≥70 years and those with multiple positive lymph nodes. Among pN+ patients, no significant differences in survival were observed between RP versus EBRT and RP with or without adjuvant EBRT. Conclusions: In this large, population-based cohort, definitive local therapy was associated with significantly improved survival in patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer

  5. The Impact of Definitive Local Therapy for Lymph Node-Positive Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusthoven, Chad G., E-mail: chad.rusthoven@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Carlson, Julie A.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Dewitt, Peter E. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Crawford, E. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Department of Urology, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Maroni, Paul D. [Department of Urology, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival outcomes for patients with lymph node-positive, nonmetastatic prostate cancer undergoing definitive local therapy (radical prostatectomy [RP], external beam radiation therapy [EBRT], or both) versus no local therapy (NLT) in the US population in the modern prostate specific antigen (PSA) era. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for patients with T1-4N1M0 prostate cancer diagnosed from 1995 through 2005. To allow comparisons of equivalent datasets, patients were analyzed in separate clinical (cN+) and pathologically confirmed (pN+) lymph node-positive cohorts. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) estimates were generated, with accompanying univariate log-rank and multivariate Cox proportional hazards comparisons. Results: A total of 796 cN+ and 2991 pN+ patients were evaluable. Among cN+ patients, 43% underwent EBRT and 57% had NLT. Outcomes for cN+ patients favored EBRT, with 10-year OS rates of 45% versus 29% (P<.001) and PCSS rates of 67% versus 53% (P<.001). Among pN+ patients, 78% underwent local therapy (RP 57%, EBRT 10%, or both 11%) and 22% had NLT. Outcomes for pN+ also favored local therapy, with 10-year OS rates of 65% versus 42% (P<.001) and PCSS rates of 78% versus 56% (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, local therapy in both the cN+ and pN+ cohorts remained independently associated with improved OS and PCSS (all P<.001). Local therapy was associated with favorable hazard ratios across subgroups, including patients aged ≥70 years and those with multiple positive lymph nodes. Among pN+ patients, no significant differences in survival were observed between RP versus EBRT and RP with or without adjuvant EBRT. Conclusions: In this large, population-based cohort, definitive local therapy was associated with significantly improved survival in patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer.

  6. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Na Young; Lee, Keun-Wook; Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Ah Kim, In

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy

  7. Oropharyngeal Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Rachid; Schultz, Robert; Fedorak, Richard N

    2008-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Classically the disease has a predilection for the distal small bowel and colon and presents with dominant symptoms of abdominal pain and diarrhea. This case report describes a 38-year-old woman with Crohn’s disease who presented with odynophagia. Direct visualization of the oropharynx revealed a large serpiginous Crohn’s disease ulcer. A precipitous drop in hemoglobin prompted a series of gastroenterologic investigations that confirmed both ileal and oropharyngeal Crohn’s disease. This manuscript describes the presentation of oropharyngeal Crohn’s and reviews previous reports and management options. PMID:21677821

  8. Radiation Therapy and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Noninvasive nodal restaging in clinically node positive breast cancer patients after neoadjuvant systemic therapy: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipper, R.J.; Moossdorff, M.; Beets-Tan, R.G.H.; Smidt, M.L.; Lobbes, M.B.I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide a systematic review of studies comparing the diagnostic performance of noninvasive techniques and axillary lymph node dissection in the identification of initially node positive patients with pathological complete response of axillary lymph nodes to neoadjuvant systemic therapy. Methods: PubMed and Embase databases were searched until May 21st, 2014. First, duplicate studies were eliminated. Next, study abstracts were read by two readers to assess eligibility. Studies were selected based on predefined inclusion criteria. Of these, data extraction was performed by two readers independently. Results: Of the 987 abstracts that were considered for inclusion, four were eligible for final analysis, which included a total of 572 patients. The diagnostic performance of clinical examination, axillary ultrasound, breast MRI, whole body 18 F-FDG PET-CT, and a prediction model to identify patients with pathological complete response were investigated. Studies were often limited by small sample size. Furthermore, systemic therapy regimens and definitions of clinical and pathological complete response were variable, refraining further pooling of data. The reported positive predictive value of different techniques to identify patients with axillary pathological complete response after neoadjuvant systemic therapy varied between 40% and 100%. Conclusion: At present, there is no accurate noninvasive restaging technique able to identify patients with complete axillary response after neoadjuvant systemic therapy

  10. Factors associated with involvement of four or more axillary nodes for sentinel lymph node-positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Angela; Niemierko, Andrzej; Gage, Irene; Evans, Sheila; Shaffer, Margaret; Smith, Frederick P.; Taghian, Alphonse; Magnant, Colette

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Sentinel lymph node-positive (SLN+) patients who are unlikely to have 4 or more involved axillary nodes might be treated with less extensive regional nodal radiation. The purpose of this study was to define possible predictors of having 4 or more involved axillary nodes. Methods and Materials: The records of 224 patients with breast cancer and 1 to 3 involved SLNs, who underwent completion axillary dissection without neoadjuvant chemotherapy or hormonal therapy were reviewed. Factors associated with the presence of 4 or more involved axillary nodes (SLNs plus non-SLNs) were evaluated by Pearson chi-square test of association and by simple and multiple logistic-regression analysis. Results: Of 224 patients, 42 had involvement of 4 or more axillary nodes. On univariate analysis, the presence of 4 or more involved axillary nodes was positively associated with increased tumor size, lobular histology, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), increased number of involved SLNs, decreased number of uninvolved SLNs, and increased size of SLN metastasis. On multivariate analysis, the presence of 4 or more involved axillary nodes was associated with LVSI, increased number of involved SLNs, increased size of SLN metastasis, and lobular histology. Conclusions: Patients with 1 or more involved SLN, LVSI, or SLN macrometastasis should be treated to the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex if they do not undergo completion axillary dissection. Other SLN+ patients might be adequately treated with less extensive radiation fields

  11. Conversion of T-stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, S.; Kondo, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty-six patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were examined with computed tomography (CT) before definitive radiation therapy. CT clearly delineated the extent of the primary tumors. CT frequently showed subtle destruction of the paranasal sinuses and pterygoid plate, which was not usually detected by conventional X ray examinations. T-staging was made according to the UICC TNM classification system (1978) or another system, depending on clinical findings and the conventional X ray examinations (non-Ct T-stage). Then, the non-CT T-stage of each patient was compared with T-stage diagnosed with CT findings alone (CT T-stage). The authors conclude that CT is the single, most reliable imaging method for primary tumors of NPCV patients. Since CT detects subtle bone destruction, however, a large number of patients will be classified as having advanced tumors. Further modification of the TNM system may be needed for NPC patients in this era of CT.

  12. Oropharyngeal dysphagia: screening and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Renée

    2013-12-01

    This article provides an overview of bedside screening and assessment tools in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia including the diagnostic performance of screening tools; the gold standards in assessment of dysphagia (videofluoroscopic and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing); a variety of clinical assessment tools; patient self-evaluation questionnaires; and a list of supplementary methods. In addition, some methodologic issues are discussed, and the need for standardization of terminology, screening and assessment protocols, and the call for evidence-based clinical guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasing utilization of regional nodal irradiation in elderly node-positive women and declining emphasis on demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitoris, Jason K; Diwanji, Tejan; Snider, James W; Bellavance, Emily C; Kesmodel, Susan B; Rosenblatt, Paula; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Bentzen, Soren M; Cohen, Randi J; Nichols, Elizabeth M; Cheston, Sally B; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the practice patterns for the use of regional nodal irradiation (RNI) in treatment of elderly women with low volume node-positive breast cancer in the setting of breast conservation surgery (BCS). Women aged 70-89 diagnosed with unilateral, pathologic T1-2N1M0 breast cancer from 2004 to 2013, who underwent BCS and received radiotherapy were identified from the National Cancer Database. In 2011, two major trials were presented that helped define indications for RNI. Patients were dichotomized into "early", i.e. diagnosed up to 2010, and "late" cohorts. Patient and treatment characteristics were compared between the cohorts and logistic regression used to determine independent factors associated with the receipt of RNI. 7228 women met inclusion criteria; 4330 (59.9%) in early and 2898 (40.1%) in late cohorts. Utilization of RNI increased from 33.9% in early to 42.5% in late cohorts (P ≤ 0.001) and was independent of a general increase in RNI utilization. RNI in the early and late cohorts was not different between the study population and younger women (P > 0.05). RNI utilization increased in both cohorts with increasing number of positive lymph nodes. In the early cohort, RNI was also associated with higher grade, white race and lower income. In the late cohort, RNI increased with the presence of multiple, predefined risk factors. There was an increase in utilization of RNI for elderly patients from 2004 to 2013. In more recent years, the primary factors associated with receipt of RNI were tumor related with declining importance of demographic factors.

  14. Dose intensity of standard adjuvant CMF with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, H; Willemse, PHB; Bong, SB; Piersma, H; Tjabbes, T; vanVeelen, H; Coenen, JLLM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on total dose and dose intensity of standard oral adjuvant CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy were studied in premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer. Treatment consisted of standard CMF

  15. Alternating chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaoka, Masahiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Matsumoto, Akira; Kimura, Yasuo; Furutani, Kazuhisa; Kamata, Minoru; Kodaira, Takeshi; Morita, Kouzou [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer, we retrospectively analyzed disease-free survival (DFS) and acute toxicities of the patients treated with this therapy. Between 1990 and 1998, 15 patients were treated with alternating chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Chemotherapy (CT) mainly consisted of 5-fluorouracil 700 mg/m{sup 2} (iv) on days 1-5 and nedaplatin 100-140 mg/m{sup 2} (iv) on day 6. Chemotherapy was administered before the beginning of radiotherapy. One cycle of this treatment consisted of CT and a subsequent 27 to 36 Gy of radiotherapy, as a general rule, two cycles were performed. Radiotherapy was delivered in single daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy, to a total dose of 54 to 75 Gy for local lesions and 45 to 86.3 Gy for nodal metastases in the neck. As a historical control, 52 patients treated with curative radiotherapy between 1971 and 1990 were analyzed and compared with the CRT group in terms of DFS. The complete response rate with CRT was 100%. The three-year DFS were 87% and 38% with CRT and RT, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two groups (p=0.0081). The most frequent and severe acute toxicity was mucositis, with grade 3-4 occurring in 47%. Acute hematologic toxicities were mild. Therefore, this CRT is considered to be an effective and tolerable treatment, and is expected to improve survival for oropharyngeal cancer patients. (author)

  16. Age and axillary lymph node ratio in postmenopausal women with T1-T2 node positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Joseph, Sue A; Coutty, Nadege; Ly, Bevan Hong; Vlastos, Georges; Nguyen, Nam Phong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine the relationship between age and lymph node ratio (LNR, number of positive nodes divided by number of examined nodes), and to determine their effects on breast cancer (BC) and overall mortality. Women aged ≥50 years, diagnosed in 1988-1997 with a unilateral histologically confirmed T1-T2 node positive surgically treated primary nonmetastatic BC, were selected from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER). Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) were used to evaluate the age-LNR relationship. Cumulative incidence functions and multivariate competing risks analysis based on model selection by the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) were used to examine the effect of age and LNR on mortality. Low LNR was defined as ≤0.20, mid-LNR 0.21-0.65, and high LNR >0.65. GAMLSS showed a nonlinear LNR-age relationship, increasing from mean LNR 0.26-0.28 at age 50-70 years to 0.30 at 80 years and 0.40 at 90 years. Compared with a 9.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8%-10.8%] risk of BC death at 5 years in women aged 50-59 years with low LNR, the risk in women ≥80 years with low LNR was 12.6% [95% CI 10.1%-15.0%], mid-LNR 18.1% [13.9%-22.1%], high LNR 29.8% [22.7%-36.1%]. Five-years overall risk of death increased from 40.8% [37.5%-43.9%] by low LNR to 67.4% [61.4%-72.4%] by high LNR. The overall mortality hazard ratio for age ≥80 years with high LNR was 7.49 [6.54-8.59], as compared with women aged 50-59 years with low LNR. High LNR combined with older age was associated with a threefold increased risk of BC death and a sevenfold increased hazard ratio of overall mortality.

  17. Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Node-Positive Male Breast Cancer: A Population Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, Matthew J., E-mail: mabrams@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Koffer, Paul P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Hepel, Jaroslaw T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2017-06-01

    addition of PMRT for male breast cancer with node-positive disease.

  18. Age and Axillary Lymph Node Ratio in Postmenopausal Women with T1-T2 Node Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sue A.; Coutty, Nadege; Ly, Bevan Hong; Vlastos, Georges; Nguyen, Nam Phong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this article was to examine the relationship between age and lymph node ratio (LNR, number of positive nodes divided by number of examined nodes), and to determine their effects on breast cancer (BC) and overall mortality. Methods. Women aged ≥50 years, diagnosed in 1988–1997 with a unilateral histologically confirmed T1-T2 node positive surgically treated primary nonmetastatic BC, were selected from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER). Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) were used to evaluate the age-LNR relationship. Cumulative incidence functions and multivariate competing risks analysis based on model selection by the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) were used to examine the effect of age and LNR on mortality. Low LNR was defined as ≤0.20, mid-LNR 0.21–0.65, and high LNR >0.65. Results. GAMLSS showed a nonlinear LNR-age relationship, increasing from mean LNR 0.26–0.28 at age 50–70 years to 0.30 at 80 years and 0.40 at 90 years. Compared with a 9.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8%–10.8%] risk of BC death at 5 years in women aged 50–59 years with low LNR, the risk in women ≥80 years with low LNR was 12.6% [95% CI 10.1%–15.0%], mid-LNR 18.1% [13.9%–22.1%], high LNR 29.8% [22.7%–36.1%]. Five-years overall risk of death increased from 40.8% [37.5%–43.9%] by low LNR to 67.4% [61.4%–72.4%] by high LNR. The overall mortality hazard ratio for age ≥80 years with high LNR was 7.49 [6.54–8.59], as compared with women aged 50–59 years with low LNR. Conclusion. High LNR combined with older age was associated with a threefold increased risk of BC death and a sevenfold increased hazard ratio of overall mortality. PMID:20930094

  19. Oropharyngeal styloids: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lathadevi Hassan Thotappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The close proximity of the styloid process to many of the vital neurovascular structures in the neck makes it clinically significant. The styloid process is said to be elongated if it is longer than 3.0 cm in length. Anatomical variations are very common and clinical symptoms arising from such variations have to be recognized. Elongated styloid processes may cause chronic throat pain along with foreign body sensation, dysphagia, vague facial pain, and otalgia. Surgical excision of an elongated styloid is considered as a satisfactory treatment for such cases. Here, we present a unique case of bilaterally elongated styloids that could be visualized just by depressing the tongue, when they appeared like the tusks of an elephant in the oropharyngeal region.

  20. Tumor Staging and HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittekindt, Claus; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    The current TNM staging for oropharyngeal cancer (OSCC) was designed empirically for non-HPV-related disease. Emerging evidence suggests it is unsuited for Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related OSCC. Patients with HPV-positive tumors have improved prognosis, despite presenting at advanced stages. These shortcomings of the current staging system have been identified in single- and multi-institutional trials. Patients with HPV related OSCC typically present with advanced N-stages leading to higher stage groupings. A rarity of stages I and II therefore represents the nature of HPV-related OSCC. Concerning prognosis of the patients, N-category and extracapsular spread seem to be of minor importance, whereas advanced T-stages result in unfavourable outcome. Anatomical staging therefore has been implied into different proposals to prognostic risk classifications in HPV-related disease as an additive compound. Prognostic risk groupings are further enhanced by incorporating non-anatomical factors. To summarize, it can be suggested that the current TNM system alone has little prognostic value in HPV-related OSCC.

  1. Solid Lymph Nodes as an Imaging Biomarker for Risk Stratification in Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, T J; Narayanan, S; Hughes, M A; Ferris, R L; Chiosea, S I; Branstetter, B F

    2017-07-01

    Human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is associated with cystic lymph nodes on CT and has a favorable prognosis. A subset of patients with aggressive disease experience treatment failure. Our aim was to determine whether the extent of cystic lymph node burden on staging CT can serve as an imaging biomarker to predict treatment failure in human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We identified patients with human papilloma virus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and staging neck CTs. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded. We retrospectively classified the metastatic lymph node burden on CT as cystic or solid and assessed radiologic extracapsular spread. Biopsy, subsequent imaging, or clinical follow-up was the reference standard for treatment failure. The primary end point was disease-free survival. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses of clinical, demographic, and anatomic variables for treatment failure were performed. One hundred eighty-three patients were included with a mean follow-up of 38 months. In univariate analysis, the following variables had a statistically significant association with treatment failure: solid-versus-cystic lymph nodes, clinical T-stage, clinical N-stage, and radiologic evidence of extracapsular spread. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model resulted in a model that included solid-versus-cystic lymph nodes, T-stage, and radiologic evidence of extracapsular spread as independent predictors of treatment failure. Patients with cystic nodal metastasis at staging had significantly better disease-free survival than patients with solid lymph nodes. In human papilloma virus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, patients with solid lymph node metastases are at higher risk for treatment failure with worse disease-free survival. Solid lymph nodes may serve as an imaging biomarker to tailor individual treatment regimens. © 2017 by American Journal

  2. Survival benefit of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant radiotherapy in lymph node positive esophageal cancer: a population based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumallapally, Nishitha; Meshref, Ahmed; Mousa, Mohammed; Hendawi, Mohamed; Lan, Mei; Salem, Ahmed I; Forte, Frank

    2017-10-01

    The impact of radiotherapy on the survival of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (EC) is presently insufficiently explored. Thus, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry, this study aimed to compare the survival rates of patients with lymph node (LN) positive EC who received curative resection and were treated by neoadjuvant and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), respectively. Retrospectively collected data from the SEER database using all 18 SEER registries on patients that underwent esophagectomy for EC was evaluated. All patients with LN positive pathology who received either neoadjuvant or adjuvant RT and curative intent esophagectomy from 2004 to 2007 were included. A comparison of 5-year relative survival outcome among groups categorized by sex, race, age, histology, and tumor size was performed. A total of 933 patients were evaluated; 636 (69%) and 297 (31%) received RT in neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting respectively. Their overall 5-year relative survival rates were 32.8% (95% CI: 28.7-36.9) and 26.5% (95% CI: 21-32.3) (P=0.058). Patients in the neoadjuvant RT group who underwent curative resection for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of EC had an improved 5-year relative survival rate of 43.4% (95% CI: 32.5-53.8) compared to 26.5% (95% CI: 15.4-38.9) measured for the adjuvant RT group (P=0.03). The results further revealed a significant increase in the 5-year relative survival rates for stage T3 and Tx when RT was given in neoadjuvant setting compared to adjuvant RT group (T3 28.5% vs. 20.2%, P=0.011; Tx 46.3% vs. 8.9%, P=0.021). When the patients were grouped according to race, sex or age, or based on the timing of radiation relative to surgery, in the other histological or T stage groups, there were no statistically significant differences in the 5-year survival rates. Compared to adjuvant radiotherapy, neoadjuvant radiotherapy results in a better 5-year relative survival in patients with squamous cell

  3. [Retrospective analysis of 47 cases with hilar cholangiocarcinoma using T-staging system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-hong; Zhao, Zhi-ming; Peng, Shu-you; Liu, Ying-bin; Wu, Yü-lian; Fang, He-qing; Jiang, Xian-chuan

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of T-staging system for hilar cholangiocarcinoma which was adopted in memorial Sloan-Kettering cancer center of New York. The image data of these 47 patients were analyzed retrospectively from December 1997 to December 2002 whose data were according with our demand, and they were staged into three-stage according to the criteria of the T-staging system. The difference of respectability, ratio of tumor-free resection margin and actuarial survival rate were analyzed for different T-staging. And the coincident ratio of three different kinds of imaging methods was also analyzed. Twenty patients had T(1) tumors, twenty three had T(2) tumors and four had T(3) tumors. The resectability of the three stage was 60%, 39% and 0% respectively, and the difference was significant (P = 0.013). The likelihood of achieving tumor-free margin decreased progressively with increasing T stage (P = 0.018). The cumulative 1-year survival rates of T(1), T(2) and T(3) patients were 60%, 39% and 0% respectively, and the cumulative 3-year survival rate was 35%, 9% and 0% respectively, the survival of different stage patients differed markedly (P = 0.0103). The coincident ratio of combined using MRCP and color Doppler-ultrasonography was higher than that of combined using MRCP and B-ultrasonography or combined using CT/SCT and color Doppler-ultrasonography (P = 0.007). The T-staging system has a better value for preoperative assessment, and can be used to judge resectability and survival of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. It will be helpful to use MRCP and color Doppler-Ultrasonography combined to verdict the coverage of the tumor and the T-staging preoperatively.

  4. Accuracy of preoperative CT T staging of renal cell carcinoma: which features predict advanced stage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, A.J.; MacDonald, L.; Whiteside, S.; Johnson, R.J.; Ramani, V.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To characterise CT findings in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and establish which features are associated with higher clinical T stage disease, and to evaluate patterns of discrepancy between radiological and pathological staging of RCC. Materials and methods: Preoperative CT studies of 92 patients with 94 pathologically proven RCCs were retrospectively reviewed. CT stage was compared with pathological stage using the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), 7 th edition (2010). The presence or absence of tumour necrosis, perinephric fat standing, thickening of Gerota's fascia, collateral vessels were noted, and correlated with pT stage. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for predicting pT stage ≥pT3a were derived separately for different predictors using cross-tabulations. Results: Twenty-four lesions were pathological stage T1a, 21 were T1b, seven were T2a, 25 were T3a, 11 were T3b, four were T3c, and two were T4. There were no stage T2b. Sixty-three (67%) patients had necrosis, 27 (29%) thickening of Gerota's fascia (1 T1a), 25 had collateral vessels (0 T1a), 28 (30%) had fat stranding of <2 mm, 20 (21%) of 2–5mm and one (1%) of >5 mm. For pT stage ≥pT3a, the presence of perinephric fat stranding had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 74%, 65%, 63%, and 76%, respectively. Presence of tumour necrosis had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 81%, 44%, 54%, and 72%, respectively. Thickening of Gerota's fascia had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 52%, 90%, 81% and 70%, respectively; and enlarged collateral vessels had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV value of 52%, 94%, 88%, and 71% respectively. Conclusion: The presence of perinephric stranding and tumour necrosis were not reliable signs for pT stage >T3a. Thickening of Gerota's fascia and the presence of collateral vessels in the peri- or paranephric fat had 90% and 94% specificity, with 82% and 88

  5. Early versus deferred androgen suppression therapy for patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy with curative intent: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is currently no consensus regarding the optimal timing for androgen suppression therapy in patients with prostate cancer that have undergone local therapy with curative intent but are proven to have node-positive disease without signs of distant metastases at the time of local therapy. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the benefits and harms of early (at the time of local therapy) versus deferred (at the time of clinical disease progression) androgen suppression therapy for patients with node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy. Methods The protocol was registered prospectively (CRD42011001221; http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO). We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases, as well as reference lists, the abstracts of three major conferences, and three trial registers, to identify randomized controlled trials (search update 04/08/2012). Two authors independently screened the identified articles, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. Results Four studies including 398 patients were identified for inclusion. Early androgen suppression therapy lead to a significant decrease in overall mortality (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.46-0.84), cancer-specific mortality (HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.18-0.64), and clinical progression at 3 or 9 years (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.16-0.52 at 3 years and RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.36-0.67 at 9 years). One study showed an increase of adverse effects with early androgen suppression therapy. All trials had substantial methodological limitations. Conclusions The data available suggest an improvement in survival and delayed disease progression but increased adverse events for patients with node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy treated with early androgen suppression therapy versus deferred androgen suppression therapy. However, quality of data is low. Randomized controlled trials with blinding of outcome assessment, planned to determine the timing of androgen suppression therapy in node-positive

  6. Intrinsic subtypes and benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in node-positive premenopausal breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy - results from two independent randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Tinne; Tramm, Trine; Nielsen, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    in few studies. METHODS: Gene expression-based intrinsic subtyping was performed in 228 breast tumors collected from two independent post-mastectomy clinical trials (British Columbia and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group 82b trials), where pre-menopausal patients with node-positive disease were...... randomized to adjuvant radiotherapy or not. All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and a subgroup of patients underwent ovarian ablation. Tumors were classified into intrinsic subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Normal-like using the research-based PAM50 classifier. RESULTS...

  7. Alimentation impact of treatments of 254 oropharyngeal cancers (1998-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiret, Guillaume; Daveau, Clémentine; Landry, Guillaume; Colin, Carole; Pignat, Jean-Christian; Poupart, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the functional impact of the various possible treatments of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas to find the main prognostic factors of dysphagia induced by these treatments. Patients. Clinical data from 254 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx between 1998 and 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A multivariate model enabled us to evaluate the role of each potentially harmful factor on swallowing. Main Outcome Measures. The significant factors influencing the consumption of liquid, pasty, and normal food were the same: the initial T stage and the type of treatment. Conclusion. Whatever the possible and selected treatment was, the impact on the functional capacities, and thus, the quality of life of the patients was considerable. Even though we could not significantly demonstrate exclusive radiotherapy caused more long-term undesirable effects than surgery followed by radiotherapy, our daily practice has shown that we should favour the latter.

  8. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  9. Extracapsular extension is a poor predictor of disease recurrence in surgically treated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James S; Carpenter, Danielle H; Thorstad, Wade L; Zhang, Qin; Haughey, Bruce H

    2011-11-01

    Extracapsular extension in squamous cell carcinoma nodal metastases usually predicts worse outcome. However, there are no standard histologic grading criteria for extracapsular extension, and there have been few studies on oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma alone. We studied the extent of extracapsular extension utilizing a novel grading system and correlated grades with outcomes while controlling for p16 status. A cohort of surgically treated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases were reviewed and metastases graded as 0 (within substance of node), 1 (filling subcapsular sinus with thickened capsule/pseudocapsule, but no irregular peripheral extension), 2 (≤1 mm beyond capsule), 3 (>1 mm beyond capsule), or 4 (no residual nodal tissue or architecture; 'soft tissue metastasis'). There were 101 cases, for which p16 was positive in 90 (89%). Extracapsular extension grades did not correlate with nodal size (P=0.28) or p16 status (P=0.8). In follow up, 10 patients (10%) had disease recurrence with only 3 of 64 (5%) grade 0-3 cases and 7 of 37 (19%) with grade 4 recurring (P=0.04). Grade 4 extracapsular extension was associated with poorer survival (PP=0.02), and in multivariate analysis, was not significantly associated with poorer overall (P=0.14) disease-free (P=0.2), or disease-specific survival (P=0.09). The impact of extracapsular extension in nodal metastases is limited in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Only extracapsular extension grade 4 associates with poorer outcomes, but not independently of T-stage and other variables.

  10. Overexpression of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E is correlated with increased risk for systemic dissemination in node-positive breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuedong; Kim, Roger H; Sun, Guang; Miller, Janet K; Li, Benjamin D

    2014-04-01

    Molecular events impact systemic dissemination. Overexpression of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) has been shown to predict worse clinical outcomes in breast cancer. Node-positive breast cancer patients were specifically studied to determine if eIF4E elevation increases risk for systemic dissemination. Two hundred two node-positive breast cancer patients were prospectively accrued and treated with standardized treatment and surveillance protocol. Tumor eIF4E protein level was quantified by Western blots as x-fold over benign samples from noncancer patients. Primary end point was systemic metastasis. Systemic recurrence was detected in 22.2% of the low eIF4E group, 27.3% of the intermediate group, and 49% of the high group, at a median follow-up of 47 months. A greater risk for systemic metastasis was seen in the high eIF4E group compared with the low group (log-rank test, p = 0.0084). Patients in the high eIF4E group had a 1.5-fold (hazard ratio = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.07-2.17; p = 0.0206) higher risk for systemic metastasis than the low group. Sixty percent of the patients with high eIF4E were observed to have metastasis to multiple sites, compared with 50% in the intermediate group, and 14.5% in the low group (p = 0.02, Fisher's exact test). When patients were segregated based on nodal classification (N1, N2, and N3), eIF4E overexpression continued to be a predictor for systemic dissemination in patients with N1 disease. High eIF4E is correlated with an increased risk for systemic metastasis in node-positive breast cancer patients. High eIF4E overexpression was associated with a higher incidence of metastasis to multiple sites. Therefore, high eIF4E overexpression appears to be a marker for molecular events that increases risk for systemic dissemination. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil in premonopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer: indirect comparison of dose and schedule in DBCG trials 77, 82, and 89

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlertsen, B.; Mouridsen, H.T.; Jensen, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    A significant reduction in the risk of recurrence and death was achieved three decades ago with adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with operable breast. The major pivotal trials used oral cyclophosphamide (C) days 1-14 with intravenous methotrexate (M) and fluorouracil (F) on days 1 and 8, repeated...... every 28 days. The classical CMF has later been modified as concerns dose and schedule, without formal comparisons in randomised trials between the classical CMF and the modifications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Classical CMF was used in the first adjuvant chemotherapy trial performed by the Danish Breast...... Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), and two succeeding randomised trials in premenopausal patients with node positive breast cancer used three-weekly or four-weekly intravenous CMF in one of the treatment arms. RESULTS: Between November 1977 and January 2001 these trials included 2 213 patients who...

  12. Freedom From Local and Regional Failure of Contralateral Neck With Ipsilateral Neck Radiotherapy for Node-Positive Tonsil Cancer: Results of a Prospective Management Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David; Schneider, Charles; Witt, Robert; Sammons, Sarah; Raben, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To review the outcomes of a prospective management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2007, 20 patients who presented with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate, and with Stage N1-N2b disease were prospectively treated with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. In addition, 18 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal and in-field progression was determined. Acute and late toxicity were prospectively evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The nodal disease was Stage N1 in 4 patients, N2a in 3 patients, and N2b in 13 patients. At a median follow-up 19 months (range, 12-40), no in-field or contralateral nodal recurrences had been observed. The 2-year freedom from distant metastasis rate was 87.4%. The actuarial 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 79.5%. Late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 1 patient (5%). No late Grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. No patient was feeding tube dependent at their last follow-up visit. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with node-positive, lateralized tonsillar cancer, treatment of the ipsilateral neck and primary site does not appear to increase the risk of contralateral nodal failure and reduces late morbidity compared with historical controls. Although the outcomes with ipsilateral radiotherapy in the present series were promising, these findings require longer follow-up and validation in a larger patient cohort.

  13. Freedom from local and regional failure of contralateral neck with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy for node-positive tonsil cancer: updated results of an institutional clinical management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Tu D; Raben, David; Schneider, Charles J; Hockstein, Neil G; Witt, Robert L; Dzeda, Michael; Cormier, Jennifer F; Raben, Adam

    2015-06-01

    To update the outcomes of an institutional clinical management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Between August 2003 and April 2014, 61 consecutive patients with ipsilateral node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate were treated at a community hospital-based cancer center with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. Overall survival, disease-free survival and freedom from contralateral failure were calculated. Median follow up was 37.2months (range 4-121months). Freedom from contralateral nodal failure at 5years was 98% with one contralateral nodal failure noted. The patient underwent a salvage neck dissection and was treated with post-operative radiotherapy with no evidence of disease to date. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 92.4% and 5year disease-free survival (DFS) was 86.7%. This represents the single largest series reported from a community hospital-based cancer center in which lateralized tonsil cancers with N+ disease were treated with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy. In this carefully selected cohort of patients with well-lateralized tonsil cancers, the risk of contralateral nodal failure appears to be <5%, suggesting that prophylactic radiation of the contralateral neck may not be necessary. Future planned studies will focus on prospectively selecting subgroups of patients eligible for treatment de-intensification as survivorship issues in excellent prognosis HPV positive patients are increasingly becoming relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouesse, Jacques; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m 2 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m 2 mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m 2 cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy ± 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m 2 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m 2 epirubicin, and 500 mg/m 2 cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed

  15. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, William C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kim, Janice [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States); Silverman, Paula [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Overmoyer, Beth [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Cooper, Brenda W. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Anthony, Sue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary [Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hanks, Shelli H. [Arizona Institute of Urology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lyons, Janice A., E-mail: janice.lyons@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  16. Tumour extent and T stage of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, P.Y. [deceased, Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tsang, V.H. [Vancouver Cancer Centre and British Columbia Cancer Agency, Div of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada); Munk, P.L. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Radiology and Surgery, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Radiology, BC (Canada)

    2000-10-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in defining the T stage and full tumour extent of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Forty-eight patients with pathologically proven nasopharyngeal carcinoma underwent MRI and CT examinations within 2 weeks of each other. Contrast medium was used in both examinations. The T stage and full tumour extent according to MRI and CT were compared. In 32 patients MRI and CT findings agreed completely. MRI findings resulted in assignment of a higher stage than CT findings in another 8 patients. In the remaining 8 patients MRI showed wider tumour spread than CT, although there was no discordance in the T stage assigned. When compared with CT in defining the full tumour extent and assigning the T stage in 48 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, MRI showed more extensive disease in 16 patients, including 8 in whom the T stage was revised upward. Therapy was altered as a result of the MRI findings. (author)

  17. Sparing bilateral neck level IB in oropharyngeal carcinoma and xerostomia outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Moses; Riaz, Nadeem; Kannarunimit, Danita; Peña, Angela P; Schupak, Karen D; Gelblum, Daphna Y; Wolden, Suzanne L; Rao, Shyam; Lee, Nancy Y

    2015-08-01

    To assess whether sparing neck-level IB in target delineation of node-positive (N+) oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) can improve xerostomia outcomes without compromising locoregional control (LRC). A total of 125 N+ OPC patients with a median age of 57 years underwent chemoradiation between May 2010 and December 2011. A total of 74% of patients had T1-T2 disease, 26% T3-T4, 16% N1, 8% N2A, 48% N2B, 28% N2C; 53% base of tongue, 41% tonsil, and 6% other. Patients were divided into those who had target delineation sparing of bilateral level IB (the spared cohort) versus no sparing (the treated cohort). Sparing of contralateral high-level II nodes was also performed more consistently in the spared cohort. A prospective xerostomia questionnaire (patient reported) was given at each patient follow-up visit to this cohort of patients to assess late xerostomia. Clinical assessment (observer rated) at each patient follow-up visit was also recorded. The 2-year LRC for the spared and treated cohorts was 97.5% and 93.8%, respectively (median follow-up, 23.2 mo). No locoregional failures occurred outside of treatment fields. The spared cohort experienced significant benefits in patient-reported xerostomia summary scores (P=0.021) and observer-rated xerostomia scores (P=0.006). In addition, there were significant reductions in mean doses to the ipsilateral submandibular gland (63.9 vs. 70.5 Gy; Pxerostomia outcomes.

  18. Sensitive HPV detection in oropharyngeal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Margaret A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV are the aetiological agents of certain benign and malignant tumours of skin and mucosae; the most important of which is cervical cancer. Also, the incidence of ano-genital warts, HPV-anal cancer and oropharyngeal cancers are rising. To help ascertain a useful PCR detection protocol for oropharyngeal cancers, we directly compared three commonly used primer sets in detection of HPV from different clinical samples. Methods We compared PGMY09/11, MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers sets in PCRs of 34 clinically diagnosed samples of genital warts, cervical brushings (with associated histological diagnosis and vulval biopsies. All negative samples were subsequently tested using the previously reported PGMY/GP PCR method and amplicons directly sequenced for confirmation and typing. An optimised PCR protocol was then compared to a line blot assay for detection of HPV in 15 oropharyngeal cancer samples. Results PGMY09/11 primers detected HPV presence in more cervical brushing (100% and genital wart (92.9% samples compared to MY09/11 (90% and 64.3% and GP5+/6+ (80% and 64.3% primer sets, respectively. From vulval biopsies, HPV detection rates were: MY09/11 (63.6%, GP5+/6+ (54.5% and PGMY09/11 (54.5%. PGMY/GP nested PCR demonstrated that HPV was present, and direct sequencing confirmed genotypes. This nested PCR protocol showed detection of HPV in 10/15 (66.7% of oropharyngeal cancer samples. Conclusions PGMY09/11 primers are the preferred primer set among these three for primary PCR screening with different clinical samples. MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ may be used (particularly for cervical samples but demonstrate lower detection rates. A nested PCR approach (i.e. a PGMY-GP system may be required to confirm negativity or to detect low levels of HPV, undetectable using current primary PCR methods, as demonstrated using oropharyngeal cancer samples.

  19. Interaction between body mass index and hormone-receptor status as a prognostic factor in lymph-node-positive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Yong Chung

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the body mass index (BMI at a breast cancer diagnosis and various factors including the hormone-receptor, menopause, and lymph-node status, and identify if there is a specific patient subgroup for which the BMI has an effect on the breast cancer prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 8,742 patients with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer from the research database of Asan Medical Center. The overall survival (OS and breast-cancer-specific survival (BCSS outcomes were compared among BMI groups using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional-hazards regression models with an interaction term. There was a significant interaction between BMI and hormone-receptor status for the OS (P = 0.029, and BCSS (P = 0.013 in lymph-node-positive breast cancers. Obesity in hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer showed a poorer OS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.92 to 2.48 and significantly poorer BCSS (HR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.99. In contrast, a high BMI in hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer revealed a better OS (HR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.16 to 1.19 and BCSS (HR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.19 to 1.44. Being underweight (BMI < 18.50 kg/m2 with hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer was associated with a significantly worse OS (HR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.00-3.95 and BCSS (HR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.12-4.47. There was no significant interaction found between the BMI and hormone-receptor status in the lymph-node-negative setting, and BMI did not interact with the menopause status in any subgroup. In conclusion, BMI interacts with the hormone-receptor status in a lymph-node-positive setting, thereby playing a role in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  20. Randomized, phase III trial of sequential epirubicin and docetaxel versus epirubicin alone in postmenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, R Charles; Bliss, Judith M; Espie, Marc; Erdkamp, Frans; Wals, Jacob; Tres, Alejandro; Marty, Michel; Coleman, Robert E; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole; den Boer, Marinus O; Wardley, Andrew; Kilburn, Lucy S; Cooper, Derek; Thomas, Marina W K; Reise, Justine A; Wilkinson, Katie; Hupperets, Pierre

    2011-08-20

    The Docetaxel Epirubicin Adjuvant (DEVA) trial evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of incorporating docetaxel after epirubicin to create a sequential anthracycline-taxane regimen in early breast cancer. After complete tumor excision, postmenopausal women with node-positive early breast cancer were randomly assigned to either epirubicin 50 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for six cycles (EPI × 6) or three cycles of epirubicin 50 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks followed by three cycles of docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 every 3 weeks (EPI-DOC). A subset of patients also participated in a quality of life (QOL) study. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). From 1997 to 2005, 803 patients entered DEVA (EPI × 6, n = 397; EPI-DOC, n = 406). At a median follow-up of 64.7 months (interquartile range, 45.2 to 84.4 months), 198 DFS events had been reported (EPI × 6, n = 114; EPI-DOC, n = 84). The 5-year DFS rates were 72.7% (95% CI, 68.0% to 77.3%) for epirubicin alone and 79.5% (95% CI, 75.2% to 83.8%) for epirubicin followed by docetaxel; evidence of improvement in DFS was observed with EPI-DOC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.91; P = .008). One hundred twenty-seven patients have died (EPI × 6, n = 75; EPI-DOC, n = 52); a reduction in deaths was observed with EPI-DOC (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.94; P = .02). The 5-year overall survival rates were 81.8% (95% CI, 77.7% to 85.9%) for epirubicin and 88.9% (95% CI, 85.5% to 92.2%) for epirubicin followed by docetaxel. Assessment of toxicity and QOL showed that EPI-DOC was associated with greater toxicity but with no difference in QOL between arms during follow-up. These results suggest, within a relatively small trial, that substitution of docetaxel for epirubicin for the last three cycles of chemotherapy results in improved outcome in postmenopausal women with node-positive, early breast cancer compared with six cycles of epirubicin monotherapy.

  1. Epirubicin dose and sequential hormonal therapy-Mature results of the HMFEC randomised phase III trial in premenopausal patients with node positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, R C; Kilburn, L S; Tubiana-Mathieu, N; Olmos, T; Van Bochove, A; Perez-Lopez, F R; Palmieri, C; Stebbing, J; Bliss, J M

    2016-06-01

    The hormonal manipulation 5-Fluoro-uracil Epirubicin Cyclophosphamide (HMFEC) trial was developed at a time of uncertainty around the dose intensity of chemotherapy given to premenopausal patients with node positive breast cancer and to the benefits of tailored endocrine therapy in such patients. HMFEC was a multi-centre, phase III, open label, randomised controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design. Eligible patients were premenopausal with node positive early breast cancer; significant cardiac disease or uncontrolled hypertension was exclusion criterion. Patients were allocated to receive either eight cycles of FE50C or FE75C (given 3 weekly) with or without hormone manipulation (HM; tamoxifen or luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists according to residual hormone levels at the end of chemotherapy) irrespective of ER status. The primary end-point was disease free survival (DFS). Principal analyses were by intention to treat (ITT); however, to reflect contemporary practice, subgroup analyses according to ER status were also conducted. The mature follow-up now available from this modest sized trial enables presentation of definitive results. Between 1992 and 2000 a total of 785 patients were randomised into the HMFEC trial (203 FE50C-HM, 191 FE50C+HM, 198 FE75C-HM, 193 FE75C+HM). At a median follow-up of 7.4 years, 245 DFS events have been reported (92 ER-, 153 ER+/unknown). The effects on DFS were not statistically significantly different according to epirubicin dose (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63-1.06; p = 0.13 FE75C versus FE50C); however, FE75C appeared to induce more alopecia and neutropenia. No statistically significant evidence was observed to support an improvement in DFS in patients allocated HM either overall (HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.68-1.13; p = 0.32) or in patients with ER+/unknown disease (HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.62-1.17; p = 0.32) although effect sizes are consistent with worthwhile clinical

  2. Radiographically Negative, Asymptomatic, Sentinel Lymph Node Positive Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in a 3-Year-Old Male: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Carson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 3-year-old male originally diagnosed with a CD30+ anaplastic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with no evidence of systemic disease after CT scan, PET scan, and bone marrow aspiration. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB was performed as an additional step in the workup and showed microscopic disease. Current management/recommendations for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma do not include SLNB. Medical and surgical management of cutaneous malignancies is dramatically different for local versus advanced disease. Therefore adequate evaluation is necessary to properly stage patients for specific treatment. Such distinction in extent of disease suggests more extensive therapy including locoregional radiation and systemic chemotherapy versus local excision only. Two international case reports have described SLNB in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with one demonstrating evidence of node positive microscopic disease despite a negative metastatic disease workup. This case is being presented as a novel case in a child with implications including lymphoscintigraphy and SLNB as a routine procedure for evaluation and staging of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma if the patient does not demonstrate evidence of metastatic disease on routine workup.

  3. The impact of postmastectomy and regional nodal radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for clinically lymph node-positive breast cancer: a National Cancer Database (NCDB) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusthoven, C G; Rabinovitch, R A; Jones, B L; Koshy, M; Amini, A; Yeh, N; Jackson, M W; Fisher, C M

    2016-05-01

    Following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the optimal strategies for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and regional nodal irradiation (RNI) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) are controversial. In this analysis, we evaluate the impact of these radiotherapy (RT) approaches for women with clinically node-positive breast cancer treated with NAC in the National Cancer Database (NCDB). Women with cT1-3 cN1 M0 breast cancer treated with NAC were divided into four cohorts by surgery [Mastectomy (Mast) versus BCS] and post-chemotherapy pathologic nodal status (ypN0 versus ypN+). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and RT approaches were analyzed using the log-rank test, multivariate Cox models, and propensity score-matched analyses. From 2003 to 2011, 15 315 cases were identified including 3040 Mast-ypN0, 7243 Mast-ypN+, 2070 BCS-ypN0, and 2962 BCS-ypN+ patients. On univariate analysis, PMRT was associated with improved OS for both Mast-ypN0 (P = 0.019) and Mast-ypN+ (P RNI to breast RT for BCS-ypN0 or BCS-ypN+ patients. Propensity score-matched analyses demonstrated identical patterns of significance. On subset analysis, OS was improved with PMRT in each pathologic nodal subgroup (ypN0, ypN1, and ypN2-3) (all P RNI to breast RT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Oropharyngeal perinatal colonization by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torices, María Soledad; Corrales-Millan, Rocío; Hijona-Elosegui, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common human sexually transmitted disease. It is clinically relevant because this condition is necessary for the development of epithelial cervical cancer, and it is also a factor closely associated with the occurrence of diverse tumours and various benign and malignant lesions of the head and neck area. The infective mechanism in most of these cases is associated with sexual intercourse, but there is recent scientific evidence suggesting that HPV infection may also be acquired by other routes of infection not necessarily linked to sexual contact. One of them is vertical transmission from mother to child, either during pregnancy or at the time of delivery. The aim of our research was to study maternal-foetal HPV transmission during childbirth in detail, establishing the rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV in vaginal deliveries. The presence and type of HPV viral DNA at the time of delivery in samples of maternal cervical secretions, amniotic fluid, venous cord blood samples and neonatal oropharynx in pregnant women (and their babies) were determined. The rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV colonization in vaginal deliveries was 58.24%. The maternal and neonatal HPV colonization mechanism is essentially, but not exclusively, transvaginal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  5. Nodal ratio of positive to excised nodes, but not number of positive lymph nodes is better to predict group to avoid chemotherapy among postmenopausal ER-positive, lymph node-positive T1-T2 breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Q Jia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This retrospective analysis demonstrates that NR of positive to excised nodes, but not number of positive lymph nodes is better to predict group to avoid chemotherapy among postmenopausal ER-positive, lymph node-positive T1-T2 breast cancer patients.

  6. Overall survival benefit for sequential doxorubicin-docetaxel compared with concurrent doxorubicin and docetaxel in node-positive breast cancer--8-year results of the Breast International Group 02-98 phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oakman, C; Francis, P A; Crown, J

    2013-01-01

    Background In women with node-positive breast cancer, the Breast International Group (BIG) 02-98 tested the incorporation of docetaxel (Taxotere) into doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-based chemotherapy, and compared sequential and concurrent docetaxel. At 5 years, there was a trend for improved disease...

  7. Longitudinal evaluation of restricted mouth opening (trismus) in patients following primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, B; D'Souza, J; Perinparajah, N; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2011-03-01

    Trismus is a serious problem for some patients after oral and oropharyngeal cancer, and it has a detrimental impact on quality of life and function. We know of few published papers that include preoperative assessment in reports on the longitudinal outcomes of mouth opening after oral and oropharyngeal surgery. We prospectively measured mouth opening in patients who had primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer from baseline to six months to find out the characteristics at baseline and at discharge of those who develop trismus at six months. Ninety-eight patients were eligible between February 2007 and March 2008, and 64 (65%) were recruited into the study. The range of mouth opening was measured on three occasions: before operation, on the ward before discharge from hospital, and at follow-up six months after operation. Using a criterion of 35 mm or less as an indication of trismus, 30% (19/63) had trismus before operation, 65% (37/57) at hospital discharge, and 54% (26/48) at six month follow-up. Patients at high risk of trismus were those with T stage 3 or 4 cancers who required free flap reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy; radiotherapy was the most significant factor at six months. Trismus at discharge was a prediction of trismus at six months. Interventions such as spatulas or a passive jaw mobiliser should be targeted at patients at high risk early in the postoperative phase. The efficacy of such interventions needs further research. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined effects of smoking and HPV16 in oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantharaman, Devasena; Muller, David C; Lagiou, Pagona

    2016-01-01

    stratified by HPV16 seropositivity. In addition, we report that the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancer increases with smoking for both HPV16-positive and HPV16-negative persons. The impact of smoking on HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer highlights the continued need for smoking cessation programmes...... is not understood. METHODS: Using HPV serology as a marker of HPV-related cancer, we examined the interaction between smoking and HPV16 in 459 oropharyngeal (and 1445 oral cavity and laryngeal) cancer patients and 3024 control participants from two large European multi-centre studies. Odds ratios and credible...

  9. Development and validation of a staging system for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer by the International Collaboration on Oropharyngeal cancer Network for Staging (ICON-S)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Sullivan, Brian; Huang, Shao Hui; Su, Jie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer is a rapidly emerging disease with generally good prognosis. Many prognostic algorithms for oropharyngeal cancer incorporate HPV status as a stratification factor, rather than recognising the uniqueness of HPV+ disease. The Inte...

  10. Long-term follow-up of axillary node-positive breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant systemic therapy alone: patterns of recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Perera, Francisco E.; Cooke, Andrew L.; Opeitum, Abiola; Venkatesan, Varagur; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors for locoregional failure have been poorly documented. The purpose of this retrospective review is to examine the patterns of failure of 320 patients with Stage II or III axillary node-positive breast cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy without locoregional radiation. Methods and Materials: The records of 735 patients who were referred to the London Regional Cancer Centre between 1980 and 1989 with a diagnosis of Stage II or III breast cancer were reviewed. Three hundred and twenty patients were identified who underwent segmental mastectomy with axillary dissection or modified radical mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy without adjuvant locoregional radiation. Seventy-one percent of these patients had undergone a modified radical mastectomy, 40% had T1 tumors, 49% T2, and 11% T3. Resection margins were positive in 13 patients. The median number of axillary nodes removed was 11. Fifty-four percent had one to three positive axillary nodes, 27% had four to seven positive nodes, and 19% had in excess of seven positive nodes. Results: Median follow-up for the 320 patients was 77 months. One hundred and fourteen patients developed a locoregional recurrence as the site of first relapse (31 in the intact breast, 29 on the chest wall, 21 in the axilla, 22 in the supraclavicular fossa, 1 in the internal mammary chain, and 10 in multiple sites). Thirty-three percent of segmental mastectomy patients and 13% of modified radical mastectomy patients developed local recurrence. Seven percent of patients recurred in axillary or supraclavicular nodes each. Factors with regard to locoregional recurrence which on univariate analysis were significant included type of mastectomy (i.e., segmental vs. modified radical), size of primary tumor, positive resection margins, and percentage of ideal chemotherapy dose intensity ( 5 cm in diameter). Breast or chest wall radiation is recommended for these groups. Supraclavicular radiation is recommended for

  11. Does the result of completion axillary lymph node dissection influence the recommendation for adjuvant treatment in sentinel lymph node-positive patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sávolt, Akos; Polgár, Csaba; Musonda, Patrick; Mátrai, Zoltán; Rényi-Vámos, Ferenc; Tóth, László; Kásler, Miklós; Péley, Gábor

    2013-10-01

    The Hungarian National Institute of Oncology has just closed a single-center randomized clinical study. The Optimal Treatment of the Axilla-Surgery or Radiotherapy (OTOASOR) trial compares completion axillary lymph node dissection (cALND) with regional nodal irradiation (RNI) in patients with sentinel lymph node-positive (SLN+) primary invasive breast cancer. In the investigational treatment arm, patients received 50 Gy RNI instead of cALND. In these patients we had information only about the sentinel lymph node (SLN) status, but the further axillary nodal involvement remained unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the result of cALND influenced the recommendation for adjuvant treatment in patients with SLN+ breast cancer. Patients with SLN+ primary breast cancer were randomized for cALND (arm A, standard treatment) or RNI (arm B, investigational treatment). Adjuvant systemic treatments were given according to the standard institutional protocol, and patients were followed according to the actual institutional guidelines. Between August 2002 and June 2009, 474 SLN+ patients were randomized to cALND (arm A, standard treatment = 244 patients) or RNI (arm B, investigational treatment = 230 patients). The 2 arms were well balanced according to the majority of main prognostic factors. However, more patients were premenopausal (34% vs. 27%; P = .095) and had pT2-3 tumors (57% vs. 40%; P = .003) in the completion axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) arm. On the other hand, there were more patients with known human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive tumor (12% vs. 17%, P = .066) in the RNI arm. In the ALND and RNI arms, 78% (190/244) and 69% (159/230), respectively, received chemotherapy (P = .020). Endocrine therapy was administered in 87% (213/244) of the patients in the ALND arm and 89% (204/230) of the patients in the RNI arm (P = .372). Six patients (2.5%) on arm A and 13 patients (5.7%) on arm B received adjuvant trastuzumab

  12. SU-E-J-124: FDG PET Metrics Analysis in the Context of An Adaptive PET Protocol for Node Positive Gynecologic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrocki, J; Chino, J; Light, K; Vergalasova, I; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare PET extracted metrics and investigate the role of a gradient-based PET segmentation tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH), in the context of an adaptive PET protocol for node positive gynecologic cancer patients. Methods: An IRB approved protocol enrolled women with gynecological, PET visible malignancies. A PET-CT was obtained for treatment planning prescribed to 45–50.4Gy with a 55– 70Gy boost to the PET positive nodes. An intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained between 30–36Gy, and all volumes re-contoured. Standard uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVmedian) and GTV volumes were extracted from the clinician contoured GTVs on the pre- and intra-treament PET-CT for primaries and nodes and compared with a two tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences between primary and node GTV volumes contoured in the treatment planning system and those volumes generated using PET Edge were also investigated. Bland-Altman plots were used to describe significant differences between the two contouring methods. Results: Thirteen women were enrolled in this study. The median baseline/intra-treatment primary (SUVmax, mean, median) were (30.5, 9.09, 7.83)/( 16.6, 4.35, 3.74), and nodes were (20.1, 4.64, 3.93)/( 6.78, 3.13, 3.26). The p values were all < 0.001. The clinical contours were all larger than the PET Edge generated ones, with mean difference of +20.6 ml for primary, and +23.5 ml for nodes. The Bland-Altman revealed changes between clinician/PET Edge contours to be mostly within the margins of the coefficient of variability. However, there was a proportional trend, i.e. the larger the GTV, the larger the clinical contours as compared to PET Edge contours. Conclusion: Primary and node SUV values taken from the intratreament PET-CT can be used to assess the disease response and to design an adaptive plan. The PET Edge tool can streamline the contouring process and lead to smaller, less user-dependent contours.

  13. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Bostanci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications.

  14. HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is Doing Related Links Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All ... Cancer Home HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  15. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: a unique disease on the rise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Monsjou, Hester S.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite successful efforts to control tobacco and alcohol consumption in the western world, several developed countries report rising oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) incidence figures, specifically in young individuals. Similar to anogenital cancers, a significant proportion of OPSCC

  16. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16?positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. Study Design This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. Methods We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16?positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5?fluorouracil. ...

  17. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis of oropharyngeal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sokouti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM is a rare and life-threatening infection. Management of this condition is very difficult and before 1990s, DNM had a mortality rate of 40% despite the use of antibiotics. One of the etiologies of this condition is rapid downward spread of oropharyngeal infection along the cervical fascia planes into the mediastinum. Materials and methods. Patients with DNM from odontogenic, peritonsillar and retropharyngeal origins, who underwent surgical treatment from 1990 to 2007, were reviewed. Data extracted from medical records of the patients included age, gender, origin of the infection, surgical approaches, and the cause of mortality. Descriptive data were expressed as a Mean ± SE. Results. Thirteen patients aged 15 to 56 (mean, 34.5 years old; 8 males and 5 females were studied. The origins of infection included odontogenic abscess in 10 cases and peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscess in 3 patients. The mean duration from onset of symptoms to the surgery was 12.18 ± 0.98 days (range 3 to 24 days and the mean duration from initial surgery to discharges was 28.51 ± 3.25 days (range 5 to 92 days. Post-operative mortality was seen in three patients. Conclusion. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis can arise from odontogenic abscesses and must be detected as early as possible, as it is a life-threatening infection.

  18. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  19. Gross morphology of rhea oropharyngeal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio N. Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The rhea (Rhea americana americana is an american bird belonging to Ratite's family. Studies related to its morphology are still scarce. This study aims to describe the macroscopic structures of the oropharyngeal cavity. Five heads (2 to 6 months old formalin preserved were anatomically dissected to expose the oropharynx. The oropharynx of the rhea was "bell-shaped" composed by the maxillary and mandibular rhamphotheca. The roof and floor presented two distinct regions different in colour of the mucosa. The rostral region was pale pink contrasting to grey coloured caudal region. The median longitudinal ridge extended rostrally from the apex of the choana to the tip of the beak in the roof and it is clearly more prominent and rigid than the homolog in the floor that appeared thin and stretched merely along the rostral portion of the regio interramalis. The floor was formed by the interramal region, (regio interramalis tongue and laryngeal mound containing glove-shaped glottis. This study confirmed the basic morphology of the oropharinx of the rhea. However, important morphological information not previously described is highlighted and contradictory information present in the literature is clarified.

  20. Cine MRI of swallowing in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Muller, Sara H.; Pameijer, Frank A.; Hallo, Eeke; Balm, Alfons J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of oral and oropharyngeal cancer may cause dysphagia. Purpose is to examine whether cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields additional information compared to standard examination in the evaluation of posttreatment dysphagia and mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures.

  1. Cryostimulation improves recovery from oropharyngeal dysphagia after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo da

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is considered one of the most frequent neurological causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Aim: To determine the effect of cryostimulation on oropharyngeal sensitivity and, subsequently, on the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. Methods: Clinical and experimental study. The study enrolled 7 adult subjects, 6 men and 1 woman ranging from 28 to 64 years of age, with a diagnosis of stroke and current oropharyngeal dysphagia without any other underlying disease. The selected subjects underwent speech-language pathology evaluation and videofluoroscopic assessment of the dysphagia. The subjects were then treated with cryostimulation consisting of 10 applications to each structure (anterior faucial pillar, posterior oropharyngeal wall, soft palate, and back tongue 3 times a day (for a total of 30 daily applications per structure for 4 consecutive days. The patients were then re-evaluated based on the same criteria. The pre- and post-cryostimulation results of the clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluations were analyzed descriptively and statistically using Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Cryostimulation had beneficial effects on oropharyngeal sensitivity in 6 of the 7 subjects. There was also a significant improvement in swallowing and in the premature escape in six subjects. Conclusion: Cryostimulation increased sensitivity and subsequently improved the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. These effects were evident by both speech-language pathology and videofluoroscopic evaluation.

