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Sample records for t beams

  1. Fatigue behavior of RC T-beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Farghal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to study the fatigue performance of reinforced concrete (RC T-beams strengthened in shear with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composite. Experiments were conducted on RC beams with and without CFRP sheets bonded on their web surfaces and subjected to static and cycling loading. The obtained results showed that the strengthened beams could survive one million cycles of cyclic loading (=50% of maximum static load with no apparent signs of damage (premature failure demonstrating the effectiveness of CFRP strengthening system on extending the fatigue life of structures. Also, for beams having the same geometry, the applied strengthening technique can significantly enhance the cycling load particularly, in case of beams provided with U-jacket sheets. Moreover, although the failure mode for the different beams was a brittle one, the strengthened beams provided with U-jacket sheets approved an acceptable enhancement in the structural ductility.

  2. RC T beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Spagnolo JR

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental data of the behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites. The tests were composed of eight T beams, b w=15 cm, h=40 cm, flange width 40 cm, flange height 8 cm, and length 300 cm, divided into two series with the same longitudinal steel reinforcement and a reference beam without strengthening in each series. The beams had two types of arrangement of internal steel stirrups. The test variables were the internal and external geometric ratio of the transverse reinforcement and the mechanical ratio of carbon fiber composites stirrups. All the beams were loaded at two points. The strengthened beams were submitted to a preloading and the strengthening was applied to the cracked beam. All the beams were designed in order to guarantee shear failure, and the ultimate load of the strengthened beams was 36% to 54% greater than the reference beams. The Cracking Sliding Model applied to the strengthened beams was evaluated and showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Non-shoring construction for T/G pedestal beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.

    1992-01-01

    The T/G pedestal construction work has been the critical path within the T/B construction work of BWR type nuclear power plant. In order to meet the requirement of shortening the construction period and improved in safety on a Turbine Building (T/B) construction work, Non-soring construction for T/G Pedestal Beams was developed. By applying this method to T/G pedestal construction work, we succeeded in shortening the T/B construction period and improvement in safety significantly. (author)

  4. An automatic beam steering system for the NSLS X-17T beam line using closed orbit feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Ma, Li; Rarback, H.M.; Singh, O.V.; Yu, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Initial observations of motion of the undulator radiation in the NSLS X-17T beam line clearly indicated that the beam had to be stabilized in both directions to be usable for the planned soft x-ray imaging experiments. The low frequency spectra of beam motion contained peaks in the range from dc to 60 Hz and at higher frequencies. A beam steering system employing closed orbit feedback has been designed and installed to stabilize the beam in both planes. In each plane of motion, beam position is measured with a beam position detector and a correction signal is fed back to a local four magnet orbit bump to dynamically control the angle of the radiation at the source. This paper describes the design and performance of the beam steering system

  5. Study of Anti-Neutrino Beam with Muon Monitor in the T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Takahiro

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. In 2013, the T2K collaboration observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam at 7.3 sigma significance. One of the next main goals of the T2K experiment is to measure electron anti-neutrino appearance. In June 2014 we took anti-neutrino beam data for the first time. The anti-neutrino beam was obtained by reversing the polarity of horn focusing magnets. To monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam which is produced from the decay of pions and kaons, the muon beam is continuously measured by Muon Monitor (MUMON). To reconstruct the profile of the muon beam, MUMON is equipped with 49 sensors distributed on a plane behind the beam dump. In this report, we show some results of the anti-neutrino beam data taken by monitors including MUMON. In particular, dependence of the muon beam intensity on electric current of the horns, correlation between the proton beam position and the MUMON profile, and beam stability are presented. Comparison between the data and Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed.

  6. Study of anti-neutrino beam with Muon Monitor in the T2K experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. In 2013, the T2K collaboration observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam at 7.3 sigma significance. One of the next main goals of the T2K experiment is to measure electron anti-neutrino appearance. In June 2014 we took anti-neutrino beam data for the first time. The anti-neutrino beam was obtained by reversing the polarity of horn focusing magnets. To monitor the direction and intensity of the neutrino beam which is produced from the decay of pions and kaons, the muon beam is continuously measured by Muon Monitor (MUMON). To reconstruct the profile of the muon beam, MUMON is equipped with 49 sensors distributed on a plane behind the beam dump. In this report, we show some results of the anti-neutrino beam data taken by monitors including MUMON. In particular, dependence of the muon beam intensity on electric current of the horns, correlation between the proton beam position and the MUMON profile, and beam stability are presented. Comparison between the data and Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed. (author)

  7. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Batu Pahat (Malaysia); Elrawaff, Blkasem S.; Elzaroug, Omer [Faculty of Civil Engineering Omar Al Mukhtar University, Bayda, Libya, Africa (Libya)

    2015-05-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips with three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.

  8. RESEARCH OF USING OPEN DOUBLE T BEAMS FOR SPANS IN FLOATING BRIDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU. M. Gorbatiuk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The publication presents the results of calculations of spans for floating bridges with open double T beams. The purpose of research is to analyze the suitability of spans from open double T beams for floating bridges with minimum weight under loads, which is provided by standards for modern floating bridges designing. Methodology. Comparative method, analytical calculation methods (influence lines methodology, strength calculations, endurance, maximum shear stress are used in this paper. Findings. Current loads for bridges calculations are 75% more than those, for which the spans of floating bridge from NZhM-56 property are designed. The use of open double T beams that is formed with double T beam no. 70 (the height of the open one is 104 cm reduces the cross sectional area in a weakened spot, but virtually it does not influence the strength and durability of the material. The use of open double T beams for spans of floating bridges saves up to 22 % of metal that means one in five spans will made of saved metal. Savings on each spans, such as CRP, will be 33.6 - 263 thous. grn. (considering the price of 1 ton of final product 29 thous. grn.. Originality. Research allows making next step in material saving and use of open double T beams for spans in the whole. Practical value. The obtained results give us possibility to make a number of conclusions that allow us to become more familiar and more practical with the use of open double T beams for spans of floating bridges.

  9. EBIS/T charge breeding for intense rare isotope beams at MSU

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Marrs, R E; Kittimanapun, K; Lapierre, A; Mendez, A J; Ames, F; Beene, J R; Lindroos, M; Ahle, L E; Stracener, D W; Kester, O; Wenander, F; Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Dilling, J; Bollen, G

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with reaccelerated beams are an essential component of the science program of existing and future rare isotope beam facilities. NSCL is currently constructing ReA3, a reaccelerator for rare isotopes that have been produced by projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission and that have been thermalized in a gas stopper. The resulting low-energy beam will be brought to an Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) in order to obtain highly charged ions at an energy of 12 keV/u. This charge breeder is followed by a compact linear accelerator with a maximum beam energy of 3MeV/u for U-238 and higher energies for lighter isotopes. Next-generation rare isotope beam facilities like the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams FRIB, but also existing Isotope Separator On-line (ISOL) facilities are expected to provide rare-isotope beam rates in the order of 10(11) particles per second for reacceleration. At present the most promising scheme to efficiently start the reacceleration of these intense beams is the use of a...

  10. Response of TLD-100"T"M microtubes to two RQR3 quality radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, M.G.; Villani, D.; Almeida, S.B.; Vivolo, V.; Yoriyaz, H.; Louis, G.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The present work compares the response of TLD-100"T"M microcubes to two RQR 3 diagnostic radiology reference quality radiation beams, defined by IEC-61267 norm, aiming to evaluate the detectability of TLD-100"T"M energy dependence reported in literature within the same reference quality radiation range. TLD-100"T"M microcubes reproducibility is assessed through the response of a second set of TLD-100"T"M microcubes, evaluated in a second thermoluminescence reader, to the RQR 3 diagnostic radiology reference quality radiation beam implemented at the Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentos of IPEN, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. The dependence of TLD-100"T"M microcubes TL response was not detectable in these conditions and the reproducibility of the measurements is 90,2%. (author)

  11. Design recommendations for the optimized continuity diaphragm for prestressed concrete bulb-T beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This research focused on prestressed concrete bulb-T (PCBT) beams made composite with a cast-in-place concrete deck and continuous over several spans through the use of continuity diaphragms. The current design procedure in AASHTO states that a conti...

  12. Testing the YerPhI Transimpedance Preamplifier with PPC by the T11 PS Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Parlakian, L K; CERN. Geneva; Martmianov, A N

    1997-01-01

    We report on the test of the preamplifier, described in [1], by the 3 GeV/c positive particle T11 beam of PS/CERN. We have measured the amplitude and time of flight spectrum, the time resolution and detection efficiency. The preamplifier has shown a stable work and hardness to the chamber discharge. The test results are presented.

  13. Evaluation of Electron Beam Welding Performance of AA6061-T6 Plate-type Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Sung; Seo, Kyoung-Seok; Lee, Don-Bae; Park, Jong-Man; Lee, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Chong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most commonly used heat-treatable aluminum alloys, AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is available in a wide range of structural materials. Typically, it is used in structural members, auto-body sheet and many other applications. Generally, this alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW(Electron Beam Welding). However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the plate-type nuclear fuel fabrication and assembly, a fundamental electron beam welding experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the suitable welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the plate-type fuel assembly has been also studied by the weld penetrations of side plate to end fitting and fixing bar and weld inspections using computed tomography

  14. Charge breeding of stable and radioactive ion beams with EBIS/T devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kester, Oliver; Becker, R

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) are an important tool for experiments at the foremost frontier of nuclear physics. The quasi-continuous radioactive beams from target ion sources of RIB-facilities have to be accelerated to energies at and beyond the Coulomb barrier. An efficient acceleration requires a suitable A/q of the ions determined by the accelerator design, which can be reached via the stripping method or by using a charge state breeder like the REX-ISOLDE system. In order to get comparable efficiencies for a charge state breeder with the stripping scheme, the breeding efficiency in one charge state has to be optimized by narrowing the charge state distribution. In addition good beam quality and thus small emittances are required to achieve best transmission in the following accelerator, which is mandatory for high intensity RIBs. For EBIS/T devices the maximum intensity of the radioactive ion beam is a critical issue, and high current EBIS/T devices will be necessary to deal with intensities of second gen...

  15. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  16. Beam characterisation of the 1.5 T MRI-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodings, S. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Niatsetski, Y.; van Veelen, B.; Schillings, J.; Kok, J. G. M.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Hackett, S. L.; van Asselen, B.; van Zijp, H. M.; Pencea, S.; Roberts, D. A.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2018-04-01

    As a prerequisite for clinical treatments it was necessary to characterize the Elekta 1.5 T MRI-linac 7 MV FFF radiation beam. Following acceptance testing, beam characterization data were acquired with Semiflex 3D (PTW 31021), microDiamond (PTW 60019), and Farmer-type (PTW 30013 and IBA FC65-G) detectors in an Elekta 3D scanning water phantom and a PTW 1D water phantom. EBT3 Gafchromic film and ion chamber measurements in a buildup cap were also used. Special consideration was given to scan offsets, detector effective points of measurement and avoiding air gaps. Machine performance has been verified and the system satisfied the relevant beam requirements of IEC60976. Beam data were acquired for field sizes between 1  ×  1 and 57  ×  22 cm2. New techniques were developed to measure percentage depth dose (PDD) curves including the electron return effect at beam exit, which exhibits an electron-type practical range of cm. The Lorentz force acting on the secondary charged particles creates an asymmetry in the crossline profiles with an average shift of  +0.24 cm. For a 10  ×  10 cm2 beam, scatter from the cryostat contributes 1% of the dose at isocentre. This affects the relative output factors, scatter factors and beam profiles, both in-field and out-of-field. The average 20%–80% penumbral width measured for small fields with a microDiamond detector at 10 cm depth is 0.50 cm. MRI-linac penumbral widths are very similar to that of the Elekta Agility linac MLC, as is the near-surface dose PDD(0.2 cm)  =  57%. The entrance surface dose is  ∼36% of . Cryostat transmission is quantified for inclusion within the treatment planning system. As a result, the 1.5 T MRI-linac 7 MV FFF beam has been characterised for the first time and is suitable for clinical use. This was a key step towards the first clinical treatments with the MRI-linac, which were delivered at University Medical Center Utrecht in May 2017

  17. Fabrication of AA6061-T6 Plate Type Fuel Assembly Using Electron Beam Welding Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Seo, Kyoungseok; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang; Lee, Chongtak

    2014-01-01

    AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW. However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the shrinkage measurement and weld inspection using computed tomography. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding parameters and to evaluate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory electron beam welding process of the full-sized sample was being developed. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication of the plate-type fuel assembly will be provided for the future Ki-Jang research reactor project

  18. Laser beam welding and friction stir welding of 6013-T6 aluminium alloy sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, R.; Dalle Donne, C.; Staniek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Butt welds of 1.6 mm thick 6013-T6 sheet were produced using laser beam welding and friction stir welding processes. Employing the former joining technique, filler powders of the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si were used. Microstructure, hardness profiles, tensile properties and the corrosion behaviour of the welds in the as-welded condition were investigated. The hardness in the weld zone was lower compared to that of the base material in the peak-aged temper. Hardness minima were measured in the fusion zone and in the thermomechanically affected zone for laser beam welded and friction stir welded joints, respectively. Metallographic and fractographic examinations revealed pores in the fusion zone of the laser beam welds. Porosity was higher in welds made using the filler alloy Al-5%Mg than using the filler metal Al-12%Si. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the β '' (Mg 2 Si) hardening precipitates were dissolved in the weld zone due to the heat input of the joining processes. Joint efficiencies achieved for laser beam welds depended upon the filler powders, being about 60 and 80% using the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si, respectively. Strength of the friction stir weld approached over 80% of the ultimate tensile strength of the 6013-T6 base material. Fracture occurred in the region of hardness minima unless defects in the weld zone led to premature failure. The heat input during welding did not cause a degradation of the corrosion behaviour of the welds, as found in continuous immersion tests in an aqueous chloride-peroxide solution. In contrast to the 6013-T6 parent material, the weld zone was not sensitive to intergranular corrosion. Alternate immersion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution indicated high stress corrosion cracking resistance of the joints. For laser beam welded sheet, the weld zone of alternately immersed specimens suffered severe degradation by pitting and intergranular corrosion, which may be associated with galvanic coupling of filler metal and

  19. SU-F-T-137: Out-Of-Beam Dose for a Compact Double-Scattering Proton Beam Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M; Ahmad, S; Jin, H [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The out-of-beam dose is important for understanding the peripheral dose in radiation therapy. In proton radiotherapy, the study of out-of-beam dose is scarce and the treatment planning system (TPS) based on pencil beam algorithm cannot accurately predict the out-of-beam dose. This study investigates the out-of-beam dose for the single-room Mevion S250 double scattering proton therapy system using experimentally measured and treatment planning software generated data. The results are compared with those reported for conventional photon beam therapy. However, this study does not incorporate the neutron contribution in the scattered dose. Methods: A total of seven proton treatment plans were generated using Varian Eclipse TPS for three different sites (brain, lung, and pelvis) in an anthropomorphic phantom. Three field sizes of 5×5, 10×10, and 20×20 cm{sup 2} (lung only) with typical clinical range (13.3–22.8 g/cm{sup 2}) and modulation widths (5.3–14.0 g/cm{sup 2}) were used. A single beam was employed in each treatment plan to deliver a dose of 181.8 cGy (200.0 cGy (RBE)) to the selected target. The out-of-beam dose was measured at 2.0, 5.0, 10.0, and 15.0 cm from the beam edge in the phantom using a thimble chamber (PTW TN31010). Results: The out-of-beam dose generally increased with field size, range, and volume irradiated. For all the plans, the scattered dose sharply fell off with distance. At 2.0 cm, the out-of-beam dose ranged from 0.35% to 2.16% of the delivered dose; however, the dose was clinically negligible (<0.3%) at a distance of 5.0 cm and greater. In photon therapy, the slightly greater out-of-beam dose was reported (TG36; 4%, 2%, and 1% for 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 cm, respectively, using 6 MV beam). Conclusion: The measured out-of-beam dose in proton therapy excluding neutron contribution was observed higher than the TPS calculated dose and comparable to that of photon beam therapy.

  20. Design and construction of two 10.8 T.m superconducting beam bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, P.; Kesseler, G.

    1978-01-01

    Constructional details are given of two superconducting beam bending magnets built at CERN in 1975-77. Each magnet unit has a bending power of 10.8 T.m at the nominal current of 700 A, corresponding to a central induction of 4.75 T in a cold bore of 74 mm diameter. An 'intersecting-ellipses' coil configuration is approximated by 36 horizontally wound racetrack layers of rectangular cross-section with 90 0 bends at the coil ends. A cold-iron magnetic shield serves, in addition, as retaining structure for the electromagnetic forces. The vacuum-insulated liquid helium vessel is surrounded by a radiation shield cooled by helium boil-off gas and supported by a fibre-glass/ stainless steel suspension system. The cryogenic losses of each magnet cryostat are approximately 4 W excluding transfer losses. After successful tests the magnets were placed in a particle beam where they have been regularly operated on automatic control for about one year. (Auth.)

  1. SU-E-T-49: Automatic Beam Angle Determination for Lung IMRT Planning Using a Beam Configuration Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, L; Yin, F; Sheng, Y; Wu, Q J.; Ge, Y; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a technique to automatically determine beam angle configurations for lung IMRT planning based on the patient-specific anatomy and tumor geometry. Methods: The relationship between individual patient anatomy and proper beam configurations was learned from high quality clinical plans in three steps. First, a beam configuration atlas was obtained by classifying 60 lung IMRT plans into 6 beam configuration clusters based on a dissimilarity measure defined between different beam configurations. A beam configuration template was extracted from each cluster to form an atlas. Second, a beam efficiency index map (EI map) was constructed to characterize the geometry of the tumor relative to the lungs, the body and other OARs along each candidate beam direction. Finally, the EI maps of the clinical cases and the cluster assignments of their beam configurations were paired to train a Bayesian classification model. This technique was validated by leave-one-out cross validation with 16 cases randomly selected from the original dataset. An IMRT plan (autobeam plan) for each test case was generated using the beam configuration template according to the cluster assignment given by the model and was compared with the corresponding clinical plan. Results: The dosimetric parameters (mean±S.D. in percentage of prescription dose) in the auto-beam plans and in the clinical plans, respectively, and the p-values by a paired ttest (in parenthesis) are: lung Dmean: 16.3±9.3, 18.6±7.4 (0.48), esophagus Dmean: 28.4±18, 30.7±19.3 (0.02), Heart Dmean: 21.5±17.5,21.1±17.2 (0.76), Spinal Cord D2%: 48±23, 51.2±21.8 (0.01), PTV dose homogeneity (D2%–D99%): 22±27.4, 20.4±12.8 (0.10).The dose reductions by the autobeam plans in esophagus Dmean and cord D02 are statistically significant but the differences (<4%) may not be clinically significant. The other dosimetric parameters are not statistically different. Conclusion: Plans generated by the automatic beam angle

  2. SU-F-T-511: Feasibility Study of Using Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams to Deliver Conventional Flat Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, N; Lebron, S; Yan, G; Li, J; Liu, C; Lu, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Various dosimetric benefits such as increased dose rate, and reduced leakage and out of field dose has led to the growth of FFF technology in the clinic. In this study, we concentrate on investigating the feasibility of using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams to deliver conventional flat beams (CFB), since completely getting rid of the flattening-filter module from the gantry head can not only simplify the gantry design but also decrease the workload on machine maintain and quality assurance. Methods: The sliding window based IMRT technique was utilized to generate the CFB from the FFF beam for various beam configurations on the Elekta Versa HD. The flat beam reproducibility and MU efficiency were compared for each beam configuration among FFF planning, delivery and CFB planning. Results: Compared to the CFB plan, the 3%3mm passing rates of the FFF beams from both measurement and plan are 100% and 95%(or better) for 15×15 cm 2 or smaller field size and for any field size greater than 15×15 cm 2 at 10 cm depth, respectively. The largest discrepancy is about 5% and typically appears at the field shoulder area. The MU increase average was 80% for FFF compared to CFB, however has a minimal impact on treatment delivery time. Conclusion: The ability to deliver conventional flat treatments is not absent when operating in FFF mode. With proper TPS manipulation and beam modulation, FFF mode can achieve reasonable flat profiles and comparable dose coverage as CFB does for various conventional treatment techniques, such as four field box, or long spine treatment techniques. The ability to deliver most clinical treatments from the same treatment unit, will allow for less quality assurance as well as maintenance, and completely eliminate the need for the flattening filter on modern linacs.

  3. SU-F-T-511: Feasibility Study of Using Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams to Deliver Conventional Flat Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, N; Lebron, S; Yan, G; Li, J; Liu, C; Lu, B [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Various dosimetric benefits such as increased dose rate, and reduced leakage and out of field dose has led to the growth of FFF technology in the clinic. In this study, we concentrate on investigating the feasibility of using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams to deliver conventional flat beams (CFB), since completely getting rid of the flattening-filter module from the gantry head can not only simplify the gantry design but also decrease the workload on machine maintain and quality assurance. Methods: The sliding window based IMRT technique was utilized to generate the CFB from the FFF beam for various beam configurations on the Elekta Versa HD. The flat beam reproducibility and MU efficiency were compared for each beam configuration among FFF planning, delivery and CFB planning. Results: Compared to the CFB plan, the 3%3mm passing rates of the FFF beams from both measurement and plan are 100% and 95%(or better) for 15×15 cm{sup 2} or smaller field size and for any field size greater than 15×15 cm{sup 2}at 10 cm depth, respectively. The largest discrepancy is about 5% and typically appears at the field shoulder area. The MU increase average was 80% for FFF compared to CFB, however has a minimal impact on treatment delivery time. Conclusion: The ability to deliver conventional flat treatments is not absent when operating in FFF mode. With proper TPS manipulation and beam modulation, FFF mode can achieve reasonable flat profiles and comparable dose coverage as CFB does for various conventional treatment techniques, such as four field box, or long spine treatment techniques. The ability to deliver most clinical treatments from the same treatment unit, will allow for less quality assurance as well as maintenance, and completely eliminate the need for the flattening filter on modern linacs.

  4. SU-F-T-352: Development of a Knowledge Based Automatic Lung IMRT Planning Algorithm with Non-Coplanar Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, W; Wu, Q; Yuan, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the robustness of a knowledge based automatic lung IMRT planning method and to further validate the reliability of this algorithm by utilizing for the planning of clinical cases with non-coplanar beams. Methods: A lung IMRT planning method which automatically determines both plan optimization objectives and beam configurations with non-coplanar beams has been reported previously. A beam efficiency index map is constructed to guide beam angle selection in this algorithm. This index takes into account both the dose contributions from individual beams and the combined effect of multiple beams which is represented by a beam separation score. We studied the effect of this beam separation score on plan quality and determined the optimal weight for this score.14 clinical plans were re-planned with the knowledge-based algorithm. Significant dosimetric metrics for the PTV and OARs in the automatic plans are compared with those in the clinical plans by the two-sample t-test. In addition, a composite dosimetric quality index was defined to obtain the relationship between the plan quality and the beam separation score. Results: On average, we observed more than 15% reduction on conformity index and homogeneity index for PTV and V_4_0, V_6_0 for heart while an 8% and 3% increase on V_5, V_2_0 for lungs, respectively. The variation curve of the composite index as a function of angle spread score shows that 0.6 is the best value for the weight of the beam separation score. Conclusion: Optimal value for beam angle spread score in automatic lung IMRT planning is obtained. With this value, model can result in statistically the “best” achievable plans. This method can potentially improve the quality and planning efficiency for IMRT plans with no-coplanar angles.

  5. A novel design of beam shaping assembly to use D-T neutron generator for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Karimi, Marjan

    2016-12-01

    In order to use 14.1MeV neutrons produced by d-T neutron generators, two special and novel Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), including multi-layer and hexagonal lattice have been suggested and the effect of them has been investigated by MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The results show that the proposed BSA can provide the qualified epithermal neutron beam for BNCT. The final epithermal neutron flux is about 6e9 n/cm2.s. The final proposed BSA has some different advantages: 1) it consists of usual and well-known materials (Pb, Al, Fluental and Cd); 2) it has a simple geometry; 3) it does not need any additional gamma filter; 4) it can provide high flux of epithermal neutrons. As this type of neutron source is under development in the world, it seems that they can be used clinically in a hospital considering the proposed BSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancers. Influence of radiation beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Joja, Ikuo; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of various parameters on the results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer by assessing the outcomes of 60 patients with this cancer who received definitive radiotherapy between 1985 and 1994. Seven patients were treated with a cobalt-60 unit, and the other 53 with a linear accelerator (26 patients at 3-MV, 10 at 6-MV, and 17 at 10-MV). Of the 17 patients treated at 10-MV, 4 also received part of their treatment with a cobalt-60 unit. The total radiation dose ranged from 56 Gy to 70 Gy (mean, 61 Gy). The total radiation dose of 51 patients (85%) was 60 Gy. The factors found to influence local control were the strength of the radiation beam energy and whether or not there was gross tumor invasion of the anterior commissure. The local control rate was 71% in the patients treated with a 10-MV linear accelerator, 56% in those treated with a 6-MV linear accelerator and, 97% in those treated with a cobalt-60 unit or a 3-MV linear accelerator (P=0.0173). The local control rate was 43% in the patients with gross anterior commissure invasion and 88% in those without (P=0.0075). We conclude that low energy photon beams are more suitable for the treatment of early glottic cancers, especially if the lesion grossly invades the anterior commissure. (author)

  7. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response......PURPOSE: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments...... or a very good partial response rate (response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. CONCLUSIONS...

  8. SU-E-T-514: Investigating the Dose Distributions of Equiangular Spaced Noncoplanar Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T; Maxim, P; Hadsell, M; Loo, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that the use of noncoplanar beams in radiation therapy may Result in dose distributions that are comparable or better than standard coplanar beams [Pugachev, 2001]. A radiation therapy system designed with a noncoplanar beam geometry could allow for a full ring diagnostic quality imaging system to be placed around the patient. Additionally, if the noncoplanar beams were fixed in number and in their angle with respect to the patient’s axial plane, then both treatment and imaging could be achieved concurrently without the need for moving parts, which could greatly reduce treatment times. For such a system to be designed, it is necessary to determine the appropriate number of beams and the beam angles to achieve optimal dose distributions. For simplicity, the beam angles are assumed to be equiangular in the patient’s axial plane, and only the beam angle with respect to the axial plane are varied. This study aims to investigate the dose distributions produced by equiangular noncoplanar beams for multiple beam numbers and beam angles, and to compare these dose distributions with distributions achieved in coplanar volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Dose distributions produced by noncoplanar beams were calculated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system by varying the gantry, collimator, and couch angles to simulate the noncoplanar delivery method. Noncoplanar intensity-modulated (NC-IMRT) beams using 8, 12, and 16 beams with angles varying from 45 degrees to 54 with respect to the patient’s axial plane were studied. Results The NC-IMRT beams produced dose distributions comparable to VMAT plans for a number of treatment sites, and were capable of meeting similar dose-volume histogram constraints. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that a noncoplanar beam delivery method with fixed beam numbers and beam angles is capable of delivering dose distributions comparable to VMAT plans currently in use

  9. SU-E-T-577: Obliquity Factor and Surface Dose in Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, I; Andersen, A; Coutinho, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The advantage of lower skin dose in proton beam may be diminished creating radiation related sequalae usually seen with photon and electron beams. This study evaluates the surface dose as a complex function of beam parameters but more importantly the effect of beam angle. Methods: Surface dose in proton beam depends on the beam energy, source to surface distance, the air gap between snout and surface, field size, material thickness in front of surface, atomic number of the medium, beam angle and type of nozzle (ie double scattering, (DS), uniform scanning (US) or pencil beam scanning (PBS). Obliquity factor (OF) is defined as ratio of surface dose in 0° to beam angle Θ. Measurements were made in water phantom at various beam angles using very small microdiamond that has shown favorable beam characteristics for high, medium and low proton energy. Depth dose measurements were performed in the central axis of the beam in each respective gantry angle. Results: It is observed that surface dose is energy dependent but more predominantly on the SOBP. It is found that as SSD increases, surface dose decreases. In general, SSD, and air gap has limited impact in clinical proton range. High energy has higher surface dose and so the beam angle. The OF rises with beam angle. Compared to OF of 1.0 at 0° beam angle, the value is 1.5, 1.6, 1,7 for small, medium and large range respectively for 60 degree angle. Conclusion: It is advised that just like range and SOBP, surface dose should be clearly understood and a method to reduce the surface dose should be employed. Obliquity factor is a critical parameter that should be accounted in proton beam therapy and a perpendicular beam should be used to reduce surface dose

  10. Seismic performance of interior precast concrete beam-column connections with T-section steel inserts under cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketiyot, Rattapon; Hansapinyo, Chayanon

    2018-04-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the performance of precast beam-column concrete connections using T-section steel inserts into the concrete beam and joint core, under reversed cyclic loading. Six 2/3-scale interior beam-column subassemblies, one monolithic concrete specimen and five precast concrete specimens were tested. One precast specimen was a simple connection for a gravity load resistant design. Other precast specimens were developed with different attributes to improve their seismic performance. The test results showed that the performance of the monolithic specimen M1 represented ductile seismic behavior. Failure of columns and joints could be prevented, and the failure of the frame occurred at the flexural plastic hinge formation at the beam ends, close to the column faces. For the precast specimens, the splitting crack along the longitudinal lapped splice was a major failure. The precast P5 specimen with double steel T-section inserts showed better seismic performance compared to the other precast models. However, the dowel bars connected to the steel inserts were too short to develop a bond. The design of the precast concrete beams with lap splice is needed for longer lap lengths and should be done at the beam mid span or at the low flexural stress region.

  11. SU-E-T-353: Decoding the Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, W; Cho, S; Zhang, X; Hoffman, K; Kudchadker, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Modern IMRT relies on computers to generate treatment plans of varied complexity. A highly complex treatment plan may use a large number of small and irregular beam apertures in order to achieve high dose conformity. However, excessive beam complexity can increase dosimetric uncertainty, prolong treatment time, and increase susceptibility to target or organ motion. In this study we sought to develop metrics to assess the complexity of IMRT beams and plans. Methods: Based the information of leaf positions and MU for each beam segment, we calculated the following beam complexity metrics: aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation. Then these beam complexity metrics were averaged to obtain the corresponding plan complexity metrics, using the beam MUs as weighting factors. We evaluated and compared the beam and plan complexity scores for 65 IMRT plans from 3 sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine). We also studied how the plan complexity scores were affected by adjusting inverse planning parameters. Results: For prostate IMRT, the lateral beams had large MUs and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior or posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest shape irregularity and beam modulation; the HN IMRT plans had the largest aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic IMRT plans often had small aperture area, which may be associated with relatively large discrepancies between calculated and measures doses. The plan complexity increased as the number of optimization iterations and the number of beam segments increased and as the minimum segment area decreased. Conclusion: Complexity of IMRT beams and plans were quantified in terms of aperture area, shape irregularity and beam modulation. The complexity metrics varied among IMRT plans for different disease sites and were affected when the planning parameters were adjusted

  12. Tomografía computada cone beam en articulación témporo mandibular (ATM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. B. Andrés Briner

    2014-09-01

    El propósito del presente artículo es exponer imágenes de alta resolución obtenidas mediante la técnica de Cone Beam, mostrando la elevada capacidad que esta técnica tiene para detectar cambios óseos morfológicos sutiles, que permiten el diagnóstico de las diversas etapas del proceso óseo degenerativo.

  13. Revisiting T2KK and T2KO physics potential and ν{sub μ}- anti ν{sub μ} beam ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Kaoru [Theory Center, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sokendai, Department of Accelerator Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ko, Pyungwon [KIAS, School of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Okamura, Naotoshi [International University of Health and Welfare, Department of Radiological Sciences, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Takaesu, Yoshitaro [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    We revisit the sensitivity study of the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea (T2KK) and Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Oki (T2KO) proposals where a water Cerenkov detector with the 100 kton fiducial volume is placed in Korea (L = 1000 km) and Oki island (L = 653 km) in Japan, respectively, in addition to the Super-Kamiokande for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and leptonic CP phase (δ{sub CP}). We systematically study the running ratio of the ν{sub μ} and anti ν{sub μ} focusing beams with dedicated background estimation for the ν{sub e} appearance and ν{sub μ} disappearance signals, especially improving treatment of the neutral-current π{sup 0} backgrounds. Using a ν{sub μ}- anti ν{sub μ} beam ratio between 3:2 and 2.5:2.5 (in units of 10{sup 21}POT with the proton energy of 40 GeV), the mass-hierarchy determination with the median sensitivity of 3-5 σ by the T2KK and 1-4 σ by the T2KO experiment are expected when sin{sup 2}θ{sub 23} = 0.5, depending on the mass-hierarchy pattern and CP phase. These sensitivities are enhanced (reduced) by 30-40% in Δχ{sup 2} when sin{sup 2}θ{sub 23} = 0.6 (0.4). The CP phase is measured with the uncertainty of 20 {sup circle} -50 {sup circle} by the T2KK and T2KO using the ν{sub μ}- anti ν{sub μ} focusing beam ratio between 3.5:1.5 and 1.5:3.5. These findings indicate that inclusion of the anti ν{sub μ} focusing beam improves the sensitivities of the T2KK and T2KO experiments to both the mass-hierarchy determination and the leptonic CP phase measurement simultaneously with the preferred beam ratio being between 3:2-2.5:2.5 (x 10{sup 21}POT). (orig.)

  14. An analytical model of a curved beam with a T shaped cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Andrew J.; Perez, Daniel; Cox, Donald L.

    2018-03-01

    This paper derives a comprehensive analytical dynamic model of a closed circular beam that has a T shaped cross section. The new model includes in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations derived using continuous media expressions which produces results that have a valid frequency range above those available from traditional lumped parameter models. The web is modeled using two-dimensional elasticity equations for in-plane motion and the classical flexural plate equation for out-of-plane motion. The flange is modeled using two sets of Donnell shell equations: one for the left side of the flange and one for the right side of the flange. The governing differential equations are solved with unknown wave propagation coefficients multiplied by spatial domain and time domain functions which are inserted into equilibrium and continuity equations at the intersection of the web and flange and into boundary conditions at the edges of the system resulting in 24 algebraic equations. These equations are solved to yield the wave propagation coefficients and this produces a solution to the displacement field in all three dimensions. An example problem is formulated and compared to results from finite element analysis.

  15. Reinforced concrete T-beams externally prestressed with unbonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennitz, Anders; Nilimaa, Jonny; Täljsten, Björn

    2012-01-01

    force, and the presence of a deviator were investigated. The results were compared to those observed with analogous beams prestressed with steel tendons, common beam theory, and predictions made using an analytical model adapted from the literature. It was found that steel and CFRP tendons had very...... similar effects on the structural behavior of the strengthened beams; the minor differences that were observed are attributed to the difference between the modulus of elasticity of the CFRP and the steel used in the tests. The models predicted the beams' load-bearing behavior accurately but were less...

  16. Shear or bending? Experimental results on large t-shaped prestressed conrete beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensink, S.W.H.; Van der Veen, C.; De Boer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental results of four shear tests on two large prestressed concrete beams are compared to nonlinear analysis and design code calculations. The beams have a length of 12 m and a depth of 1.3 m and are reinforced with stirrups and pre-tensioning. The four tests consist of a single point load at

  17. Total Skin Electron Beam for Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Moustakis, Christos; Scobioala, Sergiu; Reinartz, Gabriele; Haverkamp, Uwe; Willich, Normann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Weishaupt, Carsten [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Stadler, Rudolf [Department of Dermatology, Johannes-Wesling-Klinikum Minden, Minden (Germany); Sunderkötter, Cord [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor, E-mail: Hans.Eich@ukmuenster.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Recent trials with low-dose total skin electron beam (TSEB) therapy demonstrated encouraging results for treating primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (PCTCL). In this study, we assessed the feasibility of different radiation doses and estimated survival rates of different pathologic entities and stages. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 45 patients with PCTCL undergoing TSEB therapy between 2000 and 2015. Clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and toxicity were assessed. Results: A total of 49 courses of TSEB therapy were administered to the 45 patients. There were 26 pathologically confirmed cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) lymphoma, 10 cases of Sézary syndrome (SS), and 9 non-MF/SS PCTCL patients. In the MF patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 92% (50% complete remission [CR]), 70% ORR in SS patients (50% CR), and 89% ORR in non-MF/SS patients (78% CR). The ORR for MF/SS patients treated with conventional dose (30-36 Gy) regimens was 92% (63% CR) and 75% (25% CR) for low-dose (<30-Gy) regimens (P=.09). In MF patients, the overall survival (OS) was 77 months with conventional dose regimens versus 14 months with low-dose regimens (P=.553). In SS patients, the median OS was 48 versus 16 months (P=.219), respectively. Median event-free survival (EFS) for MF in conventional dose patients versus low-dose patients was 15 versus 8 months, respectively (P=.264) and 19 versus 3 months for SS patients (P=.457). Low-dose regimens had shorter treatment time (P=.009) and lower grade 2 adverse events (P=.043). A second TSEB course was administered in 4 MF patients with 100% ORR. There is a possible prognostic impact of supplemental/boost radiation (P<.001); adjuvant treatment (P<.001) and radiation tolerability (P=.021) were detected. Conclusions: TSEB therapy is an efficacious treatment modality in the treatment of several forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. There is a nonsignificant trend to higher and longer clinical benefit

  18. SU-F-T-345: Quasi-Dead Beams: Clinical Relevance and Implications for Automatic Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, R; Veltchev, I; Lin, T; Gleason, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Beam direction selection for fixed-beam IMRT planning is typically a manual process. Severe dose-volume limits on critical structures in the thorax often result in atypical selection of beam directions as compared to other body sites. This work demonstrates the potential consequences as well as clinical relevance. Methods: 21 thoracic cases treated with 5–7 beam directions, 6 cases including non-coplanar arrangements, with fractional doses of 150–411cGy were analyzed. Endpoints included per-beam modulation scaling factor (MSF), variation from equal weighting, and delivery QA passing rate. Results: During analysis of patient-specific delivery QA a sub-standard passing rate was found for a single 5-field plan (90.48% of pixels evaluated passing 3% dose, 3mm DTA). During investigation it was found that a single beam demonstrated a MSF of 34.7 and contributed only 2.7% to the mean dose of the target. In addition, the variation from equal weighting for this beam was 17.3% absolute resulting in another beam with a MSF of 4.6 contributing 41.9% to the mean dose to the target; a variation of 21.9% from equal weighting. The average MSF for the remaining 20 cases was 4.0 (SD 1.8) with an average absolute deviation of 2.8% from equal weighting (SD 3.1%). Conclusion: Optimization in commercial treatment planning systems typically results in relatively equally weighted beams. Extreme variation from this can result in excessively high MSFs (very small segments) and potential decreases in agreement between planned and delivered dose distributions. In addition, the resultant beam may contribute minimal dose to the target (quasi-dead beam); a byproduct being increased treatment time and associated localization uncertainties. Potential ramifications exist for automatic planning algorithms should they allow for user-defined beam directions. Additionally, these quasi-dead beams may be embedded in the libraries for model-based systems potentially resulting in inefficient

  19. Tomografía computada cone beam en articulación témporo mandibular (ATM)

    OpenAIRE

    DR. B. Andrés Briner

    2014-01-01

    En el estudio de la patología degenerativa de las ATM se pueden utilizar diversas modalidades imaginológicas, orientadas a detectar los cambios morfológicos y funcionales que ésta presenta, especialmente en los casos de artrosis. El propósito del presente artículo es exponer imágenes de alta resolución obtenidas mediante la técnica de Cone Beam, mostrando la elevada capacidad que esta técnica tiene para detectar cambios óseos morfológicos sutiles, que permiten el diagnóstico de las diversa...

  20. Structural stability of coplanar 1T-2H superlattice MoS2 under high energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshmi, S.; Akshaya, M. V.; Satpati, Biswarup; Basu, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharjee, K.

    2018-05-01

    Coplanar heterojunctions composed of van der Waals layered materials with different structural polymorphs have drawn immense interest recently due to low contact resistance and high carrier injection rate owing to low Schottky barrier height. Present research has largely focused on efficient exfoliation of these layered materials and their restacking to achieve better performances. We present here a microwave assisted easy, fast and efficient route to induce high concentration of metallic 1T phase in the original 2H matrix of exfoliated MoS2 layers and thus facilitating the formation of a 1T-2H coplanar superlattice phase. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations reveal formation of highly crystalline 1T-2H hybridized structure with sharp interface and disclose the evidence of surface ripplocations within the same exfoliated layer of MoS2. In this work, the structural stability of 1T-2H superlattice phase during HRTEM measurements under an electron beam of energy 300 keV is reported. This structural stability could be either associated to the change in electronic configuration due to induction of the restacked hybridized phase with 1T- and 2H-regions or to the formation of the surface ripplocations. Surface ripplocations can act as an additional source of scattering centers to the electron beam and also it is possible that a pulse train of propagating ripplocations can sweep out the defects via interaction from specific areas of MoS2 sheets.

  1. SU-E-T-610: Phosphor-Based Fiber Optic Probes for Proton Beam Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Soldner, A; Liu, H; Kassaee, A; Zhu, T; Finlay, J [Univ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility of using fiber optics probes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam radiation dosimetry. We designed and fabricated a fiber probe with submillimeter resolution (<0.5 mm3) based on TbF3 phosphors and evaluated its performance for measurement of proton beam including profiles and range. Methods: The fiber optic probe with TbF3 phosphor tip, embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms was irradiated with double scattering proton beam with energy of 180 MeV. Luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectra of the fiber tip. In order to measure the spatial beam profile and percentage depth dose, we used singular value decomposition method to spectrally separate the phosphors ionoluminescence signal from the background Cerenkov radiation signal. Results: The spectra of the TbF3 fiber probe showed characteristic ionoluminescence emission peaks at 489, 542, 586, and 620 nm. By using singular value decomposition we found the contribution of the ionoluminescence signal to measure the percentage depth dose in phantoms and compared that with measurements performed with ion chamber. We observed quenching effect at the spread out Bragg peak region, manifested as under-responding of the signal, due to the high LET of the beam. However, the beam profiles were not dramatically affected by the quenching effect. Conclusion: We have evaluated the performance of a fiber optic probe with submillimeter resolution for proton beam dosimetry. We demonstrated feasibility of spectral separation of the Cerenkov radiation from the collected signal. Such fiber probes can be used for measurements of proton beams profile and range. The experimental apparatus and spectroscopy method developed in this work provide a robust platform for characterization of proton-irradiated nanophosphor particles for ultralow fluence photodynamic therapy or molecular imaging applications.

  2. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F; Flanz, J; Alexandrov, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  3. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F [ProTom International, Inc., Flower Mound, TX (United States); Flanz, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Alexandrov, V [ZAO ProTom, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  4. T1/T2 glottic cancer managed by external beam radiotherapy - the influence of pretreatment hemoglobin on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, P.R.; O'Sullivan, B.; Panzarella, T.; Keane, T.J.; Gullane, P.; Payne, D.; Liu, F.-F.; McLean, M.; Waldron, J.; Cummings, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) level has been reported to be an important prognostic factor for local control and survival in various malignancies. However in many settings, the adverse effect of a low Hb may be related to more advanced disease and the purpose of this analysis was to assess the influence of pretreatment Hb on local control in a large series of patients with a localised cancer (T1/T2 glottic cancer, AJCC 1992) treated in a standard fashion. Materials and Methods: Between Jan 1981 and Dec 1989, 735 patients (median age 63, 657 males 78 females) with T1/T2 glottic cancer were treated with RT. The standard RT prescription was 50Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks (97% patients). Factors studied for prognostic importance for local failure included pretreatment Hb (assessed as a continuous variable) age, sex, T category, anterior commissure involvement, subglottic extension, tumour bulk (presence of visible tumour vs subclinical disease), treatment time and RT technique (Cobalt vs 6 MV). Results: With a median follow-up of 6.8 years (range 0.2 - 14.3), 131 patients have relapsed for an actuarial 5-year relapse free rate of 81.7%. The 5-year actuarial survival was 75.8%, cause specific survival - 92.4%. The median pretreatment hemoglobin level was 14.8 g/dl and was the same in all T categories. On multivariate analysis, using the Cox proportional hazards model, pretreatment Hb (p=0.001) predicted for local failure after RT. The relative risk (RR) for relapse was calculated for various Hb levels eg the RR for a Hb of 12 g/dl vs a Hb of 15 g/dl was 1.8, (95% C.I. 1.3 - 2.7). Previously noted factors including gender (p=0.0038), T category (p=0.007)) as well as tumour bulk (p=0.02) were also prognostically important for local control. Conclusions: This analysis, in a large number of similarly treated patients, indicates that pretreatment Hb is an independent prognostic factor for local control in patients with T1/T2 carcinoma of the glottis treated with

  5. Optical fluctuation measurements of turbulence using a diagnostic beam on Phaedrus-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evensen, H.; Brouchous, D.; Diebold, D.; Doczy, M.; Fonck, R.J.; Nolan, D.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma density turbulence has been measured with the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system, using a low-power neutral beam with He 0 and H 0 as beam species. In general, He 0 (588 nm) provided the best signal-to-noise ratio due to its lower edge plasma background interference. Simultaneous measurements of edge density fluctuations have been made with BES and Langmuir probes; the spectra are seen to be essentially identical, and the fluctuation amplitudes from both diagnostics are in close agreement. A poloidal coherence length of about 2--4 cm was observed. Radial propagation of modes was not seen, but a lab-frame poloidal phase velocity at r/a=0.77 of about 7x10 5 cm/s in the electron diamagnetic direction was observed, corresponding to m=8--75 kHz

  6. An Influence of 7.5 T Superconducting Wiggler on Beam Parameters of Siberia-2 Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, Vladimir; Valentinov, Alexander; Mezentsev, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    At present the dedicated synchrotron radiation source Siberia-2 in Kurchatov Institute operates with electron energy 2.5 GeV and current up to 200 mA. In order to expand spectral range of SR and to increase brightness an installation of 7.5 T 19-pole superconducting wiggler is planned at the end of 2006. Now the wiggler is under fabrication in BINP, Novosibirsk. Such high level of a magnetic field in the wiggler will have a great influence on electron beam parameters of Siberia-2. Changes of these parameters (betatron tunes, horizontal emittance of the electron beam, momentum compaction, energy spread etc.) are discussed in the report. Different methods of compensation (global and local) of betatron functions distortion are presented. Much attention is paid to dynamic aperture calculations using analytical approximation of magnetic field behavior in transverse horizontal direction

  7. Design Oriented Model for the Assessment of T-Shaped Beam-Column Joints in Reinforced Concrete Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bossio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints represent very important elements of reinforced concrete (RC structures. In fact, beams and columns, at the boundary, generate internal forces acting on concrete core and on reinforcement bars with a very high gradient. To fully understand the seismic performances and the failure modes of T-shaped beam-column joints (external corner-positioned in RC structures, a simplified analytical model of joint behaviour is proposed and theoretical simulations have been performed. The model is based on the solution of a system of equilibrium equations of cracked joint portions designed to evaluate internal stresses at different values of column shear forces. The main aim of the proposed model is to identify the strength hierarchy. Limit values of different internal stresses allow us to detect the occurrence of different failure modes (namely the failure of the cracked joint, the bond failure of passing through bars, and the flexural/shear failures of columns or beams associated with column shear forces; the smaller one represents the capacity of the joint. The present work, focusing on T-shaped joints, could represent a useful tool for designers to quantify the performance of new structures or of existing ones. In fact, such a tool allows us to push an initial undesired failure mode to a more appropriate one to be evaluated. Finally, some experimental results of tests available in literature are reported, analysed, and compared to the predictions of the proposed model (by means of a worked example and of some international codes. The outcomes confirm that failure modes and corresponding joint capacities require an analytical model, like the proposed one, to be accurately predicted.

  8. SU-E-T-665: Radiochromic Film Quenching Effect Reduction for Proton Beam Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldelaijan, S; Alzorkany, F; Moftah, B; Alrumayan, F [King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lewis, D [RCF Consulting, LLC, Monroe, CT (United States); Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Depending on the useful dose range in which radiochromic films operate, number of different radiochromic film models have been designed. The impact of different film models on quenching effect for percent depth dose (PDD) measurements in proton beams has been investigated. Methods: Calibrated PTW Markus ionization chamber was used to measure PDD and beam output for 26.5 MeV protons produced by CS30 cyclotron. An aluminum cylinder was added in front of the beam exit serving as a radiation shutter. The measured signal was normalized to a monitor chamber reading and subsequently scaled by ratio of water-to-air stopping powers at given depth, while the effective depth of measurements was scaled by ratios of material-to-water physical densities and CSDA ranges. Output was measured in water at 2.1 mm reference-depth in the plateau upstream from the Bragg peak. Following the TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol for proton beams, the output was calibrated in water. Three radiochromic film models (EBT, EBT3 and HD-V2) were calibrated within Lexan phantom positioned at the same water-equivalent depth. Thicknesses of films sensitive layers were 34 µm, 30 µm and 8 µm, respectively. Small film pieces (1 x 2 cm{sup 2}) were positioned within polyethylene phantom along the beam central axis with an angulation of 5° for PDD measurements. Results: While the output of the proton beam was found to be around 7 Gy/sec, the actual value of the output per monitor chamber reading (2.32 Gy/nC) was used for reference-dose irradiations during film calibration. Dose ratios at the Bragg peak relative to the reference-depth were 3.88, 2.52, 2.19, and 2.02 for the Markus chamber, HD-V2, EBT3, and EBT film models, respectively. Conclusion: Results at hand suggest that quenching effect is reduced when a radiochromic film model with smaller sensitive layer thickness is used for PDD measurements in proton beams. David Lewis is the owner of RCF Consulting, LLC.

  9. SU-F-T-188: A Robust Treatment Planning Technique for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Cranial Spinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, M; Mehta, M; Badiyan, S; Young, K; Malyapa, R; Regine, W; Langen, K [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yam, M [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) treatment planning technique robust against patient roll, isocenter offset and proton range uncertainty. Method: Proton PBS plans were created (Eclipse V11) for three previously treated CSI patients to 36 Gy (1.8 Gy/fractions). The target volume was separated into three regions: brain, upper spine and lower spine. One posterior-anterior (PA) beam was used for each spine region, and two posterior-oblique beams (15° apart from PA direction, denoted as 2PO-15) for the brain region. For comparison, another plan using one PA beam for the brain target (denoted as 1PA) was created. Using the same optimization objectives, 98% CTV was optimized to receive the prescription dose. To evaluate plan robustness against patient roll, the gantry angle was increased by 3° and dose was recalculated without changing the proton spot weights. On the re-calculated plan, doses were then calculated using 12 scenarios that are combinations of isocenter shift (±3mm in X, Y, and Z directions) and proton range variation (±3.5%). The worst-case-scenario (WCS) brain CTV dosimetric metrics were compared to the nominal plan. Results: For both beam arrangements, the brain field(s) and upper-spine field overlap in the T2–T5 region depending on patient anatomy. The maximum monitor unit per spot were 48.7%, 47.2%, and 40.0% higher for 1PA plans than 2PO-15 plans for the three patients. The 2PO-15 plans have better dose conformity. At the same level of CTV coverage, the 2PO-15 plans have lower maximum dose and higher minimum dose to the CTV. The 2PO-15 plans also showed lower WCS maximum dose to CTV, while the WCS minimum dose to CTV were comparable between the two techniques. Conclusion: Our method of using two posterior-oblique beams for brain target provides improved dose conformity and homogeneity, and plan robustness including patient roll.