  2. Oral and Oropharyngeal Reconstruction with a Free Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Shik; Oh, Tae Suk

    2016-06-01

    Extensive surgical resection of the aerodigestive track can result in a large and complex defect of the oropharynx, which represents a significant reconstructive challenge for the plastic surgery. Development of microsurgical techniques has allowed for free flap reconstruction of oropharyngeal defects, with superior outcomes as well as decreases in postoperative complications. The reconstructive goals for oral and oropharyngeal defects are to restore the anatomy, to maintain continuity of the intraoral surface and oropharynx, to protect vital structures such as carotid arteries, to cover exposed portions of internal organs in preparation for adjuvant radiation, and to preserve complex functions of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Oral and oropharyngeal cancers should be treated with consideration of functional recovery. Multidisciplinary treatment strategies are necessary for maximizing disease control and preserving the natural form and function of the oropharynx.

  3. Understanding personal risk of oropharyngeal cancer: risk-groups for oncogenic oral HPV infection and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, G; McNeel, T S; Fakhry, C

    2017-12-01

    Incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer is increasing. There is interest in identifying healthy individuals most at risk for development of oropharyngeal cancer to inform screening strategies. All data are from 2009 to 2014, including 13 089 people ages 20-69 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), oropharyngeal cancer cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER 18) registries (representing ∼28% of the US population), and oropharyngeal cancer mortality from National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Primary study outcomes are (i) prevalence of oncogenic HPV DNA in an oral rinse and gargle sample, and (ii) incident oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Oncogenic oral HPV DNA is detected in 3.5% of all adults age 20-69 years; however, the lifetime risk of oropharyngeal cancer is low (37 per 10 000). Among men 50-59 years old, 8.1% have an oncogenic oral HPV infection, 2.1% have an oral HPV16 infection, yet only 0.7% will 'ever' develop oropharyngeal cancer in their lifetime. Oncogenic oral HPV prevalence was higher in men than women, and increased with number of lifetime oral sexual partners and tobacco use. Men who currently smoked and had ≥5 lifetime oral sexual partners had 'elevated risk' (prevalence = 14.9%). Men with only one of these risk factors (i.e. either smoked and had 2-4 partners or did not smoke and had ≥5 partners) had 'medium risk' (7.3%). Regardless of what other risk factors participants had, oncogenic oral HPV prevalence was 'low' among those with only ≤1 lifetime oral sexual partner (women = 0.7% and men = 1.7%). Screening based upon oncogenic oral HPV detection would be challenging. Most groups have low oncogenic oral HPV prevalence. In addition to the large numbers of individuals who would need to be screened to identify prevalent oncogenic oral HPV, the lifetime risk of developing oropharyngeal caner among those with infection remains

  4. Contralateral regional recurrence after elective unilateral neck irradiation in oropharyngeal carcinoma: A literature-based critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; van Werkhoven, Erik; Navran, Arash; Karakullukcu, Baris; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Machiels, Melanie; van der Velden, Lilly-Ann; Vogel, Wouter V; Klop, W Martin

    2017-09-01

    The head and neck region has rich regional lymphatic network, with a theoretical risk on contralateral metastasis from oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). There is a long-standing convention to irradiate the great majority of these tumors electively to both sides of the neck to reduce the risk of contralateral regional failure (cRF), but this can induce significant toxicity. We aimed to identify patient groups where elective contralateral irradiation may safely be omitted. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for original full-text articles in English with a combination of search terms related to the end points: cRF in OPC primarily treated by radiotherapy only to the ipsilateral neck and identifying predictive factors for increased incidence of cRF. The data from the identified studies were pooled, the incidence of cRF was calculated and the correlation with different predictive factors was investigated. Eleven full-text articles met the inclusion criteria. In these studies, 1116 patients were treated to the ipsilateral neck alone. The mean incidence of cRF was 2.42% (range 0-5.9%, 95% CI 1.6-3.5%). The incidence of cRF correlated only with T-stage (p=0.008), and involvement of midline (p=0.001). However, the significant correlation with T-stage can be explained by the very low incidence of cRF among T1 (0.77%), and disappeared when the incidence of cRF was compared between T2, T3,and T4 (p=0.344). The incidence of cRF in patients with OPC is very low, with involvement of midline providing the most significant prognosticator. These results call for trials on unilateral elective irradiation in selected groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Five year review of oropharyngeal cancer patients at University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five year review of oropharyngeal cancer patients at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, north central Nigeria. H.K. Omokanye, O.A. Afolabi, S. Segun-Busari, S.I. Muhammed, S.O. Ayodele, N.O. Shittu, B.S. Alabi ...

  6. Added value of dedicated axillary hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI for improved axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer patients. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijnatten, Thiemo J.A. van; Goorts, B.; Voeoe, S.; Wildberger, J.E.; Boer, M. de; Kooreman, L.F.S.; Heuts, E.M.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Lobbes, M.B.I.; Smidt, M.L.

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and potential added value of dedicated axillary 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI, compared to standard imaging modalities (i.e. ultrasound [US], MRI and PET/CT), for axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer. Twelve patients with clinically node-positive breast cancer underwent axillary US and dedicated axillary hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI. Nine of the 12 patients also underwent whole-body PET/CT. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were measured for the primary breast tumor and the most FDG-avid axillary lymph node. A positive axillary lymph node on dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI was defined as a moderate to very intense FDG-avid lymph node. The diagnostic performance of dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI was calculated by comparing quantitative and its qualitative measurements to results of axillary US, MRI and PET/CT. The number of suspicious axillary lymph nodes was subdivided as follows: N0 (0 nodes), N1 (1-3 nodes), N2 (4-9 nodes) and N3 (≥ 10 nodes). According to dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI findings, seven patients were diagnosed with N1, four with N2 and one with N3. With regard to mean SUVmax, there was no significant difference in the primary tumor (9.0 [±5.0] vs. 8.6 [±5.7], p = 0.678) or the most FDG-avid axillary lymph node (7.8 [±5.3] vs. 7.7 [±4.3], p = 0.767) between dedicated axillary PET/MRI and PET/CT. Compared to standard imaging modalities, dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI resulted in changes in nodal status as follows: 40% compared to US, 75% compared to T2-weighted MRI, 40% compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, and 22% compared to PET/CT. Adding dedicated axillary 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI to diagnostic work-up may improve the diagnostic performance of axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer patients. (orig.)

  7. Oropharyngeal histoplasmosis: The diagnosis lies in the biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Claudia; Jaker, Michael A; Fitzhugh-Kull, Valerie A; Dever, Lisa L

    2018-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum , a dimorphic fungus found world-wide, is endemic to regions of the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys and portions of Central and South America. Initial infection can present with acute pulmonary symptoms or remain clinically asymptomatic, with disease course generally guided by degree of inoculum and underlying immunosuppression. A chronic, progressive course of weight loss, oral ulceration, and fatigue has been associated with elderly males. We present a 79-year-old man with a chronic, progressive course of oral lesions, odynophagia, and weight loss who was found to have histoplasmosis on oral biopsy performed for suspicions of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Histoplasma urine antigen, serum complement fixation antibody titers, and fungal tissues were all negative despite validated sensitivities in the >90% range. Our case report highlights the critical role of tissue biopsy in establishing a diagnosis of oropharyngeal histoplasmosis.

  8. Effects of Barium Concentration on Oropharyngeal Swallow Timing Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Stokely, Shauna L.; Molfenter, Sonja M.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2013-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy is commonly used for evaluating oropharyngeal swallowing but requires radiopaque contrast (typically barium). Prior studies suggest that some aspects of swallowing, including timing measures of oral and pharyngeal bolus transit, vary depending on barium concentration. The aim of our study was to identify timing differences in healthy swallowing between “thin” (40 % w/v concentration) and “ultrathin” (22 % w/v concentration) barium solutions. Twenty healthy adults (Ten women; ...

  9. Detection of HPV related oropharyngeal cancer in oral rinse specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Matthew; Huang, Bin; Katabi, Nora; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Bryant, Robert; Kaplan, Samuel; Blackwell, Timothy; Patel, Snehal; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Tang, Yi-Wei; Ganly, Ian

    2017-12-12

    The majority of patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OPSCC) are due to HPV infection. At present, there are no reliable tests for screening HPV in patients with OPSCC. The objective of this study was to assess the Cobas® HPV Test on oral rinse specimens as an early, non-invasive tool for HPV-related OPSCC. Oral rinse specimens were collected from 187 patients (45 with OPSCC, 61 with oral cavity SCC (OCSCC) and 81 control patients who had benign or malignant thyroid nodules) treated at MSKCC. The Cobas® HPV Test was used to detect 14 high-risk HPV types in these samples. Performance of the HPV Test was correlated with p16 tumor immunohistochemistry as gold standard. 91.1% of the oropharynx cancer patients had p16 positive tumors compared to 3.3% of oral cavity cancer. Of the 81 control patients, 79 (97.5%) had no HPV in their oral rinse giving a specificity of the HPV test of 98%. For the combined oral cavity oropharynx cancer cohort, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the HPV Test were 79.1%, 90.5%, 85.0% and 86.4% respectively when p16 immunohistochemistry was used as the reference. The Cobas® HPV Test on oral rinse is a highly specific and potentially sensitive test for oropharyngeal cancer and may be a potentially useful screening test for early oropharyngeal cancer. We describe an oral rinse test for the detection of HPV related oropharyngeal cancer.

  10. The role of sequential chemoradiation for local advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masterson, Liam; Tanweer, Faiz

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess survival, prognostic indicators, and pattern of failure for advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated by induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation (sequential CRT). A retrospective review of 80 consecutive patients who underwent chemoradiation [doublet cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF)] for local advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma at a tertiary center from March 2003 to July 2008 is reported. Seven studies utilizing a similar protocol were reviewed, and all outcomes are collated. At a median follow-up of 32 months, the 3-year overall survival was 75%. Tumor size (p<0.001), age at presentation (p<0.002), and failure to complete the full course of induction chemotherapy (p<0.01) were all found to be significant factors affecting survival. Induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation utilizing doublet PF is an effective treatment for local advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma. At present, the addition of a taxane to the PF regimen cannot be assumed to provide benefit until further evidence emerges from a representative controlled trial. (author)

  11. Surveillance Imaging in HPV-related Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, William; Miles, Brett A; Posner, Marshall; Som, Peter; Kostakoglu, Lale; Gupta, Vishal; Bakst, Richard L

    2018-03-01

    Current guidelines derived from a pre-human papilloma virus (HPV) era in oropharyngeal cancer do not recommend routine surveillance imaging. We aimed to analyze the method of recurrence detection in HPV+ disease to determine a role for follow-up imaging. All HPV+ and HPV- oropharyngeal cancer patients treated at our institution from 2005-2016 with biopsy-proven recurrence were identified and their method of recurrence detection was analyzed. A total of 16 HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer patients were identified to have recurrence, 12 (75%) of which experienced distant recurrence and 13 (81.3%) were detected asymptomatically with imaging at a median time of 19.7 months after initial treatment and verifying no residual disease. Twelve (75%) detections were with PET-CT. While HPV- patients (17 patients) also have a high rate of asymptomatic detection (16 patients, 94.1%), their 3-year post-recurrence survival was significantly lower at 6.5% compared to 83.6% for the HPV+ group (pHPV+ patients, a large proportion of failures are asymptomatic distant metastases, which occur beyond 6 months following treatment completion, and are detected with whole body imaging alone. In light of long term post-recurrence survival observed, this preliminary data suggests that routine surveillance imaging should be further studied for HPV+ disease. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Low Survival Rates of Oral and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolina Omena Vasconcellos Le Campion

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the epidemiological and clinical factors that influence the prognosis of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Methods. One hundred and twenty-one cases of oral and oropharyngeal SCC were selected. The survival curves for each variable were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression model was applied to assess the effect of the variables on survival. Results. Cancers at an advanced stage were observed in 103 patients (85.1%. Cancers on the tongue were more frequent (23.1%. The survival analysis was 59.9% in one year, 40.7% in two years, and 27.8% in 5 years. There was a significant low survival rate linked to alcohol intake (p=0.038, advanced cancer staging (p=0.003, and procedures without surgery (p<0.001. When these variables were included in the Cox regression model only surgery procedures (p=0.005 demonstrated a significant effect on survival. Conclusion. The findings suggest that patients who underwent surgery had a greater survival rate compared with those that did not. The low survival rates and the high percentage of patients diagnosed at advanced stages demonstrate that oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients should receive more attention.

  13. Attempt to minimize contralateral parotid gland dose using a computed tomography simulator in radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagei, Kenji; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi; Kitahara, Toshihiro; Omori, Keiichi; Kaneko, Masanori; Hashimoto, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidehumi; Arimoto, Takuro; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: From 1988 when a computed tomography simulator (CTS) was introduced at our institute, we have attempted to minimize xerostomia by reducing the dose to the contralateral parotid gland as much as possible by using the CTS in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate our 5-year experience with radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer using the CTS. Materials and methods: We evaluated the treatment results of 60 patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated by definitive RT between November 1988 and December 1994. Their median age was 61 years (9 females and 51 males). The primary disease site was the tonsilar area (TA) 28, base of tongue (BT) 13, soft palate (SP) 13, and posterior wall (PA) 6. Treatment planning was performed using the CTS for all patients. To minimize the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, an ipsilateral technique (an anterior and a posterior oblique field with 30 or 45 deg. wedges) designed to treat the primary tumor and ipsilateral upper neck region was used for patients with laterally located tumors. The parotid gland, spinal cord, and the targets (the primary tumors and the regional lymph nodes) were outlined on axial CT images. To limit the dose to the contralateral parotid gland and spinal cord while encompassing the targets, beam's eye view displays were used to determine the angle and shape of each field. A bilateral technique (lateral opposed fields or an anterior and lateral opposed fields) was used for patients with centrally located tumors. A dose of 65 Gy in 26 fractions over 6.5 weeks (40 Gy to large fields and 25 Gy to gross disease) was used as the standard radical dose. In 10 patients who were found to have residual tumors at the end of 65 Gy irradiation, an additional boost of 10 or 15 Gy in 4 or 6 fractions was delivered to the residual tumors. The primary site, T stage, and N stage by RT techniques are shown below. Results: The median follow-up was 31 months with a range

  14. Selective digestive or oropharyngeal decontamination and topical oropharyngeal chlorhexidine for prevention of death in general intensive care: systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard; MacLennan, Graeme; Glen, John

    2014-03-31

    To determine the effect on mortality of selective digestive decontamination, selective oropharyngeal decontamination, and topical oropharyngeal chlorhexidine in adult patients in general intensive care units and to compare these interventions with each other in a network meta-analysis. Systematic review, conventional meta-analysis, and network meta-analysis. Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL were searched to December 2012. Previous meta-analyses, conference abstracts, and key journals were also searched. We used pairwise meta-analyses to estimate direct evidence from intervention-control trials and a network meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework to combine direct and indirect evidence. Prospective randomised controlled trials that recruited adult patients in general intensive care units and studied selective digestive decontamination, selective oropharyngeal decontamination, or oropharyngeal chlorhexidine compared with standard care or placebo. Selective digestive decontamination had a favourable effect on mortality, with a direct evidence odds ratio of 0.73 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.84). The direct evidence odds ratio for selective oropharyngeal decontamination was 0.85 (0.74 to 0.97). Chlorhexidine was associated with increased mortality (odds ratio 1.25, 1.05 to 1.50). When each intervention was compared with the other, both selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination were superior to chlorhexidine. The difference between selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination was uncertain. Selective digestive decontamination has a favourable effect on mortality in adult patients in general intensive care units. In these patients, the effect of selective oropharyngeal decontamination is less certain. Both selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination are superior to chlorhexidine, and there is a possibility that chlorhexidine is associated with increased

  15. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Castiglione, Monica; Colleoni, Marco; Gruber, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods: From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). Conclusions: This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT.

  16. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  17. The clinical significance of thymidylate synthase expression in human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hisayuki; Yui, Takehiro; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Urano, Makoto; Sakurai, Kazuo; Naito, Kensei; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The focus of human papilloma virus (HPV), particulary HPV 16 is on the role of carcinogenic and prognostic factors on oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OSCC). However, it remains unclear why patients with HPV-positive tumors have better outcomes than those with HPV-negative tumors. Thymidylate synthase (TS) is one of the initial key enzymes in the 5-fluouracil (5-FU) metabolic pathway. Clinical studies showed that intratumoural TS level was related to the response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with several types of cancer such as gastroenterological and head and neck cancers. We investigated the prevalence of HPV infection and TS expression in the patients with OSCC and evaluated the prognostic implications according to the HPV status and TS expression. We evaluated for high-risk HPV types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 51, 52, 58) using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay on archival biopsies from 54 patients with OSCC. Immunohistochemical assessments for TS were also performed. HPV was positive in 22 (40.7%) of 54 samples. Of these positive cases, 21 (95%) carried HPV 16 and only 1 (5%) HPV58 sequences. TS was overexpressed in 25 (46.3%) of 54 samples. Of these, 19 (76.0%) had an HPV-negative status and 21 (84.0%) were heavy smokers. TS overexpression was associated with the patients with HPV-negative tumors (P=0.02) and heavy smokers (p=0.012). Univariate analysis revealed that HPV positive status (77.3% vs. 29.0%; p=0.006) significantly improved overall survival. Conversely, no remarkable prognostic difference was observed on immunohistochemical analysis of TS expression. A multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazard model showed that early T stage (T1-2), early N stage (N0-1), and positive HPV status were significantly independent predictors for superior overall survival. Our studies suggested that positive HPV status was most strongly associated with a favorable prognosis in the patients with OSCC. TS expression has an unusual aspect

  18. Influence of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy on the Surgical Strategy According to the Clinical T Stage of Patients With Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic responses and changes to surgical strategies following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in rectal cancer patients according to their clinical T stage (cT). The use of PCRT has recently been extended to less advanced disease. The authors enrolled 650 patients with cT2 to 4 mid and low rectal cancer who received both PCRT and surgical resection. The rate of total regression and the proportion of local excision were compared according to the cT category. The 3-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was compared using the log-rank test according to patient cT category, pathologic stage, and type of surgical treatment. Patients with cT2 were older (P = 0.001), predominately female (P = 0.028), and had low-lying rectal cancer (P = 0.008). Pathologic total regression was achieved most frequently in cT2 patients (54% of cT2 versus 17.6% of cT3 versus 8.2% of cT4; P rectal cancer, optimal surgical treatment may be achieved with the tailored use of PCRT. PMID:26717384

  19. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16-positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. We measured the survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. We reviewed 23 patients (18 men and 5 women; age, 42-79 years). Induction chemotherapy resulted in partial or complete remission (20 patients) and in stable (2 patients) or progressive (1 patient) disease. In partial or complete remission, subsequent radiotherapy was performed in 16 patients, chemoradiotherapy in two, and transoral resection in two. In stable or progressive disease, subsequent open surgery was performed. Overall, one patient died of cervical lymph node metastasis, one died of kidney cancer, and one died of myocardial infarction. Event-free, distant-metastasis-free survival was present for 20 patients. The 3-year disease-specific survival was 95%; the overall survival was 87%. Two patients required gastrostomies during chemoradiotherapy and three required tracheotomies, but these were closed in all patients. The therapeutic response to induction chemotherapy for p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer was good. Partial or complete remission was achieved in almost 90% patients, and control of local and distant metastases was possible when it was followed by radiotherapy alone or with transoral resection of the primary tumor. A multicenter study is required to confirm these findings. 4.

  20. Acute arterial hemorrhage following radiotherapy of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

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    Greve, Jens; Schuler, Patrick; Hoffmann, Thomas K. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany); Bas, Murat; Bier, Henning [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Turowski, Bernd [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany); Scheckenbach, Kathrin [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany); Budach, Wilfried; Boelke, Edwin [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany); Bergmann, Christoph; Lang, Stephan; Arweiler-Harbeck, Diana; Lehnerdt, Goetz; Mattheis, Stefan [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Background and purpose: vascular erosion is a rare but life-threatening complication after radiotherapy. The authors report on acute arterial bleeding and its therapy following radiotherapy of oropharyngeal tumors. Patients and methods: ten patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma of any stage developed foudroyant acute arterial hemorrhage 3-46 months (14.4 {+-} 5.1 months) after primary (5/10) or adjuvant radio(chemo)therapy (R[C]T). Results: all patients had a history of recurrent minor bleeding episodes and showed deep mucosal ulcerations also outside the primary tumor region. A life-threatening arterial hemorrhage appeared in the area of these mucosal defects in the pharyngeal region. Affected vessels were the common carotid artery as well as the internal and the external portion with branches like the ascending pharyngeal and superior thyroid arteries. Treatment consisted of emergency intubation or tracheotomy followed by exposure and package of the pharynx and surgical ligature and/or embolization. 6/10 patients (all hospitalized) survived the episode, however, lethal outcome in 4/10 patients (outpatients) was related to asphyxia as a result of blood aspiration or exsanguination. None of the patients revealed evidence of persistent or recurrent tumor disease as proven by biopsy/autopsy and imaging technique. Conclusion: vascular erosion following primary or adjuvant R(C)T represents a rare and potentially life-threatening complication requiring immediate emergency treatment involving head and neck surgeons, anesthesiologists and neuroradiologists. For patients with oropharyngeal neoplasms treated by R(C)T and showing recurrent bleeding episodes and mucosal ulceration particularly after the acute treatment phase, hospitalization with prophylactic surgical ligature or embolization of affected arteries is recommended. (orig.)

  1. Effects of Oropharyngeal Exercises on Snoring: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieto, Vanessa; Kayamori, Fabiane; Montes, Maria I; Hirata, Raquel P; Gregório, Marcelo G; Alencar, Adriano M; Drager, Luciano F; Genta, Pedro R; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2015-09-01

    Snoring is extremely common in the general population and may indicate OSA. However, snoring is not objectively measured during polysomnography, and no standard treatment is available for primary snoring or when snoring is associated with mild forms of OSA. This study determined the effects of oropharyngeal exercises on snoring in minimally symptomatic patients with a primary complaint of snoring and diagnosis of primary snoring or mild to moderate OSA. Patients were randomized for 3 months of treatment with nasal dilator strips plus respiratory exercises (control) or daily oropharyngeal exercises (therapy). Patients were evaluated at study entry and end by sleep questionnaires (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and full polysomnography with objective measurements of snoring. We studied 39 patients (age, 46 ± 13 years; BMI, 28.2 ± 3.1 kg/m2; apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 15.3 ± 9.3 events/h; Epworth Sleepiness Scale, 9.2 ± 4.9; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, 6.4 ± 3.3). Control (n = 20) and therapy (n = 19) groups were similar at study entry. One patient from each group dropped out. Intention-to-treat analysis was used. No significant changes occurred in the control group. In contrast, patients randomized to therapy experienced a significant decrease in the snore index (snores > 36 dB/h), 99.5 (49.6-221.3) vs 48.2 (25.5-219.2); P = .017 and total snore index (total power of snore/h), 60.4 (21.8-220.6) vs 31.0 (10.1-146.5); P = .033. Oropharyngeal exercises are effective in reducing objectively measured snoring and are a possible treatment of a large population suffering from snoring. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01636856; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  2. Radiation Therapy for Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a key therapeutic modality used in the treatment of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers, whether as definitive treatment or postoperatively for those with high-risk factors after surgery. Although radiotherapy is a proven, effective treatment of cancer control, it can result in significant acute and late toxicities. Pretreatment patient education, supportive care, and posttreatment adherence to rehabilitative and preventive care can help mitigate toxicities. Advances in radiation delivery, such as through continued technological advances, or novel approaches to customizing radiation dose and volume, to maximize the therapeutic efficacy while minimizing side effects, are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and prognosis of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Kano, Satoshi; Hara, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Fumiyuki; Suzuki, Seigo; Homma, Akihiro; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the presence of HPV from 53 patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In total 14/53 (26%) were HPV-positive. In 14 HPV-positive patients, 12 patients (86%) were HPV-16-positive, 1 patient was HPV-18-positive, and 1 patient was HPV-58-positive. HPV-positive patients had significantly better disease-specific survival rates than HPV-negative patients. Compared with patients with HPV-negative tumors, patients with HPV-positive tumors had higher response rates after chemoradiation treatment. For patients with HNSCC of the oropharynx, tumor HPV status is strongly associated with chemoradiation response and survival. (author)

  4. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Cárdenas-Lara, Armando; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Bautista, Heber

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia associated with neurological disease is an important clinical manifestation in the diagnosis of injury that justifies the compression of the brainstem and lower cranial nerves. To emphasize the study of dysphagia in a patient with Chiari I malformation associated with syringomyelia in the absence of primary gastroenterological symptoms. We describe the case of a 62 year-old woman with oropharyngeal dysphagia of six years of evolution, cervicobrachialgia, ptosis and facial diplexia. Magnetic resonance imaging is an essential element for establishing the etiologic diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  5. Oropharyngeal teratoma in a child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nmadu, P T

    1993-07-01

    Teratoid tumours of the oropharynx are notorious for obstructing the airways and interfering with alimentation. We report here a healthy 20-day old neonate who presented with a painless growth in the floor of the mouth from birth. In this neonate, the tumour interfered with breast-feeding but not with bottle-feeding which the child tolerated very well. At operation, the tumour was easily enucleated, weighed 6G and was histologically consistent with a teratoma. The commonest site for this tumour is the nasopharynx and only 26 oropharyngeal teratomas have been reported in the English literature. The differential diagnosis of congenital oral growths should include a teratoma.

  6. Weekly Low-Dose Docetaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal or Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Retrospective, Single-Institution Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ohashi, Toshio; Tomita, Toshiki; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Fujii, Masato; Kubo, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the efficacy, toxicity, and prognostic factors of weekly low-dose docetaxel-based chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2005, 72 consecutive patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCR; radiation at 60 Gy plus weekly docetaxel [10 mg/m 2 ]). Thirty of these patients also received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC; docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil) before concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Survival was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months, with overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates at 3 years of 59%, 45%, and 52%, respectively. Thirty-six patients (50%) experienced more than one Grade 3 to 4 acute toxicity. Grade 3 mucositis occurred in 32 patients (44%), Grade 4 laryngeal edema in 1 (1%). Grade ≥3 severe hematologic toxicity was observed in only 2 patients (3%). Grade 3 dysphagia occurred as a late complication in 2 patients (3%). Multivariate analyses identified age, T stage, hemoglobin level, and completion of weekly docetaxel, but not NAC, as significant factors determining disease-free survival. Conclusions: Docetaxel is an active agent used in both concurrent and sequential chemoradiotherapy regimens. Mucositis was the major acute toxicity, but this was well tolerated in most subjects. Anemia was the most significant prognostic factor determining survival. Further studies are warranted to investigate the optimal protocol for integrating docetaxel into first-line chemoradiotherapy regimens, as well as the potential additive impact of NAC.

  7. CT mucosal window settings: a novel approach to evaluating early T-stage head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Jenny K; Glastonbury, Christine M; Chen, Luke F; Salvatore, Jaime K; Eastwood, James D

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the CT densities of small head and neck mucosal cancers as a means of deriving a CT mucosal window display of narrower window width and higher window level to better detect and delineate head and neck carcinomas. We retrospectively studied 19 subjects with T1-2 head and neck carcinomas. The density of tumor and adjacent normal mucosa on CT were measured. CT scans for the 19 patients with tumors and 35 subjects without mucosal tumors were anonymized and interpreted by two readers using standard soft-tissue windows and were reviewed again 1 week later with the addition of mucosal windows. The mean (± SD) attenuation of 17 visible tumors was 85.5 ± 18.3 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the surrounding normal mucosa was 55.3 ± 15.2 HU (p < 0.0001). From our data, we derived guideline mucosal window settings-a window width of 120 HU and a window level of 60 HU. On blinded review, reader A detected 12 tumors with the addition of mucosal windows (sensitivity, 63%; specificity, 82%) and nine tumors on soft-tissue windows alone (sensitivity, 47%; specificity, 94%). Reader B detected nine tumors with use of mucosal windows (sensitivity, 47%; specificity, 71%) and eight tumors on soft-tissue windows alone (sensitivity, 42%; specificity, 74%). Early T-stage tumors have higher CT density than normal mucosa. Their conspicuity can be amplified using display windows with narrower window width and higher window level. The potential clinical applications are for the improved detection of unknown primary tumors and delineation of a known mucosal tumor.

  8. Surrogate for oropharyngeal cancer HPV status in cancer database studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megwalu, Uchechukwu C; Chen, Michelle M; Ma, Yifei; Divi, Vasu

    2017-12-01

    The utility of cancer databases for oropharyngeal cancer studies is limited by lack of information on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. The purpose of this study was to develop a surrogate that can be used to adjust for the effect of HPV status on survival. The study cohort included 6419 patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 2004 and 2012, identified in the National Cancer Database (NCDB). The HPV surrogate score was developed using a logistic regression model predicting HPV-positive status. The HPV surrogate score was predictive of HPV status (area under the curve [AUC] 0.73; accuracy of 70.4%). Similar to HPV-positive tumors, HPV surrogate positive tumors were associated with improved overall survival (OS; hazard ratio [HR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.91; P = .005), after adjusting for important covariates. The HPV surrogate score is useful for adjusting for the effect of HPV status on survival in studies utilizing cancer databases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alters quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, G; Martinaud, O; Petit, A; Cuvelier, A; Hannequin, D; Roppeneck, P; Verin, E

    2013-03-01

    Dysphagia is one of the most important complications encountered in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Our aim was to determine whether oropharyngeal dysphagia impacted the quality of life (QoL) of patients with ALS. Thirty consecutive patients were recruited (31-82 years, 18 men). Swallowing function was evaluated using a standardised videofluoroscopic barium swallow. All the patients completed a specific questionnaire on quality of life in dysphagia (SWAL-QoL) immediately after the videofluoroscopy. The results of dysphagia outcome severity scale separated 14 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 16 with normal swallowing function. There was no difference in the average age, weight and body mass index of the two groups (dysphagic patients: 68 ± 11 kg versus non-dysphagic patients: 69 ± 14 kg). Most of the dysphagic patients had a bulbar affection based on their Norris scores which determine the importance of cranial nerves illness (20 ± 8), significantly lower than those of the non-dysphagic patients (35 ± 5) (P quality of life questionnaire revealed that the dysphagic patients had significant burden (P dysphagia (P dysphagia which impacted directly mental health (P life (P dysphagia is a common symptom accompanying ALS, which alters the patient's QoL, especially social health. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Acoustic analysis of oropharyngeal swallowing using Sonar Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Franciele Savaris; Silva, Roberta Gonçalves da; Furkim, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    During the aging process, one of the functions that changes is swallowing. These alterations in oropharyngeal swallowing may be diagnosed by methods that allow both the diagnosis and biofeedback monitoring by the patient. One of the methods recently described in the literature for the evaluation of swallowing is the Sonar Doppler. To compare the acoustic parameters of oropharyngeal swallowing between different age groups. This was a field, quantitative, study. Examination with Sonar Doppler was performed in 75 elderly and 72 non-elderly adult subjects. The following acoustic parameters were established: initial frequency, first peak frequency, second peak frequency; initial intensity, final intensity; and time for the swallowing of saliva, liquid, nectar, honey, and pudding, with 5- and 10-mL free drinks. Objective, measurable data were obtained; most acoustic parameters studied between adult and elderly groups with respect to consistency and volume were significant. When comparing elderly with non-elderly adult subjects, there is a modification of the acoustic pattern of swallowing, regarding both consistency and food bolus volume. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. A clinical study of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Chemoradioselection by TAR therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Tetsuro; Yoshimura, Tomonori; Ohara, Hirotatsu

    2013-01-01

    The data of 91 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma treated at the University of Tsukuba Hospital between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. The mean age (±standard deviation) was 62.5 (±10.2) years and the male-female ratio was 5.5 : 1. The tumor originated from the lateral wall in 58 cases (63.7%), the anterior wall in 22 cases (24.2%), the superior wall in 8 cases (8.8%), and the posterior wall in 3 cases (3.3%). Six cases were revealed to be positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) among the 7 cases examined. Only supportive care was administered in 12 cases. The remaining 79 cases were treated, and the disease-specific 5-year survival rate was 55.6%. Smoking and alcohol consumption were significantly related to the disease-specific survival rate. At our department, chemoradiotherapy is initiated with 45 Gy of radiation concurrently with a novel oral fluoropyrimidine derivative (Teysuno, Taiho Phamaceutical Co., Ltd.) and vitamin A (TAR therapy), to improve the rate of curative surgical resection and select appropriate candidates for further definitive chemoradiotherapy to allow organ preservation (chemoradioselection). Chemoselection by induction chemotherapy, or chemoradioselection by initial concurrent chemoradiotherapy is considered to be important to make individualized treatment selection for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, because of the highly variable response to definitive chemoradiotherapy among cases. (author)

  12. Effect of computed tomography window settings and reconstruction plane on 8th edition T-stage classification in patients with lung adenocarcinoma manifesting as a subsolid nodule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyungwoo; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jihang; Kim, Kwhanmien; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Lee, Choon-Taek

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effect of window settings and reconstruction plane on clinical T-stage determined by solid portion size within subsolid nodules (SSNs), based on 8th-edition TNM standards. This retrospective study included 247 SSNs from 221 patients who underwent surgery for lung adenocarcinomas between Feb 2012 and Oct 2015. Two radiologists independently measured the diameter of the solid portion on axial, coronal, and sagittal planes using lung- and mediastinal-window. The largest diameter among the measurements on the three planes was referred to as multiplanar measurement. Inter-reader agreement as well as the correlation between the CT and pathologic measurements were calculated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). The proportions of disagreement in clinical T-stage on different measurement methods were measured. The κ values for agreement between clinical- and pathological T-stage were measured. Inter-reader agreement was moderate-to-excellent (ICC confidence interval [CI] range, 0.51-0.92) in lung-window, while it was good-to-excellent (0.77-0.95) in mediastinal-window. The correlation between the CT and pathologic measurements was good-to-excellent (ICC CI range, 0.63-0.82) in lung-window and fair-to-good (0.25-0.78) in mediastinal-window. The proportions of disagreement between clinical T-stages using mediastinal- and lung-window were 32.0%-41.7% and 33.6%-49.0% with axial and multiplanar measurement, respectively. Multiplanar measurement resulted in upstaging in 12.6%-15.8% and 19.0%-24.3% of cases with mediastinal- and lung-window, respectively, when compared with axial measurement alone. The κ values for agreement between clinical T-stage and pathological T-stage ranged from 0.53 to 0.69. Mediastinal-window was a more stable method in the aspect of the inter-reader agreement, but the correlation between the CT and pathologic measurement was better in lung-window. The clinical T-stage varied in up to one-half of the cases according to the

  13. The interaction between the oropharyngeal geometry and aerosols via pressurised metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehtezazi, T; Saleem, I; Shrubb, I; Allanson, D R; Jenkinson, I D; O'Callaghan, C

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of oropharyngeal geometry on inhaled aerosol characteristics via pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), both with or without spacers. Seven adult oropharyngeal models with different centreline lengths, total volumes, and degrees of constriction were employed as induction ports for a laser diffraction particle size analyser and cascade impactor. Particle size change over time, mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), average median volume diameter (D(V)50), inhaled doses, and oropharyngeal depositions (percentage of the nominal dose) for aerosols via suspension and ultrafine pMDIs with or without spacers at 30 l/min airflow were determined. Variations in oropharyngeal geometry caused significant variations in inhaled particle size distributions, doses, oropharyngeal drug depositions, and particle size change over time when pMDIs were used without spacers. However, inhaled aerosol characteristics had marginal variations for the ultrafine pMDI plus large volume spacer (MMAD range: 0.69-0.78 microm, D(V)50 range: 1.27-1.36 microm, inhaled dose range: 46.46-52.92%). It was found that the amounts of inhaled aerosol particles with aerodynamic size of less than 0.83 microm via pMDIs plus large volume spacer were slightly affected by the oropharyngeal geometry. Inhaling ultrafine aerosols via spacers may reduce the effect of oropharyngeal geometry on inhaled aerosol properties.

  14. Oropharyngeal HPV infection: prevalence and sampling methods among HIV-infected men in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikandiwa, Admire; Pisa, Pedro T; Chersich, Matthew F; Muller, Etienne E; Mayaud, Philippe; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead

    2018-01-01

    Worldwide, 96,000 cases of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) occurred in 2012. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for OPC. Data on oropharyngeal HPV infection are limited. There is no consensus on the best sampling method for detecting the infection. We describe the prevalence of oropharyngeal HPV infection among HIV-infected men and compare the performance of oral rinses and swabs in detecting oropharyngeal HPV infection. Paired oral rinses and swabs for 181 men were tested for HPV DNA using the Roche Linear Array. Performance was determined by the number of infections detected and the percentage of samples with adequate DNA extraction. Agreement between sampling methods was assessed by the kappa statistic. Prevalence of oropharyngeal HPV infection with rinse samples was 1.8% (three infections) and 0.6% (one infection) with swabs (p = 0.06). Adequate cellular DNA extraction was more likely with rinse (93.4%) than swab samples (89.0%, p = 0.05). There was moderate agreement between the methods (kappa = 0.49). The prevalence of oropharyngeal HPV DNA infection among this predominantly heterosexual sample of men living with HIV was low and consistent with the infrequent oral sex practices. Oral rinse performed better than oral swab in detecting oropharyngeal HPV DNA infection and might contribute to screening for OPCs.

  15. Prediction of primary breast cancer size and T-stage using micro-computed tomography in lumpectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa M Sarraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histopathology is the only accepted method to measure and stage the breast tumor size. However, there is a need to find another method to measure and stage the tumor size when the pathological assessment is not available. Micro-computed tomography. (micro-CT has the ability to measure tumor in three dimensions in an intact lumpectomy specimen. In this study, we aimed to determine the accuracy of micro-CT to measure and stage the primary tumor size in breast lumpectomy specimens, as compared to the histopathology. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two women who underwent lumpectomy surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Surgery from June 2011 to September 2011, and from August 2013 to December 2013 participated in this study. The lumpectomy specimens were scanned using micro-CT followed by routine pathological processing. The maximum dimension of the invasive breast tumor was obtained from the micro-CT image and was compared to the corresponding pathology report for each subject. Results: The invasive tumor size measurement by micro-CT was underestimated in 24. cases. (33%, overestimated in 37. cases. (51%, and matched it exactly in 11. cases. (15% compared to the histopathology measurement for all the cases. However, micro-CT T.stage classification differed from histopathology in only 11. (15.2% with 6. cases. (8.3% classified as a higher stage by micro-CT, and 5. cases. (6.9% classified as lower compared to histopathology. In addition, micro-CT demonstrated a statically significant strong agreement (κ =0.6, P < 0.05 with pathological tumor size and staging for invasive ductal carcinoma. (IDC group. In contrast, there was no agreement. (κ = .2, P = 0.67 between micro-CT and pathology in estimating and staging tumor size for invasive lobular carcinoma. (ILC group. This could be explained by a small sample size. (7 for ILC group. Conclusions: Micro-CT is a promising modality for measuring and staging the IDC.

  16. Human papillomavirus-mediated carcinogenesis and HPV-associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Part 2: Human papillomavirus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khammissa Razia AG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV infection of the mouth and oropharynx can be acquired by a variety of sexual and social forms of transmission. HPV-16 genotype is present in many oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomata. It has an essential aetiologic role in the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in a subset of subjects who are typically younger, are more engaged with high-risk sexual behaviour, have higher HPV-16 serum antibody titer, use less tobacco and have better survival rates than in subjects with HPV-cytonegative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In this subset of subjects the HPV-cytopositive carcinomatous cells have a distinct molecular profile. In contrast to HPV-cytopositive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, the causal association between HPV-16 and other high-risk HPV genotypes and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa is weak, and the nature of the association is unclear. It is likely that routine administration of HPV vaccination against high-risk HPV genotypes before the start of sexual activity will bring about a reduction in the incidence of HPV-mediated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. This article focuses on aspects of HPV infection of the mouth and the oropharynx with emphasis on the link between HPV and squamous cell carcinoma, and on the limitations of the available diagnostic tests in identifying a cause-and-effect relationship of HPV with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx.

  17. Clinical outcome of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Yasukazu; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Mochimatsu, Izumi; Arai, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Satoshi; Enomoto, Hiroyuki

    2001-01-01

    Sixty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at our hospital from 1991 through 1999 were analyzed. In terms of curative treatments, definitive radiotherapy or curative surgery after neoajuvant chemotherapy had been mainly applied for advanced cases until 1997. Since 1998, advanced cases have been treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The cause-specific survival rate at 5 years for the 60 patients was 50% (stage I, II, 100%; III, 45%; IV A, 36%; IV B, 0%). In the 35 patients with operable advanced-stage disease, the 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 35% in cases treated with definitive radiotherapy, and 66% in those treated with curative surgery, respectively. All 12 operable patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy showed complete response, and 10 patients in this group are disease-free now. However, many problems in definitive treatment modalities, including concomitant chemoradiotherapy for advanced cases with oropharyngeal carcinoma, have not been clarified yet. (author)

  18. Swallowing rehabilitation before and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuneyuki, Miki; Yonezawa, Kouichiro; Morimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, oropharyngeal cancer is more frequently being managed with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). As more patients receive CCRT, there is increasing attention on dysphagia. Since 2009, speech therapists in our hospital have performed swallowing rehabilitation for dysphagia associated with CCRT. We evaluated dysphagia after CCRT and examined the relationship between swallowing rehabilitation and swallowing disability. A total of 26 patients (22 males and 4 females) with a mean age of 63 years (range, 41 to 79), underwent CCRT between March 2008 and March 2010. Dysphagia after treatment was graded at the end of CCRT and discharge according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 and Fujishima dysphagia grade. Ten of the 26 patients underwent swallowing rehabilitation, exercise and education on muscle strengthening programs before and during CCRT. They tended not to have severe dysphagia, but there were no significant differences. (author)

  19. Xerostomia after Radiotherapy for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Killerup Kaae, Julie; Stenfeldt, Lone; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radiation-induced xerostomia is a frequent late side effect after treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancers. This may induce swallowing difficulties, compromised oral well-being, reduced nutrition intake, or speech deficiencies. Consequently, quality of life is often impaired...... prior to participation and suffered from xerostomia. Samples of unstimulated and chewing gum-stimulated saliva were obtained at the entry into the study (Visit 1). For 2 weeks, patients used chewing gum on a regular basis whereupon saliva measurements were repeated to verify the changes (Visit 2...... at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. No improvement in baseline saliva was seen. Relevant changes in subjective measures of xerostomia were seen after 2 weeks of chewing the gum....

  20. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the pathophysiology of and diagnostic procedures for oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy (MD). The electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Library were used. The search was limited to English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese publications. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included articles. Swallowing assessment tools, the corresponding protocols, the studies' outcome measurements, and main findings are summarized and presented. The body of literature on pathophysiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients with MD type 1 remains scant. The included studies are heterogeneous with respect to design and outcome measures and hence are not directly comparable. More importantly, most studies had methodological problems. These are discussed in detail and recommendations for further research on diagnostic examinations for swallowing disorders in patients with MD type 1 are provided.

  1. Quality of life in survivors of oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høxbroe Michaelsen, Sanne; Grønhøj, Christian; Høxbroe Michaelsen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    and meta-analysis investigates how treatment affects quality of life (QoL) in survivors of oropharyngeal cancer. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for all studies reporting patient-assessed QoL at least 1 year after treatment for OPC. In a meta-analysis, weighted average...... for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) was answered by 704 patients, 644 patients answered the EORTC QLQ Head and Neck-35 (H&N-35), 474 patients answered the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire, and 381 patients answered the M. D. Anderson...... Dysphagia Inventory. Moderate to large clinically important deteriorations in QoL were found in the domains dry mouth and sticky saliva for the EORTC QLQ-H&N35, saliva, chewing, swallowing, speech, taste, appearance and shoulder for the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire, and the global...

  2. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of oropharyngeal swallowing in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, André Vinicius Marcondes Natel; Giacheti, Célia Maria; Cola, Paula Cristina; Silva, Roberta Gonçalves da

    2017-10-23

    To describe the qualitative and quantitative temporal analysis of oropharyngeal swallowing in children diagnosed with Down syndrome (DS) through a case series study of six individuals aged 4 to 17 months (mean age = 11.16 months; median = 12 months). Qualitative and quantitative temporal analysis of swallowing using videofluoroscopy and specific software. The following parameters were assessed: presence or absence of oral incoordination, labial sphincter sealing incompetence, oral residue, posterior oral spillage, laryngotracheal penetration and aspiration, pharyngeal and total oral transit time (TOTT). Qualitative analysis identified individuals with disorders in at least four of the swallowing parameters investigated. Only one individual presented total oral transit time (TOTT) different from the others. No difference was observed between the cases regarding pharyngeal transit time. Qualitative swallowing disorders are observed in children with DS, with difference in TOTT only in the case report of the youngest infant.

  3. Clinical outcome of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisumoto, Koji; Okami, Kenji; Sakai, Akihiro; Atsumi, Taku; Maki, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Iida, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate therapeutic strategies for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma based on an examination of clinical outcomes in our department. The patients were 99 cases with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated in our hospital from March 2000 to March 2009. Five-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) were examined by the Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Subsite, stage, treatment (surgery group or radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group) and prognosis were reviewed retrospectively. Five-year OS and 5-year CSS were 50% and 59%. Compared with the Stage I and II groups, the prognosis of Stage III and IV groups was significantly worse. As for the treatment, 5-year CSS of the surgery group was 76%, while that of the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group was 52%. Regarding the subsite, 5-year CSS of the lateral wall type Stage I and II groups was 90% (surgery group: 100%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 83%), and that of the Stage III and IV groups was 63% (surgery group: 87%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 55%). Five-year CSS of the superior wall type Stage I and II groups was 85% (surgery group: 100%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 66%), and that of the Stage III and IV groups was 50% (surgery group: 75%, 5-year CSS was not obtained in the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group). The good outcome of the surgery group suggests that the indications for the operation were appropriate, and expansion of transoral resection should be considered in the near future. The outcomes of the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group require improvement. (author)

  4. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-01-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS

  5. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  6. Predictive factors for oropharyngeal dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina Martins de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Salomão, Marina Silva; Bougo, Graziela Chamarelli; Vicente, Laélia Cristina Caseiro

    2017-09-13

    Lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx due to endotracheal intubation can cause reduction in the local motility and sensitivity, impairing the swallowing process, resulting in oropharyngeal dysphagia. To verify the predictive factors for the development of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the risk of aspiration in patients with prolonged orotracheal intubation admitted to an intensive care unit. This is an observational, analytical, cross-sectional and retrospective data collection study of 181 electronic medical records of patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation. Data on age; gender; underlying disease; associated comorbidities; time and reason for orotracheal intubation; Glasgow scale on the day of the Speech Therapist assessment; comprehension; vocal quality; presence and severity of dysphagia; risk of bronchoaspiration; and the suggested oral route were collected. The data were analyzed through logistic regression. The level of significance was set at 5%, with a 95% Confidence Interval. The prevalence of dysphagia in this study was 35.9% and the risk of aspiration was 24.9%. As the age increased, the altered vocal quality and the degree of voice impairment increased the risk of the presence of dysphagia by 5-; 45.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and of aspiration by 6-; 36.4- and 4.8-fold. The increase in the time of orotracheal intubation increased the risk of aspiration by 5.5-fold. Patients submitted to prolonged intubation who have risk factors associated with dysphagia and aspiration should be submitted to an early speech-language/audiology assessment and receive appropriate and timely treatment. The recognition of these predictive factors by the entire multidisciplinary team can minimize the possibility of clinical complications inherent to the risk of dysphagia and aspiration in extubated patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  7. HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, Virginia; Pieralli, Annalisa; Corioni, Serena; Longinotti, Manuela; Bianchi, Claudia; Moncini, Daniela; Fallani, Maria Grazia

    2014-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV 16, is associated with the development of both cervical and oral cancer. We show the case of a woman affected by HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). A 41-year-old woman arrived at our Colposcopy Center following an abnormal Pap smear result (ASC-H) and a diagnosis of moderate cervical dysplasia obtained by a cervical biopsy. She underwent a colposcopy that showed a cervical abnormal transformation zone grade 2. A laser conization was performed in November 2010. Histology reported a moderate/severe dysplasia. The cone resection margins were free. Follow-up colposcopy and cytology were negative. The HPV testing showed an infection by HPV 16. In October 2012, the patient presented to the Head-Neck ER after episodes of hemoptysis; a lesion was found in the left tonsillar lodge. A biopsy was performed with a result of squamous cell carcinoma with low-grade differentiation. The HPV testing detected a high-risk HPV and the immunohistochemical analysis was positive for p16. She was treated by chemotherapy and brachytherapy. She was followed at the head-neck center with monthly visits with oral visual inspection that showed complete absence of mucosal abnormalities. HPV-related OPSCC and cervical precancerous/cancerous lesions have significant similarities in terms of pathogenesis. They are both caused largely by HPV 16, as in the present case. In conclusion, because of this association found in literature and in our case, we think that women with HPV cervical lesions should have regular surveillance for oropharyngeal cancer, whereas women with OPSCC should be encouraged to have diligent cervical screening.

  8. Oral health in older patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Omar; Parra, Carlos; Zarcero, Silvia; Nart, Jose; Sakwinska, Olga; Clavé, Pere

    2014-01-01

    oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD), aspiration and poor oral health status are potential risk factors in elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia (AP). to assess the oral hygiene status and the prevalence of periodontal disease and dental caries in elderly patients with OD. fifty elderly patients (79.7 ± 6.64 years) with OD associated with ageing or neurological diseases and 15 elderly patients without OD (77.01 ± 4.51 years) were enrolled in this observational-transversal study. OD and aspiration were evaluated by videofluoroscopy (VFS). Oral health was assessed by: (i) the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S); (ii) a complete periodontal examination, assessing the periodontal pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and bleeding on probing to study periodontal diseases (periodontitis, gingivitis); and (iii) the presence of dental caries. 8/50 elderly patients with OD presented VFS signs of aspiration, half of them silent; 40/50, signs of penetration into laryngeal vestibule and 16/50, oropharyngeal residue. Prevalence of edentulism and caries was higher in patients with OD. Dentate older patients with OD (30/50) presented the following complications (i) poor oral hygiene in 18 patients (OHI-S 3.1-6), (ii) gingivitis in 2 and periodontitis in 28 and (iii) caries in 16. older patients with OD presented polymorbidity and impaired health status, high prevalence of VFS signs of impaired safety of swallow and poor oral health status with high prevalence of periodontal diseases and caries. These patients are at great risk of developing AP. We recommend a policy of systematic oral health assessment in elderly patients with OD.

  9. Alterations in oropharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEP) with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Teresa; Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Sapienza, Christine M; Bolser, Donald C; Davenport, Paul W

    2016-07-15

    Movement of a food bolus from the oral cavity into the oropharynx activates pharyngeal sensory mechanoreceptors. Using electroencephalography, somatosensory cortical-evoked potentials resulting from oropharyngeal mechanical stimulation (PSEP) have been studied in young healthy individuals. However, limited information is known about changes in processing of oropharyngeal afferent signals with Parkinson's disease (PD). To determine if sensory changes occurred with a mechanical stimulus (air-puff) to the oropharynx, two stimuli (S1-first; S2-s) were delivered 500ms apart. Seven healthy older adults (HOA; 3 male and 4 female; 72.2±6.9 years of age), and thirteen persons diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; 11 male and 2 female; 67.2±8.9 years of age) participated. Results demonstrated PSEP P1, N1, and P2 component peaks were identified in all participants, and the N2 peak was present in 17/20 participants. Additionally, the PD participants had a decreased N2 latency and gated the P1, P2, and N2 responses (S2/S1 under 0.6). Compared to the HOAs, the PD participants had greater evidence of gating the P1 and N2 component peaks. These results suggest that persons with PD experience changes in sensory processing of mechanical stimulation of the pharynx to a greater degree than age-matched controls. In conclusion, the altered processing of sensory feedback from the pharynx may contribute to disordered swallow in patients with PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, Retno; SahBandar, Ivo N.; Theelen, Bart; Hagen, Ferry; Poot, Ge; Meis, Jacques F.; Rozalyani, Anna; Sjam, Ridhawati; Widodo, Djoko; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Boekhout, Teun

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavueonazole and

  11. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, R.; SahBandar, IN; Theelen, B.; Hagen, F.; Poot, G.; Meis, J.F.; Rozalyani, A.; Sjam, R.; Widodo, D.; Djauzi, S.; Boekhout, T.

    2008-01-01

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavuconazole and

  12. Patient Related Factors Associated with Delayed Reporting in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study provide guidance towards interventions to reduce patient delay. Interventions should target the rural, older age group and lower socioeconomic population for educating them and to change their psychosocial behavior for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia and Its Nutritional and Respiratory Complications in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, Laia; Arreola, Viridiana; Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Campins, Lluís; García-Peris, Pilar; Speyer, Renée; Clavé, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a major complaint among older people. Dysphagia may cause two types of complications in these patients: (a) a decrease in the efficacy of deglutition leading to malnutrition and dehydration, (b) a decrease in deglutition safety, leading to tracheobronchial aspiration which results in aspiration pneumonia and can lead to death. Clinical screening methods should be used to identify older people with oropharyngeal dysphagia and to identify those patients who are at risk of aspiration. Videofluoroscopy (VFS) is the gold standard to study the oral and pharyngeal mechanisms of dysphagia in older patients. Up to 30% of older patients with dysphagia present aspiration—half of them without cough, and 45%, oropharyngeal residue; and 55% older patients with dysphagia are at risk of malnutrition. Treatment with dietetic changes in bolus volume and viscosity, as well as rehabilitation procedures can improve deglutition and prevent nutritional and respiratory complications in older patients. Diagnosis and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia need a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:20811545

  14. A mathematical prediction model incorporating molecular subtype for risk of non-sentinel lymph node metastasis in sentinel lymph node-positive breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis and nomogram development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na-Na; Yang, Zheng-Jun; Wang, Xue; Chen, Li-Xuan; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Cao, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Bin

    2018-04-25

    -sentinel lymph node metastasis, which had an AUC of 0.8188. The model was validated in the validation cohort and showed excellent diagnostic performance. The mathematical prediction model that incorporates five variables including breast cancer molecular subtype demonstrates excellent diagnostic performance in assessing the risk of non-sentinel lymph node metastasis in sentinel lymph node-positive patients. The prediction model could be of help surgeons in evaluating the risk of non-sentinel lymph node involvement for breast cancer patients; however, the model requires further validation in prospective studies.

  15. HPV infection and P16 expression in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Adilbay, Dauren; Adilbayev, Galim; Kidirbayeva, Gulzhan; Shipilova, Viktoria; Sadyk, Zhanat; Koyanbekova, Gulsum; Sokolenko, Ekaterina; Klozar, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important etiologic factor in different cancers of anogenital region and also in a fraction of head and neck cancers (HNC) particularly oropharyngeal tumors. The HPV16 genotype associated with the majority of HPV-related head and neck carcinomas. Th incidence of oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in many countries, and the rate of HPV positive tumors is about 70% in Europe and North America. Little known about the prevalence of HPV in HNC in Central...

  16. A therapeutic maneuver for oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients. METHOD: Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson's disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions...

  17. A Broadly Adaptive Array of Dose-Constraint Templates for Planning of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Advanced T-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, R.M.-C.; Leung, S.-F.; Kam, M.K.-M.; Cheung, K.-Y.; Kwan, W.-H.; Yu, K.-H.; Chiu, K.-W.; Cheung, M.L.-M.; Chan, A.T.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate adaptive dose-constraint templates in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for advanced T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Method and Materials: Dose-volume histograms of clinically approved plans for 20 patients with advanced T-stage NPC were analyzed, and the pattern of distribution in relation to the degree of overlap between targets and organs at risk (OARs) was explored. An adaptive dose constraint template (ADCT) was developed based on the degree of overlap. Another set of 10 patients with advanced T-stage NPC was selected for validation. Results of the manual arm optimization protocol and the ADCT optimization protocol were compared with respect to dose optimization time, conformity indices, multiple-dose end points, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability. Results: For the ADCT protocol, average time required to achieve an acceptable plan was 9 minutes, with one optimization compared with 94 minutes with more than two optimizations of the manual arm protocol. Target coverage was similar between the manual arm and ADCT plans. A more desirable dose distribution in the region of overlap between planning target volume and OARs was achieved in the ADCT plan. Dose end points of OARs were similar between the manual arm and ADCT plans. Conclusions: With the developed ADCT, IMRT treatment planning becomes more efficient and less dependent on the planner's experience on dose optimization. The developed ADCT is applicable to a wide range of advanced T-stage NPC treatment and has the potential to be applied in a broader context to IMRT planning for other cancer sites

  18. T-staging of gastric cancer of air-filling multidetector-row CT: Comparison with hydro-multidetector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Seishi, E-mail: kumano@radiol.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro; Shimono, Taro; Kuwabara, Masatomo; Yagyu, Yukinobu; Imaoka, Izumi; Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Ishii, Kazunari; Murakami, Takamichi [Department of Radiology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of T-staging of gastric cancer by air-filling multidetector-row CT (air-MDCT) compared with water-filling MDCT (hydro-MDCT). Materials and methods: One hundred fifteen patients with histologically diagnosed gastric cancer were included in this study. Fifty-eight patients underwent air-MDCT, and the remaining 57 had hydro-MDCT using a 64-channel scanner. Based on the volumetric data of contrast-enhanced MDCT obtained about 75 s after intravenously injecting 525 mg iodine per kilogram patients weight (525 mgI/kg) nonionic contrast material at the rate of 2 ml/s, oblique coronal and oblique sagittal multi-planar reformatted images perpendicular to the stomach wall, including the tumor, were reconstructed on a workstation. Mural invasion of gastric cancer into the gastric wall, as visualized by CT, was classified according to the TNM classification, and the results of T-staging by MDCT were compared with those by pathologic analysis after surgery. Results: Correct assessment of T-staging by air-CT was achieved in 48 of 58 patients (83%), and that by hydro-MDCT was 49 of 57 patients (86%). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the technique in determining the invasion of serosa were 88%, 93%, and 91% for air-CT and 83%, 95%, and 91% for hydro-CT. There were no significant differences between hydro-MDCT and air-MDCT in sensitivity (P = 0.73), specificity (P = 0.71) and accuracy (P = 0.98). Conclusion: Air-MDCT is a very valuable tool in T-staging of gastric cancer as well as hydro-MDCT.

  19. FEATURES OF LOCAL IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Keith

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oropharyngeal cancer is the second most frequent cancer among patients with head and neck tumors in the Russian Federation. Patients usually seek medical assistance in the late stages of the disease (stages III–IV. The mortality rate in such patients during the first year after treatment varies from 30 % to 40 %. This makes it necessary to improve the methods of its diagnosis and treatment. Modern laboratory techniques allow predicting patient’s condition before and during the course of treatment; they were implemented into clinical practice for successful treatment correction. An important role is given to assessing the practical experience of related medical institutions.Objective: to develop an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with oropharyngeal cancer using the experience of medical institutions dealing with these patients. We explored the experience of the Rostov Research Institute of Oncology and the Republican Specialized Scientific and Practical Medical Center of Oncology and Radiology of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Uzbekistan.Materials and methods. The study included 40 patients with oropharyngeal cancer who received treatment in the departments of head and neck tumors of the Rostov and Uzbek Oncology Institutes between 2007 and 2014. Twenty-five patients had stage III (T1–3N0–1 oropharyngeal cancer, seven patients were diagnosed with stage IV (T4N0–1 cancer, and eight patients had a widespread relapse. Before admission to the hospital for surgery, all patients received neoadjuvant radiation therapy (40 Gy. The surgeries included radical removal of the primary tumor; patients with cervical metastases underwent simultaneous cervical lymph node dissection (levels IB, IIA–B, III, and VA. Samples of tumor tissues and pertumoral tissues were collected during the surgery. They were homogenized and used for the assessment of the levels of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines

  20. HPV infection and P16 expression in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adilbay, Dauren; Adilbayev, Galim; Kidirbayeva, Gulzhan; Shipilova, Viktoria; Sadyk, Zhanat; Koyanbekova, Gulsum; Sokolenko, Ekaterina; Klozar, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important etiologic factor in different cancers of anogenital region and also in a fraction of head and neck cancers (HNC) particularly oropharyngeal tumors. The HPV16 genotype associated with the majority of HPV-related head and neck carcinomas. Th incidence of oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in many countries, and the rate of HPV positive tumors is about 70% in Europe and North America. Little known about the prevalence of HPV in HNC in Central Asia. It's a prospective analysis of patients with verified oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Sociodemographic and clinical data obtained on admission to treatment. The diagnosis of HPV positivity assessed by both the P16 expression on immunohistochemistry(IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)with HPV DNA detection and HR HPV type determination. Seventy six patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer tested for HPV. Forteen cases were positive for HPV by PCR and 15 cases by P16 IHC. Of the 35 oropharyngeal tumors, nine were HPV DNA and p16 IHC positive, giving the rate of 25.7%. Of the 41 oral tumors, five were HPV DNA and six p16 IHC positive, giving the rate of 12.2%. It is the first study mapping prevalence of HPV positivity in oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the Central Asian region. The rate of HPV positivity was higher in oropharyngeal than in oral cancer, the nonsmokers were significantly more frequent in the HPV positive group and HPV 16 was the most frequent type. However, the HPV positivity rates are lower than referred in the western world.

  1. Comparative analysis of HPV16 gene expression profiles in cervical and in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasuolo, Andrea; Annunziata, Clorinda; Tortora, Marianna; Starita, Noemy; Stellato, Giovanni; Greggi, Stefano; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major cause of cervical cancer and of a fraction of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Few studies compared the viral expression profiles in the two types of tumor. We analyzed HPV genotypes and viral load as well as early (E2/E4, E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II, E7) and late (L1 and L2) gene expression of HPV16 in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer biopsies. The study included 28 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and ten oropharyngeal SCC, along with pair-matched non-tumor tissues, as well as four oropharynx dysplastic tissues and 112 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia biopsies. Viral load was found higher in cervical SCC (<1 to 694 copies/cell) and CIN (<1 to 43 copies/cell) compared to oropharyngeal SCC (<1 to 4 copies/cell). HPV16 E2/E4 and E5 as well as L1 and L2 mRNA levels were low in cervical SCC and CIN and undetectable in oropharynx cases. The HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were consistently high in cervical SCC and low in oropharyngeal SCC. The analysis of HPV16 E6 mRNA expression pattern showed statistically significant higher levels of E6*I versus E6*II isoform in cervical SCC (p = 0.002) and a slightly higher expression of E6*I versus E6*II in oropharyngeal cases. In conclusion, the HPV16 E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II and E7 mRNA levels were more abundant in cervical SCC compared to oropharyngeal SCC suggesting different carcinogenic mechanisms in the two types of HPV-related cancers. PMID:28423662

  2. Planned neck dissection for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Nobuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Terada, Akihiro; Ozawa, Taijiro; Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Kawakita, Daisuke; Maruo, Takashi; Mikami, Shinnji

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the use of chemoradiotherapy for preserving organs in the treatment of head and neck cancer is increasing. However, there is controversy about advanced neck node management in post-chemoradiation cases. We retrospectively analyzed our 119 cases of chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer to examine the effectiveness and indications of planned neck dissection. Regional control rate and survival rate were superior in the neck dissection group. If the cases did not achieve complete response (CR) in imaging, planned neck dissection improved the regional control rate significantly. We should perform planned neck dissection immediately rather than 'wait and see' for this persistent disease. However, in the cases achieving radiological CR, it is possible to omit planned neck dissection because of the high salvage rate of neck disease. However, in these cases, careful observation is essential. We clarified that the presence of pathologically positive lymph node is a prognostic factor. For evaluating persistent disease of cervical lymph nodes, positron emission tomography (PET)-CT was the most accurate method of imaging. (author)

  3. Effects of barium concentration on oropharyngeal swallow timing measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokely, Shauna L; Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2014-02-01

    Videofluoroscopy is commonly used for evaluating oropharyngeal swallowing but requires radiopaque contrast (typically barium). Prior studies suggest that some aspects of swallowing, including timing measures of oral and pharyngeal bolus transit, vary depending on barium concentration. The aim of our study was to identify timing differences in healthy swallowing between "thin" (40 % w/v concentration) and "ultrathin" (22 % w/v concentration) barium solutions. Twenty healthy adults (Ten women; mean age = 31 years) each performed a series of three noncued 5-ml swallows each of ultrathin and thin liquid barium solutions in videofluoroscopy. Timing measures were compared between barium concentrations using a mixed-model ANOVA. The measures of interest were stage transition duration, pharyngeal transit time, and duration of upper esophageal sphincter opening. Significant differences were observed in the timing measures of swallowing with respect to barium concentration. In all cases, longer durations were seen with the higher barium concentration. Barium concentration influences timing parameters in healthy swallowing, even between ultrathin and thin concentrations. Clinicians need to understand and control for the impact of different barium stimuli on swallowing physiology.

  4. Transoral laser resections of oral cavity and oropharyngeal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bolotin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck remains high and ranks tenth in the structure of overall cancer morbidity. Surgical radicality has remained one of the major determinants of the long-term results of treatment so far. In the period December 2014 to January 2016, our clinic performed surgical interventions as transoral laser oral cavity and oropharyngeal resections using carbon dioxide (CO2 laser in 34 patients. Tumors are most commonly located in the area of the tongue root and oropharynx in 16 (47.1 % patients, tongue (its anterior two thirds in 14 (41.2 %, and mouth floor in 4 (11.7 %. The average length of hospital stay after transoral laser resections was 10.14 days. A nasogastric tube was postoperatively placed in 6 (17.6 % patients for 8 to 17 days. According to the results of planned histological examination, surgical interventions were microscopically radical in all cases. Transoral CO2 laser resections make possible to perform rather large radical surgical interventions with a satisfactory functional and cosmetic results, without deteriorating the long-term results of treatment. 

  5. Oropharyngeal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae among Medical Students in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Valencia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae may colonize the upper respiratory tract without causing any symptoms. Medical students may be inhabited by these bacteria and transmit them to patients who were prone to infections. Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance to antibiotics was recently reported. This study was conducted to determine whether there was Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization among Medical Students of the Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran Batch 2011 and analyze its susceptibility patterns towards several antibiotics. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted involving 75 Medical Students of the Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran Batch 2011 that met the selection criteria. After informed consent, oropharyngeal throat swab was taken and further identification was carried out. Once Streptococcus pneumoniae colony was identified, susceptibility testing would be performed. Results: The identification results indicate that 7 students (9% were colonized by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The susceptibility test showed that out of 7 isolates, 2 were resistant to 1 antibiotic, 1 was resistant to 2 antibiotics, and 4 were resistant to 3 antibiotics. Meanwhile, Streptococcus pneumoniae was resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (71%, oxacillin (71%, erythromycin (57%, and levofloxacin (14%. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization is found among medical students. All Streptococcus pneumoniae are resistant to one or more antibiotics, mostly to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and oxacillin.

  6. Recurrence of oropharyngeal carcinoma. A retrospective study of 207 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigauri, Tomohiko; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi [Cancer Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1999-03-01

    Two hundred seven patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo from 1971 to 1994 are presented. The patients were 182 males and 25 females, aged from 31 to 87 years (mean: 61 years). One hundred sixteen patients had carcinoma of the lateral wall (tonsillar region), 60 of the anterior wall (base of tongue), 26 of the superior wall (soft palate) and 5 of the posterior wall. Stage distribution was stage I; 12, stage II: 36, stage III: 64, and stage IV: 95. Of these patients, 121 were treated mainly by irradiation and 30 underwent salvage surgery after the failure of primary radiotherapy. The recurrence rate after primary treatment of this group was 43% and the overall local control rate was 70% (T1: 100%, T2: 78%, T3: 61%, T4: 11%). Treatment of advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma remains controversial. Radiation therapy, in our experience, often failed to achieve local control in advanced cases (stage III/IV). Local control rate of another 86 patients treated mainly by surgery was 74% (T1: 100%, T2: 87%, T3: 73%, T4: 50%). The cause-specific survival rate at 5 years for the 207 patients was 59% (stage I: 89%, II: 82%, III: 73%, IV: 36%). (author)

  7. Management of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Granell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On considering a function-preserving treatment for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer, swallowing is a capital issue. For most of the patients, achieving an effective and safe deglutition will mark the difference between a functional and a dysfunctional outcome. We present an overview of the management of dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients. A brief review on the normal physiology of swallowing is mandatory to analyze next the impact of head and neck cancer and its treatment on the anatomic and functional foundations of deglutition. The approach proposed underlines two leading principles: a transversal one, that is, the multidisciplinary approach, as clinical aspects to be managed in the oncologic patient with oropharyngeal dysphagia are diverse, and a longitudinal one; that is, the concern for preserving a functional swallow permeates the whole process of the diagnosis and treatment, with interventions required at multiple levels. We further discuss the clinical reports of two patients who underwent a supracricoid laryngectomy, a function-preserving surgical technique that particularly disturbs the laryngeal mechanics, and in which swallowing rehabilitation dramatically conditions the functional results.

  8. Utility of the Iodine Overlay Technique and Virtual Nonenhanced Images for the Preoperative T Staging of Colorectal Cancer by Dual-Energy CT with Tin Filter Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsu, Jui-Sheng; Jaw, Twei-Shiun; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Chien-Hung; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lai, Ming-Lai; Liu, Gin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and the potential radiation dose reduction of dual-energy CT (DECT) for tumor (T) staging of colorectal cancer (CRC) using iodine overlay (IO) and virtual nonenhanced (VNE) images. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included 103 consecutive patients who underwent nonenhanced CT and enhanced DECT for preoperative CRC staging. Enhanced weighted-average (WA), IO and VNE images were reconstructed from enhanced 80 kVp and Sn140 kVp scans. Two radiologists assessed image qualities of the true nonenhanced (TNE) and VNE images. For T-staging, another two radiologists independently interpreted all scans in two separate reading sessions: in the first session, only images derived from the single phase DECT acquisition (IO and VNE images) were read. In the second reading session after 30 to 50 (average:42) days, the same assessment was again performed with the TNE and enhanced WA images thereby simulating conventional dual-phase single-energy CT. The tumor node metastasis (TNM) system was used for staging with histopathologic reports as gold standard. Analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. Results The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the tumors and normal reference tissues showed significant correlation between the TNE and VNE images (Poverlay value (48.4 HU±12.2) and enhancement (49.4 HU±11.8) value of CRCs had no significant difference (P = 0.52).The mean image noise on TNE (5.0±1.1) and VNE (5.3±1.1) images were similar (P = 0.07). The quantitative qualities of the VNE images were mildly inferior to the TNE images. Overall accuracy of T-stage CRC when using single-phase acquisition was slightly better than the dual-phase acquisition (90.3% vs 87.4%) (P = 0.51). The mean dose of the single-phase DECT acquisition was 6.2mSv comparing with 14.3mSv of dual-phase. Conclusion Single-phase DECT using IO and VNE images yields a high accuracy in T-staging of CRCs. Thereby, the radiation

  9. Utility of the iodine overlay technique and virtual nonenhanced images for the preoperative T staging of colorectal cancer by dual-energy CT with tin filter technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Yun Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and the potential radiation dose reduction of dual-energy CT (DECT for tumor (T staging of colorectal cancer (CRC using iodine overlay (IO and virtual nonenhanced (VNE images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included 103 consecutive patients who underwent nonenhanced CT and enhanced DECT for preoperative CRC staging. Enhanced weighted-average (WA, IO and VNE images were reconstructed from enhanced 80 kVp and Sn140 kVp scans. Two radiologists assessed image qualities of the true nonenhanced (TNE and VNE images. For T-staging, another two radiologists independently interpreted all scans in two separate reading sessions: in the first session, only images derived from the single phase DECT acquisition (IO and VNE images were read. In the second reading session after 30 to 50 (average:42 days, the same assessment was again performed with the TNE and enhanced WA images thereby simulating conventional dual-phase single-energy CT. The tumor node metastasis (TNM system was used for staging with histopathologic reports as gold standard. Analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs of the tumors and normal reference tissues showed significant correlation between the TNE and VNE images (P<0.01. The mean iodine overlay value (48.4 HU±12.2 and enhancement (49.4 HU±11.8 value of CRCs had no significant difference (P = 0.52.The mean image noise on TNE (5.0±1.1 and VNE (5.3±1.1 images were similar (P = 0.07. The quantitative qualities of the VNE images were mildly inferior to the TNE images. Overall accuracy of T-stage CRC when using single-phase acquisition was slightly better than the dual-phase acquisition (90.3% vs 87.4% (P = 0.51. The mean dose of the single-phase DECT acquisition was 6.2 mSv comparing with 14.3 mSv of dual-phase. CONCLUSION: Single-phase DECT using IO and VNE images yields a high accuracy in T-staging of CRCs

  10. Investigation of the presence of HPV related oropharyngeal and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Jeffrey; Monjane, Leonel; Prasad, Manju; Carrilho, Carla; Judson, Benjamin L

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is endemic in East Africa. Recent, dramatic, increases in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States and Europe are linked to the same high risk HPV genotypes responsible for cervical cancer. Currently, there is extremely limited data regarding the role of HPV in head and neck cancers in Africa. Evidence of HPV as an etiologic agent in head and neck cancers in Africa would have important prevention and treatment implications. A retrospective single institution review of oral tongue and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas diagnosed between 2005 and 2013 was performed. Individual case data for 51 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from the oropharynx (n=22) and oral tongue (n=29) were identified. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded biopsy samples were obtained and evaluated for p16 by immunohistochemistry and HPV genotype 16 specific oncogenes, E6 and E7, by PCR. All of the positive controls, but none of the oropharyngeal samples stained positively for p16. Two of the oral tongue samples stained positive for p16. None of the oropharyngeal or oral tongue cases demonstrated PCR products for HPV-16 E6 or E7. Though Mozambique has extremely high levels of HPV positive cervical cancer this study demonstrates an absence of HPV positive oropharyngeal or oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma within biopsy samples from a single referral hospital in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Clinical outcome and health-related quality-of-life following microsurgical reconstruction in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Hayder, Shems; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Charabi, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    L in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer following free flap reconstruction. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records and self-administered HRQoL questionnaires, EORTC QLQ-C30, and -H&N35. All patients who underwent surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer followed by primary reconstruction...

  12. MR imaging of urinary bladder cancer for T-staging: a review and a pictorial essay of diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Shigeru; Naiki, Taku; Kawai, Noriyasu; Kohri, Kenjiro; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2013-12-01

    Treatment decisions for bladder cancer patients are mainly based on the depth of bladder wall invasion by the tumor. In this article, we review the conventional MRI and exhibit a recently emerged diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of urinary bladder cancer for T-staging. We discuss limitations of conventional MRI, scanning protocols of DWI, normal pelvic findings on DWI, determination of T-stage using DWI, and pitfalls of DWI. DWI provides high contrast between bladder cancer and background tissue because the cancer shows markedly high SI. DWI has high sensitivity for detecting the stalk seen in stage Ta or T1. An inflammatory change or fibrosis surrounding the tumor mimics the invasion of bladder cancer on T2-weighted imaging or enhanced MRI and could lead to over-staging, but DWI could differentiate them clearly because these benign changes do not show high SI on DWI. DWI is also useful for detecting ureteral, urethral, and prostatic extension by means of the urethra. DWI provides more accurate information on the extent of bladder cancer and contributes to determination of the treatment strategy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer O.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968–2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993–2012, APC = 1.9%, pSingapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  14. Strategy for personalized treatment of human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kano, Satoshi; Sakashita, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Seigo; Homma, Akihiro; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the association between tumor HPV status and the demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 83 patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma at Hokkaido University Hospital, Japan, between 1998 and 2010. The parameters included age, gender, tumor subsite, Tumor-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, and overall survival. HPV status was established by multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis. Of the 83 oropharyngeal cancers, 22 were positive for HPV-16, two for HPV-18, and one for HPV-35 and HPV-58. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed improved overall survival rates in patients with HPV-positive tumors (p=0.0024) compared with HPV-negative tumors. Of the 51 patients who received chemoradiotherapy, HPV-positive patients experienced better overall survival than HPV-negative patients (p=0.0024). HPV status is a significantly favorable prognostic factor in oropharyngeal cancer in Japan. (author)

  15. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  16. Confronting human papilloma virus/oropharyngeal cancer: a model for interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative practice model related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancer highlights the role of the dental hygienist in addressing this condition. The incidence of HPV associated head and neck cancer is rising. Multiple professionals including the dental hygienist can work collaboratively to confront this growing public health concern. A critical review applies the growth and utilization of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to multi-disciplinary models addressing the human papilloma virus and oropharyngeal cancers. A model related to HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer addresses an oral systemic condition that supports the inclusion of a dental hygienist on collaborative teams addressing prevention, detection, treatment and cure of OPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  18. Affective symptoms in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonschot, Rob J C G; Baijens, Laura W J; Vanbelle, Sophie; van de Kolk, Ilona; Kremer, Bernd; Leue, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Affective disorders are prevalent in different somatic conditions and influence somatic symptom bother and quality of life. Mood and anxiety disorders impact patients' compliance and adherence to treatment. This systematic review summarizes published studies on affective complaints in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) in order to determine the quality of studies concerning any association of OD with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety. A literature search was carried out using electronic databases Embase, Medline, Web-of-science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and Google scholar. Two reviewers made the preselecting cut by screening all articles on title and abstract and independently screened the full texts of this initial set of articles. Methodological quality of the studies that met the inclusion criteria was assessed independently. Twenty-six articles were included in the analysis after full-text screening and by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All studies concluded that symptoms of depression were associated with impaired swallowing function, and 9 out of 12 studies concluded that symptoms of anxiety were associated with functional impairment of swallowing. The reviewers found heterogeneous outcomes and methodological limitations, which prevented data from pooling. Although no meta-analytic conclusions can be drawn, it appears that symptoms of anxiety and depression are common in OD. Caregivers have to be aware of this in order to detect affective comorbidity. Given that affective conditions influence patients' treatment adherence and compliance, integrated care approaches should be advocated in case of comorbidity. Studies on treatment effect are lacking and well-designed prospective research is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost considerations in the treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eric J; Hinni, Michael L; Olsen, Kerry D; Price, Daniel L; Laborde, Rebecca R; Inman, Jared C

    2012-06-01

    To determine the cost of treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP SCCA) with transoral surgery with concomitant neck dissection (TOS), TOS with adjuvant radiation therapy (TOS + RT), TOS with adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (TOS + CRT), and primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Case series. Two tertiary care teaching hospitals. Using the databases of 2 teaching hospitals, patients were identified who had OP SCCA treated with TOS, TOS + RT, TOS + CRT, and primary CRT in 2009 to 2010. Costs were analyzed from an institutional perspective looking at reimbursement. Patients with government payers and patients with private payers in each group were identified, and net revenue data obtained for the 3-month period from diagnosis were calculated and averaged for each group. Cost was defined as the reimbursement for all charges surrounding the 3-month episode of treatment. All revenue associated with inpatient and outpatient care, including pharmacy charges, was included. The mean cost of TOS (private payers/government payers) was $37,435/$15,664 (range, $22,486-$48,746/$13,325-$16,885). The mean cost of TOS + RT (private payers/government payers) was $74,484/$34,343 (range, $72,400-$84,825/$31,565-$40,810). The mean cost of TOS + CRT (private payers/government payers) was $191,780/$53,245 (range, $145,450-$217,220/$49,400-$58,325). The mean cost of CRT (private payers/government payers) was $198,285/$57,429 (range, $168,216-$298,945/$52,900-$59,545). An algorithm of transoral surgical treatment of OP SCCA with adjuvant treatment as indicated by pathology is more cost conscious than an algorithm of treatment of all OP SCCA with CRT.

  20. Racial disparities in being recommended to surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yanqiu; Korte, Jeffrey E

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the impact of race on the likelihood of patients being recommended for surgery after a diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. A total of 68,445 cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer were extracted from the 1988 to 2005 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. County-level rurality data and income data were merged using the US Department of Agriculture Rural-Urban Continuum Codes dataset and US Census Bureau Small Area Income & Poverty Estimates dataset. We used logistic regression analyses to investigate the impact of race on being recommended to surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors. Stratified analyses were further conducted by tumor site and rural/urban status. Recommendation to surgery varied significantly by race, with black patients less likely than white patients to be recommended to surgery for their oral and oropharyngeal cancer. The racial difference in recommendation to surgery varied significantly by age, geography, and tumor subsite. Racial disparities are most evident in lip and buccal cancer from rural areas (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 2.6-7.5); and least evident in oropharyngeal cancer from urban areas (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). The magnitude of the racial disparity is attenuated with increasing age. We observed substantial racial disparities in surgery recommendation for oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Our results suggest the need to improve accessibility to better health care in racial minority groups, particularly in rural areas, and call for individual and institutional efforts to avoid physician bias related to the patient's sociodemographic characteristics in healthcare service. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Knowledge and risk perception of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer among non-medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba; Tutlam, Nhial T

    2016-01-28

    To assess non-medical university students' knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among non-medical students of a private Midwestern university in the United States in May 2012. Questionnaire assessed demographic information and contained 21 previously validated questions regarding knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Knowledge scale was categorized into low and high. Risk level was estimated based on smoking, drinking, and sexual habits. Bivariate associations between continuous and categorical variables were assessed using Pearson correlation and Chi-square tests, respectively. The response rate was 87% (100 out of 115 students approached). Eighty-one percent (81%) had low oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge; and only 2% perceived that their oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer risk was high. Risk perception was negatively correlated with age at sexual debut, r (64) = -0.26, p = 0.037; one-way ANOVA showed a marginally significant association between risk perception and number of sexual partners, F(4, 60) = 2.48, p = 0.05. There was no significant association between knowledge and perception of risk; however, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge was significantly associated with frequency of prevention of STDs (p perception is low among this student population. Since oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer incidence is increasingly shifting towards younger adults, interventions must be tailored to this group in order to improve prevention and control.

  2. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in Greenland in 1994-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus Balslev; Jensen, Ramon Gordon; Garnæs, Emilie

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection. In Gree......Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection....... In Greenland, only girls are included in the mandatory HPV vaccination program....

  3. Fluconazole for ketoconazole-resistant oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, S; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of fluconazole in doses ranging from 50 to 200 mg/day in controlling oropharyngeal candidiasis was retrospectively evaluated in 16 consecutive HIV-1-infected patients. 13 patients received fluconazole due to failure of treatment with ketoconazole, and among these 11 (84%) initially...... showed complete or partial remission of oropharyngeal candidiasis. 3 (27%) of these subsequently developed failure of treatment within a median observation period of 38 days. No major toxicities were observed. Fluconazole appears promising in the therapy of ketoconazole-resistant candidiasis....

  4. Optimizing patient selection for dose escalation techniques using the prostate-specific antigen level, biopsy gleason score, and clinical T-stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Whittington, Richard; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Schultz, Delray; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Richie, Jerome P.; Wein, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Ideal candidates for 3D dose escalation conformal radiation or external beam + implant therapy are identified on the basis of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, biopsy Gleason score, and the 1992 American Joint Commission Cancer (AJCC) clinical T-stage. Methods and Materials: The pathologic findings of 1742 men with clinical stage T1c,2 prostate cancer managed with a radical prostatectomy (RP) between 1990 and 1998 were subjected to a logistic regression multivariable analysis. The endpoints examined included pathologic organ-confined (OC), specimen-confined (SC), and margin (M) or seminal vesicle (SV) positive disease. SC disease was defined as extracapsular extension (ECE) with a negative surgical margin. The clinical factors tested included PSA level, biopsy Gleason score, and the 1992 AJCC clinical T-stage. PSA failure-free (bNED) survival was calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: Significant negative predictors of pathologic OC-disease or positive predictors of M + or SV + disease included a PSA > 10 ng/ml (p + or SV + disease respectively. Conclusions: Patients most likely to derive a survival benefit from the improved local control possible using dose escalation techniques were those who had both a low risk of having occult micrometastatic disease ( + or SV + ) and a reasonable likelihood of remaining disease-free after RP (>50% 5-year bNED). These patients included those having T1c, 2a, PSA > 10-15 ng/ml, and biopsy Gleason ≤6 or T1c, 2a, 2b, PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml, and biopsy Gleason ≤ 7 prostate cancer

  5. Zone-size nonuniformity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET regional textural features predicts survival in patients with oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Keelung (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Fang, Yu-Hua Dean [Chang Gung University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Taiyuan (China); Lee, Li-yu [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Biostatistics Unit, Clinical Trial Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Ching-Han [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan (China); Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2014-10-23

    The question as to whether the regional textural features extracted from PET images predict prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) remains open. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of regional heterogeneity in patients with T3/T4 OPSCC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 88 patients with T3 or T4 OPSCC who had completed primary therapy. Progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were the main outcome measures. In an exploratory analysis, a standardized uptake value of 2.5 (SUV 2.5) was taken as the cut-off value for the detection of tumour boundaries. A fixed threshold at 42 % of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub max} 42 %) and an adaptive threshold method were then used for validation. Regional textural features were extracted from pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images using the grey-level run length encoding method and grey-level size zone matrix. The prognostic significance of PET textural features was examined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Cox regression analysis. Zone-size nonuniformity (ZSNU) was identified as an independent predictor of PFS and DSS. Its prognostic impact was confirmed using both the SUV{sub max} 42 % and the adaptive threshold segmentation methods. Based on (1) total lesion glycolysis, (2) uniformity (a local scale texture parameter), and (3) ZSNU, we devised a prognostic stratification system that allowed the identification of four distinct risk groups. The model combining the three prognostic parameters showed a higher predictive value than each variable alone. ZSNU is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with advanced T-stage OPSCC, and may improve their prognostic stratification. (orig.)

  6. Prognostic impact of HPV-associated p16-expression and smoking status on outcomes following radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: The MARCH-HPV project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Pernille; Lacas, Benjamin; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Trotti, Andy; Zackrisson, Bjorn; Zhang, Qiang; Overgaard, Jens; Blanchard, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Evaluate the prognostic and predictive impact of HPV-associated p16-expression and assess the combined prognostic impact of p16 and smoking on altered fractionated radiotherapy (AFRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) within the frames of the update of the Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH). Patients with OPC, known tumor p16-status and smoking history were identified from the MARCH update, resulting in a dataset of 815 patients from four randomized trials (RTOG9003, DAHANCA6&7, RTOG0129, ARTSCAN). Analysis was performed using a Cox model stratified by trial and adjusted on gender, age, T-stage, N-stage, type of radiotherapy fractionation, p16, smoking. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). In total, 465 patients (57%) had p16-positive tumors and 350 (43%) p16-negative. Compared to p16-negative, p16-positive patients had significantly better PFS (HR = 0.42 [95% CI: 0.34-0.51], 28.9% absolute increase at 10 years) and OS (HR = 0.40 [0.32-0.49], 32.1% absolute increase at 10 years). No interaction between p16-status and fractionation schedule was detected. Smoking negatively impacted outcome; in the p16-positive subgroup, never smokers had significantly better PFS than former/current smokers (HR = 0.49 [0.33-0.75], 24.2% survival benefit at 10 years). No predictive impact of p16-status on response to AFRT could be detected but the strong prognostic impact of p16-status was confirmed and especially p16-positive never smoking patients have superior outcome after RT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A systematic investigation of the association between HPV and the clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengze; Zhang, Hui; Xue, Yang; Wen, Jiao; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Xinjie; Wei, Jianhua

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the causal factor of cervical cancers, was closely linked to the etiology and prognosis of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), but its role in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was unclear. In addition, few researches based on Chinese population were documented. Hence, we sought to investigate the relationship of HPV marker P16 protein to the clinicopathological parameters and survival of OPSCC and OSCC patients systematically to assess the influence of ethnic, regional difference on HPV susceptibility. Specimens from 93 OPSCC patients and 95 OSCC patients were recut, and P16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed. Moreover, survival analysis was conducted to confirm the independent factors that influenced the prognosis. The P16 results were positive in 25.8% and 9.5% of patients with OPSCC and OSCC, respectively. The overall survival (OS) of HPV-positive OPSCC patients was significantly longer than that of HPV-negative OPSCC patients (P = 0.004). Conversely, statistical significance was not observed regarding the OS of OSCC patients (P = 0.343). Cox regression analysis indicated that T stage and P16 status were independent factors that affected the prognosis of OPSCC patients, and the smoking index influenced the prognosis of OSCC patients. Among OPSCC patients who received radiochemotherapy (RCT), HPV-positive patients had a better survival rate than their HPV-negative counterparts (P = 0.015). Conversely, no significant difference was observed between HPV-positive and HPV-negative OSCC patients who received RCT (P = 0.237). P16 is a credible surrogate by which to define HPV status. HPV expression had a favorable effect on OPSCC patients as opposed to their OSCC counterparts in this single center population-based study. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Different clinical utility of oropharyngeal bacterial screening prior to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in oncological and neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Radek; Jurankova, Jana; Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66-41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08-18.76). During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  9. Differences in survival outcome between oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma in relation to HPV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kenneth; Killingsworth, Murray; Matthews, Slade; Caixeiro, Nicole; Evangelista, Carlyn; Wu, Xiao; Wykes, James; Samakeh, Alan; Forstner, Dion; Niles, Navin; Hong, Angela; Lee, Cheok Soon

    2017-09-01

    This study examined the prognostic significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) in patients with oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Tissue microarrays were constructed from oropharyngeal and oral cavity SCC (n = 143). The presence of functional HPV in tumour was determined by combined assessments of p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridisation. Oropharyngeal SCC patients presented with more advanced disease in comparison with oral cavity SCC patients (P = 0.001). HPV is present in 60% and 61% of oropharyngeal and oral cavity SCC patients, respectively. HPV-positive oropharyngeal SCC patients with advanced TNM stages displayed better overall and disease-free survival outcomes than HPV-negative patients (P = 0.022 and 0.046, respectively). Such survival differences were not observed in oral cavity SCC. HPV is common in both oropharyngeal and oral cavity SCC and is associated with better survival outcome in oropharyngeal SCC but not in oral cavity SCC patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Kroupa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG. Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274, dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001. Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9% of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76. Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76. Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  11. MALNUTRITION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van Oort, Rob P.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Background. This study assessed whether malnourished patients score lower on quality of life after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Methods. Malnutrition (weight loss >= 10% in 6 months/>= 5% in 1 month) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality

  12. No evidence for active human papillomavirus (HPV) in fields surrounding HPV-positive oropharyngeal tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.M.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Moukhtari, N.; Bloemena, E.; Brink, A.; Sie, D.; Ylstra, B.; Baatenburg de Jong, R.J.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Leemans, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) have a better prognosis than patients with HPV-negative OPSCCs. Important factors contributing to this better prognosis are relatively low numbers of local/regional recurrences (LRRs) and

  13. Management of locally advanced HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: where are we?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samuels, S.E.; Eisbruch, A.; Beitler, J.J.; Corry, J.; Bradford, C.R.; Saba, N.F.; Brekel, M.W. van den; Smee, R.; Strojan, P.; Suarez, C.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Takes, R.P.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz, M., Jr.; Rapidis, A.D.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2016-01-01

    HPV-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) has a better prognosis compared to HPV unrelated (HPV-) OPC. This review summarizes and discusses several of the controversies regarding the management of HPV+ OPC, including the mechanism of its treatment sensitivity, modern surgical techniques,

  14. Chronic Inflammation-Related HPV: A Driving Force Speeds Oropharyngeal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC has been known to be a highly aggressive disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV infection. To investigate the relationship between HPV and chronic inflammation in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, we collected 140 oral mucous fresh specimens including 50 OPSCC patients, 50 cancer in situ, 30 precancerous lesions, and 10 normal oral mucous. Our data demonstrated that there was a significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation in dysplastic epithelia in comparison with that in normal tissues (P<0.001. The positive rate of HPV 16 was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from mild to severe inflammation (P<0.05. The positive rate of HPV 16 was progressively improved with the malignant progression of oral mucous (P<0.05. In addition, CD11b+ LIN- HLA-DR-CD33+ MDSCs were a critical cell population that mediates inflammation response and immune suppression in HPV-positive OPSCC. These indicated that persistent chronic inflammation-related HPV infection might drive oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and MDSCs might pay an important role during this process. Thus, a combination of HPV infection and inflammation expression might become a helpful biomedical marker to predict oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

  15. IPSILATERAL IRRADIATION FOR ORAL AND OROPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA TREATED WITH PRIMARY SURGERY AND POSTOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, Marije R.; Doornaert, Patricia A. H.; Jonkman, Anja; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M.; van den Ende, Piet L. A.; de Jong, Martin A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Slotman, Ben J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the contralateral nodal control (CLNC) in postoperative patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with ipsilateral irradiation of the neck and primary site. Late radiation-induced morbidity was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: The study included

  16. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  17. Long-Term Results of External Upper Esophageal Sphincter Myotomy for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.P.; David, E.F.; Knol, E.C.; Mahieu, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy of external myotomy of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) for oropharyngeal dysphagia. In the period 1991-2006, 28 patients with longstanding dysphagia and/or aspiration problems of different etiologies underwent UES myotomy as a single surgical

  18. Molecular characterization of p16-immunopositive but HPV DNA-negative oropharyngeal carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Beekzada, D.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Brink, A.; Heideman, D.A.M.; Hesselink, A.T.; Witte, B.I.; Bloemena, E.; Baatenburg-de Jong, R.J.; Leemans, C.R.; Brakenhoff, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that p16 protein overexpression qualifies as a surrogate marker identifying an oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). However, there is still a percentage of OPSCCs that are positive for p16 immunohistochemistry

  19. Radial forearm flap : eight years experience with oral and oropharyngeal reconstructions - donor and acceptor site morbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Vermey, A; Robinson, PH; Lichtendahl, DHE; Roodenburg, JLN

    The success rate of 56 free radial forearm flaps used between 1987 and 1995 in the University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands for oral and oropharyngeal reconstructions in cancer patients, was evaluated. There were 36 men and 20 women. The most prevalent neoplasm was squamous cell carcinoma

  20. A nationwide study of the epidemiology, treatment and survival of oropharyngeal carcinoma in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mak-Kregar (S.); F.J.M. Hilgers; P.C. Levendag (Peter); H. Manni (Hans); H. Lubsen (Herman); J.L.N. Roodenburg; J.M.H. van der Beek (Johan); A.G.L. van der Meij (A. G L)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSeven head and neck oncology cooperative groups in the Netherlands have reviewed the epidemiology, staging, treatment and survival of oropharyngeal carcinoma patients treated between 1986 and 1990. In all, 640 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (628, 98%) or undifferentiated carcinoma

  1. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia and Its Nutritional and Respiratory Complications in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Rofes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a major complaint among older people. Dysphagia may cause two types of complications in these patients: (a a decrease in the efficacy of deglutition leading to malnutrition and dehydration, (b a decrease in deglutition safety, leading to tracheobronchial aspiration which results in aspiration pneumonia and can lead to death. Clinical screening methods should be used to identify older people with oropharyngeal dysphagia and to identify those patients who are at risk of aspiration. Videofluoroscopy (VFS is the gold standard to study the oral and pharyngeal mechanisms of dysphagia in older patients. Up to 30% of older patients with dysphagia present aspiration—half of them without cough, and 45%, oropharyngeal residue; and 55% older patients with dysphagia are at risk of malnutrition. Treatment with dietetic changes in bolus volume and viscosity, as well as rehabilitation procedures can improve deglutition and prevent nutritional and respiratory complications in older patients. Diagnosis and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia need a multidisciplinary approach.

  3. Cine MRI of swallowing in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Rasch, Coen R N; Muller, Sara H; Pameijer, Frank A; Hallo, Eeke; Balm, Alfons J M

    2012-06-01

    Treatment of oral and oropharyngeal cancer may cause dysphagia. Purpose is to examine whether cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields additional information compared to standard examination in the evaluation of posttreatment dysphagia and mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures. Thirty-four cine MRIs were made in 23 patients with advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer, consisting of an MR image every 800 ms during swallowing which is compared to videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires. A scoring system was applied to assess mobility on cine MR and videofluoroscopy leading to a score ranging from 9 to 17. Cine MRI of the swallowing in a midsagittal plane visualized the tumor (if located in the same plane), important anatomic structures and surgical reconstructions. Posttreatment mobility on cine MRI and videofluoroscopy was significantly diminished compared to pretreatment, mean pretreatment cine MRI score was 10.8 and posttreatment 12.4 (p = 0.017). Impaired mobility on cine MRI was significantly correlated to more swallowing problems (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.73, p = 0.04), on videofluoroscopy not. Cine MRI is a promising new technique as an adjunct to standard examinations for evaluation of swallowing in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Cine MRI directly visualizes the dynamics of swallowing and allows evaluation of pre- and posttreatment differences. Abnormal findings are significantly correlated with subjective swallowing complaints of patients.

  4. Immune cells and prognosis in HPV-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Camelia Nami; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Dalianis, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Currently, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) are treated based on the traditional TNM-classification, although this scheme might be inadequate for the subgroup of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated OPSCCs. It remains debatable whether this subgroup of patients with favorable progn...

  5. Artificial neural network analysis to assess hypernasality in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke; ten Bosch, Louis; Kuik, Dirk J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Investigation of applicability of neural network feature analysis of nasalance in speech to assess hypernasality in speech of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Patients and methods. Speech recordings of 51 patients and of 18 control speakers were evaluated regarding

  6. Design and fungicidal activity of mucoadhesive lactoferrin tablets for the treatment of oropharyngeal candidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Mirjam E.; Heegsma, Janette; Bakker, Hester I.; Meijer, Dirk; Swart, Pieter J.; Frijlink, Erik W.; Eissens, Anko; de Vries - Hospers, Hillechiena; Van Den Berg, Jeroen J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a potential drug candidate for the treatment of oropharyngeal Candida infections. However, for an effective therapeutic treatment an appropriate dosage form is required. Therefore a mucoadhesive tablet for buccal application was developed. Tablets of sufficient strength could be

  7. HPV vaccination to prevent oropharyngeal carcinoma: What can be learned from anogenital vaccination programs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takes, R.P.; Wierzbicka, M.; D'Souza, G.; Jackowska, J.; Silver, C.E.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Dikkers, F.G.; Olsen, K.D.; Rinaldo, A.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Ferlito, A.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are well known causes of anogenital cancers. Recent studies show that HPV also plays a role in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). A review on the role of HPV vaccination in the prevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with special emphasis on OPC was

  8. HPV vaccination to prevent oropharyngeal carcinoma : What can be learned from anogenital vaccination programs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takes, Robert P.; Wierzbicka, Malgorzata; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Jackowska, Joanna; Silver, Carl E.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Olsen, Kerry D.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Brakenhoff, Ruud H.; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are well known causes of anogenital cancers. Recent studies show that HPV also plays a role in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). A review on the role of HPV vaccination in the prevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with special emphasis on OPC was

  9. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaan Bloem; Johanna Kalf; Marten Munneke; Bert de Swart

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers

  10. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers

  11. A therapeutic maneuver for oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Nilton Felix

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients. METHOD: Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson's disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. RESULTS: The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41. A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: The effortful swallow maneuver reinforced by using biofeedback appears to be a therapeutic resource in the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson's disease patients.

  12. Human Papillomavirus and Rising Oropharyngeal Cancer Incidence in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Engels, Eric A.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Xiao, Weihong; Kim, Esther; Jiang, Bo; Goodman, Marc T.; Sibug-Saber, Maria; Cozen, Wendy; Liu, Lihua; Lynch, Charles F.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Jordan, Richard C.; Altekruse, Sean; Anderson, William F.; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Gillison, Maura L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Recent increases in incidence and survival of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States have been attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, but empirical evidence is lacking. Patients and Methods HPV status was determined for all 271 oropharyngeal cancers (1984-2004) collected by the three population-based cancer registries in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Residual Tissue Repositories Program by using polymerase chain reaction and genotyping (Inno-LiPA), HPV16 viral load, and HPV16 mRNA expression. Trends in HPV prevalence across four calendar periods were estimated by using logistic regression. Observed HPV prevalence was reweighted to all oropharyngeal cancers within the cancer registries to account for nonrandom selection and to calculate incidence trends. Survival of HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients was compared by using Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analyses. Results HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal cancers significantly increased over calendar time regardless of HPV detection assay (P trend < .05). For example, HPV prevalence by Inno-LiPA increased from 16.3% during 1984 to 1989 to 71.7% during 2000 to 2004. Median survival was significantly longer for HPV-positive than for HPV-negative patients (131 v 20 months; log-rank P < .001; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.46). Survival significantly increased across calendar periods for HPV-positive (P = .003) but not for HPV-negative patients (P = .18). Population-level incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers increased by 225% (95% CI, 208% to 242%) from 1988 to 2004 (from 0.8 per 100,000 to 2.6 per 100,000), and incidence for HPV-negative cancers declined by 50% (95% CI, 47% to 53%; from 2.0 per 100,000 to 1.0 per 100,000). If recent incidence trends continue, the annual number of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers is expected to surpass the annual number of cervical cancers by the year 2020. Conclusion Increases in the

  13. Routine endoscopy for esophageal cancer is suggestive for patients with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Han Hung

    Full Text Available This study attempted to reveal the incidence and risk of synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancer in subjects with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer based on a population-wide database in Taiwan.We retrieved data for this cross-sectional study from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. The study group included 2,965 subjects who had received their first-time diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer in 2002∼2009. We assigned the date of their first diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer as the index date. We also randomly retrieved 29,650 comparison subjects matched with the study subjects in terms of gender and age group. We assigned their first medical utilization that occurred in the index year as the index date for the comparison group. We further performed a conditional logistic regression to investigate the association between esophageal cancer and oral cancer.Results showed that prevalences of esophageal cancer within 3 months before and after the index date were respectively 2.19% and 0.04% for the study and comparison groups. A conditional logistic regression revealed that the odds ratio (OR of esophageal cancer for subjects with oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 55.33 (95% confidence interval (CI: 29.86∼102.52 compared to comparison subjects. Furthermore, compared to comparison subjects, ORs for esophageal cancer were respectively 18.41 (95% CI: 8.50-39.85, 40.49 (95% CI: 15.11∼108.64, and 240.96 (95% CI: 125.49-462.69 for study subjects with a malignancy of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx.We concluded that there were relatively high chances for synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancers being detected through panendoscopy in patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancers. The routine use of panendoscopy in such patients should be encouraged with a higher priority.

  14. Nitric oxide formation in the oropharyngeal tract: possible influence of cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteus, H; Mavropoulos, A; Palm, J P; Ulfgren, A-K; Bergström, J; Alving, K

    2004-11-01

    Cigarette smoking reduces the level of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled air by an unknown mechanism. The view that part of the effect of cigarette smoking on NO production should occur in the oropharyngeal tract is supported by several studies. We have therefore compared smokers and non-smokers regarding non-enzymatic formation of NO from nitrite in the oral cavity since this is a primary candidate target for cigarette smoke. We have also looked at NO synthase-dependent NO formation in the mucosa of the oropharyngeal tract as an alternative target for the inhibitory effect induced by cigarette smoke. Smokers exhaled 67% lower levels of NO than controls (pnitrite, nitrate or ascorbate between smokers and non-smokers. Mouthwash with the antibacterial agent chlorhexidine reduced salivary nitrite (-65%) and exhaled NO levels (-10%) similarly in the two groups. Immunohistochemical techniques revealed dense expression of inducible (but not endothelial or neuronal) NO synthase in the squamous epithelium of non-inflamed tonsillar and gingival tissue biopsies. In the same biopsies, significant Ca2+ -independent citrulline-forming activity was detected. We found no difference between smoking and non-smoking subjects regarding NO-synthase expression and in vitro activity. In another group of non-smoking subjects (n=10), spraying the oropharyngeal tract with the NO-synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (250 mg) significantly reduced exhaled NO levels for at least 30 min (-18%, pnitrite in saliva. However, NO is also formed by inducible NO synthase in the squamous epithelium of the normal oropharyngeal tract. We suggest that cigarette smoking may down-regulate enzymatic NO formation in the oropharyngeal compartment as well as in the bronchial compartment.

  15. Development and validation of a staging system for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer by the International Collaboration on Oropharyngeal cancer Network for Staging (ICON-S): a multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Brian; Huang, Shao Hui; Su, Jie; Garden, Adam S; Sturgis, Erich M; Dahlstrom, Kristina; Lee, Nancy; Riaz, Nadeem; Pei, Xin; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Adelstein, David; Burkey, Brian B; Friborg, Jeppe; Kristensen, Claus A; Gothelf, Anita B; Hoebers, Frank; Kremer, Bernd; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Bowles, Daniel W; Raben, David; Karam, Sana D; Yu, Eugene; Xu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer is a rapidly emerging disease with generally good prognosis. Many prognostic algorithms for oropharyngeal cancer incorporate HPV status as a stratification factor, rather than recognising the uniqueness of HPV+ disease. The International Collaboration on Oropharyngeal cancer Network for Staging (ICON-S) aimed to develop a TNM classification specific to HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer. The ICON-S study included patients with non-metastatic oropharyngeal cancer from seven cancer centres located across Europe and North America; one centre comprised the training cohort and six formed the validation cohorts. We ascertained patients' HPV status with p16 staining or in-situ hybridisation. We compared overall survival at 5 years between training and validation cohorts according to 7th edition TNM classifications and HPV status. We used recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) modelling methods to derive new staging classifications for HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer. Recent hypotheses concerning the effect of lower neck lymph nodes and number of lymph nodes were also investigated in an exploratory training cohort to assess relevance within the ICON-S classification. Of 1907 patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer, 661 (35%) were recruited at the training centre and 1246 (65%) were enrolled at the validation centres. 5-year overall survival was similar for 7th edition TNM stage I, II, III, and IVA (respectively; 88% [95% CI 74-100]; 82% [71-95]; 84% [79-89]; and 81% [79-83]; global p=0·25) but was lower for stage IVB (60% [53-68]; pHPV+ oropharyngeal cancer is suitable for the 8th edition of the Union for International Cancer Control/American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM classification. Future work is needed to ascertain whether T and N categories should be further refined and whether non-anatomical factors might augment the full classification. None. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Testing and Evaluation of the IMPACT Instrumentation, Inc. 3O8ME13 Continous Oropharyngeal/Tracheal Suction Apparatus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blake, Butch

    1998-01-01

    The IMPACT Instrumentation, Inc., Continous Oropharyngeal Tracheal Suction, model 308ME13 is a portable self contained, general purpose, medical suction apparatus designed for removing secretions from the upper airway...

  17. Human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer: HPV and p16 status in the recurrent versus parent tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey; McHugh, Jonathan B; Spector, Matthew E; Walline, Heather M; Komarck, Christine M; Stenmark, Matthew H; Prince, Mark E; Worden, Francis P; Wolf, Gregory T; Bradford, Carol R; Chepeha, Douglas B; Carey, Thomas; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    Although typically associated with a favorable prognosis, a minority of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related (+) oropharyngeal cancers recur after chemoradiation. We postulated that a minor HPV-negative tumor subfraction may be responsible for recurrences of HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer. Paired untreated primary and recurrent tumor specimens were identified for 37 patients with oropharyngeal cancer who received definitive chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Concordance in HPV/p16 expression between primary and recurrent tumors was assessed. Among 31 patients with HPV+/p16+ primary tumors, 30 (97%) retained evidence of both HPV and p16 expression at recurrence (27 HPV+/p16+; 3 HPV+/p16-partial). One (3%) initially HPV+/p16+ patient developed an HPV-negative/p16-negative lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), representing either a discordant oropharyngeal cancer metastasis or second primary tumor. HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers retain HPV+/p16+ expression at recurrence. Our results fail to provide evidence that a minor HPV-negative tumor subfraction is responsible for biologically aggressive behavior of HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer that recurs after chemoradiation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Study Of The Effects Of Illness Experienced By Families Of Oral And Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalaxmi A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the various areas and burden a family experiences due to presence of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patient. Objectives: 1. To identify the family burden like financial burden, disruption of routine activities and family leisure etc. 2. To study the severity of family burden experienced by the families of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Study design: Case- control. Setting: Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (G.C.R.I, Ahmedabad. Participants: 100 cases belonging to the diagnostic categories no. 140-46 of ICD â€"9 and 100 controls belonging to the diagnostic categories other than no. 140-46 of ICD-9 Statistical analysis: Proportions, Chi-square test and Z test. Results: Financial burden was observed in 36% of cases and 43% of controls had burden on the family. Out of 43% respondents reporting any burden, 36(83.72% were identified with severe burden.

  19. Oropharyngeal cancer and human papilloma virus: evolving diagnostic and management paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Lisa; Gupta, Ruta; Ashford, Bruce; Jabbour, Joe; Clark, Jonathan R

    2016-06-01

    The significant increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) over recent years has lead to a surge in research and an improved understanding of the disease. Most patients with HPV-associated OPC present with cystic nodal metastases with a small primary tumour, and respond well to all treatment modalities including primary surgery and primary chemoradiotherapy. Current research is evaluating treatment de-escalation to reduce long-term treatment-associated morbidities. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is particularly relevant as the transoral approach allows small primary tumours to be removed with lower morbidity than traditional surgical approaches. The current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for oropharyngeal cancer does not appropriately stratify HPV-associated OPC; hence, alternative risk stratification and staging classifications are being proposed. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Use of Lugol's iodine in the resection of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Jeremy; Devine, John C; McCaul, James A; McLellan, Douglas R; Farrow, Adrian

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the use of Lugol's iodine in achieving surgical margins free from dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and invasive carcinoma by an observational study of two series of 50 consecutive patients having resection of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) between November 2004 and March 2007. The standard group had resection of the primary tumour with a macroscopic 1cm margin and removal of adjacent visibly abnormal mucosa. The Lugol's iodine group had identical treatment with resection of any adjacent mucosa that did not stain after the application of Lugol's iodine (where this was feasible). In the standard group 16 patients (32%) had dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, or invasive SCC at a surgical margin. In the Lugol's iodine group two patients (4%) had dysplasia or carcinoma in situ; none had invasive SCC. Lugol's iodine is a simple, inexpensive, and apparently effective means of reducing the likelihood of unsatisfactory surgical margins in the resection of oral and oropharyngeal SCC.

  1. Screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in older adults: A systematic review of self-reported questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães Junior, Hipólito V; Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Lima, Kenio C; Ferreira, Maria Angela F

    2018-04-03

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a swallowing disorder with signs and symptoms which may be present in older adults, but they are rarely noticed as a health concern by older people. The earliest possible identification of this clinical condition is needed by self-reported population-based screening questionnaire, which are valid and reliable for preventing risks to nutritional status, increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this systematic review was to identify self-reported screening questionnaires for oropharyngeal dysphagia in older adults to evaluate their methodological quality for population-based studies. An extensive search of electronic databases (PubMed (MEDLINE), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science (WOS), PsycINFO (APA), Lilacs and Scielo) was conducted in the period from April to May 2017 using previously established search strategies by the two evaluators. The methodological quality and the psychometric properties of the included studies were evaluated by the COSMIN (Consensus based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments) checklist and the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues, respectively. The analysed information was extracted from three articles which had conducted studies on the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia by self-reported screening questionnaires, showing poor methodological quality and flaws in the methodological description to demonstrate its psychometric properties. This study did not find any self-reported screening questionnaires for oropharyngeal dysphagia with suitable methodological quality and appropriate evidence in its psychometric properties for elders. Therefore, the self-reported questionnaires within the diagnostic proposal require greater details in its process for obtaining valid and reliable evidence. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus and Metformin on Distant Metastases in Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zumsteg, Zachary S., E-mail: zachary.zumsteg@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Rivera, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Skinner, Heath D. [Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Osborne, Joseph R. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Local control in oropharyngeal cancer has improved to unprecedented rates with combined modality therapy; as a result, distant metastases are becoming a principal challenge. We aimed to determine the impact of diabetes mellitus and metformin use on clinical outcomes in a large population of oropharyngeal cancer patients treated in the modern era. Methods and Materials: We identified 1745 consecutive patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated at 2 large cancer centers with external beam radiation therapy from 1998 to 2011. A total of 184 patients had diabetes mellitus at the time of diagnosis, of whom 102 were taking metformin. The outcomes assessed included local failure-free survival (LFFS), regional failure-free survival (RFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS were 89.6% for nondiabetic patients and 78.7% for diabetic nonmetformin users (P=.011) and of OS were 83.0% for nondiabetic patients and 70.7% for diabetic nonmetformin users (P=.048). Diabetic metformin users had 5-year DMFS (90.1%) and OS (89.6%) similar to those of nondiabetic patients. Multivariate analysis (diabetic nonmetformin users as reference) demonstrated improved DMFS for nondiabetic patients (adjusted hazard ratio 0.54; 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.93; P=.03) and a trend toward improved DMFS with metformin use (adjusted hazard ratio 0.46; 95% confidence interval 0.20-1.04; P=.06). LFFS and RFFS were high in all groups and were not significantly different by diabetic status or metformin use. Conclusions: Diabetic patients not using metformin independently have significantly higher rates of distant metastases than do nondiabetic patients, whereas metformin users have rates of distant metastases similar to those of nondiabetic patients. Further prospective investigation is warranted to validate the benefit of metformin in oropharyngeal cancer.

  3. The oropharyngeal morphology in the semiaquatic giant Asian pond turtle, Heosemys grandis, and its evolutionary implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Lintner

    Full Text Available The oropharynx as a functional entity plays a fundamental role in feeding. Transitions from aquatic to terrestrial lifestyles in vertebrates demanded major changes of the oropharynx for the required adaptations to a different feeding environment. Extant turtles evolved terrestrial feeding modes in three families (testudinids, emydids, geoemydids-independently from other amniotes-and are therefore important model organisms to reconstruct morpho-functional changes behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions. In this study we hypothesized that the oropharyngeal morphology in semiaquatic turtles of the geoemydid family shows parallels to testudinids, the only purely terrestrial extant lineage. We provide an in-depth description of the oropharynx in the semiaquatic geoemydid Heosemys grandis by using a combination of micro computed tomography (micro-CT and subsequent digital in situ 3-D reconstruction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and histology. We show that H. grandis has a large tongue with rough papillose surface and well-developed lingual muscles. The attachment sites of the lingual muscles on the hyolingual skeleton and their courses within the tongue are nearly identical with testudinids. The hyolingual skeleton itself is mainly cartilaginous and shows distinct-but compared to testudinids rather small-anterior extensions of the hyoid body and hypoglossum. Oral glands are well developed in H. grandis but are smaller and simpler than in testudinids. Similarly, oropharyngeal keratinization was minimal and found only in the anterior palate, regions close to the beak, and tongue tip. We conclude that H. grandis shows distinct oropharyngeal morpho-functional adaptations for a terrestrial lifestyle but still retains characters typical for aquatic forms. This makes this species an important example showing the oropharyngeal adaptations behind aquatic-terrestrial transitions in turtles.