  10. SU-E-T-542: Measurement of Internal Neutrons for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Zheng, Y; Rana, S [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Collums, T [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States); Monsoon, J; Benton, E [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton radiotherapy, the production of neutrons is a wellknown problem since neutron exposure can lead to increased risk of secondary cancers later in the patient’s lifetime. The assessment of neutron exposure is, therefore, important for the overall quality of proton radiotherapy. This study investigates the secondary neutrons created inside the patient from uniform scanning proton beams. Methods: Dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons was measured outside the primary field as a function of distance from beam isocenter at three different angles, 45, 90 and 135 degree, relative to beam axis. Plastic track nuclear detector (CR-39 PNTD) was used for the measurement of neutron dose. Two experimental configurations, in-air and cylindrical-phantom, were designed. In a cylindrical-phantom configuration, a cylindrical phantom of 5.5 cm diameter and 35 cm long was placed along the beam direction and in an in-air configuration, no phantom was used. All the detectors were placed at nearly identical locations in both configurations. Three proton beams of range 5 cm, 18 cm, and 32 cm with 4 cm modulation width and a 5 cm diameter aperture were used. The contribution from internal neutrons was estimated from the differences in measured dose equivalent between in-air and cylindrical-phantom configurations at respective locations. Results: The measured ratio of neutron dose equivalent to the primary proton dose (H/D) dropped off with distance and ranged from 27 to 0.3 mSv/Gy. The contribution of internal neutrons near the treatment field edge was found to be up to 64 % of the total neutron exposure. As the distance from the field edge became larger, the external neutrons from the nozzle appear to dominate and the internal neutrons became less prominent. Conclusion: This study suggests that the contribution of internal neutrons could be significant to the total neutron dose equivalent.

  11. SU-E-T-323: The FLUKA Monte Carlo Code in Ion Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, I [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly used in the ion beam therapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code demands accurate and reliable physical models for the transport and the interaction of all components of the mixed radiation field. This contribution will address an overview of the recent developments in the FLUKA code oriented to its application in ion beam therapy. Methods: FLUKA is a general purpose MC code which allows the calculations of particle transport and interactions with matter, covering an extended range of applications. The user can manage the code through a graphic interface (FLAIR) developed using the Python programming language. Results: This contribution will present recent refinements in the description of the ionization processes and comparisons between FLUKA results and experimental data of ion beam therapy facilities. Moreover, several validations of the largely improved FLUKA nuclear models for imaging application to treatment monitoring will be shown. The complex calculation of prompt gamma ray emission compares favorably with experimental data and can be considered adequate for the intended applications. New features in the modeling of proton induced nuclear interactions also provide reliable cross section predictions for the production of radionuclides. Of great interest for the community are the developments introduced in FLAIR. The most recent efforts concern the capability of importing computed-tomography images in order to build automatically patient geometries and the implementation of different types of existing positron-emission-tomography scanner devices for imaging applications. Conclusion: The FLUA code has been already chosen as reference MC code in many ion beam therapy centers, and is being continuously improved in order to match the needs of ion beam therapy applications. Parts of this work have been supported by the European

  12. Particle Identification in the T2K TPCs and study of the electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giganti, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the work done on the TPCs of the Near Detector of the T2K experiment. T2K is an experiment installed in Japan and its main purpose is the measurement of the last angle of the neutrino mixing matrix, Θ 13 . The other two angles of the matrix have already been measured in the last years, through the phenomenon of the neutrino oscillations, showing that the neutrinos have masses different from zero. The measurement of the missing angle Θ 13 is of fundamental importance for the neutrino physics as, if this angle is different from zero, CP violation in the lepton sector can occur. Up to now only upper limits on the value of Θ 13 exist: the aim of T2K is to measure this angle or to put upper limits on it with a sensitivity 20 times better than the current limit. This measurement will be done measuring the appearance at the far detector, SuperKamiokande, of electron neutrinos in the muon neutrino beam produced at JPARC. The main background to the measurement of Θ 13 is the electron neutrinos produced together with the muon neutrinos in the beam: this component, expected to be of the order of 1% of the total neutrino flux, has to be measured at the T2K Near Detector, before the oscillations. This can be done selecting neutrino interactions in the Near Detector tracker and using the TPC particle identification capabilities to distinguish electrons from muons. This allows to select a sample of electron neutrino interactions and to measure their spectrum at the Near Detector. During this thesis I have developed the methods to perform the particle identification in the TPCs: the method is based on the measurement of the truncated mean of the energy deposited by the charged particles in the gas: at the typical energy of the T2K neutrinos the difference in the deposited energy between muons and electrons is of the order of 40% and for this reason a resolution better than 10% is needed to distinguish the two particles: as we will show in the thesis, with

  13. Development of the electron beam welding of the aluminium alloy 6061-T6 for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 6061-T6 has been selected for the construction of the Jules Horowitz's reactor vessel. This reactor vessel is pressurized and will be made through butt welding of ∼ 2 cm thick aluminium slabs. The electron beam welding process has been tested and qualified. It appears that this welding process allows: -) welding without pre-heating, -) vacuum welding, -) welding of 100% of the thickness in one passage, -) very low deforming welding process, -) very low density and very low volume of blow holes, -) weak ZAT (Thermal Affected Zones), and -) high reproducibility that permits automation. (A.C.)

  14. Total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a nationwide cohort study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Lise M; Kamstrup, Maria Rørbæk; Petersen, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Background. Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective palliative treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). In the present study we reviewed the clinical response to TSEBT in Danish patients with CTCL. Material and methods. This retrospective study included 35 patients with CTCL...... to treatment compared to patients treated with high-dose. Consequently the study with low-dose was discontinued and published. In patients treated with high-dose the overall response rate was 100%. Complete response (CR) rate was 68% and CR occurred after a median time of 2.1 months (range 1.8 months-2.0 years...

  15. Performance of the CMS 2S $p_T$ module prototype using CBC2 readout at beam tests

    CERN Document Server

    Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar

    2017-01-01

    As the LHC will enter into its high luminosity phase\\,(HL-LHC), operating at a luminosity of $5\\rm{\\mbox{-}}7.5\\times10^{34}~\\rm cm^{-2}\\rm s^{-1}$, the CMS experiment will replace the Run 2 tracker with a new one which will be able to sustain the increased number of collisions per bunch crossing, which can be as high as 200. The tracker information will be used in the Level-1 trigger to reject low $p_T$ tracks. In this paper, the performance of the modules of the proposed outer tracker in test beams is reported.

  16. SU-E-T-238: Deriving Electron Contamination Spectra From Pure and Clinical Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, C; Plessis, F du

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To extract the electron contamination energy spectra for an Elekta Precise Linac, based on pure photon and measured clinical beam percentage depth dose data. And to include this as an additional source in isource 4 in DOSXYZnrc. Methods: A pure photon beam was simulated for the Linac using isource 4 in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. Percentage depth dose (PDD) data were extracted afterwards for a range of field sizes (FS). These simulated dose data were compared to actual measured dose PDD data, with the data normalized at 10 cm depth. The resulting PDD data resembled the electron contamination depth dose. Since the dose fall-off is a strictly decreasing function, a method was adopted to derive the contamination electron spectrum. Afterwards this spectrum was used in a DOSXYZnrc MC simulation run to verify that the original electron depth dose could be replicated. Results: Various square aperture FS’s for 6, 8 and 15 megavolt (MV) photon beams were modeled, simulated and compared to their respective actual measured PDD data. As FS increased, simulated pure photon depth-dose profiles shifted deeper, thus requiring electron contamination to increase the surface dose. The percentage of electron weight increased with increase in FS. For a FS of 15×15 cm 2 , the percentage electron weight is 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% for 6, 8 and 15 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: From the PDD results obtained, an additional electron contamination source was added to the photon source model so that simulation and measured PDD data could match within 2 % / 2 mm gamma-index criteria. The improved source model could assure more accurate simulations of surface doses. This research project was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) with funds from National Treasury under its Economic Competitiveness and Support package

  17. SU-E-T-455: Characterization of 3D Printed Materials for Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, W; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; McDonough, J; Yin, L; Teo, B; Fisher, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The widespread availability of low cost 3D printing technologies provides an alternative fabrication method for customized proton range modifying accessories such as compensators and boluses. However the material properties of the printed object are dependent on the printing technology used. In order to facilitate the application of 3D printing in proton therapy, this study investigated the stopping power of several printed materials using both proton pencil beam measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Five 3–4 cm cubes fabricated using three 3D printing technologies (selective laser sintering, fused-deposition modeling and stereolithography) from five printers were investigated. The cubes were scanned on a CT scanner and the depth dose curves for a mono-energetic pencil beam passing through the material were measured using a large parallel plate ion chamber in a water tank. Each cube was measured from two directions (perpendicular and parallel to printing plane) to evaluate the effects of the anisotropic material layout. The results were compared with GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation using the manufacturer specified material density and chemical composition data. Results: Compared with water, the differences from the range pull back by the printed blocks varied and corresponded well with the material CT Hounsfield unit. The measurement results were in agreement with Monte Carlo simulation. However, depending on the technology, inhomogeneity existed in the printed cubes evidenced from CT images. The effect of such inhomogeneity on the proton beam is to be investigated. Conclusion: Printed blocks by three different 3D printing technologies were characterized for proton beam with measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. The effects of the printing technologies in proton range and stopping power were studied. The derived results can be applied when specific devices are used in proton radiotherapy

  18. SU-E-T-238: Deriving Electron Contamination Spectra From Pure and Clinical Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, C; Plessis, F du [University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Free State (South Africa)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To extract the electron contamination energy spectra for an Elekta Precise Linac, based on pure photon and measured clinical beam percentage depth dose data. And to include this as an additional source in isource 4 in DOSXYZnrc. Methods: A pure photon beam was simulated for the Linac using isource 4 in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. Percentage depth dose (PDD) data were extracted afterwards for a range of field sizes (FS). These simulated dose data were compared to actual measured dose PDD data, with the data normalized at 10 cm depth. The resulting PDD data resembled the electron contamination depth dose. Since the dose fall-off is a strictly decreasing function, a method was adopted to derive the contamination electron spectrum. Afterwards this spectrum was used in a DOSXYZnrc MC simulation run to verify that the original electron depth dose could be replicated. Results: Various square aperture FS’s for 6, 8 and 15 megavolt (MV) photon beams were modeled, simulated and compared to their respective actual measured PDD data. As FS increased, simulated pure photon depth-dose profiles shifted deeper, thus requiring electron contamination to increase the surface dose. The percentage of electron weight increased with increase in FS. For a FS of 15×15 cm{sup 2}, the percentage electron weight is 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% for 6, 8 and 15 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: From the PDD results obtained, an additional electron contamination source was added to the photon source model so that simulation and measured PDD data could match within 2 % / 2 mm gamma-index criteria. The improved source model could assure more accurate simulations of surface doses. This research project was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) with funds from National Treasury under its Economic Competitiveness and Support package.

  19. Optimization of beam shaping assembly based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Hamza; Chen, Chaobin; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing

    2017-04-01

    The feasibility of developing an epithermal neutron beam for a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility based on a high intensity D-T fusion neutron generator (HINEG) and using the Monte Carlo code SuperMC (Super Monte Carlo simulation program for nuclear and radiation process) is proposed in this study. The Monte Carlo code SuperMC is used to determine and optimize the final configuration of the beam shaping assembly (BSA). The optimal BSA design in a cylindrical geometry which consists of a natural uranium sphere (14 cm) as a neutron multiplier, AlF3 and TiF3 as moderators (20 cm each), Cd (1 mm) as a thermal neutron filter, Bi (5 cm) as a gamma shield, and Pb as a reflector and collimator to guide neutrons towards the exit window. The epithermal neutron beam flux of the proposed model is 5.73 × 109 n/cm2s, and other dosimetric parameters for the BNCT reported by IAEA-TECDOC-1223 have been verified. The phantom dose analysis shows that the designed BSA is accurate, efficient and suitable for BNCT applications. Thus, the Monte Carlo code SuperMC is concluded to be capable of simulating the BSA and the dose calculation for BNCT, and high epithermal flux can be achieved using proposed BSA.

  20. SU-F-T-554: Dark Current Effect On CyberKnife Beam Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H; Chang, A [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: All RF linear accelerators produce dark current to varying degrees when an accelerating voltage and RF input is applied in the absence of electron gun injection. This study is to evaluate how dark current from the linear accelerator of CyberKnife affect the dose in the reference dosimetry. Methods: The G4 CyberKnife system with 6MV photon beam was used in this study. Using the ion chamber and the diode detector, the dose was measured in water with varying time delay between acquiring charges and staring beam-on after applying high-voltage into the linear accelerator. The dose was measured after the time delay with over the range of 0 to 120 seconds in the accelerating high-voltage mode without beam-on, applying 0, 10, 50, 100, and 200 MUs. For the measurements, the collimator of 60 mm was used and the detectors were placed at the depths of 10 cm with the source-to-surface distance of 80 cm. Results: The dark current was constant over time regardless of MU. The dose due to the dark current increased over time linearly with the R-squared value of 0.9983 up to 4.4 cGy for the time 120 seconds. In the dose rate setting of 720 MU/min, the relative dose when applying the accelerating voltage without beam-on was increased over time up to 0.6% but it was less than the leakage radiation resulted from the accelerated head. As the reference dosimetry condition, when 100 MU was delivered after 10 seconds time delay, the relative dose increased by 0.7% but 6.7% for the low MU (10 MU). Conclusion: In the dosimetry using CyberKnife system, the constant dark current affected to the dose. Although the time delay in the accelerating high-voltage mode without beam-on is within 10 seconds, the dose less than 100 cGy can be overestimated more than 1%.

  1. Characteristics of OTFTs based on α-ω- Dihexyl-sexithiophene(DH6T) using Organic Molecular Beam Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dae Hee; Park, Byung Eun

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated an organic thin film transistor using organic semiconductor material α-ω- Dihexyl-sexithiophene (DH6T). The organic semiconductor was deposited using organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). The deposition rate was 0.3A/s and the final thickness was 100 nm. After deposition, we annealed at 40 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C. In present, DH6T was used as a p-type semiconductor, so we measured 0V∼-40V. We measured drain current versus drain voltage, drain current versus gate voltage, calculated mobility and On/Off ratio at 40 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C. The field-effect mobility was 8x10- 3 , 9x10- 3 , 1.2x10- 2 , and on/off ratio was 1.75x10- 2 , 1.85x10- 2 , 2.17x10- 2 , respectively.

  2. SU-E-T-403: Evaluation of the Beam Performance of a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator Under External Device-Based Gated Delivery Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobulnicky, K; Pawlak, D; Purwar, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the beam performance of a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator under external device-based gated delivery conditions. Methods: Six gating cycles were used to evaluate the gating performance of a standard production TrueBeam system that was not specially tuned in any way. The system was equipped with a factory installed external gating interface (EXGI). An in-house EXGI tester box was used to simulate the input gating signals. The gating cycles were selected based on long beam-on and short beam-off times, short beam-on and long beam-off times, or equal beam on and off times to check linac performance. The beam latencies were measured as the time difference between the logic high gating signal and the first or last target pulses with an oscilloscope. Tissue-Phantom Ratio, beam flatness, and dose distributions from 5 different plans were measured using the 6 different gating durations and the un-gated irradiation. A PTW 729 2-D array was used to compare 5 plans versus the un-gated delivery with a 1%/1mm gamma index passing criteria. Results: The beam latencies of the linac were based off of 20 samples for beam-on and beam-off, for each gating cycle. The average beam-on delays were measured to be between 57 and 66msec, with a maximum of 88 msec. The beam off latencies averaged between 19 and 26msec, with a maximum of 48 msec. TPR20,10 measurements showed beam energy stability within 0.5% of the un-gated delivery. Beam flatness was better than 2.5% for all gated cycles. All but two deliveries, the open field with 4 seconds on, 1 second off, and a five field IMRT plan with 0.5 seconds on, 2.5 seconds off, had >90% passing rate. Conclusion: TrueBeam demonstrates excellent beam stability with minimal beam latencies under external device-based gated operations. Dosimetric measurements show minimal variation in beam energy, flatness, and plan delivery. Authors are employees of Varian Medical Systems, Inc

  3. SU-E-T-403: Evaluation of the Beam Performance of a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator Under External Device-Based Gated Delivery Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobulnicky, K; Pawlak, D; Purwar, A [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the beam performance of a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator under external device-based gated delivery conditions. Methods: Six gating cycles were used to evaluate the gating performance of a standard production TrueBeam system that was not specially tuned in any way. The system was equipped with a factory installed external gating interface (EXGI). An in-house EXGI tester box was used to simulate the input gating signals. The gating cycles were selected based on long beam-on and short beam-off times, short beam-on and long beam-off times, or equal beam on and off times to check linac performance. The beam latencies were measured as the time difference between the logic high gating signal and the first or last target pulses with an oscilloscope. Tissue-Phantom Ratio, beam flatness, and dose distributions from 5 different plans were measured using the 6 different gating durations and the un-gated irradiation. A PTW 729 2-D array was used to compare 5 plans versus the un-gated delivery with a 1%/1mm gamma index passing criteria. Results: The beam latencies of the linac were based off of 20 samples for beam-on and beam-off, for each gating cycle. The average beam-on delays were measured to be between 57 and 66msec, with a maximum of 88 msec. The beam off latencies averaged between 19 and 26msec, with a maximum of 48 msec. TPR20,10 measurements showed beam energy stability within 0.5% of the un-gated delivery. Beam flatness was better than 2.5% for all gated cycles. All but two deliveries, the open field with 4 seconds on, 1 second off, and a five field IMRT plan with 0.5 seconds on, 2.5 seconds off, had >90% passing rate. Conclusion: TrueBeam demonstrates excellent beam stability with minimal beam latencies under external device-based gated operations. Dosimetric measurements show minimal variation in beam energy, flatness, and plan delivery. Authors are employees of Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  4. SU-E-T-577: Commissioning of a Deterministic Algorithm for External Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, T; Finlay, J; Mesina, C; Liu, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We report commissioning results for a deterministic algorithm for external photon beam treatment planning. A deterministic algorithm solves the radiation transport equations directly using a finite difference method, thus improve the accuracy of dose calculation, particularly under heterogeneous conditions with results similar to that of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Methods: Commissioning data for photon energies 6 – 15 MV includes the percentage depth dose (PDD) measured at SSD = 90 cm and output ratio in water (Spc), both normalized to 10 cm depth, for field sizes between 2 and 40 cm and depths between 0 and 40 cm. Off-axis ratio (OAR) for the same set of field sizes was used at 5 depths (dmax, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm). The final model was compared with the commissioning data as well as additional benchmark data. The benchmark data includes dose per MU determined for 17 points for SSD between 80 and 110 cm, depth between 5 and 20 cm, and lateral offset of up to 16.5 cm. Relative comparisons were made in a heterogeneous phantom made of cork and solid water. Results: Compared to the commissioning beam data, the agreement are generally better than 2% with large errors (up to 13%) observed in the buildup regions of the FDD and penumbra regions of the OAR profiles. The overall mean standard deviation is 0.04% when all data are taken into account. Compared to the benchmark data, the agreements are generally better than 2%. Relative comparison in heterogeneous phantom is in general better than 4%. Conclusion: A commercial deterministic algorithm was commissioned for megavoltage photon beams. In a homogeneous medium, the agreement between the algorithm and measurement at the benchmark points is generally better than 2%. The dose accuracy for a deterministic algorithm is better than a convolution algorithm in heterogeneous medium

  5. SU-F-T-279: Impact of Beam Energy Drifts On IMRT Delivery Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddu, S; Kamal, G; Herman, A; Edwards, S; Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Oddiraju, S; Rangaraj, D; Mutic, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: According to TG-40 percent-depth-dose (PDD) tolerance is ±2% but TG-142 is ±1%. Now the question is, which one is relevant in IMRT era? The primary objective of this study is to evaluate dosimetric impact of beam-energy-drifts on IMRT-delivery. Methods: Beam-energy drifts were simulated by adjusting Linac’s bending-magnet-current (BMC) followed by tuning the pulse-forming network and adjusting gun-current. PDD change of −0.6% and +1.2% were tested. Planar-dosimetry measurements were performed using an ionization-chamber-array in solid-water phantoms. Study includes 10-head-and-neck and 3-breast cancer patients. en-face beam-deliveries were also tested at 1.3cm and 5.3cm depths. Composite and single-field dose-distributions were compared against the plans to determine %Gamma pass-rates (%GPRs). For plan dose comparisons, changes in %Gamma pass-rates (cPGPRs) were computed/reported to exclude the differences between dose-computation and delivery. Dose distributions of the drifted-energies were compared against their baseline measurements to determine the% GPRs. A Gamma criteria of 3%/3mm was considered for plan-dose comparisons while 3%/1mm used for measured dose intercomparisons. Results: For composite-dose delivery, average cPGPRs were 0.41%±2.48% and −2.54%±3.65% for low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) drifts, respectively. For measured dose inter-comparisons, the average%GPRs were 98.4%±2.2% (LE-drift) and 95.8%±4.0 (HE-drift). The average %GPR of 92.6%±4.3% was noted for the worst-case scenario comparing LE-drift to HE-drift. All en-face beams at 5.3 cm depth have cPGPRs within ±4% of the baseline-energy measurements. However, greater variations were noted for 1.3cm depth. Average %GPRs for drifted energies were >99% at 5.3cm and >97% at 1.3cm depths. However, for the worst-case scenario (LE-drift to HE-drift) these numbers dropped to 95.2% at 5.3cm and 93.1% at 1.3cm depths. Conclusion: The dosimetric impact of beam-energy drifts was

  6. SU-F-T-66: Characteristics of Electron Beams From Varian Trubeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimofte, A; Kennedy, C; Zhu, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the electron beam data between Truebeam and 2300ix Varian accelerators for percent depth dose for broad beam and small circular cutouts, cone factors, head scatter factor as a function of cone size and SSD, phantom scatter factor, blocking factor, distance factor and virtual source position. Methods: Measurements were performed for Truebeam and 2300ix Varian accelerators. The main energies used were: 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV. PDD was measured at SSD = 100 cm for open beam and small circular cutouts (r = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 6.6cm) for different energies. Measurements to determine the head scatter factor (H) were done as a function of radius for six representative energies and five cone sizes (6, 10, 15, 20 and 25cm2). The phantom scatter factor (PSF) is defined as the ratio of blocking factor in water at reference depth and head scatter factor in air. PSF was measured as a function of radius and electron energy. Distance factor was measured for all energies and cones for three SSD’s (100, 110 and 120cm). Results: The percent depth dose (PDD) was measured for small cutouts of radius r = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 5.6cm. Blocking factor (BF) was measured for Truebeam and 2300ix accelerators, for different circular cutouts and energies for a 10×10 cone. Cone factors were compared between the two accelerators for different energies and applicator sizes. Conclusion: Cone factors measured for the two accelerator types differ by up to 5% for the largest applicator size. Blocking factors differs by up to 3%, with the largest variation for the smallest field size (0.5cm). Distance factor for different SSD’s differ by up to 4.5%.

  7. SU-F-T-66: Characteristics of Electron Beams From Varian Trubeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimofte, A; Kennedy, C; Zhu, T [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the electron beam data between Truebeam and 2300ix Varian accelerators for percent depth dose for broad beam and small circular cutouts, cone factors, head scatter factor as a function of cone size and SSD, phantom scatter factor, blocking factor, distance factor and virtual source position. Methods: Measurements were performed for Truebeam and 2300ix Varian accelerators. The main energies used were: 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV. PDD was measured at SSD = 100 cm for open beam and small circular cutouts (r = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 6.6cm) for different energies. Measurements to determine the head scatter factor (H) were done as a function of radius for six representative energies and five cone sizes (6, 10, 15, 20 and 25cm2). The phantom scatter factor (PSF) is defined as the ratio of blocking factor in water at reference depth and head scatter factor in air. PSF was measured as a function of radius and electron energy. Distance factor was measured for all energies and cones for three SSD’s (100, 110 and 120cm). Results: The percent depth dose (PDD) was measured for small cutouts of radius r = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 5.6cm. Blocking factor (BF) was measured for Truebeam and 2300ix accelerators, for different circular cutouts and energies for a 10×10 cone. Cone factors were compared between the two accelerators for different energies and applicator sizes. Conclusion: Cone factors measured for the two accelerator types differ by up to 5% for the largest applicator size. Blocking factors differs by up to 3%, with the largest variation for the smallest field size (0.5cm). Distance factor for different SSD’s differ by up to 4.5%.

  8. TFTR neutral beam D-T gas injection system operational experiences of the first two years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldaker, M.E.; Lawson, J.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; Kamperschroer, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Tritium Gas Injection System (TGIS) has successfully performed tritium operations since December 1993. TGIS operation has been reliable, with no leaks to the secondary containment to date. Notable operational problems include throughput leaks on fill, exit and piezoelectric valves. Repair of a TGIS requires replacement of the assembly, involving TFTR downtime and extensive purging, since the TGIS assembly is highly contaminated with residual tritium, and is located within secondary containment. Modifications to improve reliability and operating range include adjustable reverse bias voltage to the piezoelectric valves, timing and error calculation changes to tune the PLC and hardwired timing control, and exercising piezoelectric valves without actually pulsing gas prior to use after extended inactivity. A pressure sensor failure required the development of an open loop piezoelectric valve drive control scheme, using a simple voltage ramp to partially compensate for declining plenum pressure. Replacement of TGIS's have been performed, maintaining twelve system tritium capability as part of scheduled project maintenance activity

  9. SU-F-T-478: Effect of Deconvolution in Analysis of Mega Voltage Photon Beam Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, M [Apollo Speciality Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Manigandan, D [Fortis Cancer Institute, Mohali, Punjab (India); Murali, V; Chitra, S; Ganapathy, K [Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Vikraman, S [JAYPEE HOSPITAL- RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Noida, UTTAR PRADESH (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study and compare the penumbra of 6 MV and 15 MV photon beam profiles after deconvoluting different volume ionization chambers. Methods: 0.125cc Semi-Flex chamber, Markus Chamber and PTW Farmer chamber were used to measure the in-plane and cross-plane profiles at 5 cm depth for 6 MV and 15 MV photons. The profiles were measured for various field sizes starting from 2×2 cm till 30×30 cm. PTW TBA scan software was used for the measurements and the “deconvolution” functionality in the software was used to remove the volume averaging effect due to finite volume of the chamber along lateral and longitudinal directions for all the ionization chambers. The predicted true profile was compared and the change in penumbra before and after deconvolution was studied. Results: After deconvoluting the penumbra decreased by 1 mm for field sizes ranging from 2 × 2 cm till 20 x20 cm. This is observed for along both lateral and longitudinal directions. However for field sizes from 20 × 20 till 30 ×30 cm the difference in penumbra was around 1.2 till 1.8 mm. This was observed for both 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The penumbra was always lesser in the deconvoluted profiles for all the ionization chambers involved in the study. The variation in difference in penumbral values were in the order of 0.1 till 0.3 mm between the deconvoluted profile along lateral and longitudinal directions for all the chambers under study. Deconvolution of the profiles along longitudinal direction for Farmer chamber was not good and is not comparable with other deconvoluted profiles. Conclusion: The results of the deconvoluted profiles for 0.125cc and Markus chamber was comparable and the deconvolution functionality can be used to overcome the volume averaging effect.

  10. Study of factorization in QCD with polarized beams and a production at large psub(T)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craigie, N.S.; Baldracchini, F.; Roberto, V.; Socolovsky, M.

    1980-07-01

    We discuss what aspects of the leading orders in QCD could be tested in the large psub(T) reactions p-bar-vectorp → Λ-vector + X, p-barp-vector → Λ-vector + X and p-bar-vectorp-vector → Λ + X. (author)

  11. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Junrun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng; Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin; Yao, Zeen

    2016-01-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft–Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  12. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery

  13. 15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvester, John E.; Grimm, Peter D.; Blasko, John C.; Millar, Jeremy; Orio, Peter F.; Skoglund, Scott; Galbreath, Robert W.; Merrick, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I 125 or Pd 103 brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I 125 or Pd 103 brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts

  14. SU-E-T-211: Induced Release of Nanocarrier Encapsulated Chemotherapeutic Drugs Using Proton Radiotherapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polf, J; Jackson, I [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ranjan, A; Fernando, R [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an open source independent MU dose calculation software for S and S IMRT based in the algorithm proposed by Kung et.al. Methods: Treatment plans were done using Iplan v4.5 BrainLAB TPS and S and S IMRT modality. A 6MV photon beam produced by a Primus linear accelerator equipped with an Optifocus MLC was used. TPS dose calculation algorithms were pencil beam and Monte Carlo. 230 IMRT treatments plans were selected for the study. The software was written under MALTLAB environment. Treatment plans were imported by the software using RTP format. Field fluences were reconstructed adding all segments.The algorithm implemented in the software calculates the dose at a reference point as the sum of primary and scatter dose. The primary dose is obtained by masking the fluence map with a circle of radius 1cm. The scatter dose is obtained through a shaped ring mask around the previous circle with a thickness of 0.5cm; the rings are increased one after another with constant thickness until cover the entire map of influence. The dosimetric parameters Sc, Sp and TPR vary depending on radio, the transmission effect of the MLC, inverse square law and dose profile are used for the calculation. Results: The average difference between measured and independent calculated dose was 0.4% ± 2.2% [−6.8%, 6.4%]. For 91% of the studied plans the difference was less than 3%. The difference between the measured and TPS dose with pencilbeam algorithm was 2.6% ± 1.41% [−2.0%, 5.6%] and Monte Carlo algorithm was 0.4% ± 1.5% [−4.9%, 3.7%]. The differences obtained are comparable to that obtained with the ionization chamber and TPS. Conclusion: The developed software is suitable for use in S and S IMRT dose calculation. This application is open and can be downloading under request.

  15. SU-F-T-574: MLC Based SRS Beam Commissioning - Minimum Target Size Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakikhani, R [Florida Cancer Specialists - Largo, Largo, FL (United States); Able, C [Florida Cancer Specialists - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a MLC accelerator based SRS program using small fields down to 1 cm × 1 cm and to determine the smallest target size safe for clinical treatment. Methods: Computerized beam scanning was performed in water using a diode detector and a linac-head attached transmission ion chamber to characterize the small field dosimetric aspects of a 6 MV photon beam (Trilogy-Varian Medical Systems, Inc.). The output factors, PDD and profiles of field sizes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 cm{sup 2} were measured and utilized to create a new treatment planning system (TPS) model (AAA ver 11021). Static MLC SRS treatment plans were created and delivered to a homogeneous phantom (Cube 20, CIRS, Inc.) for a 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm “PTV” target. A 12 field DMLC plan was created for a 2.1 cm target. Radiochromic film (EBT3, Ashland Inc.) was used to measure the planar dose in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes. A micro ion chamber (0.007 cc) was used to measure the dose at isocenter for each treatment delivery. Results: The new TPS model was validated by using a tolerance criteria of 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement. For fields ≤ 3 cm{sup 2}, the max PDD, Profile and OF difference was 0.9%, 2%/2mm and 1.4% respectively. The measured radiochromic film planar dose distributions had gamma scores of 95.3% or higher using a 3%/2mm criteria. Ion chamber measurements for all 3 test plans effectively met our goal of delivering the dose accurately to within 5% when compared to the expected dose reported by the TPS (1 cm plan Δ= −5.2%, 1.5 cm plan Δ= −2.0%, 2 cm plan Δ= 1.5%). Conclusion: End to end testing confirmed that MLC defined SRS for target sizes ≥ 1.0 cm can be safely planned and delivered.

  16. Three dimensional microstructural characterization of nanoscale precipitates in AA7075-T651 by focused ion beam (FIB) tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Loza, Jose J. [Materials Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287–6106 (United States); Merkle, Arno P. [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Chawla, Nikhilesh, E-mail: nchawla@asu.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287–6106 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The size and distribution of precipitates in Al 7075 alloys affects both the mechanical and corrosion behavior (including stress corrosion cracking and fatigue corrosion) of the alloy. Three dimensional (3D) quantitative microstructural analysis of Al 7075 in the peak aged condition (T651) allows for a better understanding of these behaviors. In this study, Focused ion beam (FIB) tomography was used to characterize the microstructure in three dimensions. Analysis of grains and precipitates was performed in terms of volume, size, and morphology. It was found that the precipitates at the grain boundaries are larger in size, higher in aspect ratios and maximum Feret diameter compared to the precipitates inside the grains, due to earlier nucleation of the precipitates at the grain boundaries. Our data on the precipitates at the interface between grains and Mg{sub 2}Si inclusion show that the surfaces of inclusion (impurity) particles can serve as a location for heterogeneous nucleation of precipitates. - Highlights: •Focused ion beam (FIB) tomography was used to characterize the microstructure of Al 7075 in three dimensions. •Analysis of grains and precipitates was performed in terms of volume, size, and morphology. •Precipitates at the grain boundaries have larger size and aspect ratio compared to the precipitates inside the grains.

  17. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-F-T-399: Migration of Treatment Planning Systems Without Beam Data Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolakanahalli, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Walker Family Cancer Centre, St. Catharines, ON (Canada); Tewatia, D [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin- Madison, Madison WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Data acquisition for commissioning is steered by Treatment Planning System (TPS) requirements which can be cumbersome and time consuming involving significant clinic downtime. The purpose of this abstract is to answer if we could circumvent this by extracting data from existing TPS and speed up the process. Methods: Commissioning beam data was obtained from a clinically commissioned TPS (Pinnacle™) using Matlab™ generated Pinnacle™ executable scripts to commission a secondary 3D dose verification TPS (Eclipse™). Profiles and output factors for commissioning as required by Eclipse™ were computed on a 50 cm{sup 3} water phantom at a dose grid resolution of 2mm3. Verification doses were computed and compared to clinical TPS dose profiles as per TG-106 guidelines. Standard patient plans from Pinnacle™ including IMRT and VMAT plans were re-computed keeping the same monitor units (in order to perform true comparison) using Eclipse™. Computed dose was exported back to Pinnacle for comparison to original plans. This methodology enables us to alleviate all ambiguities that arise in such studies. Results: Profile analysis using in-house software for 6x, showed that for all field sizes including small MLC generated fields, 100% of infield and penumbra data points of Eclipse™ match Pinnacle™ generated and measured profiles with 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. Excellent agreement was observed in the penumbra regions, with all data points passing DTA criteria for complex C-shaped and S-shaped profiles. Patient plan dose volume histograms (DVHs) and isodose lines agreed well to within a 1.5% for target coverage. Conclusion: Secondary 3D dose checking is of utmost importance with advanced techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. Migration of TPS is possible without compromising accuracy or enduring the cumbersome measurement of commissioning data. Economizing time for commissioning such a verification system or for migration of TPS can add great QA value and minimize

  19. SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Huq, M Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the polarity effects for small volume ionization chambers in {sup 60}Co gamma-ray beams using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Measurements were made for 7 small volume ionization chambers (a PTW 31016, an Exradin A14, 2 Capintec PR0-5P, and 3 Exradin A16) using a PTW UNIDOSwebline Universal Dosemeter and an ELEKTA solid water phantom with proper inserts. For each ion chamber, the temperature/pressure corrected electric charge readings were obtained for 16 voltage values (±50V, ±100V, ±200V, ±300V, ±400V, ±500V, ±600V, ±700V). For each voltage, a five-minute leakage charge reading and a series of 2-minute readings were continuously taken during irradiation until 5 stable signals (less than 0.05% variation) were obtained. The average of the 5 reading was then used for the calculation of the polarity corrections at the voltage and for generating the saturation curves. Results: The polarity effects are more pronounced at high or low voltages than at the medium voltages for all chambers studied. The voltage dependence of the 3 Exradin A16 chambers is similar in shape. The polarity corrections for the Exradin A16 chambers changes rapidly from about 1 at 500V to about 0.98 at 700V. The polarity corrections for the 7 ion chambers at 300V are in the range from 0.9925 (for the PTW31016) to 1.0035 (for an Exradin A16). Conclusion: The polarity corrections for certain micro-chambers are large even at normal operating voltage.

  20. SU-F-T-67: Correction Factors for Monitor Unit Verification of Clinical Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haywood, J [Mercy Health Partners, Muskegon, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Monitor units calculated by electron Monte Carlo treatment planning systems are often higher than TG-71 hand calculations for a majority of patients. Here I’ve calculated tables of geometry and heterogeneity correction factors for correcting electron hand calculations. Method: A flat water phantom with spherical volumes having radii ranging from 3 to 15 cm was created. The spheres were centered with respect to the flat water phantom, and all shapes shared a surface at 100 cm SSD. D{sub max} dose at 100 cm SSD was calculated for each cone and energy on the flat phantom and for the spherical volumes in the absence of the flat phantom. The ratio of dose in the sphere to dose in the flat phantom defined the geometrical correction factor. The heterogeneity factors were then calculated from the unrestricted collisional stopping power for tissues encountered in electron beam treatments. These factors were then used in patient second check calculations. Patient curvature was estimated by the largest sphere that aligns to the patient contour, and appropriate tissue density was read from the physical properties provided by the CT. The resulting MU were compared to those calculated by the treatment planning system and TG-71 hand calculations. Results: The geometry and heterogeneity correction factors range from ∼(0.8–1.0) and ∼(0.9–1.01) respectively for the energies and cones presented. Percent differences for TG-71 hand calculations drop from ∼(3–14)% to ∼(0–2)%. Conclusion: Monitor units calculated with the correction factors typically decrease the percent difference to under actionable levels, < 5%. While these correction factors work for a majority of patients, there are some patient anatomies that do not fit the assumptions made. Using these factors in hand calculations is a first step in bringing the verification monitor units into agreement with the treatment planning system MU.

  1. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy

  2. Beam shaping assembly of a D-T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-08-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D-T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D-T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor.

  3. SU-E-T-63: A Preliminary Study of Gold Nanoparticles Enhanced Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K; Sha, H; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have potential of being used as a new-generation contrast agent to enhance CT imaging of cancer. This feasibility study is to determine the GNP concentration required to provide sufficient image contrast in small animal cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods: The GNPs used are nanorods with 10nm diameter and 44nm length. A 50µl GNP colloid with an original GNP concentration of 3.6mg/ml was diluted to five different concentrations at 2.4, 2.1, 2.0, 1.9 and 1.8mg/ml, respectively. The GNP colloid was enclosed in a 150µl vial, and the GNP colloid vial was submerged in a water bottle for CBCT. CBCTs were acquired with x-ray energy of 65kVp and tube current of 1.5mA. In addition, to evaluate the optimal x-ray energy for GNP detection in CBCT, the GNP colloid of 1.8mg/ml was also imaged at x-ray energy of 45kVp and 85kVp. Regions of interest were placed in axial CBCT slices contouring the GNP colloid volume and a same volume in the surrounding water to calculate the signal and contrast. Results: For the GNP colloid at concentrations of 3.6, 2.4, 2.1, 2.0, 1.9 and 1.8mg/ml, the image contrasts between GNP colloid and water were 68±4, 33±4, 23±3, 20±3, 13±4, and 10±3 HU, respectively. At 1.8mg/ml concentration level, the image contrasts were 16±3 and 7±4 HU, respectively, when the x-ray energy was set at 45kVp and 85kVp. Conclusion: The minimal GNP concentration required on our small animal CBCT was estimated to be around 1.8mg/ml due to the fact that the minimum image contrast for adequate differentiation in CT is about 8 HU. CBCT at lower x-ray energy, i.e. 45kVp, can provide better image contrast than at higher energies, i.e., 65kVp and 85kVp. A study of GNP enhanced CBCT for in vivo small animal imaging is ongoing efforts in our group

  4. SU-E-T-153: Burst-Mode Modulated Arc Therapy with Flattening-Filter-Free Beams Versus Flattening-Filtered Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainz, K; Lawton, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry and delivery of burst-mode modulated arc radiotherapy using flattening-filter-free (FFF) and flattening-filtered (FF) beams. Methods: Burst-mode modulated arc therapy (mARC, Siemens) plans were generated for six prostate cases with FFF and FF beam models, using the Elekta Monaco v. 5.00 planning system. One 360-degree arc was used for five cases, and for one case two 360-degree coplanar arcs were used. The maximum number of optimization points (OPs) per arc was set to 91, and OPs with less than 4 MU were disregarded. All plans were delivered on the Siemens Artiste linear accelerator with 6MV FF (300 MU/min) and comparable-energy FFF (2000 MU/min, labeled as 7UF) beams. Results: For all cases studied, the plans with FFF beams exhibited DVHs for the PTV, rectum, and bladder that were nearly identical to those for the plans with FF beams. The FFF plan yielded reduced dose to the right femoral head for 5 cases, and lower mean dose to the left femoral head for 4 cases. For all but the two-arc case, the FFF and FF plans resulted in an identical number of segments. The total number of MUs was slightly lower for the FF plans for five cases. The total delivery time per fraction was substantially lower for the FFF plans, ranging from 25 to 50 percent among all cases, as compared to the FF plans. Conclusion: For mARC plans, FFF and FF beams provided comparable PTV coverage and rectum and bladder sparing. For the femoral heads, the mean dose was slightly lower in most cases when using the FFF beam. Although the flat beam plans typically required slightly fewer MUs, FFF beams required substantially less time to deliver a plan of similar quality. This work was supported by Siemens Medical Solutions and the MCW Cancer Center Fotsch Foundation.

  5. SU-E-T-464: On the Equivalence of the Quality Correction Factor for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorriaux, J; Paganetti, H; Testa, M; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In current practice, most proton therapy centers apply IAEA TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol. Quality correction factors (kQ) take into account in the dose determination process the differences in beam qualities used for calibration unit and for treatment unit. These quality correction factors are valid for specific reference conditions. TRS-398 reference conditions should be achievable in both scattered proton beams (i.e. DS) and scanned proton beams (i.e. PBS). However, it is not a priori clear if TRS-398 kQ data, which are based on Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in scattered beams, can be used for scanned beams. Using TOPAS-Geant4 MC simulations, the study aims to determine whether broad beam quality correction factors calculated in TRS-398 can be directly applied to PBS delivery modality. Methods: As reference conditions, we consider a 10×10×10 cm 3 homogeneous dose distribution delivered by PBS system in a water phantom (32/10 cm range/modulation) and an air cavity placed at the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak. In order to isolate beam differences, a hypothetical broad beam is simulated. This hypothetical beam reproduces exactly the same range modulation, and uses the same energy layers than the PBS field. Ion chamber responses are computed for the PBS and hypothetical beams and then compared. Results: For an air cavity of 2×2×0.2 cm 3 , the ratio of ion chamber responses for the PBS and hypothetical beam qualities is 0.9991 ± 0.0016. Conclusion: Quality correction factors are insensitive to the delivery pattern of the beam (broad beam or PBS), as long as similar dose distributions are achieved. This investigation, for an air cavity, suggests that broad beam quality correction factors published in TRS-398 can be applied for scanned beams. J. Sorriaux is financially supported by a public-private partnership involving the company Ion Beam Applications (IBA)

  6. Total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: A nationwide cohort study from Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, Lise M.; Iversen, Lars; Kamstrup, Maria R.; Gniadecki, Robert; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena; Wiren, Johan; Fenger-Groen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Background. Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective palliative treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). In the present study we reviewed the clinical response to TSEBT in Danish patients with CTCL. Material and methods. This retrospective study included 35 patients with CTCL treated with TSEBT in Denmark from 2001 to 2008 and followed for a median time of 7.6 months (range 3 days-3.7 years). Twenty five patients were treated with high-dose (30 Gy) and 10 patients in a protocol with low-dose (4 Gy) TSEBT. Results. Patients treated with low-dose therapy had inadequate response to treatment compared to patients treated with high-dose. Consequently the study with low-dose was discontinued and published. In patients treated with high-dose the overall response rate was 100%. Complete response (CR) rate was 68% and CR occurred after a median time of 2.1 months (range 1.8 months - 2.0 years). We found no difference in CR rate in patients with T2 (66.7%) and T3 disease (78.6%) (p = 0.64). Following CR 82.4% relapsed at a median time of four months (range 12 days-11.5 months). Relapse-free-survival was similar in patients with T2 and T3 disease (p 0.77). Progressive disease (PD) was experienced in 28.0% and the median time to PD was 9.0 months (range 4.6-44.3 months). Overall progression-free survival was 95.3%, 72.1% and 64.1% after 0.5-, 1- and 2-years. Effects of initial therapy on TSEBT treatment response and side effects to TSEBT were also analyzed. Conclusion. In conclusion, the present study confirms that high-dose TSEBT is an effective, but generally not a curative therapy in the management of CTCL. High-dose treatment yielded significantly better results than low-dose treatment with 4 Gy. TSEBT offers significant palliation in most patients when other skin-directed or systemic treatments have failed

  7. SU-F-T-276: Source Modeling and VMAT Quality Assurance Referring to the TrueBeam Representative Beam Data for Eclipse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q [Beijing Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) after the 6MV and 10MV photon beam source modeling, referring to the Varian TrueBeam representative beam data for Eclipse. Methods: The source model needs specific measured beam data, such as PDDs and profiles, diagonal profile, output factors (OFs), and MLC transmission factor (TF) and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG), et al. We downloaded the representative data from myVarian website, which includes TrueBeam 4MV-15MV photon beam data and 6MeV-22MeV electron beam data in w2CAD file format for use with Eclipse and in Excel spreadsheet format for use in data comparison. The beam data in W2CAD format can be imported into the Eclipse system and calibrated for use, as appropriate. We used PTW MP3 water tank to measure the beam data in some typical field sizes, and compared the measured data with the representative data. We found that the PDDs, profiles and OFs are similar. However according to some papers and our measurements, we decided that our MLC TF and DLG are 1.58 and 1.33 (6MV), 1.79 and 1.57 (10MV), respectively. After we had configured the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) with the representative data in Eclipse, we also have done dosimetric verification for 88 VMAT plans. Results: The end-to-end test procedures of VMAT were performed for 6MV and 10MV energy modes. The NE Farmer ion chamber mean measurements showed 1.2% (6MV, 38 cases) and 1.2% (10MV, 50 cases) between measurement and calculation; the Sun Nuclear ArcCheck mean measurements demonstrated gamma pass rates are as followings: 98.9%, 93.2%, 61.0% for 6MV, and 98.9%, 91.9%, 59.5% for 10MV, using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm, 1%/1mm, 10% threshold criteria, respectively. Conclusion: The representative data is applicable to our TrueBeam for the VMAT plan, though our MLC factors are a little different, and its patientspecific QA is good.

  8. The relative biological effectiveness of a high energy neutron beam for micronuclei induction in T-lymphocytes of different individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabbert, J.P., E-mail: jps@tlabs.ac.z [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), Somerset West (South Africa); Dept. of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, University of Stellenbosch (South Africa); August, L. [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), Somerset West (South Africa); Vral, A. [Dept. of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University (Belgium); Symons, J. [NRF iThemba LABS (Laboratory for Accelerated Based Sciences), Somerset West (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    In assessing the radiation risk of personnel exposed to cosmic radiation fields as it pertains to radiological damage during travel in civilian aircrafts, it is particularly important to know the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for high energy neutrons. It has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years using different neutron energies and cytogenetic examinations. Variations in the radiosensitivity of white blood cells for different individuals are likely to influence the estimate of the relative biological effectiveness for high energy neutrons. This as such observations have been noted in the response of different cancer cell lines with varying inherent sensitivities. In this work the radiosensitivities of T-lymphocytes of different individuals to the p(66)/Be neutron beam at iThemba LABS were measured using micronuclei formations and compared to that noted following exposure to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. The principle objective of this investigation was to establish if a relationship between neutron RBE and variation in biological response to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays for lymphocytes from different individuals could be determined. Peripheral blood samples were collected from four healthy donors and isolated lymphocytes were exposed to different doses of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays (1-5 Gy) and p(66)/Be neutrons (0.5-2.5 Gy). One sample per donor was not exposed to radiation and served as a control. Lymphocytes were stimulated using PHA and cultured to induce micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked cells. Micronuclei yields were numerated using fluorescent microscopy. Radiosensitivities and RBE values were calculated from the fitted parameters describing the micronuclei frequency dose response data. Dissimilar dose response curves for different donors were observed reflecting varying inherent sensitivities to both neutron and gamma radiation. A clear reduction in the dose limiting RBE{sub M} is noted for donors with lymphocytes more sensitive to

  9. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchior, M; Salinas Aranda, F; Sciutto, S; Dodat, D; Larragueta, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO™ 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse™ Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use

  10. SU-E-T-327: The Update of a XML Composing Tool for TrueBeam Developer Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y; Mao, W; Jiang, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a major upgrade of a novel XML beam composing tool to scientists and engineers who strive to translate certain capabilities of TrueBeam Developer Mode to future clinical benefits of radiation therapy. Methods: TrueBeam Developer Mode provides the users with a test bed for unconventional plans utilizing certain unique features not accessible at the clinical mode. To access the full set of capabilities, a XML beam definition file accommodating all parameters including kV/MV imaging triggers in the plan can be locally loaded at this mode, however it is difficult and laborious to compose one in a text editor. In this study, a stand-along interactive XML beam composing application, TrueBeam TeachMod, was developed on Windows platforms to assist users in making their unique plans in a WYSWYG manner. A conventional plan can be imported in a DICOM RT object as the start of the beam editing process in which trajectories of all axes of a TrueBeam machine can be modified to the intended values at any control point. TeachMod also includes libraries of predefined imaging and treatment procedures to further expedite the process. Results: The TeachMod application is a major of the TeachMod module within DICOManTX. It fully supports TrueBeam 2.0. Trajectories of all axes including all MLC leaves can be graphically rendered and edited as needed. The time for XML beam composing has been reduced to a negligible amount regardless the complexity of the plan. A good understanding of XML language and TrueBeam schema is not required though preferred. Conclusion: Creating XML beams manually in a text editor will be a lengthy error-prone process for sophisticated plans. A XML beam composing tool is highly desirable for R and D activities. It will bridge the gap between scopes of TrueBeam capabilities and their clinical application potentials

  11. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  12. SU-F-T-501: Dosimetric Comparison of Single Arc-Per-Beam and Two Arc-Per-Beam VMAT Optimization in the Monaco Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalet, A; Cao, N; Meyer, J; Dempsey, C [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States); Richardson, H [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric and practical effects of the Monaco treatment planning system “max arcs-per-beam” optimization parameter in pelvic radiotherapy treatments. Methods: A total of 17 previously treated patients were selected for this study with a range of pelvic disease site including prostate(9), bladder(1), uterus(3), rectum(3), and cervix(1). For each patient, two plans were generated, one using a arc-per-beam setting of ‘1’ and another with setting of ‘2’. The setting allows the optimizer to add a gantry direction change, creating multiple arc passes per beam sequence. Volumes and constraints established from the initial clinical treatments were used for planning. All constraints and dose coverage objects were kept the same between plans, and all plans were normalized to 99.7% to ensure 100% of the PTV received 95% of the prescription dose. We evaluated the PTV conformity index, homogeneity index, total monitor units, number of control points, and various dose volume histogram (DVH) points for statistical comparison (alpha=0.05). Results: We found for the 10 complex shaped target volumes (small central volumes with extending bilateral ‘arms’ to cover nodal regions) that the use of 2 arcs-per-beam achieved significantly lower average DVH values for the bladder V20 (p=0.036) and rectum V30 (p=0.001) while still meeting the high dose target constraints. DVH values for the simpler, more spherical PTVs were not found significantly different. Additionally, we found a beam delivery time reduction of approximately 25%. Conclusion: In summary, the dosimetric benefit, while moderate, was improved over a 1 arc-per-beam setting for complex PTVs, and equivalent in other cases. The overall reduced delivery time suggests that the use of multiple arcs-per-beam could lead to reduced patient on table time, increased clinical throughput, and reduced medical physics quality assurance effort.