  4. Quality of life in survivors of squamous cell carcinoma of oral and oropharyngeal patients in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.U.; Farrukh, M.S.; Begum, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate quality of life (QOL) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oral and oropharyngeal region. Methodology: This is prospective longitudinal study was conducted at ENT department Dow University Hospital and Radiotherapy Department KIRAN from November 2012 to November 2015. It included 56 patients of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of oral cavity and oropharynx regions who had completed cancer treatment (Wide local excision +/-Neck dissection +/- Radiotherapy). UW QOL questionnaire is taken as the tool to analyze the quality improvement in the domains of pain, appearance, activity, recreation, swallowing, chewing, speech, shoulder, taste, saliva, mood and anxiety. Comparative analysis used to assess all 12 factors associated with cancer patients. A paired t-test was used to compare preoperative and 6 months or more post-operative QOL rating. Results: Six months or more after surgery, 13 patients were lost to follow up and 9 died. 34 patients completed the UW QOL. Cancer Survivors presented overall significantly poorer QOL. QOL improved in the domains of activity, shoulder pain, mood and anxiety. Conclusion: This study recommend Quality of life assessment of oral and oropharyngeal cancers which may contribute to functional, psychological and somatic limitations and likely alter the treatment methodology where cure of cancer is equally good for any modality. This study also identifies that cases of early cancer of oral and oropharyngeal region would not compromise QOL of the patients significantly. (author)

  5. Predictive models of objective oropharyngeal OSA surgery outcomes: Success rate and AHI reduction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Ho; Lee, Jae Yong; Cha, Jaehyung; Kim, Kangwoo; Hong, Seung-No; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model of objective oropharyngeal obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) surgery outcomes including success rate and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) reduction ratio in adult OSA patients. Retrospective outcome research. All subjects with OSA who underwent oropharyngeal and/or nasal surgery and were followed for at least 3 months were enrolled in this study. Demographic, anatomical [tonsil size (TS) and palate-tongue position (PTP) grade (Gr)], and polysomnographic parameters were analyzed. The AHI reduction ratio (%) was defined as [(postoperative AHI-preoperative AHI) x 100 / postoperative AHI], and surgical success was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in preoperative AHI with a postoperative AHI predictive equation by Forward Selection likelihood ratio (LR) logistic regression analysis was: [Formula: see text]The best predictive equation according to stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was: [Formula: see text] (TS/PTP Gr = 1 if TS/PTP Gr 3 or 4, TS/PTP Gr = 0 if TS/PTP Gr 1 or 2). The predictive models for oropharyngeal surgery described in this study may be useful for planning surgical treatments and improving objective outcomes in adult OSA patients.

  6. Impact of County-Level Socioeconomic Status on Oropharyngeal Cancer Survival in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megwalu, Uchechukwu C

    2017-04-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of county-level socioeconomic status on survival in patients with oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Study Design Retrospective cohort study via a large population-based cancer database. Methods Data were extracted from the SEER 18 database (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) of the National Cancer Institute. The study cohort included 18,791 patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 2004 and 2012. Results Patients residing in counties with a low socioeconomic status index had worse overall survival (56.5% vs 63.0%, P socioeconomic status index. On multivariable analysis, residing in a county with a low socioeconomic status index was associated with worse overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14-1.29; P status, year of diagnosis, site, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage group, presence of distant metastasis, presence of unresectable tumor, histologic grade, surgical resection of primary site, treatment with neck dissection, and radiation therapy. Conclusion Residing in a county with a low socioeconomic status index is associated with worse survival. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanism by which socioeconomic status affects survival in oropharyngeal cancer.

  7. Pathophysiology, relevance and natural history of oropharyngeal dysphagia among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavé, Pere; Rofes, Laia; Carrión, Silvia; Ortega, Omar; Cabré, Mateu; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Arreola, Viridiana

    2012-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a very frequent condition among older people with a prevalence ranging from mild symptoms in 25% of the independently living to severe symptoms in more than 50% living in nursing homes. There are several validated methods of screening, and clinical assessment and videofluoroscopy are the gold standard for the study of the mechanisms of OD in the elderly. Oropharyngeal residue is mainly caused by weak bolus propulsion forces due to tongue sarcopenia. The neural elements of swallow response are also impaired in older persons, with prolonged and delayed laryngeal vestibule closure and slow hyoid movement causing oropharyngeal aspirations. OD causes malnutrition, dehydration, impaired quality of life, lower respiratory tract infections, aspiration pneumonia, and poor prognosis including prolonged hospital stay and enhanced morbidity and mortality in several phenotypes of older patients ranging from independently living older people, hospitalized older patients and nursing home residents. Enhancing bolus viscosity of fluids greatly improves safety of swallow in all these patients. We believe OD should be recognized as a major geriatric syndrome, and we recommend a policy of systematic and universal screening and assessment of OD among older people to prevent its severe complications. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Quality-of-life scores compared to objective measures of swallowing after oropharyngeal chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Katherine A; Kosek, Steven R; Tanner, Kristine

    2014-03-01

    To compare objective measures of swallowing function with patient reports of swallowing-related quality of life 1 year after treatment of oropharyngeal cancer with chemoradiation therapy. Patients seen for follow-up at least 1 year after treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma with chemoradiation therapy were sequentially approached and asked to participate in the study. Maximum pharyngeal constriction, hyoid elevation, upper esophageal sphincter opening size, and bolus pharyngeal transit time were measured from modified barium swallowing studies in a group of 31 patients at least 1 year after chemoradiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Measures were made for a liquid 1-mL, 3-mL, and 20-mL bolus. Objective measure results were compared to scores from the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and The University of Washington Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire results from the same patients. No strong correlation was identified between any of the objective measures of swallowing physiology and quality-of-life scores. Patient perception of the impact of swallowing function on quality of life does not correlate well with actual physiologic functioning. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. PIK3CA, HRAS and PTEN in human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiosea, Simion I; Nikiforova, Marina N; Grandis, Jennifer R; Lui, Vivian W Y; Diergaarde, Brenda; Maxwell, Jessica H; Ferris, Robert L; Kim, Seungwon W; Luvison, Alyssa; Miller, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Recent genomic evidence suggests frequent phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activation in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Mutations/amplification of the gene encoding p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3CA), loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and HRAS mutations are known to activate PI3K pathway. PIK3CA mutations were identified by Sanger sequencing in 23 of 75 (31%) HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas, including exon 9 (p.E545K [n = 10] and p.E542K [n = 5]) or exon 20 (p.H1047Y, n = 2) mutations. Five rare and one novel (p.R537Q) PIK3CA mutations were identified. HRAS mutation (p.Q61L) was detected in 1 of 62 tested cases. PIK3CA amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was identified in 4 cases (4/21, 20%), while PTEN loss was seen in 7 (7/21, 33%) cases (chromosome 10 monosomy [n = 4], homozygous deletion [n = 3]). Overall, genetic alterations that likely lead to PI3K pathway activation were identified in 34 of 75 cases (45%) and did not correlate with disease specific survival. These findings offer a molecular rationale for therapeutic targeting of PI3K pathway in patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma

  10. A Review Of Different Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Therapies By Speech And Language Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Nadeifar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the common symptoms after stroke and is a marker for poor prognosis. Select the best therapy procedure is important. This study reviews the various therapy methods available to clinicians. Methods: An electronic database search was performed on PubMed and Embase. The search was limited to English publications. Terms such as stroke, dysphagia, swallowing disorders; deglutition, deglutition disorders, treatment outcome, electro-stimulation-therapy, thermal-stimulation, muscle-training, rehabilitation, also extensive manual searching was conducted. Results: oropharyngeal dysphagia interventions are divided into 5 groups based on the type of therapy: 1- bolus modifications and management (Compensatory Techniques, 2- swallow maneuvers and postures (Compensatory Techniques and/or Rehabilitative Techniques 3- combination of interventions (Compensatory Techniques and/or Rehabilitative Techniques, 4- electro-stimulation and thermo-tactile stimulation (Facilitation Techniques, 5- other interventions (Rehabilitative Techniques. Conclusion: There are different therapy procedures that can be use for Oropharyngeal dysphagia after stroke, but there are questions about the most effective of therapy, although some positive significant outcome studies have been published.

  11. Predictive models of objective oropharyngeal OSA surgery outcomes: Success rate and AHI reduction ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ho Choi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model of objective oropharyngeal obstructive sleep apnea (OSA surgery outcomes including success rate and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI reduction ratio in adult OSA patients.Retrospective outcome research.All subjects with OSA who underwent oropharyngeal and/or nasal surgery and were followed for at least 3 months were enrolled in this study. Demographic, anatomical [tonsil size (TS and palate-tongue position (PTP grade (Gr], and polysomnographic parameters were analyzed. The AHI reduction ratio (% was defined as [(postoperative AHI-preoperative AHI x 100 / postoperative AHI], and surgical success was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in preoperative AHI with a postoperative AHI < 20.A total of 156 consecutive OSAS adult patients (mean age ± SD = 38.9 ± 9.6, M / F = 149 / 7 were included in this study. The best predictive equation by Forward Selection likelihood ratio (LR logistic regression analysis was: [Formula: see text]The best predictive equation according to stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was: [Formula: see text] (TS/PTP Gr = 1 if TS/PTP Gr 3 or 4, TS/PTP Gr = 0 if TS/PTP Gr 1 or 2.The predictive models for oropharyngeal surgery described in this study may be useful for planning surgical treatments and improving objective outcomes in adult OSA patients.

  12. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Huisman, Paulien M; van Oort, Rob P; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were asked about their oral symptoms related to mouth opening, dental status, oral sensory function, tongue mobility, salivary function, and pain. They were asked to rank these oral symptoms according to the degree of burden experienced. The Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ) was used to assess functional outcome. In a multivariate linear regression analyses, variables related to MFIQ scores (p≤0.10) were entered as predictors with MFIQ score as the outcome. Lack of saliva (52%), restricted mouth opening (48%), and restricted tongue mobility (46%) were the most frequently reported oral symptoms. Lack of saliva was most frequently (32%) ranked as the most burdensome oral symptom. For radiated patients, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, a T3 or T4 stage, and a higher age were predictive of MFIQ scores. For non-radiated patients, a restricted mouth opening, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, restricted tongue mobility, and surgery of the mandible were predictive of MFIQ scores. Lack of saliva was not only the most frequently reported oral symptom after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer, but also the most burdensome. Functional outcome is strongly influenced by an inability to wear a dental prosthesis in both radiated and non-radiated patients.

  13. Analysis of oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Flores, Melissa; Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Villeda-Miranda, Alicia; Rocha-Cacho, Karina Elizabeth; Verduzco-Mendoza, Antonio; Hernández-López, Xochiquetzal

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a high incidence in Mexico and is estimated at approximately 500,000 patients. One of the main clinical manifestations of PD is dysphagia, which is the difficult passage of food from the mouth to the stomach. The aim of this study was to assess oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with PD. We conducted a census sample of patients with PD: 17 males and 10 females, aged >49 years. Clinical history, physical examination and neurological evaluation of swallowing fibroendoscopy were carried out. Of the symptomatic patients, 16 patients (59.25%) reported dysphagia. Fibroendoscopic evaluation demonstrated swallowing disorders in 25 patients (92.59%). The main findings were poor bolus control in 19 patients (70.37%), deficits in bolus propulsion in 25 patients (92.59%), impaired swallowing in 14 patients (51.85%), fractional swallowing in 11 patients (40.74%), reduced epiglottic tilting in 11 patients (48.14%), food residue in vallecula in 24 patients (88.88%) and piriform sinus in 19 patients (70.37%). There was no correlation between duration of PD and degree of involvement of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with PD is a common symptom and can range from the oral cavity to the upper esophageal sphincter. Early onset of severe dysphagia is exceptional in this disease and should alert the clinician to the diagnostic possibility of parkinsonism.

  14. A therapeutic maneuver for oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients. Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson's disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41). A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p dysphagia in Parkinson's disease patients.

  15. Prognostic ability of EndoPredict compared to research-based versions of the PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) scores in node-positive, estrogen receptor-positive, and HER2-negative breast cancer. A GEICAM/9906 sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Miguel; Brase, Jan C; Ruiz, Amparo; Prat, Aleix; Kronenwett, Ralf; Calvo, Lourdes; Petry, Christoph; Bernard, Philip S; Ruiz-Borrego, Manuel; Weber, Karsten E; Rodriguez, César A; Alvarez, Isabel M; Segui, Miguel A; Perou, Charles M; Casas, Maribel; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; Rodriguez-Lescure, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    There are several prognostic multigene-based tests for managing breast cancer (BC), but limited data comparing them in the same cohort. We compared the prognostic performance of the EndoPredict (EP) test (standardized for pathology laboratory) with the research-based PAM50 non-standardized qRT-PCR assay in node-positive estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and HER2-negative (HER2-) BC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy followed by endocrine therapy (ET) in the GEICAM/9906 trial. EP and PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) scores [based on subtype (ROR-S) and on subtype and proliferation (ROR-P)] were compared in 536 ER+/HER2- patients. Scores combined with clinical information were evaluated: ROR-T (ROR-S, tumor size), ROR-PT (ROR-P, tumor size), and EPclin (EP, tumor size, nodal status). Patients were assigned to risk-categories according to prespecified cutoffs. Distant metastasis-free survival (MFS) was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier. ROR-S, ROR-P, and EP scores identified a low-risk group with a relative better outcome (10-year MFS: ROR-S 87 %; ROR-P 89 %; EP 93 %). There was no significant difference between tests. Predictors including clinical information showed superior prognostic performance compared to molecular scores alone (10-year MFS, low-risk group: ROR-T 88 %; ROR-PT 92 %; EPclin 100 %). The EPclin-based risk stratification achieved a significantly improved prediction of MFS compared to ROR-T, but not ROR-PT. All signatures added prognostic information to common clinical parameters. EPclin provided independent prognostic information beyond ROR-T and ROR-PT. ROR and EP can reliably predict risk of distant metastasis in node-positive ER+/HER2- BC patients treated with chemotherapy and ET. Addition of clinical parameters into risk scores improves their prognostic ability.

  16. Intracavitary brachytherapy significantly enhances local control of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: the existence of a dose-tumor-control relationship above conventional tumoricidal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Peter Man Lung; Leung, Sing Fai; Lee, Wai Yee; Zee, Benny

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of intracavitary brachytherapy (ICT) in early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: All T1 and T2 (nasal infiltration) NPC treated with a curative intent from 1984 to 1996 were analyzed (n = 509). One hundred sixty-three patients were given ICT after radical external radiotherapy (ERT) (Group A). They were compared with 346 patients treated by ERT alone (Group B). The ERT delivered the tumoricidal dose (uncorrected BED-10 ≥75 Gy) to the primary tumor and did not differ between the two groups in technique or dosage. The ICT delivered a dose of 18-24 Gy in 3 fractions over 15 days to a point 1 cm perpendicular to the midpoint of the plane of the sources. ICT was used to treat local persistence diagnosed at 4-6 weeks after ERT (n = 101) or as an adjuvant for the complete responders to ERT (n = 62). Results: The two groups did not differ in patients' age or sex, rate of distant metastasis, rate of regional failure, overall survival, or the follow-up duration. However, Group A had significantly more T2 lesions and Group B had significantly more advanced N-stages. Local failure was significantly less (crude rates 6.75% vs. 13.0%; 5-year actuarial rates 5.40% vs. 10.3%) and the disease-specific mortality was significantly lower (crude rates 14.1 % vs. 21.7%; 5-year actuarial rates 11.9% vs. 16.4%) in Group A compared to Group B. Multivariate analysis showed that the ICT was the only significant prognostic factor predictive for fewer local failures (Cox regression p = 0.0328, risk ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.256-0.957). However, when ICT was excluded from the Cox regression model, the total physical dose or the total BED-10 uncorrected for tumor repopulation during the period of radiotherapy became significant in predicting ultimate local failure rate. The two groups were comparable in the incidence rates of each individual chronic radiation complication and the actuarial cumulative rate of

  17. Significance of primary tumor volume and T-stage on prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanben; Fei, Zhaodong; Pan, Jianji; Bai, Penggang; Chen, Lisha

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the primary tumor volume on prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Between August 2003 and April 2005, 112 patients with Stage I-IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy were included. Measurement of the primary tumor volume was based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans before treatment. A receiver operating characteristics curve was used to determine the best cut-off point of the primary tumor volume. The mean primary tumor volume for 112 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma was 33.9 ± 28.7 ml. Within the framework of UICC T-staging, all patients were divided into four groups according to the primary tumor volume. We call it the volume stage (V1 50.55 ml). The 5-year overall survival rates for V1, V2, V3 and V4 were 88.5, 83.3, 82.4 and 54.5% (P = 0.014), respectively. The cumulative survival curves for V1, V2 and V3 were very close, but clearly separated from V4. In addition, Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis showed that a primary tumor volume >50 ml was an independent risk factor for radiotherapy (risk ratio = 3.485, P = 0.025). This study demonstrated that the primary tumor volume had significantly impacted on the prognosis of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. We proposed that the primary tumor volume should be considered as an additional stage indicator in the new revision of the clinical stage of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  18. The impact of health insurance status on stage at diagnosis of oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Amy Y; Schrag, Nicole M; Halpern, Michael T; Ward, Elizabeth M

    2007-07-15

    Although patients who have early-stage oropharyngeal cancer can be treated with little impairment of function, the treatment of advanced disease can result in decreased quality of life and mortality. Patients without insurance and with other barriers to access to care may delay seeking medical attention for early symptoms, resulting in more advanced disease at presentation. In this study, the authors examined whether patients who had no insurance or who were covered by Medicaid insurance were more likely to present with advanced oropharyngeal cancer. In this retrospective cohort study from the National Cancer Database from 1996 to 2003, patients with known insurance status who were diagnosed with invasive oropharyngeal cancer at Commission on Cancer facilities (n = 40,487) were included. Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression models were used to analyze the likelihood of presenting with more advanced stage disease. After controlling for other sociodemographic characteristics, patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer at diagnosis were more likely to be uninsured (odds ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.21-1.25) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.19-1.46) compared with patients who had private insurance. Similarly, patients were most likely to present with the largest tumors (T4 disease) if they were uninsured (OR, 2.82; 95% CI, 2.46-3.23) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 2.95; 95% CI, 2.63-3.31). They also were more likely to present with the greatest degree of lymph node involvement (N3) if they were uninsured (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.76-2.40) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.45-1.90). Individuals who lacked insurance or had Medicaid coverage were at the greatest risk for presenting with advanced oropharyngeal cancer. In the current study, the results for the Medicaid group may have been influenced by the postdiagnostic enrollment of uninsured patients. Insurance coverage appeared to be a highly modifiable predictor of cancer

  19. Prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian population studies: a systematic review

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    Leandro Luongo de Matos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Human papillomavirus has been associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, there is no conclusive evidence on the prevalence of oral or pharyngeal infection by human papillomavirus in the Brazilian population. OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate of human papillomavirus infection in the Brazilian population. METHODS: Systematic review of published articles. Medline, The Cochrane Library, Embase, Lilacs (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences and Scielo electronic databases were searched. The search included published articles up to December 2014 in Portuguese, Spanish and English. A wide search strategy was employed in order to avoid publication biases and to assess studies dealing only with oral and/or oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infections in the Brazilian population. RESULTS: The 42 selected articles enrolled 4066 patients. It was observed that oral or oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infections were identified in 738 patients (18.2%; IC 95 17.6-18.8, varying between 0.0% and 91.9%. The prevalences of oral or oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infections were respectively 6.2%, 44.6%, 44.4%, 27.4%, 38.5% and 11.9% for healthy people, those with benign oral lesions, pre-malignant lesions, oral or oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, risk groups (patients with genital human papillomavirus lesions or infected partners and immunocompromised patients. The risk of human papillomavirus infection was estimated for each subgroup and it was evident that, when compared to the healthy population, the risk of human papillomavirus infection was approximately 1.5-9.0 times higher, especially in patients with an immunodeficiency, oral lesions and squamous cell carcinoma. The rates of the most well-known oncogenic types (human papillomavirus 16 and/or 18 also show this increased risk. CONCLUSIONS: Globally, the Brazilian healthy population has a very low oral human papillomavirus infection rate. Other

  20. Differential impact of flow and mouth leak on oropharyngeal humidification during high-flow nasal cannula: a neonatal bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Tim Leon; Czernik, Christoph; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd; Fischer, Hendrik Stefan

    2018-03-09

    Heated humidification is paramount during neonatal high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. However, there is little knowledge about the influence of flow rate and mouth leak on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature. The effect of the Optiflow HFNC on oropharyngeal gas conditioning was investigated at flow rates of 4, 6 and 8 L min -1 with and without mouth leak in a bench model simulating physiological oropharyngeal air conditions during spontaneous breathing. Temperature and absolute humidity (AH) were measured using a digital thermo-hygrosensor. Without mouth leak, oropharyngeal temperature and AH increased significantly with increasing flow (P < 0.001). Mouth leak did not affect this increase up to 6 L min -1 , but at 8 L min -1 , temperature and AH plateaued, and the effect of mouth leak became statistically significant (P < 0.001). Mouth leak during HFNC had a negative impact on oropharyngeal gas conditioning when high flows were applied. However, temperature and AH always remained clinically acceptable.

  1. Knowledge of HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer and Use of Human Papillomavirus Vaccines by Pediatricians in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vikas; Holmes, Sean; Master, Adam; Leblanc, Blake; Caldito, L Gloria; Bocchini, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    To determine the level of knowledge of HPV related oropharyngeal cancer and practice patterns of HPV vaccine use by pediatricians. IRB approved 18-question survey was administered to members of the Louisiana Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. We received 116 responses (response rate: 15.9 percent );. 104 respondents (89.66 percent ); routinely recommend/offer HPV vaccine, 6 (5.17 percent ); occasionally or only at caregiver request, and 6 (5.17 percent ); do not offer the vaccine. 17 (15.5 percent ); reported having no awareness of the link between oropharyngeal cancer and HPV, and only 50 (45.9 percent ); had knowledge that HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer incidence was increasing. Strength of recommendation for males and knowledge of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer were not associated with years in practice, practice type or patient population served. Increased awareness regarding HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers among primary care providers may increase HPV immunization rates, especially in males.

  2. Oropharyngeal cancer mortality according to the human development index in the Metropolitan Region of Chile, 2002-2014.

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    Vicente Livacic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine mortality rates for oropharyngeal cancer according to the Human Development Index (HDI per district in the Metropolitan Region (RM, Santiago, Chile, between 2002 and 2014. Materials and Methods: An ecological study was carried out. The sample corresponded to individuals over 45 years, from the Metropolitan Region, with oropharyngeal cancer as cause of death, as registered in the Chilean National Institute of Statistics (INE. The HDI was classified into three categories: “medium” (8 districts, “high” (18 districts and “very high” (25 districts. The crude and adjusted mortality rates were calculated for each year and period. Results: The oropharyngeal cancer adjusted mortality rate for the chosen period was 3.98 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants. The specific mortality rate from oropharyngeal cancer in the “medium” HDI category was 4.01; in the “high” DHI category, 4.42; and in the “very high” HDI category, 3.79. Conclusion: Mortality from oropharyngeal cancer was higher in the “medium” HDI category between 2002 and 2014.

  3. Prospective evaluation of health-related quality of life in long-term oral and oropharyngeal cancer survivors and the perceived need for supportive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oskam, Inge M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Witte, Birgit I.; de Bree, Remco; Doornaert, Patricia; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in health related quality of life (HRQOL) in oral/oropharyngeal cancer survivors and their need for and use of supportive care. Methods: Between 1999 and 2001, 80 advanced oral or oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with free-flap reconstruction and

  4. Prospective evaluation of health-related quality of life in long-term oral and oropharyngeal cancer survivors and the perceived need for supportive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oskam, I.M.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; Witte, B.I.; de Bree, R.; Doornaert, P.; Langendijk, J.A.; Leemans, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in health related quality of life (HRQOL) in oral/oropharyngeal cancer survivors and their need for and use of supportive care. Methods: Between 1999 and 2001, 80 advanced oral or oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with free-flap reconstruction and

  5. Administration of bleomycin via the oropharyngeal aspiration route leads to sustained lung fibrosis in mice and rats as quantified by UTE-MRI and histology.

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    Christine Egger

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis can be experimentally induced in small rodents by bleomycin. The antibiotic is usually administered via the intratracheal or intranasal routes. In the present study, we investigated the oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin as an alternative route for the induction of lung fibrosis in rats and mice. The development of lung injury was followed in vivo by ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE-MRI and by post-mortem analyses (histology of collagen, hydroxyproline determination, and qRT-PCR. In C57BL/6 mice, oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin led to more prominent lung fibrosis as compared to intranasal administration. Consequently, the oropharyngeal aspiration route allowed a dose reduction of bleomycin and, therewith, a model refinement. Moreover, the distribution of collagen after oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin was more homogenous than after intranasal administration: for the oropharyngeal aspiration route, fibrotic areas appeared all over the lung lobes, while for the intranasal route fibrotic lesions appeared mainly around the largest superior airways. Thus, oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin induced morphological changes that were more comparable to the human disease than the intranasal administration route did. Oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin led to a homogeneous fibrotic injury also in rat lungs. The present data suggest oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin as a less invasive means to induce homogeneous and sustained fibrosis in the lungs of mice and rats.

  6. Administration of Bleomycin via the Oropharyngeal Aspiration Route Leads to Sustained Lung Fibrosis in Mice and Rats as Quantified by UTE-MRI and Histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Christine; Cannet, Catherine; Gérard, Christelle; Jarman, Elizabeth; Jarai, Gabor; Feige, Agnès; Suply, Thomas; Micard, Arthur; Dunbar, Andrew; Tigani, Bruno; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis can be experimentally induced in small rodents by bleomycin. The antibiotic is usually administered via the intratracheal or intranasal routes. In the present study, we investigated the oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin as an alternative route for the induction of lung fibrosis in rats and mice. The development of lung injury was followed in vivo by ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE-MRI) and by post-mortem analyses (histology of collagen, hydroxyproline determination, and qRT-PCR). In C57BL/6 mice, oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin led to more prominent lung fibrosis as compared to intranasal administration. Consequently, the oropharyngeal aspiration route allowed a dose reduction of bleomycin and, therewith, a model refinement. Moreover, the distribution of collagen after oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin was more homogenous than after intranasal administration: for the oropharyngeal aspiration route, fibrotic areas appeared all over the lung lobes, while for the intranasal route fibrotic lesions appeared mainly around the largest superior airways. Thus, oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin induced morphological changes that were more comparable to the human disease than the intranasal administration route did. Oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin led to a homogeneous fibrotic injury also in rat lungs. The present data suggest oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin as a less invasive means to induce homogeneous and sustained fibrosis in the lungs of mice and rats. PMID:23667616

  7. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE OF TRANSORAL ROBOT-ASSISTED SURGERY IN A PATIENT WITH OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER (CLINICAL OBSERVATION

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    M. A. Kropotov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple approaches are currently available for treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Particular attention is usually paid to preservation of the normal shape of the organ and maintenance of the quality of life in patients. Early-stage oropharyngeal cancer can be treated by both radiotherapy and surgery, including transoral laser microsurgery and robot-assisted surgery.Early diagnosis and the use of modern technological approaches allow to conduct adequate surgical treatment without significant injury of the surrounding soft tissues and bone structures, which in turn promotes both aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the patient. The case of robot-assisted surgical treatment of the oropharyngeal tumor described in this article is a good example of this rehabilitation.

  8. Planned neck dissection after weekly docetaxel and concurrent radiotherapy for advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshiki; Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Koji; Fujii, Ryoichi; Ogawa, Kaoru; Fujii, Masato; Yamashita, Taku; Shinden, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Small oropharyngeal carcinomas with advanced neck metastases (stage N2 or greater) are common. Patients with small T with large N oropharyngeal carcinoma have high rates of local control but lower rates of regional control when treated with chemoradiotherapy. Clinical assessment after chemoradiotherapy cannot ensure the absence of neck disease. In the last 5 years, we have treated patients with T1-2 with N2-3 oropharyngeal carcinoma with weekly docetaxel radiotherapy followed by planned neck dissection (PND). Our objectives were to clarify the pathologically complete response (CR) rate of neck metastasis after weekly docetaxel radiotherapy, to identify the clinical predictor of residual neck disease, and to determine the mobidity of planned neck dissection. After chemoradiotherapy, all 12 patients had a complete response at the primary site. We conducted 15 neck dissections. Of these, 6 (40%) had positive nodes. The pathological CR rate of neck metastasis was 58.3%, whereas overall 2-year neck control rate was 91.7%. These findings lend support to the role of PND after chemoradiotherapy in N2-3 neck disease. After chemoradiotherapy, clinical parameters including TN status, feasibility of chemoradiotherapy, largest lymph node size or size reduction in MRI, did not identify patients with residual neck disease. We conducted selective neck dissection (SND) in 80% of patients. SND as PND appears to be appropriate in this group of patients because of the low incidence of complications. A further cohort study including the comparison of PND nonenforcement group is necessary to clarify the validity of the addition of PND in weekly docetaxel radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Evaluation of nasal and oropharyngeal flora in patients with acne vulgaris according to treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuguz, Pınar; Callioglu, Elif E; Tulaci, Kamil G; Kacar, Seval D; Balta, Ilknur; Asik, Gulsah; Karatas, Serap; Karaca, Semsettin

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in nasal and oropharyngeal flora in patients with acne during treatments with tetracycline and isotretinoin. Swab specimens were taken from the right and left nasal cavities and oropharynx of 55 patients with acne and 20 healthy volunteers who were admitted to the dermatology department (Etlik Educational and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey) before the administration of treatment and in the third month of treatment. Study participants were divided into four groups as follows: patients with acne on topical treatment only, systemic isotretinoin, and systemic tetracycline, and the control group. Of 55 patients with acne, 18 were male and 37 were female. The mean age of the patients and the control group was 22.21 ± 4.22 and 21.95 ± 7.64, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the nasal flora of five patients, normal flora was suppressed in the oropharyngeal cultures of seven patients, and normal flora grew in the cultures of the other 20 patients who were on tetracycline treatment. On the other hand, normal flora grew in the nasal and oropharyngeal cultures of all the patients who were on isotretinoin treatment. Treatment options and follow-up procedures for acne vulgaris may lead to the development of bacterial resistance and damage to flora. In particular, systemic tetracycline treatment leads to changes in flora of the nose and throat in patients with acne with an increased carriage of S. aureus. Therefore, careful attention should be paid to the duration of tetracycline treatment in order to not increase the risk of disturbance of microbial flora. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal cancer in Canada: analysis of 5 comprehensive cancer centres using multiple imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbous, Steven; Chu, Karen P; Lau, Harold; Schorr, Melissa; Belayneh, Mathieos; Ha, Michael N; Murray, Scott; O'Sullivan, Brian; Huang, Shao Hui; Snow, Stephanie; Parliament, Matthew; Hao, Desiree; Cheung, Winson Y; Xu, Wei; Liu, Geoffrey

    2017-08-14

    The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has risen over the past 2 decades. This rise has been attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV), but information on temporal trends in incidence of HPV-associated cancers across Canada is limited. We collected social, clinical and demographic characteristics and p16 protein status (p16-positive or p16-negative, using this immunohistochemistry variable as a surrogate marker of HPV status) for 3643 patients with oropharyngeal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2012 at comprehensive cancer centres in British Columbia (6 centres), Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto and Halifax. We used receiver operating characteristic curves and multiple imputation to estimate the p16 status for missing values. We chose a best-imputation probability cut point on the basis of accuracy in samples with known p16 status and through an independent relation between p16 status and overall survival. We used logistic and Cox proportional hazard regression. We found no temporal changes in p16-positive status initially, but there was significant selection bias, with p16 testing significantly more likely to be performed in males, lifetime never-smokers, patients with tonsillar or base-of-tongue tumours and those with nodal involvement ( p multiple imputation: male sex, tonsillar or base-of-tongue tumours, smaller tumours, nodal involvement, less smoking and lower alcohol consumption ( p imputation probability cut points for p16-positive status each identified a rise from 2000 to 2012, with the best-probability cut point identifying an increase from 47.3% in 2000 to 73.7% in 2012 ( p multiple centres in Canada, there was a steady rise in the proportion of oropharyngeal cancers attributable to HPV from 2000 to 2012. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  11. The impact of HPV status on weight loss and feeding tube use in oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelov, Belinda; Kotevski, Damian P; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2018-04-01

    It has been well established that patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma are at high nutritional risk, with significant weight loss and tube feeding common. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease has led to a change in the "typical" presentation and nutritional profile of this population. The aim of our study was to determine whether the need for a feeding tube, and weight loss during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma differed with HPV status. Patients who received curative RT ± chemotherapy from January 2011 to January 2016 were included (n = 100). We retrospectively evaluated feeding tube use and timing of insertion (prophylactic vs reactive), percentage weight loss during RT and the prevalence of critical weight loss (CWL) ≥5%. HPV-positive patients had significantly higher weight loss during RT compared to the rest of the cohort (8.4% vs 6.1%, 95%CI 0.8-3.9, p = 0.003). CWL was observed in 86% and in a higher proportion with HPV-positive disease (93%, p = 0.011). Conditional probability modelling analysis revealed, with 74% accuracy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy and HPV-positive status were predictors of CWL when comparing HPV-positive patients to HPV-negative (96%, p = 0.001 and 98%, p = 0.012 respectively). More HPV-positive patients required feeding tubes (n = 43, 63%, p = 0.05), most being reactive (n = 27, 63%). All patients with reactive tubes experienced CWL. The high incidence of CWL in patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma is of concern. Tube feeding continues to be a necessary nutritional intervention in this population and predicting who will require a tube is challenging. Larger, prospective cohort studies are required. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal swallowing in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasegbon, A; Hamdy, S

    2017-11-01

    Eating and drinking are enjoyable activities that positively impact on an individual's quality of life. The ability to swallow food and fluid is integral to the process of eating. Swallowing occupies a dual role being both part of the enjoyment of eating and being a critically important utilitarian activity to enable adequate nutrition and hydration. Any impairment to the process of swallowing can negatively affect a person's perception of their quality of life. The process of swallowing is highly complex and involves muscles in the mouth, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus. The oropharynx is the anatomical region encompassing the oral cavity and the pharynx. Food must be masticated, formed into a bolus and transported to the pharynx by the tongue whereas fluids are usually held within the mouth before being transported ab-orally. The bolus must then be transported through the pharynx to the esophagus without any matter entering the larynx. The muscles needed for all these steps are coordinated by swallowing centers within the brainstem which are supplied with sensory information by afferent nerve fibers from several cranial nerves. The swallowing centers also receive modulatory input from higher centers within the brain. Hence, a swallow has both voluntary and involuntary physiologic components and the term dysphagia is given to difficult swallowing while oropharyngeal dysphagia is difficult swallowing due to pathology within the oropharynx. Problems affecting any point along the complex swallowing pathway can result in dysphagia. This review focuses on the anatomy and physiology behind normal and abnormal oropharyngeal swallowing. It also details the common diseases and pathology causing oropharyngeal dysphagia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Active Tobacco Smoking and Distant Metastasis in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, Sean M.; Ali, Nawal N.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Chan, Annie W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Distant metastasis is the site of first relapse in approximately one-third of patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, irrespective of human papillomavirus status. Yet the risk factors associated with distant metastasis are not well characterized. We sought to characterize the relationship between smoking status and distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the association between tobacco smoking status and distant metastasis in a retrospective cohort study of 132 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Stage III–IVA/B oropharyngeal cancer. Information on tobacco smoking was prospectively collected by patient questionnaires and physician notes at the time of diagnosis. Thirty-three percent of the patients were nonsmokers, 51% were former smokers, 16% were active smokers. The cumulative lifetime tobacco smoking in pack-years was 20 (range, 0–150). Results: With a median follow-up time of 52 months, the overall rate of distant metastasis at 4 years was 8%. Distant metastasis was the most common first site of relapse, occurring in 56% of the patients with recurrences. Active smokers had higher rates of distant metastasis than non-active smokers (including never- and former smokers; 31% vs. 4%, p 20 and ≤20 (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.19). In univariate analysis, active smoking (p = 0.0004) and N category (p = 0.009) were predictive of increased risk of distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, active smoking was the most significant predictive factor for increased risk of distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 12.7, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between active smoking and distant metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  14. Teratoma congênito de orofaringe: relato de caso Oropharyngeal congenital teratoma: a case report

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    Yuri Seguchi Chaves

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available O teratoma congênito de orofaringe é o tipo mais raro de teratoma, compreendendo apenas 2% desses tumores fetais. O diagnóstico deve ser realizado o mais precocemente possível, preferencialmente durante o pré-natal. O prognóstico irá depender do tamanho e localização da lesão, da velocidade de crescimento desta, do envolvimento de estruturas intracranianas e da ressecção adequada do tumor com equipe multidisciplinar. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente que teve diagnosticado durante a gestação feto com teratoma congênito de orofaringe (epignathus por meio de ultra-sonografia. O feto evoluiu para óbito intra-uterino na 29ª semana de gestação, sendo então induzido o parto por via vaginal. O exame anatomopatológico revelou feto do sexo feminino, compatível com 27-28 semanas, teratoma orofaríngeo e outras malformações congênitas.Oropharyngeal teratoma is the most rare type of teratoma, with only 2% of fetal teratomas. The diagnosis must be established as early as possible, preferably during the prenatal period. The prognosis will depend on the size and location of the lesion, growth rate of the lesion, degree of intracranial spread, its resectability, and immediate care at birth by a multisciplinary team. We report aparticular case of congenital oropharyngeal teratoma (epignathus. The diagnosis was made during the prenatal period by ultrasound, and the fetus evolved to intrauterine death at the 29th week. The anatomopathological examination revealed a female fetus, compatible with 27-28 weeks, oropharyngeal teratoma and congenital malformations.

  15. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012.

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    Jennifer O Lam

    Full Text Available In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV. Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968-2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC, 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian. Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993-2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968-2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01 and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968-2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001 and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06. ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001. ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years but declined significantly between 1968-2012 (APC = -2.4%. Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence.

  16. A novel porcine model of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by oropharyngeal challenge with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Rigol, Montserrat; Marti, Joan-Daniel; Saucedo, Lina; Ranzani, Otavio T; Roca, Ignasi; Cabanas, Maria; Muñoz, Laura; Giunta, Valeria; Luque, Nestor; Rinaudo, Mariano; Esperatti, Mariano; Fernandez-Barat, Laia; Ferrer, Miquel; Vila, Jordi; Ramirez, Jose; Torres, Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Animal models of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in primates, sheep, and pigs differ in the underlying pulmonary injury, etiology, bacterial inoculation methods, and time to onset. The most common ovine and porcine models do not reproduce the primary pathogenic mechanism of the disease, through the aspiration of oropharyngeal pathogens, or the most prevalent human etiology. Herein the authors characterize a novel porcine model of VAP due to aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ten healthy pigs were intubated, positioned in anti-Trendelenburg, and mechanically ventilated for 72 h. Three animals did not receive bacterial challenge, whereas in seven animals, a P. aeruginosa suspension was instilled into the oropharynx. Tracheal aspirates were cultured and respiratory mechanics were recorded. On autopsy, lobar samples were obtained to corroborate VAP through microbiological and histological studies. In animals not challenged, diverse bacterial colonization of the airways was found and monolobar VAP rarely developed. In animals with P. aeruginosa challenge, colonization of tracheal secretion increased up to 6.39 ± 0.34 log colony-forming unit (cfu)/ml (P VAP was confirmed in six of seven pigs, in 78% of the cases developed in the dependent lung segments (right medium and lower lobes, P = 0.032). The static respiratory system elastance worsened to 41.5 ± 5.8 cm H2O/l (P = 0.001). The authors devised a VAP model caused by aspiration of oropharyngeal P. aeruginosa, a frequent causative pathogen of human VAP. The model also overcomes the practical and legislative limitations associated with the use of primates. The authors' model could be employed to study pathophysiologic mechanisms, as well as novel diagnostic/preventive strategies.

  17. Submandibular gland preservation during concurrent neck dissection and transoral surgery for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Brittany E; Hinni, Michael L; Nagel, Thomas H; Chang, Yu-Hui; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Hayden, Richard E

    2014-04-01

    Analyze the effect of ipsilateral submandibular gland preservation on patients undergoing concurrent neck dissection and transoral surgery for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Evaluate for (1) intraoperative and postoperative communications between the oropharynx and neck and (2) oncologic outcomes. Retrospective chart review of prospectively collected data. Tertiary academic referral center. Retrospective chart review of patients undergoing transoral laser resection of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma with simultaneous neck dissection(s) for primary, persistent, recurrent, and second primary disease between January 1999 and February 2013. Data analyzed for operative technique, pathologic diagnosis, postoperative course, complications, and oncologic outcomes. Overall 253 patients were identified. Of these, 96 patients underwent ipsilateral submandibular gland preservation and 157 underwent ipsilateral submandibular gland removal at the time of neck dissection. The prevalence of intraoperative communication between the neck and oropharynx was significantly lower in cases with submandibular gland preservation (2/96, 2.08%) compared to those with submandibular gland removal (22/157, 14.13%). No postoperative leaks occurred in the gland preservation group (0/96, 0%) compared to a leak prevalence of 8.92% (14/157) when the gland was removed (P = .0041). There was no difference in local, regional, or distant disease recurrence between submandibular gland preservation and gland removal. Similarly, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no difference in disease free survival, disease specific survival, or overall survival. Submandibular gland preservation during neck dissection in patients undergoing transoral surgery for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma significantly reduces the risk of intraoperative and postoperative salivary leaks without compromising oncologic outcomes.

  18. [Low rate of oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection among women with cervical lesion. Preliminary results from the South-Eastern Hungarian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanya, Melinda; Jakó, Mária; Terhes, Gabriella; Szakács, László; Kaiser, László; Deák, Judit; Bártfai, György

    2016-01-10

    Although the natural history of cervical and oral human papillomavirus infection has been intensively investigated in the past years, the ability of this virus to infect oral and genital mucosae in the same individual and its potential to co-infect both cervical and oral mucosa are still unclear. The aim of the authors was to assess the presence of oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection in women with cervical lesions in the South-Eastern Hungarian population. The total of 103 women have been included in the study between March 1, 2013 and January 1, 2015. Brushing was used to collect cells from the oropharyngeal mucosa. Human papillomavirus DNA was detected using polymerase chain reaction, and Amplicor line blot test was used for genotyping. Oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection was detected in 2 cases (3%). The detected genotypes were 31, 40/61 and 73 in the oropharyngeal region. The results indicate that in women with cervical lesions oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection rarely occurs.

  19. Influence of chronic azithromycin treatment on the composition of the oropharyngeal microbial community in patients with severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Dos Santos Santiago, Guido; Brusselle, Guy; Dauwe, Kenny; Deschaght, Pieter; Verhofstede, Chris; Vaneechoutte, Dries; Deschepper, Ellen; Jordens, Paul; Joos, Guy; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2017-05-10

    This study of the oropharyngeal microbiome complements the previously published AZIthromycin in Severe ASThma (AZISAST) clinical trial, where the use of azithromycin was assessed in subjects with exacerbation-prone severe asthma. Here, we determined the composition of the oropharyngeal microbial community by means of deep sequencing of the amplified 16S rRNA gene in oropharyngeal swabs from patients with exacerbation-prone severe asthma, at baseline and during and after 6 months treatment with azithromycin or placebo. A total of 1429 OTUs were observed, of which only 59 were represented by more than 0.02% of the reads. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the most abundant phyla and Streptococcus and Prevotella were the most abundant genera in all the samples. Thirteen species only accounted for two thirds of the reads and two species only, i.e. Prevotella melaninogenica and Streptococcus mitis/pneumoniae, accounted for one fourth of the reads. We found that the overall composition of the oropharyngeal microbiome in patients with severe asthma is comparable to that of the healthy population, confirming the results of previous studies. Long term treatment (6 months) with azithromycin increased the species Streptococcus salivarius approximately 5-fold and decreased the species Leptotrichia wadei approximately 5-fold. This was confirmed by Boruta feature selection, which also indicated a significant decrease of L. buccalis/L. hofstadtii and of Fusobacterium nucleatum. Four of the 8 treated patients regained their initial microbial composition within one month after cessation of treatment. Despite large diversity of the oropharyngeal microbiome, only a few species predominate. We confirm the absence of significant differences between the oropharyngeal microbiomes of people with and without severe asthma. Possibly, long term azithromycin treatment may have long term effects on the composition of the oropharygeal microbiome in

  20. Radiotherapeutic effect on oropharyngeal flora in patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Shara, K.A.; Ghareeb, M.A.; Zaher, S.; Mobacher, A.; Khalifa, M.Ch.; Saleh, S.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy on oropharyngeal bacterial flora was studied in the hope that this might help in controlling post-operative infections in previously irradiated patients. Eighty patients were included from whom swabs were taken before and at the end of irradiation. Swabs were also taken two weeks after treatment in the last 40 patients. Thirty healthy controls were included. It was found that coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic streptococci, Candida albicans, B. proteus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were significantly increased at the end of irradiation, while Klebsiella was increased significantly in the period after irradiation. Culture and sensitivity was performed for the organisms isolated in the last 40 patients. (author)

  1. Radiotherapeutic effect on oropharyngeal flora in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu Shara, K.A.; Ghareeb, M.A.; Zaher, S.; Mobacher, A.; Khalifa, M.Ch.; Saleh, S.Z.

    1993-03-01

    The effect of radiotherapy on oropharyngeal bacterial flora was studied in the hope that this might help in controlling post-operative infections in previously irradiated patients. Eighty patients were included from whom swabs were taken before and at the end of irradiation. Swabs were also taken two weeks after treatment in the last 40 patients. Thirty healthy controls were included. It was found that coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus, [beta]-haemolytic streptococci, Candida albicans, B. proteus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were significantly increased at the end of irradiation, while Klebsiella was increased significantly in the period after irradiation. Culture and sensitivity was performed for the organisms isolated in the last 40 patients. (author).

  2. A Case of Dermatomyositis with Esophageal Fistula in Whom Blind Mucosal Biopsy Detected Occult Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Kabuto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of anti-transcription intermediary factor 1 (anti-TIF-1 antibody-positive dermatomyositis with concomitant esophageal fistula and extensive truncal erythema. The characteristic cutaneous features and presence of anti-TIF-1 antibodies were predictive for internal malignancy. However, repeated examinations for internal malignancy showed none, and blind mucosal biopsy was needed to diagnose oropharyngeal carcinoma. We should note the possibility of occult nasopharyngeal carcinoma and consider performing blind mucosal biopsy in dermatomyositis with esophageal fistula, especially with extensive truncal erythema.

  3. Long-Term Follow-Up of Cardiac Function and Quality of Life for Patients in NSABP Protocol B-31/NRG Oncology: A Randomized Trial Comparing the Safety and Efficacy of Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide (AC) Followed by Paclitaxel With AC Followed by Paclitaxel and Trastuzumab in Patients With Node-Positive Breast Cancer With Tumors Overexpressing Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Patricia A; Romond, Edward H; Cecchini, Reena S; Rastogi, Priya; Geyer, Charles E; Swain, Sandra M; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Gross, Howard M; Brufsky, Adam M; Flynn, Patrick J; Wahl, Tanya A; Seay, Thomas E; Wade, James L; Biggs, David D; Atkins, James N; Polikoff, Jonathan; Zapas, John L; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Wolmark, Norman

    2017-12-10

    Purpose Early cardiac toxicity is a risk associated with adjuvant chemotherapy plus trastuzumab. However, objective measures of cardiac function and health-related quality of life are lacking in long-term follow-up of patients who remain cancer free after completion of adjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods Patients in NSABP Protocol B-31 received anthracycline and taxane chemotherapy with or without trastuzumab for adjuvant treatment of node-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive early-stage breast cancer. A long-term follow-up assessment was undertaken for patients who were alive and disease free, which included measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction by multigated acquisition scan along with patient-reported outcomes using the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI), the Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire, and a review of current medications and comorbid conditions. Results At a median follow-up of 8.8 years among eligible participants, five (4.5%) of 110 in the control group and 10 (3.4%) of 297 in the trastuzumab group had a > 10% decline in left ventricular ejection fraction from baseline to a value patients had received trastuzumab. Conclusion In patients without underlying cardiac disease at baseline, the addition of trastuzumab to adjuvant anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy does not result in long-term worsening of cardiac function, cardiac symptoms, or health-related quality of life. The DASI questionnaire may provide a simple and useful tool for monitoring patient-reported changes that reflect cardiac function.

  4. Oropharyngeal Microbiota in Frail Older Patients Unaffected by Time in Hospital

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    Victoria C. Ewan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are the commonest nosocomial infections, and occur predominantly in frailer, older patients with multiple comorbidities. The oropharyngeal microbiota is the major reservoir of infection. This study explored the relative contributions of time in hospital and patient demographics to the community structure of the oropharyngeal microbiota in older patients with lower limb fracture. We collected 167 throat swabs from 53 patients (mean age 83 over 14 days after hospitalization, and analyzed these using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We calculated frailty/comorbidity indices, undertook dental examinations and collected data on respiratory tract infections. We analyzed microbial community composition using correspondence (CA and canonical correspondence analysis. Ten patients were treated for respiratory tract infection. Microbial community structure was related to frailty, number of teeth and comorbidity on admission, with comorbidity exerting the largest effect. Time in hospital neither significantly changed alpha (t = −0.910, p = 0.365 nor beta diversity (CA1 t = 0.022, p = 0.982; CA2 t = −0.513, p = 0.609 of microbial communities in patient samples. Incidence of respiratory pathogens were not associated with time in hospital (t = −0.207, p = 0.837, nor with alpha diversity of the oral microbiota (t = −1.599, p = 0.113. Patient characteristics at admission, rather than time in hospital, influenced the community structure of the oral microbiota.

  5. Psychometric Properties of Questionnaires on Functional Health Status in Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Speyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Questionnaires on Functional Health Status (FHS are part of the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Objective. To conduct a systematic review of the literature on the psychometric properties of English-language FHS questionnaires in adults with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Methods. A systematic search was performed using the electronic databases Pubmed and Embase. The psychometric properties of the questionnaires were determined based on the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties and definitions for health-related patient-reported outcomes and the COSMIN checklist using preset psychometric criteria. Results. Three questionnaires were included: the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10, the Swallowing Outcome after Laryngectomy (SOAL, and the Self-report Symptom Inventory. The Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ proved to be identical to the Modified Self-report Symptom Inventory. All FHS questionnaires obtained poor overall methodological quality scores for most measurement properties. Conclusions. The retrieved FHS questionnaires need psychometric reevaluation; if the overall methodological quality shows satisfactory improvement on most measurement properties, the use of the questionnaires in daily clinic and research can be justified. However, in case of insufficient validity and/or reliability scores, new FHS questionnaires need to be developed using and reporting on preestablished psychometric criteria as recommended in literature.

  6. Variable course of progression of oral cavity and oropharyngeal carcinoma in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabiszczak, Maciej Szczepan; Waśniewska, Elżbieta; Mielcarek-Kuchta, Daniela; Miętkiewska-Leszniewska, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Witold

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this article is the epidemiological analysis of patients treated due to oral and oropharyngeal cancer, with a special interest in the group under the age of 40, evaluation of the differences in the clinical course of the disease as well as assessment of the treatment results, regarding the age of the affected individuals. 523 individuals affected by oral and oropharyngeal cancer who were treated in the Otolaryngology and Laryngeal Oncology Department between 2000 and 2008. Precise analysis was performed on 360 out of 523 affected individuals, in whom full clinical status was determined; 13 patients were young adults. The retrospective analysis was created based on case histories, surgical protocols and emergency records. In young adults there is a markedly increased risk of organ involvement according to the Mann-Whitney U-test analysis (p = 0.044907). The probability of recurrence in the group of young adults is also much higher. Analysis of Kaplan-Meier test results indicated that the chance for the lack of recurrence within a 6-month period was 85.7%; however, the risk of recurrence increased, and after 12 months was equal to the arithmetic data (50%). Among young adults there is an increased risk of local recurrence following 12 months after surgical intervention. According to our observations, despite rapid progression and early recurrence in young adults (4/7) the prognosis for both groups is not statistically different.

  7. Post-operative radiation therapy for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric; Panwala, Kathryn; Holland, John

    2002-11-01

    Between 1985 and 1999, 43 patients with locally-advanced, resectable oropharyngeal cancer were treated with combined surgery and post-operative radiation therapy (RT) at Oregon Health and Science University. Five patients (12 per cent) had Stage III disease and 38 patients (88 per cent) had Stage IV disease. All patients had gross total resections of the primary tumour. Thirty-seven patients had neck dissections for regional disease. RT consisted of a mean tumour-bed dose of 63.0 Gy delivered in 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions over a mean of 49 days. At three- and five-years, the actuarial local control was 96 per cent and the actuarial local/regional control was 80 per cent. The three- and five-year actuarial rates of distant metastases were 41 per cent and 46 per cent, respectively. The actuarial overall survival at three- and five-years was 41 per cent and 34 per cent, respectively. The actuarial rates of progression-free survival were 49 per cent at three-years and 45 per cent at five years. Combined surgery and post-operative RT for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer results in excellent local/regional control. This particular group of patients experienced a high-rate of developing distant metastases.

  8. Patient experience and anxiety during and after treatment for an HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Zhang, Yuehan; Merritt, Samantha; Gold, Dorothy; Robbins, Hilary A; Buckman, Victoria; Gerber, Jennifer; Eisele, David W; Ha, Patrick; Califano, Joseph; Fakhry, Carole

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis with an HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer includes unique social issues. However, it is unknown how common these psychosocial issues are for patients and whether they continue after treatment. Patients with pathologically confirmed HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OPC, n=48) were recruited from two medical centers. Participants completed a computer assisted self interview that explored their psychosocial experiences during and after treatment. We examined responses overall and by age. The majority of participants with confirmed HPV-OPC, reported being told that HPV could have (90%) or did cause (77%) their malignancy, but only 52% believed that HPV was the main cause of their OPC. Participants over 65years were less likely than younger participants to report that their doctors told them their tumor was HPV-positive (50% vs 84%, p=0.03). Anxiety that their tumor was HPV-related was a major issue among participants when first diagnosed (93%). However, only 17% still reported anxiety after treatment was complete. While many patients reported that providers discussed the emotional effects of diagnosis and treatment adequately (58%), almost half reported discussing these emotional effects inadequately (24%), or not at all (18%). Further, 18% reported that their families still wondered about some questions that they had never asked. After treatment, some HPV-OPC patients remain concerned about HPV and have unanswered questions about HPV. Older patients had lower awareness of the role of HPV in their cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of position and phonation on oropharyngeal view and correlation with laryngoscpic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasun, F E; Adudu, O P; Sadiq, A

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of phonation and various head and body positions on oropharyngeal view (Mallampati score), and the correlation of these with laryngoscopic view, using the Cormack and Lehane score. Four hundred (390) consecutive patients were evaluated in the wards during preoperative anaesthetic review. During airway assessment, the patients were placed in various head and body positions to determine oropharyngeal structures visualized, with and without phonation, according to the Mallampati test score. In the operating theatre, laryngoscopic view scores (according to Cormack and Lehane) were recorded, and the various scores analyzed. Phonation consistently improved the Mallampati scores in all the head and body positions. The scores were better in the supine position compared to the sitting position. The best correlation of the Mallampati score with the Cormack and Lehane score was in the sitting, head maximally extended position, without phonation. Extention of the head improved the score in the sitting position, but not in the supine position. Phonation reduced the correlation of the scores in all the positions. We conclude that the best position to conduct the Mallampati test is sitting, head maximally extended, without phonation. This correlated best with laryngoscopic view score in our study.

  10. Selective intraarterial chemoradiation therapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma with high-dose cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Ryota; Saito, Kazuhiro; Ito, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin has shown a high tumor response rate among head and neck carcinomas, and the tumor response is related to the cisplatin dosage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of selective intraarterial chemoradiation therapy for oropharyngeal carcinomas with high-dose cisplatin. This retrospective study consisted of 21 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, stages II-IVB, in whom intraarterial chemoradiation therapy was performed between 2000 and 2008. All patients were given two courses of selective intraarterial infusions of cisplatin (300 mg/m 2 ), systemic chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil, and simultaneous radiation therapy (58-61 Gy/30 fractions), with a 1-week rest period. The 2-year overall survival rate of the 15 patients who completed the therapeutic regimen was 71.3%. The 2-year locoregional control rate and disease-free survival rate were 95.0% and 67.7%, respectively. Selective intraarterial high-dose cisplatin chemotherapy with concomitant radiation therapy shows results similar to those of original methods in terms of survival and locoregional control with a reduction in the number of procedure times. (author)

  11. Surface ultrastructural (SEM) characteristics of oropharyngeal cavity of house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumandour, Mohamed M A

    2017-12-22

    The focus of the present study is to provide a full morphological description of the oropharyngeal cavity of the house sparrow. The head of six birds was prepared for gross examination and by stereo and electron microscopy. The bifid lingual apex has multiple long, rostrally directed needle-like processes. The lateral border of the apex carries rostromedially directed needle-like processes. The dorsal lingual surface of the apex and body carries numerous caudomedially directed filiform papillae and many orifices of lingual salivary glands. The lingual body is divided into two parts: rostral and caudal. The caudal part is divided into two laterally elevated regions by a median groove, while the rostral part is bounded laterally by a rostrodorsally directed papillary row, which on SEM is formed from two rows. On SEM, the lingual root has many orifices of posterior salivary glands. The pharyngeal papillary row is located at the caudal border of the laryngeal mound, but this single papillary row is formed from two rows at SEM magnification. The laryngeal cleft continues caudally as a laryngeal fissure bounded by two longitudinal rows of caudally directed papillae; at high SEM magnification, this fissure is divided into two halves by a median ridge which carries caudally directed papillae on its posterior part. The choanal cleft proceeds rostrally by the median tubercle. There are a small number of orifices of palatine salivary glands. The morphological characters of the oropharyngeal cavity of the sparrow confirm its adaptation to surrounding environmental conditions and available food particles.

  12. The effects of oropharyngeal-lingual exercises in patients with primary snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Shadman; Gerami, Hooshang; Soltanipour, Soheil; Saberi, Alia; Moghadam, Solmaz Khorasani; Setva, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Primary snoring (PS) is one of the sleep breathing disorders with suboptimal results of treatment. It is recommended that Oropharyngeal exercises can be a therapeutic choice for the patients with mild to moderate degrees of PS. We assessed the effects of oropharyngeal-lingual (OPL) exercises on patients with primary snoring (PS) referred to Amiralmomenin University Hospital, Rasht, Iran in 2012. Fifty-three patients with PS underwent the sets of OPL exercises for 3 months, 5 days a week, and 30 min a day under the supervision of a speech therapist. Severity of the snoring was assessed by use of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Snoring Scale Score (SSS) criteria before and after the exercises, and data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Mean SSS before the study was 7.01 ± 1.72, while it was 3.09 ± 2.7 after the study; and the mean VAS scores were 8.54 ± 1.89 and 4.69 ± 2.94 before and after the study, respectively (P = 0.0001). There was a significant relationship between having conflicts with roommates (P = 0.0001), duration of snoring occurrence (P = 0.0001), severity of snoring (P = 0.0001) before and after the intervention. In conclusion, doing the OPL exercises significantly decreases the severity of PS.

  13. Fetal Oropharyngeal and Neck Tumors: Determination of the Need for Ex-Utero Intrapartum Treatment Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Tuncay Özgünen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the ex-utero intrapartum therapy (EXIT applied to 3 of the 7 cases with oropharyngeal or neck masses and review the indicators of the need for an EXIT procedure. Case Report: Prenatal presentation, size and localization of the masses, existence of fetal hydrops and associated findings such as polyhydramnios, intraoperative managements, complications, and maternal and neonatal outcomes were evaluated through a retrospective analysis. Four cases had neck masses and three cases had oropharyngeal masses. Prenatal sonography was used as the main diagnostic tool for all patients. The median gestational age was 34.5 weeks at the time of diagnosis and 36 weeks at delivery. Polyhydramnios was observed in three of the seven cases and they were delivered prematurely. Interventions such as endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy were performed to provide patency of the airway during delivery by the EXIT procedure in three cases. Hemangioma was found in two cases, teratoma in two cases, lymphangioma in two cases and hamartoma in one case following pathological examination of the masses. Conclusion: The localization of mass, its characteristics, invasion (if it exists, and relation to the airway are the main factors used to determine the need for EXIT. The presence of polyhydramnios may be an important indicator to predict both the need for EXIT and fetal outcomes.

  14. Comparison of Oropharyngeal Microbiota from Children with Asthma and Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boutin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A genuine microbiota resides in the lungs which emanates from the colonization by the oropharyngeal microbiota. Changes in the oropharyngeal microbiota might be the source of dysbiosis observed in the lower airways in patients suffering from asthma or cystic fibrosis (CF. To examine this hypothesis, we compared the throat microbiota from healthy children (n=62 and that from children with asthma (n=27 and CF (n=57 aged 6 to 12 years using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Our results show high levels of similarities between healthy controls and children with asthma and CF revealing the existence of a core microbiome represented by Prevotella, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Veillonella, and Haemophilus. However, in CF, the global diversity, the bacterial load, and abundances of 53 OTUs were significantly reduced, whereas abundances of 6 OTUs representing opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus were increased compared to those in healthy controls controls and asthmatics. Our data reveal a core microbiome in the throat of healthy children that persists in asthma and CF indicating shared host regulation favoring growth of commensals. Furthermore, we provide evidence for dysbiosis with a decrease in diversity and biomass associated with the presence of known pathogens consistent with impaired host defense in children with CF.

  15. Alterations of Bacteroides sp., Neisseria sp., Actinomyces sp., and Streptococcus sp. populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome are associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Qian, Guirong; Ren, Zhigang; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Wei; Ye, Ping; Yang, Yunmei; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-06-23

    The microbiomes of humans are associated with liver and lung inflammation. We identified and verified alterations of the oropharyngeal microbiome and assessed their association with cirrhosis and pneumonia. Study components were as follows: (1) determination of the temporal stability of the oropharyngeal microbiome; (2) identification of oropharyngeal microbial variation in 90 subjects; (3) quantitative identification of disease-associated bacteria. DNAs enriched in bacterial sequences were produced from low-biomass oropharyngeal swabs using whole genome amplification and were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Whole genome amplification combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis monitored successfully oropharyngeal microbial variations and showed that the composition of each subject's oropharyngeal microbiome remained relatively stable during the follow-up. The microbial composition of cirrhotic patients with pneumonia differed from those of others and clustered together in subgroup analysis. Further, species richness and the value of Shannon's diversity and evenness index increased significantly in patients with cirrhosis and pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Moreover, we identified variants of Bacteroides, Eubacterium, Lachnospiraceae, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus through phylogenetic analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that the populations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, and Actinomycetes increased, while that of Streptococcus decreased in cirrhotic patients with pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Alterations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome were associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

  16. Speech and swallowing after surgical treatment of advanced oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Molen, Lisette van der; Hilgers, Frans J.; Balm, Alfons J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of this review is the evaluation of speech and swallowing function after surgical treatment for advanced oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. A systematic literature search (1993-2009), yielding 1,220 hits. The predefined criteria for inclusion in this systematic review were oral or

  17. Influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature in a bench model of neonatal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hendrik S; Ullrich, Tim L; Bührer, Christoph; Czernik, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2017-02-01

    Clinical studies show that non-invasive respiratory support by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) affects gas conditioning in the upper airways, especially in the presence of mouth leaks. Using a new bench model of neonatal CPAP, we investigated the influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. The model features the insertion of a heated humidifier between an active model lung and an oropharyngeal head model to simulate the recurrent expiration of heated, humidified air. During unsupported breathing, physiological temperature and humidity were attained inside the model oropharynx, and mouth opening had no significant effect on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. During binasal CPAP, the impact of mouth opening was investigated using three different scenarios: no conditioning in the CPAP circuit, heating only, and heated humidification. Mouth opening had a strong negative impact on oropharyngeal humidification in all tested scenarios, but heated humidification in the CPAP circuit maintained clinically acceptable humidity levels regardless of closed or open mouths. The model can be used to test new equipment for use with CPAP, and to investigate the effects of other methods of non-invasive respiratory support on gas conditioning in the presence of leaks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of Haemophilus influenzae fimbrial genes establishes adherence to oropharyngeal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, S. M.; Mooi, F. R.; Sindhunata, M. G.; Maris, W. R.; van Alphen, L.

    1989-01-01

    In this report the first example of functional expression of a fimbrial gene cluster of a non-enteric human pathogen in Escherichia coli is described. This is shown for Haemophilus influenzae fimbriae which mediate adherence to oropharyngeal epithelial cells. A genomic library of H.influenzae type

  19. Human papillomavirus detection and comorbidity: critical issues in selection of patients with oropharyngeal cancer for treatment De-escalation trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.M.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Bloemena, E.; Witte, B.I.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Heideman, D.A.M.; Boon, D.; Koljenovic, S.; Baatenburg-de Jong, R.J.; Leemans, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is a major determinant in prognostic risk modeling. However, most risk models are based on clinical trials which only include a selected patient population. The clinical significance of

  20. Dimensional and volumetric analysis of the oropharyngeal region in obstructive sleep apnea patients: A cone beam computed tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Tikku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is a potentially life-threatening condition in which there is a periodic cessation of breathing (for 10 sec or longer that occurs during sleep in the presence of inspiratory effort. The aim of the study was to assess volumetric and dimensional differences between OSA patients and normal individuals in the upright posture. Material and Method: The present study was conducted on CBCT scans of 32 patients who were divided into two groups -Group I (control group and Group II (OSA subjects. Group I consisted of 16 patients with normal airway with ESS score from 2 to 10, STOP BANG Questionnaire score of 10, STOP BANG Questionnaire score of > 3, AHI index >5. Linear and angular parameters, volume and minimum cross-section area (MCA of oropharyngeal airway, anteroposterior length and lateral width at MCA was compared amongst the groups. Results: The oropharyngeal volume, MCA, and the anteroposterior and lateral width of the airway at MCA of the OSA subjects was significantly lesser than that of normal subjects. The length of both soft palate and tongue was significantly more in Group II. The angle between the nasopharyngeal airway and the oropharyngeal airway was significantly more obtuse in Group II. Conclusion: The reduction in oropharyngeal volume in OSA patients could be attributed to different anatomical and pathophysiological factors that were corroborated with the findings of the present study.

  1. Morbidity and cost differences between free flap reconstruction and pedicled flap reconstruction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer: Matched control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeele, Ludwig E.; Goldstein, David; Tsai, Vance; Gullane, Patrick J.; Neligan, Peter; Brown, Dale H.; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2006-01-01

    To compare morbidity and cost in patients who underwent primary reconstruction with free tissue transfer with those with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) reconstructions after ablation of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Over a 6-year period, 36 patients had PMMF

  2. Early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Annelise; Jarden, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to explore early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and to investigate the factors that influence these effects. PubMed, Cinahl, and PsycInfo were searched for studies concerning patients...

  3. First experience of Candida non-albicans isolates with high antibiotic resistance pattern caused oropharyngeal candidiasis among cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, oropharyngeal Candidiasis is a serious infection among cancer patients. The isolated Candida spp. were resistant to common antifungal agents, which may lead to longer hospital stay, more expensive/toxic drugs and higher mortality. Therefore, interval surveillance is necessary in developing institutional guidelines.

  4. Malnutrition in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer-prevalence and relationship with oral symptoms : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess prevalence of malnutrition after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer and to explore how oral symptoms relate to malnutrition after treatment. In this cross-sectional study, malnutrition (weight loss a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 10% in 6 months or a

  5. Detection of HPV-associated oropharyngeal tumours in a 16-year cohort : more than meets the eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, L. J.; Mastik, M. F.; Cameron, B. Samaniego; van Dijk, B. A. C.; de Bock, G. H.; van der Laan, B. F. A. M.; van der Vegt, B.; Speel, E. J. M.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Witjes, M. J. H.; Schuuring, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of the prevalence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in oropharyngeal tumours (OpSCC) is important because HPV-positive OpSCC are consistently associated with an improved overall survival. Recently, an algorithm has become available that reliably detects clinically

  6. Genotyping, levels of expression and physical status of human papilloma virus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among Colombian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erira, Alveiro; Motta, Leidy Angélica; Chala, Andrés; Moreno, Andrey; Gamboa, Fredy; García, Dabeiba Adriana

    2015-10-23

    One of the risk factors for squamous cell oropharyngeal carcinoma is infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), with prevalences that vary depending on the geographical region.  To identify the most frequent HPV viral types in oropharyngeal cancer, the levels of expression and the physical condition of the viral genome.  Forty-six patients were included in the study from among those attending head and neck surgical services in the cities of Bogotá, Manizales and Bucaramanga. In the histopathological report all study samples were characterized as oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. DNA extraction was subsequently performed for HPV genotyping and to determine the physical state of the viral genome, as well as RNA to determine viral transcripts using real-time PCR.  HPV prevalence in tumors was 21.74% (n=10) and the most common viral type was HPV-16 (nine cases). Viral expression for HPV-16 was low (one of 11 copies) and the predominant physical state of the virus was mixed (eight cases), with disruption observed at the E1 - E2 binding site (2525 - 3720 nucleotides).  The prevalence of HPV associated with oropharyngeal carcinoma among the Colombian study population was 21.7%, which is relatively low. The most frequent viral type was HPV-16, found in a mixed form and with low expression of E7, possibly indicating a poor prognosis for these patients.

  7. Time to change perspectives on HPV in oropharyngeal cancer. A systematic review of HPV prevalence per oropharyngeal sub-site the last 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeggblom, Linnea; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Tommasino, Massimo; Dalianis, Tina; Näsman, Anders

    2017-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) as a risk factor in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is well established. However, accumulating data imply that the OPSCC concept is too unspecific with regard to HPV prevalence and clinical importance. To further study the role of HPV in OPSCC by sub-site, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed was searched and all studies reporting HPV data (p16/HPV DNA/RNA) in both "lymphoepithelial associated" (i.e. tonsillar and base of tongue cancer; TSCC and BOTSCC respectively) and "non-lymphoepithelial" ("other" OPSCC) OPSCC were included. Pooled odds ratios by HPV detection method were analysed using a random effects model. In total, 58 unique patient cohorts were identified. Total HPV prevalence in TSCC/BOTSCC was 56%, 95%CI: 55-57% (59%, 95%CI: 58-60% for TSCC only) as compared to 19%, 95%CI: 17-20%, in "other" OPSCC. Significant association of HPV to TSCC/BOTSCC vs. "other" OPSCC was observed no matter HPV detection method used, but statistical homogeneity was only observed when studies using algorithm based HPV detection were pooled. HPV prevalence differs markedly between OPSCC sub-sites and while the role of HPV in TSCC/BOTSCC is strong, the role in "other" OPSCC is more uncertain and needs further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined videofluoroscopy and manometry in the diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia: examination technique and preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappabianca, S; Reginelli, A; Monaco, L; Del Vecchio, L; Di Martino, N; Grassi, R

    2008-09-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom of different pathological conditions characterised by alteration of the swallowing mechanism, which may manifest at different levels. We report our experience in the evaluation of the swallowing mechanism with combined videofluoroscopy and manometric recordings. For the combined study, we used a Dyno Compact computerised system (Menfis Biomedical s.r.l., Bologna, Italy) equipped with: (1) graphics card for the management of ultrasonographic or radiological images; (2) A.VI.U.S. dedicated software package, which enables digital-quality recording (PAL/NTSC, composite video or S-Video) of the videofluoroscopy study in AVI format with 320 x 240 resolution and 25 Hz acquisition frequency. The delay introduced by the process of image digitalisation is in the order of 200 ms, so for analysis purposes, the images can be considered synchronised with the manometric recordings. The videomanometry study was performed with the administration of contrast material either in bolus form or diluted. Data were collected on a specifically designed grid for the evaluation of 46 videofluoroscopic items, of which 34 are derived from the laterolateral view (seven in the oral preparatory phase, 15 in the oral transport phase and 12 in the pharyngeal phase) and 12 in the anteroposterior view (six in the oral preparatory phase and six in the oropharyngeal phase). A positive finding for the individual parameters is expressed in a binary fashion. Manometric evaluation was based on 11 items divided into four major and seven minor criteria. Dynamic videofluoroscopy swallow study combined with concurrent manometry enabled the simultaneous recording of anatomical alterations and the functional data of oropharyngeal pressure, thus providing a picture of the anatomical, biomechanical and physiological conditions of swallowing and the manner of bolus propulsion and transit. An early and effective diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia means being able to effectively implement

  9. Prognostic impact of leukocyte counts before and during radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett L. Jensen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral blood count components are accessible and evidently predictive in other cancers but have not been explored in oropharyngeal carcinoma. We examine if there is an association between the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT and lymphopenia, as well as if there is an association between baseline neutrophilia, baseline leukocytosis and lymphocyte nadir in oropharyngeal cancer. Materials and Methods: Analysis started with 150 patients from a previous case to case study design, which retrospectively identified adults with oropharyngeal carcinoma, 100 treated with IMRT in 2010-2012 and 50 treated with IMPT in 2011–2014. Pretreatment leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and hemoglobin levels were extracted, as were neutrophil and lymphocyte nadir levels during radiotherapy. We retained 137 patients with recorded pre-treatment leukocyte and neutrophil levels for associated analysis and 114 patients with recorded lymphocyte levels during radiation and associated analysis. Multivariate survival analyses were done with Cox regression. Results: The radiotherapy type (IMRT vs. IMPT was not associated with lymphopenia (grade 3 P > .99; grade 4 P = .55. In univariate analyses, poor overall survival was associated with pretreatment neutrophilia (hazard ratio [HR] 5.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.99–15.7, P = .001, pretreatment leukocytosis (HR 4.85, 95% CI 1.73–13.6, P = .003, grade 4 lymphopenia during radiotherapy (HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.14–9.44, P = .03, and possibly smoking status >10 pack-years (HR 2.88, 95% CI 1.01–8.18, P = .05, but only T status was possibly significant in multivariate analysis (HR 2.64, 95% CI 0.99–7.00, P = .05. Poor progression-free survival was associated with pretreatment leukocytosis and T status in univariate analysis, and pretreatment neutrophilia and

  10. Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, C.; Denis, F.; Pointreau, Y.; Calais, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Debelleix, C.; Bourhis, J.; Thariat, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cancers of the oropharynx are common lesions. Their treatment often includes radiation therapy either exclusively or in combination with chemotherapy or after surgery. The definition of target volumes is made difficult by the complex anatomy of this area. The aim of this work is to clarify the principles of 3D conformal radiation illustrated by a case report. (authors)

  11. Trans-oral robotic surgery in oropharyngeal carcinoma - A guide for general practitioners and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wendy Sijia; Limmer, Alex; Jabbour, Joe; Clark, Jonathan

    Trans-oral robotic surgery (TORS) is emerging as a minimally invasive alternative to open surgery, or trans-oral laser surgery, for the treatment of some head and neck pathologies, particularly oropharyngeal carcinoma, which is rapidly increasing in incidence. In this article we review current evidence regarding the use of TORS in head and neck surgery in a manner relevant to general practice. This information may be used to facilitate discussion with patients. Compared with open surgery or trans-oral laser surgery, TORS has numerous advantages, including no scarring, less blood loss, fewer complications, lower rates of admission to the intensive care unit, and reduced length of hospitalisation. The availability of TORS in Australia is currently limited and, therefore, public awareness about TORS is lacking. Details regarding the role of TORS and reliable, up-to-date, patient-friendly information sources are discussed in this article.

  12. [Light and electron microscopic studies of oropharyngeal epithelium in Salamandra salamandra (L.) (Urodela: Salamandridae) larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, G

    1984-01-01

    The oropharyngeal-epithelium of intrauterine and free swimming larvae of Salamandra salamandra has been investigated by electron microscopy. With the exception of the toothed areas, where it is multi-layered, the epithelium of intrauterine larvae consists of two cell layers, pavement and basal cells. In older larvae, however, the entire epithelium is multi-layered. The outermost layer contains nonciliated pavement cells, goblet cells and sporadically mitochondria-rich cells. Both, goblet cells and pavement cells synthesize mainly acid mucosubstances, which are localized in big confluent secretory granules in the former and in small granules immediately beneath the apical plasmalemm in the latter. In the second layer different developmental stages of goblet cells and pavement cells can be identified.

  13. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: current status and unresolved challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemel, Christina; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rubello, Domenico [Rovigo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine-PET/CT Oncologic and Endocrine Sections, Rovigo (Italy); Colletti, Patrick M. [University of Southern California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Bree, Remco de [UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, Department of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Because imaging with ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography is unreliable for preoperative lymph node staging of early-stage oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), elective neck dissection has been typically performed. The targeted sampling of sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) identified by lymphoscintigraphy and detected by gamma probe has become an effective alternative for the selection of patients for regional nodal resection. With careful consideration to technique, high SLN detection rates have been reported. Advanced techniques including intraoperative handheld gamma camera imaging and freehand single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are expected to increase surgical confidence in these procedures. This review gives an update on SLN biopsy in patients with OSCC including clinical standards and controversial aspects. (orig.)

  14. Epigenetics of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: opportunities for novel chemotherapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Cameron; Seikaly, Hadi; Biron, Vincent L

    2017-01-31

    Epigenetic modifications are heritable changes in gene expression that do not directly alter DNA sequence. These modifications include DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, small and non-coding RNAs. Alterations in epigenetic profiles cause deregulation of fundamental gene expression pathways associated with carcinogenesis. The role of epigenetics in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has recently been recognized, with implications for novel biomarkers, molecular diagnostics and chemotherapeutics. In this review, important epigenetic pathways in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and negative OPSCC are summarized, as well as the potential clinical utility of this knowledge.This material has never been published and is not currently under evaluation in any other peer-reviewed publication.

  15. Identification of rhabdoviral sequences in oropharyngeal swabs from German and Danish bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Melina; Freuling, Conrad M.; Müller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the frame of active lyssavirus surveillance in bats, oropharyngeal swabs from German (N = 2297) and Danish (N = 134) insectivorous bats were investigated using a newly developed generic pan-lyssavirus real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR).Findings: In total, 15 RT......-qPCR positive swabs were detected. Remarkably, sequencing of positive samples did not confirm the presence of bat associated lyssaviruses but revealed nine distinct novel rhabdovirus-related sequences. Conclusions: Several novel rhabdovirus-related sequences were detected both in German and Danish insectivorous...... bats. The results also prove that the novel generic pan-lyssavirus RT-qPCR offers a very broad detection range that allows the collection of further valuable data concerning the broad and complex diversity within the family Rhabdoviridae....

  16. Species distribution & antifungal susceptibility pattern of oropharyngeal Candida isolates from human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Das

    2016-01-01

    Results: From the 59 culture positive HIV seropositive cases, 61 Candida isolates were recovered; Candidaalbicans (n=47, 77.0%, C. dubliniensis (n=9, 14.7%, C. parapsilosis (n=2, 3.2%, C. glabrata (n=2, 3.2%, and C. famata (n=1, 1.6%. Candida colonization in HIV-seropositive individuals was significantly higher than that of HIV-seronegative (control group. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed (n=6, 9.3% C. albicans isolates resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole by disk-diffusion method whereas no resistance was seen by Fungitest method. Interpretation & conclusions: C. albicans was the commonest Candida species infecting or colonizing HIV seropositive individuals. Oropharyngeal Candida isolates had high level susceptibility to all the major antifungals commonly in use. Increased level of immunosuppression in HIV-seropositives and drug resistance of non-albicans Candida species makes identification and susceptibility testing of Candida species necessary in different geographical areas of the country.

  17. Correlation between HPV status at T and N sites of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josiassen, Michael Vallop; Charabi, Birgitte; Lajer, Christel Braemer

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is known to be associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and may potentially play a vital role in tumor metastasis. The purpose of this study was to correlate HPV status of cervical lymph node metastases with their respective primary...... OPSCC tumor. Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples obtained from 34 patients with cervical lymph node metastases were analyzed with HPV 16 DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR), p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV typing. The results were correlated with the HPV status and type...... found in the primary tumors of OPSCC. Results: Comparing HPV DNA status with p16 we found that 21 primary tumors and lymph node metastases were HPV positive (61.8%) and seven primary tumors and lymph node metastases were HPV negative (20.6%). Six patient samples differed when correlating the primary...

  18. Clinical features and treatment strategy for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Among head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the incidence of oropharyngeal SCC (OPSCC) is increasing in contrast to carcinoma with origin in other subsites. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is now recognized as a significant risk factor of the carcinogenesis of OPSCC. The HPV-related OPSCC patients tend to be relatively young, less exposed to tobacco and alcohol, and have a relatively high socioeconomic status and education level, which is distinct from HPV-unrelated classical OPSCC. The neck metastases tend to be aggressive and cystic. The better response to treatment resulting in improved prognosis of HPV-related OPSCC led to reconsidering the clinical staging and treatment approaches. Clinical trials of treatment deintensification to reduce the acute and late toxicity without compromising efficacy have been conducted. This review of HPV-related OPSCC focuses on current and generally accepted facts regarding the biology, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategy of this new disease entity.

  19. The physiology of deglutition and the pathophysiology and complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    The opening session of the 2nd International Conference on Oropharyngeal Dysphagia featured a series of invited talks reviewing the definition of dysphagia, its prevalence and its pathophysiology. The discussion arising from these talks focused heavily on the current underrecognition of dysphagia as a significant concern for older adults, particularly those over 75. The burdens associated with dysphagia in this sector of the population were recognized to be substantial, both in social/psychological terms and in terms of economic consequences for the healthcare system. The importance of developing swallow screening protocols as a routine method for the early identification of dysphagia and aspiration was explored. The idea of launching political initiatives aimed at increasing awareness and the utilization of appropriate dysphagia healthcare codes was also discussed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalf, J G; de Swart, B J M; Bloem, B R; Munneke, M

    2012-05-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers selected the papers. We computed the estimates of the pooled prevalence weighted by sample size. Twelve studies were suitable for calculating prevalence rates. Ten studies provided an estimate based on subjective outcomes, which proved statistically heterogeneous (p disease severity. Subjective dysphagia occurs in one third of community-dwelling PD patients. Objectively measured dysphagia rates were much higher, with 4 out of 5 patients being affected. This suggests that dysphagia is common in PD, but patients do not always report swallowing difficulties unless asked. This underreporting calls for a proactive clinical approach to dysphagia, particularly in light of the serious clinical consequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Candidate Dosimetric Predictors of Long-Term Swallowing Dysfunction After Oropharyngeal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Hutcheson, Katherine; Barringer, Denise; Tucker, Susan L.; Kies, Merrill; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Dong Lei; Lewin, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate long-term swallowing function in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and to identify novel dose-limiting criteria predictive for dysphagia. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with Stage IV oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma enrolled on a Phase II trial were prospectively evaluated by modified barium swallow studies at baseline, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-IMRT treatment. Candidate dysphagia-associated organs at risk were retrospectively contoured into original treatment plans. Twenty-one (68%) cases were base of tongue and 10 (32%) were tonsil. Stage distribution was T1 (12 patients), T2 (10), T3 (4), T4 (2), and TX (3), and N2 (24), N3 (5), and NX (2). Median age was 52.8 years (range, 42-78 years). Thirteen patients (42%) received concurrent chemotherapy during IMRT. Thirteen (42%) were former smokers. Mean dose to glottic larynx for the cohort was limited to 18 Gy (range, 6-39 Gy) by matching IMRT to conventional low-neck fields. Results: Dose-volume constraints (V30 < 65% and V35 < 35% for anterior oral cavity and V55 < 80% and V65 < 30% for high superior pharyngeal constrictors) predictive for objective swallowing dysfunction were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Aspiration and feeding tube dependence were observed in only 1 patient at 24 months. Conclusions: In the context of glottic laryngeal shielding, we describe candidate oral cavity and superior pharyngeal constrictor organs at risk and dose-volume constraints associated with preserved long-term swallowing function; these constraints are currently undergoing prospective validation. Strict protection of the glottic larynx via beam-split IMRT techniques promises to make chronic aspiration an uncommon outcome.

  2. Monitoring of microvascular free flaps following oropharyngeal reconstruction using infrared thermography: first clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Maren; Chalopin, Claire; Unger, Michael; Halama, Dirk; Neumuth, Thomas; Dietz, Andreas; Fischer, Miloš

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate static and dynamic infrared (IR) thermography for intra- and postoperative free-flap monitoring following oropharyngeal reconstruction. Sixteen patients with oropharyngeal reconstruction by free radial forearm flap were included in this prospective, clinical study (05/2013-08/2014). Prior ("intraop_pre") and following ("intraop_post") completion of the microvascular anastomoses, IR thermography was performed for intraoperative flap monitoring. Further IR images were acquired one day ("postop_1") and 10 days ("postop_10") after surgery for postoperative flap monitoring. Of the 16, 15 transferred free radial forearm flaps did not show any perfusion failure. A significant decreasing mean temperature difference (∆T: temperature difference between the flap surface and the surrounding tissue in Kelvin) was measured at all investigation points in comparison with the temperature difference at "intraop_pre" (mean values on all patients: ∆T intraop_pre = -2.64 K; ∆T intraop_post = -1.22 K, p thermography showed typical pattern of non-pathological rewarming due to re-established flap perfusion after completion of the microvascular anastomoses. Static and dynamic IR thermography is a promising, objective method for intraoperative and postoperative monitoring of free-flap reconstructions in head and neck surgery and to detect perfusion failure, before macroscopic changes in the tissue surface are obvious. A lack of significant decrease of the temperature difference compared to surrounding tissue following completion of microvascular anastomoses and an atypical rewarming following a thermal challenge are suggestive of flap perfusion failure.

  3. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stugis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, Gary B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Kies, Merill S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  4. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence and mortality trends in the United States, 1973-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megwalu, Uchechukwu C; Sirjani, Davud; Devine, Erin E

    2017-10-31

    To analyze oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence and mortality trends in the United States for the years 1973 through 2013. Cross-sectional study using a large population-based cancer database. Data on incidence and mortality rates were extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 Database. Annual percentage change in rates was calculated using Joinpoint regression analysis (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD). Incidence rates increased (annual percent change [APC]; 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17 to 2.88) from 1973 to 1983, remained stable (APC -0.52, 95% CI -1.30 to 0.26) from 1983 to 1997, and increased (APC 1.32, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.81) from 1997 to 2013. Overall, incidence rates increased for males (APC 0.73, 95% CI 0.22 to 1.25) but not females (APC -0.77, 95% CI -0.68 to 0.82). Incidence rates increased in the white population (APC 0.79, 95% CI 0.33 to 1.25) but decreased in the black population (APC -0.72, 95% CI -1.41 to -0.02). The incidence rates increased for tongue-base tumors (APC 1.17, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.92) and tonsil tumors (APC 0.47, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.96) but decreased for other sites. Incidence-based mortality decreased (APC -0.78, 95% CI -1.13 to -0.42) from 1993 to 2013. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence rates increased in a nonlinear fashion from 1973 to 2013, whereas mortality rates declined. This, along with variation in trends by demographic and tumor factors, suggest that human papilloma virus is the main driver of the recent rise in incidence. 2b. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Chemoradiotherapy-induced upregulation of PD-1 antagonizes immunity to HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Falguni; Duluc, Dorothée; Imai, Naoko; Clark, Amelia; Misiukiewicz, Krzys; Bonomi, Marcello; Gupta, Vishal; Patsias, Alexis; Parides, Michael; Demicco, Elizabeth G; Zhang, David Y; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Kao, Johnny; Gnjatic, Sacha; Oh, Sangkon; Posner, Marshall R; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-12-15

    While viral antigens in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (HPVOPC) are attractive targets for immunotherapy, the effects of existing standard-of-care therapies on immune responses to HPV are poorly understood. We serially sampled blood from patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer undergoing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy. Circulating immunocytes including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, regulatory T cells (Treg), and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were profiled by flow cytometry. Antigen-specific T-cell responses were measured in response to HPV16 E6 and E7 peptide pools. The role of PD-1 signaling in treatment-related immunosuppression was functionally defined by performing HPV-specific T-cell assays in the presence of blocking antibody. While HPV-specific T-cell responses were present in 13 of 18 patients before treatment, 10 of 13 patients lost these responses within 3 months after chemoradiotherapy. Chemoradiotherapy decreased circulating T cells and markedly elevated MDSCs. PD-1 expression on CD4(+) T cells increased by nearly 2.5-fold after chemoradiotherapy, and ex vivo culture with PD-1-blocking antibody enhanced HPV-specific T-cell responses in 8 of 18 samples tested. Chemoradiotherapy suppresses circulating immune responses in patients with HPVOPC by unfavorably altering effector:suppressor immunocyte ratios and upregulating PD-1 expression on CD4(+) T cells. These data strongly support testing of PD-1-blocking agents in combination with standard-of-care chemoradiotherapy for HPVOPC. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Treatment results of selective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, Mioko; Chitose, Shun-ichi; Maeda, Akiteru; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma were treated with intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy between December 2002 and December 2008. The patients were classified as 3 stage II, 3 stage III and 8 stage IV cases. According to the subsite of the oropharynx, the patients were classified as 6 lateral wall (LW), 5 anterior wall (AW) and 3 superior wall (SW) cases. Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy by cisplatin was given weekly with concurrent radiotherapy for approximately four weeks, and the total number of infusions was decided according to intermediate judgments of effectiveness. The total dose of radiation was 60-81.4 Gy (average 65.3 Gy). As a result of this treatment, there were 12 complete response (CR) (85.7%) and 2 partial response (PR) (14.3%) for primary tumor and 4 CR (57.1%), 2 PR (28.6%), and 1 no change (NC) (14.3%) for lymph node. Regarding survival, 7 were alive and cancer-free (50%), 2 were alive with cervical lymph node metastasis (14.3%), 4 died of the primary tumor (28.6%) and 1 died of other disease (7.1%). The local control rates by subsite were 75% in LW, 66.7% in AW and 33.3% in SW. These results indicate in terms of both local control rate and functional preservation, that advanced AW cancer seems to be a good indication for intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy, but the therapy should be determined cautiously with respect to indications for LW and SW oropharyngeal carcinoma. (author)

  7. Outcomes and xerostomia after postoperative radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-He; Yan, Chao; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Ping; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Tu, Wen-Yong; Kirwan, Jessica; Mendenhall, William M

    2014-10-01

    We compared outcomes and xerostomia grade after postoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (RT) in patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. Eighty-eight patients with oral cavity (n = 77) and oropharyngeal (n = 11) carcinoma underwent postoperative IMRT (n = 44) or conventional RT (n = 44). Outcomes, failure patterns, volume, doses, salivary gland V30, and xerostomia grade were evaluated. The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 48-58 months). The median interval from surgery to RT was 4 weeks (range, 3-6 weeks). Twenty-one patients (7 and 14 for the IMRT and conventional RT groups, respectively) experienced local-regional failure. For the IMRT group, all 7 local-regional failures occurred in the high-dose target volumes. For the conventional RT group, there were 12 in-field failures, 1 at the margin, and 1 out-of-field. Nine patients experienced distant failure (5 and 4 for the IMRT and conventional RT groups, respectively). The 4-year local-regional control, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and distant-metastasis rates for the IMRT and conventional RT groups were 84.1% versus 68.2% (p = .055), 68.2% versus 52.3% (p = .091), 70.5% versus 56.8% (p = .124), and 11.4% versus 9.1% (p = .927), respectively. Xerostomia grade after RT was lower for IMRT compared to conventional RT (p xerostomia grade when compared to conventional RT. The predominant failure pattern was local. No differences were found in survival outcomes between both groups. There was a marginal difference in local-regional control. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Psychometric characteristics of health-related quality-of-life questionnaires in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Angelique A; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Klijn-Zwijnenberg, Iris R

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia can have severe consequences for the patient's health, influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sound psychometric properties of HRQoL questionnaires are a precondition for assessing the impact of dysphagia, the focus of this study, resulting in recommendations for the appropriate use of these questionnaires in both clinical practice and research contexts. We performed a systematic review starting with a search for and retrieval of all full-text articles on the development of HRQoL questionnaires related to oropharyngeal dysphagia and/or their psychometric validation from the electronic databases PubMed and Embase published up to June 2011. Psychometric properties were judged according to quality criteria proposed for health status questionnaires. Eight questionnaires were included in this study. Four are aimed solely at HRQoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia: the deglutition handicap index (DHI), dysphagia handicap index (DHI'), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), and SWAL-QOL, while the EDGQ, EORTC QLQ-STO 22, EORTC QLQ-OG 25 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 focus on other primary diseases resulting in dysphagia. The psychometric properties of the DHI, DHI', MDADI, and SWAL-QOL were evaluated. For appropriate applicability of HRQoL questionnaires, strong scores on the psychometric criteria face validity, criterion validity, and interpretability are prerequisites. The SWAL-QOL has the strongest ratings for these criteria, while the DHI' is the most easy to apply given its 25 items and the use of a uniform scoring format. For optimal use of HRQoL questionnaires in diverse settings, it is necessary to combine psychometric and utility approaches.

  9. A Comparative Study Between Modified Starch and Xanthan Gum Thickeners in Post-Stroke Oropharyngeal Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardell, N; Rofes, L; Arreola, V; Speyer, R; Clavé, P

    2016-04-01

    Thickeners are used in post-stroke oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) as a compensatory therapeutic strategy against aspirations. To compare the therapeutic effects of modified starch (MS) and xanthan gum (XG) thickeners on swallow safety and efficacy in chronic post-stroke OD patients using clinical and videofluoroscopic (VFS) assessment. Patients were studied by clinical assessment (volume-viscosity swallow test, V-VST) and VFS using 3 volumes (5, 10, 20 mL) and 3 viscosities (liquid, nectar and spoon thick), comparing MS and XG. We studied 122 patients (46MS, 76XG). (A) V-VST showed that both thickeners similarly improved safety of swallow. Prevalence of safe swallowing significantly increased with enhanced viscosity (P < 0.001 vs liquid), MS: 47.83 % at liquid, 84.93 % at nectar and 92.96 % at spoon thick; XG: 55.31 % at liquid, 77.78 % at nectar and 97.84 % at spoon thick. Patients on MS reported higher prevalence of pharyngeal residue at spoon-thick viscosities. (B) VFS: increasing bolus viscosity with either thickener increased prevalence of safe swallows (P < 0.001 vs liquid), MS: 30.25 % liquid, 61.07 % nectar and 92.64 % spoon thick; XG: 29.12 % liquid, 71.30 % nectar and 89.91 % spoon thick. Penetration-aspiration scale score was significantly reduced with increased viscosity with both thickeners. MS increased oral and pharyngeal residues at nectar and spoon-thick viscosities but XG did not. Timing of airway protection mechanisms and bolus velocity were not affected by either thickener. Increasing bolus viscosity with MS and XG thickeners strongly and similarly improved safety of swallow in chronic post-stroke OD by a compensatory mechanism; in contrast only MS thickeners increased oropharyngeal residue.

  10. Fourier transform infrared for noninvasive optical diagnosis of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Georgina E; Fox, Hannah R; Marnane, Conor; Pope, Laysan; Prabhu, Vinod; Winter, Stuart; Derrick, Anna V; Lewis, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    The 5-year survival rate for advanced head and neck cancers is 50%. There is currently no noninvasive method or effective screening procedure available to diagnose head and neck cancer at the earliest stages when it is still highly curable. This study aims to show how Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could be used as a sensitive, noninvasive, low cost technique to diagnose head and neck cancer at an earlier stage and, thus, increase the likelihood of survival. Sputum samples were collected from 16 cases with oral or oropharyngeal cancer, 8 cases with laryngeal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. Cell pellets were produced from each of these samples and used to generate FTIR spectra within the 'biochemical fingerprint' wavenumber region of 1800 to 950 cm(-1). Discrimination between cancer and normal sputum was achieved using infrared wavenumbers 1650 cm(-1), 1550 cm(-1), and 1042 cm(-1) determined by robust feature selection. These 3 wavenumbers were used to develop potential models to discriminate both oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer from normal control. In cancer cases, the absorbance levels for 1550 cm(-1) were increased relative to controls, whereas 1042 cm(-1) absorbance was decreased suggesting changes to protein and glycoprotein structure within sputa cells. This preliminary study shows potential for how FTIR could be developed into a simplistic diagnostic tool that could easily be implemented by a nonspecialist to diagnose and monitor head and neck cancer. The method could especially provide a means for detecting laryngeal cancer hidden from noninvasive observation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  12. Selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination and antibiotic resistance in patients in intensive-care units: an open-label, clustered group-randomised, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, A.M. de; Kluytmans, J.A.; Blok, H.E.; Mascini, E.M.; Benus, R.F.; Bernards, A.T.; Kuijper, E.J.; Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Jansz, A.R.; Jongh, B.M. de; Asselt, G.J. van; Frenay, I.H.; Thijsen, S.F.; Conijn, S.N.; Kaan, J.A.; Arends, J.P.; Sturm, P.D.J.; Bootsma, M.C.; Bonten, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, we assessed selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) on survival and prevention of bacteraemia in patients in intensive-care units. In this analysis, we aimed to assess effectiveness of these interventions for

  13. Selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination and antibiotic resistance in patients in intensive-care units : an open-label, clustered group-randomised, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smet, Anne Marie G. A.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Blok, Hetty E. M.; Mascini, Ellen M.; Benus, Robin F. J.; Bernards, Alexandra T.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine A.; Jansz, Arjan R.; de Jongh, Bartelt M.; van Asselt, Gerard J.; Frenay, Ine H. M. E.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; Conijn, Simon N. M.; Kaan, Jan A.; Arends, Jan P.; Sturm, Patrick D. J.; Bootsma, Martin C. J.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    Background Previously, we assessed selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) on survival and prevention of bacteraemia in patients in intensive-care units. In this analysis, we aimed to assess effectiveness of these interventions for prevention

  14. Single-dose fluconazole versus standard 2-week therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.J.M.; Matee, M.I.N.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Moshi, M.J.; Simon, E.N.; Mugusi, F.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Verweij, P.E.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection affecting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because of convenience, cost, and reluctance to complicate antiretroviral treatment regimens, single-dose fluconazole may be a favorable regimen for

  15. Quality of Life in Oncological Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Validity and Reliability of the Dutch Version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index

    OpenAIRE

    Speyer, Ren?e; Heijnen, Bas J.; Baijens, Laura W.; Vrijenhoef, Femke H.; Otters, Elsemieke F.; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C.

    2011-01-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questio...

  16. Pediatric sialolithiasis is not related to oral or oropharyngeal infection: A population-based case control study using the Korean National Health Insurance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Seong Jun; Lee, Eunkyu; Kim, Hee Jung; Oh, Hyun-Kyung; Jeong, Han-Sin

    2017-06-01

    Poor oral hygiene is one of the risk factors for sialolithiasis particularly in adults; however the etiology of sialolithiasis in pediatric patients remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study is to identify the association between sialolithiasis and the oral/oropharyngeal infections in the pediatric population, as surrogate indicators for oral hygiene and retrograde infections to the affected salivary gland. This was a population based case-control study using the Korean National Health Insurance Database. We identified 10,095 pediatric patients, diagnosed with sialolithiasis, as cases (study period 2011-2015) and 50,475 age/gender/residence matched subjects without sialolithiasis, but with unrelated diseases (e.g., simple trauma in extremities) were set as controls. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the association of sialolithiasis with oral or oropharyngeal infections. The morbidity rate of sialadenitis was much higher in the cases than the controls (32.92% vs 0.72%, p oral or oropharyngeal infections (stomatitis, gingivitis, periodontitis, and pharyngo-tonsillitis) was significantly lower in pediatric sialolithiasis patients in all age (0-18) groups. The adjusted odds ratios of the multivariate analyses also confirmed significantly less prevalence of the oral and oropharyngeal infections in pediatric sialolithiasis patients. Oral or oropharyngeal infections were inversely associated with pediatric sialolithiasis, suggesting that pediatric sialolithiasis may result from the intrinsic factors of the salivary gland itself, not from oral or oropharyngeal infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidental finding of an extensive oropharyngeal mass in magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with temporomandibular disorder: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omolehinwa, Temitope T.; Mupparapu, Mel; Akintoye, SundayO. [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-12-15

    In this report, we describe the incidental finding of an oropharyngeal mass in a patient who presented with a chief complaint of temporomandibular pain. The patient was initially evaluated by an otorhinolaryngologist for complaints of headaches, earache, and sinus congestion. Due to worsening headaches and trismus, he was further referred for the management of temporomandibular disorder. The clinical evaluation was uneventful except for limited mouth opening (trismus). An advanced radiological evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal region. The mass occupied the masticatory space and extended superioinferiorly from the skull base to the mandible. A diagnostic biopsy of the lesion revealed a long-standing human papilloma virus (HPV-16)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. This case illustrates the need for the timely radiological evaluation of seemingly innocuous orofacial pain.

  18. Incidental finding of an extensive oropharyngeal mass in magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with temporomandibular disorder: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omolehinwa, Temitope T.; Mupparapu, Mel; Akintoye, SundayO.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe the incidental finding of an oropharyngeal mass in a patient who presented with a chief complaint of temporomandibular pain. The patient was initially evaluated by an otorhinolaryngologist for complaints of headaches, earache, and sinus congestion. Due to worsening headaches and trismus, he was further referred for the management of temporomandibular disorder. The clinical evaluation was uneventful except for limited mouth opening (trismus). An advanced radiological evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal region. The mass occupied the masticatory space and extended superioinferiorly from the skull base to the mandible. A diagnostic biopsy of the lesion revealed a long-standing human papilloma virus (HPV-16)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. This case illustrates the need for the timely radiological evaluation of seemingly innocuous orofacial pain

  19. Population-based incidence trends of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers by sex among the poorest and underprivileged populations

    OpenAIRE

    Auluck, Ajit; Walker, Blake Byron; Hislop, Greg; Lear, Scott A; Schuurman, Nadine; Rosin, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral cancer is an important health issue, with changing incidence in many countries. Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC, in tonsil and oropharygeal areas) is increasing, while oral cavity cancer (OCC, other sites in the mouth) is decreasing. There is the need to identify high risk groups and communities for further study and intervention. The objective of this study was to determine how the incidence of OPC and OCC varied by neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) in British Columbia (B...

  20. Investigation of radiomic signatures for local recurrence using primary tumor texture analysis in oropharyngeal head and neck cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Elhalawani, Hesham; Kanwar, Aasheesh; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; White, Aubrey; Zafereo, James; Wong, Andrew; Berends, Joel; Abohashem, Shady; Williams, Bowman; Aymard, Jeremy M.; Perni, Subha; Messer, Jay; Warren, Ben; Youssef, Bassem; Yang, Pei

    2018-01-01

    Radiomics is one such “big data” approach that applies advanced image refining/data characterization algorithms to generate imaging features that can quantitatively classify tumor phenotypes in a non-invasive manner. We hypothesize that certain textural features of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) primary tumors will have statistically significant correlations to patient outcomes such as local control. Patients from an IRB-approved database dispositioned to (chemo)radiotherapy for locally advanced ...

  1. Topical gentian violet compared with nystatin oral suspension for the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-1-infected participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pranab K; Chen, Huichao; Patton, Lauren L; Evans, Scott; Lee, Anthony; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Hakim, James; Masheto, Gaerolwe; Sawe, Frederick; Pho, Mai T; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Shiboski, Caroline H; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Salata, Robert A

    2017-01-02

    Compare the safety and efficacy of topical gentian violet with that of nystatin oral suspension (NYS) for the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-1-infected adults in resource-limited settings. Multicenter, open-label, evaluator-blinded, randomized clinical trial at eight international sites, within the AIDS Clinical Trials Group. Adult HIV-infected participants with oropharyngeal candidiasis, stratified by CD4 cell counts and antiretroviral therapy status at study entry, were randomized to receive either gentian violet (0.00165%, BID) or NYS (500 000 units, QID) for 14 days. Cure or improvement after 14 days of treatment. Signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal candidiasis were evaluated in an evaluator-blinded manner. The study was closed early per Data Safety Monitoring Board after enrolling 221 participants (target = 494). Among the 182 participants eligible for efficacy analysis, 63 (68.5%) in the gentian violet arm had cure or improvement of oropharyngeal candidiasis versus 61 (67.8%) in the NYS arm, resulting in a nonsizable difference of 0.007 (95% confidence interval: -0.129, 0.143). There was no sizable difference in cure rates between the two arms (-0.0007; 95% confidence interval: -0.146, 0.131). No gentian violet-related adverse events were noted. No sizable differences were identified in tolerance, adherence, quality of life, or acceptability of study drugs. In gentian violet arm, 61 and 39% of participants reported 'no' and 'mild-to-moderate' staining, respectively. Cost for medication procurement was significantly lower for gentian violet versus NYS (median $2.51 and 19.42, respectively, P = 0.01). Efficacy of gentian violet was not statistically different than NYS, was well tolerated, and its procurement cost was substantially less than NYS.

  2. Fine needle aspiration cytology of oral and oropharyngeal lesions with an emphasis on the diagnostic utility and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic utility and pitfalls of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC in oral and oropharyngeal lesions. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective audit of oral and oropharyngeal lesions diagnosed with FNAC over a period of six years (2005-2010. Results: Oral/oropharyngeal lesions [n=157] comprised 0.35% of the total FNAC load. The age ranged 1-80 years with the male: female ratio being 1.4:1. Aspirates were inadequate in 7% cases. Histopathology was available in 73/157 (46.5% cases. Palate was the most common site of involvement [n=66] followed by tongue [n=35], buccal mucosa [n=18], floor of the mouth [n=17], tonsil [n=10], alveolus [n=5], retromolar trigone [n=3], and posterior pharyngeal wall [n=3]. Cytodiagnoses were categorized into infective/inflammatory lesions and benign cysts, and benign and malignant tumours. Uncommon lesions included ectopic lingual thyroid and adult rhabdomyoma of tongue, and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT, and leiomyosarcoma in buccal mucosa. A single false-positive case was dense inflammation with squamous cells misinterpreted as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC on cytology. There were eight false-negative cases mainly due to sampling error. One false-negative case due to interpretation error was in a salivary gland tumor. The sensitivity of FNAC in diagnosing oral/oropharyngeal lesions was 71.4%; specificity was 97.8% with diagnostic accuracy of 87.7%. Conclusions: Salivary gland tumors and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC are the most common lesions seen in the oral cavity. FNAC proves to be highly effective in diagnosing the spectrum of different lesions in this region. Sampling error is the main cause of false-negative cases in this region.

  3. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-07-01

     There are an estimated 30,000-40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977-2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children.

  4. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000-40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977-2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09% addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5% were from Canada, 3 (13.6% were from Japan, 2 (9% were from Brazil, 2 (9% were from Germany, 1 (4.5% was from the USA, 1 (4.5% was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5% was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (rehabilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children.

  5. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up.

  6. Late radiation-associated dysphagia with lower cranial neuropathy in long-term oropharyngeal cancer survivors: video case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Katherine A; Yuk, Margaret M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Gunn, G Brandon; Lewin, Jan S

    2015-04-01

    Lower cranial neuropathies are a late effect of radiotherapy (RT), typically reported in nasopharyngeal cancer survivors. Limited data examine these neuropathies after oropharyngeal cancer, particularly as it relates to late radiation-associated dysphagia (late-RAD). Two cases were examined over 4 to 6 years. Late-RAD was assessed per MBS impairment profile (MBSImP™©), Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS), Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck cancer (PSS-HN), and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI). Neuropathies were examined via clinical examination and laryngeal videostroboscopy, and compared with trajectories of late-RAD. Media-enriched case reports describe the course of late-RAD and neuropathies in 2 cases after definitive RT ± epidermal growth factor receptor-inhibitor for oropharyngeal cancer. Late-RAD was characterized by severe physiologic impairments per MBSImP™© and decreased swallowing-related quality of life (QOL) per MDADI. Trajectories of late-RAD paralleled the progression or stability of neuropathies. Late-RAD with lower cranial neuropathies resulted in profound and persistent functional impairment. Rarely reported, late radiation-associated lower cranial neuropathies may be a major contributor to new-onset or progressive dysphagia in long-term oropharyngeal cancer survivors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000–40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977–2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children. PMID:25991964

  8. Developing a new diagnostic algorithm for human papilloma virus associated oropharyngeal carcinoma: an investigation of HPV DNA assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Natasha; Gupta, Michael; Doerwald-Munoz, Lilian; Jang, Dan; Young, James Edward Massey; Archibald, Stuart; Jackson, Bernard; Lee, Jenny; Chernesky, Max

    2017-02-13

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the development of a large proportion of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Current techniques used to diagnose HPV etiology require histopathologic analysis. We aim to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of a new application non-histopathologic diagnostic tests to help assist diagnosis of HPV-related oropharyngeal tumors. Patients with OPSCC with nodal metastasis were consecutively recruited from a multidisciplinary cancer clinic. Appropriate samples were collected and analyzed. The various tests examined included COBAS® 4800, Cervista® HR and Genotyping. These tests were compared to p16 staining, which was used as the diagnostic standard. StataIC 14.2 was used to perform analysis, including sensitivity, specificity and receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curves. The COBAS® FNA (area under ROC 0.863) and saliva (area under ROC 0.847) samples performed well in diagnosing HPV positive and negative tumors. Samples tested with Cervista® did not corroborate p16 status reliably. We were able to increase the diagnostic yield of the COBAS® FNA samples by applying the results of the saliva test to negative FNA samples which correctly identified 11 additional p16 positive tumors (area under ROC 0.915). Surrogate testing for HPV using alternate methods is feasible and closely predicts the results of standard diagnostic methods. In the future, these could minimize invasive procedures for diagnosing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer, but also help to diagnose and treat patients with unknown primaries.

  9. Long-term survival outcomes in patients with surgically treated oropharyngeal cancer and defined human papilloma virus status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, O T; Sood, S; Shah, K A; Han, C; Rapozo, D; Mehanna, H; Winter, S C

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated long-term survival outcomes in surgically treated oropharyngeal cancer patients with known human papilloma virus status. A case note review was performed of all patients undergoing primary surgery for oropharyngeal cancer in a single centre over a 10-year period. Human papilloma virus status was determined via dual modality testing. Associations between clinicopathological variables and survival were identified using a log-rank test. Of the 107 cases in the study, 40 per cent (n = 41) were human papilloma virus positive. The positive and negative predictive values of p16 immunohistochemistry for human papilloma virus status were 57 per cent and 100 per cent, respectively. At a mean follow up of 59.5 months, 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates were 78 per cent and 69 per cent, respectively. Human papilloma virus status (p = 0.014), smoking status (p = 0.021) and tumour stage (p = 0.03) were significant prognostic indicators. The long-term survival rates in surgically treated oropharyngeal cancer patients were comparable to other studies. Variables including human papilloma virus status and tumour stage were associated with survival in patients treated with primary surgery; however, nodal stage and presence of extracapsular spread were non-prognostic.

  10. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification.

  11. A model using concomitant markers for predicting outcome in human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Cinzia; Mints, Michael; Tertipis, Nikolaos; Haeggblom, Linnea; Sivars, Lars; Ährlund-Richter, Andreas; Vlastos, Andrea; Smedberg, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Näsman, Anders; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2017-05-01

    Head-neck cancer therapy has become intensified. With radiotherapy alone, 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) is 80% for HPV-positive TSCC/BOTSCC and better for patients with favorable characteristics, suggesting therapy could be tapered for some, decreasing side-effects. Therefore, we built a model to predict progression-free survival for patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC. TSCC/BOTSCC patients treated curatively between 2000 and 2011, with HPV16 DNA/E7 mRNA positive tumors examined for CD8 + TILs, HPV16 mRNA and HLA class I expression were included. Patients were split randomly 65/35 into training and validation sets, and LASSO regression was used to select a model in the training set, the performance of which was evaluated in the validation set. 258 patients with HPV DNA/E7 mRNA positive tumors could be included, 168 and 90 patients in the respective sets. No treatment improved prognosis compared to radiotherapy alone. CD8 + TIL counts and young age were the strongest predictors of survival, followed by T-stage <3 and presence of HPV16 E2 mRNA. The model had an area under curve (AUC) of 76%. A model where the presence of three of four of these markers defined good prognosis captured 56% of non-relapsing patients with a positive predictive value of 98% in the validation set. Furthermore, the model identified 35% of our cohort that was overtreated and could safely have received de-escalated therapy. CD8 + TIL counts, age, T-stage and E2 expression could predict progression-free survival, identifying patients eligible for randomized trials with milder treatment, potentially reducing side effects without worsening prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Robustness Recipes for Minimax Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, Sebastian van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Perkó, Zoltán [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lathouwers, Danny [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa, E-mail: m.hoogeman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: We aimed to derive a “robustness recipe” giving the range robustness (RR) and setup robustness (SR) settings (ie, the error values) that ensure adequate clinical target volume (CTV) coverage in oropharyngeal cancer patients for given gaussian distributions of systematic setup, random setup, and range errors (characterized by standard deviations of Σ, σ, and ρ, respectively) when used in minimax worst-case robust intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization. Methods and Materials: For the analysis, contoured computed tomography (CT) scans of 9 unilateral and 9 bilateral patients were used. An IMPT plan was considered robust if, for at least 98% of the simulated fractionated treatments, 98% of the CTV received 95% or more of the prescribed dose. For fast assessment of the CTV coverage for given error distributions (ie, different values of Σ, σ, and ρ), polynomial chaos methods were used. Separate recipes were derived for the unilateral and bilateral cases using one patient from each group, and all 18 patients were included in the validation of the recipes. Results: Treatment plans for bilateral cases are intrinsically more robust than those for unilateral cases. The required RR only depends on the ρ, and SR can be fitted by second-order polynomials in Σ and σ. The formulas for the derived robustness recipes are as follows: Unilateral patients need SR = −0.15Σ{sup 2} + 0.27σ{sup 2} + 1.85Σ − 0.06σ + 1.22 and RR=3% for ρ = 1% and ρ = 2%; bilateral patients need SR = −0.07Σ{sup 2} + 0.19σ{sup 2} + 1.34Σ − 0.07σ + 1.17 and RR=3% and 4% for ρ = 1% and 2%, respectively. For the recipe validation, 2 plans were generated for each of the 18 patients corresponding to Σ = σ = 1.5 mm and ρ = 0% and 2%. Thirty-four plans had adequate CTV coverage in 98% or more of the simulated fractionated treatments; the remaining 2 had adequate coverage in 97.8% and 97.9%. Conclusions: Robustness recipes were derived that can

  13. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schöder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p 0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation. Conclusion: PET and MRI are complementary and combined use is ideal. However, the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) particularly for primary tumors underscores the limitations of defining GTVs using imaging alone. PE is invaluable and must be incorporated.