  13. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  14. Direct observation of CD4 T cell morphologies and their cross-sectional traction force derivation on quartz nanopillar substrates using focused ion beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Gil-Sung; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Won-Yong; Hong, Chang-Hee; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Direct observations of the primary mouse CD4 T cell morphologies, e.g., cell adhesion and cell spreading by culturing CD4 T cells in a short period of incubation (e.g., 20 min) on streptavidin-functionalized quartz nanopillar arrays (QNPA) using a high-content scanning electron microscopy method were reported. Furthermore, we first demonstrated cross-sectional cell traction force distribution of surface-bound CD4 T cells on QNPA substrates by culturing the cells on top of the QNPA and further analysis in deflection of underlying QNPA via focused ion beam-assisted technique.

  15. SU-F-T-521: Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Parameters Comparison From Different Linac Machine Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A [King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Arkansas Cancer Institute, Pine Bluff, AR (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Novel linac machines, TrueBeam (TB) and Elekta Versa have updated head designing and software control system, include flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon and electron beams. Later on FFF beams were also introduced on C-Series machines. In this work FFF beams for same energy 6MV but from different machine versions were studied with reference to beam data parameters. Methods: The 6MV-FFF percent depth doses, profile symmetry and flatness, dose rate tables, and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) transmission factors were measured during commissioning process of both C-series and Truebeam machines. The scanning and dosimetric data for 6MV-FFF beam from Truebeam and C-Series linacs was compared. A correlation of 6MV-FFF beam from Elekta Versa with that of Varian linacs was also found. Results: The scanning files were plotted for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) for C-Series 6MV-FFF beam is 1.1 mm. Published values for Truebeam dosimetric leaf gap is 1.16 mm. 6MV MLC transmission factor varies between 1.3 % and 1.4 % in two separate measurements and measured DLG values vary between 1.32 mm and 1.33 mm on C-Series machine. MLC transmission factor from C-Series machine varies between 1.5 % and 1.6 %. Some of the measured data values from C-Series FFF beam are compared with Truebeam representative data. 6MV-FFF beam parameter values like dmax, OP factors, beam symmetry and flatness and additional parameters for C-Series and Truebeam liancs will be presented and compared in graphical form and tabular data form if selected. Conclusion: The 6MV flattening filter (FF) beam data from C-Series & Truebeam and 6MV-FFF beam data from Truebeam has already presented. This particular analysis to compare 6MV-FFF beam from C-Series and Truebeam provides opportunity to better elaborate FFF mode on novel machines. It was found that C-Series and Truebeam 6MV-FFF dosimetric and beam data was quite similar.

  16. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D; Wolden, S; Yeh, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm"3 of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  17. SU-F-T-658: Out-Of-Field Dose Comparison for TrueBeam Low Energy Beams for Extended Distances: Measurement Vs Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesooriya, K [University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States); University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Liyanage, N; Kaluarachchi, M [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Sawkey, D [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patient dose far from the treatment field is comprised of scatter from within the patient, and treatment head leakage. We quantify the treatment head leakage for TrueBeam linear accelerator for 6X and 6X-FFF beams by comparing measurements to Monte Carlo simulations for a variety of jaw sizes and collimator rotations. This work is conceptually similar to that of Kry et al. (Medical Physics 2006; 33: 4405), who considered a Clinac linear accelerator. Methods: Measurements were made using an EXRADIN A101 ion chamber positioned in the patient plane, at distances up to 100 cm from isocenter. Simulations were done using VirtuaLinac, the GEANT4-based Monte Carlo model of the TrueBeam treatment head, and an in-house (U. Virginia) GEANT4-based code. In-house code modelled an ion chamber with build-up, based on a CT scan of the chamber. VirtuaLinac included a detailed model of the treatment head shielding, and was run on the Amazon Web Services cloud to generate spherical phase space files surrounding the treatment head. These phase space files were imported into the in-house code. Results: Initial comparisons between measurements and simulation showed an excess of dose in the in-plane direction, away from the gantry, in the simulations. This was traced to an incomplete model of the shielding—specifically, the component holding the primary collimator was smaller in the model than in the TrueBeam. Modifications were made to VirtuaLinac to more closely match the engineering drawings. In the in-plane direction, the lowest out of field dose was away from gantry (negative abscissa values) at around 60 cm from isocenter, for fields smaller than 10×10 cm2. Out of field dose decreased with decreasing jaw size. Flattening-filter free beam produced out-of-field doses as low as 65% of those with flattened beam. Conclusion: Doses determined from simulation and measurement were in close agreement. Funding support from the Jefferson Trust Foundation.

  18. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  19. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  20. SU-F-T-491: Photon Beam Matching Analysis at Multiple Sites Up to Twelve Years Post Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Able, C [Florida Cancer Specialists - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States); Zakikhani, R [Florida Cancer Specialists - Largo, Largo, FL (United States); Yan, K [Florida Cancer Specialists- Tampa, Tampa, FL (United States); Sha, D [Florida Cancer Specialist - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States); Chopra, A [Florida Cancer Specialist - Brooksville, Spring Hill, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if the photon beams associated with several models of accelerators are matched with ‘Golden Beam’ data (VGBD) to assess treatment planning modeling and delivery. Methods: Six accelerators’ photon beams were evaluated to determine if they matched the manufacturer’s (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) VGBD. Additional direct comparisons of the 6X and 18X beams using the manufacturer’s specification of Basic and Fine beam matching were also performed. The Cseries accelerator models were 21 EX (3), IX (2), and a IX Trilogy, ranging from three to twelve years post installation. Computerized beam scanning was performed (IBA Blue Phantom 2) with 2 CC13 ion chambers in water at 100 cm SSD. Dmax (10 cm2 field size), percentage depth dose (6 cm2, 10 cm2, 20 cm2, and 30 cm2 field sizes) and beam uniformity (10 cm2, 30 cm2 and 40 cm2 field sizes) were evaluated. Results: When comparing the beams with VGBD using the ‘Basic’ matching criteria, all beams were within the specifications ( 1.5mm at dmax, 1% PDD, and 2% Profiles). When considering the “Fine” matching criteria ( 1.5mm at dmax, 0.5% PDD, and 2% Profiles), only three of six 6MV beams and two of six high energy (five 18MV & one 15MV) beams passed. Direct comparisons between accelerators using the Clinac IX (installed 2012) as the reference beam datasets resulted in all 6 MV and 18MV beams meeting both the “Basic” and “Fine” criterion with the exception of two accelerators. Conclusion: Linear accelerators installed up to nine years apart are capable of meeting the manufacturers beam matching criteria for “Basic” matching. Without any adjustments most beams, when evaluated, may meet the “Fine” match criteria. The use of a single dataset (VGBD or designated accelerator reference data) for treatment planning commissioning is acceptable and can provide quality treatment delivery.

  1. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  2. SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Tesfamicael, B; Park, S [McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Twyford, T [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Cheng, C [Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm range uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPO plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal

  3. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Systemic chemotherapy and extracorporeal photochemotherapy for T3 and T4 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients who have achieved a complete response to total skin electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Lynn D.; Licata, Anita L.; Braverman, Irwin M.; Edelson, Richard L.; Heald, Peter W.; Feldman, Andrea M.; Kacinski, Barry M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of systemic adjuvant therapies on relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) patients treated with total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT). Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1990, TSEBT (36 Gy at 1 Gy/day; 9 weeks; 6 MeV electrons) was administered with curative intent to a total of 163 CTCL (mycosis fungoides) patients using six fields supplemented by orthovoltage boosts (120 kvp, 1 Gy x 20) to the perineum, soles of feet, and apical scalp (120 kvp, 2 Gy x 3). In this group, all patients who achieved a clinical complete response or a good partial response were offered one of two competing regimens of either adjuvant doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide or adjuvant extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP). Results: When the results for the group who achieved a complete response (CR) to TSEBT were analyzed, OS for T1 and T2 patients was excellent (85-90% at 5-10 years) and not improved by either adjuvant regimen. However, T3 and T4 patients who received either adjuvant doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (75% at 3 years) or adjuvant ECP (100% at 3 years) had better overall survival than those who received neither adjuvant regimen (∼ 50% at 5 years). The difference between the OS curves for those who received ECP vs. those who received no adjuvant therapy approached statistical significance (p < 0.06), while a significant survival benefit from the addition of chemotherapy for TSEBT complete responders was not observed. Neither adjuvant therapy provided benefit with respect to relapse free survival after TSEBT. Conclusions: These results suggest that an adjuvant nontoxic regimen of extracorporeal photochemotherapy may prolong survival in advanced stage CTCL patients who have achieved a complete remission after TSEBT. The combination of doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide had no significant impact on overall survival in those patients who achieved CR to TSEBT, and neither adjuvant therapy had an impact on relapse

  5. SU-F-T-494: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Using Golden Beam Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itano, M; Yamazaki, T [Inagi Municipal Hospital, Inagi, Tokyo (Japan); Tachibana, R; Uchida, Y [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Yamashita, M [Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Shimizu, H [Kitasato University Medical Center, Kitamoto, Saitama (Japan); Sugawara, Y; Kotabe, K [National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kamima, T [Cancer Institute Hospital Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, R [Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto, Tokyo (Japan); Ishibashi, S [Sasebo City General Hospital, Sasebo, Nagasaki (Japan); Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In general, beam data of individual linac is measured for independent dose verification software program and the verification is performed as a secondary check. In this study, independent dose verification using golden beam data was compared to that using individual linac’s beam data. Methods: Six institutions were participated and three different beam data were prepared. The one was individual measured data (Original Beam Data, OBD) .The others were generated by all measurements from same linac model (Model-GBD) and all linac models (All-GBD). The three different beam data were registered to the independent verification software program for each institute. Subsequently, patient’s plans in eight sites (brain, head and neck, lung, esophagus, breast, abdomen, pelvis and bone) were analyzed using the verification program to compare doses calculated using the three different beam data. Results: 1116 plans were collected from six institutes. Compared to using the OBD, the results shows the variation using the Model-GBD based calculation and the All-GBD was 0.0 ± 0.3% and 0.0 ± 0.6%, respectively. The maximum variations were 1.2% and 2.3%, respectively. The plans with the variation over 1% shows the reference points were located away from the central axis with/without physical wedge. Conclusion: The confidence limit (2SD) using the Model-GBD and the All-GBD was within 0.6% and 1.2%, respectively. Thus, the use of golden beam data may be feasible for independent verification. In addition to it, the verification using golden beam data provide quality assurance of planning from the view of audit. This research is partially supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development(AMED)

  6. SU-F-T-494: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Using Golden Beam Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, M; Yamazaki, T; Tachibana, R; Uchida, Y; Yamashita, M; Shimizu, H; Sugawara, Y; Kotabe, K; Kamima, T; Takahashi, R; Ishibashi, S; Tachibana, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In general, beam data of individual linac is measured for independent dose verification software program and the verification is performed as a secondary check. In this study, independent dose verification using golden beam data was compared to that using individual linac’s beam data. Methods: Six institutions were participated and three different beam data were prepared. The one was individual measured data (Original Beam Data, OBD) .The others were generated by all measurements from same linac model (Model-GBD) and all linac models (All-GBD). The three different beam data were registered to the independent verification software program for each institute. Subsequently, patient’s plans in eight sites (brain, head and neck, lung, esophagus, breast, abdomen, pelvis and bone) were analyzed using the verification program to compare doses calculated using the three different beam data. Results: 1116 plans were collected from six institutes. Compared to using the OBD, the results shows the variation using the Model-GBD based calculation and the All-GBD was 0.0 ± 0.3% and 0.0 ± 0.6%, respectively. The maximum variations were 1.2% and 2.3%, respectively. The plans with the variation over 1% shows the reference points were located away from the central axis with/without physical wedge. Conclusion: The confidence limit (2SD) using the Model-GBD and the All-GBD was within 0.6% and 1.2%, respectively. Thus, the use of golden beam data may be feasible for independent verification. In addition to it, the verification using golden beam data provide quality assurance of planning from the view of audit. This research is partially supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development(AMED)

  7. SU-E-T-377: Inaccurate Positioning Might Introduce Significant MapCheck Calibration Error in Flatten Filter Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S; Chao, C; Chang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the calibration error of detector sensitivity for MapCheck due to inaccurate positioning of the device, which is not taken into account by the current commercial iterative calibration algorithm. We hypothesize the calibration is more vulnerable to the positioning error for the flatten filter free (FFF) beams than the conventional flatten filter flattened beams. Methods: MapCheck2 was calibrated with 10MV conventional and FFF beams, with careful alignment and with 1cm positioning error during calibration, respectively. Open fields of 37cmx37cm were delivered to gauge the impact of resultant calibration errors. The local calibration error was modeled as a detector independent multiplication factor, with which propagation error was estimated with positioning error from 1mm to 1cm. The calibrated sensitivities, without positioning error, were compared between the conventional and FFF beams to evaluate the dependence on the beam type. Results: The 1cm positioning error leads to 0.39% and 5.24% local calibration error in the conventional and FFF beams respectively. After propagating to the edges of MapCheck, the calibration errors become 6.5% and 57.7%, respectively. The propagation error increases almost linearly with respect to the positioning error. The difference of sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams was small (0.11 ± 0.49%). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the positioning error is not handled by the current commercial calibration algorithm of MapCheck. Particularly, the calibration errors for the FFF beams are ~9 times greater than those for the conventional beams with identical positioning error, and a small 1mm positioning error might lead to up to 8% calibration error. Since the sensitivities are only slightly dependent of the beam type and the conventional beam is less affected by the positioning error, it is advisable to cross-check the sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams to detect

  8. T2 signal intensity as an imaging biomarker for patients with superficial Fibromatoses of the hands (Dupuytren's disease) and feet (Ledderhose disease) undergoing definitive electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, James S; Wolfson, Aaron H; Subhawong, Ty K

    2018-02-01

    Electron beam therapy is a definitive radiation treatment option for superficial fibromatoses of the hands and feet. Because objective criteria for treatment response remain poorly defined, we sought to describe changes in electron beam treated lesions on MRI. The study included 1 male and 9 female patients with a total of 37 superficial fibromatoses; average age was 60.7 years. Standard 6 MeV electron beam treatment included 3 Gy per fraction for 10 or 12 treatments using split-course with 3-month halfway break. Pre- and post-treatment MRIs were evaluated to determine lesion size (cm3), T2 signal intensity and contrast enhancement (5-point ordinal scales) by a fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. MRI findings were correlated with clinical response using a composite 1-5 ordinal scale, Karnofsky Performance Scale and patient-reported 10-point visual analog scale for pain. Mean volume decreased from 1.5 to 1.2 cm 3 (p = 0.01, paired t-test). Mean T2 hyperintensity score decreased from 3.0 to 2.1 (p Wilcoxon signed-rank). Mean enhancement score available for 22 lesions decreased from 3.8 to 3.0 (p Wilcoxon signed-rank). Performance scores improved from 78.9 ± 13.7 to 84.6 ± 6.9 (p = 0.007, paired t-test). Pain scores decreased from 3.0 ± 3.3 to 1.1 ± 2.0 (p = 0.0001, paired t-test). Post-treatment T2 signal correlated weakly with performance and pain (Spearman's ρ = -0.37 and 0.16, respectively). MRI is valuable for evaluating patients undergoing electron beam therapy for superficial fibromatoses: higher pretreatment T2 intensity may predict benefit from radiotherapy. T2 hypointensity may be a better marker than size for therapeutic effect.

  9. SU-E-T-778: Use of the 2D MatriXX Detector for Measuring Scanned Ion Beam Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anvar, M Varasteh; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Guarachi, L Fanola; Cirio, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); University of Torino, Turin, TO (Italy); Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Vignati, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); Donetti, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia, PV (Italy); Ciocca, M; Panizza, D [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia, PV (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quality assurance (QA) procedure has to check the most relevant beam parameters to ensure the delivery of the correct dose to patients. Film dosimetry, which is commonly used for scanned ion beam QA, does not provide immediate results. The purpose of this work is to answer whether, for scanned ion beam therapy, film dosimetry can be replaced with the 2D MatriXX detector as a real-time tool. Methods: MatriXX, equipped with 32×32 parallel plate ion-chambers, is a commercial device intended for pre-treatment verification of conventional radiation therapy.The MatriXX, placed at the isocenter, and GAFCHROMIC films, positioned on the MatriXX entrance, were exposed to 131.44 MeV proton and 221.45 MeV/u Carbon-ion beams.The OmniPro-I’mRT software, applied for the data taking of MatriXX, gives the possibility of acquiring consecutive snapshots. Using the NI LabVIEW, the data from snapshots were logged as text files for further analysis. Radiochromic films were scanned with EPSON scanner and analyzed using software programs developed in-house for comparative purposes. Results: The field dose uniformity, flatness, beam position and beam width were investigated. The field flatness for the region covering 6×6 cm{sup 2} square field was found to be better than 2%. The relative standard deviations, expected to be constant over 2×2, 4×4 and 6×6 pixels from MatriXX measurement gives a uniformity of 1.5% in good agreement with the film results.The beam center position is determined with a resolution better than 200 µm for Carbon and less than 100 µm for proton beam.The FWHM determination for a beam wider than 10 mm is satisfactory, whilst for smaller beams the determination is uncertain. Conclusion: Precise beam position and fast 2D dose distribution can be determined in real-time using MatriXX detector. The results show that MatriXX is quick and accurate enough to be used in charged-particle therapy QA.

  10. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, J; Burguete, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated

  11. SU-E-T-163: Thin-Film Organic Photocell (OPV) Properties in MV and KV Beams for Dosimetry Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S K; Hesser, J; Zhang, H; Gowrisanker, S; Yakushevich, S; Shulhevich, Y; Abkai, C; Wack, L; Zygmanski, P

    2012-06-01

    To characterize dosimetric properties of low-cost thin film organic-based photovoltaic (OPV) cells to kV and MV x-ray beams for their usage as large area dosimeter for QA and patient safety monitoring device. A series of thin film OPV cells of various areas and thicknesses were irradiated with MV beams to evaluate the stability and reproducibility of their response, linearity and sensitivity to absorbed dose. The OPV response to x-rays of various linac energies were also characterized. Furthermore the practical (clinical) sensitivity of the cells was determined using IMRT sweeping gap test generated with various gap sizes. To evaluate their potential usage in the development of low cost kV imaging device, the OPV cells were irradiated with kV beam (60-120 kVp) from a fluoroscopy unit. Photocell response to the absorbed dose was characterized as a function of the organic thin film thickness and size, beam energy and exposure for kV beams as well. In addition, photocell response was determined with and without thin plastic scintillator. Response of the OPV cells to the absorbed dose from kV and MV beams are stable and reproducible. The photocell response was linearly proportional to the size and about slightly decreasing with the thickness of the organic thin film, which agrees with the general performance of the photocells in visible light. The photocell response increases as a linear function of absorbed dose and x-ray energy. The sweeping gap tests performed showed that OPV cells have sufficient practical sensitivity to measured MV x-ray delivery with gap size as small as 1 mm. With proper calibration, the OPV cells could be used for online radiation dose measurement for quality assurance and patient safety purposes. Their response to kV beam show promising potential in development of low cost kV radiation detection devices. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. SU-E-T-571: Newly Emerging Integrated Transmission Detector Systems Provide Online Quality Assurance of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D; Chung, E; Hess, C; Stern, R; Benedict, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two newly emerging transmission detectors positioned upstream from the patient have been evaluated for online quality assurance of external beam radiotherapy. The prototype for the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), developed by iRT Systems GmbH (Koblenz, Germany) is a large-area ion chamber mounted on the linac accessory tray to monitor photon fluence, energy, beam shape, and gantry position during treatment. The ion chamber utilizes a thickness gradient which records variable response dependent on beam position. The prototype of Delta4 Discover™, developed by ScandiDos (Uppsala, Sweden) is a linac accessory tray mounted 4040 diode array that measures photon fluence during patient treatment. Both systems are employable for patient specific QA prior to treatment delivery. Methods: Our institution evaluated the reproducibility of measurements using various beam types, including VMAT treatment plans with both the IQM ion chamber and the Delta4 Discover diode array. Additionally, the IQM’s effect on photon fluence, dose response, simulated beam error detection, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer were characterized. The evaluated photon beam errors are based on the annual tolerances specified in AAPM TG-142. Results: Repeated VMAT treatments were measured with 0.16% reproducibility by the IQM and 0.55% reproducibility by the Delta4 Discover. The IQM attenuated 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43±0.02%, 4.60±0.02%, and 4.21±0.03% respectively. Photon beam profiles were affected <1.5% in the non-penumbra regions. The IQM’s ion chamber’s dose response was linear and the thermometer, barometer, and inclinometer agreed with other calibrated devices. The device detected variations in monitor units delivered (1%), field position (3mm), single MLC leaf positions (13mm), and photon energy. Conclusion: We have characterized two new transmissions detector systems designed to provide in-vivo like measurements upstream

  13. SU-E-T-571: Newly Emerging Integrated Transmission Detector Systems Provide Online Quality Assurance of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D; Chung, E; Hess, C; Stern, R; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Two newly emerging transmission detectors positioned upstream from the patient have been evaluated for online quality assurance of external beam radiotherapy. The prototype for the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), developed by iRT Systems GmbH (Koblenz, Germany) is a large-area ion chamber mounted on the linac accessory tray to monitor photon fluence, energy, beam shape, and gantry position during treatment. The ion chamber utilizes a thickness gradient which records variable response dependent on beam position. The prototype of Delta4 Discover™, developed by ScandiDos (Uppsala, Sweden) is a linac accessory tray mounted 4040 diode array that measures photon fluence during patient treatment. Both systems are employable for patient specific QA prior to treatment delivery. Methods: Our institution evaluated the reproducibility of measurements using various beam types, including VMAT treatment plans with both the IQM ion chamber and the Delta4 Discover diode array. Additionally, the IQM’s effect on photon fluence, dose response, simulated beam error detection, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer were characterized. The evaluated photon beam errors are based on the annual tolerances specified in AAPM TG-142. Results: Repeated VMAT treatments were measured with 0.16% reproducibility by the IQM and 0.55% reproducibility by the Delta4 Discover. The IQM attenuated 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43±0.02%, 4.60±0.02%, and 4.21±0.03% respectively. Photon beam profiles were affected <1.5% in the non-penumbra regions. The IQM’s ion chamber’s dose response was linear and the thermometer, barometer, and inclinometer agreed with other calibrated devices. The device detected variations in monitor units delivered (1%), field position (3mm), single MLC leaf positions (13mm), and photon energy. Conclusion: We have characterized two new transmissions detector systems designed to provide in-vivo like measurements upstream

  14. SU-F-T-207: Does the Greater Flexibility of Pencil Beam Scanning Reduce the Need for a Proton Gantry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S; Depauw, N; Flanz, J; Adams, J; Gorissen, BL; Shih, H; Bortfeld, T; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Gantry-less proton treatment facility could lower the capital cost of proton therapy. This study investigates the dosimetric feasibility of using only coplanar pencil beam scanning (PBS) beams for those patients who had beam angles that would not have been deliverable without the gantry. Those coplanar beams are implemented on gantry-less horizontal beam-line with patients in sitting or standing positions. Methods: We have selected ten patients (seven head-and-neck, one thoracic, one abdominal and one pelvic case) with clinically delivered double scattering (DS) or PBS treatment plans with beam angles that were challenging to achieve without a gantry. After removing these beams angles, PBS plans were optimized for gantry-less intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) or single field optimization (SFO) with multi-criteria optimization (MCO). For head-and-neck patients who were treated by DS, we generated PBS plans with non-coplanar beams for comparison. Dose-volume-histograms (DVHs), target homogeneity index (HI), mean dose, D-2 and D-98 were reported. Robustness analysis was performed with ±2.5 mm setup errors and ±3.5% range uncertainties for three head-and-neck patients. Results: PBS-gantry-less plans provided more homogenous target coverage and significant improvements on organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing, compared to passive scattering treatments with a gantry. The PBS gantry-less treatments reduced the HI for target coverage by 1.3% to 47.2%, except for a suprasellar patient and a liver patient. The PBS-gantry-less plans reduced the D-mean of OARs by 3.6% to 67.4%. The PBS-gantry plans had similar target coverage and only marginal improvements on OAR sparing as compared to the PBS-gantry-less plans. These two PBS plans also had similar robustness relative to range uncertainties and setup errors. Conclusion: The gantry-less plans have with less mean dose to OARs and more homogeneous target coverage. Although the PBS-gantry plans have slightly improved

  15. SU-F-T-434: Development of a Fan-Beam Optical Scanner Using CMOS Array for Small Field Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brost, E; Warmington, L; Watanabe, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Senthilkumar, S [Department of Physics, Vel Tech University, Chennai (India); Departamento de Ingeneria Fisica, DCI, Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design and construct a second generation optical computed tomography (OCT) system using a fan-beam with a CMOS array detector for the 3D dosimetry with polymer gel and radiochromic solid dosimeters. The system was specifically designed for the small field dosimetry. Methods: The optical scanner used a fan-beam laser, which was produced from a collimated red laser beam (λ=620 nm) with a 15-degree laser-line generating lens. The fan-beam was sent through an index-matching bath which holds the sample stage and a sample. The emerging laser light was detected with a 2.54 cm-long CMOS array detector (512 elements). The sample stage rotated through the full 360 degree projection angles at 0.9-degree increments. Each projection was normalized to the unirradiated sample at the projection angle to correct for imperfections in the dosimeter. A larger sample could be scanned by using a motorized mirror and linearly translating the CMOS detector. The height of the sample stage was varied for a full 3D scanning. The image acquisition and motor motion was controlled by a computer. The 3D image reconstruction was accomplished by a fan-beam reconstruction algorithm. All the software was developed inhouse with MATLAB. Results: The scanner was used on both PRESAGE and PAGAT gel dosimeters. Irreconcilable refraction errors were seen with PAGAT because the fan beam laser line refracted away from the detector when the field was highly varying in 3D. With PRESAGE, this type of error was not seen. Conclusion: We could acquire tomographic images of dose distributions by the new OCT system with both polymer gel and radiochromic solid dosimeters. Preliminary results showed that the system was more suited for radiochromic solid dosimeters since the radiochromic dosimeters exhibited minimal refraction and scattering errors. We are currently working on improving the image quality by thorough characterization of the OCT system.

  16. SU-F-T-434: Development of a Fan-Beam Optical Scanner Using CMOS Array for Small Field Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brost, E; Warmington, L; Watanabe, Y; Senthilkumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To design and construct a second generation optical computed tomography (OCT) system using a fan-beam with a CMOS array detector for the 3D dosimetry with polymer gel and radiochromic solid dosimeters. The system was specifically designed for the small field dosimetry. Methods: The optical scanner used a fan-beam laser, which was produced from a collimated red laser beam (λ=620 nm) with a 15-degree laser-line generating lens. The fan-beam was sent through an index-matching bath which holds the sample stage and a sample. The emerging laser light was detected with a 2.54 cm-long CMOS array detector (512 elements). The sample stage rotated through the full 360 degree projection angles at 0.9-degree increments. Each projection was normalized to the unirradiated sample at the projection angle to correct for imperfections in the dosimeter. A larger sample could be scanned by using a motorized mirror and linearly translating the CMOS detector. The height of the sample stage was varied for a full 3D scanning. The image acquisition and motor motion was controlled by a computer. The 3D image reconstruction was accomplished by a fan-beam reconstruction algorithm. All the software was developed inhouse with MATLAB. Results: The scanner was used on both PRESAGE and PAGAT gel dosimeters. Irreconcilable refraction errors were seen with PAGAT because the fan beam laser line refracted away from the detector when the field was highly varying in 3D. With PRESAGE, this type of error was not seen. Conclusion: We could acquire tomographic images of dose distributions by the new OCT system with both polymer gel and radiochromic solid dosimeters. Preliminary results showed that the system was more suited for radiochromic solid dosimeters since the radiochromic dosimeters exhibited minimal refraction and scattering errors. We are currently working on improving the image quality by thorough characterization of the OCT system.

  17. SU-F-T-428: An Optimization-Based Commissioning Tool for Finite Size Pencil Beam Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Song, T; Jia, X; Gu, X; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithms are commonly used to pre-calculate the beamlet dose distribution for IMRT treatment planning. FSPB commissioning, which usually requires fine tuning of the FSPB kernel parameters, is crucial to the dose calculation accuracy and hence the plan quality. Yet due to the large number of beamlets, FSPB commissioning could be very tedious. This abstract reports an optimization-based FSPB commissioning tool we have developed in MatLab to facilitate the commissioning. Methods: A FSPB dose kernel generally contains two types of parameters: the profile parameters determining the dose kernel shape, and a 2D scaling factors accounting for the longitudinal and off-axis corrections. The former were fitted using the penumbra of a reference broad beam’s dose profile with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Since the dose distribution of a broad beam is simply a linear superposition of the dose kernel of each beamlet calculated with the fitted profile parameters and scaled using the scaling factors, these factors could be determined by solving an optimization problem which minimizes the discrepancies between the calculated dose of broad beams and the reference dose. Results: We have commissioned a FSPB algorithm for three linac photon beams (6MV, 15MV and 6MVFFF). Dose of four field sizes (6*6cm2, 10*10cm2, 15*15cm2 and 20*20cm2) were calculated and compared with the reference dose exported from Eclipse TPS system. For depth dose curves, the differences are less than 1% of maximum dose after maximum dose depth for most cases. For lateral dose profiles, the differences are less than 2% of central dose at inner-beam regions. The differences of the output factors are within 1% for all the three beams. Conclusion: We have developed an optimization-based commissioning tool for FSPB algorithms to facilitate the commissioning, providing sufficient accuracy of beamlet dose calculation for IMRT optimization.

  18. SU-E-T-435: Flattening Filter Free Beams for Head and Neck IMRT and VMAT Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghahremani, S; Chavez, R; Li, Y; Crownover, R; Baacke, D; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate if there is benefits of using flattening filter free (FFF) versus flattening filter (FF) beams during plan optimization for head and neck targets. Methods: Five head and neck cancer patients previously treated were selected for this study. Each plan was optimized for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using 2 full arcs. Target volumes and the organs at risk (OAR) were outlined by the same physician. The prescription doses for each patient and the dose limits for each OAR were specified by the physician. For each patient four plans were created by varying the photon beam energy (6MV vs 10MV) and the use of FF or FFF. For each patient the prescription dose and OAR dose limits remained unchanged. Furthermore, the number of optimization iterations remained the same for each plan without user interference. The plans were compared using dose volume histograms, conformity and homogeneity indices. Results: Our results showed that the plans optimized with FF beams produced more homogeneous dose distributions in the PTV than the ones with FFF beams (0.92 vs. 0.86 and 0.92 vs.85 for 6MVFF, 6MVFFF, 10MVFF and 10MVFFF respectively). The conformity was better for FFF beams than for FF beams (1.26 vs. 1.20 and 1.27 vs. 1.21 for 6MVFF, 6MVFFF, 10MVFF and 10MVFFF respectively). The overall minimum, maximum and means doses were reduced for the FFF plans by approximately 4% to 6%. All FFF plans allowed more sparing of organs at risk by 7% to 9% on average. Only one 10MVFFF plan had a 1% higher dose than the respective 10MVFF for the spinal cord. Conclusion: The 6MVFFF and 10MVFFF beams illustrated the improvement of normal tissue sparing while achieving similar target dose distribution compared to 6MVFF and 10MVFF beams. Further investigation is required to determine the magnitude of improvement. case specific, fluence-based optimization improved both PTV and OAR dosimetry in 80% of cases.

  19. SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granville, DA [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Flint, DB; Sawakuchi, GO [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) exposed to therapeutic proton beams of differing beam quality. Methods: We prepared Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs from the same material as commercially available nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc). We irradiated the OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying quality, as defined by the residual range. An absorbed dose to water of 0.2 Gy was delivered to all OSLDs with the residual range values varying from 0.5 to 23.5 cm (average LET in water from ∼0.5 to 2.5 keV/µm). To investigate the beam quality dependence of different emission bands within the OSL spectrum, we performed OSLD readouts using both continuous-wave stimulation (CW-OSL) and pulsed stimulation (P-OSL) with two sets of optical filters (Hoya U-340 and Kopp 5113). For all readout modes, the relative absorbed dose sensitivity (S{sub rel}) for each beam quality was calculated using OSLDs irradiated in a 6 MV photon beam as a reference. Results: We found that the relative absorbed dose sensitivity was highly dependent on both readout mode and integration time of the OSL signal. For CW-OSL signals containing only the blue emission band, S{sub rel} was between 0.85 and 0.94 for 1 s readouts and between 0.82 and 0.93 for 10 s readouts. Similarly, for P-OSL readouts containing only the blue emission band S{sub rel} ranged from 0.86 to 0.91, and 0.82 to 0.93 for 1 s and 10 s readouts, respectively. For OSLD signals containing only the UV emission band, S{sub rel} ranged from 1.00 to 1.46, and 0.97 to 1.30 for P-OSL readouts of 1 s and 10 s, respectively. Conclusion: For measurements of absorbed dose using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs in therapeutic proton beams, dependence on beam quality was smallest for readout protocols that selected the blue emission band with small integration times. DA Granville received financial support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  20. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Simone, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD (United States); Thomas, A [ATC healthcare, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  1. Determination of the D/T fuel mixture using two-photon laser induced fluorescence in combination with neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.; Mandl, W.

    1997-08-01

    Doppler-free two-photon induced fluorescence in the Lyman-α lines of H, D and T has been suggested previously as a local and isotope-selective diagnostic of the intrinsic neutral hydrogen densities in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. In the present paper it is shown that the diagnostic potential of this method is significantly increased if it is combined with neutral atom beams whose characteristics are such that efficient production of thermal ground state atoms via charge exchange reactions is achieved. Considerably deeper plasma regions than just the plasma edge can thus be probed and local, isotope-selective information is obtained on the more relevant ions rather than on the neutrals. Additional diagnostic possibilities, e.g. those arising from the spectroscopic investigation of the beam particles themselves, are also discussed. (author)

  2. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  3. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  4. SU-E-T-354: Efficient and Enhanced QA Testing of Linear Accelerators Using a Real-Time Beam Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J; Farrokhkish, M; Norrlinger, B; Wang, Y [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heaton, R; Jaffray, D; Islam, M [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of performing routine QA tests of linear accelerators (Linac) using the Integral Quality Monitoring (IQM) system. The system, consisting of a 1-D sensitivity gradient large area ion-chamber mounted at the collimator, allows automatic collection and analysis of beam data. Methods: The IQM was investigated to perform several QA constancy tests, similar to those recommended by AAPM TG142, of a Linac including: beam output, MLC calibration, beam symmetry, relative dose factor (RDF), dose linearity, output as a function of gantry angle and dose rate. All measurements by the IQM system accompanied a reference measurement using a conventional dosimetry system and were performed on an Elekta Infinity Linac with Agility MLC. The MLC calibration check is done using a Picket-Fence type 2×10cm{sup 2} field positioned at different off-axis locations along the chamber gradient. Beam symmetry constancy values are established by signals from an 4×4cm{sup 2} aperture located at various off-axis positions; the sensitivity of the test was determined by the changes in the signals in response to a tilt in the beam. The data for various square field sizes were used to develop a functional relationship with RDF. Results: The IQM tracked the beam output well within 1% of the reference ion-chamber readings. The Picket-Fence type field test detected a 1mm shift error of one MLC bank. The system was able to detect 2.5% or greater beam asymmetry. The IQM results for all other QA tests were found to agree with the reference values to within 0.5%. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the IQM system can effectively monitor the Linac performance parameters for the purpose of routine QA constancy tests. With minimum user interactions a comprehensive set of tests can be performed efficiently, allowing frequent monitoring of the Linac. The presenting author’s salary is funded by the manufacturer of the QA device. All the other authors have financial

  5. SU-E-T-354: Efficient and Enhanced QA Testing of Linear Accelerators Using a Real-Time Beam Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Farrokhkish, M; Norrlinger, B; Wang, Y; Heaton, R; Jaffray, D; Islam, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of performing routine QA tests of linear accelerators (Linac) using the Integral Quality Monitoring (IQM) system. The system, consisting of a 1-D sensitivity gradient large area ion-chamber mounted at the collimator, allows automatic collection and analysis of beam data. Methods: The IQM was investigated to perform several QA constancy tests, similar to those recommended by AAPM TG142, of a Linac including: beam output, MLC calibration, beam symmetry, relative dose factor (RDF), dose linearity, output as a function of gantry angle and dose rate. All measurements by the IQM system accompanied a reference measurement using a conventional dosimetry system and were performed on an Elekta Infinity Linac with Agility MLC. The MLC calibration check is done using a Picket-Fence type 2×10cm 2 field positioned at different off-axis locations along the chamber gradient. Beam symmetry constancy values are established by signals from an 4×4cm 2 aperture located at various off-axis positions; the sensitivity of the test was determined by the changes in the signals in response to a tilt in the beam. The data for various square field sizes were used to develop a functional relationship with RDF. Results: The IQM tracked the beam output well within 1% of the reference ion-chamber readings. The Picket-Fence type field test detected a 1mm shift error of one MLC bank. The system was able to detect 2.5% or greater beam asymmetry. The IQM results for all other QA tests were found to agree with the reference values to within 0.5%. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the IQM system can effectively monitor the Linac performance parameters for the purpose of routine QA constancy tests. With minimum user interactions a comprehensive set of tests can be performed efficiently, allowing frequent monitoring of the Linac. The presenting author’s salary is funded by the manufacturer of the QA device. All the other authors have financial interests with

  6. SU-F-T-283: A Novel Device to Enable Portal Dosimetry for Flattening Filter Free Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faught, A; Wu, Q; Adamson, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Varian’s electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based portal dosimetry tool is a popular and effective means of performing IMRT QA. EPIDs for older models of the TrueBeam accelerator utilize a 40cmx30cm Image Detection Unit (IDU) that saturates at the center for standard source to imager distances with high dose rate flattening filter free (FFF) beams. This makes portal dosimetry not possible and an alternative means of IMRT QA necessary. We developed a filter that would attenuate the beam to a dose rate measureable by the IDU for portal dosimetry IMRT QA. Methods: Multipurpose 304 stainless steel plates were placed on an accessory tray to attenuate the beam. Profiles of an open field measured on the IDU were acquired with varying number of plates to assess the thickness needed to reduce the maximum dose rates of 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams to measurable levels. A new portal dose image prediction (PDIP) model was commissioned based on open field measurements with plates in position, and a modified beam profile was input to portal dosimetry calibration at the console to empirically correct for attenuation and scatter. The portal dosimetry tool was used to assess agreement between predicted and measured doses for open 25×25cm{sup 2} fields and intensity modulated fields using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams. Results: Thicknesses of 2.5cm and 3.8cm of steel were required to reduce the highest dose rates to a measureable level for 6XFFF and 10XFFF, respectively. Gamma analysis using a 3%/3mm relative criterion with the filter in place and using the new PDIP model resulted in 98.2% and 93.6% of pixels passing while intensity modulated fields showed passing rates of 98.2% and 99.0%. Conclusion: Use of the filter allows for portal dosimetry to be used for IMRT QA of FFF plans in place of purchasing a second option for IMRT QA.

  7. SU-E-T-554: Comparison of Electron Disequilibrium Factor in External Photon Beams for Different Models of Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIU, B; Zhu, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dose in the buildup region of a photon beam is usually determined by the transport of the primary secondary electrons and the contaminating electrons from accelerator head. This can be quantified by the electron disequilibrium factor, E, defined as the ratio between total dose and equilibrium dose (proportional to total kerma), E = 1 in regions beyond buildup region. Ecan be different among accelerators of different models and/or manufactures of the same machine. This study compares E in photon beams from different machine models/ Methods: Photon beam data such as fractional depth dose curve (FDD) and phantom scatter factors as a function of field size and phantom depth were measured for different Linac machines. E was extrapolated from these fractional depth dose data while taking into account inverse-square law. The ranges of secondary electron were chosen as 3 and 6 cm for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. The field sizes range from 2x2 to 40x40 cm 2 . Results: The comparison indicates the standard deviations of electron contamination among different machines are about 2.4 - 3.3% at 5 mm depth for 6 MV and 1.2 - 3.9% at 1 cm depth for 15 MV for the same field size. The corresponding maximum deviations are 3.0 - 4.6% and 2 - 4% for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. Both standard and maximum deviations are independent of field sizes in the buildup region for 6 MV photons, and slightly decreasing with increasing field size at depths up to 1 cm for 15 MV photons. Conclusion: The deviations of electron disequilibrium factor for all studied Linacs are less than 3% beyond the depth of 0.5 cm for the photon beams for the full range of field sizes (2-40 cm) so long as they are from the same manufacturer

  8. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans

  9. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A [University of Pennsylvenia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans.

  10. Beam shaping assembly of a D–T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-01-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D–T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D–T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor. - Highlights: ► An assembly for the D–T neutron source including many regions is given herein. ► Dosimetry simulations in the Snyder head phantom for a deeply-seated tumor are carried out. ► Brief literatures conclusions on the recent BNCT studies are presented herein

  11. Experimental investigation and finite element simulation of laser beam welding induced residual stresses and distortions in thin sheets of AA 6056-T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain-ul-abdein, Muhammad; Nelias, Daniel; Jullien, Jean-Francois; Deloison, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Laser beam welding has recently found its application in the fabrication of aircraft structures where fuselage panels, made of thin sheets of AA 6056-T4 (an aluminium alloy), are welded with stiffeners of the same material in a T-joint configuration. The present work simulates laser beam welding induced residual stresses and distortions using industrially employed thermal and mechanical boundary conditions. Various measurements performed on small-scale welded test specimens provide a database of experimental results that serves as a benchmark for qualification of the simulation results. The welding simulation is performed with the commercial finite element software Abaqus and a Fortran programme encoding a conical heat source with Gaussian volumetric distribution of flux. A sequentially coupled temperature-displacement analysis is undertaken to simulate the weld pool geometry, transient temperature and displacement fields. The material is assumed to follow an elasto-plastic law with isotropic hardening behaviour (von Mises plasticity model). A comparison between the experimental and simulation results shows a good agreement. Finally, the residual stress and strain states in a T-joint are predicted.

  12. SU-F-T-648: Sharpening Dose Fall-Off Via Beam Number Enhancements For Stereotactic Brain Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J; Braunstein, S; McDermott, M; Sneed, P; Ma, L [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Pierce, M [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Sharp dose fall-off is the hallmark of brain radiosurgery to deliver a high dose of radiation to the target while minimizing dose to normal brain tissue. In this study, we developed a technique for the purpose of enhancing the peripheral dose gradient by magnifying the total number of beams focused toward each isocenter via patient head tilt and simultaneous beam intensity modulations. Methods: Computer scripting for the proposed beam number enhancement (BNE) technique was developed. The technique was tested and then implemented on a clinical treatment planning system for a dedicated brain radiosurgical system (GK Perfexion, Elekta Oncology). To study technical feasibility and dosimetric advantages of the technique, we compared treatment planning quality and delivery efficiency for 20 radiosurgical cases previously treated at our institution. These cases included relatively complex treatments such as acoustic schwannoma, meningioma, brain metastasis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results: The BNE treatment plans were found to produce nearly identical target volume coverage (absolute value < 0.5%, P > 0.2) and dose conformity (BNE CI= 1.41±0.15 versus 1.41±0.20, P>0.9) as the original treatment plans. The total beam-on time for theBNE treatment plans were comparable (within 1.0 min or 1.8%) with those of the original treatment plans for all the cases. However, BNE treatment plans significantly improved the mean gradient index (BNE GI = 2.9±0.3 versus original GI =3.0±0.3 p<0.0001) and low-level isodose volumes, e.g. 20-50% prescribed isodose volumes, by 2.0% to 5.0% (p<0.02). Furthermore, with 4 to 5-fold increase in the total number of beams, the GI decreased by as much as 20% or 0.5 in absolute values. Conclusion: BNE via head tilt and simultaneous beam intensity modulation is an effective and efficient technique that physically sharpens the peripheral dose gradient for brain radiosurgery.

  13. SU-E-T-146: Reference Dosimetry for Protons and Light-Ion Beams Based on Graphite Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomme, S; Palmans, H; Thomas, R; Lee, N; Bailey, M; Shipley, D; Al-Sulaiti, L; Cirrone, P; Romano, F; Kacperek, A; Bertrand, D; Vynckier, S

    2012-06-01

    The IAEA TRS-398 code of practice can be applied for the measurement of absorbed dose to water under reference conditions with an ionization chamber. For protons, the combined relative standard uncertainty on those measurements is less than 2% while for light-ion beams, it is considerably larger, i.e. 3.2%, mainly due to the higher uncertainty contributions for the water to air stopping power ration and the W air-value on the beam quality correction factors kQ,Q 0 . To decrease this uncertainty, a quantification of kQ,Q 0 is proposed using a primary standard level graphite calorimeter. This work includes numerical and experimental determinations of dose conversion factors to derive dose to water from graphite calorimetry. It also reports on the first experimental data obtained with the graphite calorimeter in proton, alpha and carbon ion beams. Firstly, the dose conversion has been calculated with by Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulations through the determination of the water to graphite stopping power ratio and the fluence correction factor. The latter factor was also derived by comparison of measured ionization curves in graphite and water. Secondly, kQ,Q 0 was obtained by comparison of the dose response of ionization chambers with that of the calorimeter. Stopping power ratios are found to vary by no more than 0.35% up to the Bragg peak, while fluence correction factors are shown to increase slightly above unity close to the Bragg peak. The comparison of the calorimeter with ionization chambers is currently under analysis. For the modulated proton beam, preliminary results on W air confirm the value recommended in TRS-398. Data in both the non-modulated proton and light-ion beams indicate higher values but further investigation of heat loss corrections is needed. The application of graphite calorimetry to proton, alpha and carbon ion beams has been demonstrated successfully. Other experimental campaigns will be held in 2012. This work is supported by the BioWin program

  14. The T10 beam produces a few hits per event. In ALICE the SSD will have to cope with many hits per strip. In the three centimeters of aluminium the beam will produce many secondary particles. This increases the chance of multiple hits per strip, although not to the level in ALICE.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G.

    2004-01-01

    The T10 beam produces a few hits per event. In ALICE the SSD will have to cope with many hits per strip. In the three centimeters of aluminium the beam will produce many secondary particles. This increases the chance of multiple hits per strip, although not to the level in ALICE.

  15. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L [Stanford UniversitySchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Ye, Y [Stanford Univ, Management Science and Engineering, Stanford, Ca (United States); Boyd, S [Stanford University, Electrical Engineering, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  16. SU-E-T-149: Electron Beam Profile Differences Between Elekta MLCi2 and Elekta Agility Treatment Heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C [Sutter Medical Foundation, Roseville, CA 95661 (United States); Hatcher, C [Sutter Shared Services S3, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report and investigate observed differences in electron beam profiles at various energies/applicators between Elekta MLCi2 and Agility treatment head on Elekta Infinity LINAC Methods: When we upgraded from MLCi2 to Agility on one of our Elekta Infinity LINAC's, electron beam PDDs and profiles were acquired for comparison purpose. All clinical electron energies (6/9/12/15/12/18 MeV) and electron applicators (6/10/14/20/25 square) were included in measurement. PDDs were acquired at 100 SSD in water (PTW MP3 water tank) with a plane-parallel ion chamber (PTW Roos). X and Y Profiles were acquired using IC Profiler (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at 1cm and maximum PDD depths (water equivalent). Results: All PDD curves match very well between MLCi2 and Agility treatment head. However, some significant differences on electron profiles were found. On Agility, even after increasing the default auto-tracking offset values for backup diaphragms in Y and MLC in X by 2.8 cm (the maximum allowed change is 3.0 cm), electron profiles still have rounder shoulders comparing to corresponding MLCi2 profiles. This difference is significantly more pronounced at larger applicators (20 and 25 square), for all electron energies. Conclusion: The significant design change between MLCi2 and Agility beam limiting device seems to affect exit electron beam profiles. In IEC1217 X direction, the main change on Agility is the removal of the original MLCi2 X backup diaphragms and replacing it with MLC leaves; In Y direction, the main change is the radius and materials on Y backup diaphragms.

  17. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  18. Double-sided laser beam welded T-joints for aluminum-lithium alloy aircraft fuselage panels: Effects of filler elements on microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In the current work, T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys for aircraft fuselage panels have been fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with different filler wires. A new type wire CW3 (Al-6.2Cu-5.4Si) was studied and compared with conventional wire AA4047 (Al-12Si) mainly on microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that the main combined function of Al-6.2%Cu-5.4%Si in CW3 resulted in considerable improvements especially on intergranular strength, hot cracking susceptibility and hoop tensile properties. Typical non-dendritic equiaxed zone (EQZ) was observed along welds' fusion boundary. Hot cracks and fractures during the load were always located within the EQZ, however, this typical zone could be restrained by CW3, effectively. Furthermore, changing of the main intergranular precipitated phase within the EQZ from T phase by AA4047 to T2 phase by CW3 also resulted in developments on microscopic intergranular reinforcement and macroscopic hoop tensile properties. In addition, bridging caused by richer substructure dendrites within CW3 weld's columnar zone resulted in much lower hot cracking susceptibility of the whole weld than AA4047.

  19. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim-Reinders, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Physics (Canada); Keller, B; McCann, C; Sahgal, A; Lee, J; Kim, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.

  20. SU-E-T-400: Evaluation of Shielding and Activation at Two Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remmes, N; Mundy, D; Classic, K; Beltran, C; Kruse, J; Herman, M; Stoker, J; Nelson, K; Bues, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify acceptably low dose levels around two newly constructed identical pencil beam scanning proton therapy facilities and to evaluate accuracy of pre-construction shielding calculations. Methods: Dose measurements were taken at select points of interest using a WENDI-2 style wide-energy neutron detector. Measurements were compared to pre-construction shielding calculations. Radiation badges with neutron dose measurement capabilities were worn by personnel and also placed at points throughout the facilities. Seven neutron and gamma detectors were permanently installed throughout the facility, continuously logging data. Potential activation hazards have also been investigated. Dose rates near water tanks immediately after prolonged irradiation have been measured. Equipment inside the treatment room and accelerator vault has been surveyed and/or wipe tested. Air filters from air handling units, sticky mats placed outside of the accelerator vault, and water samples from the magnet cooling water loops have also been tested. Results: All radiation badges have been returned with readings below the reporting minimum. Measurements of mats, air filters, cooling water, wipe tests and surveys of equipment that has not been placed in the beam have all come back at background levels. All survey measurements show the analytical shielding calculations to be conservative by at least a factor of 2. No anomalous events have been identified by the building radiation monitoring system. Measurements of dose rates close to scanning water tanks have shown dose rates of approximately 10 mrem/hr with a half-life less than 5 minutes. Measurements around the accelerator show some areas with dose rates slightly higher than 10 mrem/hr. Conclusion: The shielding design is shown to be adequate. Measured dose rates are below those predicted by shielding calculations. Activation hazards are minimal except in certain very well defined areas within the accelerator vault and for objects

  1. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N [OH State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs.