  14. Oropharyngeal and laryngeal sensory innervation in the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and sensory stimulation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Berdugo, Daniel; Rofes, Laia; Casamitjana, J Francesc; Padrón, Andreína; Quer, Miquel; Clavé, Pere

    2016-09-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) affects older and neurological patients, causing malnutrition and dehydration and increasing the risk for aspiration pneumonia. There is evidence that sensory deficits in those populations are closely related to swallowing disorders, and several research groups are developing new therapies based on sensory stimulation of this area. More information on the sensory innervation participating in the swallow response is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of OD and to develop new treatments. This review focuses on the sensory innervation of the human oropharynx and larynx in healthy people compared with patients with swallowing disorders in order to unravel the abnormalities that may lead to the loss of sensitivity in patients with OD. We also hypothesize the pathway through which active sensory-enhancement treatments may elicit their therapeutic effect on patients with swallowing dysfunctions. As far as we know, this is the first time a review covers the anatomy, histology, ultrastructure, and molecular biology of the sensory innervation of the swallowing function. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  16. Beta-Catenin and Epithelial Tumors: A Study Based on 374 Oropharyngeal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Santoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although altered regulation of the Wnt pathway via beta-catenin is a frequent event in several human cancers, its potential implications in oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC/OPSCC are largely unexplored. Work purpose was to define association between beta-catenin expression and clinical-pathological parameters in 374 OSCCs/OP-SCCs by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Materials and Methods. Association between IHC detected patterns of protein expression and clinical-pathological parameters was assessed by statistical analysis and survival rates by Kaplan-Meier curves. Beta-catenin expression was also investigated in OSCC cell lines by Real-Time PCR. An additional analysis of the DNA content was performed on 22 representative OSCCs/OPSCCs by DNA-image-cytometric analysis. Results and Discussion. All carcinomas exhibited significant alterations of beta-catenin expression (P<0.05. Beta-catenin protein was mainly detected in the cytoplasm of cancerous cells and only focal nuclear positivity was observed. Higher cytoplasmic expression correlated significantly with poor histological differentiation, advanced stage, and worst patient outcome (P<0.05. By Real-Time PCR significant increase of beta-catenin mRNA was detected in OSCC cell lines and in 45% of surgical specimens. DNA ploidy study demonstrated high levels of aneuploidy in beta-catenin overexpressing carcinomas. Conclusions. This is the largest study reporting significant association between beta-catenin expression and clinical-pathological factors in patients with OSCCs/OPSCCs.

  17. IL-17 Receptor Signaling in Oral Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Protection against Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R; Bruno, Vincent M; Childs, Erin E; Daugherty, Sean; Hunter, Joseph P; Mengesha, Bemnet G; Saevig, Danielle L; Hendricks, Matthew R; Coleman, Bianca M; Brane, Lucas; Solis, Norma; Cruz, J Agustin; Verma, Akash H; Garg, Abhishek V; Hise, Amy G; Richardson, Jonathan P; Naglik, Julian R; Filler, Scott G; Kolls, Jay K; Sinha, Satrajit; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-11-09

    Signaling through the IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) is required to prevent oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in mice and humans. However, the IL-17-responsive cell type(s) that mediate protection are unknown. Using radiation chimeras, we were able to rule out a requirement for IL-17RA in the hematopoietic compartment. We saw remarkable concordance of IL-17-controlled gene expression in C. albicans-infected human oral epithelial cells (OECs) and in tongue tissue from mice with OPC. To interrogate the role of the IL-17R in OECs, we generated mice with conditional deletion of IL-17RA in superficial oral and esophageal epithelial cells (Il17ra ΔK13 ). Following oral Candida infection, Il17ra ΔK13 mice exhibited fungal loads and weight loss indistinguishable from Il17ra -/- mice. Susceptibility in Il17ra ΔK13 mice correlated with expression of the antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 3 (BD3, Defb3). Consistently, Defb3 -/- mice were susceptible to OPC. Thus, OECs dominantly control IL-17R-dependent responses to OPC through regulation of BD3 expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CD8 T-cells and E-cadherin in host responses against oropharyngeal candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, K.; Lilly, E.A.; Zacharek, M.; McNulty, K.; Leigh, J.E.; Vazquez, J.E.; Fidel, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is the most common oral infection in HIV+ persons. Previous studies suggest a role for CD8+ T-cells against OPC when CD4+ T-cells are lost, but enhanced susceptibility to infection occurs when CD8+ T-cell migration is inhibited by reduced tissue E-cadherin. Objective Conduct a longitudinal study of tissue CD8+ T-cells and E-cadherin expression before, during, and after episodes of OPC. Methods Oral fungal burden was monitored and tissue was evaluated for CD8+ T-cells and E-cadherin over a one-year period in HIV+ persons with a history of, or an acute episode of OPC. Results While longitudinal analyses precluded formal interpretations, point prevalence analyses of the dataset revealed that when patients experiencing OPC were successfully treated, tissue E-cadherin expression was similar to patients who had not experienced OPC, and higher numbers of CD8+ T-cells were distributed throughout OPC− tissue under normal expression of E-cadherin. Conclusion These results suggest that 1) reduction in tissue E-cadherin expression in OPC+ patients is not permanent, and 2) high numbers of CD8+ T-cells can be distributed throughout OPC− tissue under normal E-cadherin expression. Together these results extend our previous studies and continue to support a role for CD8+ T-cells in host defense against OPC. PMID:21958417

  19. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gligorov, Joseph; Bastit, Laurent; Gervais, Honorine; Henni, Mehdi; Kahila, Widad; Lepille, Daniel; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Sasso, Giuseppe; Varette, Charles; Azria, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%] in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  20. Natural course of distant metastases following radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao Hui; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Hope, Andrew; Massey, Christine; Waldron, John N; Kim, John; Bayley, Andrew J; Cummings, Bernard; Cho, B C John; Ringash, Jolie; Dawson, Laura A; Siu, Lillian L; Chen, Eric; Irish, Jonathan; Gullane, Patrick; Hui, Angela; Liu, Fei-Fei; Shen, Xiaowei; Xu, Wei; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    To describe the natural course of distant metastases (DMs) following radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in HPV(+) oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC). OPC treated with RT/CRT from 1/1/2000 to 5/31/2010 were reviewed. The natural course of DM were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(-) cohorts. Median follow-up was 3.9 years. The DM rate were similar (11% vs. 15% at 3-years, p=0.25) between the HPV(+) (n=457) vs. the HPV(-) (n=167) cases. While almost all (24/25) HPV(-) DM occurred within 2-years following RT (1 was at 2.1 years), 7/54 (13%) of HPV(+) DM were detected beyond 3 years (up to 5.3 years). Disseminating to >2 organs occurred in 18 (33%) HPV(+) vs. none in HPV(-). Post-DM survival rates were 11% vs. 4% at 2-years (p=0.02) for the HPV(+) vs. HPV(-) cases respectively. 5/6 HPV(+) with lung oligo-metastasis were still alive with stable disease beyond 2-years after salvage procedures for DM (chemotherapy: 3; surgical resection: 2; radiotherapy: 1). Although DM rates are similar, the natural course of HPV(+) DM differs from that of HPV(-) patients: it may occur after a longer interval, often with a "disseminating" phenotype, and a small number may have prolonged survival after salvage for DM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Constraining the brachial plexus does not compromise regional control in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Mutter W; Wolden, Suzanne L; Lee, Nancy Y; Lok, Benjamin H; Dutta, Pinaki R; Riaz, Nadeem; Setton, Jeremy; Berry, Sean L; Goenka, Anuj; Zhang, Zhigang; Rao, Shyam S

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that brachial plexopathy following head and neck cancer radiotherapy may be underreported and that this toxicity is associated with a dose–response. Our purpose was to determine whether the dose to the brachial plexus (BP) can be constrained, without compromising regional control. The radiation plans of 324 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were reviewed. We identified 42 patients (13%) with gross nodal disease <1 cm from the BP. Normal tissue constraints included a maximum dose of 66 Gy and a D 05 of 60 Gy for the BP. These criteria took precedence over planning target volume (PTV) coverage of nodal disease near the BP. There was only one regional failure in the vicinity of the BP, salvaged with neck dissection (ND) and regional re-irradiation. There have been no reported episodes of brachial plexopathy to date. In combined-modality therapy, including ND as salvage, regional control did not appear to be compromised by constraining the dose to the BP. This approach may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing the long-term risk of brachial plexopathy

  2. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human papillomavirus in cervical cancer and oropharyngeal cancer: One cause, two diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Tara A; Schiller, John T

    2017-06-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes greater than 5% of cancers worldwide, including all cervical cancers and an alarmingly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). Despite markedly reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations with organized screening programs, cervical cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, as developing countries lack resources for universal, high-quality screening. In the United States, HPV-related OPC is only 1 of 5 cancers with a rising incidence since 1975 and now has taken over the cervix as the most common site of HPV-related cancer. Similar trends follow throughout North America and Europe. The need for early detection and prevention is paramount. Despite the common etiologic role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC, great disparity exists between incidence, screening modalities (or lack thereof), treatment, and prevention in these 2 very distinct cohorts. These differences in cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC and their impact are discussed here. Cancer 2017;123:2219-2229. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Correlation between HPV status at T and N sites of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josiassen, Michael Vallop; Charabi, Birgitte; Lajer, Christel Braemer; Garnaes, Emilie; Hamilton Therkildsen, Marianne; Norrild, Bodil; Specht, Lena; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; von Buchwald, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is known to be associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and may potentially play a vital role in tumor metastasis. The purpose of this study was to correlate HPV status of cervical lymph node metastases with their respective primary OPSCC tumor. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples obtained from 34 patients with cervical lymph node metastases were analyzed with HPV 16 DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR), p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV typing. The results were correlated with the HPV status and type found in the primary tumors of OPSCC. Comparing HPV DNA status with p16 we found that 21 primary tumors and lymph node metastases were HPV positive (61.8%) and seven primary tumors and lymph node metastases were HPV negative (20.6%). Six patient samples differed when correlating the primary tumor and lymph node metastasis (17.6%). In this study, HPV status in OPSCCs and their cervical lymph node metastases correlated in the vast majority of cases. However, HPV detection methods may have certain limitations resulting in varying degree of non-correlation. This should be taken into account when stratifying treatment in regard to HPV status.

  5. Longitudinal Study of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Preschool Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2016-04-01

    To determine changes in prevalence and severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and the relationship to health outcomes. Longitudinal cohort study. Community and tertiary institutions. Children (N=53, 33 boys) with a confirmed diagnosis of CP assessed first at 18 to 24 months (Assessment 1: mean age ± SD, 22.9±2.9 mo corrected age; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS]: I, n=22; II, n=7; III, n=11; IV, n=5; V, n=8) and at 36 months (Assessment 2). Not applicable. OPD was classified using the Dysphagia Disorders Survey (DDS) and signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia. Nutritional status was measured using Z scores for weight, height, and body mass index (BMI). Gross motor skills were classified on GMFCS and motor type/distribution. Prevalence of OPD decreased from 62% to 59% between the ages of 18 to 24 months and 36 months. Thirty percent of children had an improvement in severity of OPD (greater than smallest detectable change), and 4% had worse OPD. Gross motor function was strongly associated with OPD at both assessments, on the DDS (Assessment 1: odds ratio [OR]=20.3, P=.011; Assessment 2: OR=28.9, P=.002), pharyngeal signs (Assessment 1: OR=10.6, P=.007; Assessment 2: OR=15.8, P=.003), and OPD severity (Assessment 1: β=6.1, PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rehabilitative management of oropharyngeal dysphagia in acute care settings: data from a large Italian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Vincon, Elena; Grosso, Elena; Miletto, Anna Maria; Di Rosa, Rosalba; Schindler, Oskar

    2008-09-01

    A high incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) in acute-care settings has been reported; however, no data on its management are found in the literature. Here we report the experience with rehabilitative management of OD in a large Italian hospital. The characteristics of inpatients with OD during 2004 have been studied prospectively. For each patient, demographic data, the department referring the patient, the disease causing OD, and the presence of a communication disorder were registered. The swallowing level at the beginning and at the end of rehabilitation were recorded. Of the 35,590 inpatients admitted to San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin during 2004, 222 of them were referred for the assessment and rehabilitation of OD. The inpatients with OD came from different departments and mainly had a neurologic disease. In 110 patients a communication disorder was present. The swallowing impairment was moderate to severe at the moment of referral, while on average patients were able to eat by mouth after swallowing therapy. Dysphagia rehabilitation in an acute care setting is requested from different departments because of its prevalence and severity; skilled specialists are needed for early assessment and the best management.

  7. The Alteration of Nasopharyngeal and Oropharyngeal Microbiota in Children with MPP and Non-MPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the morbidity of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP has increased significantly in China. A growing number of studies indicate that imbalanced respiratory microbiota is associated with various respiratory diseases. Methods: We enrolled 119 children, including 60 pneumonia patients and 59 healthy children. Nasopharyngeal (NP and oropharyngeal (OP sampling was performed for 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA gene analysis of all children. Sputum and OP swabs were obtained from patients for pathogen detection. Results: Both the NP and OP microbiota of patients differ significantly from that of healthy children. Diseased children harbor lower microbial diversity and a simpler co-occurrence network in NP and OP. In pneumonia patients, NP and OP microbiota showed greater similarities between each other, suggesting transmission of NP microbiota to the OP. Aside from clinically detected pathogens, NP and OP microbiota analysis has also identified possible pathogens in seven cases with unknown infections. Conclusion: NP and OP microbiota in MPP and non-MPP are definitely similar. Respiratory infection generates imbalanced NP microbiota, which has the potential to transmit to OP. Microbiota analysis also promises to compliment the present means of detecting respiratory pathogens.

  8. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

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    Swetha Tati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC, we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  9. Current Technologies and Recent Developments for Screening of HPV-Associated Cervical and Oropharyngeal Cancers

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    Sunny S. Shah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV is responsible for a growing number of malignancies, predominantly represented by cervical cancer and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the prevalence of the virus, persistence of infection, and long latency period, novel and low-cost methods are needed for effective population level screening and monitoring. We review established methods for screening of cervical and oral cancer as well as commercially-available techniques for detection of HPV DNA. We then describe the ongoing development of microfluidic nucleic acid-based biosensors to evaluate circulating host microRNAs that are produced in response to an oncogenic HPV infection. The goal is to develop an ideal screening platform that is low-cost, portable, and easy to use, with appropriate signal stability, sensitivity and specificity. Advances in technologies for sample lysis, pre-treatment and concentration, and multiplexed nucleic acid detection are provided. Continued development of these devices provides opportunities for cancer screening in low resource settings, for point-of-care diagnostics and self-screening, and for monitoring response to vaccination or surgical treatment.

  10. Oropharyngeal airway in children with Class III malocclusion evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomonori; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Kanomi, Ryuzo; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2009-09-01

    Upper airway size is increasingly recognized as an important factor in malocclusion. However, children with Class III malocclusion are somewhat neglected compared with those with a Class II skeletal pattern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the characteristic shape of the oropharyngeal airway (OA) in children with Class III malocclusion. The sample comprised 45 children (average age, 8.6 +/- 1.0 years) divided into 2 groups: 25 with Class I and 20 with Class III malocclusions. OA size of each group was evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography. Cluster analysis, based on OA shape, redivided the subjects into wide, square, and long types. The distributions of Class I and Class III subjects were compared among the types. The Class III group showed statistically larger OA area and width compared with the Class I group. Area was positively correlated with Class III severity. The square type included 84% of the Class I malocclusions but only 30% of the Class III malocclusions, indicating that the OA in Class III malocclusion tends to be flat. The Class III malocclusion is associated with a large and flat OA compared with the Class I malocclusion.

  11. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Masanori; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kiyota, Naomi; Okuno, Shinya; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with head and neck carcinoma are often provided concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), but they experience severe mucositis and dysphagia. These side effects can lead to decreased oral intake, resulting in interruption of treatment. In our hospital, from September 2007, all patients with oropharyngeal cancer who were to receive CCRT, were principally offered percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) before the start of treatment, and tube feeding was started when swallowing became impaired, to accomplish the treatment as planned. To evaluate the effect of prophylactic PEG, outcome measures in this study included the frequency of unplanned break from CCRT, nutritional deterioration and required analgesic during CCRT, complication of PEG, and patient satisfaction between 15 patients with PEG and 11 patients without PEG as a control group. Although no significant weight loss occurred in either group, there were fewer patients with a Body Mass Index <18.5 in the PEG group after CCRT than in the control group. Regarding the treatment, most patients were satisfied with their PEG and considered that prophylactic PEG was necessary and helpful in completing the CCRT. This study suggests that prophylactic PEG helps patients to complete CCRT both mentally and nutritionally. (author)

  12. Species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of oral yeast isolates from Tanzanian HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis

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    Rijs Antonius JMM

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, little is known on the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profiles of yeast isolates from HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis. Methods A total of 296 clinical oral yeasts were isolated from 292 HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Identification of the yeasts was performed using standard phenotypic methods. Antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, clotrimazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed using a broth microdilution format according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI; M27-A2. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species from 250 (84.5% patients followed by C. glabrata from 20 (6.8% patients, and C. krusei from 10 (3.4% patients. There was no observed significant difference in species distribution between patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis, but isolates cultured from patients previously treated were significantly less susceptible to the azole compounds compared to those cultured from antifungal naïve patients. Conclusion C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species from patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oral yeast isolates from Tanzania had high level susceptibility to the antifungal agents tested. Recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous antifungal therapy significantly correlated with reduced susceptibility to azoles antifungal agents.

  13. The epidemiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in The Netherlands during the era of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Is there really evidence for a change?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Monsjou, H.S.; Schaapveld, M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Balm, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several recent studies have shown that incidence of oropharyngeal carcinomas is rising in the Western World. This increase has been attributed to changes in the etiology of oropharyngeal carcinomas with a growing role for infections with Human Papilloma viruses. This nationwide study

  14. Combined therapy for oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Depth of invasion as prognostic factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizmarevic, B.; Lanisnik, B.; Didanovic, V.; Kramberger, K.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to emphasize the importance of surgical management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the head and neck and to find the most important predictive factor for cervical lymph node metastasis and prognostic factor for survival. The use of multimodality therapy is being discussed as well. Patients and methods. From June 1st, 1992 to May 31st, 1998, 154 patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC were admitted to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervicofacial Surgery in the Teaching Hospital of Maribor. The criteria for inclusion into the study were met by 142 patients, but only 62/142 patients entered the multimodality protocol (surgery and postoperative radiotherapy). These 62/142 patients were treated surgically and 49 of them were postoperatively irradiated, while 13/62 declined postoperative radiotherapy. Surgical specimen was evaluated for positive or negative lymph nodes, tumor margins and the depth of invasion. Tumor cells were stained for Ki67 proliferative factor. Results. The depth of invasion was the most important predictive factor for the neck metastases in multivariate model including also the grade, pT and T. pN was found to be important in determining the overall survival using Cox regression model (p < 0,05). A statistically important discrepancy between N and pN classification was found. In 23 cases N was overrated and in 3 cases underrated. The overall 5-year disease specific survival was 55 %. Ki67 correlated with the grade of tumor differentiation. No statistically significant correlation was found with lymph node metastases. Conclusions. The depth of invasion is the most important factor determining the occurrence of the neck metastases whereas the N status determines the survival. (author)

  15. Complement activation product C4d in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajona, D; Pajares, M J; Chiara, M D; Rodrigo, J P; Jantus-Lewintre, E; Camps, C; Suarez, C; Bagán, J V; Montuenga, L M; Pio, R

    2015-10-01

    Complement C4d-containing fragments have been proposed as diagnostic markers for lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of C4d in oropharyngeal (OPSCC) and oral (OSCC) squamous cell carcinomas. C4d staining was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 244 OPSCC surgical specimens. C4d levels were quantified by ELISA in resting saliva samples from 48 patients with oral leukoplakia and 62 with OSCC. Plasma samples from 21 patients with leukoplakia and 30 with oral carcinoma were also studied. C4d staining in OPSCC specimens was associated with nodal invasion (P = 0.001), histopathologic grade (P = 0.014), disease stage (P = 0.040), and focal-adhesion kinase expression (P Saliva C4d levels were higher in patients with oral cancer than in subjects with leukoplakia (0.07 ± 0.07 vs 0.04 ± 0.03 μg ml(-1) , P = 0.003). The area under the ROC curve was 0.63 (95%CI: 0.55-0.71). Salivary C4d levels in stage IV patients were higher than in patients with earlier stages (P = 0.028) and correlated with tumor size (P = 0.045). Plasma C4d levels also correlated with salivary C4d levels (P = 0.041), but differences between patients with oral cancer and subjects with leukoplakia were not significant (1.26 ± 0.59 vs 1.09 ± 0.39 μg ml(-1) , P = 0.232). C4d-containing fragments are detected in oral primary tumors and are increased in saliva from patients with OSCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Garden, Adam S.; Lindberg, Mary E.; Wei Qingyi; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  17. Forward versus inverse planning in oropharyngeal cancer: A comparative study using physical and biological indices

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    T Sundaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Possible benefits of inverse planning. Aims: To analyze possible benefits of inverse planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT over field-in-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (FIF-3DCRT and to evaluate the differences if any, between low (6 Million Volts and high energy (15 Million Volts IMRT plans. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx, previously treated with 6 MV step and shoot IMRT were studied. V 100 , V 33 , V 66 , mean dose and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP were evaluated for parotid glands. Maximum dose and NTCP were the parameters for spinal cord. Statistical Analysis Used: A two-tailed t-test was applied to analyze statistical significance between the different techniques. Results: For combined parotid gland, a reduction of 4.374 Gy, 9.343 Gy and 7.883 Gy were achieved for D 100 , D 66 and D 33 , respectively in 6 MV-IMRT when compared with FIF-3DCRT. Spinal cord sparing was better in 6 MV-IMRT (40.963 ± 2.650, with an average reduction of maximum spinal cord dose by 7.355 Gy from that using the FIF-3DCRT technique. The uncomplicated tumor control probabilities values were higher in IMRT plans thus leading to a possibility of dose escalation. Conclusions: Though low-energy IMRT is the preferred choice for treatment of oropharyngeal cancers, FIF-3DCRT must be given due consideration as a second choice for its well established advantages over traditional conventioan technique.

  18. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. Conclusions: The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models

  19. Oral microflora and their relation to risk factors in HIV+ patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, A; Khosravi, A R; Shokri, H; Asadi Jamnani, F; Hajiabdolbaghi, M; Ashrafi Tamami, I

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral microflora and association of oral candidiasis and multiple risk factors in HIV(+) patients. The present study included 100 HIV-infected patients participated in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran for Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) and HIV. We assessed the presence or absence of OPC, and samples were obtained from the oral cavity and direct microscopic examination, gram staining and culture on standard microbiological media were performed in all patients. CD4(+) cell count/CD4(+) percentage were also calculated. The demographic characteristics showed that the patients had a mean age of 32.3 years old, 78% male and 22% female. Patients belonging to 'O(+)' blood group (27%) were more prone to develop OPC. A total of 460 bacterial colonies were obtained and Streptococcus mutans (15.4%) was the most frequently isolated species in the HIV(+) patients, followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.8%) and Corynebacterium (8.7%). In addition, 254 yeasts (from four different genera) were isolated from the patient under study. Candida species (94.4%) were the most frequently obtained genera, followed by Saccharomyces (2.4%), Kluyveromyces and Cryptococcus (1.6% for both) species. Candida albicans (37.2%) was the most common species isolated from HIV(+) patients with OPC and its frequency was significantly higher than that of other Candida species (Poral cavity of HIV(+) patients and there was no significant difference of the variables CD4(+) cell count and yeast counts. The findings of this study would be helpful in any further study, which, if done prospectively on a large cohort, can be confirmatory. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Oropharyngeal candidiasis and resistance to antifungal drugs in patients receiving radiation for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rad DMD, MSc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a common infection in patient receiving radiotherapy for head and neckcancer. Accurate and rapid identification of candida species is very important in clinical laboratory, because theincidence of candidiasis continues to rise after radiotherapy. The genus Candida has about 154 species that showdifferent level of resistance to antifungal drugs and have high degree of phenotypic similarity. The aim of this study wasto investigate oral yeast colonization and infection and resistance to antifungal drugs in these patients.METHODS: Thirty patients receiving a 6-week course of radiation therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer at theOncology Unit in Shafa Hospital, in 2008, were enrolled in the study. Specimens from patients were cultured weeklyfor Candida. All isolates were plated on CHROM agar and RPMI-based medium. They were subcultured and submittedfor antifungal susceptibility testing (nystatin, fluconazole, clotrimazole and ketoconazole and molecular typing.RESULTS: Infection (clinical and microbiological evidence occurred in 50% of the patients and Candida colonization(only microbiological evidence occurred in 70% of subjects in the first week. Candida albicans alone was isolated in94.9% of patient visits with positive cultures. Candida tropicalis was isolated from 5.1% of patient visits with positivecultures. All isolates were susceptible to nystatin, but did not respond to the other antifungal drugsCONCLUSIONS: The irradiation-induced changes of the intraoral environment such as xerostomia lead to increasedintraoral colonization by Candida species. All yeast isolates were susceptible to nystatin. Thus prophylactic therapywith nystatin should be considered for these patients.

  1. Relationship between HPV infection/p16 expression and radiotherapy prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Yuan; Gao Li; Yi Junlin; Huang Xiaodong; Luo Jingwei; Zhang Shiping; Wang Kai; Xu Guozhen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection/p16 expression and radiotherapy prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and the prognostic value of p16 in OSCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods: Tissue samples were collected from 42 patients newly diagnosed with OSCC in our hospital from January 1999 to December 2008. PCR was performed to detect HPV DNA, and p16 expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. The chi-square test was used to compare the local/regional control rate (CR) between HPV (+)/p16 (+) patients and HPV (-)/p16 (-) patients after radical radiotherapy and evaluate the association between HPV infection and p16 expression; the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate overall survival (OS), and the log-rank test was used for survival difference analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%.The HPV infection rate was 19%, and the positive rate of p16 was 43%. In patients who received radical radiotherapy, the local CR for HPV (+) patients was 100%, versus 54% for HPV (-) patients (P =0.026); the local CR for p16 (+) patients was 92%, versus 44% for p16 (-) patients (P=0.006); the locoregional CR for p16(-) patients was 69%, versus 22% for p16 (-) patients (P=0.009). For high-risk patients, HPV infection was significantly associated with p16 expression (P=0.000). The 3-year OS rates for p16 (+) and p16 (-) patients were 91% and 2 6 %, respectively (P=0.001). Conclusions: The p16 expression is closely associated with HPV infection in OSCC patients, and it is expected to become one of the prognostic markers in OSCC patients treated with radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. Outcomes of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone using altered fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Sullivan, Brian; Huang Shaohui; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Massey, Christine; Siu, Lillian L.; Weinreb, Ilan; Hope, Andrew; Kim, John; Bayley, Andrew J.; Cummings, Bernard; Ringash, Jolie; Dawson, Laura A.; Cho, B.C. John; Chen, Eric; Irish, Jonathan; Gilbert, Ralph W.; Hui, Angela; Liu Feifei; Zhao, Helen; Waldron, John N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcome of HPV-related [HPV(+)] oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) managed predominantly by altered-fractionation radiotherapy-alone (RT-alone). Methods: OPCs treated with RT-alone (n = 207) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 151) from 2001 to 2008 were included. Overall survival (OS), local (LC), regional (RC) and distant (DC) control were compared for HPV(+) vs. HPV-unrelated [HPV(−)], by RT-alone vs. CRT, and by smoking pack-years (⩽10 vs. >10). Multivariate analysis identified predictors. Results: HPV(+) (n = 277) had better OS (81% vs. 44%), LC (93% vs. 76%), RC (94% vs. 79%) (all p < 0.01) but similar DC (89% vs. 86%, p = 0.87) vs. HPV(−) (n = 81). HPV(+) stage IV CRT (n = 125) had better OS (89% vs. 70%, p < 0.01), but similar LC (93% vs. 90%, p = 0.41), RC (94% vs. 90%, p = 0.31) and DC (90% vs. 83%, p = 0.22) vs. RT-alone (n = 96). Both HPV(+) RT-alone (n = 37) and CRT (n = 67) stage IV minimal smokers had favorable OS (86% vs. 88%, p = 0.45), LC (95% vs. 92%, p = 0.52), RC (97% vs. 93%, p = 0.22), and DC (92% vs. 86%, p = 0.37). RT-alone and heavy-smoking were independent predictors for lower OS but not CSS in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Overall, HPV(+) RT-alone stage IV demonstrated lower survival but comparable disease control vs. CRT, but no difference was apparent among minimal smokers.

  3. SU-E-T-352: Why Is the Survival Rate Low in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Rasmussen, K; Rice, J; Stephenson, S; Ferreira, Maria C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Liu, T [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Yuh, K [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Wang, R; Grecula, J [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lo, S [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors are composed of a large number of clonogens that have the capability of indefinite reproduction. Even when there is complete clinical or radiographic regression of the gross tumor mass after treatment, tumor recurrence can occur if the clonogens are not completely eradicated by radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the colonogen number and its association with the tumor control probability (TCP) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCCA). Methods: A literature search was conducted to collect clinical information of patients with OSCCA, including the prescription dose, tumor volume and survival rate. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was incorporated into TCP model for clinical data analysis. The total dose ranged from 60 to 70 Gy and tumor volume ranged from 10 to 50 cc. The TCP was calculated for each group according to tumor size and dose. The least χ{sup 2} method was used to fit the TCP calculation to clinical data while other LQ model parameters (α, β) were adopted from the literature, due to the limited patient data. Results: A total of 190 patients with T2–T4 OSCCA were included. The association with HPV was not available for all the patients. The 3-year survival rate was about 82% for T2 squamous cell carcinoma and 40% for advanced tumors. Fitting the TCP model to the survival data, the average clonogen number was 1.56×10{sup 12}. For the prescription dose of 70 Gy, the calculated TCP ranged from 40% to 90% when the tumor volume varied from 10 to 50 cc. Conclusion: Our data suggests variation between the clonogen number and TCP in OSCCA. Tumors with larger colonogen number tend to have lower TCP and therefore dose escalation above 70 Gy may be indicated in order to improve the TCP and survival rate. Our result will require future confirmation with a large number of patients.

  4. Human papillomavirus DNA and p16 expression in Japanese patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Hisato; Okamoto, Isamu; Terao, Kyoichi; Sakai, Kazuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Ueda, Shinya; Tanaka, Kaoru; Kuwata, Kiyoko; Morita, Yume; Ono, Koji; Nishio, Kazuto; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Doi, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major etiologic factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). However, little is known about HPV-related OPSCC in Japan. During the study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded OPSCC specimens from Japanese patients were analyzed for HPV DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the surrogate marker p16 by immuno-histochemistry. For HPV DNA-positive, p16-negative specimens, the methylation status of the p16 gene promoter was examined by methylation-specific PCR. Overall survival was calculated in relation to HPV DNA and p16 status and was subjected to multivariate analysis. OPSCC cell lines were examined for sensitivity to radiation or cisplatin in vitro. The study results showed that tumor specimens from 40 (38%) of the 104 study patients contained HPV DNA, with such positivity being associated with tumors of the tonsils, lymph node metastasis, and nonsmoking. Overall survival was better for OPSCC patients with HPV DNA than for those without it (hazard ratio, 0.214; 95% confidence interval, 0.074–0.614; P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis revealed HPV DNA to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.015). Expression of p16 was associated with HPV DNA positivity. However, 20% of HPV DNA-positive tumors were negative for p16, with most of these tumors manifesting DNA methylation at the p16 gene promoter. Radiation or cisplatin sensitivity did not differ between OPSCC cell lines positive or negative for HPV DNA. Thus, positivity for HPV DNA identifies a distinct clinical subset of OPSCC with a more favorable outcome in Japanese

  5. Baseline peripheral blood leukocytosis: Biological marker predicts outcome in oropharyngeal cancer, regardless of HPV-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw, Zeno A R; Paul de Boer, Jan; Navran, Arash; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim

    2018-03-01

    To study the prognostic value of abnormalities in baseline complete blood count in patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) treated with (chemo) radiation. The prognostic value of baseline complete blood count on outcome in 234 patients with OPC treated between 2010 and 2015 was examined in multivariate analysis together with other conventional prognostic variables including HPV-status, tumor stage, tumor and nodal size. The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant control (DC) of the whole group were 74%, 64%, 79%, and 88%, respectively. Leukocytosis and HPV-status were the only significant prognosticators for OS and DFS at the multivariate analysis. Patients without leukocytosis had a significantly better DC compared to those with leukocytosis (92% and 70%, respectively, p HPV-negative OPC had significantly worse LRC compared to HPV-positive patients (67% and 90%, respectively, p HPV-positive group with leukocytosis compared to those without leukocytosis were 69% and 95%, respectively (p HPV-negative patients were 41% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.010). This is the first study to date reporting the independent impact of leukocytosis and HPV-status on outcome of patients with OPC. The poor outcome of patients with leukocytosis is mainly caused by the worse DC. The significant impact of leukocytosis on outcome was even more pronounced in HPV-positive patients. These biomarkers could help identifying patients with poor prognosis at baseline requiring intensification of local and/or systemic treatment while treatment de-intensification might be offered to the low-risk group. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitation of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Plasma of Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hongbin; Banh, Alice; Kwok, Shirley; Shi Xiaoli; Wu, Simon; Krakow, Trevor; Khong, Brian; Bavan, Brindha; Bala, Rajeev; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Colevas, Dimitrios; Pourmand, Nader; Koong, Albert C.; Kong, Christina S.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA can be detected in the plasma of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and to monitor its temporal change during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We used polymerase chain reaction to detect HPV DNA in the culture media of HPV-positive SCC90 and VU147T cells and the plasma of SCC90 and HeLa tumor-bearing mice, non-tumor-bearing controls, and those with HPV-negative tumors. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to quantify the plasma HPV DNA in 40 HPV-positive OPC, 24 HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients and 10 non-cancer volunteers. The tumor HPV status was confirmed by p16 INK4a staining and HPV16/18 polymerase chain reaction or HPV in situ hybridization. A total of 14 patients had serial plasma samples for HPV DNA quantification during radiotherapy. Results: HPV DNA was detectable in the plasma samples of SCC90- and HeLa-bearing mice but not in the controls. It was detected in 65% of the pretreatment plasma samples from HPV-positive OPC patients using E6/7 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. None of the HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients or non-cancer controls had detectable HPV DNA. The pretreatment plasma HPV DNA copy number correlated significantly with the nodal metabolic tumor volume (assessed using 18 F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography). The serial measurements in 14 patients showed a rapid decline in HPV DNA that had become undetectable at radiotherapy completion. In 3 patients, the HPV DNA level had increased to a discernable level at metastasis. Conclusions: Xenograft studies indicated that plasma HPV DNA is released from HPV-positive tumors. Circulating HPV DNA was detectable in most HPV-positive OPC patients. Thus, plasma HPV DNA might be a valuable tool for identifying relapse.

  7. Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Disease Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Medical Physics Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohamed, Abdallah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Alexandria (Egypt); Morrison, William H.; Phan, Jack; Beadle, Beth M.; Skinner, Heath D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hutcheson, Kate A. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: A single-institution prospective study was conducted to assess disease control and toxicity of proton therapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Disease control, toxicity, functional outcomes, and patterns of failure for the initial cohort of patients with oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) were prospectively collected in 2 registry studies at a single institution. Locoregional failures were analyzed by using deformable image registration. Results: Fifty patients with OPC treated from March 3, 2011, to July 2014 formed the cohort. Eighty-four percent were male, 50% had never smoked, 98% had stage III/IV disease, 64% received concurrent therapy, and 35% received induction chemotherapy. Forty-four of 45 tumors (98%) tested for p16 were positive. All patients received IMPT (multifield optimization to n=46; single-field optimization to n=4). No Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. The most common grade 3 toxicities were acute mucositis in 58% of patients and late dysphagia in 12%. Eleven patients had a gastrostomy (feeding) tube placed during therapy, but none had a feeding tube at last follow-up. At a median follow-up time of 29 months, 5 patients had disease recurrence: local in 1, local and regional in 1, regional in 2, and distant in 1. The 2-year actuarial overall and progression-free survival rates were 94.5% and 88.6%. Conclusions: The oncologic, toxicity, and functional outcomes after IMPT for OPC are encouraging and provide the basis for ongoing and future clinical studies.

  8. Definitive Surgical Therapy after Open Neck Biopsy for HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenga, Joseph; Graboyes, Evan M; Haughey, Bruce H; Paniello, Randal C; Mehrad, Mitra; Lewis, James S; Thorstad, Wade L; Nussenbaum, Brian; Rich, Jason T

    2016-04-01

    To determine the impact of prior open neck biopsy on the prognosis of patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) who are subsequently treated with a definitive surgical paradigm, including adjuvant therapy when indicated. Retrospective cohort. Tertiary care university hospital. Patients with open neck biopsies who were treated with definitive surgery, with or without adjuvant therapy, for HPV-related OPSCC between 1998 and 2012 were compared with a matched control group who did not undergo open neck biopsy. Outcomes were disease-free survival, overall survival, disease-specific survival, incidence of tumor deposit in dermal scar, patterns of recurrence, and neck dissection complications. Forty-five patients who underwent open neck biopsy were compared with 90 matched controls. Tumor deposits in dermal scars from the prior open neck biopsy were found in 3 patients (7%) during completion neck dissection. Overall complications of the neck dissection were not significantly increased in the open biopsy group over matched controls (20% vs 12%, respectively; P > .05). Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for disease-free survival, overall survival, and disease-specific survival were not significantly different between the open biopsy and control groups (93% vs 91%, 98% vs 97%, 98% vs 99%, respectively; all P > .05). Recurrence rates were also not significantly different between groups. Patients with HPV-related OPSCC who have undergone a prior open neck biopsy can be successfully treated with a definitive surgical paradigm. Although needle biopsy is preferable to establish a diagnosis, previous open neck biopsy does not affect prognosis in these patients. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  9. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapir, Eli; Tao, Yebin; Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A.; Feng, Mary; Schipper, Matthew; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D 50 doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  10. The Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Danish Patients Hospitalised with Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgaard, Dorte; Baandrup, Ulrik; Bøgsted, Martin; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Hansen, Tina

    2017-06-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) are prevalent conditions in the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CAP, OD, and frailty in patients admitted to a department of respiratory medicine at a regional hospital. The outcome was mortality during hospitalization and within 30 days of discharge and rehospitalization within 30 days of discharge. A total of 154 consecutive patients (54.5% male, mean age 77.4 years (SD 11.51)) hospitalized because of CAP from September 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014 at North Denmark Regional Hospital were included in this study. The volume-viscosity swallow test was conducted for each patient. A total of 34.42% patients presented with OD. Patients with OD and CAP presented significant differences in age, CURB-65, and dementia compared with those of patients with CAP alone. The majority lived in nursing homes, had a lower body mass index, Barthel 20 score, and handgrip strength, and had poor oral health compared with patients with CAP only. Patients with OD presented an increased length of stay in hospital (P < 0.001), intra-hospital mortality (P < 0.001), and 30-day mortality rate (P < 0.001) compared with those of patients with CAP only. Their rate of rehospitalization 0-30 days after discharge was also increased (P < 0.001) compared with that of patients with CAP only. Thus, OD is related to frailty and poor outcome.

  11. Human papilloma virus and survival of oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglie, Martina A; Soltermann, Alex; Haile, Sarah R; Huber, Gerhard F; Stoeckli, Sandro J

    2015-07-01

    Impact of p16 protein, a surrogate marker for human papilloma virus induced cancer, p53 and EGFR as well as clinical factors on survival in a patient cohort with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated by surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) ± concomitant chemotherapy (CT). This is a retrospective analysis of patient's charts and tumor tissue. 57 patients were consecutively included and their tumor tissue assembled on a tissue microarray following immunohistochemical analysis. Survival times were estimated by means of Kaplan-Meier analysis. The importance of clinical and immunohistochemical factors for outcome was estimated by cox proportional hazard models. With 88% 5-year overall survival, 91% 5-year disease-specific survival and 91% 5-year disease-free survival, respectively, we found excellent survival rates in this surgically treated patient cohort of mainly advanced OPSCC (93% AJCC stage III or IV). The only factors positively influencing survival were p16 overexpression as well as p53 negativity and even more pronounced the combination of those biomarkers. Survival analysis of patients classified into three risk categories according to an algorithm based on p16, smoking, T- and N-category revealed a low, intermediate and high-risk group with significant survival differences between the low and the high-risk group. Patients with OPSCC can be successfully treated by surgery and adjuvant RT ± CT with a clear survival benefit of p16 positive, p53 negative patients. We recommend considering a combination of immunohistochemical (p16, p53) and clinical factors (smoking, T- and N-category) for risk stratification.

  12. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstede, Theresa M. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lindberg, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Radiation Therapy Versus Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Danielle; Caulley, Lisa; Burger, Emily; Kim, Jane; Johnson-Obaseki, Stephanie; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V; Hansen, Aaron; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) versus the standard treatment modality for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), radiation therapy (RT), in a subset of patients with early-stage OPSCC. We developed a microsimulation state-transition model associated with RT and TORS for patients with clinically staged T1N0M0 to T2N1M0 OPSCC. Transition probabilities, utilities, and costs for each health state were estimated from recently published data and discounted by 3% annually over a lifetime time horizon. Model outcomes included lifetime costs (in 2014 US dollars), health benefits (quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]), and cost-effectiveness ratios from a societal perspective. Under base-case assumptions, TORS was associated with modest gains in QALYs. RT yielded 10.43 QALYs at a cost of $123,410 per patient, whereas TORS yielded 11.10 QALYs at a cost of $178,480. This resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $82,190/QALY gained. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was most sensitive to the need for adjuvant therapy, cost of late toxicity, age at diagnosis, disease state utilities, and discount rate. Accounting for joint parameter uncertainty, RT had a higher probability of demonstrating a cost-effective profile compared with TORS, at 54% compared with 46%. By use of standard benchmarks for cost-effectiveness in the United States, TORS may be a cost-effective alternative for the subset of patients with early-stage OPSCC but demonstrates considerable sensitivity to assumptions around quality of life. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyan, Arthur; Chen, Josephine; Shugard, Erin; Lambert, Louise; Quivey, Jeanne M; Yom, Sue S

    2014-01-01

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Concordance of oral HPV prevalence between patients with oropharyngeal cancer and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Anne S; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lin, Heather; Guo, Ming; Lee, J Jack; Holsinger, F Christopher; Hong, Waun Ki; Sturgis, Erich M

    2016-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a known causative factor in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OPC). In this prospective study, we sought to define the risk of HPV transmission between OPC patients and their sexual partners by performing HPV genotyping on oral cytology brushings. Newly diagnosed OPC patients and their sexual partners underwent oral mouth swabs and answered a risk factor questionnaire. Patient tumor samples and oral swabs from both the patient and partner were assessed for HPV status and genotyped using Easy-Chip HPV Blot PCR. We enrolled 227 patient-partner pairs and obtained sufficient analyzable DNA from both members in 198 pairs. Of 144 patients with available OPC tumor tissue, 128 (89 %) had HPV-positive tumors by either in situ hybridization or p16 immunohistochemical analysis (104 or 121, respectively). In total, there were 28 patients and 30 partners who were HPV positive by oral swab. The prevalence rate of oral HPV in partners was 15 %. There were 39 patient-partner pairs who had one or both members returning positive for HPV in the oral swab, and 49 % of these pairs were concordant for their HPV-genotype. Female partners had a higher oral HPV prevalence (16 %) than did male partners (11 %). Patients who were non-white were also found to have a higher oral prevalence of HPV (p = 0.032) by mouth swab. Partners of OPC patients may have a higher prevalence of oral HPV and should be studied prospectively to understand their OPC risk. Additional future research is needed to identify oral HPV persistence in partners to OPC patients and to determine the optimal sampling methods and technologies to screen patients at high risk for HPV-related disease.

  16. Variations in the Contouring of Organs at Risk: Test Case From a Patient With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E., E-mail: alpha@canislupusllc.com [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, WI (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Robinson, Greg [Radiation Oncology Resources, Goshen, IN (United States); Wheeler, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Goshen Health System Goshen, IN (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomy contouring is critical in radiation therapy. Inaccuracy and variation in defining critical volumes will affect everything downstream: treatment planning, dose-volume histogram analysis, and contour-based visual guidance used in image-guided radiation therapy. This study quantified: (1) variation in the contouring of organs at risk (OAR) in a clinical test case and (2) corresponding effects on dosimetric metrics of highly conformal plans. Methods and Materials: A common CT data set with predefined targets from a patient with oropharyngeal cancer was provided to a population of clinics, which were asked to (1) contour OARs and (2) design an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Thirty-two acceptable plans were submitted as DICOM RT data sets, each generated by a different clinical team. Using those data sets, we quantified: (1) the OAR contouring variation and (2) the impact this variation has on dosimetric metrics. New technologies were employed, including a software tool to quantify three-dimensional structure comparisons. Results: There was significant interclinician variation in OAR contouring. The degree of variation is organ-dependent. We found substantial dose differences resulting strictly from contouring variation (differences ranging from -289% to 56% for mean OAR dose; -22% to 35% for maximum dose). However, there appears to be a threshold in the OAR comparison metric beyond which the dose differences stabilize. Conclusions: The effects of interclinician variation in contouring organs-at-risk in the head and neck can be large and are organ-specific. Physicians need to be aware of the effect that variation in OAR contouring can play on the final treatment plan and not restrict their focus only to the target volumes.

  17. Association of combined p73 and p53 genetic variants with tumor HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiu Wang

    Full Text Available p53 and p73 interact with human papillomavirus (HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins. The interplay between p53 and p73 and HPV16 may lead to deregulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, through which inflammation/immune responses control the HPV clearance and escape of immune surveillance, and subsequently contribute to tumor HPV16 status. In this case-case comparison study, HPV16 status in tumor specimens was analyzed and p53 codon 72 and p73 G4C14-to-A4T14 polymorphisms were genotyped using genomic DNA from blood of 309 oropharyngeal cancer patients. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated in univariate and multivariable logistic regression models to examine the association. The results from this study showed both p53 variant genotypes (Arg/Pro+Pro/Pro and p73 variant genotypes (GC/AT+AT/AT were significantly associated with HPV16-positive tumor in oropharyngeal cancer patients (OR, 1.9, 95% CI, 1.1-3.3 and OR, 2.1, 95% CI, 1.2-3.8, respectively, while the combined variant genotypes (p53 Pro carriers and p73 AT carriers exhibited a significantly greater association with HPV16-positive tumor (OR, 3.2, 95% CI, 1.4-7.4, compared with combined wild-type genotypes (p53 Arg/Arg and p73 GC/GC, and the association was in a statistically significant dose-effect relationship (p = 0.001. Moreover, such association was more pronounced among several subgroups. These findings suggest that variant genotypes of p53 and p73 genes may be individually, or more likely jointly, associated with tumor HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer patients, particularly in never smokers. Identification of such susceptible biomarkers would greatly influence on individualized treatment for an improved prognosis.

  18. Submandibular gland-sparing radiation therapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: patterns of failure and xerostomia outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Liao, Jay J; Garden, Adam S; Laramore, George E; Parvathaneni, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Saliva from submandibular glands (SMG) is necessary to minimize xerostomia. It is unclear whether SMG can be safely spared in patients undergoing bilateral neck radiotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer without increasing the risk of marginal recurrence. We evaluated the outcomes of contralateral submandibular gland (cSMG) sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). All patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with bilateral neck IMRT from 2006–2012 at our institution were included. Appropriately selected patients with favorable primary tumor characteristics and no definite contralateral neck disease were treated with cSMG-sparing IMRT. Patterns of failure and xerostomia outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. 114 patients were treated. 89% had stage IV disease and 89% received definitive radiation therapy. 76 patients (67%) received cSMG sparing IMRT. With a median follow-up of 30 months, there were 10 local, 9 regional, and 10 distant recurrences. 2-year overall survival was 86% and 2-year loco-regional control was 87%. In cSMG spared patients, the mean cSMG dose was 30.7 Gy. Late grade 2+ xerostomia was significantly reduced in the cSMG spared group compared to those without SMG sparing (6 months: 23% vs. 72%, 12 months: 6% vs. 41%, 24 months: 3% vs. 36%, all p < 0.0007). There were no peri-SMG marginal recurrences in the cSMG-spared cohort. cSMG sparing IMRT did not increase marginal failures in this series of locally advanced oropharyngeal SCC patients. Xerostomia was significantly reduced in cSMG spared patients

  19. Living with oropharyngeal dysphagia: effects of bolus modification on health-related quality of life--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Katina; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Wagg, Bethany; Cordier, Reinie

    2015-10-01

    Difficulty swallowing, oropharyngeal dysphagia, is widespread among many patient populations (such as stroke and cancer groups) and aged community-dwelling individuals. It is commonly managed with bolus modification: altering food (usually cutting, mashing or puréeing) or fluids (typically thickening) to make them easier or safer to swallow. Although this treatment is ubiquitous, anecdotal evidence suggests patients dislike this management, and this may affect compliance and well-being. This review aimed to examine the impact of bolus modification on health-related quality of life. A systematic review of the literature was conducted by speech pathologists with experience in oropharyngeal dysphagia. The literature search was completed with electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, and all available exclusion dates up to September 2012 were used. The search was limited to English-language publications which were full text and appeared in peer-reviewed journals. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Generally, bolus modification was typically associated with worse quality of life. Modifications to foods appeared to be more detrimental than modifications to fluids, but this may be due to the increased severity of dysfunction that is implied by the necessity for significant alterations to foods. The number of studies retrieved was quite small. The diverse nature of methodologies, terminologies and assessment procedures found in the studies makes the results difficult to generalise. Overall, even though the severity of dysphagia may have been a confounding factor, the impact of bolus modification on health-related quality of life in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia appears to be negative, with increased modification of food and fluids often correlating to a decreased quality of life. Further, associated disease factors, such as decreased life expectancy, may also have affected health-related quality of life. More research is needed.

  20. European Society for Swallowing Disorders - European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijens, Laura Wj; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization's classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies.

  1. The Hippo component YAP localizes in the nucleus of human papilloma virus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Faisal; Clattenburg, Leanne; Muruganandan, Shanmugam; Bullock, Martin; MacIsaac, Kaitlyn; Wigerius, Michael; Williams, Blair A; Graham, M Elise R; Rigby, Matthew H; Trites, Jonathan R B; Taylor, S Mark; Sinal, Christopher J; Fawcett, James P; Hart, Robert D

    2017-02-22

    HPV infection causes cervical cancer, mediated in part by the degradation of Scribble via the HPV E6 oncoprotein. Recently, Scribble has been shown to be an important regulator of the Hippo signaling cascade. Deregulation of the Hippo pathway induces an abnormal cellular transformation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which promotes oncogenic progression. Given the recent rise in oropharyngeal HPV squamous cell carcinoma we sought to determine if Hippo signaling components are implicated in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Molecular and cellular techniques including immunoprecipiations, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were used to identify the key Hippo pathway effector Yes-Associated Protein (YAP)1. Oropharyngeal tissue was collected from CO 2 laser resections, and probed with YAP1 antibody in tumor and pre-malignant regions of HPV positive OPSCC tissue. This study reveals that the Scribble binding protein Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Adaptor Protein (NOS1AP) forms a complex with YAP. Further, the NOS1APa and NOS1APc isoforms show differential association with activated and non-activated YAP, and impact cellular proliferation. Consistent with deregulated Hippo signaling in OPSCC HPV tumors, we see a delocalization of Scribble and increased nuclear accumulation of YAP1 in an HPV-positive OPSCC. Our preliminary data indicates that NOS1AP isoforms differentially associate with YAP1, which, together with our previous findings, predicts that loss of YAP1 enhances cellular transformation. Moreover, YAP1 is highly accumulated in the nucleus of HPV-positive OPSCC, implying that Hippo signaling and possibly NOS1AP expression are de-regulated in OPSCC. Further studies will help determine if NOS1AP isoforms, Scribble and Hippo components will be useful biomarkers in OPSCC tumor biology.

  2. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijens, Laura WJ; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies

  3. Marital status as a predictor of survival in patients with human papilloma virus-positive oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Samuel J; Kirke, Diana N; Ezzat, Waleed H; Truong, Minh T; Salama, Andrew R; Jalisi, Scharukh

    Determine whether marital status is a significant predictor of survival in human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. A single center retrospective study included patients diagnosed with human papilloma virus-positive oropharyngeal cancer at Boston Medical Center between January 1, 2010 and December 30, 2015, and initiated treatment with curative intent at Boston Medical Center. Demographic data and tumor-related variables were recorded. Univariate analysis was performed using a two-sample t-test, chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and Kaplan Meier curves with a log rank test. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using a Cox regression model. A total of 65 patients were included in the study with 24 patients described as married and 41 patients described as single. There was no significant difference in most demographic variables or tumor related variables between the two study groups, except single patients were significantly more likely to have government insurance (p=0.0431). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in 3-year overall survival between married patients and single patients (married=91.67% vs single=87.80%; p=0.6532) or 3-year progression free survival (married=79.17% vs single=85.37%; p=0.8136). After adjusting for confounders including age, sex, race, insurance type, smoking status, treatment, and AJCC combined pathologic stage, marital status was not a significant predictor of survival [HR=0.903; 95% CI (0.126,6.489); p=0.9192]. Although previous literature has demonstrated that married patients with head and neck cancer have a survival benefit compared to single patients with head and neck cancer, we were unable to demonstrate the same survival benefit in a cohort of patients with human papilloma virus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of concomitant boost radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers: A phase III randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rishi, Anupam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Verma, Roshan; Oinam, Arun S.; Patil, Vijai M.; Mohinder, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant boost radiotherapy alone against concurrent chemoradiation (conventional fractionation) in locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer in our patient population. Methods and materials: In this open-label, randomised trial, 216 patients with histologically proven Stage III–IVA oropharyngeal cancer were randomly assigned between June 2006 and December 2010 to receive either chemoradiation (CRT) to a dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions over 6.5 weeks with concurrent cisplatin (100 mg/m 2 on days 1, 22 and 43) or accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost (CBRT) to a dose of 67.5 Gy in 40 fractions over 5 weeks. The compliance, toxicity and quality of life were investigated. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared using log rank test. Results: The compliance to radiotherapy was superior in concomitant boost with lesser treatment interruptions (p = 0.004). Expected acute toxicities were significantly higher in CRT, except for grade 3/4 mucositis which was seen more in CBRT arm (39% and 55% in CRT and CBRT, respectively; p = 0.02). Late toxicities like Grade 3 xerostomia were significantly high in CRT arm than CBRT arm (33% versus 18%; p 2 cm had significantly better DFS with CRT (p = 0.05; HR-1.59, 95%CI-0.93–2.7). Conclusion: In selected patients of locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, concomitant boost offers a better compliance, toxicity profile and quality of life with similar disease control, than chemoradiation

  5. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes Following IMRT Versus Conventional Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Karnell, Lucy H.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from the database of an ongoing longitudinal Outcome Assessment Project. Eligible criteria included (1) treated with definitive radiation, and (2) provided 12-month posttreatment HRQOL data. Excluded were 7 patients who received IMRT before October 1, 2002, during this institution's developmental phase of the IMRT technique. The HRQOL outcomes of patients treated with IMRT were compared with those of patients who received CRT. Results: Twenty-six patients treated using IMRT and 27 patients treated using CRT were included. Patients in the IMRT group were older and had more advanced-stage diseases and more patients received concurrent chemotherapy. However, the IMRT group had higher mean Head and Neck Cancer Inventory scores (which represent better outcomes) for each of the four head-and-neck cancer-specific domains, including eating, speech, aesthetics, and social disruption, at 12 months after treatment. A significantly greater percentage of patients in the CRT group had restricted diets compared with those in the IMRT group (48.0% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.032). At 3 months after treatment, both groups had significant decreases from pretreatment eating scores. However, the IMRT group had a significant improvement during the first year, but the CRT group had only small improvement. Conclusions: Proper delivery of IMRT can improve HRQOL for patients with oropharyngeal cancer compared with CRT

  6. Role of high-risk human papillomavirus in the etiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancers in Thailand: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotipanich, Adit; Siriarechakul, Surattaya; Mungkung, On-Ong

    2018-01-01

    Among developing countries, Thailand shows no increase in the incidence of human papillomavirus-driven oropharyngeal cancer. The causal role of human papillomavirus infection in this pathology has not been researched thoroughly. A hospital-based, case-control study was performed which included 104 patients with newly diagnosed oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and 104 individuals without cancer. The Cervista high-risk human papillomavirus and 16/18 assays were used to detect human papillomavirus. Odds ratios were used to assess the association between high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus and the cancers. High-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 4 of 52 (7.7%) oral cancer cases, 6 of 52 (11.5%) oropharyngeal cancer cases, and 1 of 104 (0.96%) control subjects. Of 104 cancer patients in the study, 83 were smokers. High-risk human papillomavirus was significantly associated with oropharyngeal cancer (odds ratio = 13.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.6-114.8) but was nonsignificantly associated with oral cancer (odds ratio = 8.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.9-78.9). However, after adjustment for smoking, high-risk human papillomavirus was determined to be nonsignificantly associated with oropharyngeal cancer (adjusted odds ratio = 5.83, 95% confidence interval = 0.8-43.5). Although low human papillomavirus prevalence was observed, the rate of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in the cancer group was still higher than that in the control group. Smoking may have an influence on the etiology of human papillomavirus-related cancers. However, the study is underpowered to clarify the role of human papillomavirus as the independent risk factor for oral and oropharyngeal cancers in the Thai population.

  7. Morphology and distribution of taste papillae and oral denticles in the developing oropharyngeal cavity of the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. L. Atkinson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gustation in sharks is not well understood, especially within species that ingest food items using suction. This study examines the morphological and immunohistochemical characterisation of taste papillae and oral denticles in the oropharynx of the brown-banded bamboo shark Chiloscyllium punctatum and compares their distribution during development. Taste papillae of C. punctatum are located throughout the oropharyngeal region and are most concentrated on the oral valves (2125-3483 per cm2 in embryos; 89-111 per cm2 in mature adults close to the tooth territories. Papillae appearance is comparable at all stages of development, with the exception of the embryos (unhatched specimens, where no microvilli are present. Oral valve papillae are comparable in structure to Type I taste buds of teleost fishes, whereas those of the rest of the oropharyngeal region are comparable to Type II. Both types of papillae show immunofluorescence for a number of markers of taste buds, including β-Catenin and Sox2. Taste papillae densities are highest in embryos with 420-941 per cm2 compared to 8-29 per cm2 in mature adults. The total number of papillae remains around 1900 for all stages of development. However, the papillae increase in diameter from 72±1 μm (mean±s.e.m. in embryos to 310±7 μm in mature individuals. Microvilli protrude in multiple patches at the apical tip of the papilla covering ∼0.5% of the papillar surface area. We further document the relationship between taste papillae and the closely associated oral denticles within the shark orophayngeal cavity. Oral denticles first break through the epithelium in the antero-central region of the dorsal oral cavity, shortly after the emergence of teeth, around time of hatching. Denticles are located throughout the oropharyngeal epithelium of both immature and mature stages, with the highest concentrations in the antero-dorsal oral cavity and the central regions of the pharynx. These denticle

  8. Imaging characteristics and treatment of a penetrating brain injury caused by an oropharyngeal foreign body in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jennifer; Cooper Murphy, Megan; Broome, Cameron; Tayari, Hamaseh; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo

    2017-07-20

    A 4-year-old Border collie was presented with one episode of collapse, altered mentation, and a suspected pharyngeal stick injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography showed a linear foreign body penetrating the right oropharynx, through the foramen ovale and the brain parenchyma. The foreign body was surgically removed and medical treatment initiated. Complete resolution of clinical signs was noted at recheck 8 weeks later. Repeat MRI showed chronic secondary changes in the brain parenchyma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the advanced imaging findings and successful treatment of a penetrating oropharyngeal intracranial foreign body in a dog. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  10. Long-term swallow function after chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: the influence of a prophylactic gastrostomy or reactive nasogastric tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, R J D; Teo, M T W; Gilbert, A; Williams, G; Dyker, K E; Sen, M

    2014-02-01

    Two contrasting approaches of a prophylactic gastrostomy or a nasogastric tube as needed are widely used to support patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The influence of the type and timing of enteral feeding tube support upon long-term swallowing is uncertain. This study analysed the patients' perspective on long-term swallowing, comparing two groups of patients who received chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer managed with the two approaches. The MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) was posted to 63 consecutive patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy between January 2007 and June 2009, who had not required therapeutic enteral feeding before treatment and who were disease free on follow-up at least 2 years after treatment. In total, 56/63 patients completed questionnaires; 43 had been managed with a prophylactic gastrostomy and 13 with a policy of nasogastric tube as needed. There were no significant differences in all global, emotional, physical or functional domains of the MDADI according to enteral feeding strategy. Diet at 6 months after treatment was significantly correlated with better MDADI scores. In this study, the choice of a prophylactic gastrostomy or nasogastric tube as needed did not seem to influence long-term swallowing function. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of age and non-oropharyngeal proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensation on the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shune, S E; Moon, J B

    2016-09-01

    To best prevent and treat eating/swallowing problems, it is essential to understand how components of oral physiology contribute to the preservation and/or degradation of eating/swallowing in healthy ageing. Anticipatory, pre-swallow motor movements may be critical to safe and efficient eating/swallowing, particularly for older adults. However, the nature of these responses is relatively unknown. This study compared the magnitude of anticipatory mouth opening during eating in healthy older (aged 70-85) and younger (aged 18-30) adults under four eating conditions: typical self-feeding, typical assisted feeding (being fed by a research assistant resulting in proprioceptive loss), sensory loss self-feeding (wearing blindfold/headphones resulting in exteroceptive loss) and sensory loss assisted feeding (proprioceptive and exteroceptive loss). Older adults opened their mouths wider than younger adults in anticipation of food intake under both typical and most non-oropharyngeal sensory loss conditions. Further, the loss of proprioceptive and exteroceptive cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening for all participants. Greater mouth opening in older adults may be a protective compensation, contributing to the preservation of function associated with healthy ageing. Our finding that the loss of non-oropharyngeal sensory cues resulted in decreased anticipatory mouth opening highlights how important proprioception, vision, and hearing are in pre-swallow behaviour. Age- and disease-related changes in vision, hearing, and the ability to self-feed may reduce the effectiveness of these pre-swallow strategies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. New generation cut-and-seal devices in oral and oropharyngeal cancer resection: clinical and cost-effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirelli, G; Del Piero, G C; Valentinuz, G; Monte, A; Gatto, A; Rebelli, A; Quatela, E

    2017-12-18

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of ultrasonic shears and the electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing system, in comparison to the traditional cold knife and bipolar forceps, in oral and oropharyngeal cancer surgery. Patients who underwent oral or oropharyngeal cancer resection and neck dissection with either ultrasonic shears (n = 36) or electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing (n = 32) were enrolled. Surgical time, intra-operative bleeding, blood drainage, post-operative pain, neck oedema, complications and hospitalisation duration were compared to those of an historical cohort of 36 patients treated using a cold knife and bipolar forceps. Additionally, a cost-effectiveness evaluation was performed. Ultrasonic shears and, in particular, electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing, were advantageous compared to the traditional techniques. The cost of ultrasonic shears and electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing was completely offset by declining time-driven costs for the surgical team and operating theatre. Ultrasonic shears and, in particular, electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing, are more advantageous compared to the traditional techniques, from both a clinical and economic point of view.

  13. Effectiveness of oral hygiene interventions against oral and oropharyngeal reservoirs of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Otto L T; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2012-03-01

    Aerobic and facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacilli (AGNB) are opportunistic pathogens and continue to cause a large number of hospital-acquired infections. AGNB residing in the oral cavity and oropharynx have been linked to nosocomial pneumonia and septicemia. Although AGNB are not considered members of the normal oral and oropharyngeal flora, medically compromised patients have been demonstrated to be susceptible to AGNB colonization. A literature search was conducted to retrieve articles that evaluated the effectiveness of oral hygiene interventions in reducing the oral and oropharyngeal carriage of AGNB in medically compromised patients. Few studies have documented the use of mechanical oral hygiene interventions alone against AGNB. Although a number of studies have employed oral hygiene interventions complemented by antiseptic agents such as chlorhexidine and povidone iodine, there appears to be a discrepancy between their in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. With the recognition of the oral cavity and oropharynx as a reservoir of AGNB and the recent emergence of multidrug and pandrug resistance in hospital settings, there is a pressing need for additional high-quality randomized controlled trials to determine which oral hygiene interventions or combination of interventions are most effective in eliminating or reducing AGNB carriage. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative study between biopsy and brushing sampling methods for detection of human papillomavirus in oral and oropharyngeal cavity lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Bussoloti Filho, Ivo; Rossi, Lia Mara; Andreoli, Maria Antonieta; Cruz, Natália Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have suggested that human papillomavirus (HPV), especially type 16, is involved in the genesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx, especially in young, non-smoking patients; thus, its detection in lesions in this region is important. To clarify the capacity of the brushing sampling method to detect the presence of HPV in oral or oropharyngeal lesions through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, and to compare the results with those obtained by biopsy. Prospective study of adult patients with oral or oropharyngeal lesions assessed by PCR, comparing biopsy specimens with samples obtained by the brushing method. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the institution. A total of 35 sample pairs were analyzed, but 45.7% of the brushing samples were inadequate (16/35) and, thus, only 19 pairs could be compared. There was agreement of results in 94.7% (18/19) of the pairs, with HPV identified in 16 of them. HPV DNA was detected in 8.6% (3/35) of biopsy and 5.7% (2/35) of brushing samples. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods, but the brushing sampling method showed a higher number of inadequate samples, suggesting that it is an unreliable method for surveillance. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. A retrospective study of 606 cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with or without oropharyngeal candidiasis during radiotherapy.

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    Wen-Ze Qiu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the clinical characteristics, treatment-related toxicities and survival in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC with or without oropharyngealcandidiasis (OPC during radiotherapy.The current study was conducted with NPC patients undergoing radiotherapy at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center between June 2011 and May 2012. A clinical diagnosis of candidiasis was determined on the basis of a positive potassium hydroxide (KOH test and the presence of pseudomembranous (white form of candidal overgrowth. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test the association of OPC and related survival rates.Compared with the non-OPC group, the OPC group had significantly increased occurrence rates of grade 3-4 mucositis (14.5% vs. 7.4%, P = 0.049, anaemia (11.3% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.020, hepatotoxicity (4.8% vs. 1.1%, P = 0.021 and critical weight loss (85.5% vs. 56.6%, P<0.001 during radiotherapy. The OPC group had a significantly lower disease-free survival (DFS (70.9% vs. 82.6%, P = 0.012, mainly as a result of a reduction in locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS (87.0%vs. 94.9%, P = 0.025. After stratification by T stage, the 5-year DFS in T3-4 patients were 82.0% and 68.8% in non-OPC and OPC groups, respectively (P = 0.022. Multivariate analyses indicated that OPC was a prognostic factor for LRFS and DFS.OPC during radiotherapy may worsen the nutritional status of NPC patients according to weight loss and anaemia, leading to a negative impact on 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival and disease-specific survival. Further investigations are needed to explore whether prevention and treatment of OPC during radiotherapy will be useful.

  16. A retrospective study of 606 cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with or without oropharyngeal candidiasis during radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wen-Ze; Ke, Liang-Ru; Xia, Wei-Xiong; Yang, Jing; Yu, Ya-Hui; Liang, Hu; Huang, Xin-Jun; Liu, Guo-Ying; Li, Wang-Zhong; Xiang, Yan-Qun; Guo, Xiang; Lv, Xing

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics, treatment-related toxicities and survival in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with or without oropharyngealcandidiasis (OPC) during radiotherapy. The current study was conducted with NPC patients undergoing radiotherapy at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center between June 2011 and May 2012. A clinical diagnosis of candidiasis was determined on the basis of a positive potassium hydroxide (KOH) test and the presence of pseudomembranous (white) form of candidal overgrowth. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test the association of OPC and related survival rates. Compared with the non-OPC group, the OPC group had significantly increased occurrence rates of grade 3-4 mucositis (14.5% vs. 7.4%, P = 0.049), anaemia (11.3% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.020), hepatotoxicity (4.8% vs. 1.1%, P = 0.021) and critical weight loss (85.5% vs. 56.6%, P<0.001) during radiotherapy. The OPC group had a significantly lower disease-free survival (DFS) (70.9% vs. 82.6%, P = 0.012), mainly as a result of a reduction in locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS) (87.0%vs. 94.9%, P = 0.025). After stratification by T stage, the 5-year DFS in T3-4 patients were 82.0% and 68.8% in non-OPC and OPC groups, respectively (P = 0.022). Multivariate analyses indicated that OPC was a prognostic factor for LRFS and DFS. OPC during radiotherapy may worsen the nutritional status of NPC patients according to weight loss and anaemia, leading to a negative impact on 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival and disease-specific survival. Further investigations are needed to explore whether prevention and treatment of OPC during radiotherapy will be useful.

  17. Ecological Effect of Solithromycin on Normal Human Oropharyngeal and Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Holm, Johan; Söderberg Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-07-01

    Solithromycin is a new fluoroketolide. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of orally administered solithromycin on the human oropharyngeal and intestinal microbiota. Thirteen healthy volunteers (median age, 27.3 years) received oral solithromycin at 800 mg on day 1 followed by 400 mg daily on days 2 to 7. Fecal and saliva samples were collected at baseline and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21 for pharmacokinetic and microbiological analyses. Plasma samples were collected predose on days 2, 5, and 7 as proof of exposure, and solithromycin concentration ranges were 21.9 to 258 ng/ml, 18.0 to 386 ng/ml, and 16.9 to 417 ng/ml, respectively. The solithromycin concentrations in feces were 15.8 to 65.4 mg/kg, 24.5 to 82.7 mg/kg, 21.4 to 82.7 mg/kg, 12.1 to 72.4 mg/kg, 0.2 to 25.6 mg/kg, and 0 to 0.5 mg/kg on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21, respectively. The numbers of enterobacteria and enterococci decreased and were normalized on day 14. The numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria decreased from day 2 to day 14 and were normalized on day 21. The clostridia decreased on days 2, 7, and 14 and were normalized on day 21. No Clostridium difficile strains or toxins were detected during the study period. The number of Bacteroides strains was not significantly changed. The solithromycin concentrations in saliva were 0 to 1.2 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, and 0 to 0.1 mg/liter on days 2, 5, 7, and 9, respectively. The numbers of streptococci decreased on day 2 and were normalized on day 5. The numbers of lactobacilli, prevotellae, fusobacteria, and leptotrichiae decreased from day 2 and were normalized on day 21. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured (‘volumetric approach’) and assessed as ‘in-field’, ‘marginal’, or ‘out-field’. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as ‘in-field’, ‘marginal’, or ‘out-field’. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for

  19. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dehnad, Homan, E-mail: h.dehnad@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Braunius, Weibel [Department of ENT Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris H.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The

  20. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in Greenland in 1994–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Balslev Avnstorp

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV, smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection. In Greenland, only girls are included in the mandatory HPV vaccination program. Objective. To investigate the annual incidence of OPSCC and the proportion of HPV-associated OPSCC (HPV+ OPSCC in Greenland in 1994–2010. Design. At Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, we identified all Greenlandic patients diagnosed and treated for OPSCC from 1994 to 2010. Sections were cut from the patient's paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and investigated for p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. HPV analyses were performed with 2 sets of general HPV primers and 1 set of HPV16-specific primer. HPV+ OPSCC was defined as both >75% p16+ cells and PCR positive for HPV. Results. Of 26 Greenlandic patients diagnosed with OPSCC, 17 were males and 9 were females. The proportion of HPV+ OPSCC in the total study period was 22%, without significant changes in the population in Greenland. We found an increase in the proportion of HPV+ OPSCC from 14% in 1994–2001 to 25% in 2002–2010 (p=0.51. Among males from 20 to 27% (p=0.63 and in females from 0 to 20% (p=0.71. The annual OPSCC incidence increased from 2.3/100,000 (CI=1.2–4.2 in 1994–2001 to 3.8/100,000 (CI=2.4–6.2 in 2002–2010: among males from 2.4/100,000 (CI=1.0–5.7 to 5.0/100,000 (CI=2.9–8.9. Conclusion. Even though the population is at high risk of HPV infection, the proportion of 22% HPV+ OPSCC in the total study period is low compared to Europe and the United States. This might be explained by our small study size and/or by ethnic, geographical, sexual and cultural differences. Continuing observations of the OPSCC incidence and the proportion of HPV+ OPSCC in Greenland are needed.

  1. Naso- and oropharyngeal bacterial carriage in nursing home residents: Impact of multimorbidity and functional impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kwetkat

    Full Text Available From April 2013 to February 2014 we performed a multicentre prospective cross-sectional study in 541 German nursing home residents. We determined pharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae (primary objective and other bacteria (secondary objective in naso- and oropharyngeal swabs by culture-based standard procedures and explored the influence of multimorbidity and functional status on bacterial carriage.Socio-demographic data, vaccination status, multimorbidity, nutrition and functional status defined by Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment were evaluated. We estimated carriage rates with 95% confidence intervals (CI and explored potential risk factors by logistic regression analysis.Pneumococcal post-serotyping carriage rate was 0.8% (95%CI 0.2-1.9%; 4/526. Serotyping revealed serotypes 4, 7F, 23B and 23F and S. pseudopneumoniae in two other cases. Odds of carriage were higher in men (Odds ratio OR 5.3 (95%CI 0.9-29.4, in malnourished residents (OR 4.6 (0.8-25.7, residents living in shared rooms (OR 3.0 (0.5-16.5 or having contact with schoolchildren (OR 2.0 (0.2-17.6. The most frequent pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus (prevalence 29.5% (25.6-33.6% with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence of 1.1%. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB were found in 22.5% (19.0-26.3% with a prevalence of extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL producing bacteria of 0.8%. Odds of S. aureus carriage were higher for immobility (OR 1.84 (1.15-2.93 and cognitive impairment (OR 1.54 (0.98-2.40. Odds of GNB carriage were higher in residents with more severe comorbidity (OR 1.13 (1.00-1.28 and malnutrition (OR 1.54 (0.81-2.91.Given the observed data, at least long-term carriage of S. pneumoniae in nursing home residents seems to be rare and rather unlikely to cause nursing home acquired pneumonia. The low rate of colonization with multi drug resistant (MDR bacteria confirms that nursing home residency is not a risk factor for MDR pneumonia in Germany. For

  2. Clinical and histopathological results after local chemoembolization of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma - comparison with intraarterial chemoperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, S.; Turowski, B.; Berkefeld, J.; Kovacs, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: retrospective analysis of clinical and histopathological results after neoadjuvant intraarterial chemoembolization (iaCE) as compared to intraarterial chemoperfusion (iaCP) in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (SCC), Materials and methods: 289 patients (mean age 60 years, 68% male) with SCC of the oral cavity or the oropharynx (WHO stage I-IV) received (1) neoadjuvant iaCE (n = 103) with a crystalline suspension of cisplatin (150 mg/m 2 , solution ratio 5 mg cisplatin ad 1 ml NaCl 0.9%, total volume 40-60 ml) or (2) iaCP (n = 186) using high-dose cisplatin infusions (150 mg/m 2 1 mg cisplatin ad 1 ml NaCl 0.9%, 400-500 ml). The decision for iaCE or iaCP was made individually for each patient based on tumor localization and expected vascular supply. Four weeks after local chemotherapy, the treatment response was evaluated according (1) to WHO criteria and (2) to histopathological TNM-grading after tumor resection. Results: the overall treatment response was 72.5% after iaCE and 47% after iaCP (p < 0.001). A stable disease was found in 24% and 48%, respectively, and tumor progression was found in 3% for both modalities. Histopathological examination of resected tumors revealed complete remission in 20% after iaCE and 13% after iaCP. The percentage of complete remissions was highest in local T1 and T2 tumors after iaCE (42.9 versus 22.4% after iaCP, p = 0.031). Local side effects were significantly more frequent after iaCE than after iaCP (p < 0.001), especially in obese patients with extended carcinoma of the oral floor or the tongue base. Conclusion: Compared to iaCP, clinical and histopathological remission rates are significantly higher after iaCe, especially in early stages of local tumor growth. However, in view of the higher risk of regional complications, indication for iaCE should be considered cautiously and its application should be limited to small tumors of the oral floor and the oral tongue. (orig.)

  3. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

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    Sapir, Eli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tao, Yebin [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A. [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D{sub 50} doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  4. Sialorrhea: a review of a vexing, often unrecognized sign of oropharyngeal and esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, H Worth; Bakheet, Michael R

    2005-02-01

    Saliva is produced by the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual), as well as several smaller glands. Salivary flow can be altered by multiple entities. There is much written regarding xerostomia ("dry mouth"), the condition related to inhibited or decreased salivary flow. This condition is widely recognized in certain systemic diseases, particularly Sjögren syndrome, diabetes mellitus, after anticholinergic, antihistamine, and decongestant medications, as well as states of enhanced sympathetic drive, such as anxiety or emotional disturbances and various other psychosocial conditions. On the other hand, sialorrhea or ptyalism, the condition of increased salivary flow, is rarely discussed in the clinical literature. Sialorrhea can occur with various neurologic disorders, infections, the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, heavy metal poisoning, Wilson disease, Angelman syndrome, as well as a relatively unknown condition called idiopathic paroxysmal sialorrhea. Normal salivation may be altered by drugs (such as clozapine, risperidone, nitrazepam, lithium, and bethanecol) that have a cholinergic effect that induces sialorrhea. This report focuses on sialorrhea as it relates to disorders of the oropharynx and esophagus. The patient typically recognizes a problem with excessive "foamy mucus" but does not understand its origin. Infections and obstruction are the most common oropharyngeal causes. Increased salivary flow occurs as a typically subtle manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This occurrence is referred to as water brash. Idiopathic achalasia and megaesophagus due to the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are regularly associated with sialorrhea. Esophageal obstruction (foreign body, cancer, or stricture formation), infection, and nasogastric intubation are the more common conditions associated with the symptomatic sequelae of sialorrhea. Sialorrhea-related respiratory and pulmonary complications are greatest in those with a

  5. The role of neck surgery in patients with primary oropharyngeal cancer treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Lester J.; Weber, Randal S.; Morrison, William H.; Byers, Robert M.; Garden, Adam S.; Goepfert, Helmuth

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The role of neck surgery in node- positive patients whose primary tumours are treated by definitive radiotherapy is controversial. A planned neck dissection following radiotherapy is frequently recommended regardless of response of the neck nodes to treatment. This analysis was undertaken to assess the risk of withholding planned neck dissection in patients who obtain a complete nodal response to irradiation. Materials and Methods: The analysis is based on all 100 patients treated using the concomitant boost protocol described below who presented between 1984 and 1993 with primary squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx and clinically positive cervical lymphadenopathy. There were 73 males and 27 females with a median age of 59. Primary disease site was base of tongue 39, tonsil 40, soft palate 14 and pharyngeal wall 7. Nodal stages were N1: 35, N2: 51 and N3: 15. Nodal size varied from 1 - 9 cm with a median of 3 cm. Radiotherapy consisted of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks to large fields with a boost to gross disease of 18 Gy in 12 fractions being delivered as a second daily fraction during the last 2.4 weeks of treatment. Seventy-five patients had their nodal disease treated definitively by radiotherapy; those who had complete clinical resolution of all nodal disease (62) had no planned surgery, while the remaining 13 underwent neck dissection for presumed residual disease. Twenty-five patients had either node excision (8) or neck dissection (17) prior to radiotherapy. Results: There were 8 cases of isolated neck failure of which 3 occurred in the 62 patients who had no planned neck surgery, 0 in the 13 patients who were operated for presumed residual disease (pathologically negative in 7) and 5 in the 25 patients who had initial neck surgery. Of the 62 patients who had a complete response to radiotherapy, the two year probability of neck control was 87% if the initial nodal size was ≤ 3 cm versus 85% for nodes > 3 cm. However the likelihood of

  6. Infected or not: Are PCR-positive oropharyngeal swabs indicative of low pathogenic influenza A virus infection in the respiratory tract of Mallard Anas platyrhynchos?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wille (Michelle); P. van Run (Peter); J. Waldenström (Jonas); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractDetection of influenza virus in oropharyngeal swabs collected during wild bird surveillance is assumed to represent respiratory infection, although intestine is the main site of infection. We tested this assumption by histological examination of the respiratory tract of wild Mallards

  7. Dietary counselling and nutritional support in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy: persistent weight loss during 1-year follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlooswijk, C P; van Rooij, P H E; Kruize, J C; Schuring, H A; Al-Mamgani, A; de Roos, N M

    2016-01-01

    The need for dietary counselling and nutritional support in oropharyngeal cancer patients is generally accepted. However, evidence for the effectiveness is sparse. The aim of this study was to describe dietary counselling, nutritional support, body weight and toxicity during and after treatment, and investigate the effect of pre-treatment body mass index (BMI) on survival in oropharyngeal cancer patients. A retrospective chart review was made in 276 oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). End points were dietary consultations, weight loss, toxicity, overall survival and disease-free survival. Almost all oropharyngeal cancer patients received dietary counselling (94%) and nutritional support (99%). Dietary counselling decreased sharply shortly after treatment to 38% at 1 year after treatment. Overall weight loss increased during the first year of follow-up and ranged from 3% at start of RT, until 11% at 1 year after RT. Overall survival was significantly longer for patients with a BMI above average (P=0.01). Acute dysphagia (P=0.001), mucositis (P=0.000) and toxicity grade 3 (P=0.002) were significantly more prevalent in patients who had lost 10% or more of their body weight. This study showed that patients continue to lose body weight during and until 1 year after treatment, despite nutrition support and frequent dietetic consultation. A BMI above average appears to increase survival time. Future studies, preferably randomized trials, are needed to compare standard dietary counselling with more intensive dietary counselling that consists of earlier and/or prolonged treatment.

  8. Species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of oral yeast isolates from Tanzanian HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.J.M.; Matee, M.I.N.; Moshi, M.J.; Simon, E.N.; Mugusi, F.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Palenstein Helderman, W.H. van; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Verweij, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Tanzania, little is known on the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profiles of yeast isolates from HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis. METHODS: A total of 296 clinical oral yeasts were isolated from 292 HIV-infected patients

  9. Attitudes, subjective norms, and intention to perform routine oral examination for oropharyngeal candidiasis as perceived by primary health-care providers in Nairobi Province

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyio, L.N.; Kikwilu, E.N.; Mulder, J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions of primary health-care (PHC) providers in performing routine oral examination for oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) during outpatient consultations. Methods: A 47-item Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire was developed and

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a promising treatment option for the boost of oropharyngeal cancers not suitable for brachytherapy: a single-institutional experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamgani, A.; Tans, L.; Teguh, D.N.; Rooij, P. van; Zwijnenburg, E.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 2005 and 2010,

  11. Validity of patient-reported swallowing and speech outcomes in relation to objectively measured oral function among patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, R.N.P.M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; de Bree, R.; Aaronson, N.K.; Leemans, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the construct validity of the patient-reported outcomes Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI) in relation to objectively measured oral function among patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. The study

  12. Validity of Patient-Reported Swallowing and Speech Outcomes in Relation to Objectively Measured Oral Function Among Patients Treated for Oral or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, R. N P M; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I. M.; de Bree, R.; Aaronson, N. K.; Leemans, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the construct validity of the patient-reported outcomes Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI) in relation to objectively measured oral function among patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. The study

  13. Mitosis trumps T stage and proposed international association for the study of lung cancer/american thoracic society/european respiratory society classification for prognostic value in resected stage 1 lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhig, Edwina Elizabeth; Dettrick, Andrew; Godbolt, David Burleigh; Pauli, John; van Zwieten, Anthony; Hansen, Aaron Richard; Yang, Ian Anthony; Fong, Kwun Meng; Clarke, Belinda Edith; Bowman, Rayleen Veronica

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether a group of pathologists could reproducibly apply the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification for lung adenocarcinoma to a cohort of stage 1 tumors and whether this architectural classification and/or other parameters could demonstrate survival advantage. A total of 145 cases of 7 edition of tumor, node, metastasis stage 1 adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed for predominant architectural pattern, including cribriform pattern, nuclear grade, mitotic index, and necrosis. The parameters were assessed for reproducibility and survival and using multivariate analysis, compared with stage, age, and sex. The majority of tumors had a mixed architecture with the acinar pattern being the most common predominant architecture. Micropapillary and cribriform architecture were the least frequent patterns. This study demonstrated that a group of five pathologists could reproducibly apply the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Although there were insufficient cribriform-predominant adenocarcinomas for assessment, when the percentage of all cribriform was combined with other architectures, it was associated with a worse prognosis. The majority of the parameters assessed demonstrated significance with univariate analysis but only mitotic index, as assessed by the highest count/10 high-power fields remained significant with multivariate analysis. In this study of resected stage 1 primary lung adenocarcinoma, we found mitotic index to be the only independent prognostic marker. It was more closely associated with outcome than either pathologic T stage or IASLC/ATS/ERS architecture-based classification. Further validation of concordance and reproducibility in reporting mitotic index, as well as validation of prognostic significance, needs to be undertaken in independent data sets.

  14. A Study of 358 Cases of Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: Improving the Seventh Edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer T-Staging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the rationality and limitations of the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (the 7th AJCC edition T-staging system for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. The prognosis of 358 patients with stage T3/T4 NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT was analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method or the log-rank test. The 7th AJCC staging system of NPC has some limitations in that the T category is neither the significant factor in OS/LRFS nor the independent prognostic factor in OS/LRFS/DMFS/DFS (P>0.05. After adjustment by anatomic structures, univariate analysis has shown that the adjusted-T category has statistical significance between T3 and T4 for OS (86.4% and 71.3%, P=0.002, LRFS (97% and 90.9%, P=0.048, DMFS (90.9% and 77.2%, P=0.001, and DFS (86.2% and 67.5%, P=0.000, and multivariate analysis has shown that the adjusted-T category is an independent prognostic factor for OS/DMFS/DFS (with the exception of LRFS. Then, GTV-P was taken into consideration. Multivariate analysis showed that these nT categories serve as suitable independent prognostic factors for OS/DMFS/DFS (P<0.001 and LRFS (HR = 3.131; 95% CI, 1.090–8.990; P=0.043. The 7th AJCC staging system has limitations and should be improved by including the modifications suggested, such as anatomic structures and tumor volume adjustment.

  15. B7-H1 expression model for immune evasion in human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukpo, Odey C; Thorstad, Wade L; Lewis, James S

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Persistent viral infection is postulated to lead to carcinogenesis, although infection of benign adjacent epithelium is not typically observed. It is known that immune evasive tumor cells can provide an ideal niche for a virus. The B7-H1/PD-1 cosignaling pathway plays an important role in viral immune evasion by rendering CD8+ cytotoxic T cells anergic. We hypothesized that HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas express B7-H1 as a mechanism for immune evasion. A tissue microarray was utilized, for which HPV E6/E7 mRNA by in situ hybridization was previously performed. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect B7-H1 and staining was characterized by pattern, distribution, and intensity. B7-H1 was expressed by 84 of the 181 (46.4%) cases. Both tumor cell membranous and cytoplasmic expression were present and cytoplasmic expression was identified in some peritumoral lymphocytes. Expression was analyzed in several different ways and then considered binarily as positive versus negative. Tumors expressing B7-H1 were more likely to be HPV positive (49.2 vs. 34.1 %, p = 0.08). B7-H1 expression showed no correlation with disease recurrence in the entire cohort (OR = 1.09, p = 0.66), HPV positive cohort (OR = 0.80, p = 0.69) or HPV negative cohort (OR = 2.02, p = 0.22). However, B7-H1 expression intensity did correlate with the development of distant metastasis (p = 0.03), and B7-H1 intensity of 3+ (versus all other staining) showed a strong trend towards distant metastasis in the HPV positive (OR = 6.67, p = 0.13) and HPV negative (OR = 9.0, p = 0.13) cohorts. There was no correlation between B7-H1 expression and patient survival for any of the different ways in which staining was characterized, whether binarily, by distribution, intensity, or combined scores. B7-H1 is expressed in the majority of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas with transcriptionally-active HPV. This

  16. Androgen deprivation with or without radiation therapy for clinically node-positive prostate cancer. Lin CC, Gray PJ, Jemal A, Efstathiou JA, Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, Intramural Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (CCL, AJ); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (PJG, JAE); e-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2015 May 9;107(7). pii: djv119. [Print 2015 Jul]. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djv119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Eggener

    2017-03-01

    Clinically lymph node-positive (cN+) prostate cancer (PCa) is an often-fatal disease. Its optimal management remains largely undefined given a lack of prospective, randomized data to inform practice. We sought to describe modern practice patterns in the management of cN+PCa and assess the effect of adding radiation therapy (RT) to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on survival using the National Cancer Data Base. Patients with cN+PCa and without distant metastases diagnosed between 2004 and 2011 were included. Five-year overall survival for patients diagnosed between 2004 and 2006 and treated with ADT alone or ADT+RT were compared. Propensity score (PS) matching was used to balance baseline characteristics, and Cox multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality. Of 3,540 total patients, 32.2% were treated with ADT alone and 51.4% received ADT+RT. Compared with ADT alone, patients treated with ADT+RT were younger and more likely to have private insurance, lower comorbidity scores, higher Gleason scores, and lower PSA values. After PS matching, 318 patients remained in each group. Compared with ADT alone, ADT+RT was associated with a 50% decreased risk of five-year all-cause mortality (HR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.37-0.67, two-sided P<0.001; crude OS rate: 71.5% vs. 53.2%). Using a large national database, we have identified a statistically significant survival benefit for patients with cN+PCa treated with ADT+RT. These data, if appropriately validated by randomized trials, suggest that a substantial proportion of such patients at high risk for prostate cancer death may be undertreated, warranting a reevaluation of current practice guidelines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. [Light and electron microscopic studies of the oropharyngeal epithelium of the metamorphosed Salamandra salamandra (L.) (Urodela: Salamandridae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, G

    1985-01-01

    The multi-layered oropharyngeal-epithelium of metamorphosed S. salamandra consists of 3 principal layers: the stratum superficiale, the stratum intermedium and the stratum basale. 4 cell types can be identified in the stratum superficiale: ciliated cells producing small amounts of neutral and acid mucosubstances, and 3 types of goblet cells. Type 1 produces roundish alciano-philic, type 2 PAS-positive polygonal secretory granules; type 3 cells mostly arranged in clusters forming small glands synthesize granules which consist of complex electron dense bodies embeddet in a fuzzy matrix. All cell types mentioned arise from the undifferentiated s. basale; they differentiate in the s. intermedium, where they can be distinguished already in an early stage of maturation.

  18. [Light and electron microscopy analysis of the differentiation of oropharyngeal epithelium in Salamandra salamandra (L.) during metamorphosis (Urodela:Salamandridae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, G

    1985-01-01

    During metamorphosis the oropharyngeal-epithelium of Salamandra salamandra consists of cells partly with features typical for larvae partly with these characteristic for metamorphosed animals. In the stratum intermedium cells which in larvae develop to secreting non-ciliated pavement cells become precursors of ciliated cells. During this process mucus granulus were discharged and cells develop cilia. Cells of deepe layers stop the production of mucus granules; those granules, which are already present, disintegrate. Furthermore, new types of goblet cells (type 2 and 3 according to Clemen, 1984) arise. Goblet cells of older larvae (typ 1) are to be found nearly unchanged in metamorphosed animals. Older goblet cells degenerate. In the stratum superficiale during transformation of pavement cells to ciliated cells discharge of mucus and ciliogenesis run parallely. Some of the pavement cells, however, degenerate. The stratum basale remains unaltered.

  19. Evidence-based systematic review: Oropharyngeal dysphagia behavioral treatments. Part V--applications for clinicians and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy; McCabe, Daniel; Ashford, John; Mullen, Robert; Hammond, Carol Smith; Musson, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the integration of three essential principles: (1) the current best available research, (2) the clinician's experience and expertise, and (3) the patient's values and preferences. This report is the last in a series that presents the culmination of a collaborative effort between the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Department of Veterans Affairs to examine the state of the evidence on seven behavioral swallowing interventions. This article addresses how speech-language pathologists treating individuals with oropharyngeal dysphagia can incorporate EBP into their clinical decision-making process. A fictitious patient scenario is presented and discussed as an example of the clinical application of the findings from the three systematic reviews in this series on evidence for the use of behavioral swallowing interventions. Also, recommendations for researchers studying dysphagia treatment are discussed, with the overall goal of facilitating the generation of a stronger evidence base for clinicians.

  20. Oropharyngeal administration of mother's milk to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in extremely low-birth-weight infants: theoretical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nancy A; Caplan, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The oropharyngeal administration of mother's milk-placing drops of milk onto the infant's oral mucosa-may serve as a preventative strategy against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW: birth weight pneumonia, an earlier attainment of full enteral feeds, enhanced maturation of oral feeding skills, improved growth, and enhanced breast-feeding outcomes. While more research is needed to definitively establish safety and efficacy of this intervention, this article will examine biological plausibility and will describe the theoretical mechanisms of protection against NEC for ELBW infants who receive this intervention. Nurses play a key role in advancing the science and practice of this intervention. Future directions for research and implications for nursing practice will also be presented.

  1. The effects of non-invasive respiratory support on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity: a neonatal manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Calum T; Kortekaas, Rebecca; Dawson, Jennifer A; Manley, Brett J; Owen, Louise S; Davis, Peter G

    2016-05-01

    Heating and humidification of inspired gases is routine during neonatal non-invasive respiratory support. However, little is known about the temperature and humidity delivered to the upper airway. The International Standards Organization (ISO) specifies that for all patients with an artificial airway humidifiers should deliver ≥33 g/m(3) absolute humidity (AH). We assessed the oropharyngeal temperature and humidity during different non-invasive support modes in a neonatal manikin study. Six different modes of non-invasive respiratory support were applied at clinically relevant settings to a neonatal manikin, placed in a warmed and humidified neonatal incubator. Oropharyngeal temperature and relative humidity (RH) were assessed using a thermohygrometer. AH was subsequently calculated. Measured temperature and RH varied between devices. Bubble and ventilator continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) produced temperatures >34°C and AH >38 g/m(3). Variable flow CPAP resulted in lower levels of AH than bubble or ventilator CPAP, and AH decreased with higher gas flow. High-flow (HF) therapy delivered by Optiflow Junior produced higher AH with higher gas flow, whereas with Vapotherm HF the converse was true. Different non-invasive devices deliver inspiratory gases of variable temperature and humidity. Most AH levels were above the ISO recommendation; however, with some HF and variable flow CPAP devices at higher gas flow this was not achieved. Clinicians should be aware of differences in the efficacy of heating and humidification when choosing modes of non-invasive respiratory support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Trismus surgical release and free flap reconstruction after radiation therapy in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Alba; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Jyh-Kwei; Tsao, Chung-Kan

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to review our experience in trismus release followed by free flap reconstruction after radiotherapy in oral and oropharyngeal cancer, describe the results obtained in long-term follow-up and identify possible predictors of outcome. Patients' demographics, tumor characteristics and treatment where retrieved. Surgical release and reconstructive procedures were detailed. Interincisor distances (IIDs) where measured preoperatively (PO-IID), intraoperatively after release (IO-IID) and in the last follow-up (FU-IID). Potential predictors of outcome in terms of interincisor long-term gain (LT-gain) and postoperative loss (PO-loss) were analyzed. Twenty-eight patients were included in our study. The mean LT-gain was 8.9 ± 7.0 mm, and the PO-loss was 22.14 ± 7.27 mm. Patients with a PO-IID of 10 mm or less had a significant higher LT-gain (P = 0.038). Predictors of worse outcome included having received a previous maxillectomy during tumor ablation (lower LT-gain, P = 0.035), and previous buccal mucosa resection (higher PO-loss, P = 0.044). Trismus release and free flap reconstruction after radiotherapy in oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients seems to be associated with modest long term results and a high incidence of trismus recurrence, particularly in cases of prior buccal resections or maxillectomy. Patients should be adequately informed and carefully selected before indicating the procedure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Oropharyngeal flora in patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit: clinical factors and acid suppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandah, Wesam; Colmer-Hamood, Jane; Mojazi Amiri, Hoda; Raj, Rishi; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-05-01

    Acid suppression therapy in critically ill patients significantly reduces the incidence of stress ulceration and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding; however, recent studies suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increase the risk of pneumonia. We wanted to test the hypothesis that acid suppressive therapy promotes alteration in the bacterial flora in the GI tract and leads to colonization of the upper airway tract with pathogenic species, potentially forming the biological basis for the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in these patients. This was a prospective observational study on patients (adults 18 years or older) admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at a tertiary care centre. Exclusion criteria included all patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia at admission, with infection in the upper airway, or with a history of significant dysphagia. Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained on day 1 and days 3 or 4 of admission. We collected data on demographics, clinical information, and severity of the underlying disease using APACHE II scores. There were 110 patients enrolled in the study. The mean age was 49±16 years, 50 were women, and the mean APACHE II score was 9.8 ± 6.5. Twenty per cent of the patients had used a PPI in the month preceding admission. The first oropharyngeal specimen was available in 110 cases; a second specimen at 72-96 h was available in 68 cases. Seventy-five per cent of the patients admitted to the MICU had abnormal flora. In multivariate logistic regression, diabetes mellitus and PPI use were associated with abnormal oral flora on admission. Chronic renal failure and a higher body mass index reduced the frequency of abnormal oral flora on admission. Most critically ill patients admitted to our MICU have abnormal oral flora. Patients with diabetes and a history of recent PPI use are more likely to have abnormal oral flora on admission.

  4. Influence of tumor and microenvironment characteristics on diffusion-weighted imaging in oropharyngeal carcinoma: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Justin E; Driessen, Juliette P; van Kempen, Pauline M W; de Bree, Remco; Janssen, Luuk M; Pameijer, Frank A; Terhaard, Chris H J; Philippens, Marielle E P; Willems, Stefan

    2018-02-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a frequently performed MRI sequence in cancer patients. While previous studies have shown the clinical value of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for response prediction and response monitoring, less is known about the biological background of ADC. In the tumor microenvironment, hypoxia and increased proliferation of tumor cells contribute to resistance to (radio-)therapy, while high T-cell influx is related to better prognosis. We investigated the correlation between these three tissue characteristics and ADC in 20 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients. 20 patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) who underwent 1.5 T MRI, including DWI were included in this pilot study. Corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues were immunohistochemically analyzed for protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), Ki-67 and CD3. Expression of these markers was correlated with ADC. ADC negatively correlated with Ki-67 expression (p = .024) in tumor cells. There was a significant negative correlation between ADC and CD3-positive cell count (p = .009). No correlation was observed between HIF-1a expression and ADC. This study suggests that ADC reflects characteristics of tumor cells as well as the surrounding microenvironment. Interestingly, high tumor proliferation (a negative prognostic factor) and high T-cell influx (a beneficial prognostic factor) are both associated with a lower ADC. Further studies should be performed to correlate ADC to these histological characteristics in relation to previously known factors that affect ADC, to gain further knowledge on the role of DW-MRI in diagnostics and personalized medicine. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma with known human papillomavirus status treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy: patterns of failure and toxicity outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bledsoe, Trevor J; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Noble, Anisha R; Hunter, Grant K; Rybicki, Lisa A; Hoschar, Aaron; Chute, Deborah J; Saxton, Jerrold P; Greskovich, John F; Adelstein, David J

    2013-01-01

    Tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status has emerged as one of the most powerful prognostic factors for disease control and survival in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We reviewed our experience in patients with OPSCC and known tumor HPV status treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients with stage III-IVb OPSCC and known tumor HPV status treated with CRT between 2006 and 2011 were identified from an IRB approved registry for this retrospective review. Outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between HPV-positive and negative patients using the log-rank test. Of the 121 pts (89% male, 93% Caucasian) included in this study, median age was 57 (range: 40–73) and median follow-up was 21 months (range: 6–63). Ninety-seven (80%) patients were HPV-positive and 24 (20%) were HPV-negative. Primary site was base of tongue (55%), tonsil (44%), and oropharyngeal wall (2%). Two year rates of locoregional recurrence (3% vs. 26%; p = 0.002), disease free survival (93% vs. 64%; p = 0.001) and overall survival (94% vs 73%; p = 0.002) were superior in HPV-positive patients, while rates of distant recurrence were similar (3% vs. 5%; p = 0.98). While acute toxicities were similar between both groups, patients with HPV-positive disease were more likely to resume a normal diet (90% vs. 65%; p = 0.017) at last follow up. Also, no HPV-positive patient required a feeding tube beyond 6 months after treatment, compared with 24% of HPV-negative patients. Definitive CRT produces excellent rates of disease control with minimal late toxicity for patients with HPV-positive OPSCC. Studies of OPSCC should account for tumor HPV status when identifying factors prognostic for outcome

  6. Prognostic value of some tumor markers in unresectable stage IV oropharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soba, Erika; Budihna, Marjan; Smid, Lojze; Gale, Nina; Lesnicar, Hotimir; Zakotnik, Branko; Strojan, Primoz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how the expression of tumor markers p21, p27, p53, cyclin D1, EGFR, Ki-67, and CD31 influenced the outcome of advanced inoperable oropharyngeal carcinoma patients, treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy. The pretreatment biopsy specimens of 74 consecutive patients with inoperable stage IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy were in retrospective study processed by immunochemistry for p21, p27, p53, cyclin D1, EGFR, Ki-67, and CD31. Disease-free survival (DFS) was assessed according to the expression of tumor markers. Patients with a high expression of p21 (≥10%), p27 (>50%), Ki-67 (>50%), CD31 (>130 vessels/mm2) and low expression of p53 (<10%), cyclin D1 (<10%) and EGFR (<10%) (favorable levels - FL) had better DFS than patients with a low expression of p21 (<10%), p27 (≤50%), Ki-67 (≤50%), CD31 (<130 vessels/mm2) and high expression of p53 (≥10%), cyclin D1 (≥10%) and EGFR (≥10%) (unfavorable levels - UL). However, statistical significance in survival between FL and UL was achieved only for p27 and cyclin D1. DFS significantly decreased with an increasing number of markers with an unfavorable level per tumor (1–4 vs. 5–7) (78% vs. 32%, respectively; p = 0.004). The number of markers per tumor with UL of expression retained prognostic significance also in multivariate analysis. Statistical significance in survival between FL and UL emerged only for p27 and cyclin D1. The number of markers per tumor with UL of expression was an independent prognostic factor for an adverse outcome

  7. Tongue-to-palate resistance training improves tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallowing function in subacute stroke survivors with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H D; Choi, J B; Yoo, S J; Chang, M Y; Lee, S W; Park, J S

    2017-01-01

    Tongue function can affect both the oral and pharyngeal stages of the swallowing process, and proper tongue strength is vital for safe oropharyngeal swallowing. This trial investigated the effect of tongue-to-palate resistance training (TPRT) on tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallowing function in stroke with dysphagia patients. This trial was performed using a 4-week, two-group, pre-post-design. Participants were allocated to the experimental group (n = 18) or the control group (n = 17). The experimental group performed TPRT for 4 weeks (5 days per week) and traditional dysphagia therapy, whereas the control group performed traditional dysphagia therapy on the same schedule. Tongue strength was measured using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument. Swallowing function was measured using the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) and penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) based on a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Experimental group showed more improved in the tongue strength (both anterior and posterior regions, P = 0·009, 0·015). In addition, the experimental group showed more improved scores on the oral and pharyngeal phase of VDS (P = 0·029, 0·007), but not on the PAS (P = 0·471), compared with the control group. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of TPRT in increasing tongue muscle strength and improving swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Therefore, we recommend TPRT as an easy and simple rehabilitation strategy for improving swallowing in patients with dysphagia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prognostic impact of HPV-associated p16-expression and smoking status on outcomes following radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: The MARCH-HPV project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Lacas, Benjamin; Pignon, Jean-Pierre

    2018-01-01

    using a Cox model stratified by trial and adjusted on gender, age, T-stage, N-stage, type of radiotherapy fractionation, p16, smoking. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). RESULTS: In total, 465 patients (57%) had p16-positive tumors and 350 (43%) p16-negative. Compared to p16-negative...

  9. Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection and TP53 Mutation: Two Distinct Pathogeneses for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Eastern Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhen; Xia, Rong-Hui; Ye, Dong-Xia; Li, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, p53 expression, and TP53 mutations in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and determine their utility as prognostic predictors in a primarily eastern Chinese population. Methods The HPV infection status was tested via p16INK4A immunohistochemistry and validated using PCR, reverse blot hybridization and in situ hybridization (ISH) in 188 OPSCC samples. p53 expression levels and TP...

  10. Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs; identification of oropharyngeal tonsils as sites of primary and sustained viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Stenfeldt

    Full Text Available A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural, intra-oropharyngeal, inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglottic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi characterized by regional localization of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus. At this time FMDV antigen was localized in cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells and CD172a-expressing leukocytes of the crypt epithelium of the paraepiglottic tonsils. De novo replication of FMDV was first detected in oropharyngeal swab samples at 12 hpi and viremia occurred at 18-24 hpi, approximately 24 hours prior to the appearance of vesicular lesions. From 12 through 78 hpi, microscopic detection of FMDV was consistently localized to cytokeratin-positive cells within morphologically characteristic segments of oropharyngeal tonsil crypt epithelium. During this period, leukocyte populations expressing CD172a, SLA-DQ class II and/or CD8 were found in close proximity to infected epithelial cells, but with little or no co-localization with viral proteins. Similarly, M-cells expressing cytokeratin-18 did not co-localize with FMDV proteins. Intra-epithelial micro-vesicles composed of acantholytic epithelial cells expressing large amounts of structural and non-structural FMDV proteins were present within crypts of the tonsil of the soft palate during peak clinical infection. These findings inculpate the paraepiglottic tonsils as the primary site of FMDV infection in pigs exposed via the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, the continuing replication of FMDV in the oropharyngeal tonsils during viremia and peak clinical infection with no concurrent amplification of virus occurring in the lower respiratory tract indicates that these sites are the major source of shedding of FMDV from pigs.

  11. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Versus Traditional Therapy in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease and Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Effects on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Heijnen, B. J.; Speyer, R.; Baijens, L. W. J.; Bogaardt, H. C. A.

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatm...

  12. Transoral robotic surgery for residual and recurrent oropharyngeal cancers: Exploratory study of surgical innovation using the IDEAL framework for early-phase surgical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleri, Vinidh; Fox, Hannah; Coward, Sarah; Ragbir, Maniram; McQueen, Andrew; Ahmed, Omar; Meikle, David; Saleh, Daniel; O'Hara, James; Robinson, Max

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the management of residual and recurrent oropharyngeal cancer. IDEAL (Idea, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term Follow-up) 2a framework. Of 26 patients assessed for TORS, 21 underwent the procedure, 5 underwent open resection (4 due to unsuitable anatomy/tumor extent and 1 on the basis of patient choice). Three patients underwent intraoperative ultrasound-assisted robotic resection, and 3 received robotic-assisted free flap inset. A technical refinement for TORS of residual and recurrent oropharyngeal cancer of the tongue base is described. Actuarial plots showed estimated overall survival of 48.2%, local control of 76.6%, and disease-specific survival of 77.1% at 42.6 months. TORS is a valid management option for residual and recurrent oropharyngeal cancer. Oncologic outcomes are comparable to open surgery and transoral laser microsurgery, with the added advantages of en bloc resections, facility for intraoperative ultrasound imaging, and inset of free flaps without mandibular split. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Health System and Policy Implications of Changing Epidemiology for Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers in the United States From 1995 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeHew, Charles W; Weatherspoon, Darien J; Peterson, Caryn E; Goben, Abigail; Reitmajer, Karolina; Sroussi, Herve; Kaste, Linda M

    2017-01-01

    Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers are typically grouped under the general term, "oral cancer." Yet, the incidence of oropharyngeal cancers is increasing in the United States, while the incidence of oral cavity cancers has declined. These 2 distinct but conflated groups of oral cancers are attributed to different risk factors. Incidence and survival trends were examined across US population groups and by anatomical subsite. Disparities in incidence and survival by sex, race/ethnicity, and subsite were identified. Risk factors are complex, interactive, and not fully identified. Cancer control research illustrates health disparities in access to care and patient outcomes. Database and supplemental searches yielded 433 articles published between 1995 and 2016 characterizing aspects of oral cancer epidemiology relating to incidence, survival, risk, disparities, and cancer control. Oral cavity cancer survival in black men remains the most intractable burden. Although understanding of oral cancer etiology is improving, application to policy is limited. Cancer control efforts are diverse, sporadic, limited in scope, and generally lacking in success, and they need stratification by oral cavity cancers/oropharyngeal cancers. Further intervention and epidemiologic research, improved workforce capacity, and integrated care delivery are identified as important directions for public health policy. Sustained, multilevel campaigns modeled on tobacco control success are suggested. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Comparative randomised study of GlideScope®video laryngoscope versus flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope for awake nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients with anticipated difficult intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, Essam Abd El-Halim; Hassan, Mohamed Elsayed

    2016-12-01

    Awake flexible fibre-optic bronchoscope (FFS) is the standard method of intubation in difficult airway in oral cancer patients. We decided to evaluate GlideScope ® video laryngoscope (GL) for intubation as compared to the standard FFS for nasal intubation in such patients. After the ethical committee approval, we included 54 oropharyngeal cancer patients divided randomly into two equal groups: Group G and Group F. After pre-medication and pre-oxygenation, awake nasal intubation was performed using GL in Group G and FFS in Group F. In both groups, we compared intubation time in seconds (mean ± standard deviation) (primary outcome), success rate of the first intubation attempt, percentage of Cormack and Lehane glottic score and incidence of complications. We assumed that GL could be a suitable alternative for the standard FFS in nasal intubation of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Success rate of the first attempt and Cormack and Lehane glottic score were compared using Chi-square test. Intubation time in seconds was significantly shorter in Group G (70.85 ± 8.88 S) than in Group F (90.26 ± 9.41 S) with ( P Cormack and Lehane glottic Score I and II showed insignificant difference between both Group G (92.6%) and Group F (96.3%). We detected three cases of sore throat in each group. GlideScope ® could be a suitable alternative to FFS in nasal intubation of oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  15. Effects of Device-Facilitated Isometric Progressive Resistance Oropharyngeal Therapy on Swallowing and Health-Related Outcomes in Older Adults with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole; Rusche, Nicole; Hind, Jacqueline A; Zielinski, Jill; Gangnon, Ronald; Safdar, Nasia; Robbins, JoAnne

    2016-02-01

    Swallowing disorders (dysphagia) are associated with malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and mortality in older adults. Strengthening interventions have shown promising results, but the effectiveness of treating dysphagia in older adults remains to be established. The Swallow STRengthening OropharyNGeal (Swallow STRONG) Program is a multidisciplinary program that employs a specific approach to oropharyngeal strengthening-device-facilitated (D-F) isometric progressive resistance oropharyngeal (I-PRO) therapy-with the goal of reducing health-related sequelae in veterans with dysphagia. Participants completed 8 weeks of D-F I-PRO therapy while receiving nutritional counseling and respiratory status monitoring. Assessments were completed at baseline, 4, and 8 weeks. At each visit, videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were performed. Dietary and swallowing-related quality of life questionnaires were administered. Long-term monitoring for 6-17 months after enrollment allowed for comparison of pneumonia incidence and hospitalizations to the 6-17 months before the program. Veterans with dysphagia confirmed with videofluoroscopy (N = 56; 55 male, 1 female; mean age 70) were enrolled. Lingual pressures increased at anterior (effect estimate = 92.5, P Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders (SWAL-QOL) Questionnaire (effect estimates = 6.5-19.5, P dysphagia. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baijens LW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Laura WJ Baijens,1 Pere Clavé,2,3 Patrick Cras,4 Olle Ekberg,5 Alexandre Forster,6 Gerald F Kolb,7 Jean-Claude Leners,8 Stefano Masiero,9 Jesús Mateos-Nozal,10 Omar Ortega,2,3 David G Smithard,11 Renée Speyer,12 Margaret Walshe13 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 2Gastrointestinal Physiology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Hospital of Mataró, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Mataró, 3CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Neurology, Antwerp University Hospital, University of Antwerp, Born Bunge Institute, Edegem, Belgium; 5Department of Translational Medicine, Division of Medical Radiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; 6Clinique Bois-Bougy, Nyon, Switzerland; 7Department of Geriatrics and Physical Medicine, Bonifatius Hospital, Lingen, Germany; 8Long Term Care and Hospice, Ettelbruck, Luxembourg; 9Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Padua, Padova, Italy; 10Department of Geriatric Medicine, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain; 11Clinical Gerontology, Princess Royal University Hospital, King’s College Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK; 12College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia; 13Department of Clinical Speech and Language Studies, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids

  17. Validation of the ICON-S staging for HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma using a pre-defined treatment policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porceddu, Sandro V; Milne, Rob; Brown, Elizabeth; Bernard, Anne; Rahbari, Reza; Cartmill, Bena; Foote, Matthew; McGrath, Margaret; Coward, Jermaine; Panizza, Benedict

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether the International Collaboration on Oropharyngeal cancer Network for Staging (ICON-S) for HPV associated oropharyngeal carcinoma (HPV+OPC) is a better discriminator of overall survival (OS), compared with the 7th edition (7th Ed) AJCC/UICC TNM staging following curative radiotherapy (RT). The 5-year OS for all patients with non-metastatic (M0) p16-confirmed OPC treated between 2005 and 2015 was determined and grouped based on the 7th Ed AJCC/UICC TNM and ICON-S staging. A total of 279 patients met the inclusion criteria. The 5-year OS with the 7th Ed TNM classification were Stage I/II 88.9% (95% CI; 70.6-100%), Stage III 93.8% (95% CI; 85.9-100%), Stage IVa 86.4% (95% CI; 81.6-91.5%) and Stage IVb 62.3% (95% CI; 46.8-82.8%). On multivariate Cox regression analysis there was no statistically significant OS difference when comparing Stage I/II with, Stage III (p=0.98, HR=0.97, 95% CI; 0.11-8.64), IVa (p=0.67, HR=1.56, 95% CI; 0.2-11.94) and IVb (p=0.11, HR=5.54, 95% CI; 0.69-44.52), respectively. The 5-year OS with ICON-S staging were Stage I 93.6% (95% CI; 89.4-98.0%), Stage II 81.9% (95% CI; 73.7-91.1%) and Stage III 69.1% (95%; 57.9-82.6%). There was a consistent decrease of OS with increasing stage. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, when compared to Stage I, OS was significantly lower for stage II (p=0.007, HR=2.84, 95% CI; 1.33-6.05) and stage III (p<0.001, HR=3.78, 95% CI; 1.81-7.92), respectively. The ICON-S staging provides better OS stratification for HPV+OPC following RT compared with the 7th Ed TNM staging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparative Study Between Two Sensory Stimulation Strategies After Two Weeks Treatment on Older Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Omar; Rofes, Laia; Martin, Alberto; Arreola, Viridiana; López, Irene; Clavé, Pere

    2016-10-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a prevalent geriatric syndrome. Treatment is based on compensatory strategies to avoid complications. New treatments based on sensory stimulation to promote the recovery of the swallowing function have proved effective in acute studies but prolonged treatment needs further research. Our aim was to evaluate and compare the effect of two, longer-term sensory treatment strategies on older patients with OD. 38 older patients (≥70 years) were studied with videofluoroscopy (pre/posttreatment) and randomized into two 10-day treatment groups: Group A-transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist (capsaicin 1 × 10(-5) M) and Group B-transcutaneous sensory electrical stimulation (TSES) (Intelect VitalStim, biphasic pulses, 300 μs, 80 Hz). Patients were analyzed for treatment response. Patients were old (80.47 ± 5.2 years), with comorbidities (3.11 ± 1.59 Charlson Index), polymedication (8.92 ± 3.31 drugs/patient), and mild functional impairment (86.84 ± 17.84 Barthel Index), and 28.9 % were at risk of malnutrition (MNA-sf). Overall, all patients had videofluoroscopic signs of impaired safety of swallow (ISS) with delayed oropharyngeal swallow response (OSR). After sensory stimulation, prevalence of ISS decreased to 68.42 % in both groups (P = 0.019). There were 68.42 % responders in Group A (TRPV1) and 42.11 % in Group B (TSES). Group A responders showed an improvement in the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS, 5.23 ± 2.04 to 3 ± 1.47; P = 0.002), and the same was true for those of Group B (4.63 ± 1.41 to 2.13 ± 0.64; P = 0.007). 10-day sensory stimulation with either therapy improved safety of swallow and OSR in older patients with OD, reducing the severity of OD in a significant subgroup of these patients.