  2. SU-F-T-182: A Stochastic Approach to Daily QA Tolerances On Spot Properties for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St James, S; Bloch, C; Saini, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton pencil beam scanning is used clinically across the United States. There are no current guidelines on tolerances for daily QA specific to pencil beam scanning, specifically related to the individual spot properties (spot width). Using a stochastic method to determine tolerances has the potential to optimize tolerances on individual spots and decrease the number of false positive failures in daily QA. Individual and global spot tolerances were evaluated. Methods: As part of daily QA for proton pencil beam scanning, a field of 16 spots (corresponding to 8 energies) is measured using an array of ion chambers (Matrixx, IBA). Each individual spot is fit to two Gaussian functions (x,y). The spot width (σ) in × and y are recorded (32 parameters). Results from the daily QA were retrospectively analyzed for 100 days of data. The deviations of the spot widths were histogrammed and fit to a Gaussian function. The stochastic spot tolerance was taken to be the mean ± 3σ. Using these results, tolerances were developed and tested against known deviations in spot width. Results: The individual spot tolerances derived with the stochastic method decreased in 30/32 instances. Using the previous tolerances (± 20% width), the daily QA would have detected 0/20 days of the deviation. Using a tolerance of any 6 spots failing the stochastic tolerance, 18/20 days of the deviation would have been detected. Conclusion: Using a stochastic method we have been able to decrease daily tolerances on the spot widths for 30/32 spot widths measured. The stochastic tolerances can lead to detection of deviations that previously would have been picked up on monthly QA and missed by daily QA. This method could be easily extended for evaluation of other QA parameters in proton spot scanning.

  3. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs

  4. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Ebstein, S [Lexitek, Inc, Wellesley, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  5. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B; Ebstein, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  6. SU-E-T-666: Radionuclides and Activity of the Patient Apertures Used in a Proton Beam of Wobbling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.Y.; Chen, H.H.; Tsai, H.Y.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity of the patient apertures used in a 190-MeV proton beam of wobbling system. Methods: A proton beam of wobbling system in the first proton center in Taiwan, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, was used to bombard the patient apertures. The patient aperture was composed of 60.5 % copper, 39.4 % Zinc, 0.05 % iron, 0.05 % lead. A protable high-purity germanium (HPGe) coaxial detector was used to measure the spectra of the induced nuclides of patient apertures. The analysis of the spectra and the identification of the radionuclides were preliminarily operated by the Nuclide Navigator III Master Library. On the basis of the results by Nuclide Navigator III Master Library, we manually selected the reliable nuclides by the gamma-ray energies, branching ratio, and half life. In the spectra, we can quantify the activity of radionuclides by the Monte Carlo efficiency transfer method. Results: In this study, the radioisotopes activated in patient apertures by the 190-MeV proton beam were divided into two categories. The first category is long half-life radionuclides, such as Co-56 (half life, 77.3 days). Other radionuclides of Cu-60, Cu-61, Cu-62, Cu-66, and Zn-62 have shorter half life. The radionuclide of Cu-60 had the highest activity. From calculation with the efficiency transfer method, the deviations between the computed results and the measured efficiencies were mostly within 10%. Conclusion: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity helps us to estimate proper time intervals for cooling the patient apertures. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  7. SU-F-T-601: Equivalence of CyberKnife and TrueBeam STx for Spine Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, J [University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Price, M; Brindle, J [University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Alpert Medical School of Brown University (United States); Schmidt, M; Knutson, N [University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the equivalence of spine SBRT treatment plans created in Eclipse for the TrueBeam STx (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) compared to plans using CyberKnife and MultiPlan (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Methods: CT data and contours for 23 spine SBRT patients previously treated using CyberKnife (CK) were exported from MultiPlan treatment planning system into Eclipse where they were planned using static IMRT 6MV coplanar beams. Plans were created according to the original prescription dose and fractionation schedule while limiting spinal dose according to the RTOG 0631 protocol and maintaining target coverage comparable to the original CK plans. Plans were evaluated using new conformity index (nCI), homogeneity index (HI), dose-volume histogram data, number of MU, and estimated treatment time. To ensure all Eclipse plans were deliverable, standard clinical IMRT QA was performed. The plan results were matched with their complimentary CK plans for paired statistical analysis. Results: Plans generated in Eclipse demonstrated statistically significant (p<0.01) improvements compared to complimentary CK plans in median values of maximum spinal cord dose (17.39 vs. 18.12 Gy), RTOG spinal cord constraint dose (14.50 vs. 16.93 Gy), nCI (1.28 vs. 1.54), HI (1.13 vs. 1.27), MU (3918 vs. 36416), and estimated treatment time (8 vs. 48 min). All Eclipse generated plans passed our clinically used protocols for IMRT QA. Conclusion: CK spine SBRT replanned utilizing Eclipse for LINAC delivery demonstrated dosimetric advantages. We propose improvements in plan quality metrics reviewed in this study may be attributed to dynamic MLCs that facilitate treatment of complicated geometries as well as posterior beams ideal for centrally located and/or posterior targets afforded by gantry-based RT delivery.

  8. SU-E-T-666: Radionuclides and Activity of the Patient Apertures Used in a Proton Beam of Wobbling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.Y.; Chen, H.H.; Tsai, H.Y.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity of the patient apertures used in a 190-MeV proton beam of wobbling system. Methods: A proton beam of wobbling system in the first proton center in Taiwan, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, was used to bombard the patient apertures. The patient aperture was composed of 60.5 % copper, 39.4 % Zinc, 0.05 % iron, 0.05 % lead. A protable high-purity germanium (HPGe) coaxial detector was used to measure the spectra of the induced nuclides of patient apertures. The analysis of the spectra and the identification of the radionuclides were preliminarily operated by the Nuclide Navigator III Master Library. On the basis of the results by Nuclide Navigator III Master Library, we manually selected the reliable nuclides by the gamma-ray energies, branching ratio, and half life. In the spectra, we can quantify the activity of radionuclides by the Monte Carlo efficiency transfer method. Results: In this study, the radioisotopes activated in patient apertures by the 190-MeV proton beam were divided into two categories. The first category is long half-life radionuclides, such as Co-56 (half life, 77.3 days). Other radionuclides of Cu-60, Cu-61, Cu-62, Cu-66, and Zn-62 have shorter half life. The radionuclide of Cu-60 had the highest activity. From calculation with the efficiency transfer method, the deviations between the computed results and the measured efficiencies were mostly within 10%. Conclusion: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity helps us to estimate proper time intervals for cooling the patient apertures. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  9. SU-E-T-262: Planning for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS): Applications of Gradient Optimization for Field Matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; Deville, C; Vapiwala, N; McDonough, J; Both, S [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To propose the gradient optimization(GO) approach in planning for matching proton PBS fields and present two commonly used applications in our institution. Methods: GO is employed for PBS field matching in the scenarios that when the size of the target is beyond the field size limit of the beam delivery system or matching is required for beams from different angles to either improve the sparing of important organs or to pass through a short and simple beam path. Overlap is designed between adjacent fields and in the overlapped junction, the dose was optimized such that it gradually decreases in one field and the decrease is compensated by increase from another field. Clinical applications of this approach on craniospinal irradiation(CSI) and whole pelvis treatment were presented. Mathematical model was developed to study the relationships between dose errors, setup errors and junction lengths. Results: Uniform and conformal dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved for both applications using GO approach. For CSI, the gradient matching (6.7cm junction) between fields overcame the complexity of planning associated with feathering match lines. A slow dose gradient in the junction area significantly reduced the sensitivity of the treatment to setup errors. For whole pelvis, gradient matching (4cm junction) between posterior fields for superior target and bilateral fields for inferior target provided dose sparing to organs such as bowel, bladder and rectum. For a setup error of 3 mm in longitudinal direction from one field, mathematical model predicted dose errors of 10%, 6% and 4.3% for junction length of 3, 5 and 7cm. Conclusion: This GO approach improves the quality of the PBS treatment plan with matching fields while maintaining the safety of treatment delivery relative to potential misalignments.

  10. SU-E-T-262: Planning for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS): Applications of Gradient Optimization for Field Matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; Deville, C; Vapiwala, N; McDonough, J; Both, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose the gradient optimization(GO) approach in planning for matching proton PBS fields and present two commonly used applications in our institution. Methods: GO is employed for PBS field matching in the scenarios that when the size of the target is beyond the field size limit of the beam delivery system or matching is required for beams from different angles to either improve the sparing of important organs or to pass through a short and simple beam path. Overlap is designed between adjacent fields and in the overlapped junction, the dose was optimized such that it gradually decreases in one field and the decrease is compensated by increase from another field. Clinical applications of this approach on craniospinal irradiation(CSI) and whole pelvis treatment were presented. Mathematical model was developed to study the relationships between dose errors, setup errors and junction lengths. Results: Uniform and conformal dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved for both applications using GO approach. For CSI, the gradient matching (6.7cm junction) between fields overcame the complexity of planning associated with feathering match lines. A slow dose gradient in the junction area significantly reduced the sensitivity of the treatment to setup errors. For whole pelvis, gradient matching (4cm junction) between posterior fields for superior target and bilateral fields for inferior target provided dose sparing to organs such as bowel, bladder and rectum. For a setup error of 3 mm in longitudinal direction from one field, mathematical model predicted dose errors of 10%, 6% and 4.3% for junction length of 3, 5 and 7cm. Conclusion: This GO approach improves the quality of the PBS treatment plan with matching fields while maintaining the safety of treatment delivery relative to potential misalignments

  11. SU-E-T-319: Dosimetric Evaluation of IMRT with Mix-Energy Beam for Deep Seated Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Gandhi, A; Sharma, D; Subramani, V; Chander, S; Julkha, P [Fortis Hospital, Mohali, Punjab (India); Rath, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IMRT is preferred in the range of 6–10MV X-rays. Partially adding high energy (>10MV) treatment fields, may provide advantage of both higher and lower energies. To study IMRT dose distribution obtained from treatment plans with single (6MV) and mixed-energy (6MV and 15MV) for deep seated targets (separation more than 30cm). Methods: Five patients of carcinoma of cervix were studied using eclipse planning system. Two different dynamic IMRT plans were generated for Varian CL2300C/D linear accelerator; one is by using 6MV X-ray with seven equally spaced coplanar beams. In second plan, 2 lateral oblique fields (gantry angle 102°, 255°) beam energy was modified to 15MV by keeping all other parameters and dose volume constraints constant. Dose prescription for the planning target volume (PTV) was (5040cGy/28f). For plan comparison, dose volume histogram (DVH) was used and PTV coverage index (CI=Target volume covered by prescription dose/Target volume), heterogeneity index (D5/D95), mean dose to organ at risk (OAR) and normal tissue integral dose (NTID, liter-Gray) was also noted. Total monitor unit (MU) required to deliver a plan was also noted. Results: Mixed-energy plan showed a better conformity and CI values were 0.942±0.032 and 0.960±0.040 for single-energy and mixed-energy plan, respectively. In addition, HI value of mixed energy beam is comparable to that of single energy and the values were within 1.084±0.034 and 1.082±0.032 for single energy and mixed-energy plan, respectively. Variation in mean dose to bladder, rectum and bowel were within 1.05%, 0.87% and 0.90%. NTID was lesser for mixed-energy beam due to use of two high-energy fields. NTID were 1573.40±214.60 and 1510.20±249.80 litre-Gray for single energy and mixed-energy plan. MU needed to deliver a plan was similar in both plans and MUs were 238±45 and 237±47. Conclusion: Partial use of 15MV treatment fields in IMRT plan for deep seated targets showed dosimetric advantage over 6MV

  12. Digital test objects (D.T.O.) for treatment planning systems quality control in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, E.

    2008-04-01

    This work presents the conception and implementation of new automatic and quantitative quality assessment methods for geometric treatment planning in external radiotherapy. Treatment planning Systems (T.P.S.) quality control is mandatory in France and in the world because of encountered risks but the physical tools recommended to lead this quality control are not adapted to the situation. We present a new methodology for control quality based on the definition of Digital Test Objects (D.T.O.) that are directly introduced in the T.P.S. without acquisition device. These D.T.O. are consistently defined in a continuous and discrete modes. The T.P.S. responses to input D.T.O. are compared to theoretical results thanks to figures of merit specifically designed for each elementary control. The tests we carried out during this study allow to validate our solutions for the quality assessment of the auto-contouring, auto-margining, isocenter computation, collimator conformation and digitally reconstructed radiograph generation tools, as well as our solutions for marker positioning, collimator and displayed bean rotation, incidence, divergence and dimensions. Quality assessment solutions we propose are then fast and effective (no acquisition by the device, reduced manipulations), and more precise thanks to the continuous-discrete equivalence realized at the beginning of the modelling

  13. Vortices in Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available , t0)} = P(du, dv) {FR{g(u, v, t0)}} Replacement: u→ du = t− t0 i2 ∂ ∂u′ v → dv = t− t0 i2 ∂ ∂v′ CSIR National Laser Centre – p.13/30 Differentiation i.s.o integration Evaluate the integral over the Gaussian beam (once and for all). Then, instead... . Gaussian beams with vortex dipoles CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/30 Gaussian beam notation Gaussian beam in normalised coordinates: g(u, v, t) = exp ( −u 2 + v2 1− it ) u = xω0 v = yω0 t = zρ ρ = piω20 λ ω0 — 1/e2 beam waist radius; ρ— Rayleigh range ω ω...

  14. SU-E-T-515: Investigating the Linear Energy Transfer Dependency of Different PRESAGE Formulations in a Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Alqathami, M; Blencowe, A [The University of South Australia, South Australia, SA (Australia); Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Previous studies have reported an under-response of PRESAGE in a proton beam as a Result of the extremely high LET in the distal end of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). This work is a preliminary investigation to quantify the effect of the formulation, specifically the concentration of halocarbon radical initiator relative to leuco dye, on radical recombination resulting in LET dependence. Methods The traditional PRESAGE formulation developed by Heuris Pharma was altered to constitute radical initiator concentrations of 5, 15, and 30% (low, medium, and high) by weight with all other components balanced to maintain proportionality. Chloroform was specifically examined in this study and all dosimeters were made in-house. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters (3.5cm diameter and 6cm length) were made for each formulation and irradiated by a 200-MeV proton beam to 500 cGy across a 2cm SOBP. Dosimeters were read out using the DMOS optical-CT scanner. The dose distributions were analyzed and dose profiles were used to compare the relative dose response to find the stability across the high-LET region of the SOBP. LET dependence was measured by the variation to ion chamber measurements for the final 25% of the SOBP (∼0.5cm) prior to the distal-90 of each profile. Results Relative to ion chamber data, all PRESAGE dosimeters showed an under-response at the distal end of the SOBP. The medium concentration formulation matched most closely with an average 8.3% under-response closely followed by the low concentration at 12.2% and then the high concentration at 22.8%. In all three cases, the highest points of discrepancy were in the distal most regions. Conclusion The radical initiator concentration in PRESAGE can be tailored to reduce the LET dependence in a proton beam. This warrants further study to quantify comprehensively the effect of concentration of different halocarbon radical initiators on LET dependency. Grant number 5RO1CA100835.

  15. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic Scintillation and Other Stereotactic Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, R [Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Therriault-Proulx, F; Wang, X; Yang, J; Beddar, S [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor (OF) measurements with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for small fields made by the high-definition multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the TrueBeam STx system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new small volume near-water equivalent and energy independent PSD manufactured by Standard Imaging, Inc. All measurements were performed in an IBA Blue Phantom water tank. Square MLC-shaped fields with sides ranging from 0.5 cm to 2 cm and jawshaped fields with sides ranging from 1 cm to 40 cm were measured using an SAD setup at 10 cm depth. Dose profile and percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were also taken under the same conditions for MLC fields 0.5×0.5 and 1×1 cm2 in size with jaws at 2×2cm2. The CC01 and W1 were vertically mounted. Results: OFs measured with the W1 for jaw only square fields were consistent with the ones measured with a Farmers PTW TN33013 ion chamber (1.8% maximum deviation). OF and penumbra measurement results are presented below. PDDs measured for all detectors are within 1.5% for the 0.5×0.5 cm2 and within 1% for the 1×1 cm2 MLC fields.Output factors:MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 0.555 0.541 0.5851.0cm 0.716 0.702 0.7331.5cm 0.779 0.761 0.7772.0cm 0.804 0.785 0.796Penumbras (mm):MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 2.7 2.9 2.51.0cm 3.0 3.4 2. Conclusion: OFs measured for small MLC fields were consistent with the ones measured with the other stereotactic detectors. Measured penumbras are consistent with detector size. The Exradin W1 PSD is an excellent choice for characterizing MLC-shaped small beam dosimetry used for stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field

  16. SU-F-T-672: A Novel Kernel-Based Dose Engine for KeV Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, M; Fast, M F; Nill, S; Oelfke, U [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Mimicking state-of-the-art patient radiotherapy with high precision irradiators for small animals allows advanced dose-effect studies and radiobiological investigations. One example is the implementation of pre-clinical IMRT-like irradiations, which requires the development of inverse planning for keV photon beams. As a first step, we present a novel kernel-based dose calculation engine for keV x-rays with explicit consideration of energy and material dependencies. Methods: We follow a superposition-convolution approach adapted to keV x-rays, based on previously published work on micro-beam therapy. In small animal radiotherapy, we assume local energy deposition at the photon interaction point, since the electron ranges in tissue are of the same order of magnitude as the voxel size. This allows us to use photon-only kernel sets generated by MC simulations, which are pre-calculated for six energy windows and ten base materials. We validate our stand-alone dose engine against Geant4 MC simulations for various beam configurations in water, slab phantoms with bone and lung inserts, and on a mouse CT with (0.275mm)3 voxels. Results: We observe good agreement for all cases. For field sizes of 1mm{sup 2} to 1cm{sup 2} in water, the depth dose curves agree within 1% (mean), with the largest deviations in the first voxel (4%) and at depths>5cm (<2.5%). The out-of-field doses at 1cm depth agree within 8% (mean) for all but the smallest field size. In slab geometries, the mean agreement was within 3%, with maximum deviations of 8% at water-bone interfaces. The γ-index (1mm/1%) passing rate for a single-field mouse irradiation is 71%. Conclusion: The presented dose engine yields an accurate representation of keV-photon doses suitable for inverse treatment planning for IMRT. It has the potential to become a significantly faster yet sufficiently accurate alternative to full MC simulations. Further investigations will focus on energy sampling as well as calculation

  17. SU-E-T-314: The Application of Cloud Computing in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z [Reading Hospital, West Reading, PA (United States); Gao, M [ProCure Treatment Centers, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster software developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm{sup 2}, 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers.

  18. SU-E-T-314: The Application of Cloud Computing in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z; Gao, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster software developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm 2 , 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers

  19. SU-E-T-515: Investigating the Linear Energy Transfer Dependency of Different PRESAGE Formulations in a Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M; Alqathami, M; Blencowe, A; Ibbott, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported an under-response of PRESAGE in a proton beam as a Result of the extremely high LET in the distal end of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). This work is a preliminary investigation to quantify the effect of the formulation, specifically the concentration of halocarbon radical initiator relative to leuco dye, on radical recombination resulting in LET dependence. Methods The traditional PRESAGE formulation developed by Heuris Pharma was altered to constitute radical initiator concentrations of 5, 15, and 30% (low, medium, and high) by weight with all other components balanced to maintain proportionality. Chloroform was specifically examined in this study and all dosimeters were made in-house. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters (3.5cm diameter and 6cm length) were made for each formulation and irradiated by a 200-MeV proton beam to 500 cGy across a 2cm SOBP. Dosimeters were read out using the DMOS optical-CT scanner. The dose distributions were analyzed and dose profiles were used to compare the relative dose response to find the stability across the high-LET region of the SOBP. LET dependence was measured by the variation to ion chamber measurements for the final 25% of the SOBP (∼0.5cm) prior to the distal-90 of each profile. Results Relative to ion chamber data, all PRESAGE dosimeters showed an under-response at the distal end of the SOBP. The medium concentration formulation matched most closely with an average 8.3% under-response closely followed by the low concentration at 12.2% and then the high concentration at 22.8%. In all three cases, the highest points of discrepancy were in the distal most regions. Conclusion The radical initiator concentration in PRESAGE can be tailored to reduce the LET dependence in a proton beam. This warrants further study to quantify comprehensively the effect of concentration of different halocarbon radical initiators on LET dependency. Grant number 5RO1CA100835

  20. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic Scintillation and Other Stereotactic Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Wang, X; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor (OF) measurements with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for small fields made by the high-definition multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the TrueBeam STx system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new small volume near-water equivalent and energy independent PSD manufactured by Standard Imaging, Inc. All measurements were performed in an IBA Blue Phantom water tank. Square MLC-shaped fields with sides ranging from 0.5 cm to 2 cm and jawshaped fields with sides ranging from 1 cm to 40 cm were measured using an SAD setup at 10 cm depth. Dose profile and percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were also taken under the same conditions for MLC fields 0.5×0.5 and 1×1 cm2 in size with jaws at 2×2cm2. The CC01 and W1 were vertically mounted. Results: OFs measured with the W1 for jaw only square fields were consistent with the ones measured with a Farmers PTW TN33013 ion chamber (1.8% maximum deviation). OF and penumbra measurement results are presented below. PDDs measured for all detectors are within 1.5% for the 0.5×0.5 cm2 and within 1% for the 1×1 cm2 MLC fields.Output factors:MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 0.555 0.541 0.5851.0cm 0.716 0.702 0.7331.5cm 0.779 0.761 0.7772.0cm 0.804 0.785 0.796Penumbras (mm):MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 2.7 2.9 2.51.0cm 3.0 3.4 2. Conclusion: OFs measured for small MLC fields were consistent with the ones measured with the other stereotactic detectors. Measured penumbras are consistent with detector size. The Exradin W1 PSD is an excellent choice for characterizing MLC-shaped small beam dosimetry used for stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field

  1. Space-charge-dominated beam dynamics simulations using the massively parallel processors (MPPs) of the Cray T3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulations using the multi-particle code PARMELA with a three-dimensional point-by-point space charge algorithm have turned out to be very helpful in supporting injector commissioning and operations at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab, formerly called CEBAF). However, this algorithm, which defines a typical N 2 problem in CPU time scaling, is very time-consuming when N, the number of macro-particles, is large. Therefore, it is attractive to use massively parallel processors (MPPs) to speed up the simulations. Motivated by this, the authors modified the space charge subroutine for using the MPPs of the Cray T3D. The techniques used to parallelize and optimize the code on the T3D are discussed in this paper. The performance of the code on the T3D is examined in comparison with a Parallel Vector Processing supercomputer of the Cray C90 and an HP 735/15 high-end workstation

  2. SU-E-T-128: Dosimetric Characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 Films for Megavoltage Photon and Proton Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, N; Kato, H; Yada, R; Matsunaga, T; Ehara, I; Adachi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Gafchromic film for quantitative analysis was renewed from EBT2 to EBT3 film in November 2011. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relevant characteristics of EBT3 film for its application in dosimetric verification for IMRT/VMAT or proton therapy. We investigated the characteristics of EBT3 film with comparison of previous EBT2 film. The experiments in this study composed two categories. At first, the photo spectroscopy for the irradiated film was compared between EBT2 and EBT3. The film 1 day after the irradiation was analyzed by a photo spectrometer (SR520: JASCO Corporation, Japan). Secondly, we investigated several calibration curves which obtained by same batch. The films were calibrated by irradiation the films to 13 dose steps. The irradiated films were scanned by a flatbed scanner (ES-10000XL, Epson-Seiko Corporation, Japan). The difference on scan orientation was evaluated alternate portrait and landscape directions. The photon and proton beams were delivered from Clinac 21EX (Varian) and Mitsubishi machine, respectively. The peak absorption wavelength of EBT3 film and its response at all active range were basically same with that of EBT2 film. The peak wavelength of photo absorption in EBT3 was observed at 585 and 634 nm. The fog optical density was increased due to the hazy matte polyester for active layer. However, there is no change the tendency of the calibration curve responding to megavoltage photon and proton beams. The scan orientation dependency of EBT3 film was observed with similar to EBT2 film. The optical density of portrait orientation was 10% higher than that of landscape orientation. The dosimetric characteristics of EBT3 film were basically same with EBT2 film. With regard to the matte polyester, the creation of Newton's rings during scanning procedure was reduced. However, the suitable scan protocol should be used for accurate film dosimetry. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. SU-E-T-120: Analytic Dose Verification for Patient-Specific Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C; Mah, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To independently verify the QA dose of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) plans using an analytic dose calculation model. Methods: An independent proton dose calculation engine is created using the same commissioning measurements as those employed to build our commercially available treatment planning system (TPS). Each proton PBS plan is exported from the TPS in DICOM format and calculated by this independent dose engine in a standard 40 x 40 x 40 cm water tank. This three-dimensional dose grid is then compared with the QA dose calculated by the commercial TPS, using standard Gamma criterion. A total of 18 measured pristine Bragg peaks, ranging from 100 to 226 MeV, are used in the model. Intermediate proton energies are interpolated. Similarly, optical properties of the spots are measured in air over 15 cm upstream and downstream, and fitted to a second-order polynomial. Multiple Coulomb scattering in water is approximated analytically using Preston and Kohler formula for faster calculation. The effect of range shifters on spot size is modeled with generalized Highland formula. Note that the above formulation approximates multiple Coulomb scattering in water and we therefore chose not use the full Moliere/Hanson form. Results: Initial examination of 3 patient-specific prostate PBS plans shows that agreement exists between 3D dose distributions calculated by the TPS and the independent proton PBS dose calculation engine. Both calculated dose distributions are compared with actual measurements at three different depths per beam and good agreements are again observed. Conclusion: Results here showed that 3D dose distributions calculated by this independent proton PBS dose engine are in good agreement with both TPS calculations and actual measurements. This tool can potentially be used to reduce the amount of different measurement depths required for patient-specific proton PBS QA

  4. SU-E-T-66: A Prototype for Couch Based Real-Time Dosimetry in External Beam Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Bendigo (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to design a prototype for couch-based based real time dosimetry system in external beam radiotherapy Methods: A prototype of 100 ionization chambers was designed on a printed circuit board by etching the copper layer and each ionization chamber was wired to a 50 pin connector. The signals from the two 50 pin connectors collected from the ionization chambers were then transferred to a PXI module from National Instruments. The PXI module houses a current amplifier that amplifies the charge collected from the ionization chamber. The amplified signal is then sent to a digital multimeter module for converting the analog signal to digital signal. A software was designed in labview to read and display the signals obtained from the PXI module. A couch attachment frame was designed to house the 100 ionization chamber module. The frame was fixed underneath the treatment couch for measuring the dose during treatment. Resutls: The ionization chamber based prototype dosimetry was tested for simple radiotherapy treatment fields and found to be a useful device for measuring real time dosimetry at the treatment couch plane. This information could be used to assess the delivered dose to a patient during radiotherapy. It could be used as an invivo dosimeter during radiotherapy. Conclusion: In this study, a prototype for couch based real time dosimetry system was designed and tested. The prototype forms a basis for the development of large scale couch based real time dosimetry system that could be used to perform morning QA prior to treatment, assess real time doses delivered to patient and as a device to monitor the output of the treatment beam. Peter MacCallum Cancer Foundation.

  5. SU-E-T-572: Beam Characteristics and Treatment Planning Commissioning for a New Proton Therapy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, T; Sun, B; Grantham, K; Santanam, L; Goddu, S; Klein, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A single-room proton system, the Mevion S250, was introduced into the arena of proton radiotherapy by Mevion Medical Systems. The first unit was installed and operates at the S. Lee Kling Proton Therapy Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The objective of this abstract is to report the system's beam characteristics and Eclipse commissioning. Methods: Commissioning data were acquired for modelling longitudinal fluence, virtual source position, effective source position, source size and Bragg peaks in Eclipse. Stoichiometric CT calibration was generated via ICRU44 human. Spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) were measured with Parallel Plate Chamber and profiles with solid state detector for model validation. Heterogeneity effects were measured with bone and lung inserts in the beam line. RT dose was computed in a virtual water phantom, and exported from Eclipse to compare with measurements at various depths and axis. SOBPs were fine-tuned with partial shining correction and entry correction to match measurements. Output factor was measured for each individual field with an ADCL ion chamber in a water tank and fitted to a polynomial function to cross-check the monitor unit verification. Results: Ranges of all 24 options were measured within ±1mm tolerance. Modulations met a ±1mm or ±2% tolerance. SOBP flatness met a ±3% tolerance. Distal fall off (80%-20%) were measured between 6mm and 7mm for all options. Virtual source positions varied between 177cm and 195cm, decreasing with field size and range. SOBP generated by Eclipse agreed with measurements within ±3% in the entry region, and ±1%/±1mm in other regions. Sanity check for output achieved 5% accuracy in 98% of cases. Conclusion: The commissioning of the first Mevions S250 proton therapy system met specifications. The unit has been put in clinical operation since 12/17/2013

  6. SU-F-T-146: Comparing Monte Carlo Simulations with Commissioning Beam Data for Mevion S250 Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prusator, M; Jin, H; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the Monte Carlo simulated beam data with the measured commissioning data for the Mevion S250 proton therapy system. Method: The Mevion S250 proton therapy system utilizes a passive double scattering technique with a unique gantry mounted superconducting accelerator and offers effective proton therapy in a compact design concept. The field shaping system (FSS) includes first scattering foil, range modulator wheel (RMW), second scattering foil and post absorber and offers two field sizes and a total of 24 treatment options from proton range of 5 cm to 32 cm. The treatment nozzle was modeled in detail using TOPAS (TOolkit for PArticle Simulation) Monte Carlo code. The timing feathers of the moving modulator wheels were also implemented to generate the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). The simulation results including pristine Bragg Peak, SOBP and dose profiles were compared with the data measured during beam commissioning. Results: The comparison between the measured data and the simulation data show excellent agreement. For pristine proton Bragg Peaks, the simulated proton range (depth of distal 90%) values agreed well with the measured range values within 1 mm accuracy. The differences of the distal falloffs (depth from distal 80% to 20%) were also found to be less than 1 mm between the simulations and measurements. For the SOBP, the widths of modulation (depth of proximal 95% to distal 90%) were also found to agree with the measurement within 1 mm. The flatness of the simulated and measured lateral profiles was found to be 0.6 % and 1.1 %, respectively. Conclusion: The agreement between simulations and measurements demonstrate that TOPAS could be used as a viable platform to proton therapy applications. The matched simulation results offer a great tool and open opportunity for variety of applications.

  7. SU-E-T-538: Evaluation of IMRT Dose Calculation Based on Pencil-Beam and AAA Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Duan, J; Popple, R; Brezovich, I

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on Pencil Beam (PB) and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) computation algorithms. IMRT plans of twelve patients with different treatment sites, including head/neck, lung and pelvis, were investigated. For each patient, dose calculation with PB and AAA algorithms using dose grid sizes of 0.5 mm, 0.25 mm, and 0.125 mm, were compared with composite-beam ion chamber and film measurements in patient specific QA. Discrepancies between the calculation and the measurement were evaluated by percentage error for ion chamber dose and γ〉l failure rate in gamma analysis (3%/3mm) for film dosimetry. For 9 patients, ion chamber dose calculated with AAA-algorithms is closer to ion chamber measurement than that calculated with PB algorithm with grid size of 2.5 mm, though all calculated ion chamber doses are within 3% of the measurements. For head/neck patients and other patients with large treatment volumes, γ〉l failure rate is significantly reduced (within 5%) with AAA-based treatment planning compared to generally more than 10% with PB-based treatment planning (grid size=2.5 mm). For lung and brain cancer patients with medium and small treatment volumes, γ〉l failure rates are typically within 5% for both AAA and PB-based treatment planning (grid size=2.5 mm). For both PB and AAA-based treatment planning, improvements of dose calculation accuracy with finer dose grids were observed in film dosimetry of 11 patients and in ion chamber measurements for 3 patients. AAA-based treatment planning provides more accurate dose calculation for head/neck patients and other patients with large treatment volumes. Compared with film dosimetry, a γ〉l failure rate within 5% can be achieved for AAA-based treatment planning. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. SU-E-T-66: A Prototype for Couch Based Real-Time Dosimetry in External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to design a prototype for couch-based based real time dosimetry system in external beam radiotherapy Methods: A prototype of 100 ionization chambers was designed on a printed circuit board by etching the copper layer and each ionization chamber was wired to a 50 pin connector. The signals from the two 50 pin connectors collected from the ionization chambers were then transferred to a PXI module from National Instruments. The PXI module houses a current amplifier that amplifies the charge collected from the ionization chamber. The amplified signal is then sent to a digital multimeter module for converting the analog signal to digital signal. A software was designed in labview to read and display the signals obtained from the PXI module. A couch attachment frame was designed to house the 100 ionization chamber module. The frame was fixed underneath the treatment couch for measuring the dose during treatment. Resutls: The ionization chamber based prototype dosimetry was tested for simple radiotherapy treatment fields and found to be a useful device for measuring real time dosimetry at the treatment couch plane. This information could be used to assess the delivered dose to a patient during radiotherapy. It could be used as an invivo dosimeter during radiotherapy. Conclusion: In this study, a prototype for couch based real time dosimetry system was designed and tested. The prototype forms a basis for the development of large scale couch based real time dosimetry system that could be used to perform morning QA prior to treatment, assess real time doses delivered to patient and as a device to monitor the output of the treatment beam. Peter MacCallum Cancer Foundation

  9. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-04: Statistical Process Control for Patient-Specific QA in Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LAH, J [Myongji Hospital, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); SHIN, D [National Cancer Center, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and improve the reliability of proton QA process, to provide an optimal customized level using the statistical process control (SPC) methodology. The aim is then to suggest the suitable guidelines for patient-specific QA process. Methods: We investigated the constancy of the dose output and range to see whether it was within the tolerance level of daily QA process. This study analyzed the difference between the measured and calculated ranges along the central axis to suggest the suitable guidelines for patient-specific QA in proton beam by using process capability indices. In this study, patient QA plans were classified into 6 treatment sites: head and neck (41 cases), spinal cord (29 cases), lung (28 cases), liver (30 cases), pancreas (26 cases), and prostate (24 cases). Results: The deviations for the dose output and range of daily QA process were ±0.84% and ±019%, respectively. Our results show that the patient-specific range measurements are capable at a specification limit of ±2% in all treatment sites except spinal cord cases. In spinal cord cases, comparison of process capability indices (Cp, Cpm, Cpk ≥1, but Cpmk ≤1) indicated that the process is capable, but not centered, the process mean deviates from its target value. The UCL (upper control limit), CL (center line) and LCL (lower control limit) for spinal cord cases were 1.37%, −0.27% and −1.89%, respectively. On the other hands, the range differences in prostate cases were good agreement between calculated and measured values. The UCL, CL and LCL for prostate cases were 0.57%, −0.11% and −0.78%, respectively. Conclusion: SPC methodology has potential as a useful tool to customize an optimal tolerance levels and to suggest the suitable guidelines for patient-specific QA in clinical proton beam.

  10. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  11. SU-F-T-232: Monthly Quality Assurance in External Beam Radiation Therapy Using a Single System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ji, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Iordachita, I [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Velarde, E; Hyatt, J; Wong, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Monthly quality assurance (QA) is time consuming for external beam radiation therapy, taking as long as 6–8 hours for each machine. It is due to the use and setup of multiple devices for different QA procedures. We have developed a single system with rotational capability for the measurement of both optical light and radiation which significantly reduces the time spent on Monthly QA. Methods: A single system using mirrors, a phosphor screen and a CCD camera is housed on a cylindrical motor so that it can rotate 360 degrees. For monthly QA, the system is placed on the patient couch of the medical accelerator with the plane of the phosphor screen at isocenter for all measurements. For optical QA such as optical distance indicator, room laser and light field, the optical image is collected directly with the camera. For radiation QA such as beam profile, MLC speed, picket-fence test, collimator rotation, table rotation and gantry rotation, a brass build-up plate is attached to the top of the phosphor screen. Two brass plates with islands of different thickness were designed for photon energy and electron energy constancy checks. Flex map, distortion map and uniformity map were developed to calibrate the motor bearing, camera/lens distortion, and the phosphor screen’s measured response across the field. Results: Following the TG142 guidelines for monthly QA with our system, the overall run time is reduced from 6–8 hours to 1.5 hours. Our system’s rotating design allows for quick testing of the gantry radiation isocenter test that is also independent of the sag of the gantry and the EPID. Conclusion: Our system significantly shortens the time needed for monthly QA by unifying the tests with a single system. Future work will be focused on extending the technology to Brachytherapy, IMRT and proton therapy QAs. This work is funded in part by a sponsor research grant from JPLC who owns the Raven technology. John Wong is a co-founder of JPLC.

  12. SU-E-T-10: A Dosimetric Comparison of Copper to Lead-Alloy Apertures for Electron Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusk, B; Hogstrom, K; Gibbons, J; Carver, R [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences of copper compared to conventional lead-alloy apertures for electron beam therapy. Methods: Copper apertures were manufactured by .decimal, Inc. and matching lead-alloy, Cerrobend, apertures were constructed for 32 square field sizes (2×2 – 20×20 cm{sup 2}) for five applicator sizes (6×6–25×25 cm{sup 2}). Percent depth-dose and off-axis-dose profiles were measured using an electron diode in water with copper and Cerrobend apertures for a subset of aperture sizes (6×6, 10×10, 25×25 cm{sup 2}) and energies (6, 12, 20 MeV). Dose outputs were measured for all field size-aperture combinations and available energies (6–20 MeV). Measurements were taken at 100 and 110 cm SSDs. Using this data, 2D planar absolute dose distributions were constructed and compared. Passing criteria were ±2% of maximum dose or 1-mm distance-to-agreement for 99% of points. Results: A gamma analysis of the beam dosimetry showed 93 of 96 aperture size, applicator, energy, and SSD combinations passed the 2%/1mm criteria. Failures were found for small field size-large applicator combinations at 20 MeV and 100-cm SSD. Copper apertures showed a decrease in bremsstrahlung production due to copper's lower atomic number compared to Cerrobend (greatest difference was 2.5% at 20 MeV). This effect was most prominent at the highest energies with large amounts of shielding material present (small field size-large applicator). Also, an increase in electrons scattered from the collimator edge of copper compared to Cerrobend resulted in an increased dose at the field edge for copper at shallow depths (greatest increase was 1% at 20 MeV). Conclusion: Apertures for field sizes ≥6×6 cm{sup 2} at any energy, or for small fields (≤4×4 cm{sup 2}) at energies <20 MeV, showed dosimetric differences less than 2%/1mm for more than 99% of points. All field size-applicator size-energy combinations passed 3%/1mm criteria for 100% of points. Work partially

  13. SU-E-T-608: Perturbation Corrections for Alanine Dosimeters in Different Phantom Materials in High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Czarnecki, D; Anton, M; Zink, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Alanine dosimeters are often used for in-vivo dosimetry purposes in radiation therapy. In a Monte Carlo study the influence of 20 different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters was investigated. The investigations were performed in high-energy photon beams, covering the whole range from 60 Co up to 25 MV-X. The aim of the study is the introduction of a perturbation correction k env for alanine dosimeters accounting for the environmental material. Methods: The influence of different surrounding materials on the response of alanine dosimeters was investigated with Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc code. The photon source was adapted with BEAMnrc to a 60 Co unit and an Elekta (E nom =6, 10, 25 MV-X) linear accelerator. Different tissue-equivalent materials ranging from cortical bone to lung were investigated. In addition to available phantom materials, some material compositions were taken and scaled to different electron densities. The depth of the alanine detectors within the different phantom materials corresponds to 5 cm depth in water, i.e. the depth is scaled according to the electron density (n e /n e,w ) of the corresponding phantom material. The dose was scored within the detector volume once for an alanine/paraffin mixture and once for a liquid water voxel. The relative response, the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water, was calculated and compared to the corresponding ratio under reference conditions. Results: For each beam quality the relative response r and the correction factor for the environment kenv was calculated. k env =0.9991+0.0049 *((n e /n e,w )−0.7659) 3 Conclusion: A perturbation correction factor k env accounting for the phantom environment has been introduced. The response of the alanine dosimeter can be considered independent of the surrounding material for relative electron densities (n e /n e,w ) between 1 and 1.4. For denser materials such as bone or much less dense

  14. SU-E-T-286: Dose Verification of Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Using GafChromic EBT3 Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Tang, S; Mah, D [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Chan, M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Basking Ridge, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose verification of spot-scanning proton pencil beam is performed via planar dose measurements at several depths using an ionization-chamber array, requiring repeat irradiations of each field for each depth. Here we investigate film dosimetry which has two advantages: higher resolution and efficiency from one-shot irradiation for multiple depths. Methods: Film calibration was performed using an EBT3 film at 20-cm depth of Plastic Water (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) exposed by a 10-level step wedge on a Proteus Plus proton system (IBA, Belgium). The calibration doses ranged from 25–250 cGy(RBE) for proton energies of 170–200 MeV. A uniform 1000 cm{sup 3} dose cube and a clinical prostate combined with seminal-vesicle and pelvic-nodes plan were used for this study. All treatment plans were generated in the RayStation (RaySearch Lab, Sweden). The planar doses at different depths for both cases were measured with film using triple-channel dosimetry and the MatriXX PT (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The Gamma passing rates, dose-difference maps, and profiles of 2D planar doses measured with EBT3 film and MatriXX, versus treatment planning system (TPS) calculations were analyzed and compared using the FilmQA Pro (Ashland Inc., Bridgewater, NJ). Results: The EBT3 film measurement results matched well with the TPS calculation data with an average passing rate >95% for 2%/2mm and are comparable with the MatriXX measurements (0.7%, 1.8%, 3.8% mean differences corresponding to 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm, 2%/2mm, respectively). Overall passing rates for EBT3 films appear higher than those with MatriXX detectors. Conclusion: The energy dependence of the film response could be minimized by calibration using proton beam with mixed energies. The greater efficiency of the dose verification using GafChromic EBT3 results in a potential cost trade-off between room capacity and film cost. EBT3 film may offer distinct advantages in highly intensity-modulated fields due to its higher resolution

  15. SU-F-T-232: Monthly Quality Assurance in External Beam Radiation Therapy Using a Single System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, K; Ji, T; Iordachita, I; Velarde, E; Hyatt, J; Wong, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Monthly quality assurance (QA) is time consuming for external beam radiation therapy, taking as long as 6–8 hours for each machine. It is due to the use and setup of multiple devices for different QA procedures. We have developed a single system with rotational capability for the measurement of both optical light and radiation which significantly reduces the time spent on Monthly QA. Methods: A single system using mirrors, a phosphor screen and a CCD camera is housed on a cylindrical motor so that it can rotate 360 degrees. For monthly QA, the system is placed on the patient couch of the medical accelerator with the plane of the phosphor screen at isocenter for all measurements. For optical QA such as optical distance indicator, room laser and light field, the optical image is collected directly with the camera. For radiation QA such as beam profile, MLC speed, picket-fence test, collimator rotation, table rotation and gantry rotation, a brass build-up plate is attached to the top of the phosphor screen. Two brass plates with islands of different thickness were designed for photon energy and electron energy constancy checks. Flex map, distortion map and uniformity map were developed to calibrate the motor bearing, camera/lens distortion, and the phosphor screen’s measured response across the field. Results: Following the TG142 guidelines for monthly QA with our system, the overall run time is reduced from 6–8 hours to 1.5 hours. Our system’s rotating design allows for quick testing of the gantry radiation isocenter test that is also independent of the sag of the gantry and the EPID. Conclusion: Our system significantly shortens the time needed for monthly QA by unifying the tests with a single system. Future work will be focused on extending the technology to Brachytherapy, IMRT and proton therapy QAs. This work is funded in part by a sponsor research grant from JPLC who owns the Raven technology. John Wong is a co-founder of JPLC.

  16. Fundamental Study of Electron Beam Welding of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy for Nuclear Fuel Plate Assembly (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Lee, Haein; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang

    2013-01-01

    Certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes posses the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using a electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. In this experiment, a feasibility test was carried out by tensile tester, bead-on-plate welding and metallographic examination to comply with the aluminum welding procedure. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the mechanical testing and microstructure examinations. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding process and to investigate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory EBW of the square butt weld specimens was developed. In comparison with the rolling directions of test specimens, the tensile strengths were no difference between the longitudinal and transverse welds. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication and assembly of the nuclear fuel plates will be provided for the future Kijang research reactor project

  17. SU-F-T-225: Is It Time to Have Pre-Configured Therapeutic Beams Available in Commercial Treatment Planning Systems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Commissioning radiation beams requires considerable effort to obtain the beam data for beam configuration in a commercial treatment planning system. With the advances in technology, the manufacturer of accelerators now has the ability to adjust radiation beam parameters to meet pre-determined specifications with high precision. This study aims to illustrate the feasibility of making pre-configured radiation beams available in commercial treatment planning systems. Methods: In recent years, Varian has made a set of measured beam data from the TrueBeam accelerator available to users. Although the beam data are provided as “suggestive data” without warranty, the commissioned data measured by users have been shown to be in excellent agreement with the data set provided when the beams from the installed Linacs were adjusted to meet the beam specifications. An unofficial survey among Varian Linac TrueBeam users shows that the suggestive data set has been used with validation by users in some clinics. This indicates that radiation beams from a specified Linac can be standardized and pre-configured in a treatment planning system. Results: Two newly installed Varian TrueBeam accelerators at two different centers were examined in which one set of commissioned beam data was obtained from measurements performed by an independent physics consulting company and the other was measured by local physicists in the department. All beams from both accelerators were tuned to meet the manufacturer’s specifications. Discrepancies of less than 1% were found between the commissioned beam data from both accelerators and the suggestive data set provided by Varian. Conclusion: It may be feasible that radiation beams can be pre-configured in commercial treatment planning systems. The radiation beam users will perform the beam validation and end-to-end tests instead of configuring beams. This framework can increase both the efficiency and the accuracy in commercial radiation

  18. Failure-free survival following brachytherapy alone or external beam irradiation alone for T1-2 prostate tumors in 2222 patients: results from a single practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachman, David G.; Thomas, Theresa; Hilbe, Joseph; Beyer, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate failure-free survival (FFS) for brachytherapy (BT) alone compared to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone for Stage T1-2 Nx-No Mo patients over the same time period by a single community-based practice in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era. Materials and Methods: The database of Arizona Oncology Services (a multiphysician radiation oncology practice in the Phoenix metropolitan area) was reviewed for patients meeting the following criteria: (1) T1 or T2 Nx-No Mo prostate cancer; (2) no prior or concurrent therapy including hormones; (3) treatment period 12/88-12/95; and (4) treatment with either EBRT alone or BT alone ( 125 I or 103 Pd). This yielded 1527 EBRT and 695 BT patients; no patients meeting the above criteria were excluded from analysis. Median follow-up for EBRT patients was 41.3 months and, for BT patients, 51.3 months. Patients were not randomized to either therapy but rather received EBRT or BT based upon patient, treating, and/or referring physician preference. PSA failure was defined according to the ASTRO consensus guidelines. The median patient age was 74 years for both groups. Results: Failure-free survival at 5 years for EBRT and BT are 69% and 71%, respectively (p = 0.91). For T stage, no significant difference in FFS at 5 years is observed between EBRT and BT for either T1 (78% vs. 83%, p = 0.47) or T2 (67% vs. 67%, p = 0.89) tumors. Analysis by Gleason score shows superior outcomes for Gleason 8-10 lesions treated with EBRT vs. BT (5-year FFS 52% vs. 28%, p = 0.04); outcomes for lower grade lesions (Gleason 4-6) when analyzed by Gleason score alone do not significantly differ according to treatment received. Patients with initial PSA values of 10-20 ng/dL have an improved FFS with EBRT vs. BT at 5 years (70% vs. 53%, p = 0.001); outcomes for patients with initial PSA ranges of 0-4 ng/dL, of > 4-10 ng/dL, and > 20 ng/dL did not differ significantly by treatment received. FFS was also determined for presenting

  19. SU-E-T-167: Evaluation of Mobius Dose Calculation Engine Using Out of the Box Preconfigured Beam Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardan, R [UAB University of Alabama, Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Faught, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Huang, M; Benhabib, S [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Brezovich, I; Popple, R [University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Determine the dose calculation accuracy of a preconfigured Mobius server for use in secondary checks of a treatment planning system. Methods: 10 plans were created for irradiation on two of the IROC (formerly RPC) accreditation phantoms: 4 for the head and neck phantom and 6 for the lung phantom. The plans each were created using one of four different photon energies (6FFF, 10 FFF, 6X, and 15X) and were varied in treatment type including VMAT, step and shoot IMRT, dynamic MLC IMRT (DMLC), and conformal RT (CRT). The TLDs in the phantoms were contoured, and each plan was sent for calculation to Mobius software (Mobius Medical Systems, Houston, TX) with a default configuration. Each plan was then irradiated on the planned phantom 3 times to create an average reading across 56 TLDs. These readings were then compared against the corresponding Mobius calculation at each TLD location. Results: The mean difference (MD) normalized to the plan prescription dose between each TLD and Mobius calculation for all measurements was 0.5 ± 3.3%, with a maximum difference of 8.4%. The MD was 0.6 ± 3.8%, − 2.0 ± 1.9%, 1.7 ± 3.7%, and 1.9 ± 1.2% across the 6FFF, 10FFF, 6X and 15X energies respectively. The MD was −1.2 ± 2.3% for lung plans and 1.8 ± 3.5% for head/neck plans. Across treatment types, the MD ranged from − 1.8 ± 1.7% for CRT to 4.3 ± 2.4 % for DMLC. Conclusion: Out of the box and preconfigured, Mobius provides accurate dose calculations with respect to beam energy, treatment type, and treatment site.

  20. SU-F-T-185: Study of the Robustness of a Proton Arc Technique Based On PBS Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z [Reading Hospital, West Reading, PA (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: One potential technique to realize proton arc is through using PBS beams from many directions to form overlaid Bragg peak (OBP) spots and placing these OBP spots throughout the target volume to achieve desired dose distribution. In this study, we analyzed the robustness of this proton arc technique. Methods: We used a cylindrical water phantom of 20 cm in radius in our robustness analysis. To study the range uncertainty effect, we changed the density of the phantom by ±3%. To study the setup uncertainty effect, we shifted the phantom by 3 & 5 mm. We also combined the range and setup uncertainties (3mm/±3%). For each test plan, we performed dose calculation for the nominal and 6 disturbed scenarios. Two test plans were used, one with single OBP spot and the other consisting of 121 OBP spots covering a 10×10cm{sup 2} area. We compared the dose profiles between the nominal and disturbed scenarios to estimate the impact of the uncertainties. Dose calculation was performed with Gate/GEANT based Monte Carlo software in cloud computing environment. Results: For each of the 7 scenarios, we simulated 100k & 10M events for plans consisting of single OBP spot and 121 OBP spots respectively. For single OBP spot, the setup uncertainty had minimum impact on the spot’s dose profile while range uncertainty had significant impact on the dose profile. For plan consisting of 121 OBP spots, similar effect was observed but the extent of disturbance was much less compared to single OBP spot. Conclusion: For PBS arc technique, range uncertainty has significantly more impact than setup uncertainty. Although single OBP spot can be severely disturbed by the range uncertainty, the overall effect is much less when a large number of OBP spots are used. Robustness optimization for PBS arc technique should consider range uncertainty with priority.

  1. SU-E-T-267: Development of the Compact Graphite Calorimetry System for the High Energy Photon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B. C.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, J. H.; Yi, C. Y. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Graphite calorimeter systems are used for the absolute photon dosimetry. But many electronics are demanded in order to measure the tiny temperature changes. Minimizing the control system is needed to make a portable graphite calorimeter. Methods: A Domen-type graphite calorimetry system is constructing to measure the absorbed dose of the high energy photon beam. The graphite calorimeter divided into three parts, Core, Jacket, and Shield. In order to measure the temperature rising of the core due to the radiation accurately, the temperatures of the jacket and the shield should be controlled properly. A commercial temperature controller (Model 350, Lake Shore Cryogenics) was used to minimize the size of control system for making a portable graphite calorimetry system at the cost of the measurement uncertainty. The PID control of the jacket is conducted by the software (LabView) and Model 350 maintain the temperature of shield. Results: Our design value of the heat deposition power in the core is 0.04 mW for the dose rate of 3 Gy/min where the temperature sensitivity of the graphite is 1.4 mK/Gy. While the residuals of the Steinhart-hart equation fitting for the core thermistor were less than 0.1 mK, the temperature resolution of Model 350 is 1 mK. The temperature of the shield was kept within the 5 mK when the room temperature variation was about 0.5 K. Conclusion: The resolution of Model 350 for the temperature measurement and control is not good enough as the control system for the compact graphite calorimetry system. But The performance of Model 350 is good enough to maintain the temperature of the shield constantly. The Model 350 will be replaced by the AC resistance bridge (Model 372, Lake Shore Cryogenics) for the core temperature measurement and the jacket control.

  2. SU-F-T-185: Study of the Robustness of a Proton Arc Technique Based On PBS Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z; Zheng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: One potential technique to realize proton arc is through using PBS beams from many directions to form overlaid Bragg peak (OBP) spots and placing these OBP spots throughout the target volume to achieve desired dose distribution. In this study, we analyzed the robustness of this proton arc technique. Methods: We used a cylindrical water phantom of 20 cm in radius in our robustness analysis. To study the range uncertainty effect, we changed the density of the phantom by ±3%. To study the setup uncertainty effect, we shifted the phantom by 3 & 5 mm. We also combined the range and setup uncertainties (3mm/±3%). For each test plan, we performed dose calculation for the nominal and 6 disturbed scenarios. Two test plans were used, one with single OBP spot and the other consisting of 121 OBP spots covering a 10×10cm"2 area. We compared the dose profiles between the nominal and disturbed scenarios to estimate the impact of the uncertainties. Dose calculation was performed with Gate/GEANT based Monte Carlo software in cloud computing environment. Results: For each of the 7 scenarios, we simulated 100k & 10M events for plans consisting of single OBP spot and 121 OBP spots respectively. For single OBP spot, the setup uncertainty had minimum impact on the spot’s dose profile while range uncertainty had significant impact on the dose profile. For plan consisting of 121 OBP spots, similar effect was observed but the extent of disturbance was much less compared to single OBP spot. Conclusion: For PBS arc technique, range uncertainty has significantly more impact than setup uncertainty. Although single OBP spot can be severely disturbed by the range uncertainty, the overall effect is much less when a large number of OBP spots are used. Robustness optimization for PBS arc technique should consider range uncertainty with priority.

  3. SU-E-T-37: A GPU-Based Pencil Beam Algorithm for Dose Calculations in Proton Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantzis, G; Leventouri, T; Tachibana, H; Shang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in radiation therapy have been focused on applications of charged particles, especially protons. Over the years several dose calculation methods have been proposed in proton therapy. A common characteristic of all these methods is their extensive computational burden. In the current study we present for the first time, to our best knowledge, a GPU-based PBA for proton dose calculations in Matlab. Methods: In the current study we employed an analytical expression for the protons depth dose distribution. The central-axis term is taken from the broad-beam central-axis depth dose in water modified by an inverse square correction while the distribution of the off-axis term was considered Gaussian. The serial code was implemented in MATLAB and was launched on a desktop with a quad core Intel Xeon X5550 at 2.67GHz with 8 GB of RAM. For the parallelization on the GPU, the parallel computing toolbox was employed and the code was launched on a GTX 770 with Kepler architecture. The performance comparison was established on the speedup factors. Results: The performance of the GPU code was evaluated for three different energies: low (50 MeV), medium (100 MeV) and high (150 MeV). Four square fields were selected for each energy, and the dose calculations were performed with both the serial and parallel codes for a homogeneous water phantom with size 300×300×300 mm3. The resolution of the PBs was set to 1.0 mm. The maximum speedup of ∼127 was achieved for the highest energy and the largest field size. Conclusion: A GPU-based PB algorithm for proton dose calculations in Matlab was presented. A maximum speedup of ∼127 was achieved. Future directions of the current work include extension of our method for dose calculation in heterogeneous phantoms

  4. SU-F-T-598: Robotic Radiosurgery System Versus Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Definitive Intracranial Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M; Pompos, A; Gu, X; Yan, Y; Abdulrahman, R; Timmerman, R; Jiang, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the dose distributions of Cyberknife and intensity-modulated-proton-therapy (IMPT). Methods: A total of 20 patients previously treated with Cyberknife were selected. The original planning-target-volume (PTV) was used in the ‘IMPT-ideal’ plan assuming a comparable image-guidance with Cyberknife. A 3mm expansion was made to create the proton-PTV for the ‘IMPT-3mm’ plan representing the current proton-therapy where a margin of 3mm is used to account for the inferior image-guidance. The proton range uncertainty was taken-care in beam-design by adding the proximal- and distal-margins (3%water-equivalent-depth+1mm) for both proton plans. The IMPT plans were generated to meet the same target coverage as the Cyberknife-plans. The plan quality of IMPT-ideal and IMPT-3mm were compared to the Cyberknife-plan. To characterize plan quality, we defined the ratio(R) of volumes encompassed by the selected isodose surfaces for Cyberknife and IMPT plans (VCK/VIMPT). Comparisons were made for both Cyberknife versus IMPT-ideal and Cyberknife versusIMPT-3mm to further discuss the impact of setup error margins used in proton therapy and the correlation with target size and location. Results: IMPT-ideal plans yield comparable plan quality as CK plans and slightly better OAR sparing while the IMPT-3mm plan results in a higher dose to the OARs, especially for centralized tumors. Comparing to the IMPT-ideal plans, a slightly larger 80% (Ravg=1.05) dose cloud and significantly larger 50% (Ravg=1.3) and 20% (Ravg=1.60) dose clouds are seen in CK plans. However, the 3mm expansion results in a larger high and medium dose clouds in IMPT-3mm plans (Ravg=0.65 for 80%-isodose; Ravg=0.93 for 50%-isodose). The trend increases with the size of the target and the distance from the brainstem to the center of target. Conclusion: Cyberknife is more preferable for treating centralized targets and proton therapy is advantageous for the large and peripheral targets. Advanced

  5. SU-F-T-598: Robotic Radiosurgery System Versus Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Definitive Intracranial Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M; Pompos, A; Gu, X; Yan, Y; Abdulrahman, R; Timmerman, R; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dose distributions of Cyberknife and intensity-modulated-proton-therapy (IMPT). Methods: A total of 20 patients previously treated with Cyberknife were selected. The original planning-target-volume (PTV) was used in the ‘IMPT-ideal’ plan assuming a comparable image-guidance with Cyberknife. A 3mm expansion was made to create the proton-PTV for the ‘IMPT-3mm’ plan representing the current proton-therapy where a margin of 3mm is used to account for the inferior image-guidance. The proton range uncertainty was taken-care in beam-design by adding the proximal- and distal-margins (3%water-equivalent-depth+1mm) for both proton plans. The IMPT plans were generated to meet the same target coverage as the Cyberknife-plans. The plan quality of IMPT-ideal and IMPT-3mm were compared to the Cyberknife-plan. To characterize plan quality, we defined the ratio(R) of volumes encompassed by the selected isodose surfaces for Cyberknife and IMPT plans (VCK/VIMPT). Comparisons were made for both Cyberknife versus IMPT-ideal and Cyberknife versusIMPT-3mm to further discuss the impact of setup error margins used in proton therapy and the correlation with target size and location. Results: IMPT-ideal plans yield comparable plan quality as CK plans and slightly better OAR sparing while the IMPT-3mm plan results in a higher dose to the OARs, especially for centralized tumors. Comparing to the IMPT-ideal plans, a slightly larger 80% (Ravg=1.05) dose cloud and significantly larger 50% (Ravg=1.3) and 20% (Ravg=1.60) dose clouds are seen in CK plans. However, the 3mm expansion results in a larger high and medium dose clouds in IMPT-3mm plans (Ravg=0.65 for 80%-isodose; Ravg=0.93 for 50%-isodose). The trend increases with the size of the target and the distance from the brainstem to the center of target. Conclusion: Cyberknife is more preferable for treating centralized targets and proton therapy is advantageous for the large and peripheral targets. Advanced

  6. Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy as a Debulking Agent for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An open-label prospective phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Lindahl, Lise Maria; Gniadecki, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a powerful treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Based on the occurrence of relapses with low radiation doses, doses of 30-36 Gy are commonly used but most patients still eventually relapse and repeat treatment courses are limited...... due to the cumulative toxicity. Complete response rates are about 60-90% for T2-4 stages with a 5-year relapse-free survival of 10-25% for stages IB-III. Objectives: To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of low-dose TSEBT (10 Gy) in terms of complete cutaneous response rate, overall response rate...... and response duration in CTCL. Methods: Ten patients with stage IB-IV mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated in an open-label manner with 4 fractions of 1 Gy/week TSEB to a total skin dose of 10 Gy. Treatment responses were assessed at 1 and 3 months after treatment and subsequently at least every 6 months...

  7. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions.

  8. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  9. T2 signal intensity as an imaging biomarker for patients with superficial fibromatoses of the hands (Dupuytren's disease) and feet (Ledderhose disease) undergoing definitive electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, James S.; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Wolfson, Aaron H. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Electron beam therapy is a definitive radiation treatment option for superficial fibromatoses of the hands and feet. Because objective criteria for treatment response remain poorly defined, we sought to describe changes in electron beam treated lesions on MRI. The study included 1 male and 9 female patients with a total of 37 superficial fibromatoses; average age was 60.7 years. Standard 6 MeV electron beam treatment included 3 Gy per fraction for 10 or 12 treatments using split-course with 3-month halfway break. Pre- and post-treatment MRIs were evaluated to determine lesion size (cm3), T2 signal intensity and contrast enhancement (5-point ordinal scales) by a fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. MRI findings were correlated with clinical response using a composite 1-5 ordinal scale, Karnofsky Performance Scale and patient-reported 10-point visual analog scale for pain. Mean volume decreased from 1.5 to 1.2 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.01, paired t-test). Mean T2 hyperintensity score decreased from 3.0 to 2.1 (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank). Mean enhancement score available for 22 lesions decreased from 3.8 to 3.0 (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank). Performance scores improved from 78.9 ± 13.7 to 84.6 ± 6.9 (p = 0.007, paired t-test). Pain scores decreased from 3.0 ± 3.3 to 1.1 ± 2.0 (p = 0.0001, paired t-test). Post-treatment T2 signal correlated weakly with performance and pain (Spearman's ρ = -0.37 and 0.16, respectively). MRI is valuable for evaluating patients undergoing electron beam therapy for superficial fibromatoses: higher pretreatment T2 intensity may predict benefit from radiotherapy. T2 hypointensity may be a better marker than size for therapeutic effect. (orig.)

  10. T2 signal intensity as an imaging biomarker for patients with superficial fibromatoses of the hands (Dupuytren's disease) and feet (Ledderhose disease) undergoing definitive electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, James S.; Subhawong, Ty K.; Wolfson, Aaron H.

    2018-01-01

    Electron beam therapy is a definitive radiation treatment option for superficial fibromatoses of the hands and feet. Because objective criteria for treatment response remain poorly defined, we sought to describe changes in electron beam treated lesions on MRI. The study included 1 male and 9 female patients with a total of 37 superficial fibromatoses; average age was 60.7 years. Standard 6 MeV electron beam treatment included 3 Gy per fraction for 10 or 12 treatments using split-course with 3-month halfway break. Pre- and post-treatment MRIs were evaluated to determine lesion size (cm3), T2 signal intensity and contrast enhancement (5-point ordinal scales) by a fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. MRI findings were correlated with clinical response using a composite 1-5 ordinal scale, Karnofsky Performance Scale and patient-reported 10-point visual analog scale for pain. Mean volume decreased from 1.5 to 1.2 cm 3 (p = 0.01, paired t-test). Mean T2 hyperintensity score decreased from 3.0 to 2.1 (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank). Mean enhancement score available for 22 lesions decreased from 3.8 to 3.0 (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank). Performance scores improved from 78.9 ± 13.7 to 84.6 ± 6.9 (p = 0.007, paired t-test). Pain scores decreased from 3.0 ± 3.3 to 1.1 ± 2.0 (p = 0.0001, paired t-test). Post-treatment T2 signal correlated weakly with performance and pain (Spearman's ρ = -0.37 and 0.16, respectively). MRI is valuable for evaluating patients undergoing electron beam therapy for superficial fibromatoses: higher pretreatment T2 intensity may predict benefit from radiotherapy. T2 hypointensity may be a better marker than size for therapeutic effect. (orig.)

  11. SU-F-T-214: Re-Thinking the Useful Clinical Beam Energy in Proton Therapy: An Opportunity for Cost Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentefour, El H [IBA, Advanced Technology Group, Louvain La Neuve (Belgium); Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We conducted a retrospective study of the useful clinical proton beam energy based on the beam range data of patients treated over the last 10 years at Massachusetts General Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Methods: Treatment field information were collected for all patients treated over the last 10 years (2005–2015) in the two gantry treatment rooms at MGH. The beam ranges for these fields were retrieved and categorized per treatment site. The 10 prostate patients that required the highest beam range (lateral fields) were selected. For these patients, anterior oblique beams (30–40 degrees) were simulated in a planning system to obtain the required beam ranges including the margins for potential range uncertainties. Results: There were a total of 4033 patients, treated with combined total of 23603 fields. All treatment indications were considered with the exception of ocular tumors generally treated in a fixed beam room. For all non-prostate treatments (21811 fields), only 5 fields for 4 patients (1-pancreas, 1-lumbar chordoma, 2-spine mets) required beam range greater than 25 cm. There were 446 prostate patients (1792 fields), with the required beam range from 22.3 to 29.0 cm; 386 of them had at least one of their lateral beam range greater than 25 cm. For the 10 prostate patients with highest lateral beam ranges (26 to 29 cm), their treatment with anterior oblique beams would drop the beam ranges below 25 cm (17.3 to 18.5 cm). Conclusion: if prostate patients are treated with anterior fields only, the useful maximum beam range is reduced to 25 cm. Thus a proton therapy system with maximum beam energy of 196 MeV is sufficient to treat all tumors sites with very rare exceptions (<0.1%). Designing such PT system would reduce the cost of proton therapy for hospitals and patients and increase the accessibility to the treatment.

  12. Beam-beam phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    In colliding beam storage rings the beam collision regions are generally so short that the beam-beam interaction can be considered as a series of evenly spaced non-linear kicks superimposed on otherwise stable linear oscillations. Most of the numerical studies on computers were carried out in just this manner. But for some reason this model has not been extensively employed in analytical studies. This is perhaps because all analytical work has so far been done by mathematicians pursuing general transcendental features of non-linear mechanics for whom this specific model of the specific system of colliding beams is too parochial and too repugnantly physical. Be that as it may, this model is of direct interest to accelerator physicists and is amenable to (1) further simplification, (2) physical approximation, and (3) solution by analogy to known phenomena

  13. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an open clinical study and pooled data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars; Skov, Lone; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Loft, Annika; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of post-weld heat treatments on strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kun; Shan, Jiguo; Wang, Chunxu; Tian, Zhiling

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates here the strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam under different approaches of three post-weld heat treatments, i.e. aging (A), solutionizing+aging (SA) and homogenizing+solutionizing+aging (HSA). The microstructures of the weld metals with A and SA processes both comprised of finely dispersive Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitates, small martensite lath and reverted austenite along the grain boundary. However, in the weld metal with HSA process, it exhibited the same Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitate with the large martensite lath and the absence of reverted austenite. The ultimate tensile strength and static toughness of the welded joint with HSA process were 1350.6 MPa and 63.8 MJ m −3 , respectively. The static toughness has been remarkably improved from 71% to 91% of the applied parent metal compared with that of the welded joint with A process. The present study underscores that the Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitate and martensite are significant to ensure the high strength of welded joints. Due to its inconsistent deformation with the matrix of martensite, the reverted austenite has a notable influence on the toughness of welded joints. It shows that the post-weld heat treatments of HSA process can influence the mechanical behavior of welded joints by eliminating the reverted austenite.

  15. Effect of post-weld heat treatments on strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun [Laser Processing Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shan, Jiguo, E-mail: shanjg@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laser Processing Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Professing Technology, Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Chunxu; Tian, Zhiling [Institute for Special Steel, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-04-29

    This paper elucidates here the strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam under different approaches of three post-weld heat treatments, i.e. aging (A), solutionizing+aging (SA) and homogenizing+solutionizing+aging (HSA). The microstructures of the weld metals with A and SA processes both comprised of finely dispersive Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Mo) precipitates, small martensite lath and reverted austenite along the grain boundary. However, in the weld metal with HSA process, it exhibited the same Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Mo) precipitate with the large martensite lath and the absence of reverted austenite. The ultimate tensile strength and static toughness of the welded joint with HSA process were 1350.6 MPa and 63.8 MJ m{sup −3}, respectively. The static toughness has been remarkably improved from 71% to 91% of the applied parent metal compared with that of the welded joint with A process. The present study underscores that the Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Mo) precipitate and martensite are significant to ensure the high strength of welded joints. Due to its inconsistent deformation with the matrix of martensite, the reverted austenite has a notable influence on the toughness of welded joints. It shows that the post-weld heat treatments of HSA process can influence the mechanical behavior of welded joints by eliminating the reverted austenite.

  16. SU-E-T-14: A Feasibility Study of Using Modified AP Proton Beam for Post-Operative Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Kenton, O; Younan, F; Dormer, J; Kremmel, E; Lin, H; Liu, H; Tang, S; Both, S; Kassaee, A; Avery, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the unpredictability of bowel gas movement, the PA beam direction is always favored for robust proton therapy in post-operative pancreatic cancer treatment. We investigate the feasibility of replacing PA beam with a modified AP beam to take the bowel gas uncertainty into account. Methods: Nine post-operative pancreatic cancer patients treated with proton therapy (5040cGy, 28 fractions) in our institution were randomly selected. The original plan uses PA and lateral direction passive-scattering proton beams. Beam weighting is about 1:1. All patients received weekly verification CTs to assess the daily variations(total 17 verification CTs). The PA direction beam was replaced by two other groups of AP direction beam. Group AP: takes 3.5% range uncertainty into account. Group APmod: compensates the bowel gas uncertainty by expanding the proximal margin to 2cm more. The 2cm margin was acquired from the average bowel diameter in from 100 adult abdominal CT scans near pancreatic region (+/- 5cm superiorly and inferiorly). Dose Volume Histograms(DVHs) of the verification CTs were acquired for robustness study. Results: Without the lateral beam, Group APmod is as robust as Group PA. In Group AP, more than 10% of iCTV D98/D95 were reduced by 4–8%. LT kidney and Liver dose robustness are not affected by the AP/PA beam direction. There is 10% of chance that RT kidney and cord will be hit by AP proton beam due to the bowel gas. Compared to Group PA, APmod plan reduced the dose to kidneys and cord max significantly, while there is no statistical significant increase in bowel mean dose. Conclusion: APmod proton beam for the target coverage could be as robust as the PA direction without sacrificing too much of bowel dose. When the AP direction beam has to be selected, a 2cm proximal margin should be considered

  17. SU-F-T-630: Energy Spectral Study On Lipiodol After Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization Using the Flattened and Unflattened Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, D [Radiation Therapy Section, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Medical and Dental Sciences Course, Graduate School of Biomedical & Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Ozawa, S; Nagata, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical & Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima High-Precision Radiotherapy Cancer Center, Hiroshima (Japan); Saito, A; Nishio, T; Suzuki, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical & Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hioki, K; Masuda, H; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y [Radiation Therapy Section, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Tanaka, S [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT combining transarterial chemoembolization with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. Our showed that the dose enhancement effect in the Lipiodol with 10X flattening filter free (FFF) was inserted. This study was to investigate the energy fluence variations of electron in the Lipiodol using flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Methods: FF and FFF for 6X and 10X beams by TrueBeam were used in this study. The Lipiodol (3 X 3 X 3 cm{sup 3}) was located at the depth of 5 cm in water, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) and energy fluence were calculated by Monte Carlo (MC) calculations (PHITS). Results: DEFs with FF and FFF of 6X were 17.1% and 24.3% at rebuild-up region in the Lipiodol (5.3cm depth), 7.0% and 17.0% at the center of Lipiodol (6.5cm depth), and −13.2% and −8.2% at behind Lipiodol (8.3cm depth). DEFs with FF and FFF of 10X were 21.7% and 15.3% at rebuild-up region, 8.2% and 10.5% at the center of Lipiodol, and −14.0% and −8.6% at behind Lipiodol. Spectral results showed that the FFF beam contained more low-energy (0–0.3MeV) component of electrons than FF beam, and FF beam contained more high-energy (over 0.3MeV) electrons than FFF beam in Lipiodol. Behind the Lipiodol, build-down effect with FF beam was larger than FFF beam because FF beam contained more high energy electrons. The difference of DEFs between FFF and FF beams for 6X were larger than for 10X. This is because 10X beam contained more high-energy electrons. Conclusion: It was found that the 6XFFF beam gives the largest change of energy fluence and the largest DEF in this study. These phenomena are mainly caused by component of low-energy electrons, and this energy is almost correspond to the boundary of photo electronic dominant and Compton scattering dominant region for photon beams.

  18. Low-Dose (10-Gy) Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An Open Clinical Study and Pooled Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamstrup, Maria R., E-mail: mkam0004@bbh.regionh.dk [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gniadecki, Robert [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Iversen, Lars [Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Skov, Lone [Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter Meidahl [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. Methods and Materials: In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over <2.5 weeks, receiving a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. Results: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (<1% skin involvement with patches or plaques) documented in 57% of the patients. Median duration of overall cutaneous response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. Conclusions: Low-dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT.

  19. Toughness study of an under matched welded joint: application to the mechanical integrity of the electron beam welded joint of 6016-T6 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, Wissal

    2016-01-01

    For the demonstration of the integrity of the most sensitive nuclear components, conventional defects, as cracks for example, must be considered within the design step as required by the nuclear safety authority. This phase is particularly crucial for dimensioning of welded structures. To ensure a conservative prediction, the position of the initial crack within the welded joint must be the most detrimental in fracture behavior. Commonly used analyzes consider homogeneous structure with the behavior of the base metal of the welded joint, considered as the weakest metallurgical zone in the case of an overmatched weld. In contrast, similar analysis is not conservative in case of under matched weld. The thesis contributes by the development of an experimental and numerical methodology allowing the identification of the detrimental metallurgical zone in fracture behavior of an under matched welded joint. The methodology proposed is applied to an electron beam welded joint on al 6061-T6. To reach this goal, the gradient of the mechanical behavior along the welded joint was first identified. This is particularly interesting to conduct an advanced analysis based on a multi material approach. In a second step, the fracture behavior of the welded joint was studied on CT specimen. The transferability of the J integral at initiation was approved on another geometry: this represents an important foundation for the transferability assumption to structure. Finally, a numerical analysis on full scale tube was developed. Residual welding stresses and structural effects were considered. The results demonstrate that the heat affected zone located at 13 mm from the middle of the welded joint is the most detrimental zone for fracture analysis. This contradicts the conventional methods conducted on fracture analysis which consider a conventional defect within the fusion zone. (author) [fr

  20. SU-E-T-134: Assessing the Capabilities of An MU Model for Fields as Small as 2cm in a Passively Scattered Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R; Ghebremedhin, A; Gordon, I; Patyal, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and expand the capabilities of the current MU model for a passively scattered proton beam. The expanded MU model can potentially be used to predict the dose/MU for fields smaller than 2cm in diameter and reduce time needed for physical calibrations. Methods: The current MU model accurately predicted the dose/MU for more than 800 fields when compared to physical patient calibrations. Three different ion chambers were used in a Plastic Water phantom for physical measurements: T1, PIN, and A-16. The original MU model predicted output for fields that were affected by the bolus gap factor (BGF) and nozzle extension factor (NEF). As the system was tested for smaller treatment fields, the mod wheel dependent field size factor (MWDFSF) had to be included to describe the changes observed in treatment fields smaller than 3cm. The expanded model used Clarkson integration to determine the appropriate value for each factor (field size factor (FSF), BGF, NEF, and MWDFSF), to accurately predict the dose/MU for fields smaller than 2.5cm in effective diameter. Results: The expanded MU model demonstrated agreement better than 2% for more than 800 physical calibrations that were tested. The minimum tested fields were 1.7cm effective diameter for 149MeV and 2.4cm effective diameter for 186MeV. The inclusion of Clarkson integration into the MU model enabled accurate prediction of the dose/MU for very small and irregularly shaped treatment fields. Conclusion: The MU model accurately predicted the dose/MU for a wide range of treatment fields used in the clinic. The original MU model has been refined using factors that were problematic to accurately predict the dose/MU: the BGF, NEF, and MWDFSF. The MU model has minimized the time for determining dose/MU and reduced the time needed for physical calibrations, improving the efficiency of the patient treatment process

  1. SU-E-T-230: Creating a Large Number of Focused Beams with Variable Patient Head Tilt to Improve Dose Fall-Off for Brain Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J; Ma, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment delivery and planning strategy by increasing the number of beams to minimize dose to brain tissue surrounding a target, while maximizing dose coverage to the target. Methods: We analyzed 14 different treatment plans via Leksell PFX and 4C. For standardization, single tumor cases were chosen. Original treatment plans were compared with two optimized plans. The number of beams was increased in treatment plans by varying tilt angles of the patient head, while maintaining original isocenter and the beam positions in the x-, y- and z-axes, collimator size, and beam blocking. PFX optimized plans increased beam numbers with three pre-set tilt angles, 70, 90, 110, and 4C optimized plans increased beam numbers with tilt angles increasing arbitrarily from range of 30 to 150 degrees. Optimized treatment plans were compared dosimetrically with original treatment plans. Results: Comparing total normal tissue isodose volumes between original and optimized plans, the low-level percentage isodose volumes decreased in all plans. Despite the addition of multiple beams up to a factor of 25, beam-on times for 1 tilt angle versus 3 or more tilt angles were comparable (<1 min.). In 64% (9/14) of the studied cases, the volume percentage decrease by >5%, with the highest value reaching 19%. The addition of more tilt angles correlates to a greater decrease in normal brain irradiated volume. Selectivity and coverage for original and optimized plans remained comparable. Conclusion: Adding large number of additional focused beams with variable patient head tilt shows improvement for dose fall-off for brain radiosurgery. The study demonstrates technical feasibility of adding beams to decrease target volume.

  2. SU-E-T-230: Creating a Large Number of Focused Beams with Variable Patient Head Tilt to Improve Dose Fall-Off for Brain Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, J; Ma, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment delivery and planning strategy by increasing the number of beams to minimize dose to brain tissue surrounding a target, while maximizing dose coverage to the target. Methods: We analyzed 14 different treatment plans via Leksell PFX and 4C. For standardization, single tumor cases were chosen. Original treatment plans were compared with two optimized plans. The number of beams was increased in treatment plans by varying tilt angles of the patient head, while maintaining original isocenter and the beam positions in the x-, y- and z-axes, collimator size, and beam blocking. PFX optimized plans increased beam numbers with three pre-set tilt angles, 70, 90, 110, and 4C optimized plans increased beam numbers with tilt angles increasing arbitrarily from range of 30 to 150 degrees. Optimized treatment plans were compared dosimetrically with original treatment plans. Results: Comparing total normal tissue isodose volumes between original and optimized plans, the low-level percentage isodose volumes decreased in all plans. Despite the addition of multiple beams up to a factor of 25, beam-on times for 1 tilt angle versus 3 or more tilt angles were comparable (<1 min.). In 64% (9/14) of the studied cases, the volume percentage decrease by >5%, with the highest value reaching 19%. The addition of more tilt angles correlates to a greater decrease in normal brain irradiated volume. Selectivity and coverage for original and optimized plans remained comparable. Conclusion: Adding large number of additional focused beams with variable patient head tilt shows improvement for dose fall-off for brain radiosurgery. The study demonstrates technical feasibility of adding beams to decrease target volume

  3. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency

  4. SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Lowenstein, J; Taylor, P; Kry, S; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: IROC-H conducts external audits for output check verification of photon and electron beams. Many of these beams can meet the geometric requirements of the TG 51 calibration protocol. For those photon beams that are non TG 51 compliant like Elekta GammaKnife, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy, IROC-H has specific audit tools to monitor the reference calibration. Methods: IROC-H used its TLD and OSLD remote monitoring systems to verify the output of machines with TG 51 non compliant beams. Acrylic OSLD miniphantoms are used for the CyberKnife. Special TLD phantoms are used for TomoTherapy and GammaKnife machines to accommodate the specific geometry of each machine. These remote audit tools are sent to institutions to be irradiated and returned to IROC-H for analysis. Results: The average IROC-H/institution ratios for 480 GammaKnife, 660 CyberKnife and 907 rotational TomoTherapy beams are 1.000±0.021, 1.008±0.019, 0.974±0.023, respectively. In the particular case of TomoTherapy, the overall ratio is 0.977±0.022 for HD units. The standard deviations of all results are consistent with values determined for TG 51 compliant photon beams. These ratios have shown some changes compared to values presented in 2008. The GammaKnife results were corrected by an experimentally determined scatter factor of 1.025 in 2013. The TomoTherapy helical beam results are now from a rotational beam whereas in 2008 the results were from a static beam. The decision to change modality was based on recommendations from the users. Conclusion: External audits of beam outputs is a valuable tool to confirm the calibrations of photon beams regardless of whether the machine is TG 51 or TG 51 non compliant. The difference found for TomoTherapy units is under investigation. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  5. SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Lowenstein, J; Taylor, P; Kry, S; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: IROC-H conducts external audits for output check verification of photon and electron beams. Many of these beams can meet the geometric requirements of the TG 51 calibration protocol. For those photon beams that are non TG 51 compliant like Elekta GammaKnife, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy, IROC-H has specific audit tools to monitor the reference calibration. Methods: IROC-H used its TLD and OSLD remote monitoring systems to verify the output of machines with TG 51 non compliant beams. Acrylic OSLD miniphantoms are used for the CyberKnife. Special TLD phantoms are used for TomoTherapy and GammaKnife machines to accommodate the specific geometry of each machine. These remote audit tools are sent to institutions to be irradiated and returned to IROC-H for analysis. Results: The average IROC-H/institution ratios for 480 GammaKnife, 660 CyberKnife and 907 rotational TomoTherapy beams are 1.000±0.021, 1.008±0.019, 0.974±0.023, respectively. In the particular case of TomoTherapy, the overall ratio is 0.977±0.022 for HD units. The standard deviations of all results are consistent with values determined for TG 51 compliant photon beams. These ratios have shown some changes compared to values presented in 2008. The GammaKnife results were corrected by an experimentally determined scatter factor of 1.025 in 2013. The TomoTherapy helical beam results are now from a rotational beam whereas in 2008 the results were from a static beam. The decision to change modality was based on recommendations from the users. Conclusion: External audits of beam outputs is a valuable tool to confirm the calibrations of photon beams regardless of whether the machine is TG 51 or TG 51 non compliant. The difference found for TomoTherapy units is under investigation. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI

  6. SU-E-T-110: An Investigation On Monitor Unit Threshold and Effects On IMPT Delivery in Proton Pencil Beam Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syh, J; Ding, X; Syh, J; Patel, B; Rosen, L; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An approved proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plan might not be able to deliver because of existed extremely low monitor unit per beam spot. A dual hybrid plan with higher efficiency of higher spot monitor unit and the efficacy of less number of energy layers were searched and optimized. The range of monitor unit threshold setting was investigated and the plan quality was evaluated by target dose conformity. Methods: Certain limitations and requirements need to be checks and tested before a nominal proton PBS treatment plan can be delivered. The plan needs to be met the machine characterization, specification in record and verification to deliver the beams. Minimal threshold of monitor unit, e.g. 0.02, per spot was set to filter the low counts and plan was re-computed. Further MU threshold increment was tested in sequence without sacrificing the plan quality. The number of energy layer was also alternated due to elimination of low count layer(s). Results: Minimal MU/spot threshold, spot spacing in each energy layer and total number of energy layer and the MU weighting of beam spots of each beam were evaluated. Plan optimization between increases of the spot MU (efficiency) and less energy layers of delivery (efficacy) was adjusted. 5% weighting limit of total monitor unit per beam was feasible. Scarce spreading of beam spots was not discouraging as long as target dose conformity within 3% criteria. Conclusion: Each spot size is equivalent to the relative dose in the beam delivery system. The energy layer is associated with the depth of the targeting tumor. Our work is crucial to maintain the best possible quality plan. To keep integrity of all intrinsic elements such as spot size, spot number, layer number and the carried weighting of spots in each layer is important in this study

  7. SU-F-T-429: Craniospinal Irradiation by VMAT Technique: Impact of FFF Beam and High Resolution MLC On Plan Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, T; Sarkar, B; Munshi, A; Mohanti, B [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of using flattening filter free (FFF) beam with 0.5 cm multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves over conventional flattened beam with 1 cm leaf width MLC on the treatment plan quality in cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI). Methods: For five medulloblastoma cases (3 males and 2 females), who were previously treated by volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique using conventional flattened beam shaped by 1 cm width MLC leaves, four test plans were generated and compared against the delivered plan. These retrospective plans consisted of four different combinations of flattened and FFF beams from Elekta’s Agility treatment head with 0.5 cm width MLC leaves. Sparing of organs at risks (OAR) in terms of dose to 5%, 50%, 75% and 90% volumes, mean and maximum dose were evaluated. Results: All plans satisfied the planning objective of covering 95% of PTV by at least 95% of prescription dose. Marginal variation of dose spillage was observed between different VMAT plans at very low dose range (1–5 Gy). Variation in dose statistics for PTVs and OARs were within 1% or 1 Gy. Amongst the five plans, the plan with flattened beam with 1 cm MLC had the highest number of MUs, 2.13 times higher than the plan with Agility MLC with FFF beam that had the least number of MUs. No statistically significant difference (p≥0.05) was observed between the reference plan and the retrospectively generated plans in terms of PTV coverage, cold spot, hot spot and organ at risk doses. Conclusion: In the treatment of CSI cases by VMAT technique, FFF beams and/or finer width MLC did not exhibit advantage over the flattened beams or wider MLC in terms of plan quality except for reduction in MUs.

  8. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  9. SU-E-T-556: Monte Carlo Generated Dose Distributions for Orbital Irradiation Using a Single Anterior-Posterior Electron Beam and a Hanging Lens Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duwel, D; Lamba, M; Elson, H; Kumar, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Various cancers of the eye are successfully treated with radiotherapy utilizing one anterior-posterior (A/P) beam that encompasses the entire content of the orbit. In such cases, a hanging lens shield can be used to spare dose to the radiosensitive lens of the eye to prevent cataracts. Methods: This research focused on Monte Carlo characterization of dose distributions resulting from a single A-P field to the orbit with a hanging shield in place. Monte Carlo codes were developed which calculated dose distributions for various electron radiation energies, hanging lens shield radii, shield heights above the eye, and beam spoiler configurations. Film dosimetry was used to benchmark the coding to ensure it was calculating relative dose accurately. Results: The Monte Carlo dose calculations indicated that lateral and depth dose profiles are insensitive to changes in shield height and electron beam energy. Dose deposition was sensitive to shield radius and beam spoiler composition and height above the eye. Conclusion: The use of a single A/P electron beam to treat cancers of the eye while maintaining adequate lens sparing is feasible. Shield radius should be customized to have the same radius as the patient’s lens. A beam spoiler should be used if it is desired to substantially dose the eye tissues lying posterior to the lens in the shadow of the lens shield. The compromise between lens sparing and dose to diseased tissues surrounding the lens can be modulated by varying the beam spoiler thickness, spoiler material composition, and spoiler height above the eye. The sparing ratio is a metric that can be used to evaluate the compromise between lens sparing and dose to surrounding tissues. The higher the ratio, the more dose received by the tissues immediately posterior to the lens relative to the dose received by the lens

  10. SU-F-T-461: Dosimetric Evaluation of Indigenous Farmer Type Chamber FAR65- GB for Reference Dosimetry of FFF MV Photon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwe, P; Mhatre, V; Dandekar, P [Sir HN RF Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Indigenous Farmer type chamber FAR 65 GB is a reference class 0.6 cc ion chamber. It can be used for dosimetric evaluation of photon and high energy electron beams. We studied dosimetric characteristics of the chamber for 6MV and 10MV Flattening filter free FFF photon beams available on trueBEAM STx Linac. Methods: The study was carried out on trueBEAM STx Linac having 6 and 10 MV FFF photon beam with maximum dose rate 1400 and 2400 MU per min respectively. The dosimetric device to be evaluated is Rosalina Instruments FAR 65-GB Ion Chamber with active volume 0.65 cc, total active length 23.1cm, inner diameter of cylinder 6.2mm, wall thickness 0.4mm, inner electrode diameter 1mm. Inner and outer electrodes are made from Aluminium 2.7 gm per cc and graphite 1.82 gm per cc respectively. The ion chamber was placed along central axis of beam at 10cm depth and irradiated for 10cm × 10cm field size at SAD of 100 cm in plastic phantom. We studied Precision, Dose Linearity, Dose Rate dependence, directional dependence, Recombination effect. Recombination effect was determined using standard two-voltage method. Results: 1. Measurements were reproducible std deviation of 0.0105 and type A uncertainty 0.003265 under same set of reference conditions 2. Chamber exhibit dose linearity over a wider dose range. 3. Chamber shows dose rate independence for all available dose rate range. 4. Response of chamber with the angle of incidence of radiation is constant. 5. Recombination correction factors were 1.01848 and 1.02537 for dose rate 1400 and 2400 MU per min resp. Conclusion: Our study reveals that the chamber is prone to saturation effect at dose rate of 2400 MU per min. FAR 65-GB can be used for reference dosimetry of FFF MV photon beam with proper calculation of recombination effect.

  11. 18 December 2012 - British University of Edinburgh Principal T. O’Shea and delegation (see list below) visiting the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department D. Nisbet, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department R. Veness, in the ATLAS Visitor Centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, in LHCb experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    The delegation was throughout accompanied by Beams Department R. Veness and Physics Department and ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells 1.\tProf. Sir Timothy O'Shea, Principal, University of Edinburgh 2.\tProf. Lesley Yellowlees, Vice Principal, Head of College of Science and Engineering 3.\tProf Jeff Haywood, Vice Principal for Knowledge Management 4.\tProf. Peter Higgs, Professor of Theoretical Physics 5.\tMr Bruce Minto, Supporter of the University 6.\tProf. Walter Nimmo, Supporter of the University 7.\tProf. Arthur Trew, Head of School of Physics and Astronomy 8.\tProf David Robertson, Head of School of Informatics 9.\tProf Stefano Brandani, Head of School of Engineering 10.\tMr Alan Walker, accompanying Prof. Higgs 11.\tProf. Peter Clarke, LHCb Collaboration, School of Physics and Astronomy

  12. SU-F-T-514: Evaluation of the Accuracy of Free-Breathing and Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Gated Beam Delivery Using An Elekta Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Housley, D; Shepard, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Xie, R [Ironwood Cancer and Research Centers, Chandler, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We examined whether the use of either a short gating window or a long beam hold impacts the accuracy of the delivery Methods: The performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy was assessed using a 20cmX 20cm open field with the radiation delivered using a range of beam-on and beam-off time periods. Two SBRT plans were used to examine the accuracy of gated beam delivery for clinical treatment plans. For the SBRT cases, tests were performed for both free-breathing based gating and for gated delivery with a simulated breath-hold. A MatriXX 2D ion chamber array was used for data collection, and the gating accuracy was evaluated using gamma score. Results: For the 20cmX20cm open field, the gated beam delivery agreed closely with the non-gated delivery results. Discrepancies in the agreement, however, began to appear with a 5-to-1 ratio of the beam-off to beam-on. For these tight gating windows, each beam-on segment delivered a small number of monitor units. This finding was confirmed with dose distribution analysis from the delivery of the two VMAT plans where the gamma score(±1%,2%/1mm) showed passing rates in the range of 95% to 100% for gating windows of 25%, 38%, 50%, 63%, 75%, and 83%. Using a simulated sinusoidal breathing signal with a 4 second period, the gamma score of freebreathing gating and breath-hold gating deliveries were measured in the range of 95.7% to 100%. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that Elekta linacs can be used to accurately deliver respiratory gated treatments for both free-breathing and breath-hold patients. The accuracy of beams delivered in a gated delivery mode at low small MU proved higher than similar deliveries performed in a non-gated (manually interrupted) fashion.

  13. SU-F-T-514: Evaluation of the Accuracy of Free-Breathing and Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Gated Beam Delivery Using An Elekta Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermoumi, M; Cao, D; Housley, D; Shepard, D; Xie, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We examined whether the use of either a short gating window or a long beam hold impacts the accuracy of the delivery Methods: The performance of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy was assessed using a 20cmX 20cm open field with the radiation delivered using a range of beam-on and beam-off time periods. Two SBRT plans were used to examine the accuracy of gated beam delivery for clinical treatment plans. For the SBRT cases, tests were performed for both free-breathing based gating and for gated delivery with a simulated breath-hold. A MatriXX 2D ion chamber array was used for data collection, and the gating accuracy was evaluated using gamma score. Results: For the 20cmX20cm open field, the gated beam delivery agreed closely with the non-gated delivery results. Discrepancies in the agreement, however, began to appear with a 5-to-1 ratio of the beam-off to beam-on. For these tight gating windows, each beam-on segment delivered a small number of monitor units. This finding was confirmed with dose distribution analysis from the delivery of the two VMAT plans where the gamma score(±1%,2%/1mm) showed passing rates in the range of 95% to 100% for gating windows of 25%, 38%, 50%, 63%, 75%, and 83%. Using a simulated sinusoidal breathing signal with a 4 second period, the gamma score of freebreathing gating and breath-hold gating deliveries were measured in the range of 95.7% to 100%. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that Elekta linacs can be used to accurately deliver respiratory gated treatments for both free-breathing and breath-hold patients. The accuracy of beams delivered in a gated delivery mode at low small MU proved higher than similar deliveries performed in a non-gated (manually interrupted) fashion.

  14. Neutral beams for mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An important demonstration of negative ion technology is proposed for FY92 in the MFTF-α+T, an upgrade of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This facility calls for 200-keV negative ions to form neutral beams that generate sloshing ions in the reactor end plugs. Three different beam lines are considered for this application. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  15. SU-F-T-178: Optimized Design of a Diamond Detector Specifically Dedicated to the Dose Distribution Measurements in Clinical Proton Pencil Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Agelou, M; Hernandez, J Garcia; Lazaro, D; Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A; Tromson, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In proton-therapy, pencil beam scanning (PBS) dosimetry presents a real challenge due to the small size of the beam (about 3 to 8 mm in FWHM), the pulsed high dose rate (up to 100 Gy/s) and the proton energy variation (about 30 MeV to 250 MeV). In the framework of French INSERM DEDIPRO project, a specifically dedicated single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) was developed with the objective of obtaining accurate measurements of the dose distribution in PBS modality. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX were performed. A small proton beam of 5 mm in FWHM was simulated as well as diamond devices with various size, thickness and holder composition. The calculated doses-to-diamond were compared with the doses-to-water in order to reduce the perturbation effects. Monte-Carlo simulations lead to an optimized SCDDo design for small proton beams dosimetry. Following the optimized design, SCDDos were mounted in water-equivalent holders with electrical connection adapted to standard electrometer. First, SCDDos performances (stability, repeatability, signal-to-background ratio…) were evaluated with conventional photon beams. Then, characterizations (dose linearity, dose rate dependence…) with wide proton beams were performed at proton-therapy center (IC-CPO) from Curie Institute (France) with the passive proton delivery technique, in order to confirm dosimetric requirements. Finally, depth-dose distributions were measured in a water tank, for native and modulated Bragg Peaks with the collimator of 12 cm, and compared to a commercial PPC05 parallel-plate ionization chamber reference detector. Lateral-dose profiles were also measured with the collimator of 5 mm, and compared to a commercial SFD diode. Results: The results show that SCDDo design does not disturb the dose distributions. Conclusion: The experimental dose distributions with the SCDDo are in good agreement with the commercial detectors and no energy dependence was observed with this device

  16. SU-F-T-178: Optimized Design of a Diamond Detector Specifically Dedicated to the Dose Distribution Measurements in Clinical Proton Pencil Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Agelou, M; Hernandez, J Garcia; Lazaro, D [Institut CEA LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A [Institut Curie - Centre de Protontherapie d’Orsay, Orsay (France); Tromson, D

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In proton-therapy, pencil beam scanning (PBS) dosimetry presents a real challenge due to the small size of the beam (about 3 to 8 mm in FWHM), the pulsed high dose rate (up to 100 Gy/s) and the proton energy variation (about 30 MeV to 250 MeV). In the framework of French INSERM DEDIPRO project, a specifically dedicated single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) was developed with the objective of obtaining accurate measurements of the dose distribution in PBS modality. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX were performed. A small proton beam of 5 mm in FWHM was simulated as well as diamond devices with various size, thickness and holder composition. The calculated doses-to-diamond were compared with the doses-to-water in order to reduce the perturbation effects. Monte-Carlo simulations lead to an optimized SCDDo design for small proton beams dosimetry. Following the optimized design, SCDDos were mounted in water-equivalent holders with electrical connection adapted to standard electrometer. First, SCDDos performances (stability, repeatability, signal-to-background ratio…) were evaluated with conventional photon beams. Then, characterizations (dose linearity, dose rate dependence…) with wide proton beams were performed at proton-therapy center (IC-CPO) from Curie Institute (France) with the passive proton delivery technique, in order to confirm dosimetric requirements. Finally, depth-dose distributions were measured in a water tank, for native and modulated Bragg Peaks with the collimator of 12 cm, and compared to a commercial PPC05 parallel-plate ionization chamber reference detector. Lateral-dose profiles were also measured with the collimator of 5 mm, and compared to a commercial SFD diode. Results: The results show that SCDDo design does not disturb the dose distributions. Conclusion: The experimental dose distributions with the SCDDo are in good agreement with the commercial detectors and no energy dependence was observed with this device

  17. SU-F-T-545: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Dose Calculation Algorithms On Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Conventional Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J; Eom, K; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUs and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.

  18. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-04: An Evaluation of Out-Of-Field Doses for Electron Beams From Modern Varian and Elekta Linear Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, C; Nitsch, P; Kudchadker, R; Howell, R; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurately determining out-of-field doses when using electron beam radiotherapy is of importance when treating pregnant patients or patients with implanted electronic devices. Scattered doses outside of the applicator field in electron beams have not been broadly investigated, especially since manufacturers have taken different approaches in applicator designs. Methods: In this study, doses outside of the applicator field were measured for electron beams produced by a 10×10 applicator on two Varian 21iXs operating at 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, a Varian TrueBeam operating at 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV. Peripheral dose profiles and percent depth doses were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom at 100 cm SSD with a Farmer ion chamber. Doses were compared to peripheral photon doses from AAPM’s Task Group #36 report. Results: Doses were highest for the highest electron energies. Doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. Substantial dose differences were observed between different accelerators; the Elekta accelerator had much higher doses than any Varian unit examined. Surprisingly, doses were often similar to, and could be much higher than, doses from photon therapy. Doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that proper shielding may be very important when utilizing electron beams, particularly on a Versa HD, while treating pregnant patients or those with implanted electronic devices. Applying a water equivalent bolus of Emax(MeV)/4 thickness (cm) on the patient would reduce fetal dose drastically for all clinical energies and is a practical solution to manage the potentially high peripheral doses seen from modern electron beams. Funding from NIH Grant number: #CA180803.

  19. SU-F-T-545: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Dose Calculation Algorithms On Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Conventional Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S; Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, J; Eom, K [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUs and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.

  20. SU-E-T-381: Evaluation of Calculated Dose Accuracy for Organs-At-Risk Located at Out-Of-Field in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for High Energy Photon Beams Produced From TrueBeam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Ding, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation accuracy for the out-of-field dose is important for predicting the dose to the organs-at-risk when they are located outside primary beams. The investigations on evaluating the calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems (TPS) on out-of-field dose in existing publications have focused on low energy (6MV) photon. This study evaluates out-of-field dose calculation accuracy of AAA algorithm for 15MV high energy photon beams. Methods: We used the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes to evaluate the AAA algorithm in Varian Eclipse TPS (v.11). The incident beams start with validated Varian phase-space sources for a TrueBeam linac equipped with Millennium 120 MLC. Dose comparisons between using AAA and MC for CT based realistic patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques for prostate and lung were performed and uncertainties of organ dose predicted by AAA at out-of-field location were evaluated. Results: The results show that AAA calculations under-estimate doses at the dose level of 1% (or less) of prescribed dose for CT based patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques. In regions where dose is only 1% of prescribed dose, although AAA under-estimates the out-of-field dose by 30% relative to the local dose, it is only about 0.3% of prescribed dose. For example, the uncertainties of calculated organ dose to liver or kidney that is located out-of-field is <0.3% of prescribed dose. Conclusion: For 15MV high energy photon beams, very good agreements (<1%) in calculating dose distributions were obtained between AAA and MC. The uncertainty of out-of-field dose calculations predicted by the AAA algorithm for realistic patient VMAT plans is <0.3% of prescribed dose in regions where the dose relative to the prescribed dose is <1%, although the uncertainties can be much larger relative to local doses. For organs-at-risk located at out-of-field, the error of dose predicted by Eclipse using AAA is negligible. This work was conducted in part using the

  1. Status of ACCULINNA beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Rodin, A M; Bogdanov, D D; Golovkov, M S; Fomichev, A S; Sidorchuk, S I; Slepnev, R S; Wolski, R; Ter-Akopian, G M; Oganessian, Yu T; Yukhimchuk, A A; Perevozchikov, V V; Vinogradov, Yu I; Grishenchkin, S K; Demin, A M; Zlatoustovskii, S V; Kuryakin, A V; Filchagin, S V; Ilkaev, R I

    2003-01-01

    The separator ACCULINNA was upgraded to achieve new experimental requirements. The beam line was extended by new ion-optical elements beyond the cyclotron hall. The new arrangements yield much better background conditions. The intensities of sup 6 He and sup 8 He radioactive beams produced in fragmentation of 35 A MeV sup 1 sup 1 B ions were increased up to a factor of 10. The upgraded beam line was used in experiments to study the sup 5 H resonance states populated in the t+t reaction. A cryogenic liquid tritium target was designed and installed at the separator beam line.

  2. SU-F-T-174: Patient-Specific Point Dose Measurement Using Fiber Optic Radiation Sensor Using Cerenkov Radiation for Proton Therapeutic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [Korea University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M [Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov radiation (FOCR) has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for proton therapeutic beam. We developed the FOCR, and it applied to patient-specific point dose measurement in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the FOCR system for proton therapy QA. Methods: Calibration of FOCR was performed with an ionization chamber whose absolute doses were determined according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. To determine the calibration curve, the FOCR was irradiated perpendicularly to the proton beam at the 13 dose levels steps. We selected five actual patient treatment plans performed at proton therapy center and compared the resulting FOCR measurements with the ionization chamber measurements. Results: The Cerenkov light yield of the FOCR increases linearly with as the dose measured using the ionization chamber increases from 0 cGy to 500 cGy. The results indicate that the fitting curve is linear, suggesting that dose measurement based on the light yield of the FOCR is possible. The results of proton radiation dose QA performed using the FOCR for 10 proton fields and five patients are good agreement with an ionization chamber. Conclusion: We carried out the patient QA using the FOCR for proton therapeutic beam and evaluated the effectiveness of the FOCR as a proton therapy QA tool. Our results indicate that the FOCR is suitable for use in patient QA of clinical proton beams.

  3. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J; Hill, G; Spiegel, J; Ye, J; Mehta, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window

  4. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification.

  5. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification

  6. Beam loading

    OpenAIRE

    Boussard, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superco...

  7. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  8. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hardemark, B; Hynning, E [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  9. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M; Hardemark, B; Hynning, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  10. SU-E-T-391: Assessment and Elimination of the Angular Dependence of the Response of the NanoDot OSLD System in MV Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J; Dunn, L; Lye, J; Kenny, J W; Alves, A D C; Cole, A; Asena, A; Kron, T; Williams, I M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the angular dependence of the nanoDot OSLD system in MV X-ray beams at depths and mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Measurements for 6 MV photons at 3 cm and 10 cm depth and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. Two special holders were designed which allow a nanoDot dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume (5 mm diameter disk). The first holder positions the dosimeter disk perpendicular to the beam (en-face). It then rotates until the disk is parallel with the beam (edge on). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder positions the disk parallel to the beam (edge on) for all angles (Setup 2). Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 considered detector and housing in detail based on microCT data. Results: An average drop in response by 1.4±0.7% (measurement) and 2.1±0.3% (Monte Carlo) for the 90° orientation compared to 0° was found for Setup 1. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming 100% active material (Al??O??) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response (within simulation uncertainty of about 1%). For Setup 2, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations found the angular dependence of the dosimeter to be below 1% and within the measurement uncertainty. Conclusion: The nanoDot dosimeter system exhibits a small angular dependence off approximately 2%. Changing the orientation of the dosimeter so that a coplanar beam arrangement always hits the detector material edge on reduces the angular dependence to within the measurement uncertainty of about 1%. This makes the dosimeter more attractive for phantom based clinical measurements and audits with multiple coplanar beams. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a joint initiative between the Australian Department of Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and

  11. SU-E-T-115: Dose Perturbation Study of Self-Expandable Metal and Polyester Esophageal Stents in Proton Therapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Li, Z [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Jalaj, S; McGaw, C; B K, John; J S, Scolapio; J C, Munoz [Division of Gastoenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work investigates dose perturbations due to Self-expandable metal and polyester esophageal stents undergoing proton radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods: Five commercially available esophageal stents made of nitinol (Evolution, Wallflex and Ultraflex), stainless steel (Z-Stent) and polyester (Polyflex) were tested. Radiochromic film (GafChromic EBT3 film, Ashland, Covington, KY) wrapped around a stent and a 12cc syringe was irradiated with 2CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) of proton beam in a custom fabricated acrylic phantom. An air-hollow syringe simulates the esophagus. Results: The Z-stent created the largest dose perturbations ranges from -14.5% to 6.1% due to the steel composition. The WallFlex, Evolution and Ultraflex stents produced the dose perturbation ranges of (−9.2%∼8.6%), (−6.8%∼5.7%) and (−6.2%∼6.2%), respectively. The PolyFlex stent contains the radiopaque tungsten markers located top, middle and bottom portions. When the focal cold spots induced by the markers were excluded in the analysis, the dose perturbation range was changed from (−11.6%∼6.4%) to (−0.6%∼5.0%). Conclusion: The magnitude of dose perturbation is related to material of a metallic stent. The non-metallic stent such as PolyFlex shows relatively lower dose perturbation than metallic stents except a radiopaque marker region. Overall Evolution and Ultraflex stent appear to be less dose perturbations. The largest dose perturbations (cold spots) were located at both edges of stents in distal area for the single proton beam irradiation study. The analysis of more than two proton beam which is more typical clinical beam arrangement would be necessary to minimize the doe perturbation effect in proton ratiotherapy.

  12. SU-E-T-272: Direct Verification of a Treatment Planning System Megavoltage Linac Beam Photon Spectra Models, and Analysis of the Effects On Patient Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leheta, D; Shvydka, D; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For the photon dose calculation Philips Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) uses collapsed cone convolution algorithm, which relies on energy spectrum of the beam in computing the scatter component. The spectrum is modeled based on Linac’s standard commissioning data and typically is not independently verified. We explored a methodology of using transmission measurements in combination with regularization data processing to unfold Linac spectra. The measured spectra were compared to those modeled by the TPS, and the effect on patient plans was evaluated. Methods: Transmission measurements were conducted in narrow-beam geometry using a standard Farmer ionization chamber. Two attenuating materials and two build -up caps, having different atomic numbers, served to enhance discrimination between absorption of low and high-energy portions of the spectra, thus improving the accuracy of the results. The data was analyzed using a regularization technique implemented through spreadsheet-based calculations. Results: The unfolded spectra were found to deviate from the TPS beam models. The effect of such deviations on treatment planning was evaluated for patient plans through dose distribution calculations with either TPS modeled or measured energy spectra. The differences were reviewed through comparison of isodose distributions, and quantified based on maximum dose values for critical structures. While in most cases no drastic differences in the calculated doses were observed, plans with deviations of 4 to 8% in the maximum dose values for critical structures were discovered. The anatomical sites with large scatter contributions are the most vulnerable to inaccuracies in the modeled spectrum. Conclusion: An independent check of the TPS model spectrum is highly desirable and should be included as part of commissioning of a new Linac. The effect is particularly important for dose calculations in high heterogeneity regions. The developed approach makes

  13. SU-E-T-486: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Using the Exradin W1 Plastic Scintillation Detector for Passively Scattered Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsanea, F; Kudchadker, R; Usama, M; Beddar, S; Wootton, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of plastic scintillation detectors used for skin dosimetry of patients undergoing passive scatter proton therapy. Methods: Following an IRB approved protocol, six patients undergoing passively scattered proton beam therapy for prostate cancer were selected for in vivo skin dosimetry using the Exradin W1 plastic scintillator. The detector was calibrated on a Cobalt-60 unit, and phantom measurements in the proton beam with the W1 and a calibrated parallel plate ion chamber were used to account for the under-response due to high LET at energies used for treatment. Measurements made in a heated water tank were used to account for temperature dependence. For in vivo measurements, the W1 is fixed to the patient’s skin with medical tape in the center of each of two laterally opposed treatment fields. Measurements will be performed once per week for each patient for the duration of treatment, for a total of thirty six measurements. The measured dose will be compared to the expected dose, extracted from the Eclipse treatment planning system. The average difference over all measurements and per-patient will be computed, as well as standard deviations. Results: The calibrated detector exhibited a 7% under-response in 225 and 250 MeV beams, and a 4% under-response when used at 37 °C (relative to the response at the calibration temperature of 20 °C). Patient measurements are ongoing. Conclusion: The Exradin W1 plastic scintillator detector is a strong candidate for in vivo skin dosimetry in passively scattered proton beams as PSDs are water equivalent and very small (2mm in diameter), permitting accurate measurements that do not perturb the delivered dose. This project was supported in part by award number CA182450 from the National Cancer Institute

  14. SU-F-T-166: On the Nature of the Background Visible Light Observed in Fiber Optic Dosimetry of Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Kassaee, A; Finlay, J [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Taleei, R [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The nature of the background visible light observed during fiber optic dosimetry of proton beams, whether it is due to Cherenkov radiation or not, has been debated in the literature recently. In this work, experimentally and by means of Monte Carlo simulations, we shed light on this problem and investigated the nature of the background visible light observed in fiber optics irradiated with proton beams. Methods: A bare silica fiber optics was embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms and irradiated with clinical proton beams with energies of 100–225 MeV at Roberts Proton Therapy Center. Luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze in detail the emission spectrum of the fiber tip across the visible range of 400–700 nm. Monte Carlo simulation was performed by using FLUKA Monte Carlo code to simulate Cherenkov light and ionizing radiation dose deposition in the fiber. Results: The experimental spectra of the irradiated silica fiber shows two distinct peaks at 450 and 650 nm, whose spectral shape is different from that of Cherenkov radiation. We believe that the nature of these peaks are connected to the point defects of silica including oxygen-deficiency center (ODC) and non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC). Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the experimental observations that Cherenkov radiation cannot be solely responsible for such a signal. Conclusion: We showed that Cherenkov radiation is not the dominant visible signal observed in bare fiber optics irradiated with proton beams. We observed two distinct peaks at 450 and 650 nm whose nature is connected with the point defects of silica fiber including oxygen-deficiency center and non-bridging oxygen hole center.

  15. SU-F-T-260: Using Portal Image Device for Pre-Treatment QA in Volumetric Modulated Arc Plans with Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, H; Qi, P; Yu, N; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement and validate a method of using electronic portal image device (EPID) for pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using flattering filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: On Varian Edge with 6MV FFF beam, open field (from 2×2 cm to 20×20 cm) EPID images were acquired with 200 monitor unit (MU) at the image device to radiation source distance of 150cm. With 10×10 open field and calibration unit (CU) provided by vendor to EPID image pixel, a dose conversion factor was determined by dividing the center dose calculated from the treatment planning system (TPS) to the corresponding CU readout on the image. Water phantom measured beam profile and the output factors for various field sizes were further correlated to those of EPID images. The dose conversion factor and correction factors were then used for converting the portal images to the planner dose distributions of clinical fields. A total of 28 VMAT fields of 14 SBRT plans (8 lung, 2 prostate, 2 liver and 2 spine) were measured. With 10% low threshold cutoff, the delivered dose distributions were compared to the reference doses calculated in water phantom from the TPS. A gamma index analysis was performed for the comparison in percentage dose difference/distance-to-agreement specifications. Results: The EPID device has a linear response to the open fields with increasing MU. For the clinical fields, the gamma indices between the converted EPID dose distributions and the TPS calculated 2D dose distributions were 98.7%±1.1%, 94.0%±3.4% and 70.3%±7.7% for the criteria of 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm, respectively. Conclusion: Using a portal image device, a high resolution and high accuracy portal dosimerty was achieved for pre-treatment QA verification for SBRT VMAT plans with FFF beams.

  16. SU-F-T-81: Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Fan, J; Eldib, A; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating nose skin with an electron beam is of a substantial challenge due to uneven nose surfaces and tissue heterogeneity, and consequently could have a great uncertainty of dose accuracy on the target. This work explored the method using Monte Carlo (MC)-based energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), which would be delivered with a photon MLC in a standard medical linac (Artiste). Methods: The traditional treatment on the nose skin involves the usage of a bolus, often with a single energy electron beam. This work avoided using the bolus, and utilized mixed energies of electron beams. An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. A clinical case of the nose skin, which was previously treated with a single 9 MeV electron beam, was replanned with the MERT method. The resultant dose distributions were compared with the plan previously clinically used. The dose volume histogram of the MERT plan is calculated to examine the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) and critical structure doses. Results: The target coverage and conformality in the MERT plan are improved as compared to the conventional plan. The MERT can provide more sufficient target coverage and less normal tissue dose underneath the nose skin. Conclusion: Compared to the conventional treatment technique, using MERT for the nose skin treatment has shown the dosimetric advantages in the PTV coverage and conformality. In addition, this technique eliminates the necessity of the cutout and bolus, which makes the treatment more efficient and accurate.

  17. Use of laser-ablated fast particle beams for the measurement of n/sub e/ and T/sub e/ profiles in the TEXTOR boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Ross, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a source of suprathermal atoms consisting of a laser system, which ablates small portions of coating materials from the rear side of a glass substrate. The coating can be either a single species or a multilayer of several-thousand-angstrom thickness. Neutral particle beams produced by this method can have energies in the range of about 10 eV and penetrate into the plasma up to line densities of about n/sub e/l = 1 x 10 13 cm -2 . For the determination of the electron temperature we have chosen two elements, the ionization and excitation cross sections of which differ in the range up to 100 eV. For TEXTOR a two-component target with a C-LiF coating is used, which delivers a Li and C beam with about 5- and 15-eV energy, respectively, ablated by a ruby laser with 1-J energy. The beam attenuation is determined from the emitted light by using a camera with a Si-diode array system for spatial recording. The different attenuations and emission characteristics then allow the determination of radial electron density and temperature profiles over the spatial range from the liner into a few centimeters beyond the limiter

  18. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  19. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  20. SU-F-T-138: Commissioning and Evaluating Dose Computation Models for a Dedicated Proton Line Scanning Beam Nozzle in Eclipse Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, P [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Proton and Radiation Therapy Center, Tao-yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Huang, H; Cai, S; Chen, H; Wu, S; Wu, T; Lee, S; Yeh, C; Wu, T [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Proton and Radiation Therapy Center, Tao-yuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, C [Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we present an effective method to derive low dose envelope of the proton in-air spot fluence at beam positions other than the isocenter to reduce amount of measurements required for planning commission. Also, we demonstrate commissioning and validation results of this method to the Eclipse treatment planning system (version 13.0.29) for a Sumitomo dedicated proton line scanning beam nozzle. Methods: The in-air spot profiles at five beam-axis positions (±200, ±100 and 0 mm) were obtained in trigger mode using a MP3 Water tank (PTW-Freiburg) and a pinpoint ionization chamber (model 31014, PTW-Freiburg). Low dose envelope (below 1% of the center dose) of the spot profile at isocenter was obtained by repeated point measurements to minimize dosimetry uncertainty. The double Gaussian (DG) model was used to fit and obtain optimal σ1, σ2 and their corresponding weightings through our in-house MATLAB (Mathworks) program. σ1, σ2 were assumed to expand linearly along the beam axis from a virtual source position calculated by back projecting fitted sigmas from the single Gaussian (SG) model. Absolute doses in water were validated using an Advanced Markus chamber at the depth of 2cm with Pristine Peak (BP) R90d ranging from 5–32 cm for 10×10 cm2 scanned fields. The field size factors were verified with square fields from 2 to 20 cm at 2cm and before BP depth. Results: The absolute dose outputs were found to be within ±3%. For field size factor, the agreement between calculated and measurement were within ±2% at 2cm and ±3% before BP, except for the field size below 2×2 cm2. Conclusion: The double Gaussian model was found to be sufficient for characterizing the Sumitomo dedicated proton line scanning nozzle. With our effective double Gaussian fitting method, we are able to save significant proton beam time with acceptable output accuracy.

  1. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  2. SU-E-T-61: A Practical Process for Fabricating Passive Scatter Proton Beam Modulation Compensation Filters Using 3D Printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, T; Drzymala, R [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to devise a practical fabrication process for passive scatter proton beam compensation filters (CF) that is competitive in time, cost and effort using 3D printing. Methods: DICOM compensator filter files for a proton beam were generated by our Eclipse (Varian, Inc.) treatment planning system. The compensator thickness specifications were extracted with in-house software written in Matlab (MathWorks, Inc.) code and written to a text file which could be read by the Rhinoceros 5, computer-aided design (CAD) package (Robert McNeel and Associates), which subsequently generated a smoothed model in a STereoLithographic also known as a Standard Tesselation Language file (STL). The model in the STL file was subsequently refined using Netfabb software and then converted to printing instructions using Cura. version 15.02.1. for our 3D printer. The Airwolf3D, model HD2x, fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer (Airwolf3D.com) was used for our fabrication system with a print speed of 150mm per second. It can print in over 22 different plastic filament materials in a build volume of 11” x 8” x 12”. We choose ABS plastic to print the 3D model of the imprint for our CFs. Results: Prints of the CF could be performed at a print speed of 70mm per second. The time to print the 3D topology for the CF for the 14 cm diameter snout of our Mevion 250 proton accelerator was less than 3 hours. The printed model is intended to subsequently be used as a mold to imprint a molten wax cylindrical to form the compensation after cooling. The whole process should be performed for a typical 3 beam treatment plan within a day. Conclusion: Use of 3D printing is practical and can be used to print a 3D model of a CF within a few hours.

  3. SU-E-T-61: A Practical Process for Fabricating Passive Scatter Proton Beam Modulation Compensation Filters Using 3D Printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, T; Drzymala, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to devise a practical fabrication process for passive scatter proton beam compensation filters (CF) that is competitive in time, cost and effort using 3D printing. Methods: DICOM compensator filter files for a proton beam were generated by our Eclipse (Varian, Inc.) treatment planning system. The compensator thickness specifications were extracted with in-house software written in Matlab (MathWorks, Inc.) code and written to a text file which could be read by the Rhinoceros 5, computer-aided design (CAD) package (Robert McNeel and Associates), which subsequently generated a smoothed model in a STereoLithographic also known as a Standard Tesselation Language file (STL). The model in the STL file was subsequently refined using Netfabb software and then converted to printing instructions using Cura. version 15.02.1. for our 3D printer. The Airwolf3D, model HD2x, fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer (Airwolf3D.com) was used for our fabrication system with a print speed of 150mm per second. It can print in over 22 different plastic filament materials in a build volume of 11” x 8” x 12”. We choose ABS plastic to print the 3D model of the imprint for our CFs. Results: Prints of the CF could be performed at a print speed of 70mm per second. The time to print the 3D topology for the CF for the 14 cm diameter snout of our Mevion 250 proton accelerator was less than 3 hours. The printed model is intended to subsequently be used as a mold to imprint a molten wax cylindrical to form the compensation after cooling. The whole process should be performed for a typical 3 beam treatment plan within a day. Conclusion: Use of 3D printing is practical and can be used to print a 3D model of a CF within a few hours

  4. SU-F-T-215: An Investigation Of Multi-Scanner CT Hounsfield Unit Calibration for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Using 3D Gamma Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Liu, Q; Liang, J; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compare and investigate the dosimetric impacts on pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton treatment plans generated with CT calibration curves from four different CT scanners and one averaged ‘global’ CT calibration curve. Methods: The four CT scanners are located at three different hospital locations within the same health system. CT density calibration curves were collected from these scanners using the same CT calibration phantom and acquisition parameters. Mass density to HU value tables were then commissioned in a commercial treatment planning system. Five disease sites were chosen for dosimetric comparisons at brain, lung, head and neck, adrenal, and prostate. Three types of PBS plans were generated at each treatment site using SFUD, IMPT, and robustness optimized IMPT techniques. 3D dose differences were investigated using 3D Gamma analysis. Results: The CT calibration curves for all four scanners display very similar shapes. Large HU differences were observed at both the high HU and low HU regions of the curves. Large dose differences were generally observed at the distal edges of the beams and they are beam angle dependent. Out of the five treatment sites, lung plans exhibits the most overall range uncertainties and prostate plans have the greatest dose discrepancy. There are no significant differences between the SFUD, IMPT, and the RO-IMPT methods. 3D gamma analysis with 3%, 3 mm criteria showed all plans with greater than 95% passing rate. Two of the scanners with close HU values have negligible dose difference except for lung. Conclusion: Our study shows that there are more than 5% dosimetric differences between different CT calibration curves. PBS treatment plans generated with SFUD, IMPT, and the robustness optimized IMPT has similar sensitivity to the CT density uncertainty. More patient data and tighter gamma criteria based on structure location and size will be used for further investigation.

  5. SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L; Soldner, A; Kirk, M; Fager, M; Solberg, T; Robert, L; Dolney, D [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The beam range uncertainty presents a special challenge for proton therapy. Novel technologies currently under development offer strategies to reduce the range uncertainty [1,2]. This work quantifies the potential advantages that could be realized by such a reduction for dosimetrically challenging chordomas at the base of skull. Therapeutic improvement was assessed by evaluating tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods: Treatment plans were made for a modulated-scanned proton delivery technique using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The prescription dose was 7920 cGy to the CTV. Three different range uncertainty scenarios were considered: 5 mm (3.5% of the beam range + 1 mm, representing current clinical practice, “Curr”), 2 mm (1.3%), and 1 mm (0.7%). For each of 4 patients, 3 different PTVs were defined via uniform expansion of the CTV by the value of the range uncertainty. Tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for organs-at-risk (OARs) were calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman[3] formalism and published model parameters [ref Terahara[4], quantec S10, Burman Red Journal v21 pp 123]. Our plan optimization strategy was to achieve PTV close to prescription while maintaining OAR NTCP values at or better than the Curr plan. Results: The average TCP values for the 5, 2, and 1 mm range uncertainty scenarios are 51%, 55% and 65%. The improvement in TCP for patients was between 4 and 30%, depending primarily on the proximity of the GTV to OAR. The average NTCPs for the brainstem and cord were about 4% and 1%, respectively, for all target margins. Conclusion: For base of skull chordomas, reduced target margins can substantially increase the TCP without increasing the NTCP. This work demonstrates the potential significance of a reduction in the range uncertainty for proton beams.

  6. SU-E-T-327: Dosimetric Impact of Beam Energy for Intrabeam Breast IORT with Different Residual Cancer Cell Distributions After Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwid, M; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of beam energy to the IORT treatment of residual cancer cells with different cancer cell distributions after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: The three dimensional (3D) radiation doses of IORT using a 4-cm spherical applicator at the energy of 40 keV and 50 keV were separately calculated at different depths of the postsurgical tumor bed. The modified linear quadratic model (MLQ) was used to estimate the radiobiological response of the tumor cells assuming different radio-sensitivities and density distributions. The impact of radiation was evaluated for two types of breast cancer cell lines (α /β=10, and α /β =3.8) at 20 Gy dose prescribed at the applicator surface. Cancer cell distributions in the postsurgical tissue field were assumed to be a Gaussian with the standard deviations of 0.5, 1 and 2 mm respectively, namely the cancer cell infiltrations of 1.5, 3, and 6 mm respectively. The surface cancer cell percentage was assumed to be 0.01%, 0.1%, 1% and 10% separately. The equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all the scenarios were calculated. Results: The EUDs were found to be dependent on the distributions of cancer cells, but independent of the cancer cell radio-sensitivities and the density at the surface. EUDs of 50 keV are 1% larger than that of 40 keV. For a prescription dose of 20 Gy, EUDs of 50 keV beam are 17.52, 16.21 and 13.14 Gy respectively for 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm of the standard deviation of cancer cell Gaussian distributions. Conclusion: The impact by selected energies of IORT beams is very minimal. When energy is changed from 50 keV to 40 keV, the EUDs are almost the same for the same cancer cell distribution. 40 keV can be safely used as an alternative of 50 keV beam in IORT

  7. SU-E-T-327: Dosimetric Impact of Beam Energy for Intrabeam Breast IORT with Different Residual Cancer Cell Distributions After Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwid, M; Zhang, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of beam energy to the IORT treatment of residual cancer cells with different cancer cell distributions after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: The three dimensional (3D) radiation doses of IORT using a 4-cm spherical applicator at the energy of 40 keV and 50 keV were separately calculated at different depths of the postsurgical tumor bed. The modified linear quadratic model (MLQ) was used to estimate the radiobiological response of the tumor cells assuming different radio-sensitivities and density distributions. The impact of radiation was evaluated for two types of breast cancer cell lines (α /β=10, and α /β =3.8) at 20 Gy dose prescribed at the applicator surface. Cancer cell distributions in the postsurgical tissue field were assumed to be a Gaussian with the standard deviations of 0.5, 1 and 2 mm respectively, namely the cancer cell infiltrations of 1.5, 3, and 6 mm respectively. The surface cancer cell percentage was assumed to be 0.01%, 0.1%, 1% and 10% separately. The equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all the scenarios were calculated. Results: The EUDs were found to be dependent on the distributions of cancer cells, but independent of the cancer cell radio-sensitivities and the density at the surface. EUDs of 50 keV are 1% larger than that of 40 keV. For a prescription dose of 20 Gy, EUDs of 50 keV beam are 17.52, 16.21 and 13.14 Gy respectively for 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm of the standard deviation of cancer cell Gaussian distributions. Conclusion: The impact by selected energies of IORT beams is very minimal. When energy is changed from 50 keV to 40 keV, the EUDs are almost the same for the same cancer cell distribution. 40 keV can be safely used as an alternative of 50 keV beam in IORT.

  8. SU-F-T-373: Monte Carlo Versus Pencil Beam Dose Calculation for Spine SBRT Treatments Using HybridARC and Sliding Windows IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, C; Pino, M; Caussa, L; Garrigo, E [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina); Molineu, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithm compared to Pencil Beam (PB) on Spine SBRT with HybridARC (HA) and sliding windows IMRT (dMLC) treatment modality. Methods: A 6MV beam (1000MU/min) produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) equipped with HDMLC was used. HA uses 1 arc plus 8 IMRT beams (arc weight between 60–40%) and dIMRT 15 beams. Plans were calculated using iPlan v.4.5.3 (BrainLAB) and the treatment dose prescription was 27Gy in 3 fractions. Dose calculation was done by PB (4mm spatial resolution) with heterogeneity correction and MC dose to water (4mm spatial resolution and 4% mean variance). PTV and spinal cord dose comparison were done. Study was done on 12 patients. IROC Spine Phantom was used to validate HA and quantify dose variation using PB and MC algorithm. Results: The difference between PB and MC for PTV D98%, D95%, Dmean, D2% were 2.6% [−5.1, 6.8], 0.1% [−4.2, 5.4], 0.9% [−1.5, 3.8] and 2.4% [−0.5, 8.3]. The difference between PB and MC for spinal cord Dmax, D1.2cc and D0.35cc were 5.3% [−6.4, 18.4], 9% [−7.0, 17.0] and 7.6% [−0.6, 14.8] respectively. IROC spine phantom shows PTV TLD dose variation of 0.98% for PB and 1.01% for MC. Axial and sagittal film plane gamma index (5%-3mm) was 95% and 97% for PB and 95% and 99% for MC. Conclusion: PB slightly underestimates the dose for the PTV. For the spinal cord PB underestimates the dose and dose differences could be as high as 18% which could have unexpected clinical impact. CI shows no variation between PB and MC for both treatment modalities Treatment modalities have no impact with the dose calculation algorithms used. Following the IROC pass-fail criteria, treatment acceptance requirement was fulfilled for PB and MC.

  9. SU-F-T-183: Design of a Beam Shaping Assembly of a Compact DD-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, M; Liu, Y; Nie, L [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to shape the 2.45-MeV neutrons produced by a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator and to optimize the beam output for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors Methods: MCNP is used for this simulation study. The simulation model consists of a neutron surface source that resembles an actual DD source and is surrounded by a BSA. The neutron source emits 2.45-MeV neutrons isotropically. The BSA is composed of a moderator, reflector, collimator and filter. Various types of materials and geometries are tested for each component to optimize the neutron output. Neutron characteristics are measured with an 2×2×2-cm{sup 3} air-equivalent cylinder at the beam exit. The ideal BSA is determined by evaluating the in-air parameters, which include epithermal neutron per source neutron, fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron, and photon dose per epithermal neutron. The parameter values are compared to those recommended by the IAEA. Results: The ideal materials for reflector and thermal neutron filter were lead and cadmium, respectively. The thickness for reflector was 43 cm and for filter was 0.5 mm. At present, the best-performing moderator has 25 cm of AlF{sub 3} and 5 cm of MgF{sub 2}. This layout creates a neutron spectrum that has a peak at approximately 10 keV and produces 1.35E-4 epithermal neutrons per source neutron per cm{sup 2}. Additional neutron characteristics, fast neutrons per epithermal neutron and photon per epithermal neutron, are still under investigation. Conclusion: Working is ongoing to optimize the final layout of the BSA. The neutron spectrum at the beam exit window of the final configuration will have the maximum number of epithermal neutrons and limited photon and fast neutron contaminations within the recommended values by IAEA. Future studies will also include phantom experiments to validate the simulation results.

  10. SU-E-T-254: Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo Code Parameters for Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Based On Simulation with FLUKA General-Purpose Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosu, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics ' Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Takashina, M; Koizumi, M [Department of Medical Physics ' Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Das, I; Moskvin, V [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo codes are becoming important tools for proton beam dosimetry. However, the relationships between the customizing parameters and percentage depth dose (PDD) of GATE and PHITS codes have not been reported which are studied for PDD and proton range compared to the FLUKA code and the experimental data. Methods: The beam delivery system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled for the uniform scanning beam in FLUKA and transferred identically into GATE and PHITS. This computational model was built from the blue print and validated with the commissioning data. Three parameters evaluated are the maximum step size, cut off energy and physical and transport model. The dependence of the PDDs on the customizing parameters was compared with the published results of previous studies. Results: The optimal parameters for the simulation of the whole beam delivery system were defined by referring to the calculation results obtained with each parameter. Although the PDDs from FLUKA and the experimental data show a good agreement, those of GATE and PHITS obtained with our optimal parameters show a minor discrepancy. The measured proton range R90 was 269.37 mm, compared to the calculated range of 269.63 mm, 268.96 mm, and 270.85 mm with FLUKA, GATE and PHITS, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the dependence of the results for PDDs obtained with GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo generalpurpose codes on the customizing parameters by using the whole computational model of the treatment nozzle. The optimal parameters for the simulation were then defined by referring to the calculation results. The physical model, particle transport mechanics and the different geometrybased descriptions need accurate customization in three simulation codes to agree with experimental data for artifact-free Monte Carlo simulation. This study was supported by Grants-in Aid for Cancer Research (H22-3rd Term Cancer Control-General-043) from the Ministry of Health

  11. SU-E-T-273: Radiation Shielding for a Fixed Horizontal-Beam Linac in a Shipping Container and a Conventional Treatment Vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, M; Balter, P; Beadle, B; Chi, P; Stingo, F; Court, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed horizontal-beam linac, where the patient is treated in a seated position, could lower the overall costs of the treatment unit and room shielding substantially. This design also allows the treatment room and control area to be contained within a reduced space, such as a shipping container. The main application is the introduction of low-cost, high-quality radiation therapy to low- and middle-income regions. Here we consider shielding for upright treatments with a fixed-6MV-beam linac in a shipping container and a conventional treatment vault. Methods: Shielding calculations were done for two treatment room layouts using calculation methods in NCRP Report 151: (1) a shipping container (6m × 2.4m with the remaining space occupied by the console area), and (2) the treatment vault in NCRP 151 (7.8m by 5.4m by 3.4m). The shipping container has a fixed gantry that points in one direction at all times. For the treatment vault, various beam directions were evaluated. Results: The shipping container requires a primary barrier of 168cm concrete (4.5 TVL), surrounded by a secondary barrier of 3.6 TVL. The other walls require between 2.8–3.3 TVL. Multiple shielding calculations were done along the side wall. The results show that patient scatter increases in the forward direction and decreases dramatically in the backward direction. Leakage scatter also varies along the wall, depending largely on the distance between the gantry and the wall. For the treatment room, fixed-beam requires a slightly thicker primary barrier than the conventional linac (0.6 TVL), although this barrier is only needed in the center of one wall. The secondary barrier is different only by 0–0.2 TVL. Conclusion: This work shows that (1) the shipping container option is achievable, using indigenous materials for shielding and (2) upright treatments can be performed in a conventional treatment room with minimal additional shielding. Varian Medical Systems

  12. SU-E-T-273: Radiation Shielding for a Fixed Horizontal-Beam Linac in a Shipping Container and a Conventional Treatment Vault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, M; Balter, P; Beadle, B; Chi, P; Stingo, F; Court, L [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A fixed horizontal-beam linac, where the patient is treated in a seated position, could lower the overall costs of the treatment unit and room shielding substantially. This design also allows the treatment room and control area to be contained within a reduced space, such as a shipping container. The main application is the introduction of low-cost, high-quality radiation therapy to low- and middle-income regions. Here we consider shielding for upright treatments with a fixed-6MV-beam linac in a shipping container and a conventional treatment vault. Methods: Shielding calculations were done for two treatment room layouts using calculation methods in NCRP Report 151: (1) a shipping container (6m × 2.4m with the remaining space occupied by the console area), and (2) the treatment vault in NCRP 151 (7.8m by 5.4m by 3.4m). The shipping container has a fixed gantry that points in one direction at all times. For the treatment vault, various beam directions were evaluated. Results: The shipping container requires a primary barrier of 168cm concrete (4.5 TVL), surrounded by a secondary barrier of 3.6 TVL. The other walls require between 2.8–3.3 TVL. Multiple shielding calculations were done along the side wall. The results show that patient scatter increases in the forward direction and decreases dramatically in the backward direction. Leakage scatter also varies along the wall, depending largely on the distance between the gantry and the wall. For the treatment room, fixed-beam requires a slightly thicker primary barrier than the conventional linac (0.6 TVL), although this barrier is only needed in the center of one wall. The secondary barrier is different only by 0–0.2 TVL. Conclusion: This work shows that (1) the shipping container option is achievable, using indigenous materials for shielding and (2) upright treatments can be performed in a conventional treatment room with minimal additional shielding. Varian Medical Systems.

  13. Design of experiment existing parameter physics for supporting of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) method a t the piercing radial beam port of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indry Septiana Novitasari; Yosaphat Sumardi; Widarto

    2014-01-01

    The experiment existing parameters physics for supporting of in vivo and in vitro test facility of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preliminary study at the piercing radial beam port has been done. The existing experiments is needed for determining that the parameter physics is fulfill the BNCT method requirement. To realize the existing experiment have been done by design analysis, methodology, calculation method and some procedure related with radiation safety analysis and environment. Preparation for existing experiment physics such as foil detector of Gold (Au) should be irradiated for 30 minute, irradiation instrument and procedure related with the experiment for radiation safety. (author)

  14. SU-F-T-506: Development and Commissioning of the Effective and Efficient Grid Therapy Using High Dose Rate Flattening Filter Free Beam and Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M; Wen, N; Beyer, C; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Zhao, B [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating bulky tumors with grid therapy (GT) has demonstrated high response rates. Long delivery time (∼15min), with consequent increased risk of intrafraction motion, is a major disadvantage of conventional MLC-based GT (MLC-GT). The goal of this study was to develop and commission a MLC-GT technique with similar dosimetric characteristics, but more efficient delivery. Methods: Grid plan was designed with 10X-FFF (2400MU/min) beam and MLC in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Grid size was 1cm by 1cm and grid-to-grid distance was 2cm. Field-in-field technique was used to flatten the dose profile at depth of 10cm. Prescription was 15Gy at 1.5cm depth. Doses were verified at depths of 1.5cm, 5cm and 10cm. Point dose was measured with a plastic scintillator detector (PSD) while the planar dose was measured with calibrated Gafchromic EBT3 films in a 20cm think, 30cmx30cm solid water phantom. The measured doses were compared to the doses calculated in the treatment planning system. Percent depth dose (PDD) within the grid was also measured using EBT3 film. Five clinical cases were planned to compare beam-on time. Results: The valley-to-peak dose ratio at the 3 depths was approximately 10–15%, which is very similar to published result. The average point dose difference between the PSD measurements and TPS calculation is 2.1±0.6%. Film dosimetry revealed good agreement between the delivered and calculated dose. The average gamma passing rates at the 3 depths were 95% (3%, 1mm). The average percent difference between the measured PDD and calculated PDD was 2.1% within the depth of 20cm. The phantom plan delivery time was 3.6 min. Average beam-on time was reduced by 66.1±5.6% for the 5 clinical cases. Conclusion: An effective and efficient GT technique was developed and commissioned for the treatment of bulky tumors using FFF beam combined with MLC and automation. The Department of Radiation Oncology at Henry Ford Health System receives research

  15. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  16. Beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed. (author)

  17. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souris, K; Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L; Janssens, G; Sterpin, E; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  18. SU-E-T-493: Influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 Megavolts Energy On Rapid Arc Radiotherapy Planning for Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girigesh, Y; Kumar, L; Raman, K; Mishra, M [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 MV energy on RA planning for Ca. Cervix. Methods: CT data sets of eleven patients reported with carcinoma cervix were used for RA planning for 10MV -FFB and 10MV-FFFB. RA plans were generated using two full arcs.All RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4Gy in 28 fractions for PTV and ALARA for OAR’s. All plans were analysed for PTV Coverage, conformity Index, homogeneity index, dose to OAR’s, integral dose to normal tissue and total monitor units were studied. Results: DVH was used to evaluate RA plans for both 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB photon beam. Planning results show a comparable PTV coverage for both energies. Results shows volume of PTV receiving prescription dose were 95.10+ 0.09% and 95.09 +0.11%, and volume of PTV receiving a dose of 107% is 0.45+0.96% and 5.25+8.9%, homogeneity index (HI) were 1.051+0.007 and 1.066+0.008, Conformity Index(CI) were 1.003+0.019 and 1.012+0.013, Mean Integral dose were 2.65+0.34 and 2.60+0.33(*10−5Gy.cm3) for 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB respectively. 10MV-FB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in mean doses to bladder, rectum, bowel and mean total number of MU’s and also shows remarkable decrease in mean total no. of MU’s by 43.7% in comparison to 10MV-FFFB. There is statistically significant (p<0.05) difference found in CI and HI for 10MV-FB in comparison to 10MV -FFF beam. 10MV-FFFB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) for mean NTID and delivers 1.65 % less NTID in comparison to 10 MV- FB. Conclusion: 10MV-FB is superior to 10MV-FFFB for rapid arc planning in case of Cervix carcinomas, it offers better target coverage and OAR’s sparing, comparable mean Integral dose to normal tissues and 10 MV- FB also produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distribution in comparison to 10MV-FFFB.

  19. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  20. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi, E-mail: fukumitsun@yahoo.co.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira [Department of Otolaryngology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  1. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin

  2. SU-E-T-172: Evaluation of the Exradin A26 Ion Chamber in Megavoltage Photon Beams as a Reference Class Instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Exradin A26 is a new design of micro-ionization ion chamber that externally resembles the Exradin A16 model but has significant internal changes to address measurement issues reported in the literature for the A16. This project involved the characterization of two versions of the A26 chamber in high energy x-rays with particular reference to the performance specification laid out in the imminent Addendum to TG-51. Methods: The Exradin A26 was investigated in a range of megavoltage photon beams (6–25 MV). Investigations looked at chamber settling, ion recombination and polarity. Since it has been previously shown that non-ideal performance is most easily identified through ion recombination measurements, the focus was on the determination of Pion. Results: i) Chamber settling - the chamber response stabilizes very quickly (within 3 minutes), even after a large change in the polarizing voltage.ii) The polarity correction was found to be small (within 0.2% of unity)iii) The chamber showed linear behavior for a Jaffe plot (1/reading vs 1/polarizing voltage) for applied voltages ≤ 200 V.iv) The recombination correction showed a linear variation with the doseper- pulse, was not significantly dependent on the polarity of the collecting voltage and was consistent with the chamber dimensions (i.e. agreed with Boag theory). Conclusion: An initial investigation of the Exradin A26 micro chamber suggests that although its performance exceeds the AAPM specification for a reference-class ion chamber for use in megavoltage photon beams it is a significant improvement over the previous A16 design. Further work is required to evaluate long-term stability and determine kQ factors

  3. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  4. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30–83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22–82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4–89.6 GyE over 30–64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  5. SU-E-T-339: Dosimetric Verification of Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm On An Air Cavity for 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to verify the accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm on an air cavity for a single radiation field using 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. Methods: A rectangular slab phantom containing an air cavity was made for this study. The CT images of the phantom for dose calculation were scanned with and without film at measurement depths (4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and 7.5 cm). The central axis doses (CADs) and the off-axis doses (OADs) were measured by film and calculated with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and AXB for field sizes ranging from 2 Χ 2 to 5 Χ 5 cm 2 of 6-MV FFF beams. Both algorithms were divided into AXB-w and AAA -w when included the film in phantom for dose calculation, and AXB-w/o and AAA-w/o in calculation without film. The calculated OADs for both algorithms were compared with the measured OADs and difference values were determined using root means squares error (RMSE) and gamma evaluation. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between the measured and calculated CAD for AXB-w was most agreement than others. Compared to the %Diff with and without film, the %Diffs with film were decreased than without within both algorithms. The %Diffs for both algorithms were reduced with increasing field size and increased relative to the depth increment. RMSEs of CAD for AXB-w were within 10.32% for both inner-profile and penumbra, while the corresponding values of AAA-w appeared to 96.50%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB within air cavity shows more accurate than with AAA compared to the measured dose. Furthermore, we found that the AXB-w was superior to AXB-w/o in this region when compared against the measurements

  6. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow during double-sided laser beam welding of T-joints for aluminum aircraft fuselage panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibin; Tao, Wang; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Shi, Chunyuan

    2017-06-01

    In comparison with conventional laser beam welding, double-sided laser beam welding has two laser heat sources simultaneously and symmetrically loaded from both sides makes it to be a more complicated coupled heat transport and fluid flow process. In this work, in order to understand the heat transfer and fluid flow, a three-dimensional model was developed and validated with the experimental results. The temperature field, fluid flow field, and keyhole characteristic were calculated using the developed model by FLUENT software. Calculated results indicated that the temperature and fluid flow fields were bilateral symmetry along the stringer center, and the molten pool maximum length was located near the keyhole intersection position. The skin side had higher temperature and faster cooling speed. Several characteristic flow patterns in the weld pool cross section, including the vortexes flows near the keyhole opening position, the convection flows above the keyhole intersection location, the regularity downward flows at the molten pool bottom. And in the lengthwise section, a distinct vortex flow below the keyhole, and the liquid metal behind the keyhole first flowed to near the molten pool maximum length location and then to the molten pool surface. Perpendicular to and along welding direction the keyhole liquid metal flowed to the weld molten pool surface and around the keyhole, respectively. The special temperature fields and fluid flow patterns were closely related to the effects of the double sides' laser energy coupling and enhancement. The calculated weld pool geometry basically in good agreement with the experimental results indicated that the developed model was validity and reasonable.

  7. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of a Gaussian beam (GB) into a symmetrical higher order TEMp0 Laguerre Gaussian beam (LGB) intensity distribution of which is further rectified and transformed into a Gaussian intensity distribution in the plane of a converging...

  8. Reprodutibilidade das mensurações da espessura das tábuas ósseas na tomografia computadorizada Cone-Beam utilizando diferentes protocolos de aquisição de imagem Reproducibility of bone plate thickness measurements with Cone-Beam Computed Tomography using different image acquisition protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Carmo de Menezes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: quanto menor a dimensão do voxel, maior a nitidez da imagem de tomografia computadorizada Cone-Beam (TCCB, porém, maior a dose de radiação emitida. OBJETIVOS: avaliar e comparar a reprodutibilidade da mensuração da espessura das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual em imagens de TCCB, utilizando diferentes protocolos de aquisição de imagem com variação da dimensão do voxel. MÉTODOS: exames de TCCB foram tomados de 12 mandíbulas humanas secas, com dimensão do voxel de 0,2; 0,3 e 0,4mm, no aparelho i-CAT Cone-Beam 3-D Dental Imaging System. No software i-CAT Viewer, foi mensurada a espessura das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual, em um corte axial passando 12mm acima do forame mentoniano do lado direito. A reprodutibilidade intraexaminador foi avaliada por meio da aplicação do teste t pareado. Para a comparação interexaminadores, foi utilizado o teste t independente. Os resultados foram considerados com o nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: observou-se uma excelente reprodutibilidade interexaminadores para os três protocolos avaliados. A reprodutibilidade intraexaminadores foi muito boa, com exceção de algumas regiões dos dentes anteriores, que mostraram diferenças estatisticamente significativas, independentemente da dimensão do voxel. CONCLUSÃO: a mensuração da espessura das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual em imagens de TCCB mostrou boa precisão para exames obtidos com voxel de 0,2; 0,3 ou 0,4mm. A reprodutibilidade das mensurações na região anterior da mandíbula foi mais crítica do que na região posterior.INTRODUCTION: A smaller voxel dimension leads to greater resolution of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT, but a greater dosage of radiation is emitted. OBJECTIVE: Assess and compare the reproducibility of buccal and lingual bone plate thickness measurements in CBCT images using different image acquisition protocols, with variations in the voxel dimension. METHODS: CBCT exams

  9. SU-E-T-304: Dosimetric Comparison of Cavernous Sinus Tumors: Heterogeneity Corrected Pencil Beam (PB-Hete) Vs. X-Ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) Algorithms for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using PB-hete vs. XVMC algorithms for SRT treatments of cavernous sinus tumors. Methods: Using PB-hete SRT, five patients with cavernous sinus tumors received the prescription dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions for planning target volume PTV(V100%)=95%. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on T1/T2 MRI-CT-fused images. PTV (range 2.1–84.3cc, mean=21.7cc) was generated using a 5mm uniform-margin around GTV. PB-hete SRT plans included a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/static beams delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000 MU/min) beam. Plans were re-optimized using XVMC algorithm with identical beam geometry and MLC positions. Comparison of plan specific PTV(V99%), maximal, mean, isocenter doses, and total monitor units(MUs) were evaluated. Maximal dose to OARs such as brainstem, optic-pathway, spinal cord, and lenses as well as normal tissue volume receiving 12Gy(V12) were compared between two algorithms. All analysis was performed using two-tailed paired t-tests of an upper-bound p-value of <0.05. Results: Using either algorithm, no dosimetrically significant differences in PTV coverage (PTVV99%,maximal, mean, isocenter doses) and total number of MUs were observed (all p-values >0.05, mean ratios within 2%). However, maximal doses to optic-chiasm and nerves were significantly under-predicted using PB-hete (p=0.04). Maximal brainstem, spinal cord, lens dose and V12 were all comparable between two algorithms, with exception of one patient with the largest PTV who exhibited 11% higher V12 with XVMC. Conclusion: Unlike lung tumors, XVMC and PB-hete treatment plans provided similar PTV coverage for cavernous sinus tumors. Majority of OARs doses were comparable between two algorithms, except for small structures such as optic chiasm/nerves which could potentially receive higher doses when using XVMC algorithm. Special attention may need to be paid on a case

  10. Negative ion beam processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, T.D.; Lawrence, G.P.; Bentley, R.F.; Malanify, J.J.; Jackson, J.A.

    1975-06-01

    Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory fiscal year 1975 work on production of intense, very bright, negative hydrogen (H - ), ion beams and conversion of a high-energy (a few hundred MeV) negative beam into a neutral beam are described. The ion source work has used a cesium charge exchange source that has produced H - ion beams greater than or equal to 10 mA (about a factor of 10 greater than those available 1 yr ago) with a brightness of 1.4 x 10 9 A/m 2 -rad 2 (about 18 times brighter than before). The high-energy, neutral beam production investigations have included measurements of the 800-MeV H - -stripping cross section in hydrogen gas (sigma/sub -10/, tentatively 4 x 10 -19 cm 2 ), 3- to 6-MeV H - -stripping cross sections in a hydrogen plasma (sigma/sub -10/, tentatively 2 to 4 x 10 -16 cm 2 ), and the small-angle scattering that results from stripping an 800-MeV H - ion beam to a neutral (H 0 ) beam in hydrogen gas. These last measurements were interrupted by the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility shutdown in December 1974, but should be completed early in fiscal year 1976 when the accelerator resumes operation. Small-angle scattering calculations have included hydrogen gas-stripping, plasma-stripping, and photodetachment. Calculations indicate that the root mean square angular spread of a 390-MeV negative triton (T - ) beam stripped in a plasma stripper may be as low as 0.7 μrad

  11. Automatic optimisation of beam orientations using the simplex algorithm and optimisation of quality control using statistical process control (S.P.C.) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (I.M.R.T.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, K.

    2008-11-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (I.M.R.T.) is currently considered as a technique of choice to increase the local control of the tumour while reducing the dose to surrounding organs at risk. However, its routine clinical implementation is partially held back by the excessive amount of work required to prepare the patient treatment. In order to increase the efficiency of the treatment preparation, two axes of work have been defined. The first axis concerned the automatic optimisation of beam orientations. We integrated the simplex algorithm in the treatment planning system. Starting from the dosimetric objectives set by the user, it can automatically determine the optimal beam orientations that best cover the target volume while sparing organs at risk. In addition to time sparing, the simplex results of three patients with a cancer of the oropharynx, showed that the quality of the plan is also increased compared to a manual beam selection. Indeed, for an equivalent or even a better target coverage, it reduces the dose received by the organs at risk. The second axis of work concerned the optimisation of pre-treatment quality control. We used an industrial method: Statistical Process Control (S.P.C.) to retrospectively analyse the absolute dose quality control results performed using an ionisation chamber at Centre Alexis Vautrin (C.A.V.). This study showed that S.P.C. is an efficient method to reinforce treatment security using control charts. It also showed that our dose delivery process was stable and statistically capable for prostate treatments, which implies that a reduction of the number of controls can be considered for this type of treatment at the C.A.V.. (author)

  12. SU-E-T-143: Effect of X-Ray and Cone Beam CT Reconstruction Parameters On Estimation of Bone Volume of Mice Used in Aging Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Pang, M; Troen, B; Rudin, S; Ionita, C [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variations in bone volume calculations in mice involved in aging research when changing cone beam micro-CT x-ray and reconstruction parameters. Methods: Mouse spines were placed on an indexed turn table that rotated 0.5° per projection and imaged by a self-built micro CT machine containing a CCD-based high-resolution x-ray detector. After the full 360° rotation data set of object images was obtained, a standard filtered back-projection cone beam reconstruction was performed. Four different kVp's between 40–70 kVp in 10kVp increments were selected. For each kVp two mAs settings were used. Each acquisition was reconstructed using two voxel sizes (12 and 25μm) and two step angles, 0.5° and 1°, respectively. A LabView program was written to determine the total bone volume contained in the mouse's total spine volume (bone plus gaps) as a measure of spine health. First, the user selected the desired 512×512 reconstruction to view the whole spine volume which was then used to select a gray-level threshold that allowed for viewing of the bone structure, then another threshold to include gaps. The program returned bone volume, bone × gap volume, and their ratio, BVF. Results: The calculated bone volume fractions were compared as a function of tube potential. Cases with 25μm slice thickness showed trials with lower kVp's had greater image contrast, which resulted in higher calculated bone volume fractions. Cases with 12μm reconstructed slice thickness were significantly noisier, and showed no clear maximum BVF. Conclusion: Using the projection images and reconstructions acquired from the micro CT, it can be shown that the micro-CT x-ray and reconstruction parameters significantly affect the total bone volume calculations. When comparing mice cohorts treated with different therapies researchers need to be aware of such details and use volumes which were acquired and processed in identical conditions.

  13. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Validation of High-Resolution 3D Patient QA for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning and IMPT by Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardin, A; Avery, S; Ding, X; Kassaee, A; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maryanski, M [MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Validation of high-resolution 3D patient QA for proton pencil beam scanning and IMPT by polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: Four BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeters (manufactured by MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) were used for patient QA at the Robert's Proton Therapy Center (RPTC, Philadelphia, PA). All dosimeters were sealed in identical thin-wall Pyrex glass spheres. Each dosimeter contained a set of markers for 3D registration purposes. The dosimeters were mounted in a consistent and reproducible manner using a custom build holder. Two proton pencil beam scanning plans were designed using Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system: 1) A two-field intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan and 2) one single field uniform dose (SFUD) plan. The IMPT fields were evaluated as a composite plan and individual fields, the SFUD plan was delivered as a single field plan.Laser CT scanning was performed using the manufacturer's OCTOPUS-IQ axial transmission laser CT scanner using a 1 mm slice thickness. 3D registration, analysis, and OD/cm to absorbed dose calibrations were perfomed using DICOM RT-Dose and CT files, and software developed by the manufacturer. 3D delta index, a metric equivalent to the gamma tool, was used for dose comparison. Results: Very good agreement with single IMPT fields and with SFUD was obtained. Composite IMPT fields had a less satisfactory agreement. The single fields had 3D delta index passing rates (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA) of 98.98% and 94.91%. The composite 3D delta index passing rate was 80.80%. The SFUD passing rate was 93.77%. Required shifts of the dose distributions were less than 4 mm. Conclusion: A formulation of the BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeter, suitable for 3D QA of proton patient plans is established and validated. Likewise, the mailed QA analysis service provided by the manufacturer is a practical option when required resources are unavailable. We fully disclose that the subject of this research regards a

  14. SU-F-T-622: Comparative Analysis of Pencil Beam and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of Thoracic Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Nicolai, W; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Wang, F; Lominskac, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ramanjappa, T [S. K. University, Anantapur, AP (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the impact of Pencil Beam(PB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm(AAA) dose calculation algorithms on OARs and planning target volume (PTV) in thoracic spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Ten Spine SBRT patients were planned on Brainlab iPlan system using hybrid plan consisting of 1–2 non-coplanar conformal-dynamic arcs and few IMRT beams treated on NovalisTx with 6MV photon. Dose prescription varied from 20Gy to 30Gy in 5 fractions depending on the situation of the patient. PB plans were retrospectively recalculated using the Varian Eclipse with AAA algorithm using same MUs, MLC pattern and grid size(3mm).Differences in dose volume parameters for PTV, spinal cord, lung, and esophagus were analyzed and compared for PB and AAA algorithms. OAR constrains were followed per RTOG-0631. Results: Since patients were treated using PB calculation, we compared all the AAA DVH values with respect to PB plan values as standard, although AAA predicts the dose more accurately than PB. PTV(min), PTV(Max), PTV(mean), PTV(D99%), PTV(D90%) were overestimated with AAA calculation on average by 3.5%, 1.84%, 0.95%, 3.98% and 1.55% respectively as compared to PB. All lung DVH parameters were underestimated with AAA algorithm mean deviation of lung V20, V10, V5, and 1000cc were 42.81%,19.83%, 18.79%, and 18.35% respectively. AAA overestimated Cord(0.35cc) by mean of 17.3%; cord (0.03cc) by 12.19% and cord(max) by 10.5% as compared to PB. Esophagus max dose were overestimated by 4.4% and 5cc by 3.26% for AAA algorithm as compared to PB. Conclusion: AAA overestimated the PTV dose values by up to 4%.The lung DVH had the greatest underestimation of dose by AAA versus PB. Spinal cord dose was overestimated by AAA versus PB. Given the critical importance of accuracy of OAR and PTV dose calculation for SBRT spine, more accurate algorithms and validation of calculated doses in phantom models are indicated.

  15. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewale, S [Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma, Lawton, OK (United States); Pokharel [21st Century Oncology, Estero, FL (United States); Singh, H [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Islam, M [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Rana, S [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  16. SU-F-T-152: Experimental Validation and Calculation Benchmark for a Commercial Monte Carlo Pencil BeamScanning Proton Therapy Treatment Planning System in Heterogeneous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Huang, S; Kang, M; Ainsley, C; Simone, C; McDonough, J; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Eclipse AcurosPT 13.7, the first commercial Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment planning system (TPS), was experimentally validated for an IBA dedicated PBS nozzle in the CIRS 002LFC thoracic phantom. Methods: A two-stage procedure involving the use of TOPAS 1.3 simulations was performed. First, Geant4-based TOPAS simulations in this phantom were experimentally validated for single and multi-spot profiles at several depths for 100, 115, 150, 180, 210 and 225 MeV proton beams, using the combination of a Lynx scintillation detector and a MatriXXPT ionization chamber array. Second, benchmark calculations were performed with both AcurosPT and TOPAS in a phantom identical to the CIRS 002LFC, with the exception that the CIRS bone/mediastinum/lung tissues were replaced with similar tissues that are predefined in AcurosPT (a limitation of this system which necessitates the two stage procedure). Results: Spot sigmas measured in tissue were in agreement within 0.2 mm of TOPAS simulation for all six energies, while AcurosPT was consistently found to have larger spot sigma (<0.7 mm) than TOPAS. Using absolute dose calibration by MatriXXPT, the agreements between profiles measurements and TOPAS simulation, and calculation benchmarks are over 97% except near the end of range using 2 mm/2% gamma criteria. Overdosing and underdosing were observed at the low and high density side of tissue interfaces, respectively, and these increased with increasing depth and decreasing energy. Near the mediastinum/lung interface, the magnitude can exceed 5 mm/10%. Furthermore, we observed >5% quenching effect in the conversion of Lynx measurements to dose. Conclusion: We recommend the use of an ionization chamber array in combination with the scintillation detector to measure absolute dose and relative PBS spot characteristics. We also recommend the use of an independent Monte Carlo calculation benchmark for the commissioning of a commercial TPS. Partially

  17. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Binding Energies of the pi-Stacked Anisole Dimer: New Molecular Beam-Laser Spectroscopy Experiments and CCSD(T) Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Mazzoni, F.; Pasquini, M.; Pietraperzia, G.; Becucci, M.; Müller-Dethlefs, K.; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 18 (2015), s. 6740-6746 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0058 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : binding energy * noncovalent interactions * pi stacking * laser spectroscopy * CCSD(T) calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015

  19. SU-E-T-782: Using Light Output From Doped Plastic Scintillators to Resolve the Linear Energy Transfer Spectrum of Clinical Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusrat, H; Pang, G; Ahmad, S; Keller, B; Sarfehnia, A

    2015-01-01

    beam

  20. SU-F-T-224: Importance of Timely Review of Daily Cone-Beam CTs: Dosimetric Evaluation of Rejected CBCTs for Head and Neck Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M; Yu, N; Joshi, N; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lin, S [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To dosimetrically evaluate the importance of timely reviewing daily CBCTs for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: After each fraction daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head and neck patients are reviewed by physicians prior to next treatment. Physician rejected image registrations of CBCT were identified and analyzed for 17 patients. These CBCT images were rigidly fused with planning CT images and the contours from the planning CT were transferred to CBCTs. Because of limited extension in the superior-inferior dimension contours with partial volumes in CBCTs were discarded. The treatment isocenter was placed by applying the clinically recorded shifts to the volume isocenter of the CBCT. Dose was recalculated at the shifted isocenter using a homogeneous dose calculation algorithm. Dosimetrically relevant changes defined as greater than 5% deviation from the clinically accepted plans but with homogeneous dose calculation were evaluated for the high dose (HD), intermediate dose (ID), and low dose (LD) CTVs, spinal cord, larynx, oropharynx, parotids, and submandibular glands. Results: Among seventeen rejected CBCTS, HD-CTVs, ID-CTVs, and LD-CTVs were completely included in the CBCTs for 17, 1, and 15 patients, respectively. The prescription doses to the HD-CTV, ID-CTV, and LD-CTV were received by < 95% of the CTV volumes in 5/17, 1/1, and 5/15 patients respectively. For the spinal cord, the maximum doses (D0.03cc) were increased > 5% in 13 of 17 patients. For the oropharynx, larynx, parotid, and submandibular glands, the mean dose of these organs at risk was increased > 5% in 7/17, 8/12, 11/16 and 6/16 patients, respectively. Conclusion: Timely review daily CBCTs for head and neck patients under daily CBCT guidance is important, and uncorrected setup errors can translate to dosimetrically relevant dose increases in organsat- risk and dose decreases in the clinical target volumes.

  1. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences

  2. SU-F-T-420: Dosimetry Comparison of Advanced External Beam Radiation Treatment Modalities to Brachytherapy Treatments in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwidu, U; Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shehadeh, M; AlKafi, M; Mahmood, R; Moftah, B [King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A retrospective comparison of dose distributions achievable by High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT), Helical TomoTherapy (TOMO), CyberKnife (CK) and RapidArc (RA) in locally advanced inoperable cervical cancer patients is presented. Methods: Five patients with advanced stage cervical carcinoma were selected for this study after a full course of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), chemotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy. To highlight any significant similarities/differences in dose distributions, high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) coverage, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and machine specific delivery limitations, we used D90 (dose received by 90% of the volume) as the parameter for HRCTV coverage as recommended by the GEC-ESTRO Working Group. We also compared both integral and differential dose volume histograms (DVH) between different dose distributions treatment modalities for HRCTV and OAR. Results: TOMO and RA provided the most conformal dose distributions to HRCTV. Median doses (in Gy) to organs at risk were; for rectal wall: 1.7±0.6, 2.5±0.6,1.2±0.3, and 1.5±0.6, and for bladder wall: 1.6±0.1, 2.4±0.4, 0.8±0.6, and 1.5±0.5, for HDRBT, TOMO, CK, and RA, respectively. Conclusion: Contemporary EBRT modalities might be able to replace brachytherapy treatments for cervix cancer. While brachytherapy dose distributions feature high dose gradients, EBRT modalities provide highly conformal dose distributions to the target. However, it is still not clear whether a highly conformal dose or high gradient dose is more clinically relevant for the HRCTV in cervix cancer patients.

  3. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  4. Paul Collier : Balancing beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    As former head of AB Operations, Paul Collier and his group were in the ‘cockpit’ for the LHC’s maiden voyage - piloting the first beam around the ring. But now, as Head of the Beams Department, he will need his feet firmly on the ground in order to balance all the beam activities at CERN. "As Department Head, I’ll have less direct contact with the machines," Collier says with a hint of regret. "I’ll still obviously be very involved, but they won’t actually let me loose in front of the keyboard anymore!" As the new Head of the BE Department, Collier will be in charge of nearly 400 people, and will oversee all the beam activities, including the preparations for the longest period of beam operation in the history of CERN. In the new organization, the BE, TE and EN Departments have been grouped together in the Accelerator and Technology Sector. "‘Partnership’ is a key word for the three departments," says Collier. "The n...

  5. Lightweight HPC beam OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sýkora, Michal; Jedlinský, Petr; Komanec, Jan

    2017-09-01

    In the design and construction of precast bridge structures, a general goal is to achieve the maximum possible span length. Often, the weight of individual beams makes them difficult to handle, which may be a limiting factor in achieving the desired span. The design of the OMEGA beam aims to solve a part of these problems. It is a thin-walled shell made of prestressed high-performance concrete (HPC) in the shape of inverted Ω character. The concrete shell with prestressed strands is fitted with a non-stressed tendon already in the casting yard and is more easily transported and installed on the site. The shells are subsequently completed with mild steel reinforcement and cores are cast in situ together with the deck. The OMEGA beams can also be used as an alternative to steel - concrete composite bridges. Due to the higher production complexity, OMEGA beam can hardly substitute conventional prestressed beams like T or PETRA completely, but it can be a useful alternative for specific construction needs.

  6. SU-E-T-537: Comparison of Intra-Operative Soft X-Rays to Low Energy Electron Beams for Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinsky, B; Diak, A; Gros, S; Sethi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Superficial soft x-ray applicators have recently been designed for use with existing intra-operative radiotherapy systems. These applicators may be used in treating superficial lesions which are conventionally treated with electron beams. The purpose of this abstract is to compare dose distributions of an intra-operative 50kV x-ray unit with low energy electrons for the treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: Dosimetric parameters for 1 and 3-cm diameter Intrabeam superficial x-ray applicators were measured with EBT3 Gafchromic film in a solid water phantom. Depth dose distributions and profiles (d=2, 5, 10 and 15mm) were obtained by prescribing a dose of 400cGy at 5mm depth below the phantom surface. Corresponding dose profiles for 6-MeV electrons were acquired from a Varian Clinac 21EX at 100 SSD. H and D calibration curves were generated for each modality for 0-800cGy. Results: Dose coverage, penumbra, dose uniformity, surface dose, and dose fall-off were examined. Compared to electrons, Intrabeam lateral dose coverage at 5mm depth was 70% larger with a much sharper (1/4) penumbra. Electron isodose levels bulged with depth, whereas Intrabeam isodose levels exhibited a convex cone shape. The Intrabeam dose profiles demonstrated horns in the dose distribution up to a 5mm depth and an exponential dose fall-off. Relative surface dose was higher for the Intrabeam applicators. Treatment times were comparable for both modalities. Conclusions: The very small penumbra of Intrabeam at shallow depths could be useful in treating superficial lesions adjacent to critical structures. The exponential dose fall-off of Intrabeam makes it appealing in the sparing of structures beyond the lesion. However, for lesions past a depth of 5mm, electrons would be desirable as they penetrate farther and provide skin sparing. Intrabeam may be preferable for sites that are difficult to treat with electrons due to mechanical and physical limitations

  7. SU-F-T-123: The Simulated Effect of the Breath-Hold Reproducibility Treating Locally-Advanced Lung Cancer with Pencil Beam Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, J [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Perrin, R [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, G F; Engelholm, S A [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lomax, A [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH, Zürich (Switzerland); Josipovic, M; Rosenschöld, AF [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, D C [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The breath-hold (BH) technique has been suggested to mitigate motion and reduce target coverage degradation due to motion effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inter-BH residual motion on the dose distribution for pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy of locally-advanced lung cancer patients. Methods: A dataset of visually-guided BH CT scans was acquired (10 scans per patient) taken from five lung cancer patients: three intra-fractionally repeated CT scans on treatment days 2,16 and 31, in addition to the day 0 planning CT scan. Three field intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed on the planning CT scan. Dose delivery on fraction 2, 16 and 31 were simulated on the three consecutive CT scans, assuming BH duration of 20s and soft tissue match. The dose was accumulated in the planning CT using deformable image registration, and scaled to simulate the full treatment of 66Gy(RBE) in 33 fractions. Results: The mean dose to the lungs and heart, and maximum dose to the spinal cord and esophagus were within 1% of the planned dose. The CTV V95% decreased and the inhomogeneity (D5%–D95%) increased on average 4.1% (0.4–12.2%) and 5.8% (2.2–13.4%), respectively, over the five patient cases. Conclusion: The results showed that the BH technique seems to spare the OARs in spite of inter-BH residual motion. However, small degradation of target coverage occurred for all patients, with 3/5 patients having a decrease in V95% ≤1%. For the remaining two patients, where V95% decreased up to 12%, the cause could be related to treatment related anatomical changes and, as in photon therapy, plan adaptation may be necessary to ensure target coverage. This study showed that BH could be a potential treatment option to reliably mitigate motion for the treatment of locally-advanced lung cancer using PBS proton therapy.

  8. SU-E-T-58: A Novel Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulation Scheme and Its Application in Cone Beam CT Projection Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is an important tool to solve radiotherapy and medical imaging problems. Low computational efficiency hinders its wide applications. Conventionally, MC is performed in a particle-by -particle fashion. The lack of control on particle trajectory is a main cause of low efficiency in some applications. Take cone beam CT (CBCT) projection simulation as an example, significant amount of computations were wasted on transporting photons that do not reach the detector. To solve this problem, we propose an innovative MC simulation scheme with a path-by-path sampling method. Methods: Consider a photon path starting at the x-ray source. After going through a set of interactions, it ends at the detector. In the proposed scheme, we sampled an entire photon path each time. Metropolis-Hasting algorithm was employed to accept/reject a sampled path based on a calculated acceptance probability, in order to maintain correct relative probabilities among different paths, which are governed by photon transport physics. We developed a package gMMC on GPU with this new scheme implemented. The performance of gMMC was tested in a sample problem of CBCT projection simulation for a homogeneous object. The results were compared to those obtained using gMCDRR, a GPU-based MC tool with the conventional particle-by-particle simulation scheme. Results: Calculated scattered photon signals in gMMC agreed with those from gMCDRR with a relative difference of 3%. It took 3.1 hr. for gMCDRR to simulate 7.8e11 photons and 246.5 sec for gMMC to simulate 1.4e10 paths. Under this setting, both results attained the same ∼2% statistical uncertainty. Hence, a speed-up factor of ∼45.3 was achieved by this new path-by-path simulation scheme, where all the computations were spent on those photons contributing to the detector signal. Conclusion: We innovatively proposed a novel path-by-path simulation scheme that enabled a significant efficiency enhancement for MC particle

  9. SU-E-T-58: A Novel Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulation Scheme and Its Application in Cone Beam CT Projection Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is an important tool to solve radiotherapy and medical imaging problems. Low computational efficiency hinders its wide applications. Conventionally, MC is performed in a particle-by -particle fashion. The lack of control on particle trajectory is a main cause of low efficiency in some applications. Take cone beam CT (CBCT) projection simulation as an example, significant amount of computations were wasted on transporting photons that do not reach the detector. To solve this problem, we propose an innovative MC simulation scheme with a path-by-path sampling method. Methods: Consider a photon path starting at the x-ray source. After going through a set of interactions, it ends at the detector. In the proposed scheme, we sampled an entire photon path each time. Metropolis-Hasting algorithm was employed to accept/reject a sampled path based on a calculated acceptance probability, in order to maintain correct relative probabilities among different paths, which are governed by photon transport physics. We developed a package gMMC on GPU with this new scheme implemented. The performance of gMMC was tested in a sample problem of CBCT projection simulation for a homogeneous object. The results were compared to those obtained using gMCDRR, a GPU-based MC tool with the conventional particle-by-particle simulation scheme. Results: Calculated scattered photon signals in gMMC agreed with those from gMCDRR with a relative difference of 3%. It took 3.1 hr. for gMCDRR to simulate 7.8e11 photons and 246.5 sec for gMMC to simulate 1.4e10 paths. Under this setting, both results attained the same ∼2% statistical uncertainty. Hence, a speed-up factor of ∼45.3 was achieved by this new path-by-path simulation scheme, where all the computations were spent on those photons contributing to the detector signal. Conclusion: We innovatively proposed a novel path-by-path simulation scheme that enabled a significant efficiency enhancement for MC particle

  10. SU-E-T-336: Dosimetric Properties of a New Solid Water High Equivalency Phantom for High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, F; Ohno, T; Onitsuka, R; Shimohigashi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric properties in high-energy photon beams for a Solid Water High Equivalency (SWHE, SW557) phantom (Gammex) which was newly developed as water mimicking material. Methods: The mass density of SWHE and SWHE/water electron density ratio are 1.032 g/cm 3 and 1.005 according to the manufacturer information, respectively. SWHE is more water equivalent material in physical characteristics and uniformity than conventional SW457. This study calculated the relative ionization ratio of water and SWHE as a function of depth from the cavity dose in PTW30013 and Exradin A19 Farmer-type ionization chambers using Monte Caro simulations. The simulation was performed with a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at SAD of 100 cm for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons. The ionization ratio was also measured with the PTW30013 chamber for 6 and 15 MV photons. In addition, the overall perturbation factor of both chambers was calculated for both phantoms. Results: The relative ionization ratio curves for water and SWHE was in good agreement for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE for both chambers was 0.999–1.002, 0.999–1.002, 1.001–1.004, 1.004–1.007, and 1.006–1.010 at depths of over the buildup region for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons, respectively. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE increased up to 1% with increasing the photon energy. The measured ionization ratio of water/SWHE for 6 and 15 MV photons agreed well with calculated values. The overall perturbation factor for both chambers was 0.983–0.988 and 0.978–0.983 for water and SWHE, respectively, in a range from 4 MV to 18 MV. Conclusion: The depth scaling factor of water/SWHE was equal to unity for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE at a reference depth was equal to unity for 4 and 6 MV and larger up to 0.7% than unity for 18 MV

  11. A Monte-Carlo study to assess the effect of 1.5 T magnetic fields on the overall robustness of pencil-beam scanning proton radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Landry, Guillaume; Resch, Andreas F.; Dedes, George; Kamp, Florian; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Parodi, Katia

    2017-11-01

    Combining magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) and proton therapy (PT) using pencil-beam scanning (PBS) may improve image-guided radiotherapy. We aimed at assessing the impact of a magnetic field on PBS-PT plan quality and robustness. Specifically, the robustness against anatomical changes and positioning errors in an MRI-guided scenario with a 30 cm radius 1.5 T magnetic field was studied for prostate PT. Five prostate cancer patients with three consecutive CT images (CT1-3) were considered. Single-field uniform dose PBS-PT plans were generated on the segmented CT1 with Monte-Carlo-based treatment planning software for inverse optimization. Plans were optimized at 90° gantry angle without B-field (no B), with  ±1.5 T B-field (B and minus B), as well as at 81° gantry angle and  +1.5 T (B G81). Plans were re-calculated on aligned CT2 and CT3 to study the impact of anatomical changes. Dose distributions were compared in terms of changes in DVH parameters, proton range and gamma-index pass-rates. To assess the impact of positioning errors, DVH parameters were compared for  ±5 mm CT1 patient shifts in anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) direction. Proton beam deflection considerably reduced robustness against inter-fractional changes for the B scenario. Range agreement, gamma-index pass-rates and PTV V95% were significantly lower compared to no B. Improved robustness was obtained for minus B and B G81, the latter showing only minor differences to no B. The magnetic field introduced slight dosimetric changes under LR shifts. The impact of AP shifts was considerably larger, and equivalent for scenarios with and without B-field. Results suggest that robustness equivalent to PT without magnetic field can be achieved by adaptation of the treatment parameters, such as B-field orientation (minus B) with respect to the patient and/or gantry angle (B G81). MRI-guided PT for prostate cancer might thus be implemented without compromising robustness

  12. Dos aproximaciones a la metodología de diseño a momento flexionante de secciones T en concreto reforzado que se comportan como rectangulares y constituyen la sección recta de la viguetería de losas aligeradas Two approaches to design methodology at T sections bending moment in reinforced concrete which behave as rectangular sections and constitute the straight sections of beams of light slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Christian Chanchí Golondrino

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo esboza dos aproximaciones sobre la ecuación de diseño a momento flexionante de secciones T en concreto reforzado que se comportan como secciones rectangulares y que trabajan como viguetería de losas aligeradas. La primera aproximación discute la viabilidad de usar el ancho del nervio de la vigueta en lugar de usar el ancho efectivo de la aleta, dentro del proceso de la obtención del acero, requerida para asumir un momento flexionante; la segunda aproximación discute la viabilidad de aproximar la ecuación cuadrática que rige la obtención del área del acero requerida para obtener un momento flexionante en una ecuación lineal, cuyas únicas variables son el área del acero y la altura efectiva de la sección T. Se ha dimensionado geométricamente un conjunto de secciones de losas aligeradas siguiendo los requisitos del título C13 de la norma sismo resistente colombiana NSR98, los cuales se obtuvieron para un modelo simplemente apoyado, cuya luz varía entre [2 - 7] m y el ancho del casetón ente [0.30 - 1] m. El dimensionamiento antes mencionado fue utilizado para sensibilizar la efectividad de cada una de las aproximaciones propuestas respecto a la solución general para la obtención del área del acero de la sección T que se comporta como rectangular.This article presents two approaches on the moment design equation of T shaped beams. Particularly the beam's T cross section analyzed behaves like a rectangular cross section when the beam works like a component of a slab system built from a set of T shaped beams. The first approach discusses the feasibility to use the web width instead of effective flange width to obtain the steel area associated to the moment solicitation of T shaped beam. The second approach discusses the feasibility to approach the quadratic equation used to obtain the steel required to take the bending moment into linear equation related to variables such as steel area and the effective depth

  13. SU-F-T-448: Use of Mixed Photon Energy Beam in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Plan for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, D; Kumar, M; Mohandas, P; Puri, A; Bhalla, N [Fortis Cancer Institute, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the impact of different photon beam combination during VMAT planning and treatment delivery. Methods: Five prostate patients with no nodal involvement were chosen for the study and only prostate was considered as target (7920cGy/44fractions). In each case, three different VMAT plans were generated with two arcs (200°–160°&160°–200°). First plan used only 6MV in both arcs (6X-6X) and second utilized 6MV&15MV (6X-15X), whereas third one used 15MV&15MV (15X-15X). For consistency, all the plans were generated by the same planner using Monaco− treatment planning system (V5.1) for Elekta Synergy− linear accelerator with 1cm leaf-width. For plan comparison, target mean dose, conformity index (CI)=Planning target volume (PTV) covered by 95% of prescription dose/PTV were analyzed. Mean doses of bladder, rectum, left femur and right femur were analyzed. Integral dose (liter-Gray) to normal tissue (patient volume minus PTV), total monitor unit (MU) required to deliver a plan and gamma pass rate for each plan was analyzed. Results: The CI for PTV was 0.9937±0.0037, 0.9917±0.0033, and 0.9897±0.0048 for 6X-6X, 6X-15X and 15X-15X, respectively. Mean dose to target slightly increases with the decrease of energy. Mean doses to bladder were 3546.23±692.13cGy, 3487.43±715.53cGy and 3504.40±683.1cGy for 6X-6X, 6X-15X and 15X-15X, respectively. Mean doses to rectum were 4294.60±309.5cGy, 4277.07±279.93cGy and 4290.77±379.07cGy. Mean doses to left femur were 2737.13±545.93cGy, 2668.67±407.12cGy and 2416.77±300.73cGy and mean doses to the right femur were 2682.70±460.81cGy, 2722.58±541.92cGy and 2598.57±481.83cGy. Higher Integral doses to normal tissue observed for 6X-6X (163.06±24.6 Litre-Gray) followed by 6X-15X (154.35±24.74 Litre-Gray) and 15X-15X (145.84±26.03 Litre-Gray). Average MU required to deliver one fraction was 680.75±72.09, 634.81±95.07 and 605.06±114.65. Gamma pass rates were 99.83±0.21, 99.53±0.27 and 99.2±0

  14. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  15. SU-F-T-195: Systematic Constraining of Contralateral Parotid Gland Led to Improved Dosimetric Outcomes for Multi-Field Optimization with Scanning Beam Proton Therapy: Promising Results From a Pilot Study in Patients with Base of Tongue Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Liu, A; Poenisch, F; Palmer, M; Gillin, M; Zhu, X [Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Crowford, C; Georges, R; Amin, M [Department of Medical Dosimetry, MD Anderson Cancer Ctr, Houston, TX (United States); Sio, T; Gunn, B; Frank, S [Radiation Oncology Department MD Anderson Cancer Ctr, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for head and neck cancer is time-consuming due to the large number of organs-at-risk (OAR) to be considered. As there are many competing objectives and also wide range of acceptable OAR constraints, the final approved plan may not be most optimal for the given structures. We evaluated the dose reduction to the contralateral parotid by implementing standardized constraints during optimization for scanning beam proton therapy planning. Methods: Twenty-four (24) consecutive patients previously treated for base of tongue carcinoma were retrospectively selected. The doses were 70Gy, 63Gy and 57Gy (SIB in 33 fractions) for high-, intermediate-, and standard-risk clinical target volumes (CTV), respectively; the treatment included bilateral neck. Scanning beams using MFO with standardized bilateral anterior oblique and PA fields were applied. New plans where then developed and optimized by employing additional contralateral parotid constraints at multiple defined dose levels. Using a step-wise iterative process, the volume-based constraints at each level were then further reduced until known target coverages were compromised. The newly developed plans were then compared to the original clinically approved plans using paired student t-testing. Results: All 24 newly optimized treatment plans maintained initial plan quality as compared to the approved plans, and the 98% prescription dose coverage to the CTV’s were not compromised. Representative DVH comparison is shown in FIGURE 1. The contralateral parotid doses were reduced at all levels of interest when systematic constraints were applied to V10, V20, V30 and V40Gy (All P<0.0001; TABLE 1). Overall, the mean contralateral parotid doses were reduced by 2.26 Gy on average, a ∼13% relative improvement. Conclusion: Applying systematic and volume-based contralateral parotid constraints for IMPT planning significantly reduced the dose at all dosimetric

  16. Importance of beam-beam tune spread to collective beam-beam instability in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Lihui; Shi Jicong

    2004-01-01

    In hadron colliders, electron-beam compensation of beam-beam tune spread has been explored for a reduction of beam-beam effects. In this paper, effects of the tune-spread compensation on beam-beam instabilities were studied with a self-consistent beam-beam simulation in model lattices of Tevatron and Large Hodron Collider. It was found that the reduction of the tune spread with the electron-beam compensation could induce a coherent beam-beam instability. The merit of the compensation with different degrees of tune-spread reduction was evaluated based on beam-size growth. When two beams have a same betatron tune, the compensation could do more harm than good to the beams when only beam-beam effects are considered. If a tune split between two beams is large enough, the compensation with a small reduction of the tune spread could benefit beams as Landau damping suppresses the coherent beam-beam instability. The result indicates that nonlinear (nonintegrable) beam-beam effects could dominate beam dynamics and a reduction of beam-beam tune spread by introducing additional beam-beam interactions and reducing Landau damping may not improve the stability of beams

  17. Beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Dragt, A; Mottershead, C; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Ryne, R; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe some of the accomplishments of the Beam Dynamics portion of the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology project. During the course of the project, our beam dynamics software has evolved from the era of different codes for each physical effect to the era of hybrid codes combining start-of-the-art implementations for multiple physical effects to the beginning of the era of true multi-physics frameworks. We describe some of the infrastructure that has been developed over the course of the project and advanced features of the most recent developments, the interplay betwen beam studies and simulations and applications to current machines at Fermilab. Finally we discuss current and future plans for simulations of the International Linear Collider

  18. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y.; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-01-01

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article

  19. LHC Report: Beam on

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossano Giachino for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The powering tests described in the last edition of the Bulletin were successfully finished at the end of the first week of March opening the way for 4 TeV operations this year. The beam was back in the machine on Wednesday 14 March. The first collisions at 4 TeV are scheduled for the first week of April.   The first beam of 2012 is dumped after making a few rounds in the LHC. The magnet powering tests were followed by the machine checkout phase. Here the operations team in collaboration with the equipment groups performs a sequence of tests to ensure the readiness of the LHC for beam. The tests include driving all the LHC systems – beam dump, injection, collimation, RF, power converters, magnet circuits, vacuum, interlocks, controls, timing and synchronization – through the operational cycle. The “checkout phase” is really a massive de-bugging exercise, which is performed with the objective of ensuring the proper functioning of the whole machine and t...

  20. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  1. High-resolution study of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the light nuclei 9B and 13N using the (3He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 420 MeV beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholl, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Excited states in the light nuclei 9 B and 13 C were studied using the ( 3 He,t) charge-exchange reaction on 9 Be and 13 C targets. The measurements were performed at the research center for nuclear physics (RCNP) in Osaka, Japan, using the magnetic spectrometer Grand Raiden and the dispersive WS course. The 3 He beam with an energy of 420 MeV was accelerated by the RCNP Ring Cyclotron. The Grand Raiden spectrometer and the WS course allow to study the ( 3 He,t) charge-exchange reaction with an energy resolution of around 30 keV, which is one order of magnitude better than measurements with the (p,n) charge-exchange reaction. The high resolution allows to better separate individual states and to determine weak excitation strengths because of low background in the spectra. A total of 19 states in 13 N were studied, and a total of 20 states were observed in 9 B. Of these, 9 states in 13 C and 10 states in 9 B were identified as being excited by a Gamow-Teller transition. Charge-exchange reactions are related to beta-decay, and at zero momentum transfer a simple proportionality exists between the cross-section of the charge-exchange experiment and the Fermi (F) or Gamow-Teller (GT) beta-decay strength. While the Fermi strength B(F) is concentrated in the transition to the isobaric analog state, the Gamow-Teller strength B(GT) is scattered among the excited states. The main aim of the present study is to determine the B(GT) strengths in the nuclei 9 B and 13 N. The only charge-exchange study of 9 B was made 30 years ago with the (p,n) reaction and a resolution of around 300-400 keV. Many states, especially at high excitation energy, could not be resolved by that study. The present work was able to separate many weakly excited states with small decay width at high excitation energies (12-19 MeV) in 9 B and determine the B(GT) strength distribution by using recent high-precision beta-decay data. The results point to a strong difference in spatial structure between the

  2. High-resolution study of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the light nuclei {sup 9}B and {sup 13}N using the ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reaction at 420 MeV beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholl, Clemens

    2010-07-07

    Excited states in the light nuclei {sup 9}B and {sup 13}C were studied using the ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reaction on {sup 9}Be and {sup 13}C targets. The measurements were performed at the research center for nuclear physics (RCNP) in Osaka, Japan, using the magnetic spectrometer Grand Raiden and the dispersive WS course. The {sup 3}He beam with an energy of 420 MeV was accelerated by the RCNP Ring Cyclotron. The Grand Raiden spectrometer and the WS course allow to study the ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reaction with an energy resolution of around 30 keV, which is one order of magnitude better than measurements with the (p,n) charge-exchange reaction. The high resolution allows to better separate individual states and to determine weak excitation strengths because of low background in the spectra. A total of 19 states in {sup 13}N were studied, and a total of 20 states were observed in {sup 9}B. Of these, 9 states in {sup 13}C and 10 states in {sup 9}B were identified as being excited by a Gamow-Teller transition. Charge-exchange reactions are related to beta-decay, and at zero momentum transfer a simple proportionality exists between the cross-section of the charge-exchange experiment and the Fermi (F) or Gamow-Teller (GT) beta-decay strength. While the Fermi strength B(F) is concentrated in the transition to the isobaric analog state, the Gamow-Teller strength B(GT) is scattered among the excited states. The main aim of the present study is to determine the B(GT) strengths in the nuclei {sup 9}B and {sup 13}N. The only charge-exchange study of {sup 9}B was made 30 years ago with the (p,n) reaction and a resolution of around 300-400 keV. Many states, especially at high excitation energy, could not be resolved by that study. The present work was able to separate many weakly excited states with small decay width at high excitation energies (12-19 MeV) in {sup 9}B and determine the B(GT) strength distribution by using recent high-precision beta-decay data. The

  3. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  4. Dynamical chaos and beam-beam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izrailev, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    Some aspects of the nonlinear dynamics of beam-beam interaction for simple one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of round and flat beams are discussed. The main attention is paid to the stochasticity threshold due to the overlapping of nonlinear resonances. The peculiarities of a round beam are investigated in view of using the round beams in storage rings to get high luminosity. 16 refs.; 7 figs

  5. Beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The main part of this thesis consists of 15 published papers, in which the numerical Beam Propagating Method (BPM) is investigated, verified and used in a number of applications. In the introduction a derivation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is presented to connect the beginning of the soliton papers with Maxwell's equations including a nonlinear polarization. This thesis focuses on the wide use of the BPM for numerical simulations of propagating light and particle beams through different types of structures such as waveguides, fibers, tapers, Y-junctions, laser arrays and crystalline solids. We verify the BPM in the above listed problems against other numerical methods for example the Finite-element Method, perturbation methods and Runge-Kutta integration. Further, the BPM is shown to be a simple and effective way to numerically set up the Green's function in matrix form for periodic structures. The Green's function matrix can then be diagonalized with matrix methods yielding the eigensolutions of the structure. The BPM inherent transverse periodicity can be untied, if desired, by for example including an absorptive refractive index at the computational window edges. The interaction of two first-order soliton pulses is strongly dependent on the phase relationship between the individual solitons. When optical phase shift keying is used in coherent one-carrier wavelength communication, the fiber attenuation will suppress or delay the nonlinear instability. (orig.)

  6. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  7. Simple beam profile monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  8. Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Ions in a storage ring are confined to a mean orbit by focusing elements. To a first approximation these may be described by a constant harmonic restoring force: F = -Kr. If the particles in the frame moving along with the beam have small random thermal energies, then they will occupy a cylindrical volume around the mean orbit and the focusing force will be balanced by that from the mutual repulsion of the particles. Inside the cylinder only residual two-particle interactions will play a significant role and some form of ordering might be expected to take place. The results of some of the first MD calculations showed a surprising result: not only were the particles arranged in the form of a tube, but they formed well-defined layers: concentric shells, with the particles in each shell arranged in a hexagonal lattice that is characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb systems. This paper discusses the condense layer structure

  9. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEAM MONITOR FOR THE CLUSTER KLYSTRON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The cluster klystron project required a beam monitor to check the quality of the hollow beam shape. Since the power density of the beam is very large, a common phosphorescent screen doesn't work. We investigated varies types of monitors. The related problems were also discussed

  10. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs

  11. Beam-Beam Interaction Studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela; Alemany Fernandez, R

    2011-01-01

    The beam-beam force is one of the most important limiting factors in the performance of a collider, mainly in the delivered luminosity. Therefore, it is essential to measure the effects in LHC. Moreover, adequate understanding of LHC beam-beam interaction is of crucial importance in the design phases of the LHC luminosity upgrade. Due to the complexity of this topic the work presented in this thesis concentrates on the beam-beam tune shift and orbit effects. The study of the Linear Coherent Beam-Beam Parameter at the LHC has been determined with head-on collisions with small number of bunches at injection energy (450 GeV). For high bunch intensities the beam-beam force is strong enough to expect orbit effects if the two beams do not collide head-on but with a crossing angle or with a given offset. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are as well ...

  12. Statics and rotational dynamics of composite beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorashi, Mehrdaad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of the nonlinear statics and dynamics of composite beams and consists of solutions with and without active elements embedded in the beams. The static solution provides the initial conditions for the dynamic analysis. The dynamic problems considered include the analyses of clamped (hingeless) and articulated (hinged) accelerating rotating beams. Two independent numerical solutions for the steady state and the transient responses are presented. The author illustrates that the transient solution of the nonlinear formulation of accelerating rotating beam converges to the steady state solution obtained by the shooting method. Other key areas considered include calculation of the effect of perturbing the steady state solution, coupled nonlinear flap-lag dynamics of a rotating articulated beam with hinge offset and aerodynamic damping, and static and dynamic responses of nonlinear composite beams with embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. The book is intended as a t...

  13. Mechanical properties of micro-sized copper bending beams machined by the focused ion beam technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motz, C.; Schoeberl, T.; Pippan, R.

    2005-01-01

    Micro-sized bending beams with thicknesses, t, from 7.5 down to 1.0 μm were fabricated with the focused ion beam technique from a copper single crystal with an {1 1 1} orientation. The beams were loaded with a nano-indenter and the force vs. displacement curves were recorded. A strong size effect was found where the flow stress reaches almost 1 GPa for the thinnest beams. A common strain gradient plasticity approach was used to explain the size effect. However, the strong t -1.14 dependence of the flow stress could not be explained by this model. Additionally, the combination of two other dislocation mechanisms is discussed: the limitation of available dislocation sources and a dislocation pile-up at the beam centre. The contribution of the pile-up stress to the flow stress gives a t -1 dependence, which is in good agreement with the experimental results

  14. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  15. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e + - e - colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II)

  16. Beam line for Schools: beyond expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    Out of 292 proposals for CERN's first ever "Beam line for Schools" contest, two teams of high-school students – Odysseus' Comrades from Varvakios Pilot School in Athens, Greece and Dominicuscollege from Dominicus College in Nijmegen in the Netherlands – were selected to spend 10 days conducting their proposed experiments at the fully equipped T9 beam line on CERN's Meyrin site. Dedicated CERN staff and users from across the departments have put in a huge effort to ensure the success of the project.   Detector physicist Cenk Yidriz (centre, white helmet) explains the setup of the "Beamline for schools" experiment at the T9 beamline. It's finally beam time. After months of organisation, coding, engineering and even painting the experimental area, the T9 beam line is ready to deliver protons to experiments devised and built by high-school students. “They are here to collect data and experience the l...

  17. SU-F-T-202: An Evaluation Method of Lifetime Attributable Risk for Comparing Between Proton Beam Therapy and Intensity Modulated X-Ray Therapy for Pediatric Cancer Patients by Averaging Four Dose-Response Models for Carcinoma Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, M; Shirato, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Ito, Y [Department of Biostatistics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Sakurai, H; Mizumoto, M; Kamizawa, S [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Murayama, S; Yamashita, H [Proton Therapy Division, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi, Shizuoka (Japan); Takao, S; Suzuki, R [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine how much lifetime attributable risk (LAR) as an in silico surrogate marker of radiation-induced secondary cancer would be lowered by using proton beam therapy (PBT) in place of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) in pediatric patients. Methods: From 242 pediatric patients with cancers who were treated with PBT, 26 patients were selected by random sampling after stratification into four categories: a) brain, head, and neck, b) thoracic, c) abdominal, and d) whole craniospinal (WCNS) irradiation. IMXT was re-planned using the same computed tomography and region of interest. Using dose volume histogram (DVH) of PBT and IMXT, the LAR of Schneider et al. was calculated for the same patient. The published four dose-response models for carcinoma induction: i) full model, ii) bell-shaped model, iii) plateau model, and ix) linear model were tested for organs at risk. In the case that more than one dose-response model was available, the LAR for this patient was calculated by averaging LAR for each dose-response model. Results: Calculation of the LARs of PBT and IMXT based on DVH was feasible for all patients. The mean±standard deviation of the cumulative LAR difference between PBT and IMXT for the four categories was a) 0.77±0.44% (n=7, p=0.0037), b) 23.1±17.2%,(n=8, p=0.0067), c) 16.4±19.8% (n=8, p=0.0525), and d) 49.9±21.2% (n=3, p=0.0275, one tailed t-test), respectively. The LAR was significantly lower by PBT than IMXT for the the brain, head, and neck region, thoracic region, and whole craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: In pediatric patients who had undergone PBT, the LAR of PBT was significantly lower than the LAR of IMXT estimated by in silico modeling. This method was suggested to be useful as an in silico surrogate marker of secondary cancer induced by different radiotherapy techniques. This research was supported by the Translational Research Network Program, JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15H04768 and the Global Institution for

  18. SU-F-T-202: An Evaluation Method of Lifetime Attributable Risk for Comparing Between Proton Beam Therapy and Intensity Modulated X-Ray Therapy for Pediatric Cancer Patients by Averaging Four Dose-Response Models for Carcinoma Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M; Shirato, H; Ito, Y; Sakurai, H; Mizumoto, M; Kamizawa, S; Murayama, S; Yamashita, H; Takao, S; Suzuki, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how much lifetime attributable risk (LAR) as an in silico surrogate marker of radiation-induced secondary cancer would be lowered by using proton beam therapy (PBT) in place of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) in pediatric patients. Methods: From 242 pediatric patients with cancers who were treated with PBT, 26 patients were selected by random sampling after stratification into four categories: a) brain, head, and neck, b) thoracic, c) abdominal, and d) whole craniospinal (WCNS) irradiation. IMXT was re-planned using the same computed tomography and region of interest. Using dose volume histogram (DVH) of PBT and IMXT, the LAR of Schneider et al. was calculated for the same patient. The published four dose-response models for carcinoma induction: i) full model, ii) bell-shaped model, iii) plateau model, and ix) linear model were tested for organs at risk. In the case that more than one dose-response model was available, the LAR for this patient was calculated by averaging LAR for each dose-response model. Results: Calculation of the LARs of PBT and IMXT based on DVH was feasible for all patients. The mean±standard deviation of the cumulative LAR difference between PBT and IMXT for the four categories was a) 0.77±0.44% (n=7, p=0.0037), b) 23.1±17.2%,(n=8, p=0.0067), c) 16.4±19.8% (n=8, p=0.0525), and d) 49.9±21.2% (n=3, p=0.0275, one tailed t-test), respectively. The LAR was significantly lower by PBT than IMXT for the the brain, head, and neck region, thoracic region, and whole craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: In pediatric patients who had undergone PBT, the LAR of PBT was significantly lower than the LAR of IMXT estimated by in silico modeling. This method was suggested to be useful as an in silico surrogate marker of secondary cancer induced by different radiotherapy techniques. This research was supported by the Translational Research Network Program, JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15H04768 and the Global Institution for

  19. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs

  20. Antihydrogen Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Doser, Michael; Pérez, Patrice

    2018-03-01

    Why does our universe consist purely of matter, even though the same amount of antimatter and matter should have been produced at the moment of the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago? One of the most potentially fruitful approaches to address the mystery is to study the properties of antihydrogen and antiprotons. Because they are both stable, we can in principle make measurement precision as high as we need to see differences between these antimatter systems and their matter counterparts, i.e. hydrogen and protons. This is the goal of cold antihydrogen research. To study a fundamental symmetry-charge, parity, and time reversal (CPT) symmetry-which should lead to identical spectra in hydrogen and antihydrogen, as well as the weak equivalence principle (WEP), cold antihydrogen research seeks any discrepancies between matter and antimatter, which might also offer clues to the missing antimatter mystery. Precision tests of CPT have already been carried out in other systems, but antihydrogen spectroscopy offers the hope of reaching even higher sensitivity to violations of CPT. Meanwhile, utilizing the Earth and antihydrogen atoms as an experimental system, the WEP predicts a gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter that is identical to that between any two matter objects. The WEP has been tested to very high precision for a range of material compositions, but no such precision test using antimatter has yet been carried out, offering hope of a telltale inconsistency between matter and antimatter. In this Discovery book, we invite you to visit the frontiers of cold antimatter research, focusing on new technologies to form beams of antihydrogen atoms and antihydrogen ions, and new ways of interrogating the properties of antimatter.

  1. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  2. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-01-01

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization

  3. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  4. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  5. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  6. Telecommunication using muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location

  7. Safe LHC beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uythoven, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the large amount of energy stored in magnets and beams, safety operation of the LHC is essential. The commissioning of the LHC machine protection system will be an integral part of the general LHC commissioning program. A brief overview of the LHC Machine Protection System will be given, identifying the main components: the Beam Interlock System, the Beam Dumping System, the Collimation System, the Beam Loss Monitoring System and the Quench Protection System. An outline is given of the commissioning strategy of these systems during the different commissioning phases of the LHC: without beam, injection and the different phases with stored beam depending on beam intensity and energy. (author)

  8. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  9. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  10. Ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strehl, P.

    1994-04-01

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  11. Padronização de um método para mensuração das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual dos maxilares na Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico (Cone Beam Methodology standardization for measuring buccal and lingual alveolar bone plates using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Cezar Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a espessura das tábuas ósseas que recobrem os dentes por vestibular e lingual constitui um dos fatores limitantes da movimentação dentária. O avanço tecnológico em Imaginologia permitiu avaliar detalhadamente essas regiões anatômicas por meio da utilização da tomografia computadorizada de feixe cônico (TCFC. OBJETIVO: descrever e padronizar, pormenorizadamente, um método para mensuração das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual dos maxilares nas imagens de tomografia computadorizada de feixe cônico. METODOLOGIA: a padronização digital da posição da imagem da face deve constituir o primeiro passo antes da seleção dos cortes de TCFC. Dois cortes axiais de cada maxilar foram empregados para a mensuração da espessura do osso alveolar vestibular e lingual. Utilizou-se como referência a junção cemento-esmalte dos primeiros molares permanentes, tanto na arcada superior quanto na inferior. RESULTADOS: cortes axiais paralelos ao plano palatino foram indicados para avaliação quantitativa do osso alveolar na maxila. Na arcada inferior, os cortes axiais devem ser paralelos ao plano oclusal funcional. CONCLUSÃO: o método descrito apresenta reprodutibilidade para utilização em pesquisas, assim como para a avaliação clínica das repercussões periodontais da movimentação dentária, ao permitir a comparação de imagens pré e pós-tratamento.INTRODUCTION: The thickness of the buccal and lingual bone plates constitutes one of the limiting factors of the orthodontic movement. The imaging technology has permitted the evaluation of this anatomical region, by means of cone beam computed tomography. PURPOSE: To describe and standardize, in details, a method for measuring the buccal and lingual bone plate thickness in CBCT images. METHODOLOGY: Digital standardization of face image should constitute the first step before the selection of CBCT slices. Two axial sections of each jaw were used for measuring the thickness

  12. Overview of LHC Beam Loss Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Fadakis, E; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Kruk, G; Kurfuerst, C; Marsili, A; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Priebe, A; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M; Zamantzas, C; Grishin, V; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring system provides measurements with an update rate of 1 Hz and high time resolution data by event triggering. These informations are used for the initiation of beam aborts, fixed displays and the off line analysis. The analysis of fast and localized loss events resulted in the determination of its rate, duration, peak amplitudes, its scaling with intensity, number of bunches and beam energy. The calibration of the secondary shower beam loss signal in respect to the needed beam energy deposition to quench the magnet coil is addressed at 450GeV and 3.5T eV . The adjustment of collimators is checked my measuring the loss pattern and its variation in the collimation regions of the LHC. Loss pattern changes during a fill allow the observation of non typical fill parameters.

  13. Antihydrogen beams

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Pérez, Patrice

    2018-01-01

    Why does our universe consist purely of matter, even though the same amount of antimatter and matter should have been produced at the moment of the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago? One of the most potentially fruitful approaches to address the mystery is to study the properties of antihydrogen and antiprotons. Because they are both stable, we can in principle make measurement precision as high as we need to see differences between these antimatter systems and their matter counterparts, i.e. hydrogen and protons. This is the goal of cold antihydrogen research. To study a fundamental symmetry—charge, parity, and time reversal (CPT) symmetry—which should lead to identical spectra in hydrogen and antihydrogen, as well as the weak equivalence principle (WEP), cold antihydrogen research seeks any discrepancies between matter and antimatter, which might also offer clues to the missing antimatter mystery. Precision tests of CPT have already been carried out in other systems, but antihydrogen spectroscopy offers t...

  14. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  15. Boundary controllability for a nonlinear beam equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Min Cao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns a nonlinear system modeling the bending vibrations of a nonlinear beam of length $L>0$. First, we derive the existence of long time solutions near an equilibrium. Then we prove that the nonlinear beam is locally exact controllable around the equilibrium in $H^4(0,L$ and with control functions in $H^2(0,T$. The approach we used are open mapping theorem, local controllability established by linearization, and the induction.

  16. Studies of the beam-beam interaction for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnagopal, S.; Furman, M.A.; Turner, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have used the beam-beam simulation code CBI to study the beam-beam interaction for the LHC. We find that for nominal LHC parameters, and assuming only one bunch per beam, there are no collective (coherent) beam-beam instabilities. We have investigated the effect of sweeping one of the beams around the other (a procedure that could be used as a diagnostic for head-on beam-beam collisions). We find that this does not cause any problems at the nominal current, though at higher currents there can be beam blow-up and collective beam motion. consequence of quadrupole collective effects

  17. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A; Laird, J S; Bardos, R A; Legge, G J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T; Sekiguchi, H [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1994-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  20. Electron beam instabilities in gyrotron beam tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrozzi, M.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J.P.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1997-10-01

    Electron beam instabilities occurring in a gyrotron electron beam can induce an energy spread which might significantly deteriorate the gyrotron efficiency. Three types of instabilities are considered to explain the important discrepancy found between the theoretical and experimental efficiency in the case of quasi-optical gyrotrons (QOG): the electron cyclotron maser instability, the Bernstein instability and the Langmuir instability. The low magnetic field gradient in drift tubes of QOG makes that the electron cyclotron maser instability can develop in the drift tube at very low electron beam currents. Experimental measurements show that with a proper choice of absorbing structures in the beam tunnel, this instability can be suppressed. At high beam currents, the electrostatic Bernstein instability can induce a significant energy spread at the entrance of the interaction region. The induced energy spread scales approximately linearly with the electron beam density and for QOG one observes that the beam density is significantly higher than the beam density of an equivalent cylindrical cavity gyrotron. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  1. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitoring for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Sapinski, M

    A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system was installed on the outside surface of the LHC magnet cryostats to protect the accelerator equipment from beam losses. The protection is achieved by extracting the beam from the ring in case thresholds imposed on measured radiation levels are exceeded. Close to the interaction regions of the LHC, the present BLM system is sensitive to particle showers generated in the interaction region of the two beams. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and possible quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The particle showers measured by the present BLM configuration are partly shielded by the cryostat and the iron yoke of the magnets. The system can hence be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the protected element, i. e. the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass of the magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. T...

  2. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  3. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (2×2,4×4,10×10cm 2 ) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours

  4. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  5. Charged corpuscular beam detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikawa, H; Nishikawa, Y

    1970-09-29

    The present invention relates to a charged particle beam detector which prevents transient phenomena disturbing the path and focusing of a charged particle beam travelling through a mounted axle. The present invention provides a charged particle beam detector capable of decreasing its reaction to the charge in energy of the charged particle beam even if the relative angle between the mounted axle and the scanner is unstable. The detector is characterized by mounting electrically conductive metal pieces of high melting point onto the face of a stepped, heat-resistant electric insulating material such that the pieces partially overlap each other and individually provide electric signals, whereby the detector is no longer affected by the beam. The thickness of the metal piece is selected so that an eddy current is not induced therein by an incident beam, thus the incident beam is not affected. The detector is capable of detecting a misaligned beam since the metal pieces partially overlap each other.

  6. Advanced electron beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    After 100 years from the time of discovery of electron, we now have many applications of electron beam in science and technology. In this report, we review two important applications of electron beam: electron microscopy and pulsed-electron beam. Advanced electron microscopy techniques to investigate atomic and electronic structures, and pulsed-electron beam for investigating time-resolved structural change are described. (author)

  7. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  8. Crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can only be properly understood if one has a detailed knowledge of interactions involving atoms, molecules, ions, electrons or photons. In the laboratory these processes are often studied by preparing beams of two types of particle and observing the reactions which occur when the beams intersect. Some of the more interesting of these crossed beam experiments and their results are discussed. Proposals to extend colliding beam techniques to high energy particle physics are also outlined. (author)

  9. An Electromagnetic Beam Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electromagnetic beam converter and a method for conversion of an input beam of electromagnetic radiation having a bell shaped intensity profile a(x,y) into an output beam having a prescribed target intensity profile l(x',y') based on a further development...

  10. Beams 92: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  11. High energy beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Herr, H.; Linnecar, T.; Millich, A.; Milss, F.; Rubbia, C.; Taylor, C.S.; Meer, S. van der; Zotter, B.

    1980-01-01

    The group concerned itself with the analysis of cooling systems whose purpose is to maintain the quality of the high energy beams in the SPS in spite of gas scattering, RF noise, magnet ripple and beam-beam interactions. Three types of systems were discussed. The status of these activities is discussed below. (orig.)

  12. Beam-beam interaction working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    The limit in hadron colliders is understood phenomenologically. The beam-beam interaction produces nonlinear resonances and makes the transverse tunes amplitude dependent. Tune spreads result from the latter, and as long as these tune spreads do not overlap low order resonances, the lifetime and performance is acceptable. Experience is that tenth and sometimes twelfth order resonances must be avoided, and the hadron collider limit corresponds roughly to the space available between resonances of that and lower order when operating near the coupling resonance. The beam-beam interaction in e + e - colliders is not understood well. This affects the performance of existing colliders and could lead to surprises in new ones. For example. a substantial amount of operator tuning is usually required to reach the performance limit given above, and this tuning has to be repeated after each major shutdown. The usual interpretation is that colliding beam performance is sensitive to small lattice errors, and these are being reduced during tuning. It is natural to ask what these errors are, how can a lattice be characterized to minimize tuning time, and what aspects of a lattice should receive particular attention when a new collider is being designed. The answers to this type of question are not known, and developing ideas for calculations, simulations and experiments that could illuminate the details of the beam-beam interaction was the primary working group activity

  13. Industrial Products for Beam Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Schmickler, Hermann

    2001-01-01

    In various branches of high technology industry there has been considerable progress in the past years which could be used for beam instrumentation. The subject will be introduced by two short demonstrations: a demonstration of modern audio electronics with 24bit-96kHz ADC, digital signal electronics and application programs under windows on a PC, which allow to change the parameters of the signal treatment. Potential applications are data monitoring at constant sampling frequency, orbit feedbacks (including high power audio amplifiers), noise reduction on beam current transformers... digital treatment of video signals webcams, frame grabbers, CCD-data via USB, all one needs for image acquisitions, in particular interesting for profile measurements. These introductory demonstrations will not last longer than 30 minutes. The remaining time will be used to pass through the audience collecting information into a two dimensional table, which shall contain as row index the accelerator and as column index the t...

  14. Measurements of laser-imprinting sensitivity to relative beam mistiming in planar plastic foils driven by multiple overlapping laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Boehly, T.R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Li, D.Y.; Marozas, J.A.; Maximov, A.V.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    In a direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosion, a spherical target is irradiated by a large number of overlapped laser beams. Imprinting of laser modulations depends on the relative arrival time of laser beams and their angles of incidence. This dependence was measured in planar plastic targets using six overlapping beams on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. One of the beams (the imprint beam) had a special phase plate that produced two-dimensional modulations on the target, easily distinguishable from the features imprinted by the other five drive beams. The timing of the imprint beam was varied with respect to the drive beams to study imprinting sensitivity to beam mistiming. Shifting the imprint beam to arrive before the other beams significantly increased the imprint efficiency. The results are in very good agreement with the model predictions

  15. EUROv Super Beam Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracos, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

  16. Beam electron microprobe

    CERN Document Server

    Stoller, D; Muterspaugh, M W; Pollock, R E

    1999-01-01

    A beam profile monitor based on the deflection of a probe electron beam by the electric field of a stored, electron-cooled proton beam is described and first results are presented. Electrons were transported parallel to the proton beam by a uniform longitudinal magnetic field. The probe beam may be slowly scanned across the stored beam to determine its intensity, position, and size. Alternatively, it may be scanned rapidly over a narrow range within the interior of the stored beam for continuous observation of the changing central density during cooling. Examples of a two dimensional charge density profile obtained from a raster scan and of a cooling alignment study illustrate the scope of measurements made possible by this device.

  17. High field superconducting beam transport in a BNL primary proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Brown, H.N.; Carroll, A.S.; Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Glenn, J.W.; Jackson, J.; Keith, W.; Lowenstein, D.; Prodell, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Construction of a slow external beam switchyard at the BNL AGS requires a rapid 20.4 0 bend in the upstream end of the beam line. Two curved superconducting window dipole magnets, operating at 6.0 T and about 80% of short sample magnetic field, will be utilized with two small superconducting sextupoles to provide the necessary deflection for a 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam. Because the magnets will operate in a primary proton beam environment, they are designed to absorb large amounts of radiation heating from the beam without quenching. The field quality of the superconducting magnets is extremely good. Computer field calculations indicate a field error, ΔB/B 0 , equivalent to approx. = 1 x 10 -4 up to 75% of the 8.26 cm full aperture diameter in the magnet

  18. Breast conserving treatment of breast carcinoma T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy, high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, external beam radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: local control and overall survival analysis; Tratamento conservador do cancer de mama T2 ({<=} 4 cm) e T3 por quimioterapia neoadjuvante, quadrantectomia, braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose como reforco de dose, teleterapia complementar e quimioterapia adjuvante: analise de controle local e sobrevida global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Celia Regina; Miziara Filho, Miguel Abrao; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Baraldi, Helena Espindola; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia], e-mail: celiarsoares@terra.com.br; Fristachi, Carlos Elias [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Onco-Ginecologia e Mastologia; Paes, Roberto Pinto [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering local control and overall survival. Material and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 88 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIb and IIIa, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, treated from June/1995 to December/2006. Median follow-up was 58 months. Using clinical methods the tumor was evaluated before and after three or four cycles of chemotherapy based on anthracyclines. Overall survival and local control were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: Local control and overall survival in five years were 90% and 73.5%, respectively. Conclusion: local control and overall survival were comparable to other forms of treatment. (author)

  19. Deflection type energy analyser for energetic electron beams in a beam-plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J.A.; Hogge, J.P.

    1988-11-01

    An energy analyser for the study of electron beam distribution functions in unmagnetized plasmas is described. This analyser is designed to avoid large electric fields which are created in multi-grid analysers and to measure directly the beam distribution function without differentiation. As an example of an application we present results on the propagation of an energetic beam (E b : 2.0 keV) in a plasma (n o : 1.10 10 cm -3 , T e : 1.4 eV) (author) 7 figs., 10 refs

  20. A beam test of prototype time projection chamber using micro ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We conducted a series of beam tests of prototype TPCs for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment, equipped with an MWPC, a MicroMEGAS, or GEMs as a readout device. The prototype operated successfully in a test beam at KEK under an axial magnetic field of up to 1 T. The analysis of data is now in progress ...

  1. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ionization scheme is used to ionize atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere. This scheme utilizes 130 nm light plus three IR lasers to excite and then ionize atomic oxygen. The limiting factor for the channel strength is the energy of the 130 nm laser, which is assumed to be 1.6 mJ for BOLT. At a fixed laser energy and altitude (fixing the density of atomic oxygen), the range can be varied by adjusting the laser tuning, resulting in a neutralization fraction axial profile of the form: f(z) = f(sub 0) e(exp minus z)/R, where R is the range. In this paper we consider the propagation of the BOLT beam and calculate the range of the electron beam taking into account the fact that the erosion rates (magnetic and inductive) vary with beam length as the beam and channel dynamically respond to sausage and hose instabilities.

  2. SU-E-T-800: Verification of Acurose XB Dose Calculation Algorithm at Air Cavity-Tissue Interface Using Film Measurement for Small Fields of 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm at air-tissue interface using inhomogeneous phantom for 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: An inhomogeneous phantom included air cavity was manufactured for verifying dose accuracy at the air-tissue interface. The phantom was composed with 1 and 3 cm thickness of air cavity. To evaluate the central axis doses (CAD) and dose profiles of the interface, the dose calculations were performed for 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 cm 2 fields of 6 MV FFF beams with AAA and AXB in Eclipse treatment plainning system. Measurements in this region were performed with Gafchromic film. The root mean square errors (RMSE) were analyzed with calculated and measured dose profile. Dose profiles were divided into inner-dose profile (>80%) and penumbra (20% to 80%) region for evaluating RMSE. To quantify the distribution difference, gamma evaluation was used and determined the agreement with 3%/3mm criteria. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between measured and calculated CAD in the interface, AXB shows more agreement than AAA. The %Diffs were increased with increasing the thickness of air cavity size and it is similar for both algorithms. In RMSEs of inner-profile, AXB was more accurate than AAA. The difference was up to 6 times due to overestimation by AAA. RMSEs of penumbra appeared to high difference for increasing the measurement depth. Gamma agreement also presented that the passing rates decreased in penumbra. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB shows more accurate than with AAA for the air-tissue interface. The 2D dose distributions with AXB for both inner-profile and penumbra showed better agreement than with AAA relative to variation of the measurement depths and air cavity sizes

  3. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, J; Kim, J [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  4. SU-E-T-499: Comparison of Measured Tissue Phantom Ratios (TPR) Against Calculated From Percent Depth Doses (PDD) with and Without Peak Scatter Factor (PSF) in 6MV Open Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Gutierrez, Alonso; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S; Breton, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of measured tissue phantom ratios (TPR) values with TPR calculated from percentage depth dose (PDD) with and without peak scatter fraction (PSF) correction. Methods: For 6MV open beam, TPR and PDD values were measured using PTW Semiflex (31010) ionization field and reference chambers (0.125cc volume) in a PTW MP3-M water tank. PDD curves were measured at SSD of 100cm for 7 square fields from 3cm to 30cm. The TPR values were measured up to 22cm depth for the same fields by continuous water draining method with ionization chamber static at 100cm from source. A comparison study was performed between the (a) measured TPR, (b) TPR calculated from PDD without PSF, (c) TPR calculated from PDD with PSF and (d) clinical TPR from RadCalc (ver 6.2, Sun Nuclear Corp). Results: There is a field size, depth dependence on TPR values. For 10cmx10cm, the differences in surface dose (DDs), dose at 10cm depth (DD10) <0.5%; differences in dmax (Ddmax) <2mm for the 4 methods. The corresponding values for 30cmx30cm are DDs, DD10 <0.2% and Ddmax<3mm. Even though for 3cmx3cm field, DDs and DD10 <1% and Ddmax<1mm, the calculated TPR values with and without PSF correction differed by 2% at >20cm depth. In all field sizes at depths>28cm, (d) clinical TPR values are larger than that from (b) and (c) by >3%. Conclusion: Measured TPR in method (a) differ from calculated TPR in methods (b) and (c) to within 1% for depths < 28cm in all 7 fields in open 6MV beam. The dmax values are within 3mm of each other. The largest deviation of >3% was observed in clinical TPR values in method (d) for all fields at depths < 28cm

  5. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest

  6. Craft Stick Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  7. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating......The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  8. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  9. HIBP primary beam detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A position measuring detector was fabricated for the Heavy Ion Beam Probe. The 11 cm by 50 cm detector was a combination of 15 detector wires in one direction and 63 copper bars - .635 cm by 10 cm to measure along an orthogonal axis by means of a current divider circuit. High transmission tungsten meshes provide entrance windows and suppress secondary electrons. The detector dimensions were chosen to resolve the beam position to within one beam diameter

  10. Who needs hyperon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    Hyperon beams can provide new interesting information about hadron structure and their strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. The dependence of hadron interactions on strangeness and baryon number is not understood, and data from hyperon beams can provide new clues to paradoxes which arise in the interpretation of data from conventional beams. Examples of interesting data are total and differential cross sections, magnetic moments and values of Gsub(A)/Gsub(V) for weak semileptonic decays. (author)

  11. Beam Extraction and Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvas, T.

    2013-12-16

    This chapter gives an introduction to low-energy beam transport systems, and discusses the typically used magnetostatic elements (solenoid, dipoles and quadrupoles) and electrostatic elements (einzel lens, dipoles and quadrupoles). The ion beam emittance, beam space-charge effects and the physics of ion source extraction are introduced. Typical computer codes for analysing and designing ion optical systems are mentioned, and the trajectory tracking method most often used for extraction simulations is described in more detail.

  12. Particle beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    A particle beam accelerator is described which has several electrodes that are selectively short circuited together synchronously with changes in the magnitude of a DC voltage applied to the accelerator. By this method a substantially constant voltage gradient is maintained along the length of the unshortened electrodes despite variations in the energy applied to the beam by the accelerator. The invention has particular application to accelerating ion beams that are implanted into semiconductor wafers. (U.K.)

  13. Neutral beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A neutral beam generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange partially neutralizes the high energy beam, is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are identified. (U.K.)

  14. Chilled beam application guidebook

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, David; Gräslund, Jonas; Hogeling, Jaap; Lund Kristiansen, Erik; Reinikanen, Mika; Svensson, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Chilled beam systems are primarily used for cooling and ventilation in spaces, which appreciate good indoor environmental quality and individual space control. Active chilled beams are connected to the ventilation ductwork, high temperature cold water, and when desired, low temperature hot water system. Primary air supply induces room air to be recirculated through the heat exchanger of the chilled beam. In order to cool or heat the room either cold or warm water is cycled through the heat exchanger.

  15. Mechanical beam isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Vann, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Back-reflections from a target, lenses, etc. can gain energy passing backwards through a laser just like the main beam gains energy passing forwards. Unless something blocks these back-reflections early in their path, they can seriously damage the laser. A Mechanical Beam Isolator is a device that blocks back-reflections early, relatively inexpensively, and without introducing aberrations to the laser beam

  16. Instability of compensated beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Autin, B.; Chen, Pisin.

    1989-01-01

    The beam-beam disruption phenomena in linear colliders are increasingly seen as a source of serious problems for these machines. A plasma compensation scheme, in which the motion of the plasma electrons in the presence of the colliding beams provides neutralizing charge and current densities, has been proposed and studied. But natural alternative to this scheme is to consider the overlapping of nearly identical high energy e + and e/sup /minus// bunches, and the collision of two such pairs - in other words, collision of two opposing relativistic positronium plasmas. It should be noticed that while the luminosity for all collisions is increased by a factor of four in this scheme, the event rate for e + e/sup /minus// collisions is only increased by a factor of two. The other factor of two corresponds to the addition of e + e + and e/sup /minus//e/sup /minus// collisions to the interaction point. This beam compensation scheme, which has been examined through computer simulation by Balakin and Solyak in the Soviet Union, promises full neutralization of beam charges and currents. These numerical investigations have shown that plasma instabilities exist in this nominally neutral system. Although the implementation of this idea seems technically daunting, the potential benefits (beamstrahlung and disruption suppression, relaxation of final focus system constraints) are such that we should consider the physics of these collisions further. In the remainder of this paper, we theoretically analyze the issues of stability and bunch parameter tolerances in this scheme. 11 refs

  17. Dual-beam CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A dual-beam cathode-ray tube having a pair of electron guns and associated deflection means disposed side-by-side on each side of a central axis is described. The electron guns are parallel and the deflection means includes beam centering plates and angled horizontal deflection plates to direct the electron beams toward the central axis, precluding the need for a large-diameter tube neck in which the entire gun structures are angled. Bowing control plates are disposed adjacent to the beam centering plates to minimize trace bowing, and an intergun shield is disposed between the horizontal deflection plates to control and correct display pattern geometry distortion

  18. Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Strehl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This treatise covers all aspects of the design and the daily operations of a beam diagnostic system for a large particle accelerator. A very interdisciplinary field, it involves contributions from physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers and computer experts alike so as to satisfy the ever-increasing demands for beam parameter variability for a vast range of operation modi and particles. The author draws upon 40 years of research and work, most of them spent as the head of the beam diagnostics group at GSI. He has illustrated the more theoretical aspects with many real-life examples that will provide beam instrumentation designers with ideas and tools for their work.

  19. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  20. Neutral beam program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of the beam injection program for the Doublet-3 device is discussed. The design considerations for the beam line and design parameters for the Doublet-3 ion souce are given. Major components of the neutral beam injector system are discussed in detail. These include the neutralizer, magnetic shielding, reflecting magnets, vacuum system, calorimeter and beam dumps, and drift duct. The planned location of the two-injector system for Doublet-3 is illustrated and site preparation is considered. The status of beamline units 1 and 2 and the future program schedule are discussed

  1. Beam diagnostics on ARGUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacQuigg, D.R.; Speck, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    Performance of laser fusion targets depends critically on the characteristics of the incident beam. The spatial distribution and temporal behavior of the light incident on the target varies significantly with power, with choice of beam spatial profile and with location of spatial filters. On each ARGUS shot we photograph planes in the incident beams which are equivalent to the target plane. Array cameras record the time integrated energy distributions and streak cameras record the temporal behavior. Computer reduction of the photographic data provides detailed spatial energy distributions, and instantaneous power on target vs. time. Target performance correlates with the observed beam characteristics

  2. Beam front accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.

    1982-01-01

    An intense relativistic electron beam cannot propagate in a metal drift tube when the current exceeds the space charge limit. Very high charge density and electric field gradients (10 2 to 10 3 MV/m) develop at the beam front and the electrons are reflected. When a neutral gas or a plasma is present, collective acceleration of positive ions occur, and the resulting charge neutralization enables the beam to propagate. Experimental results, theoretical understanding, and schemes to achieve high ion energies by external control of the beam front velocity will be reviewed

  3. GANIL beam profile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beamlines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The assembly of installed detectors (around 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beam extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beam, secondary ion beams from the production target of the LISE and SPEG spectrometers, different SPIRAL project lines. All of these detectors are based on standard characteristics: - standard flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; - identical analog electronics for all the detectors, with networking; - unique display system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (beam profile and ion packet lengths) make possible in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability. (author)

  4. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GuineaPig and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam background hitting the vertex detector.

  5. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, A

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GUINEAPIG and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam back- ground hitting the vertex detector.

  6. SU-F-T-191: 4D Dose Reconstruction of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Breathing Probability Density Function (PDF) From 4D Cone Beam Projection Images: A Study for Lung Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J; Ding, X; Liang, J; Zhang, J; Wang, Y; Yan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With energy repainting in lung IMPT, the dose delivered is approximate to the convolution of dose in each phase with corresponding breathing PDF. This study is to compute breathing PDF weighted 4D dose in lung IMPT treatment and compare to its initial robust plan. Methods: Six lung patients were evaluated in this study. Amsterdam shroud image were generated from pre-treatment 4D cone-beam projections. Diaphragm motion curve was extract from the shroud image and the breathing PDF was generated. Each patient was planned to 60 Gy (12GyX5). In initial plans, ITV density on average CT was overridden with its maximum value for planning, using two IMPT beams with robust optimization (5mm uncertainty in patient position and 3.5% range uncertainty). The plan was applied to all 4D CT phases. The dose in each phase was deformed to a reference phase. 4D dose is reconstructed by summing all these doses based on corresponding weighting from the PDF. Plan parameters, including maximum dose (Dmax), ITV V100, homogeneity index (HI=D2/D98), R50 (50%IDL/ITV), and the lung-GTV’s V12.5 and V5 were compared between the reconstructed 4D dose to initial plans. Results: The Dmax is significantly less dose in the reconstructed 4D dose, 68.12±3.5Gy, vs. 70.1±4.3Gy in the initial plans (p=0.015). No significant difference is found for the ITV V100, HI, and R50, 92.2%±15.4% vs. 96.3%±2.5% (p=0.565), 1.033±0.016 vs. 1.038±0.017 (p=0.548), 19.2±12.1 vs. 18.1±11.6 (p=0.265), for the 4D dose and initial plans, respectively. The lung-GTV V12.5 and V5 are significantly high in the 4D dose, 13.9%±4.8% vs. 13.0%±4.6% (p=0.021) and 17.6%±5.4% vs. 16.9%±5.2% (p=0.011), respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose reconstruction based on phase PDF can be used to evaluate the dose received by the patient. A robust optimization based on the phase PDF may even further improve patient care.

  7. SU-E-T-133: Assessing IMRT Treatment Delivery Accuracy and Consistency On a Varian TrueBeam Using the SunNuclear PerFraction EPID Dosimetry Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieterich, S [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Trestrail, E; Holt, R [Pacific Crest Medical Physics, Chico, CA (United States); Saini, S [Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL (Australia); Pfeiffer, I [VMTH, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Kent, M; Hansen, K [Surgical and Radiological Sciences, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess if the TrueBeam HD120 collimator is delivering small IMRT fields accurately and consistently throughout the course of treatment using the SunNuclear PerFraction software. Methods: 7-field IMRT plans for 8 canine patients who passed IMRT QA using SunNuclear Mapcheck DQA were selected for this study. The animals were setup using CBCT image guidance. The EPID fluence maps were captured for each treatment field and each treatment fraction, with the first fraction EPID data serving as the baseline for comparison. The Sun Nuclear PerFraction Software was used to compare the EPID data for subsequent fractions using a Gamma (3%/3mm) pass rate of 90%. To simulate requirements for SRS, the data was reanalyzed using a Gamma (3%/1mm) pass rate of 90%. Low-dose, low- and high gradient thresholds were used to focus the analysis on clinically relevant parts of the dose distribution. Results: Not all fractions could be analyzed, because during some of the treatment courses the DICOM tags in the EPID images intermittently change from CU to US (unspecified), which would indicate a temporary loss of EPID calibration. This technical issue is still being investigated. For the remaining fractions, the vast majority (7/8 of patients, 95% of fractions, and 96.6% of fields) are passing the less stringent Gamma criteria. The more stringent Gamma criteria caused a drop in pass rate (90 % of fractions, 84% of fields). For the patient with the lowest pass rate, wet towel bolus was used. Another patient with low pass rates experienced masseter muscle wasting. Conclusion: EPID dosimetry using the PerFraction software demonstrated that the majority of fields passed a Gamma (3%/3mm) for IMRT treatments delivered with a TrueBeam HD120 MLC. Pass rates dropped for a DTA of 1mm to model SRS tolerances. PerFraction pass rates can flag missing bolus or internal shields. Sanjeev Saini is an employee of Sun Nuclear Corporation. For this study, a pre-release version of PerFRACTION 1

  8. Observations of the beam-beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1985-11-01

    The observed complexity of the beam-beam interaction is the subject of this paper. The varied observations obtained from many storage rings happen to be sufficiently similar that a prescription can be formulated to describe the behavior of the luminosity as a function of beam current including the peak value. This prescription can be used to interpret various methods for improving the luminosity. Discussion of these improvement methods is accompanied with examples from actual practice. The consequences of reducing the vertical betatron function (one of the most used techniques) to near the value of the bunch length are reviewed. Finally, areas needing further experimental and calculational studies are pointed out as they are uncovered

  9. Beam loading in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1974-06-01

    The analysis of beam loading in the RF systems of high-energy storage rings (for example, the PEP e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ ring) is complicated by the fact that the time, T/sub b/, between the passage of successive bunches is comparable to the cavity filling time, T/sub b/. In this paper, beam loading expressions are first summarized for the usual case in which T/sub b/ /much lt/ T/sub f/. The theory of phase oscillations in the heavily-beam-loaded case is considered, and the dependence of the synchrotron frequency and damping constant for the oscillations on beam current and cavity tuning is calculated. Expressions for beam loading are then derived which are valid for any value of the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/. It is shown that, for the proposed PEP e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ ring parameters, the klystron power required is increased by about 3% over that calculated using the standard beam loading expressions. Finally, the analysis is extended to take into account the additional losses associated with the excitation of higher-order cavity modes. A rough numerical estimate is made of the loss enhancement to be expected for PEP RF system. It is concluded that this loss enhancement might be substantial unless appropriate measures are taken in the design and tuning of the accelerating structure

  10. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  11. Assessment of Electron Beam Welding in Shipyard Construction,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    ELECTRON BEAM APPLICATORS QUESTIONNAIRE 1. Applicators Name: McCay Tool & Engr. Co. 2. Address: 1449 West Lark, Fenton , Mo. 3...had very li tt le undercut and requ ired no cosmet ic pass. TESTING AND RESULTS ’re~t ing wi ~ pt-f’)rimev oil spc inens inl t he- fol lowing manner. 1...Penetration Cosmet . c Accelerating Voltage (KV) 75 70 Beam Current (ma) 115 30 Travel Speed (IPM) 8 18 Beam focus (Amps programmed) 4.38 4.70 Gun to Work

  12. Simulation study of the beam-beam interaction at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, J.

    1980-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation study of the beam-beam interaction at SPEAR indicates that quantum fluctuations affecting the horizontal betatron oscillation play a critical role in the vertical beam blowup

  13. Nonlinear optical beam manipulation, beam combining, and atmospheric propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on optics: Topics include: diffraction properties of laser speckle, coherent beam combination by plasma modes, nonlinear responses, deformable mirrors, imaging radiometers, electron beam propagation in inhomogeneous media, and stability of laser beams in a structured environment

  14. Experimental study of the molecular beam destruction by beam-beam and beam-background scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossel, U.; Dettleff, G.

    1974-01-01

    The extraction of flow properties related to the molecular motion normal to stream lines of an expanding gas jet from observed intensity profiles of supersonic beams is critically assessed. The perturbation of the profile curves by various effects is studied for a helium beam. Exponential laws appear to describe scattering effects to a satisfactory degree

  15. Electron beam diagnostics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garganne, P.

    1989-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study on beam diagnostics, using carbon wire scanners and optical transition radiation (DTR) monitors. The main consideration consists in the material selection, taking their thermal properties and their effect on the beam into account [fr

  16. Rf quadrupole beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, R.H.; Crandall, K.R.; Stovall, J.E.; Swenson, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been developed to analyze the beam dynamics of the radiofrequency quadrupole accelerating structure. Calculations show that this structure can accept a dc beam at low velocity, bunch it with high capture efficiency, and accelerate it to a velocity suitable for injection into a drift tube linac

  17. Beaming teaching application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Madsen, Esben; Olesen, Søren Krarup

    2012-01-01

    BEAMING is a telepresence research project aiming at providing a multimodal interaction between two or more participants located at distant locations. One of the BEAMING applications allows a distant teacher to give a xylophone playing lecture to the students. Therefore, rendering of the xylophon...

  18. Beam stabilization at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.

    1996-01-01

    The SPEAR storage ring began routine synchrotron radiation operation with a dedicated injector in 1990. Since then, a program to improve beam stability has steadily progressed. This paper, based on a seminar given at a workshop on storage ring optimization (1995 SRI conference) reviews the beam stability program for SPEAR. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  20. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  1. Dosimetry of pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    Negative pion beams are probably the most esoteric and most complicated type of radiation which has been suggested for use in clinical radiotherapy. Because of the limited availability of pion beams in the past, even to nuclear physicists, there exist relatively fewer basic data for this modality. Pion dosimetry is discussed

  2. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  3. MODULATED PLASMA ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, L. H.

    1963-08-15

    Techniques have been developed for producing electron beams of two amperes or more, from a plasma within a hollow cathode. Electron beam energies of 20 kilovolts are readily obtained and power densities of the order of 10,000 kilowatts per square inch can be obtained with the aid of auxiliary electromagnetic focusing. An inert gas atmosphere of a few microns pressure is used to initiate and maintain the beam. Beam intensity increases with both gas pressure and cathode potential but may be controlled by varying the potential of an internal electrode. Under constant pressure and cathode potential the beam intensity may be varied over a wide range by adjusting the potential of the internal control electrode. The effects of cathode design on the volt-ampere characteristics of the beam and the design of control electrodes are described. Also, performance data in both helium and argon are given. A tentative theory of the origin of electrons and of beam formation is proposed. Applications to vacuum metallurgy and to electron beam welding are described and illustrated. (auth)

  4. Electron beam simulation applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A system for simulating electron beam treatment portals using low-temperature melting point alloy is described. Special frames having the same physical dimensions as the electron beam applicators used on the Varian Clinac 20 linear accelerator were designed and constructed

  5. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  6. VIVITRON beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadji, A.

    1989-07-01

    The VIVITRON is a new 35 MV particle accelerator which presents a great number of innovations. One of the major problem is the beam transport in this electrostatic machine of 50 m length for ions with masses between 1 and 200. Our work consisted in the study of various experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam transport in Tandem accelerators from the ion source to the analysing magnet. Calculations of the beam optics were performed with a Strasbourg version of the computer code Transport. They allowed us to optimize the beam transport parameters of the VIVITRON elements. Special attention has been focused on the design of the charge state selector to be installed in the terminal of the new machine. Beam transmission measurements were carried out in the Strasbourg MP 10 Tandem accelerator for ions beams of masses between 1 and 127 and for terminal voltages from 9 to 15 MV. Partial and total transmissions were obtained and explanations of the beam losses were proposed in terms of the vacuum pressure and/or the optics of the beam accelerator system. The results have been extrapolated to the VIVITRON for which the best working conditions are now clearly defined [fr

  7. Beam director design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30 0 beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project

  8. Ion beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    An ion beam analyzer is specified, having an ion source for generating ions of a sample to be analyzed, means for extracting the sample ions, means for focusing the sample ions into a beam, separation means positioned along the ion beam for selectively deflecting species of ions, and means for detecting the selected species of ions. According to the specification, the analyzer further comprises (a) means for disabling at least a portion of the separation means, such that the ion beam from the source remains undeflected; (b) means located along the path of the undeflected ion beam for sensing the sample ions; and (c) enabling means responsive to the sensing means for automatically re-enabling the separation means when the sample ions reach a predetermined intensity level. (author)

  9. Crossed molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.T.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities with crossed molecular beams at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: scattering of Ar*, Kr*, with Xe; metastable rare gas interactions, He* + H 2 ; an atomic and molecular halogen beam source; a crossed molecular beam study of the Cl + Br 2 → BrCl + Br reaction; O( 3 P) reaction dynamics, development of the high pressure plasma beam source; energy randomization in the Cl + C 2 H 3 Br → Br + C 2 H 3 Cl reaction; high resolution photoionization studies of NO and ICl; photoionization of (H 2 O)/sub n/ and (NH 3 ) 2 ; photoionization mass spectroscopy of NH 3 + and O 3 + ; photo fragmentation of bromine; and construction of chemiluminescence-laser fluorescence crossed molecular beam machine

  10. Survey of beam-beam limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.; Cornacchia, M.; Donald, M.M.R.; Evans, L.R.; Tazzari, S.; Wilson, E.J.N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of beam-beam interaction is known to limit the luminosity of electron-positron storage rings and will, no doubt, limit the proton-antiproton collision scheme for the SPS. While theorists are struggling to explain this phenomenon it is more instructive to list their failures than their rather limited successes, in the hope that experiments may emerge which will direct their endeavors. The search for a description of a nonlinear system as it approaches the limit in which ordered motion breaks down, is the nub of the problem. It has engaged many fine mathematical intellects for decades and will no doubt continue to do so long after ISABELLE, the p antip and LEP are past achievements. Empirical scaling laws are emerging which relate electron machines to each other but their extrapolation to proton machines remain a very speculative exercise. Experimental data on proton limits is confined to one machine, the ISR, which does not normally suffer the beam-beam effect and where it must be artificially induced or simulated. This machine is also very different in important ways from the p antip collider. The gloomy picture which has emerged recently is that the fixed limits which were conventionally assumed for proton and electron machines can only be said to be valid for the machines which engendered them - the best guess that could be made at the time. They are very difficult to extrapolate to other sets of parameters

  11. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, S., E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  12. Beam-beam interaction in e+-e- storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duff, J.

    1977-01-01

    Colliding beams in electron-positron storage rings are discussed with particular reference to the space charge forces occuring during beam-beam interactions and their effect on beam current and consequently machine performance (maximum luminosity). The first section deals with linear beam-beam effects and discussses linear tune shift; the second section considers non-linear beam-beam effects and the creation on non-linear resonances. The last section poses questions of the possibility of extrapolating present results to future machines and discusses optimization of storage ring performance. (B.D.)

  13. Beam-width spreading of vortex beams in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Li, Jinhong; Duan, Meiling

    2018-01-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function, the analytical expression for the beam-width spreading of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams in free space are derived, and used to study the influence of beam parameters on the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams. With the increment of the propagation distance, the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams will increase; the bigger the topological charge, spatial correlation length, wavelength and waist width are, the smaller the beam-width spreading is.

  14. Average spreading and beam quality evolution of Gaussian array beams propagating through oceanic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi, Dong; Chen, Yizhu; Tao, Rumao; Ma, Yanxing; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The propagation properties of a radial Gaussian beam array through oceanic turbulence are studied analytically. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the beam quality (power-in-the-bucket (PIB) and M 2 -factor) of a radial beam array in a turbulent ocean are derived based on an account of statistical optics methods, the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, and the second order moments of the Wigner distribution function. The influences of w, ε, and χ T on the average intensity are investigated. The array divergence increases and the laser beam spreads as the salinity-induced dominant, ε decreased, and χ T increased. Further, the analytical expression of PIB and the M 2 -factor in the target plane is obtained. The changes of PIB and the M 2 -factor with three oceanic turbulence parameters indicate that the stronger turbulence with a larger w, smaller ε, and larger χ T results in the value of PIB decreasing, the value of the M 2 -factor increasing, and the beam quality degrading. (letter)

  15. Beam monitoring at NA2

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    Claus Goessling working on the beam Cerenkov counter of NA2. The muon beam enters from left the hall EHN2 and the last element of the beam transport. On background is the access door on the Jura side.

  16. Beam physics design strategy for a high-current rf linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The high average beam power of an rf linac system for transmutation of nuclear waste puts very stringent requirements on beam quality and beam control. Fractional beam losses along the accelerator must be kept at extremely low levels to assure {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} maintenance. Hence, halo formation and large-amplitude tails in the particle distribution due to beam mismatch and equipartitioning effects must be avoided. This implies that the beam should ideally be in near-perfect thermal equilibrium from injection to full energy - in contrast to existing rf linacs in which the transverse temperature, T {sub {perpendicular}}, is higher than the longitudinal temperature, T{sub {parallel}}. The physics and parameter scaling for such a system will be reviewed using the results of recent work on high-intensity bunched beams. A design strategy for a high-current rf linac with equilibrated beam will be proposed.

  17. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe

  18. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  19. SU-E-T-179: Exploring Appropriate Offset Values for Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo Dose Optimization in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Encompassing the Effects of Respiration and Tumor Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G [Boca Raton, FL (United States); Shang, C [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Leventouri, T [Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Exploring appropriate offset values in dose optimization with pencil beam (PB) algorithm to minimize dosimetric differences with plans calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) for lung cancer treatment with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: 20 cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, treated with gated full motion range SBRT were selected. According to the proximity of the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) to the chest wall, two groups are defined: peripherally located when GTV merges with the chest wall for at least 50% of the lesion diameter, and centrally located when the GTV is surrounded by lung tissue. Treatment plans were created on 4D average intensity projection (AIP) CT set with Brainlab iPlanDose 4.1.2 planning system. The D97 of PTV was normalized to 50Gy using the fast PB and compared with MC. The optimized plan was then recomputed over each 4D respiratory phase, and compared with MC using the same plan MU's. Results: The mean difference in the PB and MC D97 of the ITV was 10.5% (±0.8%) of the prescription dose (50Gy). PB algorithm showed 2.3–2.4% less overestimation to the D97 of the ITV, when comparing to MC, in the maximum exhalation phase than in the maximal inhalation phase. Significantly smaller dose difference between PB and MC is also shown in plans for peripheral lesions (7.7 ± 0.7%) versus for central lesions (12.7±0.8%) (p< 0.01). Conclusion: The dosimetric differences between PB and MC can be reasonably predicted depending on the location of lesion in the lung, and may be used as offset value in dose optimization with PB. Since the maximal exhalation phase demonstrates less dose discrepancy between the two algorithms than that in maximal inhalation phase, caution is suggested when the latter is included as a major phase portion in the respiration gated lung SBRT.

  20. Particle beam source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Electron beam research directed toward providing improved in-diode pinched beam sources and establishing the efficiency and feasibility for superposition of many beams progressed in three major areas. Focusing stability has been improved from large effective aspect ratio (radius/gap of emitting surface) diodes. Substantial progress toward establishing the feasibility of combining beams guided along ionized current-carrying channels has been made. Two beams have been transported and overlayed on a target. Theoretical and experimental measurements on channel formation have resulted in specifications for the capacitor bank channel initiation system for a 12-beam combination experiment on Proto II. An additional area of beam research has been the development of a small pulsed X-ray source to yield high quality flash X-radiography of pellets. A source yielding approximately 100-μm resolution of objects has been demonstrated and work continues to improve the convenience and reliability of this source. The effort to extend the capability of higher power conventional pulse power generators to accelerate ions (rather than electrons), and assess the feasibility of this technology variation for target experiments and reactors has progressed. Progress toward development of a multistage accelerator for ions with pulse power technology centered on development of a new laboratory facility and design and procurement of hardware for a five-stage test apparatus for the Pulslac concept

  1. Nanostructures by ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B.

    Ion beam techniques, including conventional broad beam ion implantation, ion beam synthesis and ion irradiation of thin layers, as well as local ion implantation with fine-focused ion beams have been applied in different fields of micro- and nanotechnology. The ion beam synthesis of nanoparticles in high-dose ion-implanted solids is explained as phase separation of nanostructures from a super-saturated solid state through precipitation and Ostwald ripening during subsequent thermal treatment of the ion-implanted samples. A special topic will be addressed to self-organization processes of nanoparticles during ion irradiation of flat and curved solid-state interfaces. As an example of silicon nanocrystal application, the fabrication of silicon nanocrystal non-volatile memories will be described. Finally, the fabrication possibilities of nanostructures, such as nanowires and chains of nanoparticles (e.g. CoSi2), by ion beam synthesis using a focused Co+ ion beam will be demonstrated and possible applications will be mentioned.

  2. T Chandrashekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. T Chandrashekar. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 24 Issue 4 August 2001 pp 345-353 Metals and Alloys. Effects and mechanisms of grain refinement in aluminium alloys · K T Kashyap T Chandrashekar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  3. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  4. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  5. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Electron beam ion sources technology made significant progress since 1968 when this method of producing highly charged ions in a potential trap within electron beam was proposed by E. Donets. Better understanding of physical processes in EBIS, technological advances and better simulation tools determined significant progress in key EBIS parameters: electron beam current and current density, ion trap capacity, attainable charge states. Greatly increased the scope of EBIS and EBIT applications. An attempt is made to compile some of EBIS engineering problems and solutions and to demonstrate a present stage of understanding the processes and approaches to build a better EBIS.

  6. The Lhc beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redarelli, S.; Bailey, R.

    2008-01-01

    The plans for the Lhc proton beam commissioning are presented. A staged commissioning approach is proposed to satisfy the request of the Lhc experiments while minimizing the machine complexity in early commissioning phases. Machine protection and collimation aspects will be tackled progressively as the performance will be pushed to higher beam intensities. The key parameters are the number of bunches, k b , the proton intensity pe bunch, N, and the β in the various interaction points. All together these parameters determine the total beam power and the complexity of the machine. We will present the proposed trade off between the evolution of these parameters and the Lhc luminosity performance.

  7. Secondary beams at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubre, H.

    1992-01-01

    GANIL, a user's facility since 1983, can deliver a broad spectrum of heavy-ion beams, from He to U, to well-equipped experimental areas. Their very large intensities are to be exploited to produce secondary beams, either using the fragmentation method (beams at energy per nucleon larger than 30 MeV/u), or the ISOL method. With the latter one, these ions have to be re-accelerated. The project of a cyclotron as a post-accelerator is described. (author) 11 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. The TMX heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    A heavy ion beam probe has been used to measure the radial space potential distribution in the central cell of TMX. This was the first beam probe system to utilize computer control, CAMAC instrumentation, and fast time response for broadband fluctuation capabilities. The fast time response was obtained using off-line processing of the energy analyzer detector signals and wideband transimpedance amplifiers. The on-axis space potential was found to be 300--400 V, with φ e /T ec ∼8. The radial potential profile is parabolic when gas box fueling is used. The frequency of observed fluctuations was found to agree with the E x B plasma rotation frequency during the discharge. The measured Tl ++ secondary ion current level is consistent with calculations, given reasonable assumptions for beam attenuation

  9. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system

  10. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Saisut, Jatuporn; Thongbai, Chitrlada; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond electron pulses. Theses short pulses are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  11. Three-dimensional numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In neutral plasmas with a uniform magnetic field and strongly anisotropic distribution function (T parallel /T perpendicular 0 <<1). Such high-intensity beams are relevant to next-step experiments such as the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), which would serve as proof-of-principal experiment for heavy-ion fusion

  12. Definition and measurement of the times-diffraction-limit number of high-power laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollanti, Sarah; Di Lazzaro, Paolo; Murra, Daniele

    1998-07-01

    A novel definition of the times-diffraction-limit (TDL) number of a laser beam is given. A comparison is made with the commonly used beam-propagation parameter M2, which is unreliable for hard-edge beams, like those produced by unstable resonators with diffraction output coupling. The new suggested TDL number definition doesn't rely on the real beam comparison to a Gaussian beam, but on the comparison of the far-field performances of the real beam with respect to those of a uniphase beam with the same amplitude profile in the near field. A practical method is also given for the estimation of the TDL number of real beams. Finally, this procedure is applied to the high-peak-power laser beams generated by two excimer laser systems developed in ENEA.

  13. Beam-beam-induced orbit effects at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaumann, M; Fernandez, R Alemany

    2014-01-01

    For high bunch intensities the long-range beam-beam interactions are strong enough to provoke effects on the orbit. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are presented in this paper

  14. Beam line design for a low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvind Kumar; Mahadevan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The design of a beam line for transport of a 70 keV electron beam from a thermionic gun to the Plane Wave Transformer (PWT) linac incorporating two solenoid magnets, a beam profile monitor and drift sections is presented. We used beam dynamics codes EGUN, PARMELA and compare simulated results with analytical calculations. (author)

  15. Compensated linac beam colliding with a stored beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.; Oregon Univ., Eugene

    1981-01-01

    The disruptive effect of a linac beam on a beam circulating in a storage ring can be reduced by compensating for the space charge of the linac beam with a beam which is oppositely charged, may have different bunchlength as well as lower energy, and need not be circulating in a storage ring. (orig.)

  16. Longitudinal beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tecker, F

    2014-01-01

    The course gives a summary of longitudinal beam dynamics for both linear and circular accelerators. After discussing different types of acceleration methods and synchronism conditions, it focuses on the particle motion in synchrotrons

  17. Beam position monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Beam monitoring in accelerators is reviewed, with emphasis on the engineering aspects of the problem. Guidelines for monitor design are given. Advantages and disadvantages of various electrode designs and signal processing methods are reviewed

  18. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  19. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  20. Single Beam Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan; Ruterbusch, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how holography can be used as part of undergraduate physics laboratories. The authors propose a single beam technique of holography, which will reduce the recording scheme as well as relax the isolation requirements. (HM)

  1. PARTICLE BEAMS: Frontier course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Driven by the quest for higher energies and optimal physics conditions, the behaviour of particle beams in accelerators and storage rings is the subject of increasing attention. Thus the second course organized jointly by the US and CERN Accelerator Schools looked towards the frontiers of particle beam knowledge. The programme held at South Padre Island, Texas, from 23-29 October attracted 125 participants including some 35 from Europe

  2. Hadron beams and accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    There were four sessions on Hadron Beams and Accelerators with 7 talks on Siberian Snakes and spin rotators, 3 talks on polarization build-up of unpolarized beams in storage rings and 5. 9, and 3 talks on low, medium, and high energy polarimeters, respectively. In this paper I will briefly describe a few highlights from these sessions, giving emphasis to topics which I think will play an important role in the future

  3. LHC First Beam 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Tuura, L

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Centre played a major part in the LHC First Beam Event on September 10th 2008: it was a central point for CMS, hosting journalists from all over the world and providing live link-ups to collaborating institutes as well as, of course, monitoring events as they happened at Point 5. It was also a venue for celebration as the beam completed circuits of the LHC in both directions, passing successfully through the detector (Courtesy of Lassi Tuura)

  4. PARTICLE BEAMS: Frontier course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-01-15

    Driven by the quest for higher energies and optimal physics conditions, the behaviour of particle beams in accelerators and storage rings is the subject of increasing attention. Thus the second course organized jointly by the US and CERN Accelerator Schools looked towards the frontiers of particle beam knowledge. The programme held at South Padre Island, Texas, from 23-29 October attracted 125 participants including some 35 from Europe.

  5. Hadron beams and accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    There were four sessions on Hadron Beams and Accelerators with 7 talks on Siberian Snakes and spin rotators, 3 talks on polarization build-up of unpolarized beams in storage rings and 5, 9, and 3 talks on low, medium, and high energy polarimeters, respectively. In this paper I will briefly describe a few highlights from these sessions, giving emphasis to topics which I think will play an important role in the future. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10 - 8 torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed

  7. Cluster ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popok, V.N.; Prasalovich, S.V.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Campbell, E.E.B.

    2001-01-01

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  8. Electron-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriott, L.; Liddle, A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron beams to write features on silicon wafers. Recent advances in electron beam lithography, as it is known, could enable this technology to be used for the mass manufacture of silicon chips. The validation of space-charge optimization and evaluation of printing techniques is underway. (UK)

  9. Electron beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriott, L.; Liddle, A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron beams to write features on silicon wafers. Recent advances in electron beam lithography, as it is known, could enable this technology to be used for the mass manufacture of silicon chips. The validation of space-charge optimization and evaluation of printing techniques is underway. 5 figs

  10. Intense ion beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Sudan, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation

  11. CERN: Producing radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Accelerating radioactive beams has long been of interest at CERN's ISOLDE on-line isotope separator - the possibility was discussed at a CERN Workshop on intermediate energy physics as early as 1977. Meanwhile, as was highlighted in the 1991 report of the Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee, widespread scientific interest in these beams has developed and a range of projects are proposed, under construction or operational throughout the world

  12. Particles beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzureau, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the ''Chocs'' journal is devoted to particles beams used by the D.A.M. (Direction of Military Applications) and to their applications. The concerned beams are limited to those in an energy range from hundred of Kev to several Gev. Light ions (protons, deuterons, alpha) where it is easy to produce neutrons sources and heavy ions (from carbon to gold). (N.C.). 8 refs., 2 figs

  13. Fast antihydrogen beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, R.

    1989-01-01

    The motivation for production and precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen atoms is outlined. An experimental configuration is considered, concerning laser-microwave spectroscopy of a fast hydrogen beam with characteristics similar to those of an antihydrogen beam emanating from an antiproton-positron overlap region in an antiproton storage ring. In particular, a possible experiment for the measurement of the ground state hyperfine structure splitting is described. (orig.)

  14. Observations of beam-beam effects in the LHC 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W.; Alemany, R.; Buffat, X.; Calaga, R.; Giachino, R.; Papotti, G.; Pieloni, T.; Trad, G.; Schaumann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported on the first studies of beam-beam effects in the LHC with high intensity, high brightness beams and can summarize the results as follows. The effect of the beam-beam interaction on the beam dynamics is clearly established. The LHC allows very large head-on tune shifts above nominal. The effect of long range interactions on the beam lifetime and losses (dynamic aperture) is clearly visible. The number of head-on and/or long range interactions important for losses and all predicted PACMAN effects have been observed. All observations are in good agreement with the expectations