  19. Dental amalgam artifact: Adverse impact on tumor visualization and proton beam treatment planning in oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patrick; Sandison, George; Dang, Quang; Johnson, Bart; Wong, Tony; Parvathaneni, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and impact of dental filling artifacts on the definition of clinical target volume (CTV) for oropharyngeal/oral cavity cancers receiving radiation therapy. We performed phantom proton beam dosimetric analyses using a low-density composite filling to investigate artifact reduction and dose distribution. We reviewed oral cavity/oropharynx radiation treatment plans between 2010 and 2012. Plans were evaluated for artifacts and impact on CTV visualization. We constructed a head and neck phantom, obtaining planning computed tomography images at baseline (native tooth) and for each filling (composite and metal amalgam) interchanged into a tooth adjacent to the tumor. We performed uniform scanning proton plans with each filling, evaluating for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and overall dose distribution. A total of 110 treatment plans were reviewed (71 oropharynx, 39 oral cavity). Artifacts were identified in 81 plans (73.6%), including 53 oropharynx (74.6%) and 28 oral cavity (71.8%). Artifacts obscured the CTV in 77 cases (95%), including 49 of 53 oropharynx cases (92.5%) and all 28 oral cavity cases. On phantom testing, the metal amalgam obscured the tumor while the composite did not. Hounsfield unit (HU) values (range, mean) for the tumor were: baseline (-484.0 to 700.0 HU, 104 HU), composite (-728.5 to 1038.0 HU, 105 HU), metal amalgam (-1023.0 to 807.0 HU, 90.74 HU). The percent of planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose of the PTV was baseline (100%), composite (100%), and metal amalgam (92.3%). PTV dose ranges were baseline (98%-106%), composite (98%-107%), and metal amalgam (66%-111%). PTV coverage and dose distributions of the composite and native tooth plans were identical. A high incidence of artifacts was found on the planning scans of oral/oropharyngeal cancer patients, adversely impacting CTV visualization. In our phantom model, metal amalgam impacted tumor and tissue density. The PTV was underdosed with

  20. Multimodality imaging with CT, MR and FDG-PET for radiotherapy target volume delineation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, David; Scarsbrook, Andrew F.; Sykes, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Subesinghe, Manil; Carey, Brendan; Wilson, Daniel J.; Roberts, Neil; McDermott, Gary; Karakaya, Ebru; Bayman, Evrim; Sen, Mehmet; Speight, Richard; Prestwich, Robin J.D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the variation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation between CT, MR and FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective, single centre, pilot study was undertaken where 11 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers (2 tonsil, 9 base of tongue primaries) underwent pre-treatment, contrast enhanced, FDG PET-CT and MR imaging, all performed in a radiotherapy treatment mask. CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs were contoured by 5 clinicians (2 radiologists and 3 radiation oncologists). A semi-automated segmentation algorithm was used to contour PET GTVs. Volume and positional analyses were undertaken, accounting for inter-observer variation, using linear mixed effects models and contour comparison metrics respectively. Significant differences in mean GTV volume were found between CT (11.9 cm 3 ) and CT-MR (14.1 cm 3 ), p < 0.006, CT-MR and PET (9.5 cm 3 ), p < 0.0009, and MR (12.7 cm 3 ) and PET, p < 0.016. Substantial differences in GTV position were found between all modalities with the exception of CT-MR and MR GTVs. A mean of 64 %, 74 % and 77 % of the PET GTVs were included within the CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs respectively. A mean of 57 % of the MR GTVs were included within the CT GTV; conversely a mean of 63 % of the CT GTVs were included within the MR GTV. CT inter-observer variability was found to be significantly higher in terms of position and/or volume than both MR and CT-MR (p < 0.05). Significant differences in GTV volume were found between GTV volumes delineated by radiologists (9.7 cm 3 ) and oncologists (14.6 cm 3 ) for all modalities (p = 0.001). The use of different imaging modalities produced significantly different GTVs, with no single imaging technique encompassing all potential GTV regions. The use of MR reduced inter-observer variability. These data suggest delineation based on multimodality imaging has the potential to improve accuracy of GTV definition. ISRCTN Registry: ISRCTN34165059. Registered 2

  1. Morphoproteomics, E6/E7 in-situ hybridization, and biomedical analytics define the etiopathogenesis of HPV-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma and provide targeted therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert E; Naqvi, Syed; McGuire, Mary F; Buryanek, Jamie; Karni, Ron J

    2017-08-17

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an etiopathogenetic factor in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes are instrumental in promoting proliferation and blocking differentiation leading to tumorigenesis. Although surgical intervention can remove such tumors, the potential for an etiologic field effect with recurrent disease is real. A downstream effector of E7 oncoprotein, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), is known to promote proliferation and to pose a block in differentiation and in turn, could lead to HPV-induced malignant transformation. However, the EZH2 pathway is amenable to low toxicity therapies designed to promote differentiation to a more benign state and prevent recurrent disease by inhibiting the incorporation of HPV into the genome. This is the first study using clinical specimens to demonstrate EZH2 protein expression in oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC). The study included eight patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, confirmed p16INK4a- positive by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The tissue expression of E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured by RNAscope® in-situ hybridization technology. Expression of EZH2, Ki-67, and mitotic indices were assessed by morphoproteomic analysis. Biomedical analytics expanded the results with data from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and KEGG databases to construct a molecular network pathway for further insights. Expression of E6 and E7 oncogenes in p16INK4a- positive oropharyngeal carcinoma was confirmed. EZH2 and its correlates, including elevated proliferation index (Ki-67) and mitotic progression were also present. Biomedical analytics validated the relationship between HPV- E6 and E7 and the expression of the EZH2 pathway. There is morphoproteomic and mRNA evidence of the association of p16INK4a-HPV infection with the E6 and E7 oncogenes and the expression of EZH2, Ki-67 and mitotic progression in oropharyngeal carcinoma. The molecular network biology was confirmed by

  2. Socioeconomic characteristics of patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma according to tumor HPV status, patient smoking status, and sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Kristina R; Bell, Diana; Hanby, Duncan; Li, Guojun; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi; Williams, Michelle D; Sturgis, Erich M

    2015-09-01

    Patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) have distinct risk factor profiles reflected in the human papillomavirus (HPV) status of their tumor, and these profiles may also be influenced by factors related to socioeconomic status (SES). The goal of this study was to describe the socioeconomic characteristics of a large cohort of patients with OPC according to HPV status, smoking status, and sexual behavior. Patients with OPC prospectively provided information about their smoking and alcohol use, socioeconomic characteristics, and sexual behaviors. HPV status was determined by a composite of immunohistochemistry for p16 expression, HPV in situ hybridization, and PCR assay in 356 patients. Standard descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to compare socioeconomic characteristics between patient subgroups. Patients with HPV-positive OPC had higher levels of education, income, and overall SES. Among patients with HPV-positive OPC, never/light smokers had more than 5 times the odds of having at least a bachelor's degree and being in the highest level of SES compared with smokers. Patients with HPV-positive OPC and those with higher levels of education and SES had higher numbers of lifetime any and oral sex partners, although not all of these differences were significant. Socioeconomic differences among subgroups of OPC patients have implications for OPC prevention efforts, including tobacco cessation, behavior modification, and vaccination programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of radiomic signatures for local recurrence using primary tumor texture analysis in oropharyngeal head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Radiomics is one such "big data" approach that applies advanced image refining/data characterization algorithms to generate imaging features that can quantitatively classify tumor phenotypes in a non-invasive manner. We hypothesize that certain textural features of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) primary tumors will have statistically significant correlations to patient outcomes such as local control. Patients from an IRB-approved database dispositioned to (chemo)radiotherapy for locally advanced OPC were included in this retrospective series. Pretreatment contrast CT scans were extracted and radiomics-based analysis of gross tumor volume of the primary disease (GTVp) were performed using imaging biomarker explorer (IBEX) software that runs in Matlab platform. Data set was randomly divided into a training dataset and test and tuning holdback dataset. Machine learning methods were applied to yield a radiomic signature consisting of features with minimal overlap and maximum prognostic significance. The radiomic signature was adapted to discriminate patients, in concordance with other key clinical prognosticators. 465 patients were available for analysis. A signature composed of 2 radiomic features from pre-therapy imaging was derived, based on the Intensity Direct and Neighbor Intensity Difference methods. Analysis of resultant groupings showed robust discrimination of recurrence probability and Kaplan-Meier-estimated local control rate (LCR) differences between "favorable" and "unfavorable" clusters were noted.

  4. The utilization of oropharyngeal intratracheal PAMP administration and bronchoalveolar lavage to evaluate the host immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Irving C

    2014-04-02

    The host immune response to pathogens is a complex biological process. The majority of in vivo studies classically employed to characterize host-pathogen interactions take advantage of intraperitoneal injections of select bacteria or pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in mice. While these techniques have yielded tremendous data associated with infectious disease pathobiology, intraperitoneal injection models are not always appropriate for host-pathogen interaction studies in the lung. Utilizing an acute lung inflammation model in mice, it is possible to conduct a high resolution analysis of the host innate immune response utilizing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we describe the methods to administer LPS using nonsurgical oropharyngeal intratracheal administration, monitor clinical parameters associated with disease pathogenesis, and utilize bronchoalveolar lavage fluid to evaluate the host immune response. The techniques that are described are widely applicable for studying the host innate immune response to a diverse range of PAMPs and pathogens. Likewise, with minor modifications, these techniques can also be applied in studies evaluating allergic airway inflammation and in pharmacological applications.

  5. Microbiological and molecular identification of bacterial species isolated from nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa of fuel workers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlWakeel, Suaad S

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the bacterial species colonizing the nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa of fuel workers in Central Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on a microbiological and molecular level. Throat and nasal swab samples were obtained from 29 fuel station attendants in the period of time extending from March to May 2014 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Microbiological identification techniques were utilized to identify the bacterial species isolated. Antibiotic sensitivity was assessed for each of the bacterial isolates. Molecular identification techniques based on PCR analysis of specific genomic sequences was conducted and was the basis on which phylogeny representation was done for 10 randomly selected samples of the isolates. Blood was drawn and a complete blood count was conducted to note the hematological indices for each of the study participants. Nineteen bacterial species were isolated from both the nasal cavity and the oropharynx including Streptococcus thoraltensis , alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Staphylococcus hominis , coagulase-negative staphylococci, Leuconostoc mesenteroides , Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and several others. We found 100% sensitivity of the isolates to ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime and gentamicin. Whereas cefotaxime and azithromycin posted sensitivities of 85.7% and 91.4%, respectively. Low sensitivities (fuel products may be a contributing factor to bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract in fuel workers.

  6. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on nutritional status and mucositis in oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Miki; Takemoto, Naoko; Sano, Ayaka

    2012-01-01

    Recently, concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is frequently used for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. However, CCRT induces mucositis and dysphagia and causes inadequate oral nutrition intake. Thus, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in advance is recently recommended. To evaluate the effectiveness of PEG on nutritional intake, nutritional status, blood test, and grade of mucositis of 29 patients who had CCRT with PEG were investigated retrospectively. The results were statistically compared with those of 13 patients who had CCRT without PEG as a control group. Regarding the total energy, no significant change was observed in the PEG group, while the total energy intake significantly decreased in the control group (P=0.026). A significant correlation was observed between the rate of body weight loss during CCRT and total energy intake (R=0.78). The total energy intake of patients who could maintain body weight was 34.1 kcal/kg/day. Taken together, these results suggested that early nutritional administration using PEG can reduce the weight loss during CCRT. (author)

  7. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Trautwein-Weidner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity.

  8. Impact of retropharyngeal adenopathy on distant control and survival in HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuels, Stuart E.; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Spector, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Mohannad; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Tao, Yebin; Schipper, Matthew; Worden, Francis; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) is poor prognostic factor in head and neck (HN) cancer. However, the prognostic significance of RPA in Human Papillomavirus-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is unknown. Patients and methods: 185 patients with HPV + OPC were assessed. Pre-therapy images reviewed by a HN radiologist to determine presence of RPA. Doses to the RPAs were determined from treatment plans. Outcomes analyzed using Kaplan–Meier method, log-rank tests, and correlations determined using Spearman’s rank analyses. Results: 29 (16%) of the HPV + patients had RPA. At median follow-up 49 months, 5-year overall survival (OS), failure-free survival (FFS) and distant failure-free survival (DFFS) were 57% vs. 81% (P = 0.02), 63% vs 80% (P = 0.015) and 70% vs 91% (P = 0.002) for patients with/without RPA, respectively. No differences observed in local/ regional control rates, exceeding 90% in both groups, and No RPA recurrences were observed. In multivariable analysis, stages T4 or N3, and RPA, were independently, statistically significantly associated with both OS and distant failure, while N2c, age, disease site, and smoking status, were not. Conclusion: RPA in HPV + OPC is an independent prognostic factor for distant failure, translating into worse OS. Patients with RPA may not be suitable candidates for trials of systemic treatment de-escalation

  9. New Concepts for Translational Head and Neck Oncology: Lessons from HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostareli, Efterpi; Holzinger, Dana; Hess, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is well established as an etiological agent responsible for a number of pathologies affecting the stratified epithelia of skin and anogenital sites. More recently, the infection by (mucosal) high-risk HPV types has also been found to be causally associated with squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region (HNSCC), especially in the oropharynx. Intriguingly, HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) represent a distinct clinical entity compared to HPV-negative tumors with particular regard to treatment–response and survival outcome. The association between HPV infection and OPSCC may therefore have important implications for the prevention and/or treatment of OPSCC. The improved survival of patients with HPV-related tumors also raises the question, as to whether a better understanding of the underlying differences may help to identify new therapeutic concepts that could be used in targeted therapy for HPV-negative and improved therapy for HPV-positive cancers. This review summarizes the most recent advances in our understanding of the molecular principles of HPV-related OPSCC, mainly based on functional genomic approaches, but also emphasizes the significant role played by the tumor microenvironment, especially the immune system, for improved clinical outcome and differential sensitivity of HPV-related tumors to current treatment options.

  10. Morbidity, mortality and cost from HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer: Impact of 2-, 4- and 9-valent vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Greg; Mehta, Vikas; Moore, Michael

    2016-06-02

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) is increasing at a dramatic rate, with men affected more commonly than women. Individuals who develop this disease suffer significant morbidity and potential mortality from their cancer and its associated treatment. We aim to evaluate the possible impact that the currently available HPV vaccines will have on this group of cancers. Available peer-reviewed literature, practice guidelines, and statistics published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Contemporary peer-reviewed medical literature was selected based on its scientific validity and relevance to the impact HPV vaccination may have on the morbidity, mortality and cost resulting from HPV-related OPSCC in the United States. The incidence of HPV-related OPSCC is increasing at a near epidemic rate in the United States. The cost of treatment of HPV-related OPSCC is high, and the disease and its therapy result in significant morbidity and potential mortality to individuals. Using a cut-off of $50,000/Quality-Adjusted Life Year, expansion of current HPV vaccine indications to include prevention of OPSCC in both men and women should be recommended.

  11. Screening tool for oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke - Part I: evidence of validity based on the content and response processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Tatiana Magalhães de; Cola, Paula Cristina; Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Magalhães, Hipólito Virgílio; Magnoni, Carlos Daniel; Silva, Roberta Gonçalves da

    2017-08-17

    The aim of the present study was to identify the evidence of validity based on the content and response process of the Rastreamento de Disfagia Orofaríngea no Acidente Vascular Encefálico (RADAVE; "Screening Tool for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke"). The criteria used to elaborate the questions were based on a literature review. A group of judges consisting of 19 different health professionals evaluated the relevance and representativeness of the questions, and the results were analyzed using the Content Validity Index. In order to evidence validity based on the response processes, 23 health professionals administered the screening tool and analyzed the questions using a structured scale and cognitive interview. The RADAVE structured to be applied in two stages. The first version consisted of 18 questions in stage I and 11 questions in stage II. Eight questions in stage I and four in stage II did not reach the minimum Content Validity Index, requiring reformulation by the authors. The cognitive interview demonstrated some misconceptions. New adjustments were made and the final version was produced with 12 questions in stage I and six questions in stage II. It was possible to develop a screening tool for dysphagia in stroke with adequate evidence of validity based on content and response processes. Both validity evidences obtained so far allowed to adjust the screening tool in relation to its construct. The next studies will analyze the other evidences of validity and the measures of accuracy.

  12. Comparative study of primary and secondary tumors from patients with laryngeal and oropharyngeal cancer, using transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetea, Ligia Gabriela; Niculescu, Ana-Maria; Motoc, Rozalia Magda; Mihaescu, Grigore; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Manu, Dorel Augustin; Gavrila, Lucian

    2008-04-01

    In modern laboratories, the study of cancer is performed using a series of cellular and molecular methods based on optical instruments measurements. Optical and electron microscopy are valuable tools for revealing morphological features of cancer cells. Our study was focused on laryngeal and oropharyngeal cancers, which have nowadays an increased incidence, especially for women, due to unhealthy habits like tobacco and alcohol consumption. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for highlighting the ultrastructural features of cancer cells, both in primary and secondary tumors. The primary tumor is considered that which appears for the first time, at a certain organ; the secondary tumor is that which reappears at the same region or neighbouring regions, at a certain interval of time after the primary one has been surgically removed. The differences between the inner architecture of the cells from primary and secondary tumors where correlated with the expression of some genes (oncogenes and tumor suppressor factors), in order to establish the aggressiveness of the tumor, in different disease stages. The main stress in the study is placed upon electron microscopy, in order to achieve a more precise characterization of both these type of cancer cells. These ultrastructural data complete the image of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer cells, along with molecular data obtained by Real-Time PCR.

  13. Impact of xerostomia on dysphagia after chemotherapy-intensity-modulated radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer: Prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M; Samuels, Stuart; Tao, Yebin; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc; Spector, Matthew; Schipper, Matthew; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how xerostomia affects dysphagia. Prospective longitudinal studies of 93 patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with definitive chemotherapy-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Observer-rated dysphagia (ORD), patient-reported dysphagia (PRD), and patient-reported xerostomia (PRX) assessment of the swallowing mechanics by videofluoroscopy (videofluoroscopy score), and salivary flow rates, were prospectively assessed from pretherapy through 2 years. ORD grades ≥2 were rare and therefore not modeled. Of patients with no/mild videofluoroscopy abnormalities, a substantial proportion had PRD that peaked 3 months posttherapy and subsequently improved. Through 2 years, highly significant correlations were observed between PRX and PRD scores for all patients, including those with no/mild videofluoroscopy abnormalities. Both PRX and videofluoroscopy scores were highly significantly associated with PRD. On multivariate analysis, PRX score was a stronger predictor of PRD than the videofluoroscopy score. Xerostomia contributes significantly to PRD. Efforts to further decrease xerostomia, in addition to sparing parotid glands, may translate into improvements in PRD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1605-E1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Xerostomia in patients treated for oropharyngeal carcinoma: comparing linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy with helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Israël; Fortin, Bernard; Lambert, Louise; Clavel, Sébastien; Alizadeh, Moein; Filion, Edith J; Soulières, Denis; Bélair, Manon; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2014-09-01

    In comparison to sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sw-IMRT), we hypothesized that helical tomotherapy (HT) would achieve similar locoregional control and, at the same time, decrease the parotid gland dose, thus leading to a xerostomia reduction. The association between radiation techniques, mean parotid dose, and xerostomia incidence, was reviewed in 119 patients with advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with concurrent chemoradiation using sw-IMRT (n = 59) or HT (n = 60). Ipsilateral and contralateral parotid mean doses were significantly lower for patients treated with HT versus sw-IMRT: 24 Gy versus 32 Gy ipsilaterally and 20 Gy versus 25 Gy contralaterally. The incidence of grade ≥2 xerostomia was significantly lower in the HT group than in the sw-IMRT group: 12% versus 78% at 6 months, 3% versus 51% at 12 months, and 0% versus 25% at 24 months. Total parotid mean dose xerostomia at 6, 12, and 24 months. This retrospective series suggests that using HT can better spare the parotid glands while respecting quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic (QUANTEC)'s criteria. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons - from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies.

  16. Impact of retropharyngeal adenopathy on distant control and survival in HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Stuart E; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Spector, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Mohannad; McHugh, Jonathan B; Tao, Yebin; Schipper, Matthew; Worden, Francis; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2015-07-01

    Retropharyngeal adenopathy (RPA) is poor prognostic factor in head and neck (HN) cancer. However, the prognostic significance of RPA in Human Papillomavirus-related (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is unknown. 185 patients with HPV+OPC were assessed. Pre-therapy images reviewed by a HN radiologist to determine presence of RPA. Doses to the RPAs were determined from treatment plans. Outcomes analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, and correlations determined using Spearman's rank analyses. 29 (16%) of the HPV+patients had RPA. At median follow-up 49months, 5-year overall survival (OS), failure-free survival (FFS) and distant failure-free survival (DFFS) were 57% vs. 81% (P=0.02), 63% vs 80% (P=0.015) and 70% vs 91% (P=0.002) for patients with/without RPA, respectively. No differences observed in local/ regional control rates, exceeding 90% in both groups, and No RPA recurrences were observed. In multivariable analysis, stages T4 or N3, and RPA, were independently, statistically significantly associated with both OS and distant failure, while N2c, age, disease site, and smoking status, were not. RPA in HPV+OPC is an independent prognostic factor for distant failure, translating into worse OS. Patients with RPA may not be suitable candidates for trials of systemic treatment de-escalation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the detection and subtyping of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, D M; Rohatensky, M; Mintchev, P; Nakoneshny, S C; Demetrick, D J; van Marle, G; Dort, J C

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is a growing problem that presents a significant challenge to Otolaryngologist-Head and Neck Surgeons. Knowledge of HPV status yields critical prognostic information, with potential for treatment selection based on tumour HPV status. The current gold standard of diagnosis, PCR, is expensive, demanding and time consuming. Alternatives such as p16 immunohistochemistry are subjective and potentially inaccurate. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a rapid, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostic technique. Our aim was to verify LAMP as a potential bedside diagnostic assay for subtyping of HPV in OPSCC. DNA from 72 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) OPSCC patient samples was tested. PCR and LAMP were then performed to specifically identify HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35. For these high-risk subtypes, LAMP had an overall sensitivity of 99.4% and specificity of 93.2% relative to PCR. LAMP is a promising technology that can accurately diagnose high-risk HPV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharyngeal Residue and Aspiration and the Relationship with Clinical/Nutritional Status of Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Submitted to Videofluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D L; Moreira, E A M; de Freitas, M B; Gonçalves, J de A; Furkim, A M; Clavé, P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the videofluoroscopic (VFS) signs of impaired efficacy (pharyngeal residue) and safety (aspiration) swallowing and the clinical/nutritional status of patients with suspect of dysphagia. A cross-sectional study was conducted with patients submitted to videofluoroscopy. Data of 76 patients were analyzed between March 2011 and December 2014. The clinical history and VFS exams of patients ≥ 38 years were retrospectively analyzed. 88% patients presented Oropharyngeal Dysphagia (OD), 44.7% presented laryngeal penetration and 32% presented aspiration. 78% patients presented pharyngeal residue. Aspiration was associated with Head Neck Cancer (HNC) [Prevalence Ratio (PR): 2.27, p = 0.028] and cardiovascular disease (PR 1.96, p = 0.027). Underweight [Body Mass Index Underweight patients with OD had a higher prevalence rate of pharyngeal residue than those normally nourished (100% vs. 78%) (PR 1.34, p = 0.011). Pharyngeal residue was associated with male sex (PR 1.32, p = 0.040), neurodegenerative disease (PR 1.57, p = 0.021), stroke (PR 1.62, p = 0.009), cerebral palsy (PR 1.76, p = 0.006) and HNC (PR 1.73, p = 0.002). In the present study, neurologic diseases, HNC, male sex and underweight were associated to impaired swallowing efficacy. Underweight, independently of the other variables, was not associated with impaired swallowing safety.

  19. A dielectrophoretic method of discrimination between normal oral epithelium, and oral and oropharyngeal cancer in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, K A; Mulhall, H J; Labeed, F H; Lewis, M P; Hoettges, K F; Kalavrezos, N; McCaul, J; Liew, C; Porter, S; Fedele, S; Hughes, M P

    2015-08-07

    Despite the accessibility of the oral cavity to clinical examination, delays in diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma (OOPC) are observed in a large majority of patients, with negative impact on prognosis. Diagnostic aids might help detection and improve early diagnosis, but there remains little robust evidence supporting the use of any particular diagnostic technology at the moment. The aim of the present feasibility first-in-human study was to evaluate the preliminary diagnostic validity of a novel technology platform based on dielectrophoresis (DEP). DEP does not require labeling with antibodies or stains and it is an ideal tool for rapid analysis of cell properties. Cells from OOPC/dysplasia tissue and healthy oral mucosa were collected from 57 study participants via minimally-invasive brush biopsies and tested with a prototype DEP platform using median membrane midpoint frequency as main analysis parameter. Results indicate that the current DEP platform can discriminate between brush biopsy samples from cancerous and healthy oral tissue with a diagnostic sensitivity of 81.6% and a specificity of 81.0%. The present ex vivo results support the potential application of DEP testing for identification of OOPC. This result indicates that DEP has the potential to be developed into a low-cost, rapid platform as an assistive tool for the early identification of oral cancer in primary care; given the rapid, minimally-invasive and non-expensive nature of the test, dielectric characterization represents a promising platform for cost-effective early cancer detection.

  20. Human Papillomavirus and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study regarding Tobacco and Alcohol Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Farshadpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the role of HPV in the pathogenesis and outcome of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in lifelong nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. A case-case analysis was performed to compare the presence of HPV-DNA in tumor cells of 16 nonsmoking and nondrinking with 16 matched smoking and drinking patients (matching criteria: age at incidence, gender, tumor sublocation, tumor stage. HPV was detected using 2 PCR tests, FISH analysis, and p16INK4A immunostaining. Nonsmoking and nondrinking patients had more HPV-positive tumors than smoking and drinking patients (n=12; 75% versus n=2; 13%; P<0.001. All HPV-positive tumors showed p16INK4A overexpression, and 1 HPV-negative tumor had p16INK4A overexpression, (P<0.001. Overall survival and disease-specific survival were higher for HPV-positive compared to HPV-negative cases (P=0.027, P=0.039, resp.. In conclusion, HPV is strongly associated with OSCC of nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. Specific diagnostic and therapeutic actions should be considered for these patients to achieve a better prognosis.

  1. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons – from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  2. Comparison of systemic therapies used concurrently with radiation for the treatment of human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Hsin-Hua; Sturgis, Erich M; Kies, Merrill S; El-Naggar, Adel K; Morrison, William H; Beadle, Beth M; Johnson, Faye M; Gunn, Gary B; Fuller, Clifton D; Phan, Jack; Gold, Kathryn A; Frank, Steven J; Skinner, Heath; Rosenthal, David I; Garden, Adam S

    2016-04-01

    This was a retrospective study of patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent systemic therapy and radiation. Data were extracted through chart review, and statistical analyses included frequency tabulation, chi-square, and Kaplan-Meier tests. Three hundred thirty-nine patients were analyzed; 166 received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. One hundred thirty-six patients were treated with cisplatin, 123 with cetuximab, and 59 with carboplatin. The 2-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial overall survival rates were 92%, 88%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in survival or disease control when analyzed by systemic agent. Platin-treated patients had greater hematologic toxicity, and required more intravenous hydration. The incidence of confluent mucositis was highest among patients treated with cetuximab. Platin and cetuximab seem to have similar efficacy when delivered concurrently with radiation in our retrospective population study. Although platin did cause greater hematologic toxicity, radiation-specific side effects seemed relatively comparable. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1554-E1561, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation versus traditional therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia: effects on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, B J; Speyer, R; Baijens, L W J; Bogaardt, H C A

    2012-09-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatment, post-treatment, and 3 months following treatment), two quality-of-life questionnaires (SWAL-QOL and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory) and a single-item Dysphagia Severity Scale were scored. The Functional Oral Intake Scale was used to assess the dietary intake. After therapy, all groups showed significant improvement on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted positive effects on quality of life. Minimal group differences were found. These effects remained unchanged 3 months following treatment. No significant correlations were found between dietary intake and quality of life. Logopedic dysphagia treatment results in a restricted increased quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. In this randomized controlled trial, all groups showed significant therapy effects on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted improvements on the SWAL-QOL and the MDADI. However, only slight nonsignificant differences between groups were found.

  4. Ki67--no evidence for its use in node-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Fabrice; Arnedos, Monica; Goubar, Aicha; Ghouadni, Amal; Delaloge, Suzette

    2015-05-01

    The expression of Ki67 in breast cancer has been associated with the luminal B phenotype, a high risk of relapse, and likelihood of good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Several guidelines propose assays to determine Ki67 expression levels to select which patients with early stage breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary nodes should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. We discuss why oncologists should not rely on the use of this biomarker for patients with early stage breast cancer and only 1-3 positive axillary nodes. First, Ki67 staining lacks analytical validity. Second, the performance of the biomarker for prognostic purposes is poor, with no compelling evidence to indicate that patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease, low Ki67 expression and 1-3 positive axillary nodes have a very low risk of disease relapse. Finally, no robust evidence indicates that Ki67 staining predicts the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy. Overall, evidence does not support withholding adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ER-positive, Ki67-low breast cancer and 1-3 positive nodes without risk in daily practice.

  5. Gene expression profiling in lymph node-positive and lymph node-negative colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Roh, Mee-Sook; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Hong-Jo; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2004-02-01

    To identify the genes involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer, we analyzed the gene-expression profiles of colorectal cancer cells from 12 tumors with corresponding noncancerous colonic epithelia using a cDNA microarray representing 4,08 genes. We classified both samples and genes by using a two-way clustering analysis and identified genes that were differentially expressed in the cancerous and noncancerous tissues. Genes associated with lymph node metastasis were identified by means of the supervised learning technique. Differentially expressed genes (77 up-regulated and 45 down-regulated genes) were identified in more than 75 percent of the tumors. The functional categories of these genes belonged to signal transduction (19 percent), metabolism (17 percent), cell structure/motility (14 percent), cell cycle (13 percent), and gene protein expression (13 percent). The gene expression pattern of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results from randomly selected genes shows a pattern similar to that of cDNA microarray. Moreover, the gene expression patterns observed were similar to those reported previously, suggesting rare racial differences. Sixty genes possibly associated with lymph node metastasis in colorectal cancer were selected on the basis of clinicopathological data obtained by performing signal-to-noise calculations. "Leave-one-out" cross-validation testing correctly classified 10 of 12 patients (83.3 percent) as having colorectal cancer with lymph node metastasis vs. those without metastasis. These results provide not only a new molecular basis for understanding the biologic properties of colorectal cancer, including lymph node metastasis, but also provide a resource for future development of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers for colorectal cancer.

  6. Effect of medium, explants, cytokinins and node position on in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-11-06

    Nov 6, 2012 ... and antinociceptive activity (Ramesh et al., 1998). The compounds which are present in Caralluma are ingredients used in the preparation of drugs. Natural stands are fast disappearing and are threatened with extinction due to indiscriminate collection and over exploitation for commercial purposes and to ...

  7. Prognostic value of nodal ratios in node-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Wendy A; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Ueno, Naoto T; Cheng, Yee Chung; Royce, Melanie; Tai, Patricia; Vlastos, Georges; Wallace, Anne Marie; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Nieto, Yago

    2006-06-20

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for breast cancer was recently updated to reflect the impact of increasing the absolute number of positive lymph nodes on prognosis. However, numerous studies suggest that nodal ratios (absolute number of involved nodes-number of nodes resected) may have greater prognostic value than absolute numbers of involved nodes. Here we examine the data supporting the use of nodal ratios in breast cancer prognosis and consider the potential advantages and disadvantages of including nodal ratios in breast cancer staging. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the following search engines: http://www.google.com; Thomson's ISI Web of Science; PubMed. In multiple reports from both prospective and retrospectively collected data sets, nodal ratios have been shown to be significant predictors of outcome, including locoregional recurrence and overall survival. These studies span all stages of breast cancer and include various treatments as well as various statistical approaches. There is considerable data supporting the use of nodal ratios in breast cancer prognosis. A thorough and methodological evaluation of the potential prognostic importance of nodal ratios in large multicenter data sets is merited and is currently being undertaken by the International Nodal Ratio Working Group.

  8. Prediction of sentinel lymph node positivity by growth rate of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera-Vaquerizo, Antonio; Nagore, Eduardo; Herrera-Acosta, Enrique; Martorell-Calatayud, Antonio; Martín-Cuevas, Paula; Traves, Víctor; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether growth rate (GR) of cutaneous melanoma predicts the histological sentinel lymph node (SLN) positivity. Retrospective cohort study. Two tertiary melanoma referral centers. A total of 698 patients with invasive primary cutaneous melanoma in whom the SLN was identified between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2010. Based on previous studies, a surrogate measure for GR in primary invasive melanoma was calculated as the ratio of Breslow thickness to time to melanoma development. The SLN was positive in 20.2% of patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that GR, Breslow thickness, and the presence of microscopic satellitosis were independently associated with SLN positivity. The probability of SLN positivity was 8.2% for slow-growth melanomas (0.50 mm/mo). Growth rate was not an independent predictive factor for survival. Growth rate of primary cutaneous melanoma, together with Breslow thickness and the presence of microscopic satellitosis, predicts the histological SLN positivity.

  9. An Adaptive Connectivity-based Centroid Algorithm for Node Positioning in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aries Pratiarso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor network applications, the position of nodes is randomly distributed following the contour of the observation area. A simple solution without any measurement tools is provided by range-free method. However, this method yields the coarse estimating position of the nodes. In this paper, we propose Adaptive Connectivity-based (ACC algorithm. This algorithm is a combination of Centroid as range-free based algorithm, and hop-based connectivity algorithm. Nodes have a possibility to estimate their own position based on the connectivity level between them and their reference nodes. Each node divides its communication range into several regions where each of them has a certain weight depends on the received signal strength. The weighted value is used to obtain the estimated position of nodes. Simulation result shows that the proposed algorithm has up to 3 meter error of estimated position on 100x100 square meter observation area, and up to 3 hop counts for 80 meters' communication range. The proposed algorithm performs an average error positioning up to 10 meters better than Weighted Centroid algorithm. Keywords: adaptive, connectivity, centroid, range-free.

  10. Does sentinel lymph node biopsy have a role in node- positive head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical adenopathy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma. (SCC) of the upper aerodigestive tract is assumed to represent nodal metastasis and is treated with therapeutic neck dissection. [1]. Overstaging of the neck leads to overtreatment by modified neck dissection. In southern Africa and the developing world,.

  11. Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Brigham and Women’s Hospital , Dana Farber Harvard Cancer Institute, and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. The research infrastructure...2016, final approval from CTEP and CIRB was obtained. •A call was arranged with the DoD legal and human subjects experts and NCI officials on how...and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have executed a contract for Bayer to provide aspirin and placebo. The aspirin dosage has been changed from 325

  12. Protocolo para controle de eficácia terapêutica em disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica (PROCEDON Efficacy control protocol in oropharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Gonçalves da Silva

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apresentar uma proposta para o controle de eficácia terapêutica em disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica. MÉTODOS: o protocolo foi proposto em concordância com a literatura atual e aplicado em um indivíduo pós-acidente vascular encefálico (AVE isquêmico à direita, comprovado por tomografia computadorizada, com disfagia orofaríngea grave crônica, gênero masculino, 66 anos, apresentando aspiração laringotraqueal e em uso de sonda nasoentérica exclusiva pré-fonoterapia. Para controle da eficácia terapêutica do programa de reabilitação fonoaudiológica foi aplicado, pré e pós-fonoterapia, a classificação do grau de comprometimento da disfagia orofaríngea, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS, a avaliação videofluoroscópica da deglutição com medida do tempo de trânsito faríngeo (TTF da deglutição por meio de software e da percepção do indivíduo. RESULTADOS: na pré-fonoterapia verificou-se disfagia orofaríngea grave, FOIS nível 1, presença de aspiração laringotraqueal para mais de uma consistência e tempo de trânsito faríngeo de 13 segundos. Após fonoterapia verificou-se disfagia orofaríngea moderada, FOIS nível 5, ausência de aspiração laringotraqueal e TTF de 4 segundos. CONCLUSÃO: o protocolo proposto foi capaz de avaliar a eficácia da reabilitação na disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica neste indivíduo pós-acidente vascular encefálico, tanto para mensurar as mudanças ocorridas na fisiopatologia da deglutição quanto na ingestão oral e na percepção do indivíduo. Outros estudos com populações distintas são necessários, sendo que novas propostas devem ainda refletir a inclusão da condição nutricional e pulmonar do indivíduo no controle de eficácia em disfagia orofaríngea.PURPOSE: to submit a proposal for efficacy control in neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. METHODS: the protocol was proposed in accordance with other researches and applied in one post-stroke individual

  13. Selective oropharyngeal decontamination versus selective digestive decontamination in critically ill patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Di Zhao,1,* Jian Song,2,* Xuan Gao,3 Fei Gao,4 Yupeng Wu,2 Yingying Lu,5 Kai Hou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 4Hebei Provincial Procurement Centers for Medical Drugs and Devices, 5Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Selective digestive decontamination (SDD and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD are associated with reduced mortality and infection rates among patients in intensive care units (ICUs; however, whether SOD has a superior effect than SDD remains uncertain. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs to compare SOD with SDD in terms of clinical outcomes and antimicrobial resistance rates in patients who were critically ill. Methods: RCTs published in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of SOD and SDD in patients who were critically ill. Outcomes included day-28 mortality, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU-acquired bacteremia, and prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Results were expressed as risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs, and weighted mean differences (WMDs with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: A total of four RCTs involving 23,822 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. Among patients whose admitting specialty was surgery, cardiothoracic surgery (57.3% and neurosurgery (29.7% were the two main types of surgery being performed. Pooled results showed that SOD had similar effects as SDD in day-28 mortality (RR =1

  14. Valosin-containing protein (VCP/p97-expression correlates with prognosis of HPV- negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz F Meyer

    Full Text Available Valosin-containing protein (VCP/p97 has been shown to be associated with antiapoptotic function via activation of the nuclear factor-[Formula: see text]B (NF[Formula: see text]B signaling pathway and with metastasizing of tumors in several studies. VCP is located on chromosome 9p13-p12, a region often deleted in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The clinical significance of VCP expression in OSCC however remains unclear. In this study, expression of VCP was determined in 106 patients (77 male (71.3% and 31 female (28.7%; age-range: 34-79 years (mean age 57 years by immunohistochemistry and in a subset of 15 patients by quantitative PCR. HPV-DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction and p16INK4a immunohistochemistry. The experimental findings were correlated with clinico-pathological data and survival parameters. 47.2% of all OSCC specimens were analyzed as negative or weak staining intensity for VCP. 52.8% of all specimens showed a high staining intensity for VCP. 73.1% of all patients were tested HPV-negative, 26.9% were HPV-positive. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival probabilities of all patients were 71.2% and 55.7%, respectively. No correlation could be found between HPV-status and VCP expression. VCP overexpression in HPV-negative patients was associated with significantly better 5-year disease-free survival (86.4% vs., 45.6%, p = 0.017. The level of VCP-intensity determined by immunohistochemistry could be an additional prognostic marker in HPV-negative OSCC. VCP expression seems not to correlate with the HPV-status.

  15. Airway management in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized children: comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Airway with the cuffed oropharyngeal airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaya, Biruta

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of the smallest size of the cuffed oropharyngeal airway (COPA) for school age, spontaneously breathing children was investigated and compared with the Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). Seventy children of school age (7-16 years) were divided into two groups: the COPA (n=35) and the LMA (n=35). Induction was with propofol i.v. or halothane, nitrous oxide, oxygen and fentanyl. After depression of laryngopharyngeal reflexes, a COPA size 8 cm or an LMA was inserted. Ventilation was manually assisted until spontaneous breathing was established. For maintenance, propofol i.v. and fentanyl or halothane with nitrous oxide were used. Local anaesthesia or peripheral blocks were also used. Both extratracheal airways had a highly successful insertion rate, but more positional manoeuvres to achieve a satisfactory airway were required with the COPA, 28.6% versus LMA 2.9%. The need to change the method of airway management was higher (8.6%) in the COPA group. After induction, the need for assisted ventilation was higher in the LMA group 54.3% versus 20% in the COPA group. Airway reaction to cuff inflation was higher in the LMA group 14.3% versus COPA 5.7%. Problems during surgery were similar, except continuous chin support to establish an effective airway was more frequent (11.4%) in the COPA group. In the postoperative period, blood on the device and incidence of sore throat were detected less in the COPA group. The COPA is a good extratracheal airway that provides new possibilities for airway management in school age children with an adequate and well sealed airway, during spontaneous breathing or during short-term assisted manual ventilation.

  16. Temporal Analysis of Factors Associated with EAT-10 in Outpatients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia from a Tertiary Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R S; Moore, J E; Thibeault, S L

    2018-01-20

    Self-perception of disease is increasingly recognized as a determinant of health. The Eating Assessment Tool-10 (EAT-10) is a functional health status questionnaire that measures the symptomatic severity of dysphagia from the patient's perspective. The objective of this work was to identify factors (demographics, clinical variables, swallowing physiology, health-related quality of life) associated with longitudinal change in EAT-10 scores in outpatients with oropharyngeal dysphagia at a multi-disciplinary, tertiary care clinic. All patients with swallowing concerns that were included in the UW Madison Voice and Swallowing Outcomes database from 12/2012 to 04/2015 were invited to complete EAT-10 and a general health-related quality of life survey (SF-12v2) at their initial evaluation and six months later. Forty-two patients were included in analysis (n = 42). Weaning from a gastrostomy tube was significantly associated with EAT-10 improvement. Approximately 70% of the sample had mild dysphagia, and floor effects were observed for all EAT-10 items in this sample subset. Mean SF-12v2 Physical Component Summary score was substantially lower than that of the general population. Significant, weak-moderate correlations were found between EAT-10 and SF-12v2 scores for all comparisons except for Physical Health Composite at six months (rs = = 0.24 to - 0.43). Weaning from a feeding tube appears to meaningfully improve self-perceived symptoms of dysphagia. Given the floor effects observed, validity of EAT-10 for patients with mild dysphagia should be examined. Future research should address contributors to self-perceived symptom change across the range of dysphagia severity.

  17. First Steps Towards Development of an Instrument for the Reproducible Quantification of Oropharyngeal Swallow Physiology in Bottle-Fed Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefton-Greif, Maureen A; McGrattan, Katlyn Elizabeth; Carson, Kathryn A; Pinto, Jeanne M; Wright, Jennifer M; Martin-Harris, Bonnie

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of feeding/swallowing impairments (deglutition disorders) in young children is rising and poses serious acute and long-term health consequences. Accurate detection and prompt intervention can lessen the impact of dysphagia-induced sequelae. Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies (VFSSs) are used to make critical decisions for medically fragile children despite procedural variability and the lack of agreed upon measures for interpreting and reporting results. This investigation represents the first steps in the development of a novel tool for the quantification of oropharyngeal swallow physiology from full-length VFSS examinations in bottle-fed children. The Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile MBSImP™© served as the conceptual assessment model for development of components and operational score variants to characterize distinguishable VFSS observations. Twenty-four components of swallowing physiology were validated via expert consensus. Training materials included a library of 94 digitized video images comprised of distinct score variants for each component. Materials were disseminated to seven speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who participated in didactic and self-training sessions, and rated components. All SLPs achieved ≥80% reliability criterion after completing two or three training sessions. Agreement for 17 (71%) components was achieved after two sessions. Nutritive sucking/oral and airway-related components were most difficult to distinguish. Three sessions were required for 2 (33%) of the sucking/oral components and 4 (57%) of the airway-related components. These findings support the feasibility to standardize training and reliably score swallowing physiology using precise definitions and unambiguous visual images, and represent preliminary steps towards content validity and reliability of a standardized VFSS tool for bottle-fed children.

  18. Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water, Tara A. van de; Lomax, Antony J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Hug, Eugen B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether intensity-modulated proton therapy with a reduced spot size (rsIMPT) could further reduce the parotid and submandibular gland dose compared with previously calculated IMPT plans with a larger spot size. In addition, it was investigated whether the obtained dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Methods: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal cancer were included in a comparative treatment planning study. Both IMPT plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal PTV. IMPT and rsIMPT used identical three-field beam arrangements. In the IMPT plans, the parotid and submandibular salivary glands were spared as much as possible. rsIMPT plans used identical dose–volume objectives for the parotid glands as those used by the IMPT plans, whereas the objectives for the submandibular glands were tightened further. NTCPs were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Target coverage was similar for both IMPT techniques, whereas rsIMPT clearly improved target conformity. The mean doses in the parotid glands and submandibular glands were significantly lower for three-field rsIMPT (14.7 Gy and 46.9 Gy, respectively) than for three-field IMPT (16.8 Gy and 54.6 Gy, respectively). Hence, rsIMPT significantly reduced the NTCP of patient-rated xerostomia and parotid and contralateral submandibular salivary flow dysfunction (27%, 17%, and 43% respectively) compared with IMPT (39%, 20%, and 79%, respectively). In addition, mean dose values in the sublingual glands, the soft palate and oral cavity were also decreased. Obtained dose and NTCP reductions varied per patient. Conclusions: rsIMPT improved sparing of the salivary glands and reduced NTCP for xerostomia and parotid and submandibular salivary dysfunction, while maintaining similar target coverage results. It is expected that rsIMPT improves

  19. Tissue-specific Differences in Immune Cell Subsets Located in the Naso-oropharyngeal-associated Lymphoid Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankvall, M; Jontell, M; Wold, A; Östman, S

    2018-01-01

    Defining the immune cells within the naso-oropharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues would promote the development of efficient orally and nasally delivered immunotherapies. The aim was to compare murine antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cell subsets in the nose-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT), cervical lymph nodes (CLN), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and peripheral lymph nodes (PLN) using flow cytometry and in vitro proliferation assays. Overall, the NALT contained a higher proportion of APCs and a lower proportion of T cells compared to the CLN, MLN and PLN. The APCs of the NALT more often belonged to the CD11c + CD11b + and the CD11c neg CD11b + subsets as compared to the other sites. Both of these APC populations showed little sign of activation, that is low expression of the markers CD40, CD86 and IAd. Instead, the APCs of the NALT more often co-expressed CX3CR1 and CD206, markers associated with a tolerogenic function. No increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells was observed in the NALT. Instead, the T cells frequently exhibited a memory/effector phenotype, expressing the homing markers α4β7, CCR4 and CCR9, but rarely the naïve phenotype cell surface marker CD45RB. In contrast, the T cells at the other sites were mostly of the naïve phenotype. In addition, cells from the NALT did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with Con A, whereas the cells from the other sites did. Taken together, these results suggest that the NALT is primarily an effector site rather than one for activation and differentiation, despite it being regarded as a site of induction. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  20. HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is associated with TIMP3 and CADM1 promoter hypermethylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempen, Pauline M W van; Bockel, Liselotte van; Braunius, Weibel W; Moelans, Cathy B; Olst, Marina van; Jong, Rick de; Stegeman, Inge; Diest, Paul J van; Grolman, Wilko; Willems, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) in a proportion of tumors. HPV-positive OPSCC is considered a distinct molecular entity with a prognostic advantage compared to HPV-negative cases. Silencing of cancer-related genes by DNA promoter hypermethylation may play an important role in the development of OPSCC. Hence, we examined promoter methylation status in 24 common tumor suppressor genes in a group of 200 OPSCCs to determine differentially methylated genes in HPV-positive versus HPV-negative primary OPSCC. Methylation status was correlated with HPV status, clinical features, and patient survival using multivariate methods. Additionally, methylation status of 16 cervical squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) was compared with HPV-positive OPSCC. Using methylation-specific probe amplification, HPV-positive OPSCC showed a significantly higher cumulative methylation index (CMI) compared to HPV-negative OPSCC (P=0.008). For the genes CDH13, DAPK1, and RARB, both HPV-positive and HPV-negative OPSCC showed promoter hypermethylation in at least 20% of the tumors. HPV status was found to be an independent predictor of promoter hypermethylation of CADM1 (P < 0.001), CHFR (P = 0.027), and TIMP3 (P < 0.001). CADM1 and CHFR showed similar methylation patterns in OPSCC and cervical SCC, but TIMP3 showed no methylation in cervical SCC in contrast to OPSCC. Methylation status of neither individual gene nor CMI was associated with survival. These results suggest that HPV-positive tumors are to a greater extent driven by promotor hypermethylation in these tumor suppressor genes. Especially CADM1 and TIMP3 are significantly more frequently hypermethylated in HPV-positive OPSCC and CHFR in HPV-negative tumors

  1. Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radiochemotherapy: Prognostic Role of TP53 and HPV Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallai, Carlo; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Locati, Laura; Bossi, Paolo; Orlandi, Ester; Palazzi, Mauro; Olmi, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and materials: The TP53 mutation and HPV status were analyzed in 78 cases of locoregionally advanced OPSCC. The possible correlation of these factors with locoregiownal control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (OS) was also investigated. Results: Of these 78 cases, 22 had disruptive and 22 had non-disruptive (silent) TP53 mutations; the remaining 34 cases had wild-type (WT) TP53. HPV 16 DNA was found in 9 cases (11%), but all HPV-positive (HPV+) cases carried a functional p53 protein, except for 1 case that had a silent mutation. HPV+ patients fared better than HPV-negative (HPV-) patients in terms of all survival parameters, with highly statistically significant differences between the groups. Specifically, no distant metastases were observed in the HPV+ patients, whereas they occurred in 17% of the HPV- patients. However, no difference was observed between the WT TP53 and mutation group, even when this was analyzed in terms of disruptive and non-disruptive mutations. Regardless, treatment with chemotherapy nearly doubled the 5-year OS rates, both in the mutation (42% vs. 22%) and WT (30 vs. 16%) group, but only the mutation group showed improvement in all survival parameters. In addition, the second tumor-free 5-year survival rate was 72% in HPV- cases, but no second tumors were observed in HPV+ and WT p53 cases. Conclusions: Patients with HPV+ OPSCC have an excellent prognosis after radiochemotherapy, but cisplatin-based chemotherapy may not confer a satisfactory outcome, especially in WT cases, thereby justifying the additional or alternative use of taxanes and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors. Uncommon distant metastases and second tumors in the HPV+ group may be cause for clinicians to review the follow-up policies in these patients.

  2. Proposed Staging System for Patients With HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer Based on Nasopharyngeal Cancer N Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Kristina R; Garden, Adam S; William, William N; Lim, Ming Yann; Sturgis, Erich M

    2016-06-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) generally present with more advanced disease but have better survival than patients with HPV-unrelated OPC. The current American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC)/Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) TNM staging system for OPC was developed for HPV-unrelated OPC. A new staging system is needed to adequately predict outcomes of patients with HPV-related OPC. Patients with newly diagnosed HPV-positive OPC (by p16 immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization) treated at our institution from January 2003 through December 2012 were included. By using recursive partitioning analysis (RPA), we developed new stage groupings with both traditional OPC regional lymph node (N) categories and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) N categories. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between stage and survival was examined by using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. A total of 661 patients with HPV-positive OPC met the inclusion criteria. With the traditional TNM staging system, there was no difference in survival between stages (P = .141). RPA with NPC N categories resulted in more balanced stage groups and better separation between groups for 5-year survival than RPA with traditional OPC N categories. With the stage groupings that were based in part on NPC N categories, the risk of death increased with increasing stage (P for trend HPV-positive OPC with respect to survival than does the current AJCC/UICC TNM staging system. Although confirmation of our findings in other patient populations is needed, we propose consideration of NPC N categories as an alternative to the traditional OPC N categories in the new AJCC/UICC TNM staging system that is currently being developed. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 antibodies at diagnosis of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer and antibody trajectories after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuehan; Waterboer, Tim; Haddad, Robert I; Miles, Brett A; Wentz, Alicia; Gross, Neil D; Fakhry, Carole; Quon, Harry; Lorch, Jochen H; Gourin, Christine G; Clayburgh, Daniel; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J; Richmon, Jeremy D; Andersen, Peter E; Posner, Marshall R; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2017-04-01

    Despite the fact that HPV-driven oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OPC) has relatively low recurrence rates, intensive post-therapy monitoring remains the standard of care. Post-treatment biomarkers are needed to risk stratify HPV-OPC patients for more individualized surveillance intensity and which remain at higher recurrence risk. 115 HPV-OPC patients (ascertained by p16 immunohistochemistry and/or in-situ hybridization) from a multicenter prospective case study (HOTSPOT) had blood collected at diagnosis, and 64 of these also had blood collected at post-treatment follow-up visits for up to two years. Samples were centrally tested for antibodies to the L1, E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7 proteins of HPV16. At diagnosis, most HPV-OPC cases were seropositive to HPV16 E6 (85%). In post therapeutic samples, HPV16 antibody level decreased slowly over time, but only 3 (of 51 cases seropositive at enrollment) dropped low enough to be classified as seronegative. At 3years after diagnosis, cumulative risk of recurrence was 10.2% and 0% in HPV16 E6 seropositive and E6 seronegative HPV-OPC cases, respectively (p=0.18). Risk of recurrence was increased, although not statistically significant, in those with higher HPV16 E6 antibody levels at diagnosis (per log antibody level, hazard ratio [HR]=1.81, 95%CI=0.47-6.92). This study confirms the high seroprevalence of HPV oncogenic antibodies at diagnosis of HPV-OPC. HPV16 E6 antibody levels decrease after treatment, but most cases remain seropositive for up to two years. HPV16 E6 antibody levels at diagnosis did not appear to be a strong predictor of recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognostic Significance of Decreased Expression of Six Large Common Fragile Site Genes in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Gao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Common fragile sites (CFSs are large regions with profound genomic instability that often span extremely large genes a number of which have been found to be important tumor suppressors. RNA sequencing previously revealed that there was a group of six large CFS genes which frequently had decreased expression in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction experiments validated that these six large CFS genes (PARK2, DLG2, NBEA, CTNNA3, DMD, and FHIT had decreased expression in most of the tumor samples. In this study, we investigated whether the decreased expression of these genes has any clinical significance in OPSCCs. We analyzed the six CFS large genes in 45 OPSCC patients and found that 27 (60% of the OPSCC tumors had decreased expression of these six genes. When we correlated the expression of these six genes to each patient’s clinical records, for 11 patients who had tumor recurrence, 10 of them had decreased expression of almost all 6 genes. When we divided the patients into two groups, one group with decreased expression of the six genes and the other group with either slight changes or increased expression of the six genes, we found that there is significant difference in the incidence of tumor recurrence between these two groups by Kaplan-Meier plot analysis (P < .05. Our results demonstrated that those OPSCC tumors with decreased expression of this select group of six large CFS genes were much more likely to be associated with tumor recurrence and these genes are potential prognostic markers for predicting tumor recurrence in OPSCC.

  5. Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer