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Sample records for systolic pressure measurement

  1. Automatic noninvasive measurement of systolic blood pressure using photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glik Zehava

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automatic measurement of arterial blood pressure is important, but the available commercial automatic blood pressure meters, mostly based on oscillometry, are of low accuracy. Methods In this study, we present a cuff-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, based on photoplethysmographic signals measured simultaneously in fingers of both hands. After inflating the pressure cuff to a level above systolic blood pressure in a relatively slow rate, it is slowly deflated. The cuff pressure for which the photoplethysmographic signal reappeared during the deflation of the pressure-cuff was taken as the systolic blood pressure. The algorithm for the detection of the photoplethysmographic signal involves: (1 determination of the time-segments in which the photoplethysmographic signal distal to the cuff is expected to appear, utilizing the photoplethysmographic signal in the free hand, and (2 discrimination between random fluctuations and photoplethysmographic pattern. The detected pulses in the time-segments were identified as photoplethysmographic pulses if they met two criteria, based on the pulse waveform and on the correlation between the signal in each segment and the signal in the two neighboring segments. Results Comparison of the photoplethysmographic-based automatic technique to sphygmomanometry, the reference standard, shows that the standard deviation of their differences was 3.7 mmHg. For subjects with systolic blood pressure above 130 mmHg the standard deviation was even lower, 2.9 mmHg. These values are much lower than the 8 mmHg value imposed by AAMI standard for automatic blood pressure meters. Conclusion The photoplethysmographic-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, and the algorithm which was presented in this study, seems to be accurate.

  2. Invasively Measured Aortic Systolic Blood Pressure and Office Systolic Blood Pressure in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment: A Prospective Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Knudsen, Søren T; Hansen, Klavs W

    2016-01-01

    Aortic systolic blood pressure (BP) represents the hemodynamic cardiac and cerebral burden more directly than office systolic BP. Whether invasively measured aortic systolic BP confers additional prognostic value beyond office BP remains debated. In this study, office systolic BP and invasively......) and with myocardial infarction in patients without diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio, 1.07 [95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.12] and 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.10], respectively). In models including both BP measurements, aortic BP lost statistical significance and aortic BP did not confer improvement...

  3. Second measurement of morning systolic blood pressure is more closely associated with albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, Kazumi; Fukui, Michiaki; Ushigome, Emi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Tanaka, Toru; Atsuta, Haruhiko; Ohnishi, Masayoshi; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-08-01

    It is important to control blood pressure as well as to control blood glucose for the prevention of diabetic nephropathy. However, to our knowledge, there are no reports investigating which blood pressure, including morning, evening and clinic, is more closely associated with albuminuria and whether one measurement is sufficient or not in patients with Type 2 diabetes. We measured morning, evening and clinic blood pressure and compared the area under the curve (AUC) of blood pressure for urinary albumin excretion equal to or more than 30 mg/g creatinine using receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses and odds ratio for albuminuria defined as urinary albumin excretion equal to or more than 30 mg/g creatinine in 858 patients with Type 2 diabetes. Odds ratio (95% confidence interval (CI)) of morning, evening and clinic systolic blood pressure for albuminuria was 1.034 (1.024 - 1.044), 1.033 (1.023 - 1.043) and 1.013 (1.055 - 1.021), respectively (p AUC of morning, evening and clinic systolic blood pressure was 0.644 (0.628 - 0.700) (p AUC of the second morning systolic blood pressure was greater than the first (p = 0.033). The second measurement of morning systolic blood pressure is more closely associated with albuminuria than the first measurement of the morning in addition to clinic systolic blood pressure.

  4. The measurement of digital systolic blood pressure by strain gauge technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Bell, G; Lassen, N A

    1972-01-01

    The systolic blood pressure on the finger, toe, and ankle has been measured by a strain gauge technique in 10 normal subjects aged 17-31 years and 14 normal subjects aged 43-57 years. The standard deviation in repeated measurements lies between 2 and 6 mm Hg. The finger pressure in the younger...... group was significantly higher than the corresponding arm pressure (+ 9.3 mm Hg, S.D. 6.8), but equalled this in the older group (- 0.5 mm Hg, S.D. 6.6). In the two groups the ankle pressures were + 19.3 mm Hg (S.D. 7.5) and + 23.6 mm Hg (S.D. 9.5) higher than the systolic arm pressures. The toe...... pressures were lower than the arm pressures, in the two groups - 4.8 mm Hg (S.D. 6.6) and - 9.8 mm Hg (S.D. 10.7) respectively. The ankle-toe gradient was in the younger group 24.3 mm Hg (S.D. 7.3) and in the older group 33.3 mm Hg (S.D. 12.1). Using mean minus 2.5 X S.D. as the lower limit of normality...

  5. Peak systolic pressure-volume relationships in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Haruhiko; Sugihara, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Katsume, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Masakazu; Ijichi, Hamao

    1985-01-01

    We determined the relationship between left ventricular (LV) peak systolic pressure (PSP) and end-systolic volume, non-invasively using cuff sphygmomanometry and radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) measured in the arm was substituted for PSP. LV enddiastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were determined by a non-geometric method of gated RNA and recorded in three different hemodynamic states: at rest (basal state), during increased SBP after angiotensin administration (initial dose, 1-2 μg/min) and during decreased SBP after nitrate (sublingual nitroglycerin, 0.3-0.6 mg, or intravenous isosorbide dinitrate, 0.5-1.0 mg/min). The reproducibility of this method, tested in six subjects, proved to be good. Fifty-five subjects were divided into four groups based on EF at rest. The EDV and ESV were increased by angiotensin, and decreased by nitrate in all groups. EF was decreased by angiotensin and increased by nitrate. In contrast, the changes in PSP/ESVI due to these drugs remained in a narrow range in all groups. The regression lines of the PSP/ESVI relationship were almost linear and were steeper in the group with higher EF. Esub(max), the slope of the lines, was 5.75 +- 3.48 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 1 (EF>50%), 3.16 +- 1.83 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 2 (EF 49-40%), 2.27 +- 0.86 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 3 (EF 39-30%) and 0.59 +- 0.50 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 4 (EF<29%). The theoretical volume at zero pressure (VoI) did not meet in a definite value and was not related to EF at rest. Thus, the left ventricular peak systolic pressure-end-systolic volume relationship can be assessed non-invasively from radionuclide angiocardiography, which can be widely used for the evaluation of ventricular contractility, even in patients with asynergic ventricular contraction for whom echocardiography is unsuitable in measuring ventricular volume. (author)

  6. Direct measured systolic pressure gradients across the aorto-iliac segment in multiple-level-obstruction arteriosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Praestholm, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1981-01-01

    Patients with severe ischemia due to multi-level obstructions in the leg arteries both above and below the region were assessed preoperatively by intraarterial brachial and femoral artery pressure measurements. The systolic pressure drop along aorto-iliac obstructions was compared to the angiogra....... Due to large variations, however, the angiographic information was found to be useless in the individual patient. No difference in the pressure drop was found between cases in which rich and poor collateral networks were visualized....

  7. Measuring systolic arterial blood pressure. Possible errors from extension tubes or disposable transducer domes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, C F; Kim, K C

    1980-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of possible error in the measurement of systolic blood pressure if disposable, built-in diaphragm, transducer domes or long extension tubes between the patient and pressure transducer are used. Sinusoidal or arterial pressure patterns were generated with specially designed equipment. With a long extension tube or trapped air bubbles, the resonant frequency of the catheter system was reduced so that the arterial pulse was amplified as it acted on the transducer and, thus, gave an erroneously high systolic pressure measurement. The authors found this error to be as much as 20 mm Hg. Trapped air bubbles, not stopcocks or connections, per se, lead to poor fidelity. The utility of a continuous catheter flush system (Sorenson, Intraflow) to estimate the resonant frequency and degree of damping of a catheter-transducer system is described, as are possibly erroneous conclusions. Given a rough estimate of the resonant frequency of a catheter-transducer system and the magnitude of overshoot in response to a pulse, the authors present a table to predict the magnitude of probable error. These studies confirm the variability and unreliability of static calibration that may occur using some safety diaphragm domes and show that the system frequency response is decreased if air bubbles are trapped between the diaphragms. The authors conclude that regular procedures should be established to evaluate the accuracy of the pressure measuring systems in use, the transducer should be placed as close to the patient as possible, the air bubbles should be assiduously eliminated from the system.

  8. Impact of age on pulmonary artery systolic pressures at rest and with exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvan C Kane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is not well known if advancing age influences normal rest or exercise pulmonary artery pressures. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of increasing age with measurements of pulmonary artery systolic pressure at rest and with exercise. Subjects and methods: A total of 467 adults without cardiopulmonary disease and normal exercise capacity (age range: 18–85 years underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing with Doppler measurement of rest and exercise pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Results: There was a progressive increase in rest and exercise pulmonary artery pressures with increasing age. Pulmonary artery systolic pressures at rest and with exercise were 25 ± 5 mmHg and 33 ± 9 mmHg, respectively, in those <40 years, and 30 ± 5 mmHg and 41 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, in those ≥70 years. While elevated left-sided cardiac filling pressures were excluded by protocol design, markers of arterial stiffness associated with the age-dependent effects on pulmonary pressures. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that in echocardiographically normal adults, pulmonary artery systolic pressure increases with advancing age. This increase is seen at rest and with exercise. These increases in pulmonary pressure occur in association with decreasing transpulmonary flow and increases in systemic pulse pressure, suggesting that age-associated blood vessel stiffening may contribute to these differences in pulmonary artery systolic pressure.

  9. Relationship Between 24-Hour Ambulatory Central Systolic Blood Pressure and Left Ventricular Mass: A Prospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Rodilla, Enrique; Ablasser, Cornelia; Jankowski, Piotr; Lorenza Muiesan, Maria; Giannattasio, Cristina; Mang, Claudia; Wilkinson, Ian; Kellermair, Jörg; Hametner, Bernhard; Pascual, Jose Maria; Zweiker, Robert; Czarnecka, Danuta; Paini, Anna; Salvetti, Massimo; Maloberti, Alessandro; McEniery, Carmel

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between left ventricular mass and brachial office as well as brachial and central ambulatory systolic blood pressure in 7 European centers. Central systolic pressure was measured with a validated oscillometric device, using a transfer function, and mean/diastolic pressure calibration. M-mode images were obtained by echocardiography, and left ventricular mass was determined by one single reader blinded to blood pressure. We studied 289 participants (137 women) free from antihypertensive drugs (mean age: 50.8 years). Mean office blood pressure was 145/88 mm Hg and mean brachial and central ambulatory systolic pressures were 127 and 128 mm Hg, respectively. Mean left ventricular mass was 93.3 kg/m 2 , and 25.6% had left ventricular hypertrophy. The correlation coefficient between left ventricular mass and brachial office, brachial ambulatory, and central ambulatory systolic pressure was 0.29, 0.41, and 0.47, respectively ( P =0.003 for comparison between brachial office and central ambulatory systolic pressure and 0.32 for comparison between brachial and central ambulatory systolic pressure). The results were consistent for men and women, and young and old participants. The areas under the curve for prediction of left ventricular hypertrophy were 0.618, 0.635, and 0.666 for brachial office, brachial, and central ambulatory systolic pressure, respectively ( P =0.03 for comparison between brachial and central ambulatory systolic pressure). In younger participants, central ambulatory systolic pressure was superior to both other measurements. Central ambulatory systolic pressure, measured with an oscillometric cuff, shows a strong trend toward a closer association with left ventricular mass and hypertrophy than brachial office/ambulatory systolic pressure. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01278732. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. The systolic blood pressure difference between arms and cardiovascular disease in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Ido; Gona, Philimon; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Jaff, Michael R; Murabito, Joanne M

    2014-03-01

    An increased interarm systolic blood pressure difference is an easily determined physical examination finding. The relationship between interarm systolic blood pressure difference and risk of future cardiovascular disease is uncertain. We described the prevalence and risk factor correlates of interarm systolic blood pressure difference in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) original and offspring cohorts and examined the association between interarm systolic blood pressure difference and incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. An increased interarm systolic blood pressure difference was defined as ≥ 10 mm Hg using the average of initial and repeat blood pressure measurements obtained in both arms. Participants were followed through 2010 for incident cardiovascular disease events. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed to investigate the effect of interarm systolic blood pressure difference on incident cardiovascular disease. We examined 3390 (56.3% female) participants aged 40 years and older, free of cardiovascular disease at baseline, mean age of 61.1 years, who attended a FHS examination between 1991 and 1994 (original cohort) and from 1995 to 1998 (offspring cohort). The mean absolute interarm systolic blood pressure difference was 4.6 mm Hg (range 0-78). Increased interarm systolic blood pressure difference was present in 317 (9.4%) participants. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years, during which time 598 participants (17.6%) experienced a first cardiovascular event, including 83 (26.2%) participants with interarm systolic blood pressure difference ≥ 10 mm Hg. Compared with those with normal interarm systolic blood pressure difference, participants with an elevated interarm systolic blood pressure difference were older (63.0 years vs 60.9 years), had a greater prevalence of diabetes mellitus (13.3% vs 7.5%,), higher systolic blood pressure (136.3 mm Hg vs 129.3 mm Hg), and a higher total cholesterol

  11. Analysis of end-systolic pressure-volume relation by gated radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Haruhiko; Sugihara, Horoki; Katsume, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Hamao; Miyanaga, Hajime

    1982-01-01

    Left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relation has been proved experimentally to b e an useful index of left ventricular contractility relatively independent of preload or afterload. But less clinical application has been reported because of its invasive nature, and we evaluated this relationship non-invasively using gated radionuclide angiocardiography as volume determination and cuff sphyngomanometer in the arm as pressure measurement. Gated equilibrium blood pool scintigrams were obtained at rest and during intravenous infusion of angiotensin or nitrate. Ventricular volumes were derived from ventricular activity and peripheral blood volume and activity. The peak systolic pressure (PSP) by cuff method to end-systolic volume index (ESVI) relations showed good linearity (r gt .930 in 84% of consecutive 50 cases) and were gentler in the groups with more impaired left ventricular function. Emax was related exponentially to ejection fraction (EF) and hyperbolically to end-diastolic volume index. The dead volume (VoI) was unfixed and fell into positive or negative value, and was not related to EF under control condition. PSP/ESVI in each loading condition was less variable with the alteration of blood pressure than EF. The linear relation was found between PSP/ESVI under control condition and Emax (PSP/ESVI = 0.651.Emax + 0.958, r = 0.841, p lt .001). Thus in measuring ventricular volume, gated radionuclide angiocardiography is a non-invasive method less affected by the geometry of the left ventricle. Non-invasive determination of end-systolic pressure-volume relation using the volume by radionuclide and the blood pressure by cuff method is clinically useful in the assessment of left ventricular contractility. (author)

  12. Systolic blood pressure is superior to other haemodynamic predictors of outcome in community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, J D; Singanayagam, A; Hill, A T

    2008-08-01

    Admission blood pressure (BP) assessment is a central component of severity assessment for community acquired pneumonia. The aim of this study was to establish which readily available haemodynamic measure on admission is most useful for predicting severity in patients admitted with community acquired pneumonia. A prospective observational study of patients admitted with community acquired pneumonia was conducted in Edinburgh, UK. The measurements compared were systolic and diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure. The outcomes of interest were 30 day mortality and the requirement for mechanical ventilation and/or inotropic support. Admission systolic BP pressure pressure AUC values for each predictor of 30 day mortality were as follows: systolic BP pressure pressure AUC values for each predictor of need for mechanical ventilation and/or inotropic support were as follows: systolic BP pressure pressure blood pressure AUC 0.76 vs 0.74) and to the standard CURB65 score (0.76 vs 0.76) for the prediction of 30 day mortality. The simplified CRB65 score was equivalent for prediction of mechanical ventilation and/or inotropic support to standard CRB65 (0.77 vs 0.77) and to CURB65 (0.77 vs 0.78). Systolic BP is superior to other haemodynamic predictors of 30 day mortality and need for mechanical ventilation and/or inotropic support in community acquired pneumonia. The CURB65 score can be simplified to a modified CRB65 score by omission of the diastolic BP criterion without compromising its accuracy.

  13. Closure of digital arteries in high vascular tone states as demonstrated by measurement of systolic blood pressure in the fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krähenbühl, B; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    by direct cooling or intra-arterial noradrenaline infusion caused a marked drop in FSP in the exposed fingers, but not in the non-exposed fingers of the same hand. The fact that the non-exposed fingers retained the normal (arm systolic) pressure level is taken to indicate that palmar arch blood pressure......Finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) was measured indirectly in normal subjects and patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon by applying a thin-walled plastic cuff around the finger and a strain gauge more distally to detect volume changes. Inducing a high vascular tone in one or more fingers...... also remained normal. In the high vascular tone state, a large transmural pressure difference must apparently be established before the digital arteries are forced open. The lowered opening pressure constitutes a manifestation of the closure phenomenon of the digital arteries described in patients...

  14. [Development of an automatic pneumatic tourniquet system that determines pressures in synchrony with systolic blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyun; Li, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Zhengbo; Guo, Junyan; Wang, Weidong

    2012-11-01

    The correlation coefficients between arterial occlusion pressure and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, limb circumference, body mass etc were obtained through healthy volunteer experiments, in which tourniquet were applied on upper/lower extremities. The prediction equations were derived from the data of experiments by multiple regression analysis. Based on the microprocessor C8051F340, a new pneumatic tourniquet system that can determine tourniquet pressure in synchrony with systolic blood pressure was developed and verified the function and stability of designed system. Results showed that the pneumatic tourniquet which automatically adjusts occlusion pressure in accordance with systolic blood pressure could stop the flow of blood to get a bloodless field.

  15. Reducing maternal mortality: Systolic blood pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-03-21

    Mar 21, 2006 ... While deaths due to fluid overload have ... of better fluid balance management, we have made .... systolic blood pressure plays a significant role in the .... one looks at the work of Martin et al.5 ... Promoting Healthy Life.

  16. Dairy consumption, systolic blood pressure, and risk of hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Huang, Tao; Bergholdt, Helle Km

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine whether previous observed inverse associations of dairy intake with systolic blood pressure and risk of hypertension were causal.Design Mendelian randomization study using the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4988235 related to lactase persistence as an instrumental variable...... blood pressure but not risk of hypertension (odds ratio 0.98, 0.97 to 1.00; P=0.11).Conclusion The weak inverse association between dairy intake and systolic blood pressure in observational studies was not supported by a comprehensive instrumental variable analysis and systematic review of existing...

  17. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements: differences between measured and calculated mean arterial pressure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.D.; Hofstra, J.M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is often used as an index of overall blood pressure. In recent years, the use of automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices is increasing. These devices directly measure and display MAP; however, MAP is often calculated from systolic blood pressure (SBP)

  18. [Comparison of invasive blood pressure measurement in the aorta with indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement at the wrist and forearm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, F; Aristidou, Y; Klaus, D; Wiemeyer, A; Lösse, B

    1995-09-01

    Indirectly measured blood pressure at the wrist or upper arm was compared with directly measured values in the aortic arch during routinely performed diagnostic cardiac catheterization in 100 patients (31-80 years, mean 59.3 years, 60% males). The noninvasive measurements were carried out by oscillometric devices, NAiS Blood Pressure Watch for measurements at the wrist, and Hestia OZ80 at the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure measured at the wrist was 4.3 +/- 14.1 mm Hg, and the diastolic value 6.0 +/- 8.9 mm Hg higher than when measured at the aortic arch; the difference was significant in both cases. Correlation coefficients were 0.85 for systolic and 0.71 for diastolic blood pressure. In 16% of the patients the systolic blood pressure at the wrist differed more than +/- 20 mm Hg. The diastolic blood pressure at the wrist measured more than +/- 20 mm Hg higher than in the aorta in 5% of the patients. At the upper arm mean systolic values were not different to the aorta. The diastolic pressure was 9.3 +/- 9.8 mm Hg higher in the aorta than at the upper arm. To verify the accuracy of values measured with the NAiS Blood Pressure Watch compared with the standard technique at the upper arm, sequential measurements were made at wrist and ipsilateral upper arm in the same group of 100 patients. The systolic blood pressure at the left wrist was 3.4 +/- 13.3 mm Hg higher and the diastolic pressure 3.8 +/- 9.5 mm Hg lower than at the upper arm. Only 53% of systolic values lay within a range of +/- 10 mm Hg. The correspondence between wrist and upper arm values was better for diastolic blood pressure, the values differing by less than +/- 10 mm Hg in two-thirds of patients. Self-measurement of arterial blood pressure with an oscillometric device at the wrist can be recommended only in individual cases with a difference of simultaneously measured values at the upper arm of less than +/- 10 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The standard method for indirectly

  19. The correlation between psychological intervention and heart rate,systolic pressure in patients of cervical cancer treated with interventional chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Cuiyun; Lan Guiyun; Liu Shuang; Chen Bao'e; Liu Yali; Wang Zhujun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effect of psychological intervention on the heart rate, systolic pressure of the patients with cervical cancer who are treated with interventional chemoembolization. Methods: Eighty patients with cervical cancer were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) was performed in all cases. Patients in study group (n=10) received systemic psychological intervention 30 minutes before TACE. The heart rate and systolic pressure of the patients were measured when TACE started. The results were compared with that obtained at the time of admission. Patients in control group (n=10) did not receive systemic psychological intervention before TACE and their heart rate and systolic pressure were measured in the same way as in study group. Results: At the time TACE started the heart rate and systolic pressure of the patients in study group were significantly lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Preoperative psychological intervention is very helpful for reducing psychological stress and mental tension,in stabilizing heart rate and systolic pressure of the patients with cervical cancer who are treated with TACE. (authors)

  20. Systolic Blood Pressure Accuracy Enhancement in the Electronic Palpation Method Using Pulse Waveform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorvoja, H

    2001-01-01

    .... Systolic pressure errors were defined and correlations with other specific values, like pressure rise time, pulse wave velocity, systolic pressure, augmentation, arm circumference and body mass index were calculated...

  1. Contributions of social context to blood pressure: findings from a multilevel analysis of social capital and systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Fujisawa, Yoshikazu; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Ito, Katsuhisa; Nabika, Toru; Shiwaku, Kuninori

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, few studies have quantified the effect of residential context on blood pressure. Although these studies have emphasized the importance of socioeconomic influences such as education or poverty levels, the association between the features of social structure such as social capital and blood pressure remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether social capital was associated with systolic blood pressure after controlling for individual potential confounders. We analyzed data from the Shimane Study conducted from 2006 to 2008 in rural mountainous regions of Japan. After excluding the missing data and data of participants taking hypertension medication, we conducted a multilevel analysis of the data for 335 individuals nested within 30 postcode sectors. Systolic blood pressure increased with increasing age and body mass index. We also found that a higher systolic blood pressure was observed among smokers and those taking medication for diabetes. Regarding the contextual effects of social capital, systolic blood pressure increased with an increasing proportion of lack of fairness, after adjustment for individual confounders. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the association between social capital and systolic blood pressure by using a multilevel methodological framework. Surprisingly, we found that lack of fairness had a strong effect on systolic blood pressure. However, we could not find any significant associations between other items of social capital and systolic blood pressure. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism by which lack of fairness may have an effect on systolic blood pressure.

  2. Signal quality measures for unsupervised blood pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Sukor, J; Redmond, S J; Lovell, N H; Chan, G S H

    2012-01-01

    Accurate systolic and diastolic pressure estimation, using automated blood pressure measurement, is difficult to achieve when the transduced signals are contaminated with noise or interference, such as movement artifact. This study presents an algorithm for automated signal quality assessment in blood pressure measurement by determining the feasibility of accurately detecting systolic and diastolic pressures when corrupted with various levels of movement artifact. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared to a manually annotated reference scoring (RS). Based on visual representations and audible playback of Korotkoff sounds, the creation of the RS involved two experts identifying sections of the recorded sounds and annotating sections of noise contamination. The experts determined the systolic and diastolic pressure in 100 recorded Korotkoff sound recordings, using a simultaneous electrocardiograph as a reference signal. The recorded Korotkoff sounds were acquired from 25 healthy subjects (16 men and 9 women) with a total of four measurements per subject. Two of these measurements contained purposely induced noise artifact caused by subject movement. Morphological changes in the cuff pressure signal and the width of the Korotkoff pulse were extracted features which were believed to be correlated with the noise presence in the recorded Korotkoff sounds. Verification of reliable Korotkoff pulses was also performed using extracted features from the oscillometric waveform as recorded from the inflatable cuff. The time between an identified noise section and a verified Korotkoff pulse was the key feature used to determine the validity of possible systolic and diastolic pressures in noise contaminated Korotkoff sounds. The performance of the algorithm was assessed based on the ability to: verify if a signal was contaminated with any noise; the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of this noise classification, and the systolic and diastolic pressure

  3. Systolic blood pressure estimation using PPG and ECG during physical exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, S.; Bezemer, R.; Long, X.; Muehlsteff, J.; Aarts, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a model to estimate systolic blood pressure (SBP) using photoplethysmography (PPG) and electrocardiography (ECG) is proposed. Data from 19 subjects doing a 40 min exercise was analyzed. Reference SBP was measured at the finger based on the volume-clamp principle. PPG signals were

  4. Closure of digital arteries in high vascular tone states as demonstrated by measurement of systolic blood pressure in the fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krähenbühl, B; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    Finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) was measured indirectly in normal subjects and patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon by applying a thin-walled plastic cuff around the finger and a strain gauge more distally to detect volume changes. Inducing a high vascular tone in one or more fingers by ...

  5. Effects of parental smoking on exercise systolic blood pressure in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Claudia; Weisser, Burkhard

    2015-05-11

    In adults, exercise blood pressure seems to be more closely related to cardiovascular risk than resting blood pressure; however, few data are available on the effects of familial risk factors, including smoking habits, on exercise blood pressure in adolescents. Blood pressure at rest and during exercise, parental smoking, and other familial risk factors were investigated in 532 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years (14.6±1.5 years) in the Kiel EX.PRESS. (EXercise PRESSure) Study. Exercise blood pressure was determined at 1.5 W/kg body weight using a standardized submaximal cycle ergometer test. Mean resting blood pressure was 113.1±12.8/57.2±7.1 mm Hg, and exercise blood pressure was 149.9±19.8/54.2±8.6 mm Hg. Parental smoking increased exercise systolic blood pressure (+4.0 mm Hg, 3.1 to 4.9; P=0.03) but not resting blood pressure of the subjects (adjusted for age, sex, height, body mass index percentile, fitness). Parental overweight and familial hypertension were related to both higher resting and exercise systolic blood pressure values, whereas associations with an inactive lifestyle and a low educational level of the parents were found only with adolescents' blood pressure during exercise. The cumulative effect of familial risk factors on exercise systolic blood pressure was more pronounced than on blood pressure at rest. Parental smoking might be a novel risk factor for higher blood pressure, especially during exercise. In addition, systolic blood pressure during a submaximal exercise test was more closely associated with familial risk factors than was resting blood pressure, even in adolescents. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Automatic algorithm for monitoring systolic pressure variation and difference in pulse pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther; Fukui, Kimiko; Hartwich, Volker; Schumacher, Peter M; Vogt, Andreas; Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Kurz, Andrea; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Leibundgut, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Difference in pulse pressure (dPP) reliably predicts fluid responsiveness in patients. We have developed a respiratory variation (RV) monitoring device (RV monitor), which continuously records both airway pressure and arterial blood pressure (ABP). We compared the RV monitor measurements with manual dPP measurements. ABP and airway pressure (PAW) from 24 patients were recorded. Data were fed to the RV monitor to calculate dPP and systolic pressure variation in two different ways: (a) considering both ABP and PAW (RV algorithm) and (b) ABP only (RV(slim) algorithm). Additionally, ABP and PAW were recorded intraoperatively in 10-min intervals for later calculation of dPP by manual assessment. Interobserver variability was determined. Manual dPP assessments were used for comparison with automated measurements. To estimate the importance of the PAW signal, RV(slim) measurements were compared with RV measurements. For the 24 patients, 174 measurements (6-10 per patient) were recorded. Six observers assessed dPP manually in the first 8 patients (10-min interval, 53 measurements); no interobserver variability occurred using a computer-assisted method. Bland-Altman analysis showed acceptable bias and limits of agreement of the 2 automated methods compared with the manual method (RV: -0.33% +/- 8.72% and RV(slim): -1.74% +/- 7.97%). The difference between RV measurements and RV(slim) measurements is small (bias -1.05%, limits of agreement 5.67%). Measurements of the automated device are comparable with measurements obtained by human observers, who use a computer-assisted method. The importance of the PAW signal is questionable.

  7. Morning pulse pressure is associated more strongly with elevated albuminuria than systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushigome, Emi; Fukui, Michiaki; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Matsumoto, Shinobu; Mineoka, Yusuke; Nakanishi, Naoko; Senmaru, Takafumi; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto

    2013-09-01

    Recently, focus has been directed toward pulse pressure as a potentially independent risk factor for micro- and macrovascular disease. This study was designed to examine the relationship between pulse pressure taken at home and elevated albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study is a post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional multicenter study. Home blood pressure measurements were performed for 14 consecutive days in 858 patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated the relationship between systolic blood pressure or pulse pressure in the morning or in the evening and urinary albumin excretion using univariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, we measured area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) to compare the ability to identify elevated albuminuria, defined as urinary albumin excretion equal to or more than 30 mg/g creatinine, of systolic blood pressure or pulse pressure. Morning systolic blood pressure (β=0.339, Ppressure (β=0.378, PAUC for elevated albuminuria in morning systolic blood pressure and morning pulse pressure were 0.668 (0.632-0.705; PAUC of morning pulse pressure was significantly greater than that of morning systolic blood pressure (P=0.040). Our findings implicate that morning pulse pressure is associated with elevated albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes, which suggests that lowering morning pulse pressure could prevent the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Systolic and Diastolic Regulation of the Cerebral Pressure-Flow Relationship During Squat-Stand Manoeuvres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirl, Jonathan D; Wright, Alexander D; Ainslie, Philip N; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; van Donkelaar, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral pressure-flow dynamics are typically reported between mean arterial pressure and mean cerebral blood velocity. However, by reporting only mean responses, potential differential regulatory properties associated with systole and diastole may have been overlooked. Twenty young adults (16 male, age: 26.7 ± 6.6 years, BMI: 24.9 ± 3.0 kg/m 2 ) were recruited for this study. Middle cerebral artery velocity was indexed via transcranial Doppler. Cerebral pressure-flow dynamics were assessed using transfer function analysis at both 0.05 and 0.10 Hz using squat-stand manoeuvres. This method provides robust and reliable measures for coherence (correlation index), phase (timing buffer) and gain (amplitude buffer) metrics. There were main effects for both cardiac cycle and frequency for phase and gain metrics (p flow relationship. The oscillations associated with systole are extensively buffered within the cerebrovasculature, whereas diastolic oscillations are relatively unaltered. This indicates that the brain is adapted to protect itself against large increases in systolic blood pressure, likely as a mechanism to prevent cerebral haemorrhages.

  9. Different systolic blood pressure targets for people with history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack: PAST-BP (Prevention After Stroke—Blood Pressure) randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Richard J; Roalfe, Andrea; Fletcher, Kate; Taylor, Clare J; Martin, Una; Virdee, Satnam; Greenfield, Sheila; Hobbs, F D Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether using intensive blood pressure targets leads to lower blood pressure in a community population of people with prevalent cerebrovascular disease. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting 99 general practices in England, with participants recruited in 2009-11. Participants People with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack whose systolic blood pressure was 125 mm Hg or above. Interventions Intensive systolic blood pressure target (different target, patients in both arms were actively managed in the same way with regular reviews by the primary care team. Main outcome measure Change in systolic blood pressure between baseline and 12 months. Results 529 patients (mean age 72) were enrolled, 266 to the intensive target arm and 263 to the standard target arm, of whom 379 were included in the primary analysis (182 (68%) intensive arm; 197 (75%) standard arm). 84 patients withdrew from the study during the follow-up period (52 intensive arm; 32 standard arm). Mean systolic blood pressure dropped by 16.1 mm Hg to 127.4 mm Hg in the intensive target arm and by 12.8 mm Hg to 129.4 mm Hg in the standard arm (difference between groups 2.9 (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 5.7) mm Hg; P=0.03). Conclusions Aiming for target below 130 mm Hg rather than 140 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure in people with cerebrovascular disease in primary care led to a small additional reduction in blood pressure. Active management of systolic blood pressure in this population using a blood pressure. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29062286. PMID:26919870

  10. Analysis of the progression of systolic blood pressure using imputation of missing phenotype values

    OpenAIRE

    Vaitsiakhovich, Tatsiana; Drichel, Dmitriy; Angisch, Marina; Becker, Tim; Herold, Christine; Lacour, André

    2014-01-01

    We present a genome-wide association study of a quantitative trait, "progression of systolic blood pressure in time," in which 142 unrelated individuals of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 real genotype data were analyzed. Information on systolic blood pressure and other phenotypic covariates was missing at certain time points for a considerable part of the sample. We observed that the dropout process causing missingness is not independent of the initial systolic blood pressure; that is, the ...

  11. Effect of hematocrit and systolic blood pressure on cerebral blood flow in newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, D.P.; Reivich, M.; Jaggi, J.L.; Obrist, W.D.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hematocrit and systolic blood pressure on cerebral blood flow were measured in 15 stable, low birth weight babies. CBF was measured with a modification of the xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) clearance technique, which uses an intravenous bolus of 133 Xe, an external chest detector to estimate arterial 133 Xe concentration, eight external cranial detectors to measure cephalic 133 Xe clearance curves, and a two-compartmental analysis of the cephalic 133 Xe clearance curves to estimate CBF. There was a significant inverse correlation between hematocrit and CBF, presumably due to alterations in arterial oxygen content and blood viscosity. Newborn CBF varied independently of systolic blood pressure between 60 and 84 mm Hg, suggesting an intact cerebrovascular autoregulatory mechanism. These results indicate that at least two of the factors that affect newborn animal CBF are operational in human newborns and may have important clinical implications

  12. NSAID-antihypertensive drug interactions: Which outpatients are at risk for a rise in systolic blood pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; De Smet, Peter Agm; Buurma, Henk; Kramers, Cornelis; Tromp, P. Chris; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management guidelines for drug-drug interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives recommend blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive patients. We measured the short-term effect of initiating NSAIDs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) in users of

  13. NSAID-antihypertensive drug interactions: which outpatients are at risk for a rise in systolic blood pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, A.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Buurma, H.; Kramers, C.; Tromp, P.C.; Belitser, S.V.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management guidelines for drug-drug interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives recommend blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive patients. We measured the short-term effect of initiating NSAIDs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) in users of

  14. Assessing pharmacy students' ability to accurately measure blood pressure using a blood pressure simulator arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottenberg, Michelle M; Bryant, Ginelle A; Haack, Sally L; North, Andrew M

    2013-06-12

    To compare student accuracy in measuring normal and high blood pressures using a simulator arm. In this prospective, single-blind, study involving third-year pharmacy students, simulator arms were programmed with prespecified normal and high blood pressures. Students measured preset normal and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure using a crossover design. One hundred sixteen students completed both blood pressure measurements. There was a significant difference between the accuracy of high systolic blood pressure (HSBP) measurement and normal systolic blood pressure (NSBP) measurement (mean HSBP difference 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg vs NSBP 3.6 ± 6.4 mmHg; pdifference between the accuracy of high diastolic blood pressure (HDBP) measurement and normal diastolic blood pressure (NDBP) measurement (mean HDBP difference 6.8 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. mean NDBP difference 4.6 ± 4.5 mmHg; p=0.089). Pharmacy students may need additional instruction and experience with taking high blood pressure measurements to ensure they are able to accurately assess this important vital sign.

  15. Assessing Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Accurately Measure Blood Pressure Using a Blood Pressure Simulator Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ginelle A.; Haack, Sally L.; North, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare student accuracy in measuring normal and high blood pressures using a simulator arm. Methods. In this prospective, single-blind, study involving third-year pharmacy students, simulator arms were programmed with prespecified normal and high blood pressures. Students measured preset normal and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure using a crossover design. Results. One hundred sixteen students completed both blood pressure measurements. There was a significant difference between the accuracy of high systolic blood pressure (HSBP) measurement and normal systolic blood pressure (NSBP) measurement (mean HSBP difference 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg vs NSBP 3.6 ± 6.4 mmHg; pdifference between the accuracy of high diastolic blood pressure (HDBP) measurement and normal diastolic blood pressure (NDBP) measurement (mean HDBP difference 6.8 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. mean NDBP difference 4.6 ± 4.5 mmHg; p=0.089). Conclusions. Pharmacy students may need additional instruction and experience with taking high blood pressure measurements to ensure they are able to accurately assess this important vital sign. PMID:23788809

  16. Reliability of Doppler and stethoscope methods of determining systolic blood pressures: considerations for calculating an ankle-brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesbro, Steven B; Asongwed, Elmira T; Brown, Jamesha; John, Emmanuel B

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) identify the interrater and intrarater reliability of systolic blood pressures using a stethoscope and Doppler to determine an ankle-brachial index (ABI), and (2) to determine the correlation between the 2 methods. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States, and nearly half of those with this disease are asymptomatic. Early detection and prompt treatment of PAD will improve health outcomes. It is important that clinicians perform tests that determine the presence of PAD. Two individual raters trained in ABI procedure measured the systolic blood pressures of 20 individuals' upper and lower extremities. Standard ABI measurement protocols were observed. Raters individually recorded the systolic blood pressures of each extremity using a stethoscope and a Doppler, for a total of 640 independent measures. Interrater reliability of Doppler measurements to determine SBP at the ankle was very strong (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.93-0.99) compared to moderate to strong reliability using a stethoscope (ICC, 0.64-0.87). Agreement between the 2 devices to determine SBP was moderate to very weak (ICC, 0.13-0.61). Comparisons of the use of Doppler and stethoscope to determine ABI showed weak to very weak intrarater correlation (ICC, 0.17-0.35). Linear regression analysis of the 2 methods to determine ABI showed positive but weak to very weak correlations (r2 = .013, P = .184). A Doppler ultrasound is recommended over a stethoscope for accuracy in systolic pressure readings for ABI measurements.

  17. Ratio of Systolic Blood Pressure to Right Atrial Pressure, a Novel Marker to Predict Morbidity and Mortality in Acute Systolic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Charnigo, Richard; Guglin, Maya

    2017-04-01

    Congestion is the main contributor to heart failure (HF) morbidity and mortality. We assessed the combined role of congestion and decreased forward flow in predicting morbidity and mortality in acute systolic HF. The Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness trial data set was used to determine if the ratio of simultaneously measured systolic blood pressure (SBP)/right atrial pressure (RAP) on admission predicted HF rehospitalization and 6-month mortality. One hundred ninety-five patients (mean age 56.5 years, 75% men) who received pulmonary artery catheterization were studied. The RAP, SBP, and SBP/RAP had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.593 (p = 0.0205), 0.585 (p = 0.0359), and 0.621 (p = 0.0026), respectively, in predicting HF rehospitalization. The SBP/RAP was a superior marker of HF rehospitalization compared with RAP alone (difference in AUC 0.0289, p = 0.0385). The optimal criterion of SBP/RAP AUC 0.622, p = 0.0108, and a cut-off value of SBP/RAP <8 had a sensitivity of 61.9% and specificity 64.1% in predicting mortality. Multivariate analysis showed that an SBP/RAP <11 independently predicted rehospitalization for HF (estimated odds ratio 3.318, 95% confidence interval 1.692 to 6.506, p = 0.0005) and an SBP/RAP <8 independently predicted mortality (estimated hazard ratio 2.025, 95% confidence interval 1.069 to 3.833, p = 0.030). In conclusion, SBP/RAP ratio is a marker that identifies a spectrum of complications after hospitalization of patients with decompensated systolic HF, starting with increased incidence of HF rehospitalization at SBP/RAP <11 to increased mortality with SBP/RAP <8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood pressure measurement in obese patients: comparison between upper arm and forearm measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierin, Angela M G; Alavarce, Débora C; Gusmão, Josiane L; Halpern, Alfredo; Mion, Décio

    2004-06-01

    It is well known that blood pressure measurement with a standard 12-13 cm wide cuff is erroneous for large arms. To compare arm blood pressure measurements with an appropriate cuff and forearm blood pressure measurements (BPM) with a standard cuff, and both measurements by the Photopletismography (Finapres) method. One hundred and twenty-nine obese patients were studied (body mass index=40+/-7 kg/m2). The patients had three arm BPM taken by an automatic oscillometric device using an appropriate cuff and three forearm BPM with a standard cuff in the sitting position after a five-minute rest. Data were analysed by the analysis of variance. The correction values were obtained by the linear regression test. Systolic and diastolic arm BPM with an appropriate cuff were significantly lower (pforearm BPM with a standard cuff. The measurements obtained by Finapres were significantly lower (pforearm systolic and diastolic blood pressures and upper arm diastolic blood pressure. The equation to correct BPM in forearm in obese patients with arm circumference between 32-44 cm was: systolic BPM=33.2+/-0.68 x systolic forearm BPM, and diastolic BPM=25.2+0.59 x forearm diastolic BPM. This study showed that forearm blood pressure measurement overestimates the values of arm blood pressure measurement. In addition, it is possible to correct forearm BPM with an equation.

  19. Measuring systolic ankle and toe pressure using the strain gauge technique--a comparison study between mercury and indium-gallium strain gauges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Rikke; Wiinberg, Niels; Simonsen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of the ankle and toe pressures are often performed using a plethysmograph, compression cuffs and a strain gauge. Usually, the strain gauge contains mercury but other alternatives exist. From 2014, the mercury-containing strain gauge will no longer be available in the Europ......BACKGROUND: Measurement of the ankle and toe pressures are often performed using a plethysmograph, compression cuffs and a strain gauge. Usually, the strain gauge contains mercury but other alternatives exist. From 2014, the mercury-containing strain gauge will no longer be available...... in the European Union. The aim of this study was to compare an indium-gallium strain gauge to the established mercury-containing strain gauge. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to the Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine at Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals for measurements of systolic...... ankle and toe pressures volunteered for the study. Ankle and toe pressures were measured twice with the mercury and the indium-gallium strain gauge in random order. Comparison of the correlation between the mean pressure using the mercury and the indium-gallium device and the difference between the two...

  20. Older Women with Controlled Isolated Systolic Hypertension: Exercise and Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubolsakka-Jones, Chulee; Sangthong, Benjarat; Aueyingsak, Sahachat; Jones, David A

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is generally regarded as beneficial for health, but the consequent increases in blood pressure might pose a risk for hypertensive subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine blood pressure responses to dynamic exercise and sustained handgrip in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) who were stable on medication. Nineteen female ISH patients (66 ± 5 yr) and 19 age-matched normotensive (NT) female controls undertook a 5-min cycle exercise (60% heart rate reserve [HRR]) and a 2-min handgrip exercise (30% maximum voluntary contraction). Blood pressure responses were measured using an oscillometric cuff, together with heart rate and resting brachial pulse transit times. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels after cycle exercise were 194 ± 18 and 153 ± 19 mm Hg for ISH and NT, respectively, with the increase above resting being greater for ISH (P exercise, SBP rose to 168 ± 19 and 140 ± 8 mm Hg for ISH and NT, respectively. The increases above baseline were greater for ISH both during the exercise and postexercise circulatory occlusion (P = 0.017). The increase in DBP levels during exercise and postexercise occlusion were similar in ISH and NT, suggesting little difference in metaboreflex sensitivity. Pulse transit time was shorter for ISH compared with NT (166 ± 6 ms and 242 ± 24 ms, respectively, P exercises, which may constitute a risk for cardiovascular incidents.

  1. Longitudinal Patterns of Change in Systolic Blood Pressure and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruski-Ivleva, Natalia; Viera, Anthony J; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul; Avery, Christy L; Schneider, Andrea L C; Couper, David; Kucharska-Newton, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Elevated blood pressure in midlife contributes significantly to the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, patterns of blood pressure increase may differ among individuals and may result in differential risk. Our goal was to examine the contribution of longitudinal patterns of blood pressure change to incidence of heart failure, coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease mortality. Latent class growth models were used to identify patterns of change in blood pressure across 4 clinical examinations (1987-1998) among 9845 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort participants (mean age, 53.7 [SD 5.7] years). Patterns of change in systolic blood pressure included slowly and steeply increasing, a decreasing and a sustained elevated blood pressure. Changes in diastolic and mid-blood pressuresystolic+½ diastolic) were less pronounced. The association of blood pressure pattern group membership with incidence of clinical outcomes was examined in follow-up from the fourth clinical examination (1996-1998) to December 31, 2011, using Poisson regression models adjusted for demographic and metabolic characteristics, and hypertension medication use. A gradient of rates of all events was observed across the identified patterns. Associations were attenuated after adjustment for covariates. Cumulative systolic blood pressure load, rather than the temporal pattern of change in systolic blood pressure itself, plays a role in determining the risk of cardiovascular disease, in particular, of heart failure and cardiovascular disease mortality, independent of blood pressure level measured at one point in time. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Central aortic systolic blood pressure can predict prolonged QTc duration better than brachial artery systolic blood pressure in rural community residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Tang, Songtao; Chen, Ji-Yan; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jie; Cai, An-Ping; Feng, Yingqing

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that prolonged electrocardiogram QTc duration was independent risk factor for both increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, but there was no dating about the relationship between central aortic systolic blood pressure (CASP) and QTc duration. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between CASP and QTc duration, and assess whether CASP can predict prolonged QTc duration more than BSBP. A total of 500 patients were enrolled in this study, central and brachial aortic blood pressure and electrocardiogram QTc duration were measured. Pearson correlation was assessed for determining the associations of QTc duration with clinical conditions. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the independent predictor of prolonged QTc duration. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the utility of blood pressure for prolonged QTc duration. We found QTc durations were significantly positive with CASP (r = 0.308, p AUC: 0.771 vs. 0.646, p < 0.001) BSBP. Our results suggested that the non-invasive CASP is independently correlated with QTc duration, and CASP can predict prolonged QTc duration more than BSBP.

  3. Exercise capacity in young adults with hypertension and systolic blood pressure difference between right arm and leg after repair of coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instebø, Arne; Norgård, Gunnar; Helgheim, Vegard; Røksund, Ola Drange; Segadal, Leidulf; Greve, Gottfried

    2004-10-01

    Coarctation of the aorta represents 5-7% of congenital heart defects. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the degree of stenosis, age at surgery, surgical method and the presence of other heart defects. Postoperative complications are hypertension, restenosis and an abnormal blood pressure response during exercise. This study includes 41 patients, 15-40 years old, operated in the period 1975-1996. All were exercised on a treadmill until maximal oxygen consumption was achieved. Blood pressure was measured in the right arm and leg before and immediately after exercise, and in the right arm during exercise. Oxygen consumption was monitored and we defined an aerobic phase, an isocapnic buffering phase and a hypocapnic hyperventilation phase. The resting systolic blood pressure correlates with the resting systolic blood pressure difference between right arm and leg. A resting systolic blood pressure difference between the right arm and leg of 0.13 kPa (1 mmHg) to 2.67 kPa (20 mmHg) corresponds with a slight increase in resting systolic blood pressure. This rise in blood pressure increases the aerobic phase of the exercise test, helping the patients to achieve higher maximal oxygen consumption. A resting systolic blood pressure difference of more than 2.67 kPa (20 mmHg) corresponds with severe hypertension and causes reduction in the aerobic phase and maximal oxygen consumption. Resting systolic blood pressure and resting systolic blood pressure difference between the right arm and leg are not indicators for blood pressure response during exercise. Exercise testing is important to reveal exercise-induced hypertension and to monitor changes in transition from aerobic to anaerobic exercise and limitation to exercise capacity.

  4. Comparison of noninvasive assessments of central blood pressure using general transfer function and late systolic shoulder of the radial pressure wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, Peter; Krajcoviechová, Alena; Seidlerová, Jitka; Mayer, Otto; Filipovsky, Jan; Cífková, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) can be derived by the general transfer function of the radial pressure wave, as used in the SphygmoCor device, or by regression equation from directly measured late systolic shoulder of the radial pressure wave (pSBP2), as used in the Omron HEM-9000AI device. The aim of this study was to compare the SphygmoCor estimates of cSBP with 2 estimates of cSBP provided by the Omron HEM-9000AI (cSBP, pSBP2) in a large cohort of the white population. In 391 patients aged 52.3±13.5 years (46% men) from the Czech post-MONICA Study, cSBP was measured using the SphygmoCor and Omron HEM-9000AI devices in random order. Omron cSBP and pSBP2 were perfectly correlated (r = 1.0; P wave provides a comparable accuracy with the validated general transfer function. When comparing Omron HEM-9000AI and SphygmoCor estimates of cSBP, Omron pSBP2 should be used. The difference between both devices in cSBP may be explained by differences in calibration.

  5. Total flying hours and risk of high systolic blood pressure in the civilian pilot in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Afian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Latar belakang: Tekanan darah sistolik tinggi di antara pilot sipil antara lain akan menyebabkan gangguan kardiovaskular sehingga akan mengganggu kelancaran penerbangan. Tujuan penelitian ini ialah untuk mengetahui faktor-faktor dominan terhadap tekanan darah sistolik tinggi pada pilot sipil. Metode: Penelitian potong lintang dengan metode sampling purposif pada pilot yang melakukan pemeriksaan kesehatan berkala di Balai Kesehatan Penerbangan pada tanggal 18-29 Mei 2015. Data yang dikumpulkan adalah karakteristik demografi dan pekerjaan, klinis, kebiasaan olahraga, kebiasaan makan, indeks massa tubuh dan riwayat penyakit. Tekanan darah sistolik tinggi ialah tekanan darah sistolik140 mmHg atau lebih. Hasil: Dari 690 pilot yang melakukan pemeriksaan kesehatan berkala, 428 pilot laki-laki bersedia berpartisipasi mengikuti penelitian ini. Usia dan riwayat penyakit hipertensi merupakan faktor risiko dominan yang berhubungan dengan tekanan darah sistolik tinggi. Jika dibandingkan dengan pilot usia 19-39 tahun, yang berusia 40-65 tahun mempunyai 15,1 kali lipat lebih besar risiko terkena tekanan darah sistolik tinggi [rasio odds suaian (ORa= 15,12; p= 0,001]. Pilot dengan riwayat penyakit hipertensi dibandingkan dengan yang tidak ada riwayat memiliki risiko tekanan darah sistolik tinggi 93,2 kali lipat lebih besar (ORa= 93,21; p= 0,001 Kesimpulan: Usia 40-65 tahun dan memiliki riwayat hipertensi meningkatkan risiko tekanan darah sistolik tinggi di antara pilot sipil di Indonesia. Kata kunci: tekanan darah sistolik, total jam terbang, pilot sipil, Indonesia.  Abstract Background: Systolic high blood pressure among civilian pilots among others will cause cardiovascular disease and this condition will disrupt the flight.The purpose of this study was to identified the dominant factors related to high systolic blood pressure in the civilian pilots. Methods: A cross-sectional study with a purposive sampling method on a pilot who performed periodic

  6. Isolated Systolic Hypertension: A Health Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolated systolic hypertension: A health concern? Is having a high top number (systolic) blood pressure, but a normal bottom number (diastolic) ... mm Hg, you have a common type of high blood pressure called isolated systolic hypertension. Isolated systolic hypertension can ...

  7. Recruitment strategies and challenges in a large intervention trial: Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Thomas M; Snyder, Joni K; Lovato, Laura C; Roumie, Christianne L; Glasser, Steven P; Cosgrove, Nora M; Olney, Christine M; Tang, Rocky H; Johnson, Karen C; Still, Carolyn H; Gren, Lisa H; Childs, Jeffery C; Crago, Osa L; Summerson, John H; Walsh, Sandy M; Perdue, Letitia H; Bankowski, Denise M; Goff, David C

    2016-06-01

    The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial of 9361 participants with hypertension who are ≥50 years old. The trial is designed to evaluate the effect of intensive systolic blood pressure control (systolic blood pressure goal recruitment strategies and lessons learned during recruitment of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial cohort and five targeted participant subgroups: pre-existing cardiovascular disease, pre-existing chronic kidney disease, age ≥75 years, women, and minorities. In collaboration with the National Institutes of Health Project Office and Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial Coordinating Center, five Clinical Center Networks oversaw clinical site selection, recruitment, and trial activities. Recruitment began on 8 November 2010 and ended on 15 March 2013 (about 28 months). Various recruitment strategies were used, including mass mailing, brochures, referrals from healthcare providers or friends, posters, newspaper ads, radio ads, and electronic medical record searches. Recruitment was scheduled to last 24 months to enroll a target of 9250 participants; in just over 28 months, the trial enrolled 9361 participants. The trial screened 14,692 volunteers, with 33% of initial screens originating from the use of mass mailing lists. Screening results show that participants also responded to recruitment efforts through referral by Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial staff, healthcare providers, or friends (45%); brochures or posters placed in clinic waiting areas (15%); and television, radio, newspaper, Internet ads, or toll-free numbers (8%). The overall recruitment yield (number randomized/number screened) was 64% (9361 randomized/14,692 screened), 77% for those with cardiovascular disease, 79% for those with chronic kidney disease, 70% for those aged ≥75 years, 55% for women, and 61% for minorities. As recruitment was observed to lag behind expectations, additional

  8. Urinary albumin excretion is associated with nocturnal systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Martell-Clarós, Nieves; Ruilope, Luis M; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2011-03-01

    Microalbuminuria is a known marker of subclinical organ damage. Its prevalence is higher in patients with resistant hypertension than in subjects with blood pressure at goal. On the other hand, some patients with apparently well-controlled hypertension still have microalbuminuria. The current study aimed to determine the relationship between microalbuminuria and both office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. A cohort of 356 patients (mean age 64 ± 11 years; 40.2% females) with resistant hypertension (blood pressure ≥ 140 and/or 90 mm Hg despite treatment with ≥ 3 drugs, diuretic included) were selected from Spanish hypertension units. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were excluded. All patients underwent clinical and demographic evaluation, complete laboratory analyses, and good technical-quality 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was averaged from 3 first-morning void urine samples. Microalbuminuria (urinary albumin/creatinine ratio ≥ 2.5 mg/mmol in males or ≥ 3.5 mg/mmol in females) was detected in 46.6%, and impaired renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was detected in 26.8%. Bivariate analyses showed significant associations of microalbuminuria with older age, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, increased nighttime systolic blood pressure, and elevated daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour diastolic blood pressure. In a logistic regression analysis, after age and sex adjustment, elevated nighttime systolic blood pressure (multivariate odds ratio, 1.014 [95% CI, 1.001 to 1.026]; P=0.029) and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (multivariate odds ratio, 2.79 [95% CI, 1.57 to 4.96]; P=0.0005) were independently associated with the presence of microalbuminuria. We conclude that microalbuminuria is better associated with increased nighttime systolic blood pressure than with any other office and 24-hour ambulatory blood

  9. Simultaneous inter-arm and inter-leg systolic blood pressure differences to diagnose peripheral artery disease: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz-Adillo, Ángel; Soriano-Cano, Alba; Martínez-Hortelano, José Alberto; Garrido-Miguel, Miriam; Mariana-Herráiz, Julián Ángel; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2018-04-01

    Inter-arm systolic blood pressure differences (IASBPD) and inter-leg systolic blood pressure differences (ILSBPD) have arisen as potential tools to detect peripheral artery disease (PAD) and individuals at high cardiovascular risk. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of IASBPD and ILSBPD to detect PAD, and whether IASBPD or ILSBPD improves diagnostic accuracy of the oscillometric ankle-brachial index (ABI). In this prospective study, eligible for inclusion were consecutive adults, with at least one of the following cardiovascular risk factors: diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking habit or age ≥65. IASBPD, ILSBPD and ankle-brachial index (ABI) were measured in all participants through four-limb simultaneous oscillometric measurements and compared with Doppler ABI (reference test, positive cut-off: ≤ 0.9). Of 171 subjects included, PAD was confirmed in 23 and excluded in 148. Thirteen and 38 subjects had IASBPD and ILSBPD ≥10 mmHg, respectively. Pearson correlation with Doppler ABI of IASBPD and ILSBPD was 0.073 (P = .343) and -0.628 (P blood pressure measurements in upper limbs are not possible.

  10. Skin perfusion pressure measured by isotope washout in legs with arterial occlusive disease. Evaluation of different tracers, comparison to segmental systolic pressure, angiography and transcutaneous oxygen tension and variations during changes in systemic blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Trap-Jensen, J; Bagger, H

    1983-01-01

    Hg (range 18-98) (P less than 0.02). The average washout constant for the three different tracers were approximately equal and correlated statistically significant with the SPP; (2) In 59 legs with AOD, segmental SPP was compared to segmental systolic blood pressures on the thigh, calf, ankle and first...... digit (strain gauge technique). The two different methods correlated statistically significant at all four levels, but the systolic blood pressures were higher than the SPP in particular in diabetic legs; (3) Angiograms in 35 legs with AOD showed that the SPP on the ankle was only consistently decreased...

  11. Measurement of digital blood pressure after local cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    A double-inlet plastic cuff was designed for local cooling and systolic blood pressure measurement on the middle phalanx of the fingers. With a tourniquet on the proximal phalanx of one finger, cooling for 5 min made the digital artery temperature equal the skin temperature. The difference between...... the systolic pressure in a control finger and in the cooled finger give the reopening pressure in the digital arteries. At 30, 25, 20, 15, and 10 degrees C, respectively the percent decrease of the finger pressure was 0.2 (0.2), 1.5 (2.5), 8.5 (3.7), 11.4 (3.4), and 15.3 (3.1) in normal young women...

  12. Peripheral vascular effects on auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbany, S Y; Drzewiecki, G M; Noordergraaf, A

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the accuracy of the conventional auscultatory method of blood pressure measurement. The influence of the physiologic state of the vascular system in the forearm distal to the site of Korotkoff sound recording and its impact on the precision of the measured blood pressure is discussed. The peripheral resistance in the arm distal to the cuff was changed noninvasively by heating and cooling effects and by induction of reactive hyperemia. All interventions were preceded by an investigation of their effect on central blood pressure to distinguish local effects from changes in central blood pressure. These interventions were sufficiently moderate to make their effect on central blood pressure, recorded in the other arm, statistically insignificant (i.e., changes in systolic [p cooling experiments was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Moreover, both measured systolic (p < 0.004) and diastolic (p < 0.001) pressure decreases during the reactive hyperemia experiments were statistically significant. The findings demonstrate that alteration in vascular state generates perplexing changes in blood pressure, hence confirming experimental observations by earlier investigators as well as predictions by our model studies.

  13. Prevalence of systolic inter-arm differences in blood pressure for different primary care populations: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher E; Taylor, Rod S; Shore, Angela C; Campbell, John L

    2016-11-01

    Various prevalence figures have been reported for inter-arm differences in blood pressure (IAD); variation may be explained by differing population vascular risk and by measurement method. To review the literature to derive robust estimates of IAD prevalence relevant to community populations. Systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL were searched for cross-sectional studies likely to represent general or primary care populations, reporting prevalence of IAD and employing a simultaneous method of measurement. Using study-level data, pooled estimates of mean prevalence of systolic IADs were calculated and compared using a random effects model. Eighty IAD studies were identified. Sixteen met inclusion criteria: pooled estimates of prevalence for systolic IAD ≥10 mmHg were 11.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1 to 13.6) in hypertension, 7.4% (95% CI = 5.8 to 9.2) in diabetes, and 3.6% (95% CI = 2.3 to 5.0) for a general adult population (Pdifferences). Differences persisted for higher cut-off values. Prevalences were lower for East Asian than for Western populations and were overestimated by sequential measurement where this could be compared with simultaneous measurement within studies (relative risk for IAD: 2.9 [95% CI = 2.1 to 4.1]). Studies with higher mean absolute systolic pressures had higher prevalences for a systolic IAD ≥10 mmHg (P = 0.04). Prevalences of IADs rise in relation to underlying cardiovascular comorbidities of the population studied, and are overestimated threefold when sequential measurement is used. Population-specific variation in prevalences of IAD should be taken into account in delivering clinical care and in planning future studies. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  14. Cholecalciferol treatment to reduce blood pressure in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension: the VitDISH randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Price, Rosemary J G; Struthers, Allan D; Donnan, Peter T; Messow, Claudia-Martina; Ford, Ian; McMurdo, Marion E T

    2013-10-14

    Observational data link low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels to both prevalent blood pressure and incident hypertension. No clinical trial has yet examined the effect of vitamin D supplementation in isolated systolic hypertension, the most common pattern of hypertension in older people. To test whether high-dose, intermittent cholecalciferol supplementation lowers blood pressure in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Parallel group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Primary care clinics and hospital clinics. Patients 70 years and older with isolated systolic hypertension (supine systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg and supine diastolic blood pressure blood pressure, 24-hour blood pressure, arterial stiffness, endothelial function, cholesterol level, insulin resistance, and b-type natriuretic peptide level during 12 months. A total of 159 participants were randomized (mean age, 77 years). Mean baseline office systolic blood pressure was 163/78 mm Hg. Mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 18 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels increased in the treatment group compared with the placebo group (+8 ng/mL at 1 year, P blood pressure (−1 [−6 to 4]/−2 [−4 to 1] mm Hg at 3 months and 1 [−2 to 4]/0 [−2 to 2] mm Hg overall treatment effect). No significant treatment effect was evident for any of the secondary outcomes (24-hour blood pressure, arterial stiffness, endothelial function, cholesterol level, glucose level, and walking distance). There was no excess of adverse events in the treatment group, and the total number of falls was nonsignificantly lower in the group receiving vitamin D (36 vs 46, P = .24). Vitamin D supplementation did not improve blood pressure or markers of vascular health in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension. isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN92186858.

  15. Agreement between direct and indirect blood pressure measurements obtained from anesthetized Hispaniolan Amazon parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acierno, Mark J; da Cunha, Anderson; Smith, Julie; Tully, Thomas N; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Serra, Verna; Mitchell, Mark A

    2008-11-15

    To determine the level of agreement between direct and indirect blood pressure measurements obtained from healthy Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) anesthetized with isoflurane. Validation study. 16 healthy adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Parrots were anesthetized, and a 26-gauge, 19-mm catheter was placed percutaneously in the superficial ulnar artery for direct measurement of systolic, mean, and diastolic arterial pressures. Indirect blood pressure measurements were obtained with a Doppler ultrasonic flow detector and an oscillometric unit. The Bland-Altman method was used to compare direct and indirect blood pressure values. There was substantial disagreement between direct systolic arterial blood pressure and indirect blood pressure measurements obtained with the Doppler detector from the wing (bias, 24 mm Hg; limits of agreement, -37 to 85 mm Hg) and from the leg (bias, 14 mm Hg; limits of agreement, -14 to 42 mm Hg). Attempts to obtain indirect blood pressure measurements with the oscillometric unit were unsuccessful. Results suggested that there was substantial disagreement between indirect blood pressure measurements obtained with a Doppler ultrasonic flow detector in anesthetized Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and directly measured systolic arterial blood pressure.

  16. The impact of arm position on the measurement of orthostatic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, David A; Abdelnur, Diego; Hemingway, Thomas J

    2008-05-01

    Blood pressure is a standard vital sign in patients evaluated in an Emergency Department. The American Heart Association has recommended a preferred position of the arm and cuff when measuring blood pressure. There is no formal recommendation for arm position when measuring orthostatic blood pressure. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of different arm positions on the measurement of postural changes in blood pressure. This was a prospective, unblinded, convenience study involving Emergency Department patients with complaints unrelated to cardiovascular instability. Repeated blood pressure measurements were obtained using an automatic non-invasive device with each subject in a supine and standing position and with the arm parallel and perpendicular to the torso. Orthostatic hypotension was defined as a difference of >or= 20 mm Hg systolic or >or= 10 mm Hg diastolic when subtracting standing from supine measurements. There were four comparisons made: group W, arm perpendicular supine and standing; group X, arm parallel supine and standing; group Y, arm parallel supine and perpendicular standing; and group Z, arm perpendicular supine and parallel standing. There were 100 patients enrolled, 55 men, mean age 44 years. Four blood pressure measurements were obtained on each patient. The percentage of patients meeting orthostatic hypotension criteria in each group was: W systolic 6% (95% CI 1%, 11%), diastolic 4% (95% CI 0%, 8%), X systolic 8% (95% CI 3%, 13%), diastolic 9% (95% CI 3%, 13%), Y systolic 19% (95% CI 11%, 27%), diastolic 30% (95% CI 21%, 39%), Z systolic 2% (95% CI 0%, 5%), diastolic 2% (95% CI 0%, 5%). Comparison of Group Y vs. X, Z, and W was statistically significant (p postural changes in blood pressure. The combination of the arm parallel when supine and perpendicular when standing may significantly overestimate the orthostatic change. Arm position should be held constant in supine and standing positions when assessing for orthostatic

  17. Environmental lead exposure is associated with visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure variability in the US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramawi, Mohammed F; Delongchamp, Robert; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Youcheng; Abouelenien, Saly; Fischbach, Lori; Jadhav, Supriya

    2015-04-01

    The association between environmental lead exposure and blood pressure variability, an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is unexplored and unknown. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that lead exposure is associated with blood pressure variability. American participants 17 years of age or older from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III were included in the analysis. Participants' blood lead concentrations expressed as micrograms per deciliter were determined. The standard deviations of visit-to-visit systolic and diastolic blood pressure were calculated to determine blood pressure variability. Multivariable regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, race, smoking and socioeconomic status were employed. The participants' mean age and mean blood lead concentration were 42.72 years and 3.44 mcg/dl, respectively. Systolic blood pressure variability was significantly associated with environmental lead exposure after adjusting for the effect of the confounders. The unadjusted and adjusted means of visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure variability and the β coefficient of lead exposure were 3.44, 3.33 mcg/dl, β coefficient = 0.07, P variability. Screening adults with fluctuating blood pressure for lead exposure could be warranted.

  18. Efficacy and duration of benazepril plus amlodipine or hydrochlorothiazide on 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Kenneth A; Devereux, Richard; Bakris, George L; Dahlöf, Björn; Pitt, Bertram; Velazquez, Eric J; Weir, Matthew; Kelly, Roxzana Y; Hua, Tsushung A; Hester, Allen; Weber, Michael A

    2011-02-01

    The combination of benazepril plus amlodipine was shown to be more effective than benazepril plus hydrochlorothiazide in reducing cardiovascular events in the Avoiding Cardiovascular Events through Combination Therapy in Patients Living with Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial. There was a small difference in clinic systolic blood pressure between the treatment arms favoring benazepril plus amlodipine. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides a more rigorous estimate of blood pressure effects. A subset of 573 subjects underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during year 2. Readings were obtained every 20 minutes during a 24-hour period. Between-treatment differences (benazepril plus amlodipine versus benazepril plus hydrochlorothiazide) in mean values were analyzed using ANOVA. Treatment comparisons with respect to categorical variables were made using Pearson's χ². At year 2, the treatment groups did not differ significantly in 24-hour mean daytime or nighttime blood pressures (values of 123.9, 125.9, and 118.1 mm Hg for benazepril plus amlodipine group versus 122.3, 124.1, and 116.9 for the benazepril plus hydrochlorothiazide group), with mean between-group differences of 1.6, 1.8, and 1.2 mm Hg, respectively. Blood pressure control rates (24-hour mean systolic blood pressure <130 mm Hg on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring) were greater than 80% in both groups. Nighttime systolic blood pressure provided additional risk prediction after adjusting for the effects of drugs. The 24-hour blood pressure control was similar in both treatment arms, supporting the interpretation that the difference in cardiovascular outcomes favoring a renin angiotensin system blocker combined with amlodipine rather than hydrochlorothiazide shown in the ACCOMPLISH trial was not caused by differences in blood pressure, but instead intrinsic properties (metabolic or hemodynamic) of the combination therapies.

  19. Non-constrained monitoring of systolic blood pressure on a weighing scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Kang Moo; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we developed a novel technique for estimating non-constrained and cuffless blood pressure (BP) that was based on electrocardiogram (ECG) and ballistocardiogram (BCG). The BCG was non-invasively measured using a common electronic weighing scale when a subject was standing on it. The ECG was measured using three different methods: on the chest using Ag/AgCl electrodes, on the hands using dry electrodes and on the feet also using dry electrodes. For a BP correlated parameter, a time interval parameter, which was defined as the time difference between the ECG R-peak and BCG J-peak, was employed for evaluating and estimating beat-to-beat BP. Under a BP varying experiment with a Valsalva manoeuvre, the R–J intervals were extracted at every beat cycle and a systolic blood pressure (SBP) estimation equation was established using linear regression analysis for each subject. In the case of feet delivered ECG (F-ECG), an ensemble average technique synchronized at the BCG J-peak point was applied to extract the ECG signal from the feet. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using Finapres, a non-invasive blood pressure measurement system, as a reference BP signal, and a scatter plot was used to find the regression line between the reference values and estimated BPs. A moving-window averaging technique was applied to remove the high-frequency noise in the R–J intervals and was applied to enhance the accuracy of the SBP estimation. For all individuals, the estimated SBP was similar to the measured SBP with a reliable correlation, which makes the proposed method suitable for use in a home healthcare system to monitor blood pressure on a weighing scale at the same time as measuring weight

  20. Decreasing systolic blood pressure and declining mortality rates in an untreated population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla O; Marott, Jacob L; Jensen, Gorm B

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate developments in 30 years mortality risk that may be associated with developments in population systolic blood pressure (SBP) and to evaluate possible secular trends in BP-associated mortality risk in the untreated population....

  1. Dairy consumption, systolic blood pressure, and risk of hypertension: Mendelian randomization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined whether previous observed inverse associations of dairy intake with systolic blood pressure and risk of hypertension were causal. A Mendelian randomization study was employed, using the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4988235 related to lactase persistence as an instrumental var...

  2. Systolic hypertension: an increasing clinical challenge in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Bae; Kario, Kazuomi; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Systolic hypertension, the predominant form of hypertension in patients aged over 50–60 years, is a growing health issue as the Asian population ages. Elevated systolic blood pressure is mainly caused by arterial stiffening, resulting from age-related vascular changes. Elevated systolic pressure increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, mortality and renal function decline, and this risk may increase at lower systolic pressure levels in Asian than Western subjects. Hence, effective systolic pressure lowering is particularly important in Asians yet blood pressure control remains inadequate despite the availability of numerous antihypertensive medications. Reasons for poor blood pressure control include low awareness of hypertension among health-care professionals and patients, under-treatment, and tolerability problems with antihypertensive drugs. Current antihypertensive treatments also lack effects on the underlying vascular pathology of systolic hypertension, so novel drugs that address the pathophysiology of arterial stiffening are needed for optimal management of systolic hypertension and its cardiovascular complications. PMID:25503845

  3. Prevalence and implications of a difference in systolic blood pressure between one arm and the other in vascular surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrand, J W; Batterham, A M; O'Neill, B R; Danjoux, G R

    2013-12-01

    Inter-arm differences in blood pressure may confound haemodynamic management in vascular surgery. We evaluated 898 patients in the vascular pre-assessment clinic to determine the prevalence of inter-arm differences in systolic and mean arterial pressure, quantify the consequent risk of clinical error in siting monitoring peri-operatively and evaluate systolic inter-arm difference as a predictor of all-cause mortality (median follow-up 49 months). The prevalence of a systolic inter-arm difference ≥ 15 mmHg was 26% (95% CI 23-29%). The prevalence of an inter-arm mean arterial pressure difference ≥ 10 mmHg was 26% (95% CI 23-29%) and 11% (95% CI 9-13%) for a difference ≥ 15 mmHg. Monitoring could be erroneously sited in an arm reading lower for systolic pressure once in every seven to nine patients. The hazard ratio for a systolic inter-arm difference ≥ 15 mmHg vs arm blood pressure differences are common in this population, with a high potential for monitoring errors. Systolic inter-arm difference was not associated with medium-term mortality. [Correction added on 17 October 2013, after first online publication: In the Summary the sentence beginning 'We evaluated 898 patients' was corrected from (median (IQR [range]) follow-up 49 months) to read (median follow up 49 months)]. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Prognostic value of systolic mitral annular velocity measured with Doppler tissue imaging in patients with chronic heart failure caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, N P; Loh, P H; de Silva, R; Ghosh, J; Khaleva, O Y; Goode, K; Rigby, A S; Alamgir, F; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G F

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the prognostic value of various conventional and novel echocardiographic indices in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. Methods 185 patients with a mean (SD) age of 67 (11) years with CHF and LV ejection fraction < 45% despite optimal pharmacological treatment were prospectively enrolled. The patients underwent two dimensional echocardiography with tissue harmonic imaging to assess global LV systolic function and obtain volumetric data. Transmitral flow was assessed with conventional pulse wave Doppler. Systolic (Sm), early, and late diastolic mitral annular velocities were measured with the use of colour coded Doppler tissue imaging. Results During a median follow up of 32 months (range 24–38 months in survivors), 34 patients died and one underwent heart transplantation. Sm velocity (hazard ratio (HR) 0.648, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.463 to 0.907, p  =  0.011), diastolic arterial pressure (HR 0.965, 95% CI 0.938 to 0.993, p  =  0.015), serum creatinine (HR 1.006, 95% CI 1.001 to 1.011, p  =  0.023), LV ejection fraction (HR 0.945, 95% CI 0.899 to 0.992, p  =  0.024), age (HR 1.035, 95% CI 1.000 to 1.071, p  =  0.052), LV end systolic volume index (HR 1.009, 95% CI 0.999 to 1.019, p  =  0.067), and restrictive pattern of transmitral flow (HR 0.543, 95% CI 0.278 to 1.061, p  =  0.074) predicted the outcome of death or transplantation on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only Sm velocity (HR 0.648, 95% CI 0.460 to 0.912, p  =  0.013) and diastolic arterial pressure (HR 0.966, 95% CI 0.938 to 0.994, p  =  0.016) emerged as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusions In patients with CHF and LV systolic dysfunction despite optimal pharmacological treatment, the strongest independent echocardiographic predictor of prognosis was Sm velocity measured with quantitative colour coded Doppler tissue

  5. Arterial pressure measurement: Is the envelope curve of the oscillometric method influenced by arterial stiffness?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelido, G; Angiletta, S; Pujalte, A; Quiroga, P; Cornes, P; Craiem, D

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of peripheral arterial pressure using the oscillometric method is commonly used by professionals as well as by patients in their homes. This non invasive automatic method is fast, efficient and the required equipment is affordable with a low cost. The measurement method consists of obtaining parameters from a calibrated decreasing curve that is modulated by heart beats witch appear when arterial pressure reaches the cuff pressure. Diastolic, mean and systolic pressures are obtained calculating particular instants from the heart beats envelope curve. In this article we analyze the envelope of this amplified curve to find out if its morphology is related to arterial stiffness in patients. We found, in 33 volunteers, that the envelope waveform width correlates to systolic pressure (r=0.4, p<0.05), to pulse pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05) and to pulse pressure normalized to systolic pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05). We believe that the morphology of the heart beats envelope curve obtained with the oscillometric method for peripheral pressure measurement depends on arterial stiffness and can be used to enhance pressure measurements

  6. Measurement of pulmonary arterial elastance in patients with systolic heart failure using Doppler echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Sepideh; Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Amin, Ahmad; Naderi, Nasim; Abkenar, Hooman Bakhshandeh; Maleki, Majid; Mitra, Chitsazan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A reliable and easy-to-perform method for measuring right ventricular (RV) afterload is desirable when scheduling patients with systolic heart failure to undergo heart transplantation. The present study aimed to investigate the accuracy of echocardiographically-derived pulmonary arterial elastance as a measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance by comparing it with invasive measures. Methods: Thirty-one patients with moderate to severe systolic heart failure, including 22 (71%) male patients, with a mean age of 41.16±15.9 years were enrolled in the study. Right heart catheterization and comprehensive echocardiography during the first hour after completion of cardiac catheterization were performed in all the patients. The pulmonary artery elastance was estimated using the ratio of end-systolic pressure (Pes) over the stroke volume (SV) by both cardiac catheterization [Ea (PV)-C] and echocardiography [Ea (PV)-E]. Results: The mean Ea (PV)-C and Ea (PV)-E were estimated to be 0.73±0.49 mm Hg/mL and 0.67±0.44 mm Hg/mL, respectively. There was a significant relation between Ea (PV)-E and Ea (PV)-C (r=0.897, pechocardiography and catheterization methods for estimating Ea (PV), investigated by the Bland-Altman method, showed a mean bias of -0.06, with 95% limits of agreement from -0.36 mm Hg/mL to 0.48 mm Hg/mL. Conclusion: Doppler echocardiography is an easy, non-invasive, and inexpensive method for measuring pulmonary arterial elastance, which provides accurate and reliable estimation of RV afterload in patients with systolic heart failure. PMID:26467379

  7. Reciprocal Interaction of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Variability and Systolic Blood Pressure on Outcome in Stroke Thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellert, Lars; Hametner, Christian; Ahmed, Niaz; Rauch, Geraldine; MacLeod, Mary J; Perini, Francesco; Lees, Kennedy R; Ringleb, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Significance and management of blood pressure (BP) changes in acute stroke care are unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate the impact of 24-hour BP variability (BPV) on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. From the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke International Stroke Thrombolysis registry, 28 976 patients with documented pre-treatment systolic BP at 2 and 24 hours were analyzed. The primary measure of BP variability was successive variability. Data were preprocessed using coarsened exact matching. We assessed early neurological improvement, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), and long-term functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] at 90 days) by binary and ordinal regression analyses. Attempts to explain successive variation for analysis of BPV with patients characteristics at admission found systolic BP (5.5% variance) to be most influential, yet 92% of BPV variance remained unexplained. Independently from systolic BP, successive variation for analysis of BPV was associated with poor functional outcome mRS score of 0 to 2 (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-0.98), disadvantage across the shift of mRS (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08), mortality (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08), SICH SITS (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23), and SICH ECASS (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.40; ECASS [European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study 2]). Analyzing successive variation for analysis of BPV as a function of pre-treatment, systolic BP significantly improved the prediction of functional outcome (mRS score of 0-1, mRS score of 0-2, neurological improvement, mRS-shift: all P interaction accounting for pre-treatment BP and the acute BP course (ie, BPV) to achieve best possible outcome for the patient. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Valuation of Normal Range of Ankle Systolic Blood Pressure in Subjects with Normal Arm Systolic Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; Cao, Kai-wu; Xu, Jin-song; Li, Ju-xiang; Hong, Kui; Cheng, Xiao-shu; Su, Hai

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a normal range for ankle systolic blood pressure (SBP). A total of 948 subjects who had normal brachial SBP (90-139 mmHg) at investigation were enrolled. Supine BP of four limbs was simultaneously measured using four automatic BP measurement devices. The ankle-arm difference (An-a) on SBP of both sides was calculated. Two methods were used for establishing normal range of ankle SBP: the 99% method was decided on the 99% reference range of actual ankle BP, and the An-a method was the sum of An-a and the low or up limits of normal arm SBP (90-139 mmHg). Whether in the right or left side, the ankle SBP was significantly higher than the arm SBP (right: 137.1 ± 16.9 vs 119.7 ± 11.4 mmHg, P<0.05). Based on the 99% method, the normal range of ankle SBP was 94~181 mmHg for the total population, 84~166 mmHg for the young (18-44 y), 107~176 mmHg for the middle-aged(45-59 y) and 113~179 mmHg for the elderly (≥ 60 y) group. As the An-a on SBP was 13 mmHg in the young group and 20 mmHg in both middle-aged and elderly groups, the normal range of ankle SBP on the An-a method was 103-153 mmHg for young and 110-160 mmHg for middle-elderly subjects. A primary reference for normal ankle SBP was suggested as 100-165 mmHg in the young and 110-170 mmHg in the middle-elderly subjects.

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure in HIV-positive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Rasoulinejad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is rare but is one of the complications that occur due to HIV infection. Symptoms of HIV-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension are often non-specific but the main symptom of the disease is dyspnea. In this cross-sectional study, we measured systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP by echocardiographic methods among HIV-positive patients who received ART. This research is a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 170 HIV-positive patients that was conducted in Imam-Khomeini hospital, Tehran, Iran during 2011-2013. All patients regularly received antiretroviral therapy at least for recent 2 years. There were not any cardiopulmonary symptoms (cough, dyspnea, exertional fatigue and chest discomfort in these patients. All participants underwent echocardiography to estimate SPAP. The participants comprised 108 males (63.5% and 62 females (46.5%. The mean age of patients was 41 years old, and the mean duration of HIV infection was 5.5 years. The mean CD4 cell count was 401 cell/µl. The principal regimen of antiretroviral therapy included two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI in the hospital. The mean of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure was 25 mmHg in the participants; 156 (93.4% of them had SPAP ≤ 30 mmHg (normal, six (3.6% had SPAP: 31-35 mmHg (borderline and five (3% had SPAP > 35 mmHg (pulmonary hypertension. Our results indicated a significant increase of pulmonary hypertension in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients that had no association with any other risk factor. Also, antiretroviral therapy was not a risk factor for pulmonary hypertension in this study.

  10. Healing of ulcers on the feet correlated with distal blood pressure measurements in occlusive arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of healing in subchronic ulcers in 66 feet in 62 patients with arterial occlusive disease was correlated with the systolic digital blood pressure (SDBP) and the systolic ankle blood pressure (SABP), both measured with a strain gauge, and with the skin perfusion pressure on the heel...

  11. Classification of peripheral occlusive arterial diseases based on symptoms, signs and distal blood pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, K H; Noer, Ivan; Paaske, William

    1980-01-01

    Systolic blood pressures at toe and ankle were measured in 459 consecutive patients with occlusive arterial disease. Fifty-eight per cent had intermittent claudication with arterial disease of all degrees of severity. Seventeen per cent complained of rest pain having toe systolic pressures below 30...

  12. Aircraft vibration and other factors related to high systolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Penerbangan dapat berdampak pada sistem kardiovaskular manusia. Penerbang terpajan antara lain pada bising dan vibrasi pesawat. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh beberapa faktor penerbangan pada tekanan darah sistolik.Metode: Penelitian nested case-control dilakukan pada penerbang Angkatan Udara Republik Indonesia yang melakukan pemeriksaan fisik tahunan di Lembaga Kesehatan Penerbangan dan Ruang Angkasa (LAKESPRA Saryanto tahun 2003–2008. Data yang diperoleh dari rekam medik berupa umur, jumlah jam terbang, jenis pesawat, kadar glukosa puasa dan kadar kholesterol darah, lingkaran pinggang, tinggi dan berat badan, tinggi badan, serta tekanan darah.Hasil: Dari 336 penerbang, terdapat 16 penerbanga dengan tekanan sistolik ³ 140 mmHg. Penerbang dengan rata-rata jam penerbangan 300-622 jam per tahun dibandingkan dengan 29-299 jam per tahun mempunyai risiko peningkatan tekanan darah sistolik tinggi sebesarf 5 kali [rasio odds suaian (ORa = 5,05, 95% interval kepercayaan (CI = 0,88 -23,30, P = 0,070]. Menurut jam terbang total, mereka yang memiliki 1.401-1,1125 jam dibandingkan 147-1.400 jam berisiko 3,6 kali mengalami tekanan darah sistolik tinggi (ORa = 3,58, 95% CI = 1,24-10,38. Selain itu, mereka dengan denyut nadi istirahat tinggi dibandingkan dengan denyut nadi normal istirahat memiliki 2,4 kali mengalami tekanan darah sistolik tinggi (ORa = 2,37, CI = 0,74-7,50 95, P = 0,147].Kesimpulan: Vibrasi pesawat terbang tinggi, rata-rata jam terbang per tahun tinggi, dan frekuensi nadi istirahat yang tinggi meningkatkan risiko tekanan sistolik tinggi.Kata kunci:tekanan darah sistolik, vibrasi pesawat terbang, frekuensi nadi istirahat, pilotAbstractBackground:Flight may affect the human cardiovascular system. Pilots are exposed among others to aircraft noise and vibration. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aircraft flight on systolic blood pressure.Methods:A nested case-control study was conducted on

  13. Systolic blood pressure reactivity during submaximal exercise and acute psychological stress in youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Studies in youth show an association between systolic blood-pressure (SBP) reactivity to acute psychological stress and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT). However, it has not yet been determined whether SBP reactivity during submaximal exercise is also associated with CIMT i...

  14. Perceived Social Standing, Medication Nonadherence, and Systolic Blood Pressure in the Rural South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Doyle M; Wu, Jia-Rong; Cene, Crystal; Halladay, Jacquie; Donahue, Katrina E; Hinderliter, Alan; Miller, Cassandra; Garcia, Beverly; Penn, Dolly; Tillman, Jim; DeWalt, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how perceived social standing versus traditional socioeconomic characteristics influence medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) among African American and white patients with hypertension in the rural southeastern United States. Perceived social standing, socioeconomic characteristics, self-reported antihypertensive medication adherence, and BP were measured at baseline in a cohort of rural African American and white patients (n = 495) with uncontrolled hypertension attending primary care practices. Multivariate models examined the relationship of perceived social standing and socioeconomic indicators with medication adherence and systolic BP. Medication nonadherence was reported by 40% of patients. Younger age [β = 0.20; P = .001], African American race [β = -0.30; P = .03], and lower perceived social standing [β = 0.08; P = .002] but not sex or traditional socioeconomic characteristics including education and household income, were significantly associated with lower medication adherence. Race-specific analyses revealed that this pattern was limited to African Americans and not observed in whites. In stepwise modeling, older age [β = 0.57, P = .001], African American race [β = 4.4; P = .03], and lower medication adherence [β = -1.7, P = .01] but not gender, education, or household income, were significantly associated with higher systolic BP. Lower perceived social standing and age, but not traditional socioeconomic characteristics, were significantly associated with lower medication adherence in African Americans. Lower medication adherence was associated with higher systolic BP. These findings suggest the need for tailored, culturally relevant medication adherence interventions in rural communities. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  15. COMPARISON OF HIGH-DEFINITION OSCILLOMETRIC AND DIRECT ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE MEASUREMENT IN ANESTHETIZED CHEETAHS (ACINONYX JUBATUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant Cassia, Emma V; Boswood, Adrian; Tordiffe, Adrian S W

    2015-09-01

    Blood pressure measurement reveals important insights into the health of conscious and anesthetized individuals. This is of particular interest in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), which in captivity are known to suffer from chronic diseases that may be associated with hypertension and which often require immobilization for transport or veterinary treatment. Invasive testing methods are considered the gold standard but are not practical in many settings. Consequently, it is important to evaluate the use of noninvasive methods in this species. Measurements for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure obtained using high-definition oscillometry (HDO) at the coccygeal artery were compared to simultaneous direct measurements obtained via catheterization of the femoral or dorsal pedal artery in eight anesthetized captive cheetahs during nine anesthetic events. Overall, HDO and direct measurements agreed most closely for mean arterial pressure, and the poorest agreement was observed for systolic pressure. There was a tendency for low diastolic pressures to be underestimated and for high diastolic pressures to be overestimated. Across all three parameters, HDO measurements from the tail overestimated directly measured pressures in the femoral artery and underestimated those in the dorsal pedal artery. HDO agreed most closely with directly measured dorsal pedal pressures. Mean arterial pressure showed the greatest precision (standard deviation of 10.2 mm Hg) and lowest bias (-1.2 mm Hg), with 75.9% of readings within 10 mm Hg of the direct dorsal pedal pressure. Agreement with systolic pressure was hindered by a high bias (-10.4 mm Hg), but if a correction factor of +10 mm Hg was applied to all systolic measurements, agreement was improved and 65.7% of readings were within 10 mm Hg of the direct pressure. When compared to criteria defined by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine for validation of blood pressure devices, results were favorable, but a

  16. Validity of Some Anthropometric Indicators in the Prediction of High Systolic Blood Pressure among Indian Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In view of the increasing prevalence of obesity in children, it is necessary to investigate the relative performance of different indicators used for its assessment and health consequences. Objectives To examine concordance between various indicators used for assessing obesity among adolescents and to examine their ability to predict risk of high systolic blood pressure. Design Cross-sectional study, from two schools catering to affluent class. Subjects Children in age 9–16 yr (n = 1146 boys and 1036 girls. Measurements Body weight, height, skinfold thickness at triceps (TSFT and body fat percent by trained investigators and blood pressure measurement by a pediatrician using sphygmomanometer. Results Prevalence of overweight was lowest with criterion of TSFT (11.7% in boys; 7.6% in girls and was highest using criterion of body fat percent (53.7% in boys and 28.4% in girls. Body mass index (BMI had high significant correlation with each of the indicator and with systolic blood pressure (SBP as well, in both sexes. All the indicators with conventional cut offs showed poor sensitivity for predicting high SBP. However, receiver operating characteristics (ROC cut-offs improved sensitivity considerably, but the values were much lower compared to conventional cut-offs. Conclusions There is considerable disparity in the estimates of overweight children obtained by different indicators. Lower values of ROC cut-offs highlights the need for population specific customized classification systems for assessing obesity in view of the probable population differences in relative risks of non-communicable adult diseases.

  17. Target blood pressure for treatment of isolated systolic hypertension in the elderly: valsartan in elderly isolated systolic hypertension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Toshio; Saruta, Takao; Rakugi, Hiromi; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Imai, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Ito, Sadayoshi; Eto, Tanenao; Kimura, Genjiro; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Takishita, Shuichi; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2010-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point study, we aimed to establish whether strict blood pressure control ( or =140 mm Hg to or =2 years. The strict control (1545 patients) and moderate control (1534 patients) groups were well matched (mean age: 76.1 years; mean blood pressure: 169.5/81.5 mm Hg). Median follow-up was 3.07 years. At 3 years, blood pressure reached 136.6/74.8 mm Hg and 142.0/76.5 mm Hg, respectively. The blood pressure difference between the 2 groups was 5.4/1.7 mm Hg. The overall rate of the primary composite end point was 10.6 per 1000 patient-years in the strict control group and 12.0 per 1000 patient-years in the moderate control group (hazard ratio: 0.89; [95% CI: 0.60 to 1.34]; P=0.38). In summary, blood pressure targets of or = 70 years of age with isolated systolic hypertension, although our trial was underpowered to definitively determine whether strict control was superior to less stringent blood pressure targets.

  18. Blood pressure measurement of all five fingers by strain gauge plethysmography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirai, M; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1976-01-01

    of the other fingers was measured using a 24-mm-wide cuff. Blood pressure at the proximal phalanx was higher than that at the intermediate phalanx in all fingers except finger V. The difference of blood pressure values corresponded well with circumference of the finger. In 15 normal subjects, blood pressure...... at the proximal phalanx was compared in fingers I, III, IV, and V, using 16, 20, 24 and 24 mm wide cuffs. Finger blood pressure was closest to arm systolic blood pressure when a 24-mm or 27-mm-wide cuff was used in fingers I, III, and IV, and with a 20-mm-wide cuff in finger V. As the standard deviation......The aim of the present paper was to study the methodological problems involved in measuring systolic blood pressure in all five fingers by the strain gauge technique. In 24 normal subjects, blood pressure at the proximal phalanx of finger I and both at the proximal and the intermediate phalanx...

  19. Systolic hypertension in adult nigerians with hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opadijo, O.G.; Salami, T.A.T.; Sanya, E.O.; Omotoso, A.B.O.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of both systolic and diastolic hypertensions in relation to age and their impacts on target organ among adult Nigerians with hypertension. Newly diagnosed adult hypertensives, with blood pressure 140/90mm Hg, taken twice with mercury column sphygmomanometer at 3 weeks interval, were studied. The total number of hypertensive patients treated over this period was also taken into consideration. The newly diagnosed hypertensives were classified using JNC VI classification. The frequency of occurrence of target organ damage such as Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH), heart failure, renal impairment etc. was charted according to systolic and or diastolic pressures. The occurrence of systolic or diastolic blood pressure was also related with the age of the patients. Blood metabolic parameters were compared in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures for their possible contributory role. Two thousand seven hundred and ninety-two adult hypertensive patients were managed over the study period. Of them, 218 (7.8%) were newly diagnosed and studied. There were 94 males and 124 females. Seventy-seven (35.3%) were aged 60 years and above with equal frequency in the gender. One hundred and seventy-eight (81.7%) cases had combined systolic and diastolic pressures. Twenty-nine (13.3%) patients had systolic hypertension. Twenty-five (86.2%) of these 29 were aged 50 years and above and 20 (69.0%) were aged 60 years and above. Eleven (5.0%) patients had isolated diastolic hypertension and they were all in the age bracket 40-49 years. Systolic blood pressure was found to be rising with advancing age while diastolic blood pressure peaked at mid 40's and declined. Target organ damage occurred more frequently with systolic hypertension and advancing age than with diastolic hypertension. Systolic hypertension occurred more frequently in this series of adult Nigerians with hypertension. It was higher with advancing age and associated with more target organ

  20. Choice of marker for assessment of RV dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism : NT-proBNP, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, or blood pressure index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, H; Ates, I; Kundi, H; Yilmaz, F M

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to examine the value of NT-proBNP, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), blood pressure index (BPI), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the determination of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). A total of 547 patients diagnosed with APE were included in the study. Demographic characteristics and comorbid conditions of patients were recorded in patient files. For blood pressure measurement, a calibrated digital blood pressure monitor was used at regular intervals. Blood samples were taken from patients at the time of admission for hemogram, biochemical, and hemostasis blood tests. Echocardiography was performed on all patients to detect RVD and evaluate pulmonary artery pressure. PASP (p blood pressure (p blood cell (p AUC ± SE = 0.975 ± 0.006; p < 0.001) was found to be the best predictor of RVD with a higher sensitivity (92.8%) and specificity (100%). We found that BPI had a better diagnostic discrimination for RVD compared with PASP and NT-proBNP.

  1. Comparison of exercise blood pressure measured by technician and an automated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gregory, J A; Jackson, A S; Studeville, J; Squires, W G; Owen, C A

    1984-05-01

    We evaluated the automated system Blood Pressure Measuring System (BPMS) developed by NASA on 277 adult males who elected to have a treadmill test as part of their annual physical. The BPMS uses acoustic transduction with a computer-assisted ECG gating to detect nonsynchronous noise. The BPMS readings were compared to pressures simultaneously measured by trained technicians. For all stages of work, BPMS readings were higher for systolic and lower for diastolic than technician readings. At peak stages of work, BPMS systolic pressures were about 20 mmHg higher than technician readings. Within each 3-min workstage, BPMS readings were found to be more inconsistent than technician readings. The standard errors of measurement for BPMS were from two to three times higher than technician values. These data showed automated blood pressure readings were significantly different than technician values and subject to more random fluctuations. These findings demonstrate the need to view exercise blood pressure measured by automated systems with caution.

  2. Microalbuminuria in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus relates to nocturnal systolic blood pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, T H

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Microalbuminuria predicts early mortality in non-insulin-dependent-diabetes mellitus patients (NIDDM). Our objective in the present study was to compare and assess the relationship between 24-hour, day and nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) in microalbuminuric and normoalbuminuric NIDDM and in normal control subjects. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the present cross-sectional study, 24 hour ambulatory BP (daytime BP and nocturnal BP) and HbA1c were compared in microalbuminuric (n = 10) and nonmicroalbuminuric NIDDM patients (n = 10) and in nondiabetic controls (n = 9). None of the patients were taking antihypertensive agents. RESULTS: In the microlbuminuric group, whereas 24 hour and daytime systolic BP differed significantly from control values (P < 0.025 and P < 0.05 respectively), there was no difference between diabetic groups. However, nocturnal systolic BP in the microalbuminuric group was significantly higher than in the normoalbuminuric diabetic patients (139 vs. 125) (P < 0.05) and a significant difference was also found between the NIDDM patients and the control group (139, 125 vs. 114) (P < 0.025). In multiple regression analysis, only nocturnal systolic BP showed a significant relationship with UAE (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the higher nocturnal systolic blood pressure seen in our microalbuminuric NIDDM patients may contribute to the increased morbidity in this group.

  3. Effect of atrial systole on canine and porcine coronary blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, R F

    1981-09-01

    A feature of phasic coronary flow patterns recorded in conscious chronically instrumented dogs is the atrial cove--a transient depression of arterial flow that occurs during atrial systole. The association between the hemodynamic effects of atrial systole and the atrial cove was studied in anesthetized dogs and pigs with complete heart block. Many atrial coves are available for study in these preparations because atrial activity continues unabated during the diastolic ventricular arrest that follows cessation of electrical pacing. The effect of atrial systole is to translate the pressure-flow relation found during diastole to a higher intercept pressure without change in slope. The increase in the intercept pressure equals the increase in intramyocardial pressure measured with microtransducers embedded in the left ventricular wall. The decrement in flow during the atrial cove is a direct function of the change in intramyocardial pressure and an inverse function of coronary vascular resistance. Each atrial systole is associated with a forward flow transient in the coronary veins, the peak of which occurs at the same instant as does the nadir of atrial flow. These data suggest that the coronary vessels are acting as collapsible tubes and that the waterfall model of the coronary circulation is applicable. The following sequence is proposed to account for the atrial cove. Atrial systole ejects a bolus of blood into the left ventricle increasing both ventricular cavity and intramyocardial pressures. The increase in intramyocardial pressure raises the back pressure opposing coronary flow, reducing the arterial perfusion pressure gradient and causing flow to fall.

  4. Arterial blood pressure measurement and pulse wave analysis—their role in enhancing cardiovascular assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark; Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The most common method of clinical measurement of arterial blood pressure is by means of the cuff sphygmomanometer. This instrument has provided fundamental quantitative information on arterial pressure in individual subjects and in populations and facilitated estimation of cardiovascular risk related to levels of blood pressure obtained from the brachial cuff. Although the measurement is taken in a peripheral limb, the values are generally assumed to reflect the pressure throughout the arterial tree in large conduit arteries. Since the arterial pressure pulse becomes modified as it travels away from the heart towards the periphery, this is generally true for mean and diastolic pressure, but not for systolic pressure, and so pulse pressure. The relationship between central and peripheral pulse pressure depends on propagation characteristics of arteries. Hence, while the sphygmomanometer gives values of two single points on the pressure wave (systolic and diastolic pressure), there is additional information that can be obtained from the time-varying pulse waveform that enables an improved quantification of the systolic load on the heart and other central organs. This topical review will assess techniques of pressure measurement that relate to the use of the cuff sphygmomanometer and to the non-invasive registration and analysis of the peripheral and central arterial pressure waveform. Improved assessment of cardiovascular function in relation to treatment and management of high blood pressure will result from future developments in the indirect measurement of arterial blood pressure that involve the conventional cuff sphygmomanometer with the addition of information derived from the peripheral arterial pulse. (topical review)

  5. Euglycemic clamp insulin sensitivity and longitudinal systolic blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrie, John R; Malik, Muhammad Omar; Balkau, Beverley

    2013-01-01

    and Cardiovascular disease (RISC) study, we measured insulin sensitivity (M/I) using the euglycemic clamp technique in 1073 healthy European adults (587 women, 486 men) aged 30 to 60 years followed up 3 years later. Systolic BP (SBP) at baseline was higher in insulin-resistant women (ie, those in the low sex...

  6. Comparing the Efficacy of Tadalafil Versus Placebo on Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure and Right Ventricular Function in Patients with Beta-Thalassaemia Intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalian, Rozita; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Tamaddoni, Ahmad; Khafri, Soraya; Iranian, Mohammadreza

    2017-07-01

    Conventional oral therapies in the management of pulmonary hypertension in people without haemoglobinopathies are of limited value in thalassaemia patients because of toxicity and poor effectiveness. This study was conducted to assess the effect of tadalafil on pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular systolic function in patients with beta-thalassaemia intermedia. Forty-four patients with beta-thalassaemia intermedia with pulmonary hypertension based on transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were entered in the study. Patients with hepatic or renal insufficiency and also patients who were treated with organic nitrates or alpha-blockers were excluded. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (n=22) and they were treated for six weeks with tadalafil (40mg daily) or placebo. The pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV) and parameters related to systolic function of the right ventricle were measured by the TTE before and after treatment. Significant improvement in TRV (3.02±0.02 m/s-2.52±0.06 m/s), PASP (45.31±0.66 mmHg-34.26±1.15mmHg) and parameters related to systolic function of the right ventricle were observed in the group who received tadalafil compared to placebo (pintermedia. Likewise, tadalafil improved right ventricular systolic function in the patients. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of self-monitoring and medication self-titration on systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease: the TASMIN-SR randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Richard J; Mant, Jonathan; Haque, M Sayeed; Bray, Emma P; Bryan, Stirling; Greenfield, Sheila M; Jones, Miren I; Jowett, Sue; Little, Paul; Penaloza, Cristina; Schwartz, Claire; Shackleford, Helen; Shovelton, Claire; Varghese, Jinu; Williams, Bryan; Hobbs, F D Richard; Gooding, Trevor; Morrey, Ian; Fisher, Crispin; Buckley, David

    2014-08-27

    Self-monitoring of blood pressure with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension, but there are no data about patients in high-risk groups. To determine the effect of self-monitoring with self-titration of antihypertensive medication compared with usual care on systolic blood pressure among patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. A primary care, unblinded, randomized clinical trial involving 552 patients who were aged at least 35 years with a history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease and with baseline blood pressure of at least 130/80 mm Hg being treated at 59 UK primary care practices was conducted between March 2011 and January 2013. Self-monitoring of blood pressure combined with an individualized self-titration algorithm. During the study period, the office visit blood pressure measurement target was 130/80 mm Hg and the home measurement target was 120/75 mm Hg. Control patients received usual care consisting of seeing their health care clinician for routine blood pressure measurement and adjustment of medication if necessary. The primary outcome was the difference in systolic blood pressure between intervention and control groups at the 12-month office visit. Primary outcome data were available from 450 patients (81%). The mean baseline blood pressure was 143.1/80.5 mm Hg in the intervention group and 143.6/79.5 mm Hg in the control group. After 12 months, the mean blood pressure had decreased to 128.2/73.8 mm Hg in the intervention group and to 137.8/76.3 mm Hg in the control group, a difference of 9.2 mm Hg (95% CI, 5.7-12.7) in systolic and 3.4 mm Hg (95% CI, 1.8-5.0) in diastolic blood pressure following correction for baseline blood pressure. Multiple imputation for missing values gave similar results: the mean baseline was 143.5/80.2 mm Hg in the intervention group vs 144.2/79.9 mm Hg in the control group, and

  8. Non-invasive aortic systolic pressure and pulse wave velocity estimation in a primary care setting: An in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Andrea; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca; Mesin, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Everyday clinical cardiovascular evaluation is still largely based on brachial systolic and diastolic pressures. However, several clinical studies have demonstrated the higher diagnostic capacities of the aortic pressure, as well as the need to assess the aortic mechanical properties (e.g., by measuring the aortic pulse wave velocity). In order to fill this gap, we propose to exploit a set of easy-to-obtain physical characteristics to estimate the aortic pressure and pulse wave velocity. To this aim, a large population of virtual subjects is created by a validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system. Quadratic regressive models are then fitted and statistically selected in order to obtain reliable estimations of the aortic pressure and pulse wave velocity starting from the knowledge of the subject age, height, weight, brachial pressure, photoplethysmographic measures and either electrocardiogram or phonocardiogram. The results are very encouraging and foster clinical studies aiming to apply a similar technique to a real population. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system.

  10. 6A.03: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTER-ARM SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W; Zhang, B; Yang, Y; Qi, L; Meng, L; Zhang, Y; Huo, Y

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the relationship between the inter arm blood pressure difference (IASBPD) and other cardiovascular risk factors. To identify what factors are associated with this difference in a general population. The study subjects were 1426 individuals. The BP was measured simultaneously in both arms by VP1000 vascular profiler (Omron Colin, Japan). The inter-arm BP difference was expressed as the absolute difference (|R - L|). The various risk factors, ba-PWV, carotid IMT and plaque were compared between IASBPD more than 10mmHg group and IASBPD less than 10mmHg group. The relationship between IASBPD more than 10mmHg and various cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. Left upper limb systolic blood pressure was higher than the right upper limb, while right upper limb diastolic pressure was higher than the left upper limb. The prevalence of hypertension was higher in IASBPD increasing group than normal group (40.5% vs 22.6%, p blood pressure were also higher in IASBPD increasing group(p blood pressure, BMI and ABI independently, which may partly explain the mechanism that increasing IASBPD is associated with cardiovascular disease.

  11. On-Treatment Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Older Adults With Isolated Systolic Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yuichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Bakris, George L; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Oparil, Suzanne; Saruta, Takao; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Imai, Yutaka; Ogihara, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to assess optimal on-treatment blood pressure (BP) at which cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality risks are minimized in Japanese older adults with isolated systolic hypertension. We used data from the VALISH study (Valsartan in Elderly Isolated Systolic Hypertension) that recruited older adults (n=3035; mean age, 76 years) with systolic BP (SBP) of ≥160 mm Hg and diastolic BP of secondary outcome being all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the CVD risk for each group. Over a median 3-year follow-up (8022 person-years), 93 CVD events and 52 deaths occurred. Using the on-treatment SBP of 130 to hypertension, SBP in the range between 130 and 144 mm Hg was associated with minimal adverse outcomes and a reduction in CVD and all-cause mortality. The BP range will need to be confirmed in randomized controlled trials. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00151229. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Observation of the pulse oximeter trace to estimate systolic blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The estimation of systolic blood pressure by disappearance and reappearance of the pulse oximeter trace during cuff inflation and deflation was compared with non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement, across the range of body mass index (BMI), during spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section.

  13. Resistance training alone reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure in prehypertensive and hypertensive individuals: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Evitom Corrêa; Abrahin, Odilon; Ferreira, Ana Lorena Lima; Rodrigues, Rejane Pequeno; Alves, Erik Artur Cortinhas; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of resistance training alone on the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in prehypertensive and hypertensive individuals. Our meta-analysis, followed the guidelines of PRISMA. The search for articles was realized by November 2016 using the following electronic databases: BIREME, PubMed, Cochrane Library, LILACS and SciELO and a search strategy that included the combination of titles of medical affairs and terms of free text to the key concepts: 'hypertension' 'hypertensive', 'prehypertensive', 'resistance training', 'strength training', and 'weight-lifting'. These terms were combined with a search strategy to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and identified a total of 1608 articles: 644 articles BIREME, 53 SciELO, 722 PubMed, 122 Cochrane Library and 67 LILACS. Of these, five RCTs met the inclusion criteria and provided data on 201 individuals. The results showed significant reductions for systolic blood pressure (-8.2 mm Hg CI -10.9 to -5.5;I 2 : 22.5% P valor for heterogeneity=0.271 and effect size=-0.97) and diastolic blood pressure (-4.1 mm Hg CI -6.3 to -1.9; I 2 : 46.5% P valor for heterogeneity=0.113 and effect size=-0.60) when compared to group control. In conclusion, resistance training alone reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure in prehypertensive and hypertensive subjects. The RCTs studies that investigated the effects of resistance training alone in prehypertensive and hypertensive patients support the recommendation of resistance training as a tool for management of systemic hypertension.

  14. Poor Reliability of Wrist Blood Pressure Self-Measurement at Home: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Albertini, Federica; Palatini, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The reliability of blood pressure measurement with wrist devices, which has not previously been assessed under real-life circumstances in general population, is dependent on correct positioning of the wrist device at heart level. We determined whether an error was present when blood pressure was self-measured at the wrist in 721 unselected subjects from the general population. After training, blood pressure was measured in the office and self-measured at home with an upper-arm device (the UA-767 Plus) and a wrist device (the UB-542, not provided with a position sensor). The upper-arm-wrist blood pressure difference detected in the office was used as the reference measurement. The discrepancy between office and home differences was the home measurement error. In the office, systolic blood pressure was 2.5% lower at wrist than at arm (P=0.002), whereas at home, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher at wrist than at arm (+5.6% and +5.4%, respectively; Pblood pressure values likely because of a poor memory and rendition of the instructions, leading to the wrong position of the wrist. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Hypertension Treatment and Concern About Falling: Baseline Data from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlowitz, Dan R; Breaux-Shropshire, Tonya; Foy, Capri G; Gren, Lisa H; Kazis, Lewis; Lerner, Alan J; Newman, Jill C; Powell, James R; Riley, William T; Rosman, Robert; Wadley, Virginia G; Williams, Julie A

    2016-11-01

    To determine the extent of concern about falling in older adults with hypertension, whether lower blood pressure (BP) and greater use of antihypertensive medications are associated with greater concern about falling, and whether lower BP has a greater effect on concern about falling in older and more functionally impaired individuals. Secondary analysis involving cross-sectional study of baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). Approximately 100 outpatient sites. SPRINT enrollees aged 50 and older (mean age 69) diagnosed with hypertension (N = 2,299). Concern about falling was determined using the shortened version of the Falls Efficacy Scale International as measured at the baseline examination. Mild concern about falling was present in 29.3% of participants and moderate to severe concern in 17.9%. Neither low BP (systolic BPconcern about falling (P > .10). Participants with moderate to severe concern about falling were taking significantly more antihypertensive medications than those with mild or no concern. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, no associations were evident between BP, medications, and concern about falling. Results were similar in older and younger participants; interactions between BP and age and functional status were not significantly associated with concern about falling. Although concern about falling is common in older adults with hypertension, it was not found to be associated with low BP or use of more antihypertensive medications in baseline data from SPRINT. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Increased postdialysis systolic blood pressure is associated with extracellular overhydration in hemodialysis outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongnuch, Arkom; Campbell, Neil; Stern, Edward; El-Kateb, Sally; Fuentes, Laura; Davenport, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    Recently, intradialytic hypertension was reported to be associated with increased mortality for hemodialysis patients. To determine whether volume status plays a role in dialysis-associated hypertension, we prospectively audited 531 patients that had volume assessments measured by multiple-frequency bioelectrical impedance during their midweek dialysis session. Mean pre- and postdialysis weights were 73.2 vs 71.7 kg, and systolic blood pressures (SBPs) 140.5 vs. 130.3 mm Hg, respectively. Patients were divided into groups based on a fall in SBP of 20 mm Hg or more (32%), an increased SBP of 10 mm Hg or more (18%), and a stable group (50%). There were no differences in patient demographics, dialysis prescriptions, predialysis weight, total body (TBW), and extracellular (ECW) and intracellular water (ICW). However, the change in weight was significantly less in the increased blood pressure group (1.01 kg vs. stable 1.65, and 1.7 hypotensive). The ratio of ECW to TBW was significantly higher in the increased blood pressure group, particularly post dialysis (39.1 vs. stable 38.7% and fall in blood pressure group 38.7%). ECW overhydration was significantly greater in the increased blood pressure group post dialysis (0.7 (0.17 to 1.1) vs. stable 0.39 (-0.2 to 0.95) and fall in blood pressure group 0.38 (-0.19 to 0.86) liter). We found that patients who had increased blood pressure post dialysis had greater hydration status, particularly ECW. Thus, patients who increase their blood pressure post dialysis should have review of target weight, consideration of lowering the post-dialysis weight, and may benefit from increasing dialysis session time or frequency.

  17. Lack of association between systolic blood pressure and blood viscosity in normotensive healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irace, Concetta; Carallo, Claudio; Scavelli, Faustina; Loprete, Antonio; Merante, Valentina; Gnasso, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    A direct relationship between blood pressure and viscosity has frequently been reported, although clear data are not available. To better understand the relationship between these two variables, we evaluated blood viscosity and blood pressure in a group of healthy subjects without cardiovascular risk factors. Healthy subjects were selected from participants in a campaign of prevention of cardiovascular disease (n = 103). They underwent blood sampling for measurement of plasma and blood viscosity, haematocrit, blood lipids and glucose. The quantity and distribution of body fat was assessed by body mass index and waist/hip ratio, respectively. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) correlated significantly with age (r = 0.222) and waist/hip ratio (r = 0.374). Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) correlated significantly with waist/hip ratio (r = 0.216), haematocrit (r = 0.333) and blood viscosity (r = 0.258). Multiple linear regression analyses demonstrated that the only variable significantly associated with SBP was age, while haematocrit was the only variable significantly associated with DBP. Blood viscosity was closely related to waist/hip ratio. These findings show that SBP, in healthy subjects, is not influenced by haematocrit and blood viscosity. In contrast, DBP is related to the values of haematocrit. Among classical cardiovascular risk factors, waist/hip ratio is closely related to blood viscosity.

  18. 24-hour central aortic systolic pressure and 24-hour central pulse pressure are related to diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive measurements of 24 hour ambulatory central aortic systolic pressure (24 h-CASP) and central pulse pressure (24 h-CPP) are now feasible. We evaluate the relationship between 24 h central blood pressure and diabetes-related complications in patients with type 1 diabetes.......68) and 3.72 (1.85-7.47) and autonomic dysfunction: 3.25 (1.65-6.41), 1.64 (1.12-2.39) and 2.89 (1.54-5.42). CONCLUSIONS: 24 h-CASP and 24 h-CPP was higher in patients vs. controls and increased with diabetic complications independently of covariates. Furthermore, 24 h-CASP was stronger associated....... METHODS: The study was cross-sectional, including 715 subjects: 86 controls (C), 69 patients with short diabetes duration (diabetes (≥ 10 years) and normoalbuminuria (LN), 163...

  19. Long-term impact of systolic blood pressure and glycemia on the development of microalbuminuria in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Jose Maria; Rodilla, Enrique; Gonzalez, Carmen; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Redon, Josep

    2005-06-01

    The objective was to assess the temporal impact of factors related to the development of microalbuminuria during the follow-up of young adult normoalbuminurics with high-normal blood pressure or at stage 1 of essential hypertension. Prospective follow-up was conducted on 245 normoalbuminuric hypertensive subjects (mean age 40.9 years; 134 men; blood pressure 139.7/88.6 mm Hg; body mass index 28.5 kg/m2) never treated previously with antihypertensive drugs, with yearly urinary albumin excretion measurements, until the development of microalbuminuria. After enrollment, patients were placed on usual care including nonpharmacological treatment or with an antihypertensive drug regime to achieve a blood pressure of 15 mg per 24-hour systolic blood pressure >139 mm Hg and a positive trend in fasting glucose were observed in the univariate analyses. However, in the multivariate analysis, only the baseline urinary albumin excretion and the trend of fasting glucose were independently related to the risk of developing microalbuminuria. In mild hypertensives, the development of microalbuminuria was linked to insufficient blood pressure control and to a progressive increment of glucose values.

  20. Observational study comparing non-invasive blood pressure measurement at the arm and ankle during caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M J P; Hill, J S

    2013-05-01

    Upper-arm non-invasive blood pressure measurement during caesarean section can be uncomfortable and unreliable because of movement artefact in the conscious parturient. We aimed to determine whether ankle blood pressure measurement could be used instead in this patient group by comparing concurrent arm and ankle blood pressure measured throughout elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia in 64 term parturients. Bland-Altman analysis of mean difference (95% limits of agreement [range]) between the ankle and arm was 11.2 (-20.3 to +42.7 [-67 to +102]) mmHg for systolic arterial pressure, -0.5 (-21.0 to +19.9 [-44 to +91]) mmHg for mean arterial pressure and -3.8 (-25.3 to +17.8 [-41 to +94]) mmHg for diastolic arterial pressure. Although ankle blood pressure measurement is well tolerated and allows greater mobility of the arms than measurement from the arm, the degree of discrepancy between the two sites is unacceptable to allow routine use of ankle blood pressure measurement, especially for systolic arterial pressure. However, ankle blood pressure measurement may be a useful alternative in situations where arm blood pressure measurement is difficult or impossible. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Increased augmentation index and central systolic arterial pressure are associated with lower school and motor performance in young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogrin, Bernarda; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Mičetić-Turk, Dušanka

    2017-12-01

    Objective In adults, improper arterial function has been linked to cognitive impairment. The pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx) and other vascular parameters are useful indicators of arterial health. In our study, we monitored arterial properties, body constitution, school success, and motor skills in young adolescents. We hypothesize that reduced cognitive and motor abilities have a vascular origin in children. Methods We analysed 81 healthy school children aged 11-16 years. Anthropometry central systolic arterial pressure, body mass index (BMI), standard deviation scores (SDS) BMI, general school performance grade, and eight motor tests were assessed. PWV, AIx, and central systolic arterial pressure (SBPao) were measured. Results AIx and SBPao correlated negatively with school performance grades. Extremely high AIx, PWV and SBPao values were observed in 5% of children and these children had average to low school performance. PWV correlated significantly with weight, height, and waist and hip circumference. AIx, PWV, school success, and BMI correlated strongly with certain motor functions. Conclusions Increased AIx and SBPao are associated with lower school and motor performance in children. PWV is influenced by the body's constitution.

  2. Blood pressure measurement method and inter-arm differences: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Willem J; Kessels, Alfons G H; Thien, Theo

    2011-11-01

    Screening for inter-arm difference (IAD) of blood pressure (BP) at each first visit is recommended by numerous guidelines whereas it is unclear whether the method by which IAD is measured has significant influence on the IAD value. A systematic review is made of the studies reporting on double-arm measurements and the association of IAD with procedure characteristics (Medline/PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library). The mean absolute IAD was 5.4 ± 1.7 and 3.6 ± 1.2 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic BP, respectively. Of all subjects 14% had a systolic IAD ≥10 mm Hg, 4% a systolic IAD ≥20 mm Hg, and 7% a diastolic IAD ≥10 mm Hg. The relative risk (RR) of obtaining a systolic IAD ≥10 and 20 mm Hg and a diastolic IAD ≥10 mm Hg is higher when measuring sequentially instead of simultaneously (2.2 (95% CI: 1.4-3.6), P arms, with one or two automatic devices and multiple readings should be taken.

  3. Predictors of high central blood pressure in young with isolated systolic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radchenko GD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available G D Radchenko, O O Torbas, Yu M Sirenko State Institute National Scientific Center, M.D. Strazhesko Institute of Cardiology, National Academy of Medical Science, Kyiv, Ukraine Objective: According to the European Society of Cardiology/European Society of Hypertension 2013 guidelines, evaluation of aortic blood pressure (BP is needed in young with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, but using special devices is not common, especially in Ukraine, where only a few centers have these devices. The purpose of our study was to identify the simple clinical predictors for differentiation (with or without elevated aortic systolic BP [SBP] of the young with ISH without the need for further extensive work-up. Patients and methods: The study included 44 young men (mean age: 32.2±1.3 years with office SBP ≥140 mmHg and office diastolic BP (DBP <90 mmHg (average: 153.4±2.1 mmHg and 83.4±1.7 mmHg, respectively. The following procedures were performed in all the subjects: body weight and height evaluation; measurement of office SBP, DBP, and heart rate; ambulatory BP monitoring; measurement of pulse wave velocity in arteries of elastic and muscle types and central SBP (cSBP; biochemical blood tests; electrocardiography; echocardiography; and carotid ultrasound investigations. Step-by-step multifactor regression analyses were used for finding the predictors of high cSBP. Results: Depending on the cSBP level, all the patients were divided into two groups: first group (n=17, subjects with normal cSBP, and second group (n=27, subjects with elevated cSBP. Patients in the second group were significantly older, with less height and higher body mass index; they had significantly higher levels of office SBP and DBP. Characteristics of target organ damage were within normal limits in both groups and did not differ significantly. Only pulse wave velocity in arteries of elastic type was significantly higher in the second group. The independent predictors of

  4. Global Burden of Hypertension and Systolic Blood Pressure of at Least 110 to 115 mm Hg, 1990-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Liu, Patrick; Roth, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Elevated systolic blood (SBP) pressure is a leading global health risk. Quantifying the levels of SBP is important to guide prevention policies and interventions. Objective: To estimate the association between SBP of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg and SBP of 140 mm Hg or higher and the bur......Importance: Elevated systolic blood (SBP) pressure is a leading global health risk. Quantifying the levels of SBP is important to guide prevention policies and interventions. Objective: To estimate the association between SBP of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg and SBP of 140 mm Hg or higher...... and the burden of different causes of death and disability by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015. Design: A comparative risk assessment of health loss related to SBP. Estimated distribution of SBP was based on 844 studies from 154 countries (published 1980-2015) of 8.69 million participants...... in the primary analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mean SBP level, cause-specific deaths, and health burden related to SBP (≥110-115 mm Hg and also ≥140 mm Hg) by age, sex, country, and year. Results: Between 1990-2015, the rate of SBP of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg increased from 73 119 (95% uncertainty...

  5. Development of a Blood Pressure Measurement Instrument with Active Cuff Pressure Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an oscillometric blood pressure (BP measurement approach based on the active control schemes of cuff pressure. Compared with conventional electronic BP instruments, the novelty of the proposed BP measurement approach is to utilize a variable volume chamber which actively and stably alters the cuff pressure during inflating or deflating cycles. The variable volume chamber is operated with a closed-loop pressure control scheme, and it is activated by controlling the piston position of a single-acting cylinder driven by a screw motor. Therefore, the variable volume chamber could significantly eliminate the air turbulence disturbance during the air injection stage when compared to an air pump mechanism. Furthermore, the proposed active BP measurement approach is capable of measuring BP characteristics, including systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, during the inflating cycle. Two modes of air injection measurement (AIM and accurate dual-way measurement (ADM were proposed. According to the healthy subject experiment results, AIM reduced 34.21% and ADM reduced 15.78% of the measurement time when compared to a commercial BP monitor. Furthermore, the ADM performed much consistently (i.e., less standard deviation in the measurements when compared to a commercial BP monitor.

  6. Association of Interarm Systolic Blood Pressure Difference with Atherosclerosis and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ho-Ming; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Hsien; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Chee-Siong; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    An interarm systolic blood pressure (SBP) difference of 10 mmHg or more have been associated with peripheral artery disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. We investigated whether an association exists between this difference and ankle-brachial index (ABI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and echocardiographic parameters. A total of 1120 patients were included in the study. The bilateral arm blood pressures were measured simultaneously by an ABI-form device. The values of ABI and baPWV were also obtained from the same device. Clinical data, ABIdifference ≥10 mmHg were compared and analyzed. We performed two multivariate forward analyses for determining the factors associated with an interarm SBP difference ≥10 mmHg [model 1: significant variables in univariate analysis except left ventricular mass index (LVMI); model 2: significant variables in univariate analysis except ABIdifference ≥10 mmHg. Female, hypertension, and high body mass index were also associated with an interarm SBP difference ≥10 mmHg. Our study demonstrated that ABIdifference of 10 mmHg or more. Detection of an interarm SBP difference may provide a simple method of detecting patients at increased risk of atherosclerosis and left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:22927905

  7. Interarm blood pressure difference in people with diabetes: measurement and vascular and mortality implications: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher E; Steele, Anna M; Taylor, Rod S; Shore, Angela C; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Campbell, John L

    2014-06-01

    Differences in blood pressure between arms are associated with vascular disease and increased mortality; this has not been reported in diabetes. We explored these associations, and assessed reference standard and pragmatic measurement techniques, in people with diabetes and in nondiabetic controls. A prospective cohort study in Devon, England, recruited 727 people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and 285 nondiabetic controls. Simultaneous repeated measurements of bilateral blood pressure were made at recruitment. Data were used to inform a pragmatic measurement strategy. Interarm differences were examined for cross-sectional associations with target organ disease and prospective mortality associations (median follow-up 52 months). We found 8.6% of participants with diabetes and 2.9% of controls had systolic interarm differences ≥10 mmHg. Single pairs of blood pressure measurements had high negative predictive values (97-99%) for excluding interarm differences. Systolic interarm differences ≥10 mmHg in diabetes were associated with peripheral arterial disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.4 [95% CI 1.2-9.3]). Differences ≥15 mmHg were associated with diabetic retinopathy (OR 5.7 [1.5-21.6]) and chronic kidney disease (OR 7.0 [1.7-29.8]). Systolic interarm differences were associated prospectively with increased cardiovascular mortality: hazard ratios 3.5 (1.0-13.0) for ≥10 mmHg and 9.0 (2.0-41.0) for ≥15 mmHg. Blood pressure should be measured in both arms during initial assessment in diabetes. Systolic interarm differences can be excluded with a single pair of measurements. In the population with diabetes, systolic differences may be associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Placental weight, birth measurements, and blood pressure at age 8 years.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, V M; Miller, A G; Boulton, T J; Cockington, R A; Craig, I H; Magarey, A M; Robinson, J S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine relationships between blood pressure during childhood and both placental weight and body size at birth, in an Australian population. DESIGN: A follow up study of a birth cohort, undertaken when cohort members were aged 8 years. SETTING: Adelaide, South Australia. SUBJECTS: 830 children born in the Queen Victoria Hospital in Adelaide, South Australia, during 1975-6. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure measured when the children were aged 8 years. ...

  9. Traditional systolic blood pressure targets underestimate hypotension-induced secondary brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Megan; Stein, Deborah M; Hu, Peter F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Sheth, Kevin; Scalea, Thomas M

    2012-05-01

    Vital signs, particularly blood pressure, are often manipulated to maximize perfusion and optimize recovery from severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). We investigated the utility of automated continuously recorded vital signs to predict outcomes after sTBI. Sixty patients with head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3, age >14 years, "isolated" TBI, and need for intracranial pressure monitoring were prospectively enrolled at a single, large urban tertiary care facility. Outcome was measured by mortality and extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) at 12 months. Continuous, automated, digital data were collected every 6 seconds for 72 hours after admission, and 5-minute means of systolic blood pressure (SBP) were recorded. We calculated SBP as pressure × time dose (PTD) to describe the cumulative amplitude and duration of episodes above and below clinical thresholds. The extent and duration of the insults were calculated as percent time (%time), PTD, and PTD per day (PTD/D) of defined thresholds (SBP: 100 bpm and >120 bpm; and SpO(2): GOSE by receiver operator characteristics. Mean age was 33.9 (range, 16-83) years, mean admission Glasgow Coma Scale score 6.4 ± 3, and mean head Abbreviated Injury Scale score 4.2 ± 0.72. The 30-day mortality rate was 13.3%. Of the 45 patients in whom GOSE at 12 months was available, 28 (62%) had good neurologic outcomes (GOSE score >4). Traditional markers of poor outcome (admission SBP, admission Glasgow Coma Scale, and Marshall score) were not different between groups with good or poor outcome. PTD, PTD/D, and %time SBP GOSE (p = 0.02). PTD/D SBP GOSE (p < 0.05). Within the first 48 hours of intensive care unit admission, hypotension was found to be predictive of mortality and functional outcomes at higher thresholds than traditionally defined. Systemic blood pressure targets closer to 120 mm Hg may be more efficacious in minimizing secondary insults and particularly useful in settings without invasive intracranial monitoring

  10. The effects of increasing levels of dietary garlic bulb on growth performance, systolic blood pressure, hematology, and ascites syndrome in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmaghany, Saifali; Karimi Torshizi, Mohammad Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Lotfollahian, Houshang; Hassanzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    The effects of dietary garlic bulb were studied separately on hematological parameters, ascites incidence, and growth performance of an ascites susceptible broiler hybrid under both standard temperature conditions ( STC: ) and cold temperature conditions ( CTC: ). A total of 336 one-day-old male broiler chickens were allocated to 4 experimental groups with 4 replicates of 21 birds each under STC. In addition, the same grouping with another 336 birds was used for CTC. Under CTC, the birds were exposed to cold temperatures for induction of ascites. Experimental groups were defined by the inclusion of 0 (control), 5, 10 or 15 g/kg garlic bulbs in the diets under both STC and CTC. Growth performance, systolic blood pressure (as a measure of systemic arterial blood pressure), physiological and biochemical parameters, as well as ascites indices (right ventricle [ RV: ], total ventricle [ TV: ] weights, and RV/TV: ) were evaluated. Systolic blood pressure was determined using an indirect method with a sphygmomanometer, a pediatric cuff, and a Doppler device. The final body weight decreased quadratically (P = 0.003), with increasing garlic bulb levels in the diets under STC. The feed conversion ratio showed no significant differences among all groups under both STC and CTC. No significant differences were observed in total mortality and ascites-related mortality in all groups under STC, although total mortality (L: P = 0.01; Q: P = 0.001) and ascites-related mortality (L: P = 0.007; Q: P = 0.001) were significantly different among the diets under CTC. Under STC, the systolic blood pressure, packed cell volume, hemoglobin, RV, TV, and RV/TV did not vary significantly among the diets. However, red blood cell count and erythrocyte osmotic fragility decreased linearly (P garlic bulb levels in the diets under STC. Under CTC, the systolic blood pressure, packed cell volume, red blood cell count, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility decreased (P garlic levels. It is

  11. Evaluation of tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measured with cardiac MRI in children with tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslow, Jonathan H; Usoro, Emem; Wang, Li; Parra, David A

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysmal dilation of the right ventricular outflow tract complicates assessment of right ventricular function in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion is commonly used to estimate ejection fraction. We hypothesised that tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measured by cardiac MRI approximates global and segmental right ventricular function, specifically right ventricular sinus ejection fraction, in children with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was measured retrospectively on cardiac MRIs in 54 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Values were compared with right ventricular global, sinus, and infundibular ejection fractions. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was indexed to body surface area, converted into a fractional value, and converted into published paediatric Z-scores. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measurements had good agreement between observers. Right ventricular ejection fraction did not correlate with the absolute or indexed tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and correlated weakly with fractional tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r=0.41 and p=0.002). Segmental right ventricular function did not appreciably improve correlation with any of the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measures. Paediatric Z-scores were unable to differentiate patients with normal and abnormal right ventricular function. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measured by cardiac MRI correlates poorly with global and segmental right ventricular ejection fraction in children with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion is an unreliable approximation of right ventricular function in this patient population.

  12. Ischemic preconditioning of the lower extremity attenuates the normal hypoxic increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gary P; Westerdahl, Daniel E; Foster, Laura A; Hsu, Jeffrey V; Anholm, James D

    2011-12-15

    Ischemic pre-condition of an extremity (IPC) induces effects on local and remote tissues that are protective against ischemic injury. To test the effects of IPC on the normal hypoxic increase in pulmonary pressures and exercise performance, 8 amateur cyclists were evaluated under normoxia and hypoxia (13% F(I)O(2)) in a randomized cross-over trial. IPC was induced using an arterial occlusive cuff to one thigh for 5 min followed by deflation for 5 min for 4 cycles. In the control condition, the resting pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) increased from a normoxic value of 25.6±2.3 mmHg to 41.8±7.2 mmHg following 90 min of hypoxia. In the IPC condition, the PASP increased to only 32.4±3.1 mmHg following hypoxia, representing a 72.8% attenuation (p=0.003). No significant difference was detected in cycle ergometer time trial duration between control and IPC conditions with either normoxia or hypoxia. IPC administered prior to hypoxic exposure was associated with profound attenuation of the normal hypoxic increase of pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Simultaneously measured inter-arm and inter-leg systolic blood pressure differences and cardiovascular risk stratification: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhchain; Sethi, Ankur; Singh, Mukesh; Khosla, Kavia; Grewal, Navsheen; Khosla, Sandeep

    2015-08-01

    Association of inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (IASBPD) with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality remains controversial. We aimed to thoroughly examine all available evidence on inter-limb blood pressure (BP) difference and its association with CV risk and outcomes. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane library, and Ovid for studies reporting bilateral simultaneous BP measurements in arms or legs and risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, subclavian stenosis, or mortality. Random-effect meta-analysis was performed to compare effect estimates. Twenty-seven studies met inclusion criteria, but only 17 studies (18 cohorts) were suitable for analysis. IASBPD of 10 mmHg or more was associated with PAD (risk ratios, 2.22; 1.41-3.5; P = .0006; sensitivity 16.6%; 6.7-35.4; specificity 91.9%; 83.1-96.3; 8 cohorts; 4774 subjects), left ventricular mass index (standardized mean difference 0.21; 0.03-0.39; P = .02; 2 cohort; 1604 subjects), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) (one cohort). Association of PAD remained significant at cutoff of 15 mmHg (risk ratios, 1.91; 1.28-2.84; P = .001; 5 cohorts; 1914 subjects). We could not find statistically significant direct association of coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, CV, and all-cause mortality in subjects with IASBPD of 10 mmHg or more, 15 mmHg or more, and inter-leg systolic BP difference of 15 mmHg or more. Inter-leg BP difference of 15 mmHg or more was strong predictor of PAD (P = .0001) and brachial-ankle PWV (P = .0001). Two invasive studies showed association of IASBPD and subclavian stenosis (estimates could not be combined). In conclusion, inter-arm and leg BP differences are strong predictors of PAD. IASBPD may be associated with subclavian stenosis, high left ventricular mass effect, and higher brachial-ankle PWVs. Inter-leg BP difference may also be associated with high left ventricular mass effect and higher

  14. Life course path analysis of birth weight, childhood growth, and adult systolic blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Michael; Andersen, Per Kragh; Baker, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    body size, and thereby the total effect, of size and changes in size on later outcomes. Using data on childhood body size and adult systolic blood pressure from a sample of 1,284 Danish men born between 1936 and 1970, the authors compared results from path analysis with results from 3 standard...... regression methods. Path analysis produced easily interpretable results, and compared with standard regression methods it produced a noteworthy gain in statistical power. The effect of change in relative body size on adult blood pressure was more pronounced after age 11 years than in earlier childhood....... These results suggest that increases in body size prior to age 11 years are less harmful to adult blood pressure than increases occurring after this age....

  15. Home blood pressure measurement in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: comparison of agreement between relative-measured blood pressure and automated blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichart, Matthieu; Seux, Marie-Laure; Caillard, Laure; Chaussade, Edouard; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) is recommended by guidelines for hypertension management. However, this method might be difficult to use in elderly individuals with cognitive disorders. Our aim was to assess the agreement and the feasibility of HBPM by a relative as compared with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in elderly patients with dementia. Sixty outpatients with dementia aged 75 years and older with office hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) were subjected successively to HBPM by a trained relative and 24-h ABPM. The order of the two methods was randomized. Current guidelines' thresholds for the diagnosis of hypertension were used. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 80.8 (6.1) years (55% women) and the mean (SD) mini-mental state examination score was 20.1 (6.9). The feasibility of relative-HBPM was very high, with a 97% success rate (defined by ≥12/18 measurements reported). The blood pressure measurements were highly correlated between the two methods (r=0.75 and 0.64 for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively; Pmethods for the diagnosis of sustained hypertension and white-coat hypertension was excellent (overall agreement, 92%; κ coefficient, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.61-0.93). Similar results were found for daytime-ABPM. In cognitively impaired elderly patients, HBPM by a relative using an automated device was a good alternative to 24-h ABPM.

  16. Slow loaded breathing training improves blood pressure, lung capacity and arm exercise endurance for older people with treated and stable isolated systolic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ublosakka-Jones, Chulee; Tongdee, Phailin; Pachirat, Orathai; Jones, David A

    2018-03-28

    Hypertension and reduced lung function are important features of aging. Slow loaded breathing training reduces resting blood pressure and the question is whether this can also improve lung function. Thirty-two people (67 ± 5 years, 16 male) with controlled isolated systolic hypertension undertook an eight weeks randomised controlled training trial with an inspiratory load of 25% maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) at 6 breaths per minute (slow loaded breathing; SLB) or deep breathing control (CON). Outcome measures were resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate; MIP; lung capacity; chest and abdominal expansion; arm cranking exercise endurance at 50% heart rate reserve. Home based measurement of resting systolic BP decreased by 20 mm Hg (15 to 25) (Mean and 95%CI) for SLB and by 5 mm Hg (1 to 7) for CON. Heart rate and diastolic BP also decreased significantly for SLB but not CON. MIP increased by 15.8 cm H 2 O (11.8 to 19.8) and slow vital capacity by 0.21 L (0.15 to 0.27) for SLB but not for CON. Chest and abdominal expansion increased by 2.3 cm (2.05 to 2.55) and 2.5 cm (2.15 to 2.85), respectively for SLB and by 0.5 cm (0.26 to 0.74) and 1.7 cm (1.32 to 2.08) for CON. Arm exercise time increased by 4.9 min (3.65 to 5.15) for SLB with no significant change for CON. Slow inspiratory muscle training is not only effective in reducing resting BP, even in older people with well controlled isolated systolic hypertension but also increases inspiratory muscle strength, lung capacity and arm exercise duration. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Analysis of baseline, average, and longitudinally measured blood pressure data using linear mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ahmed; Beyene, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article compares baseline, average, and longitudinal data analysis methods for identifying genetic variants in genome-wide association study using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 data. We apply methods that include (a) linear mixed models with baseline measures, (b) random intercept linear mixed models with mean measures outcome, and (c) random intercept linear mixed models with longitudinal measurements. In the linear mixed models, covariates are included as fixed effects, whereas relatedness among individuals is incorporated as the variance-covariance structure of the random effect for the individuals. The overall strategy of applying linear mixed models decorrelate the data is based on Aulchenko et al.'s GRAMMAR. By analyzing systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which are used separately as outcomes, we compare the 3 methods in identifying a known genetic variant that is associated with blood pressure from chromosome 3 and simulated phenotype data. We also analyze the real phenotype data to illustrate the methods. We conclude that the linear mixed model with longitudinal measurements of diastolic blood pressure is the most accurate at identifying the known single-nucleotide polymorphism among the methods, but linear mixed models with baseline measures perform best with systolic blood pressure as the outcome.

  18. The position of the arm during blood pressure measurement in sitting position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyaman, Ahmet; Verhoeff, Rutger; Lenders, Jacques W M; Deinum, Jaap; Thien, Theo

    2006-12-01

    Determining the influence of the position of the arm on blood pressure measurement in the sitting position. Blood pressure of 128 individuals (the majority being treated hypertensive patients) visiting the outpatient clinic was measured simultaneously on both arms with arms in two different positions. First, both arms were placed at the chair support level and blood pressure was measured three times on both arms after 10 min of rest. Subsequently, while still remaining in the same sitting position, five blood pressure measurements were made simultaneously at both arms with one arm placed on the desk and one arm placed and supported at heart level (mid-sternal). The arm placed at heart level served as the reference arm. The choice of which arm was placed at desk level and which arm was placed at heart level was randomized. Both at desk level and at chair support level, mean (+/-SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than blood pressure at heart level by 6.1/5.7+/-4.6/3.1 and 9.3/9.4+/-5.4/3.4 mmHg, respectively. The effect of the height differences between the arm positions on the blood pressure readings was smaller than predicted (0.49 mmHg/cm systolic and 0.47 mmHg/cm diastolic). No significant correlation was found between blood pressure difference in the different arm positions (desk and heart level) and age, sex, weight or baseline blood pressure. Different arm positions below heart level have significant effects on blood pressure readings. The leading guidelines about arm position during blood pressure measurement are not in accordance with the arm position used in the Framingham study, the most frequently used study for risk estimations.

  19. Hemodynamic variables during exercise in childhood and resting systolic blood pressure levels 6 years later in adolescence: the European Youth Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Møller, N C

    2011-01-01

    of Danish children followed longitudinally for 6 years. The study comprised 226 children randomly sampled at age 9, who had their blood pressure and HR measured during ergometer exercise to exhaustion and was reassessed in adolescence. SBP and RPP during exercise in stage two of the test were positively......The aim of this study was to analyze whether systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and rate pressure product (RPP) during exercise in childhood can predict resting SBP levels in adolescence independent of resting SBP and conventional cardiovascular risk factors. We studied this in a sample...... remained significant (P=0.059 and P=0.012, respectively). No significant independent associations were observed for HR during exercise, but associations were in the same direction. Our results supports that measuring SBP and RPP, during a standard acute ergometer exercise test in children, improves...

  20. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability on Recently Diagnosed Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaclara Michel-Chávez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes affects approximately 250 million people in the world. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that leads to severe postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction. Objective: To determine the variability of heart rate (HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP in recently diagnosed diabetic patients. Methods: The study included 30 patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes of less than 2 years and 30 healthy controls. We used a Finapres® device to measure during five minutes beat-to-beat HR and blood pressure in three experimental conditions: supine position, standing position, and rhythmic breathing at 0.1 Hz. The results were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Results: In the HR analysis, statistically significant differences were found in the time domain, specifically on short-term values such as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD, and number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50. In the BP analysis, there were no significant differences, but there was a sympathetic dominance in all three conditions. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS decreased in patients with early diabetes compared with healthy subjects during the standing maneuver. Conclusions: There is a decrease in HR variability in patients with early type 2 diabetes. No changes were observed in the BP analysis in the supine position, but there were changes in BRS with the standing maneuver, probably due to sympathetic hyperactivity.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of manual office blood pressure measurement in ambulatory hypertensive patients in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sehun; Park, Jin Joo; Lee, Seung-Ah; Cho, Youngjin; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Suh, Jung-Won; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Chae, In-Ho; Lee, Hae-Young; Shin, Jinho; Park, Sungha; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2018-01-01

    Currently, office blood pressure (OBP) is the most widely used method of measuring blood pressure (BP) in daily clinical practice. However, data on the diagnostic accuracy of OBP in reference to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are scarce in Korea. In retrospective and prospective cohorts, manual OBP and ABP measurements were compared among ambulatory hypertensive patients. Hypertension was defined as systolic OBP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic OBP ≥ 90 mmHg, and systolic ABP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or diastolic ABP ≥ 80 mmHg. In the retrospective cohort (n = 903), the mean OBP1 (before ABP measurement) was higher than ABP in both systolic (138 ± 17 mmHg vs. 123 ± 13 mmHg, p ABP ( r 2 = 0.038, p ABP, which is the reference method for measuring BP, was 43.9%. The prospective cohort (n = 57) showed similar results. In a subgroup analysis, male patients had higher false negative results (masked or under-treated hypertension) than did female patients (26.1% vs. 17.8%, p = 0.003), whereas female patients had a higher false positive rate (white-coat or over-treated hypertension) than did male patients (28.7% vs. 15.2%, p ABP. Men and women have different patterns of discordance. These findings indicate that management of hypertensive patients with manual OBP measurements may be suboptimal and encourages the use of ABP in ambulatory hypertensive patients.

  2. Systolic Sac Pressure Index for the Prediction of Persistent Type II Endoleak for 12 Months After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikoma, Akira, E-mail: yfb04322@nifty.com; Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio, E-mail: morisato@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Hirotatsu, E-mail: kuppa1220@yahoo.co.jp; Minamiguchi, Hiroki, E-mail: hiromina4@hotmail.com; Sonomura, Tetsuo, E-mail: sonomura@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Departments of Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshiharu, E-mail: nishim-y@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Okamura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: y-ok@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between the systolic sac pressure index (SPI) and the presence of endoleaks 12 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and MethodsWe performed a single-center prospective trial of consecutively treated patients. SPI (calculated as systolic sac pressure/systolic aortic pressure) was measured by catheterization immediately after EVAR. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was scheduled 12 months after EVAR to detect possible endoleaks.ResultsData were available for 34 patients who underwent EVAR for an AAA. Persisting type II endoleak was found in 8 patients (endoleak-positive group) but not in the other 26 patients (endoleak-negative group). The mean ± standard deviation SPI was significantly greater in the endoleak-positive group than in the endoleak-negative group (0.692 ± 0.048 vs. 0.505 ± 0.081, respectively; P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that an SPI of 0.638 was the optimum cutoff value for predicting a persistent endoleak at 12 months with high accuracy (0.971; 33/34), sensitivity (1.00), and specificity (0.962) values. The mean change in AAA diameter was −4.28 ± 5.03 mm and 2.22 ± 4.54 mm in patients with SPI of <0.638 or ≥0.638, respectively (P = .002).ConclusionPatients with an SPI of ≥0.638 immediately after EVAR were more likely to have a persistent type II endoleak at 12 months with an accuracy of 0.971, and showed increases in aneurysm sac diameter compared with patients with an SPI of <0.638.

  3. Differences in blood pressure measurements in the forearm and upper arm of obese otherwise healthy first year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganthi V, Navin Rajaratnam, Suzanne Maria D’cruz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of obesity is increasing in Indian youth and obesity is associated with complications like systemic hypertension. Often, due to the non-availability of appropriate sized cuffs, standard cuff bladders are used to measure blood pressure in the forearms of obese young adults. Aim: To compare the upper arm arterial blood pressure measured using an appropriate cuff with the forearm arterial blood pressure measured using a standard cuff and conventional sphygmomanometry in obese otherwise healthy first year medical students. Materials and Methods: Blood pressure was measured in 27 obese otherwise healthy first year medical students after five minutes of rest using a mercury sphygmomanometer with the subjects seated and the arm and forearm at heart level, using an appropriate sized cuff for the upper arm according to American Heart Association standards and a standard cuff for the fore arm. Results: A statistically significant difference in both systolic [t-test (paired = -6.921; df = 26; sig = .000 (2- tailed] and diastolic blood pressure [t-test (paired = -8.508; df = 26; sig = .000 (2- tailed] was found, with the blood pressure readings being higher in the forearm. The correlations between upper arm and forearm systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 0.785 (p = .000 and 0.870 (p = .000. Conclusion: Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements were significantly higher in the forearm. Further studies with larger sample size should be conducted to confirm that forearm blood pressure measurements using standard cuff bladders cannot be considered equal to upper arm measurements made using an appropriate sized cuff in all young obese individuals

  4. Spectral analyses of systolic blood pressure and heart rate variability and their association with cognitive performance in elderly hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, W B; Matoso, J M D; Maltez, M; Gonçalves, T; Casanova, M; Moreira, I F H; Lourenço, R A; Monteiro, W D; Farinatti, P T V; Soares, P P; Oigman, W; Neves, M F T; Correia, M L G

    2015-08-01

    Systolic hypertension is associated with cognitive decline in the elderly. Altered blood pressure (BP) variability is a possible mechanism of reduced cognitive performance in elderly hypertensives. We hypothesized that altered beat-to-beat systolic BP variability is associated with reduced global cognitive performance in elderly hypertensive subjects. In exploratory analyses, we also studied the correlation between diverse discrete cognitive domains and indices of systolic BP and heart rate variability. Disproving our initial hypothesis, we have shown that hypertension and low education, but not indices of systolic BP and heart rate variability, were independent predictors of lower global cognitive performance. However, exploratory analyses showed that the systolic BP variability in semi-upright position was an independent predictor of matrix reasoning (B = 0.08 ± .03, P-value = 0.005), whereas heart rate variability in semi-upright position was an independent predictor of the executive function score (B = -6.36 ± 2.55, P-value = 0.02). We conclude that myogenic vascular and sympathetic modulation of systolic BP do not contribute to reduced global cognitive performance in treated hypertensive subjects. Nevertheless, our results suggest that both systolic BP and heart rate variability might be associated with modulation of frontal lobe cognitive domains, such as executive function and matrix reasoning.

  5. Value of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure as a prognostic factor of death in the systemic sclerosis EUSTAR population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachulla, Eric; Clerson, Pierre; Airò, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) estimated by echocardiography in the multinational European League Against Rheumatism Scleroderma Trial and Research (EUSTAR) cohort. METHODS: Data for patients with echocardiography...

  6. Measuring sub-bandage pressure: comparing the use of pressure monitors and pulse oximeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, A; Hayes, S; Dodds, S R

    2006-03-01

    To test the use of low-cost sub-bandage pressure monitors and pulse oximeters as part of a quality-control measure for graduated compression bandaging in leg ulcer clinics. Twenty-five healthy volunteers (mean age 40 years) providing 50 limbs were bandaged with a four-layer compression bandaging system. The ankle systolic pressure (ASP) was measured using a pulse oximeter (Nellcor NBP-40) before applying the graduated compression bandages. Interface pressure was measured by placing pressure sensors on the skin at three points (2cm above the medial malleolus; the widest part of the calf; and a point midway between them) in the supine and standing positions. The ASP was measured again with the pulse oximeter after the bandage had been applied, and the effect of the bandage on the ASP was recorded. The actual pressure created by the bandage was compared with the required pressure profile. Interface pressures varied with change of position and movement. With the operator blinded to the pressure monitors while applying the bandages, the target pressure of 35-40mmHg at the ankle was achieved in only 36% of limbs ([mean +/- 95% confidence interval]; 32.3 +/- 1.6mmHg [supine]; 38.4 +/- 2.4mmHg [standing position]). With the help of the pressure monitors, the target pressure was achieved in 78% of the limbs. There was no correlation between the pressure monitors and pulse oximeter pressures, demonstrating that the pulse oximeter is not a useful tool for measuring sub-bandage pressures. The results suggest a tool (interface pressure monitors) that is easy to operate should be available as part of quality assurance for treatment, training of care providers and education.

  7. Does blood pressure change in treated hypertensive patients depending on whether it is measured by a physician or a nurse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll De Tuero, Gabriel; Sanmartin Albertos, Maria; Vargas Vila, Susanna; Trèmols Iglesias, Susanna; Saez Zafra, Marc; Barceló Rado, Antonia

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether there are differences between blood pressure (BP) measured by the nurse (NBP), BP measured by the physician (PBP) and self-measured BP in treated hypertensive patients and, if found, to evaluate their clinical importance. An observational study is carried out with hypertensive patients recruited from two village-based community health centres in Catalonia (Spain) serving an area with a total population of 2800 inhabitants. All patients treated for hypertension visiting the health centre on a specific day of the week and during the same timetable between October 2000 and May 2001 were included. The difference between physician-systolic BP and nurse-systolic BP was 5.16 mmHg (95% CI 2.62-7.7; pself-measured systolic BP was 4.67 mmHg (95% CI 0.89-8.44; p=0.016). The differences between nurse-systolic BP and self-measured systolic BP were not significant (0.49 mmHg; 95% CI 3.71-2.71; p=0.758). With regards to diastolic BP, no significant differences were found between the different ways of measurement. NBP gave the following values: sensitivity (Sn) of 92% and specificity (Sp) of 60%; positive predictive value (PPV) of 65.7% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 90% with a positive coefficient of probability (CP+) of 2.3 and a negative coefficient of probability (CP-) of 0.133. PBP gave the following results: Sn=72%; Sp=66.7%; PPV=64.3%; NPV=74.1%; CP+=2.16 and CP- = 0.420. Systolic BP measured by the nurse in treated hypertensive patients is significantly lower than the readings obtained by the physician, and are almost identical to ambulatory BP monitoring. Blood pressure determination by the nurse is desirable not only for diagnosis but also to evaluate the level of control of blood pressure during the follow-up of treated hypertensive patients.

  8. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY TO FIND THE DIFFERENCE IN SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE BETWEEN ARMS AS A RISK MARKER FOR DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Subhash Bande

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic nephropathy is the commonest cause of end-stage renal disease in the developed world. Recent studies have demonstrated that a difference in systolic blood pressure between arms is associated with cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. It is considered a predictor for cardiovascular disease and a surrogate marker for early kidney damage among patients with both type 2 diabetes and hypertension. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim was to investigate an association between arm difference in systolic blood pressure and microalbuminuria which can serve as a marker for diabetic nephropathy. MATERIALS AND METHOD This study was conducted on 200 patients with diabetes mellitus and an inter-arm difference in systolic blood pressure was present in 35.7% of the study population. Presence of systolic blood pressure difference of more than 10 mmHg between arms correlated with microalbuminuria and duration of diabetes mellitus with a p value of <0.001. We also found a correlation between arm difference in blood pressure and duration of diabetes mellitus, presence of hypertension and body mass index. CONCLUSION The inter-arm difference in blood pressure could serve as a risk marker for renal damage in diabetes mellitus.

  9. Clinical comparison of automatic, noninvasive measurements of blood pressure in the forearm and upper arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Kathleen; Bradley, Elisabeth; Bucher, Linda; Seckel, Maureen; Lyons, Denise; Wakai, Sandra; Bartell, Deborah; Carson, Elizabeth; Chichester, Melanie; Foraker, Teresa; Simpson, Kathleen

    2005-05-01

    When the upper arm (area from shoulder to elbow) is inaccessible and/or a standard-sized blood pressure cuff does not fit, some healthcare workers use the forearm to measure blood pressure. To compare automatic noninvasive measurements of blood pressure in the upper arm and forearm. A descriptive, correlational comparison study was conducted in the emergency department of a 1071-bed teaching hospital. Subjects were 204 English-speaking patients 6 to 91 years old in medically stable condition who had entered the department on foot or by wheelchair and who had no exclusions to using their left upper extremity. A Welch Allyn Vital Signs 420 series monitor was used to measure blood pressure in the left upper arm and forearm with the subject seated and the upper arm or forearm at heart level. Pearson r correlation coefficients between measurements in the upper arm and forearm were 0.88 for systolic blood pressure and 0.76 for diastolic blood pressure (P upper arm and forearm differed significantly (t = 2.07, P = .04). A Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the distances between the mean values and the limits of agreement for the 2 sites ranged from 15 mm Hg (mean arterial pressure) to 18.4 mm Hg (systolic pressure). Despite strict attention to correct cuff size and placement of the upper arm or forearm at heart level, measurements of blood pressure obtained noninvasively in the arm and forearm of seated patients in stable condition are not interchangeable.

  10. Adaptation to periodic pressure chamber hypoxia and its influence on systolic and diastolic functions in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrieva М.К.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research objective is to determine the influence of adaptation method to periodic pressure chamber hypoxia on dynamics of systolic and diastolic functions of myocardium in patients with early stages of chronic heart failure. Materials and Methods: 100 men with post-infarction cardiosclerosis at the age of 40-65 years with I and IIA stages and l-ll functional classes (NYHA of chronic heart failure have been examined. Results: Positive dynamics of systolic and diastolic cardiac functions and other parameters of echocardioscopy under the influence of the hypoxic therapy in comparison with classical physical rehabilitation have been obtained. Furthermore, a more significant effect has been observed in patients with CHF IIA. Conclusion: Improvement in the geometry of the heart has proved that adaptation method to periodic pressure chamber hypoxia could be recommended for rehabilitation of patients with heart failure of early stages.

  11. Interarm systolic blood pressure difference is associated with myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belen, Erdal; Ozal, Ender; Bayyigit, Akif; Gunaydın, Senay; Helvacı, Aysen

    Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery (MINS) is closely related to increased cardiovascular mortality. To evaluate the relationship between MINS and interarm systolic blood pressure difference (IASBPD), which has previously been shown to correlate with the frequency of cardiovascular events and arterial arteriosclerotic processes. This observational, single-centre cohort study included 240 consecutive noncardiac surgery patients aged ≥ 45 years. Simultaneous blood pressure recordings were taken preoperatively and IASBPD was calculated. Patients' electrocardiography recordings and high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hscTnT) levels were obtained for a period of three days postoperatively. Postoperatively, 27 (11.3%) patients were found to have MINS when hscTnT ≥ 14 ng/L was taken as a cut-off value. IASBPD > 10 mm Hg was found in 44 (18.3%) patients. When IASBPD was accepted to be a continuous variable, there was a higher IASBPD value in the MINS group (9.4 ± 5.0 vs. 4.5 ± 3.8, p 10 mm Hg and those not, exaggerate IASBPD was found to be more frequent in patients developing MINS (16 [59.3%] vs. 28 [13.1%], respectively, p 10 mm Hg to be independently associated with the development of MINS (OR: 30.82; CI: 9.14-103.98; p AUC = 0.79; 95% CI 0.71-0.87). Increased IASBPD is closely related to development of MINS. The preoperative measurement of blood pressure from both arms may be an important and easy to use clinical tool in determining cardiovascular risk.

  12. Effects of verapamil on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: pressure-volume analysis with a nonimaging scintillation probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, R O; Ostrow, H G; Rosing, D R; Cannon, R O; Lipson, L C; Maron, B J; Kent, K M; Bacharach, S L; Green, M V

    1983-11-01

    To investigate the effects of verapamil on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, we studied 14 patients at catheterization with a nonimaging scintillation probe before and after serial intravenous infusions of low-, medium-, and high-dose verapamil (total dose 0.17 to 0.72 mg/kg). Percent change in radionuclide stroke counts after verapamil correlated well with percent change in thermodilution stroke volume (r = .87), and changes in diastolic and systolic counts were used to assess relative changes in left ventricular volumes after verapamil. Verapamil produced dose-related increases in end-diastolic counts (19 +/- 9% increase; p less than .001), end-systolic counts (91 +/- 54% increase; p less than .001), and stroke counts (7 +/- 10% increase; p less than .02). This was associated with a decrease in ejection fraction (83 +/- 8% control, 73 +/- 10% verapamil; p less than .001) and, in the 10 patients with left ventricular outflow tract gradients, a reduction in gradient (62 +/- 27 mm Hg control, 32 +/- 35 mm Hg verapamil; p less than .01). The end-systolic pressure-volume relation was shifted downward and rightward in all patients, suggesting a negative inotropic effect. In 10 patients, left ventricular pressure-volume loops were constructed with simultaneous micromanometer pressure recordings and the radionuclide time-activity curve. In five patients, verapamil shifted the diastolic pressure-volume curve downward and rightward, demonstrating improved pressure-volume relations despite the negative inotropic effect, and also increased the peak rate of rapid diastolic filling. In the other five patients, the diastolic pressure-volume relation was unaltered by verapamil, and increased end-diastolic volumes occurred at higher end-diastolic pressures; in these patients, the peak rate of left ventricular diastolic filling was not changed by verapamil. The negative inotropic effects of intravenous verapamil are

  13. Simultaneous compared with sequential blood pressure measurement results in smaller inter-arm blood pressure differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, Niels V; Lodestijn, Sophie; Nanninga, Stephanie; van Montfrans, Gert A; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2013-11-01

    There are currently few recommendations on how to assess inter-arm blood pressure (BP) differences. The authors compared simultaneous with sequential measurement on mean BP, inter-arm BP differences, and within-visit reproducibility in 240 patients stratified according to age (simultaneous and three sequential BP measurements were taken in each patient. Starting measurement type and starting arm for sequential measurements were randomized. Mean BP and inter-arm BP differences of the first pair and reproducibility of inter-arm BP differences of the first and second pair were compared between both methods. Mean systolic BP was 1.3±7.5 mm Hg lower during sequential compared with simultaneous measurement (Psequential measurement was on average higher than the second, suggesting an order effect. Absolute systolic inter-arm BP differences were smaller on simultaneous (6.2±6.7/3.3±3.5 mm Hg) compared with sequential BP measurement (7.8±7.3/4.6±5.6 mm Hg, PSimultaneous measurement of BP at both arms reduces order effects and results in smaller inter-arm BP differences, thereby potentially reducing unnecessary referral and diagnostic procedures. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Simultaneous pressure-volume measurements using optical sensors and MRI for left ventricle function assessment during animal experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Abdallah Rodriguez, Dima; Durand, Emmanuel; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Boudjemline, Younes; Mousseaux, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous pressure and volume measurements enable the extraction of valuable parameters for left ventricle function assessment. Cardiac MR has proven to be the most accurate method for volume estimation. Nonetheless, measuring pressure simultaneously during MRI acquisitions remains a challenge given the magnetic nature of the widely used pressure transducers. In this study we show the feasibility of simultaneous in vivo pressure-volume acquisitions with MRI using optical pressure sensors. Pressure-volume loops were calculated while inducing three inotropic states in a sheep and functional indices were extracted, using single beat loops, to characterize systolic and diastolic performance. Functional indices evolved as expected in response to positive inotropic stimuli. The end-systolic elastance, representing the contractility index, the diastolic myocardium compliance, and the cardiac work efficiency all increased when inducing inotropic state enhancement. The association of MRI and optical pressure sensors within the left ventricle successfully enabled pressure-volume loop analysis after having respective data simultaneously recorded during the experimentation without the need to move the animal between each inotropic state. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mozart, but not the Beatles, reduces systolic blood pressure in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhlke, Luiza Carolina; Patrício, Marcelo Coelho; Moreira, Daniel Medeiros

    2015-12-01

    Music reduces systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) in various clinical situations, but it is unclear whether these changes occur in post-infarction patients. The aim is to evaluate the effects of music on patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). We evaluated patients with MI and we measured SBP, DBP, HR and double product (DP) two times before the intervention and one time every fifteen minutes with an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. We divided the patients into 3 groups: a group listening to music by Mozart; another listening to a Beatles collection and a third one listening to the radio news. Outcomes were the change in mean SBP, DBP, HR and DP with intervention. We enrolled 60 patients (20 in each group). SBP was significantly reduced in the Mozart group (variation of –7.2 ± 8.5 mmHg) compared to the Beatles group (–1.3 ± 6.2 mmHg) (P = 0.021) and the radio news group (0.6 ± 8.7 mmHg) (P = 0.003). DP was significantly reduced in the Mozart group compared with the News group (–668.5 ± 773.2 vs 31.6 ± 722.1 mmHg) (P = 0.006). There were no differences in DBP and HR. Patients with MI who listened Mozart had a reduction in SBP and DP compared to those who listened to the Beatles or the news.

  16. Melodic algorithms for pulse oximetry to allow audible discrimination of abnormal systolic blood pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Ranjit S; Ortega, Rafael; Connor, Christopher W

    2014-12-01

    An anesthesiologist must remain vigilant of the patient's clinical status, incorporating many independent physiological measurements. Oxygen saturation and heart rate are represented by continuous audible tones generated by the pulse oximeter, a mandated monitoring device. Other important clinical parameters--notably blood pressure--lack any audible representation beyond arbitrarily-configured threshold alarms. Attempts to introduce further continuous audible tones have apparently foundered; the complexity and interaction of these tones have exceeded the ability of clinicians to interpret them. Instead, we manipulate the tonal and rhythmic structure of the accepted pulse oximeter tone pattern melodically. Three melodic algorithms were developed to apply tonal and rhythmic variations to the continuous pulse oximeter tone, dependent on the systolic blood pressure. The algorithms distort the original audible pattern minimally, to facilitate comprehension of both the underlying pattern and the applied variations. A panel of anesthesia practitioners (attending anesthesiologists, residents and nurse anesthetists) assessed these algorithms in characterizing perturbations in cardiopulmonary status. Twelve scenarios, incorporating combinations of oxygen desaturation, bradycardia, tachycardia, hypotension and hypertension, were tested. A rhythmic variation in which additional auditory information was conveyed only at halftime intervals, with every other "beat" of the pulse oximeter, was strongly favored. The respondents also strongly favored the use of musical chords over single tones. Given three algorithms of tones embedded in the pulse oximeter signal, anesthesiologists preferred a melodic tone to signal a significant change in blood pressure.

  17. Physiological Responses Associated with Nordic-Walking Training in Systolic Hypertensive Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latosik Ewelina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of physical strength and hypertension are among the most pronounced detrimental factors accompanying aging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a supervised 8-week Nordic-walking training program on systolic blood pressure in systolic-hypertensive postmenopausal women. This study was a randomized control trial on a sample of 24 subjects who did not take any hypertension medications. There was a statistically significant decrease in systolic blood pressure and an increase in lower and upper-body strength in the group following Nordic-walking training. There was a decrease in serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density cholesterol. The obtained results indicate that an 8-week Nordic-walking program may be efficiently employed for counteracting systolic hypertension through a direct abatement of systolic blood pressure and an increase of maximal aerobic capacity.

  18. Between-visit reproducibility of inter-arm systolic blood pressure differences in treated hypertensive patients: the coconet study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang Young; Kim, Eung Ju; Namgung, June; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Nam, Chang-Wook; Kim, Young-Kwon; Park, Jeong Bae

    2017-05-01

    Inter-arm systolic blood pressure (BP) differences (sIADs) have recently been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. However, sIAD reproducibility remains unresolved from a controlled trial perspective. We evaluated the between-visit reproducibility of sIADs in hypertensive patients. We examined 1875 hypertensive participants aged 20 years and older (mean age: 62.3 years, 45.4% female) from nine primary clinics and 27 secondary and tertiary hospitals. The BPs in both arms were automatically and simultaneously measured in triplicate with a cuff-oscillometric BP device. BP measurements were obtained at baseline and at 3-month follow-up time points. Increased sIAD was defined as an absolute difference of ⩾10 mm Hg in the average systolic BPs between the left and right arms. The overall mean sIAD was 4.33±4.17 mm Hg. The prevalences of increased sIAD at baseline and at the 3-month measurements were 7.6% and 7.1%, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the between-visit sIADs was 0.304 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.262-0.344). The κ-value between the baseline and follow-up increased sIADs was 0.165 (95% CI 0.096-0.234). The percentage of patients who exhibited an increased sIAD at 3 months compared with the initially increased sIAD at baseline was 21.8%. The reproducibility of sIAD determination between baseline and the 3-month follow-up measurements lacked agreement in the hypertensive patients. Further studies should identify the relevant variables and characteristics of this poor reproducibility (CRIS number; KCT0001235).

  19. [Central blood pressure and vascular damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lahiguera, Francisco; Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, José Antonio; Pascual, José María

    2015-07-20

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between central blood pressure and vascular damage. This cross-sectional study involved 393 never treated hypertensive patients (166 women). Clinical blood pressure (BP), 24h blood pressure (BP24h) and central blood pressure (CBP) were measured. Vascular organ damage (VOD) was assessed by calculating the albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), wave pulse pressure velocity and echocardiographic left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Patients with VOD had higher values of BP, BP24h, and CBP than patients without ACR. When comparing several systolic BP, systolic BP24h had a higher linear correlation with CBP (Z Steiger test: 2.26; P=.02) and LVMI (Z Steiger test: 3.23; P=.01) than PAC. In a multiple regression analysis corrected by age, sex and metabolic syndrome, all pressures were related with VOD but systolic BP24h showed the highest correlation. In a logistic regression analysis, having the highest tercile of systolic BP24h was the stronger predictor of VOD (multivariate odds ratio: 3.4; CI 95%: 2.5-5.5, P=.001). CBP does not have more correlation with VOD than other measurements of peripheral BP. Systolic BP24h is the BP measurement that best predicts VOD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. How important is the recommended slow cuff pressure deflation rate for blood pressure measurement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Amoore, John N; Mieke, Stephan; Murray, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Cuff pressure deflation rate influences blood pressure (BP) measurement. However, there is little quantitative clinical evidence on its effect. Oscillometric pulses recorded from 75 subjects at the recommended deflation rate of 2-3 mmHg per second were analyzed. Some pulses were removed to realize six faster rates (2-7 times faster than the original). Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP, MAP) were determined from the original and six reconstructed oscillometric waveforms. Manual measurement was based on the appearance of oscillometric pulse peaks, and automatic measurement on two model envelopes (linear and polynomial) fitted to the sequence of oscillometric pulse amplitudes. The effects of deflation rate on BP determination and within-subject BP variability were analyzed. For SBP and DBP determined from the manual measurement, different deflation rates resulted in significant changes (both p deflation rate effect (all p > 0.3). Faster deflation increased the within-subject BP variability (all p deflation rate, and for the automatic model-based techniques, the deflation rate had little effect.

  1. Observation of the pulse oximeter trace to estimate systolic blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia is co-published by Medpharm .... a clinically relevant amount of time when compared with NIBP ... at the time of recruitment to the study. ... Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years, ASA Class 1 to 3 and .... measured systolic blood pressure values (mean [SD], mmHg) per.

  2. Repeated Blood Pressure Measurements in Childhood in Prediction of Hypertension in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonen, Mervi; Nuotio, Joel; Magnussen, Costan G; Viikari, Jorma S A; Taittonen, Leena; Laitinen, Tomi; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Jokinen, Eero; Jula, Antti; Cheung, Michael; Sabin, Matthew A; Daniels, Stephen R; Raitakari, Olli T; Juonala, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension may be predicted from childhood risk factors. Repeated observations of abnormal blood pressure in childhood may enhance prediction of hypertension and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood compared with a single observation. Participants (1927, 54% women) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study had systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements performed when aged 3 to 24 years. Childhood/youth abnormal blood pressure was defined as above 90th or 95th percentile. After a 21- to 31-year follow-up, at the age of 30 to 45 years, hypertension (>140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication) prevalence was found to be 19%. Carotid intima-media thickness was examined, and high-risk intima-media was defined as intima-media thickness >90th percentile or carotid plaques. Prediction of adulthood hypertension and high-risk intima-media was compared between one observation of abnormal blood pressure in childhood/youth and multiple observations by improved Pearson correlation coefficients and area under the receiver operating curve. When compared with a single measurement, 2 childhood/youth observations improved the correlation for adult systolic (r=0.44 versus 0.35, Phypertension in adulthood (0.63 for 2 versus 0.60 for 1 observation, P=0.003). When compared with 2 measurements, third observation did not provide any significant improvement for correlation or prediction (P always >0.05). A higher number of childhood/youth observations of abnormal blood pressure did not enhance prediction of adult high-risk intima-media thickness. Compared with a single measurement, the prediction of adult hypertension was enhanced by 2 observations of abnormal blood pressure in childhood/youth. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Validation of noninvasive indices of global systolic function in patients with normal and abnormal loading conditions: a simultaneous echocardiography pressure-volume catheterization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Ripoll, Cristina; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Elízaga, Jaime; González-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Bañares, Rafael; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive indices based on Doppler echocardiography are increasingly used in clinical cardiovascular research to evaluate left ventricular global systolic chamber function. Our objectives were to clinically validate ultrasound-based methods of global systolic chamber function to account for differences between patients in conditions of abnormal load, and to assess their sensitivity to load confounders. Twenty-seven patients (8 dilated cardiomyopathy, 10 normal ejection fraction, and 9 end-stage liver disease) underwent simultaneous echocardiography and left heart catheterization with pressure-conductance instrumentation. The reference index, maximal elastance (Emax), was calculated from pressure-volume loop data obtained during acute inferior vena cava occlusion. A wide range of values were observed for left ventricular systolic chamber function (Emax: 2.8±1.0 mm Hg/mL), preload, and afterload. Among the noninvasive indices tested, the peak ejection intraventricular pressure difference showed the best correlation with Emax (R=0.75). A significant but weaker correlation with Emax was observed for ejection fraction (R=0.41), midwall fractional shortening (R=0.51), global circumferential strain (R=-0.53), and strain rate (R=-0.46). Longitudinal strain and strain rate failed to correlate with Emax, as did noninvasive single-beat estimations of this index. Principal component and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that peak ejection intraventricular pressure difference was less sensitive to load, whereas ejection fraction and longitudinal strain and strain rate were heavily influenced by afterload. Current ultrasound methods have limited accuracy to characterize global left ventricular systolic chamber function in a given patient. The Doppler-derived peak ejection intraventricular pressure difference should be preferred for this purpose because it best correlates with the reference index and is more robust in conditions of abnormal load.

  4. Decreased systolic blood pressure is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment: A nationwide longitudinal observational study of 27,732 patients based on the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Maria K; Afghahi, Henri; Franzen, Stefan; Björk, Staffan; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Eliasson, Björn

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a U-shaped relationship between systolic blood pressure and risk of all-cause of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment. To evaluate the associations between time-updated systolic blood pressure and time-updated change in systolic blood pressure during the follow-up period and risk of all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment. A total of 27,732 patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment in the Swedish National Diabetes Register were followed for 4.7 years. Time-dependent Cox models were used to estimate risk of all-cause mortality. Time-updated mean systolic blood pressure is the average of the baseline and the reported post-baseline systolic blood pressures. A time-updated systolic blood pressure blood pressure > 10 mmHg between the last two observations was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality (-10 to -25 mmHg; hazard ratio: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.17-1.32). Both low systolic blood pressure and a decrease in systolic blood pressure during the follow-up are associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment.

  5. Student measurement of blood pressure using a simulator arm compared with a live subject's arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer J; Sobieraj, Diana M; Kuti, Effie L

    2010-06-15

    To compare accuracy of blood pressure measurements using a live subject and a simulator arm, and to determine students' preferences regarding measurement. This was a crossover study comparing blood pressure measurements from a live subject and a simulator arm. Students completed an anonymous survey instrument defining opinions on ease of measurement. Fifty-seven students completed blood pressure measurements on live subjects while 72 students completed blood pressure measurements using the simulator arm. There were no significant systematic differences between the 2 measurement techniques. Systolic blood pressure measurements from a live subject arm were less likely to be within 4 mm Hg compared with measurements of a simulator arm. Diastolic blood pressure measurements were not significantly different between the 2 techniques. Accuracy of student measurement of blood pressure using a simulator arm was similar to the accuracy with a live subject. There was no difference in students' preferences regarding measurement techniques.

  6. Phenomenon of declining blood pressure in elderly - high systolic levels are undervalued with Korotkoff method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmståhl Sölve

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systolic blood pressure (SBP decline has been reported in octogenarians. The aim was to study if it could be observed while measuring SBP with two methods: Korotkoff (K-BP and Strain-Gauge-Finger-Pletysmography (SG-BP, and which of them were more reliable in expressing vascular burden. Methods A cohort of 703 men from a population of Malmö, Sweden, were included in "Men born in 1914-study" and followed-up at ages: 68 and 81 years. 176 survivors were examined with K-BP and SG-BP at both ages, and 104 of them with Ambulatory Blood Pressure at age 81/82. Ankle Brachial Index (ABI was measured on both occasions, and Carotid Ultrasound at age 81. Results From age 68 to 81, mean K-BP decreased in the cohort with mean 8.3 mmHg, while SG-BP increased with 13.4 mmHg. K-BP decreased in 55% and SG-BP in 31% of the subjects. At age 81, K-BP was lower than SG-BP in 72% of subjects, and correlated to high K-BP at age 68 (r = --.22; p Conclusion In contrast to K-BP, values of SG-BP in octogenarians strongly correlated with Ambulatory Blood Pressure. The SG-BP decline in the last decade was rare, and increasing SG-BP better than K-BP reflected advanced atherosclerosis. It should be aware, that K-BP underdetected 46% of subjects with SG-BP equal/higher than 140 mmHg at age 81, which may lead to biased associations with risk factors due to differential misclassification by age.

  7. Blood pressure, left ventricular geometry, and systolic function in children exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Yáñez, Citlalli; Ayllon-Vergara, Julio C; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Hernández-Castellanos, Erika; Sánchez-Peña, Luz C; Del Razo, Luz M

    2015-06-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a ubiquitous element present in the groundwater worldwide. Cardiovascular effects related to iAs exposure have been studied extensively in adult populations. Few epidemiological studies have been focused on iAs exposure-related cardiovascular disease in children. In this study we investigated the association between iAs exposure, blood pressure (BP), and functional and anatomical echocardiographic parameters in children. A cross-sectional study of 161 children between 3 and 8 years was conducted in Central Mexico. The total concentration of arsenic (As) species in urine (U-tAs) was determined by hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry and lifetime iAs exposure was estimated by multiplying As concentrations measured in drinking water by the duration of water consumption in years (LAsE). BP was measured by standard protocols, and M-mode echocardiographic parameters were determined by ultrasonography. U-tAs concentration and LAsE were significantly associated with diastolic (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in multivariable linear regression models: DBP and SBP were 0.013 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.024) and 0.021 (95% CI: 0.004, 0.037) mmHg higher in association with each 1-ng/mL increase in U-tAs (p 620 compared with 41% (95% CI: -6.44, -0.37) lower, respectively, in children with U-tAs > 70 ng/mL compared with iAs was significantly associated with higher BP and LVM and with lower EF in our study population of Mexican children.

  8. Attended and Unattended Automated Office Blood Pressure Measurements Have Better Agreement With Ambulatory Monitoring Than Conventional Office Readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Geladari, Charalampia V; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Savva, Florentia S; Georgantoni, Anna I; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2018-04-07

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement is superior to conventional office blood pressure (OBP) because it eliminates the "white coat effect" and shows a strong association with ambulatory blood pressure. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 146 participants with office hypertension, and we compared AOBP readings, taken with or without the presence of study personnel, before and after the conventional office readings to determine whether their variation in blood pressure showed a difference in blood pressure values. We also compared AOBP measurements with daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and conventional office readings. The mean age of the studied population was 56±12 years, and 53.4% of participants were male. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias (ie, mean of the differences) of 0.6±6 mm Hg systolic for attended AOBP compared with unattended and 1.4±6 and 0.1±6 mm Hg bias for attended compared with unattended systolic AOBP when measurements were performed before and after conventional readings, respectively. A small bias was observed when unattended and attended systolic AOBP measurements were compared with daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (1.3±13 and 0.6±13 mm Hg, respectively). Biases were higher for conventional OBP readings compared with unattended AOBP (-5.6±15 mm Hg for unattended AOBP and oscillometric OBP measured by a physician, -6.8±14 mm Hg for unattended AOBP and oscillometric OBP measured by a nurse, and -2.1±12 mm Hg for unattended AOBP and auscultatory OBP measured by a second physician). Our findings showed that independent of the presence or absence of medical staff, AOBP readings revealed similar values that were closer to daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring than conventional office readings, further supporting the use of AOBP in the clinical setting. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Evaluation of Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion Measured with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Patients with Tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslow, Jonathan H.; Usoro, Emem; Wang, Li; Parra, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal dilation of the right ventricular outflow tract complicates assessment of right ventricular function in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion is commonly used to estimate ejection fraction. We hypothesized that tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging approximates global and segmental right ventricular function, specifically right ventricular sinus ejection fraction, in pediatric patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Methods Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was measured retrospectively on cardiac magnetic resonance images in 54 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Values were compared with right ventricular global, sinus, and infundibular ejection fractions. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was: 1) indexed to body surface area, 2) converted into a fractional value, and 3) converted into published pediatric Z-scores. Results Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measurements had good agreement between observers. Right ventricular ejection fraction did not correlate with the absolute or indexed tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and correlated weakly with fractional tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r=0.41 and p=0.002). Segmental right ventricular function did not appreciably improve correlation with any of the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measures. Pediatric Z-scores were unable to differentiate patients with normal and abnormal right ventricular function. Conclusions Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion measured on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates poorly with global and segmental right ventricular ejection fraction in pediatric patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion is an unreliable approximation of right ventricular function in this patient population. PMID:26279488

  10. Effect of Self-monitoring and Medication Self-titration on Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients at High Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, Richard J.; Mant, Jonathan; Haque, M. Sayeed; Bray, Emma P.; Bryan, Stirling; Greenfield, Sheila M.; Jones, Miren I.; Jowett, Sue; Little, Paul; Penaloza, Cristina; Schwartz, Claire; Shackleford, Helen; Shovelton, Claire; Varghese, Jinu; Williams, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Self-monitoring of blood pressure with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension, but there are no data about patients in high-risk groups.\\ud \\ud OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of self-monitoring with self-titration of antihypertensive medication compared with usual care on systolic blood pressure among patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease.\\ud \\ud DESIGN, SETTING, AN...

  11. Correlates of blood pressure in Yanomami Indians of northwestern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, D E; Mancilha-Carvalho, J J

    1993-01-01

    We determined associations of measures of body habitus with blood pressure for 100 adult Yanomami Indians (61 men, 39 women) examined during February and March 1990. Measurements included body weight and height, four skinfolds (triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, abdomen), four circumferences (wrist, upper arm, abdomen, hip), systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse rate, and estimated age. Various indices of fat distribution were determined from the measurements of skinfolds, circumferences, weight, and height. Estimated age averaged 35.0 years in men and 33.4 years in women (range: 15 to 63 years). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were low in both men (104.8/70.4 mm Hg) and women (94.8/63.5 mm Hg), as was body mass index (men: 20.7; women: 21.4 kg/m2). In Yanomami women, all four skinfolds, wrist circumference, and the indices of hip and abdominal fat were significant correlates of systolic blood pressure, while the abdominal skinfold and wrist and hip circumferences correlated significantly with diastolic blood pressure. Among men, there was a negative correlation between estimated age and systolic blood pressure and a positive correlation between BMI and upper arm and hip circumferences and systolic blood pressure. There was a significant positive correlation between wrist, upper arm, and hip circumferences and diastolic blood pressure among Yanomami men. We used stepwise regression to generate sex-specific predictive equations for blood pressure. For men, estimated age and hip circumference, and for women, abdominal skinfold measurement and age were included in the model for systolic blood pressure. Among men, wrist circumference and height, and among women, wrist circumference alone entered the model for diastolic blood pressure. On the basis of these results, we suggest that even in a low-blood pressure, low-body fat, no-salt setting, systolic blood pressure is associated with the amount and placement of adipose tissue. However, diastolic blood

  12. Nesfatin-1 and Vitamin D levels may be associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values and hearth rate in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Figen Kir; Sahin, Serap Baydur; Ural, Ulku Mete; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Senturk, Senol; Tekin, Yesim Bayoglu; Balik, Gulsah; Cure, Erkan; Yuce, Suleyman; Kirbas, Aynur

    2015-07-09

    Obesity, insulin resistance (IR), inflammation, and hyperandrogenism may lead to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hypertension. Nesfatin-1 (N1) may be related to IR, obesity, and hypertension. Furthermore, a vitamin D (VD) deficiency is associated with hypertension and PCOS. We aimed to investigate N1 and VD levels in PCOS that have an effect on systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR).This study included 54 patients with PCOS and 48 age-body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. PCOS was diagnosed according to clinical practice guidelines. Ferriman-Gallwey scores (FGS) were calculated, while N1, VD, and other hormonal and biochemical parameters were measured for all subjects. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured as well. HR was calculated using an electrocardiogram.The levels of N1 (p < 0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (p = 0.036), homeostasis model assessment as an index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p < 0.001), systolic (p < 0.001) and diastolic (p < 0.001) BP and HR (p < 0.001) in the PCOS group were significantly higher than in the control group. However, the VD levels of the PCOS group were lower than the control group (p = 0.004). N1 had a strong positive correlation with BMI, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, luteinizing hormone, systolic and diastolic BP, and HR. VD levels were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR and luteinizing hormone.Elevated N1 and decreased VD levels may be related to the presence of high-normal BP or hypertension in PCOS subjects.  N1 level may be associated with an increased BP due to its relation to inflammation and IR.

  13. Tilting-induced decrease in systolic blood pressure in bedridden hypertensive elderly inpatients: effects of azelnidipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Shigeto; Takahashi, Takashi; Okaishi, Kohya; Nakahashi, Takeshi; Nomura, Kohji; Kanda, Tsugiyasu; Okuro, Masashi; Murai, Hiroshi; Nishino, Tomoichi; Matsumoto, Masayuki

    2006-12-01

    The object of this study was to examine blood pressure (BP) variability due to postural change in elderly hypertensive patients. The subjects studied were 154 elderly inpatients in a hospital for the elderly (48 male and 106 female; median age: 82 years), consisting of age- and sex-matched bedridden (n=39) and non-bedridden (n=39) normotensive controls and bedridden (n=38) and non-bedridden (n=38) hypertensive patients. BP and pulse rate (PR) were measured in the supine position, then again after a 2-min, 45 deg head-up tilt with the legs horizontal. The decrease in systolic BP (SBP) on tilting in the bedridden hypertensive group (median: -10 mmHg; range: -32 to 9 mmHg) was significantly (pbedridden hypertensive group. Our findings indicate that tilt-induced decrease in SBP is a rather common phenomenon in bedridden elderly hypertensive patients, and that treatment with azelnidipine attenuates tilt-induced decrease in SBP, probably through an improvement of baroreceptor sensitivity.

  14. Prognostic value of blood pressure measured during hospitalization after acute myocardial infarction: an insight from survival trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yap, Yee Guan; Duong, Trinh; Bland, J Martin

    2007-01-01

    , CAMIAT, SWORD, TRACE and DIAMOND-MI studies with left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% or asymptomatic ventricular arrhythmia surviving more than 45 days after MI were pooled. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures and pulse pressures were measured soon after MI (median 6 days, range 0-53 days...

  15. Interarm Difference in Systolic Blood Pressure in Different Ethnic Groups and Relationship to the "White Coat Effect": A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Claire Lorraine; Clark, Christopher; Koshiaris, Constantinos; Gill, Paramjit S; Greenfield, Shelia M; Haque, Sayeed M; Heer, Gurdip; Johal, Amanpreet; Kaur, Ramandeep; Mant, Jonathan; Martin, Una; Mohammed, Mohamed A; Wood, Sally; McManus, Richard J

    2017-09-01

    Interarm differences (IADs) ≥10 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (BP) are associated with greater incidence of cardiovascular disease. The effect of ethnicity and the white coat effect (WCE) on significant systolic IADs (ssIADs) are not well understood. Differences in BP by ethnicity for different methods of BP measurement were examined in 770 people (300 White British, 241 South Asian, 229 African-Caribbean). Repeated clinic measurements were obtained simultaneously in the right and left arm using 2 BPTru monitors and comparisons made between the first reading, mean of second and third and mean of second to sixth readings for patients with, and without known hypertension. All patients had ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). WCE was defined as systolic clinic BP ≥10 mm Hg higher than daytime ABPM. No significant differences were seen in the prevalence of ssIAD between ethnicities whichever combinations of BP measurement were used and regardless of hypertensive status. ssIADs fell between the 1st measurement (161, 22%), 2nd/3rd (113, 16%), and 2nd-6th (78, 11%) (1st vs. 2nd/3rd and 2nd-6th, P < 0.001). Hypertensives with a WCE were more likely to have ssIADs on 1st, (odds ratio [OR] 1.73 (95% confidence interval 1.04-2.86); 2nd/3rd, (OR 3.05 (1.68-5.53); and 2nd-6th measurements, (OR 2.58 (1.22-5.44). Nonhypertensive participants with a WCE were more likely to have a ssIAD on their first measurement (OR 3.82 (1.77 to -8.25) only. ssIAD prevalence does not vary with ethnicity regardless of hypertensive status but is affected by the number of readings, suggesting the influence of WCE. Multiple readings should be used to confirm ssIADs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

  16. A novel wearable device for continuous, non-invasion blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Qin; Wu, Jianping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we have developed a wearable cuffless device for daily blood pressure (BP) measurement. We incorporated the light based sensor and other hard wares in a small volume for BP detection. With optimized algorithm, the real-time BP reading could be achieved, the data could be presented in the screen and be transmitted by internet of things (IoT) for history data comparison and multi-terminal viewing. Thus, further analysis provides the probability for diet or sports suggestion and alarm. We have measured BP from more than 60 subjects, compare to traditional mercury blood pressure meter, no obvious error in both systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) are detected. Such device can be used for continues non-invasion BP detection, and further data docking and health analysis could be achieved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. 2014 Hypertension Guideline: Recommendation for a Change in Goal Systolic Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institute National Hypertension Guideline was developed to assist primary care physicians and other health care professionals in the outpatient treatment of uncomplicated hypertension in adult men and nonpregnant women aged 18 years and older. The new guideline reflects general acceptance, with minor modifications, of the “Evidence-Based Guideline” report by the panel members appointed to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 8th Joint National Committee. A major practice change is the recommendation for goal systolic blood pressure less than 150 mmHg in patients aged 60 years and older who are treated for hypertension in the absence of diabetes or chronic kidney disease. This article describes the reasons for, evidence for, and consequences of the change, and is followed by the National Guidelines handout. PMID:26057683

  18. Evaluation of the effect of systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure on cognitive function: the Women's Health and Aging Study II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Yasar

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP and pulse pressure (PP in midlife is associated with increased risk for cognitive impairment later in life. There is mixed evidence regarding the effects of late life elevated SBP or PP on cognitive function, and limited information on the role of female gender.Effects of SBPand PPon cognitive abilities at baseline and over a 9-year period were evaluated in 337 non-demented community-dwelling female participants over age 70 in the Women's Health and Aging Study II using logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Participants aged 76-80 years with SBP≥160 mmHg or PP≥84 mmHg showed increased incidence of impairment on Trail Making Test-Part B (TMT, Part B, a measure of executive function, over time when compared to the control group that included participants with normal and pre-hypertensive SBP (<120 and 120-139 mmHg or participants with low PP (<68 mmHg (HR = 5.05 [95%CI = 1.42, 18.04], [HR = 5.12 [95%CI = 1.11; 23.62], respectively. Participants aged 70-75 years with PP≥71 mmHg had at least a two-fold higher incidence of impairment on HVLT-I, a measure of verbal learning, over time when compared to participants with low PP (<68 mmHg (HR = 2.44 [95%CI = 1.11, 5.39].Our data suggest that elevated SBP or PP in older non-demented women increases risk for late-life cognitive impairment and that PP could be used when assessing the risk for impairment in cognitive abilities. These results warrant further, larger studies to evaluate possible effects of elevated blood pressure in normal cognitive aging.

  19. Interankle systolic blood pressure difference and renal outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Lee, Su-Chu; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Interankle blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with peripheral artery disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the relationship between interankle BP difference and renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether interankle BP difference is associated with the rate of renal function decline and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD. We enrolled 144 patients with CKD from one regional hospital. The BP in four limbs was simultaneously measured using an ABI-form device. The decline in renal function was evaluated using an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Rapid renal progression was defined as an eGFR slope < -3 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. The renal end points were defined as ≥ 25% decline in eGFR or commencement of dialysis during the follow-up period. During a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years, 90 patients (62.5%) reached renal end points. Multivariate analysis showed that an increased interankle systolic BP difference (per 5 mmHg) was associated with a worse eGFR slope (regression β, -0.292; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.482 to -0.102; P = 0.003), rapid renal progression (odds ratio, 1.189; 95% CI, 1.015-1.394; P = 0.032), and an increased risk of progression to renal end points (hazard ratio, 1.126; 95% CI, 1.052-1.204, P = 0.001). Interankle systolic BP difference was associated with rapid renal progression and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD in our study. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  20. Validity of predicting left ventricular end systolic pressure changes following an acute bout of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Rebecca M; Ranadive, Sushant M; Yan, Huimin; Lane, Abbi D; Cook, Marc D; Hall, Grenita; Harvey, I Shevon; Wilund, Kenneth R; Woods, Jeffrey A; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular end systolic pressure (LV ESP) is important in assessing left ventricular performance and is usually derived from prediction equations. It is unknown whether these equations are accurate at rest or following exercise in a young, healthy population. Measured LV ESP vs. LV ESP values from the prediction equations were compared at rest, 15 min and 30 min following peak aerobic exercise in 60 participants. LV ESP was obtained by applanation tonometry at rest, 15 min post and 30 min post peak cycle exercise. Measured LV ESP was significantly lower (p<0.05) at all time points in comparison to the two calculated values. Measured LV ESP decreased significantly from rest at both the post15 and post30 time points (p<0.05) and changed differently in comparison to the calculated values (significant interaction; p<0.05). The two LV ESP equations were also significantly different from each other (p<0.05) and changed differently over time (significant interaction; p<0.05). The two commonly used prediction equations did not accurately predict either resting or post exercise LV ESP in a young, healthy population. Thus, LV ESP needs to be individually determined in young, healthy participants. Non-invasive measurement through applanation tonometry appears to allow for a more accurate determination of LV ESP. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Galvagni Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish a correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter placed in the same aneurysm sac before and after its exclusion by an endoprosthesis. METHODS: Patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and received an EndoSureTM wireless pressure sensor implant between March 19 and December 11, 2004 were enrolled in the study. Simultaneous readings of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure within the aneurysm sac were obtained from the catheter and the sensor, both before and after sac exclusion by the endoprosthesis (Readings 1 and 2, respectively. Intrasac pressure measurements were compared using Pearson's correlation and Student's t test. Statistical significance was set at p0.05, mean (p>0.05, and pulse (p0.05 by the sensor. CONCLUSION: The excellent agreement between intrasac pressure readings recorded by the catheter and the sensor justifies use of the latter for detection of post-exclusion abdominal aortic aneurysm pressurization.

  2. Combination of Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Systolic Blood Pressure in Assessing Patients’ Outcomes with Decreased Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir S Madjid

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS is commonly used to assess outcomes of patients with loss of consciousness, but it is insufficient in predicting the outcome of some cases. This study aimed to assess the combination of GCS, systolic blood pressure and age to predict the outcome of patients with decreased consciousness. This was a retrospective cohort observational study of 76 loss of consciousness patients that comes into the Emergency Department of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital in June-August 2014. Data was obtained from the medical records . GCS, systolic blood pressure and age were recorded when patients were admitted to the triage. Outcome was assessed two weeks after admission in the emergency department. Bivariate analysis on the GCS and age showed significant different between patients with poor outcome group with good outcome group (p<0.05 and no significant different of the systolic blood pressure between both groups (p>0.05. Multivariate analysis on the GCS and age showed good probability equation based on the calibration test and discrimination. The combination of Glasgow Coma Scale and age was accurate in assessing the outcomes of patients with loss of consciousness. Keywords. Glasgow Coma Scale, systolic, age, outcomes     Gabungan Glasgow Coma Scale, Umur, dan Tekanan Darah Sistolik Sebagai Penilai Luaran Pasien Penurunan Kesadaran   Abstrak Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS telah menjadi salah satu penilaian yang digunakan untuk menilai luaran pasien penurunan kesadaran, tetapi dinilai masih belum mampu memprediksi luaran yang terjadi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menilai gabungan GCS, tekanan darah sistolik dan umur untuk memprediksi luaran pasien dengan penurunan kesadaran. Penelitian ini merupakan studi observasional kohort retrospektif yang melibatkan 76 pasien dengan penurunan kesadaran yang datang ke IGD RSUPN Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo selama bulan Juni-Agustus 2014. Data diambil dari rekam medik. GCS, tekanan darah sistolik dan

  3. Significance of White-Coat Hypertension in Older Persons With Isolated Systolic Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Hansen, Tine W.; Li, Yan; Boggia, José; Kikuya, Masahiro; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The significance of white-coat hypertension in older persons with isolated systolic hypertension remains poorly understood. We analyzed subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes database who had daytime ambulatory blood pressure (BP; ABP) and conventional BP (CBP) measurements. After excluding persons with diastolic hypertension by CBP (≥90 mm Hg) or by daytime ABP (≥85 mm Hg), a history of cardiovascular disease, and persons hypertension. During a median follow-up of 10.6 years, there was a total of 655 fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. The analyses were stratified by treatment status. In untreated subjects, those with white-coat hypertension (CBP ≥140/hypertension, the cardiovascular risk was similar in elevated conventional and normal daytime systolic BP as compared with those with normal conventional and normal daytime BPs (adjusted hazard rate: 1.10 [95% CI: 0.79–1.53]; P=0.57). However, both treated isolated systolic hypertension subjects with white-coat hypertension (adjusted hazard rate: 2.00; [95% CI: 1.43–2.79]; Phypertension who have their ABP normalized on antihypertensive therapy but with residual white-coat effect by CBP measurement have an entity that we have termed, “treated normalized hypertension.” Therefore, one should be cautious in applying the term “white-coat hypertension” to persons receiving antihypertensive treatment. PMID:22252396

  4. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  5. Significance of white-coat hypertension in older persons with isolated systolic hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, Stanley S; Thijs, Lutgarde; Hansen, Tine W

    2012-01-01

    The significance of white-coat hypertension in older persons with isolated systolic hypertension remains poorly understood. We analyzed subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes database who ...... had daytime ambulatory blood pressure (BP; ABP) and conventional BP (CBP) measurements. After excluding persons with diastolic hypertension by CBP (=90 mm Hg) or by daytime ABP (=85 mm Hg), a history of cardiovascular disease, and persons...

  6. A PILOT STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF MAGNESIUM SUPPLEMENTATION WITH HIGH AND LOW HABITUAL DIETARY MAGNESIUM INTAKE ON RESTING AND RECOVERY FROM AEROBIC AND RESISTANCE EXERCISE AND SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsy S. Kass

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure (BP have been studied for over 25 years and results have been inconsistent. Blood pressure reductions in randomized studies have varied from 12 mmHg reductions to no reduction. The objective of this pilot intervention was to investigate the effect of magnesium supplementation on systolic blood pressure whilst resting and during recovery from aerobic and resistance exercise and on performance. A further objective was to see whether the effect of a high vs low habitual dietary magnesium intake affected these results. Sixteen male volunteers were randomly assigned to either a 300 mg·d-1 magnesium oxide supplementation (MO or a control group (CG for 14 days. Resting blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR were measured before subjects performed a maximal 30 minute cycle, immediately followed by three x 5 second isometric bench press, both at baseline and after the intervention. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded immediately post exercise and after five minutes recovery. A 3 day food diary was recorded for all subjects to measure dietary magnesium intake. At the end of the intervention, the supplemented group, had a reduction in mean resting systolic BP by 8.9 mmHg (115.125 ± 9.46 mmHg, p = 0.01 and post exercise by 13 mmHg (122.625 ± 9. 88 mmHg, p = 0.01. Recovery BP was 11.9 mmHg lower in the intervention group compared to control (p = 0.006 and HR decreased by 7 beats per minute in the experimental group (69.0 ± 11.6 bpm, p = 0. 02. Performance indicators did not change within and between the groups. Habitual dietary magnesium intake affected both resting and post exercise systolic BP and the subsequent effect of the magnesium supplementation. These results have an implication in a health setting and for health and exercise but not performance.

  7. Inter-arm blood pressure differences in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, L C Y; Kametas, N; Strobl, I; Pachoumi, C; Nicolaides, K H

    2008-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of blood pressure inter-arm difference (IAD) in early pregnancy and to investigate its possible association with maternal characteristics. A cross-sectional observational study. Routine antenatal visit in a university hospital. A total of 5435 pregnant women at 11-14 weeks of gestation. Blood pressure was taken from both arms simultaneously with a validated automated device. The presence of inter-arm blood pressure difference of 10 mmHg or more. The IAD in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 10 mmHg or more in 8.3 and 2.3% of the women, respectively. Systolic IAD was found to be significantly related to systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and diastolic IAD was found to be significantly related to maternal age, diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. The systolic and diastolic IAD were higher in the hypertensive group compared with the normotensive group and absolute IAD increased with increasing blood pressure. About 31.0 and 23.9% of cases of hypertension would have been underreported if the left arm and the right arm were used, respectively, in measuring the blood pressure. There is a blood pressure IAD in a significant proportion of the pregnant population, and its prevalence increases with increasing blood pressure. By measuring blood pressure only on one arm, there is a one in three chance of underreporting hypertension. Therefore, it would be prudent that during the booking visit blood pressure should be taken in both arms and thus provide guidance for subsequent blood pressure measurements during the course of pregnancy.

  8. Lower Protein-to-Carbohydrate Ratio in Maternal Diet is Associated with Higher Childhood Systolic Blood Pressure up to Age Four Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Blumfield

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The prenatal environment can influence development of offspring blood pressure (BP, which tracks into adulthood. This prospective longitudinal study investigated whether maternal pregnancy dietary intake is associated with the development of child BP up to age four years. Data are from 129 mother-child dyads enrolled in the Women and Their Children’s Health study. Maternal diet was assessed using a validated 74-item food frequency questionnaire at 18 to 24 weeks and 36 to 40 weeks, with a reference period of the previous three months. Child systolic and diastolic BP were measured at 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months, using an automated BP monitor. Using mixed-model regression analyses adjusted for childhood growth indices, pregnancy intakes of percentage of energy (E% polyunsaturated fat (β coefficient 0.73; 95% CI 0.003, 1.45; p = 0.045, E% omega-6 fatty acids (β coefficient 0.89; 95% CI 0.09, 1.69; p = 0.03 and protein-to-carbohydrate (P:C ratio (β coefficient −14.14; 95% CI −27.68, −0.60; p = 0.04 were associated with child systolic BP trajectory up to 4 years. Child systolic BP was greatest at low proportions of dietary protein (<16% of energy and high carbohydrate (>40% of energy intakes. There may be an ideal maternal macronutrient ratio associated with optimal infant BP. Maternal diet, which is potentially modifiable, may play an important role in influencing offspring risk of future hypertension.

  9. Inter-arm systolic blood pressure differences, relations with future vascular events and mortality in patients with and without manifest vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Guido; Spiering, Wilko; de Jong, Pim A.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Cramer, Maarten J.; Visseren, Frank L.J.; Aboyans, Victor; Westerink, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background Inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (SBPD) is an easily obtained patient characteristic which relates to vascular disease. We aimed to identify determinants of large inter-arm SBPD and to investigate the relation between inter-arm SBPD and vascular events in patients with and

  10. Blood pressure and heart rate response to posteriorly directed pressure applied to the cervical spine in young, pain-free individuals: a randomized, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Emmanuel; Wong, Michael; Williams, Haddie; Mache, Kyle

    2014-08-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Objectives To compare the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) response of healthy volunteers to posteriorly directed (anterior-to-posterior [AP]) pressure applied to the cervical spine versus placebo. Manual therapists employ cervical spine AP mobilizations for various cervical-shoulder pain conditions. However, there is a paucity of literature describing the procedure, cardiovascular response, and safety profile. Thirty-nine (25 female) healthy participants (mean ± SD age, 24.7 ± 1.9 years) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received a placebo, consisting of light touch applied to the right C6 costal process. Group 2 received AP pressure at the same location. Blood pressure and HR were measured prior to, during, and after the application of AP pressure. One-way analysis of variance and paired-difference statistics were used for data analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for mean systolic BP, mean diastolic BP, and mean HR (P >.05) for all time points. Within-group comparisons indicated statistically significant differences between baseline and post-AP pressure HR (-2.8 bpm; 95% confidence interval: -4.6, -1.1) and between baseline and post-AP pressure systolic BP (-2.4 mmHg; 95% confidence interval: -3.7, -1.0) in the AP group, and between baseline and postplacebo systolic BP (-2.6 mmHg; 95% confidence interval: -4.2, -1.0) in the placebo group. No participants reported any adverse reactions or side effects within 24 hours of testing. AP pressure caused a statistically significant physiologic response that resulted in a minor drop in HR (without causing asystole or vasodepression) after the procedure, whereas this cardiovascular change did not occur for those in the placebo group. Within both groups, there was a small but statistically significant reduction in systolic BP following the procedure.

  11. Significance of white-coat hypertension in older persons with isolated systolic hypertension: a meta-analysis using the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Stanley S; Thijs, Lutgarde; Hansen, Tine W; Li, Yan; Boggia, José; Kikuya, Masahiro; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2012-03-01

    The significance of white-coat hypertension in older persons with isolated systolic hypertension remains poorly understood. We analyzed subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes database who had daytime ambulatory blood pressure (BP; ABP) and conventional BP (CBP) measurements. After excluding persons with diastolic hypertension by CBP (≥90 mm Hg) or by daytime ABP (≥85 mm Hg), a history of cardiovascular disease, and persons <18 years of age, the present analysis totaled 7295 persons, of whom 1593 had isolated systolic hypertension. During a median follow-up of 10.6 years, there was a total of 655 fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. The analyses were stratified by treatment status. In untreated subjects, those with white-coat hypertension (CBP ≥140/<90 mm Hg and ABP <135/<85 mm Hg) and subjects with normal BP (CBP <140/<90 mm Hg and ABP <135/<85 mm Hg) were at similar risk (adjusted hazard rate: 1.17 [95% CI: 0.87-1.57]; P=0.29). Furthermore, in treated subjects with isolated systolic hypertension, the cardiovascular risk was similar in elevated conventional and normal daytime systolic BP as compared with those with normal conventional and normal daytime BPs (adjusted hazard rate: 1.10 [95% CI: 0.79-1.53]; P=0.57). However, both treated isolated systolic hypertension subjects with white-coat hypertension (adjusted hazard rate: 2.00; [95% CI: 1.43-2.79]; P<0.0001) and treated subjects with normal BP (adjusted hazard rate: 1.98 [95% CI: 1.49-2.62]; P<0.0001) were at higher risk as compared with untreated normotensive subjects. In conclusion, subjects with sustained hypertension who have their ABP normalized on antihypertensive therapy but with residual white-coat effect by CBP measurement have an entity that we have termed, "treated normalized hypertension." Therefore, one should be cautious in applying the term "white-coat hypertension" to persons

  12. Influence of short-term blood pressure variability on blood pressure determinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. J.; van Goudoever, J.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blood pressure variability on Riva Rocci Korotkoff blood pressure determinations, we studied the intra-arterial pressure during Riva Rocci Korotkoff determinations in 25 patients. In 50 measurements with a cuff deflation rate of 2.5 mm Hg/sec, the systolic intra-arterial

  13. Recruitment strategies and challenges in a large intervention trial: Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Thomas M; Snyder, Joni K; Lovato, Laura C; Roumie, Christianne L; Glasser, Steven P; Cosgrove, Nora M; Olney, Christine M; Tang, Rocky H; Johnson, Karen C; Still, Carolyn H; Gren, Lisa H; Childs, Jeffery C; Crago, Osa L; Summerson, John H; Walsh, Sandy M; Perdue, Letitia H; Bankowski, Denise M; Goff, David C

    2016-01-01

    Background The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial of 9,361 participants with hypertension who are ≥ 50 years old. The trial is designed to evaluate the effect of intensive systolic blood pressure control (systolic blood pressure goal recruitment strategies and lessons learned during recruitment of the SPRINT cohort and five targeted participant subgroups: pre-existing cardiovascular disease, pre-existing chronic kidney disease, age ≥ 75 years, women, and minorities. Methods In collaboration with the National Institutes of Health Project Office and SPRINT Coordinating Center, five Clinical Center Networks oversaw clinical site selection, recruitment, and trial activities. Recruitment began November 8, 2010 and ended March 15, 2013 (about 28 months). Various recruitment strategies were used, including mass mailing, brochures, referrals from healthcare providers or friends, posters, newspaper ads, radio ads, and electronic medical record searches. Results Recruitment was scheduled to last 24 months to enroll a target of 9,250 participants; in just over 28 months, the trial enrolled 9,361 participants. The trial screened 14,692 volunteers, with 33% of initial screens originating from the use of mass mailing lists. Screening results show that participants also responded to recruitment efforts through referral by SPRINT staff, healthcare providers, or friends (45%); brochures or posters placed in clinic waiting areas (15%); and television, radio, newspaper, internet ads, or toll-free numbers (8%). The overall recruitment yield (number randomized /number screened) was 64% (9,361 randomized /14,692 screened), 77% for those with cardiovascular disease, 79% for those with chronic kidney disease, 70% for those age ≥ 75 years, 55% for women, and 61% for minorities. As recruitment was observed to lag behind expectations, additional clinics were included and inclusion criteria were broadened, keeping event rates

  14. Blood pressure measurements in the ankle are not equivalent to blood pressure measurements in the arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lara Nicole; Wells, Mike; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-07-25

    Blood pressure (BP) is often measured on the ankle in the emergency department (ED), but this has never been shown to be an acceptable alternative to measurements performed on the arm. To establish whether the differences between arm and ankle non-invasive BP measurements were clinically relevant (i.e. a difference of ≥10 mmHg). This was a prospective cross-sectional study in an urban ED making use of a convenience sample of 201 patients (18 - 50 years of age) who were not in need of emergency medical treatment. BP was measured in the supine position on both arms and ankles with the correct size cuff according to the manufacturer's guidelines. The arm and ankle BP measurements were compared. There was a clinically and statistically significant difference between arm and ankle systolic BP (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) (-13 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -28 - 1 mmHg and -5 mmHg, 95% CI -13 - 4 mmHg, respectively), with less difference in diastolic BP (DBP) (2 mmHg, 95% CI -7 - 10 mmHg). Only 37% of SBP measurements and 83% of MAP measurements were within an error range of 10 mmHg, while 95% of DBP measurements agreed within 10 mmHg. While the average differences (or the bias) were generally not large, large variations in individual patients (indicating poor precision) made the prediction of arm BP from ankle measurements unreliable. Ankle BP cannot be used as a substitute for arm BP in the ED.

  15. Comparison study of upper arm and forearm non-invasive blood pressures in adult Emergency Department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanski, Karen; Jull, Andrew; Mitchell, Nancy; McLay, Jessica

    2014-12-01

    Forearm blood pressures have been suggested as an alternative site to measure blood pressures when the upper arm is unavailable. However there is little evidence utilising clinical populations to support this substitution. To determine agreement between blood pressures measured in the left upper arm and forearm using a singular oscillometric non-invasive device in adult Emergency Department patients. The secondary objective was to explore the relationship of blood pressure differences with age, sex, ethnicity, smoking history and obesity. Single centre comparison study. Adult Emergency Department, Tertiary Trauma Centre. Forty-four participants who met inclusion/exclusion criteria selected sequentially from the Emergency Department arrival board. A random assignment of order of measurement for left upper arm and forearm blood pressures was utilised. Participants were eligible if they were aged 18 years or older, had been assigned an Australasian Triage Scale code of 2, 3, 4, or 5, were able to consent, and able to have blood pressures measured on their left arm whilst lying at a 45° angle. The Bland-Altman method of statistical analysis was used, with the level of agreement for clinical acceptability for the systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure defined as ±10 mmHg. The forearm measure overestimated systolic (mean difference 2.2 mmHg, 95% limits of agreement ±19 mmHg), diastolic (mean difference 3.4 mmHg, 95% limits of agreement ±14.4 mmHg), and mean arterial pressures (mean difference 4.1 mmHg, 95% limits of agreement ±13.7 mmHg). The systolic measure was not significantly different from zero. Evidence of better agreement was found with upper arm/forearm systolic measures below 140 mmHg compared to systolic measures above 140 mmHg using the Levene's test (p=0.002, F-statistic=11.09). Blood pressure disparity was not associated with participant characteristics. Forearm measures cannot routinely replace upper arm measures for blood pressure measurement

  16. Inter-arm systolic blood pressure differences, relations with future vascular events and mortality in patients with and without manifest vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Guido; Spiering, Wilko; de Jong, Pim A; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Cramer, Maarten J; Visseren, Frank L J; Aboyans, Victor; Westerink, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (SBPD) is an easily obtained patient characteristic which relates to vascular disease. We aimed to identify determinants of large inter-arm SBPD and to investigate the relation between inter-arm SBPD and vascular events in patients with and without manifest vascular disease. In a cohort of 7344 patients with manifest vascular disease or vascular risk factors alone enrolled in the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease (SMART) study, single bilateral non-simultaneous blood pressure measurements were performed. Logistic and Cox regression was used to identify determinants of large inter-arm SBPD (≥15mmHg) and to investigate the relation between inter-arm SBPD and vascular events (composite of non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. In all patients the median inter-arm SBPD was 7mmHg (IQR 3-11) and 1182 (16%) patients had inter-arm SBPD ≥15mmHg. Higher age, higher systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, peripheral artery disease, carotid artery stenosis, higher carotid intima-media thickness, and lower ankle-brachial indices were related to large inter-arm SBPD (≥15mmHg). Each 5mmHg increase in inter-arm SBPD was related to a 12% higher risk of vascular events in patients without manifest vascular disease (HR 1.12; 95% CI 1.00-1.27), whereas no relation was apparent in patients with manifest vascular disease (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.93-1.04, interaction p-value 0.036). Inter-arm SBPD was not related to all-cause mortality (HR 1.05; 95% CI 0.93-1.19). Inter-arm SBPD relates to a higher risk of vascular events in patients without manifest vascular disease, whereas this relation is not apparent in patients with manifest vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute Effects of Positive Airway Pressure on Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kato

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute effects of positive airway pressure (PAP [including continuous PAP (CPAP and adaptive servo-ventilation, an advanced form of bi-level PAP] on functional mitral regurgitation (fMR in patients with heart failure (HF with left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction remain unclear. Thus, whether PAP therapy reduces fMR in such patients with HF was investigated.Methods and Results: Twenty patients with HF and LV systolic dysfunction defined as LV ejection fraction (LVEF <50% (14 men; mean LVEF, 35.0 ± 11.5% with fMR underwent echocardiography during 10-min CPAP (4 and 8 cm H2O and adaptive servo-ventilation. For fMR assessment, MR jet area fraction, defined as the ratio of MR jet on color Doppler to the left atrial area, was measured. The forward stroke volume (SV index (fSVI was calculated from the time-velocity integral, cross-sectional area of the aortic annulus, and body surface area. fMR significantly reduced on CPAP at 8 cm H2O (0.30 ± 0.12 and adaptive servo-ventilation (0.29 ± 0.12, compared with the baseline phase (0.37 ± 0.12 and CPAP at 4 cm H2O (0.34 ± 0.12 (P < 0.001. The fSVI did not change in any of the PAP sessions (P = 0.888. However, significant differences in fSVI responses to PAP were found between sexes (P for interaction, 0.006, with a significant reduction in fSVI in women (P = 0.041 and between patients with baseline fSVI ≥ and < the median value (27.8 ml/m2, P for interaction, 0.018, with a significant fSVI reduction in patients with high baseline fSVI (P = 0.028. In addition, significant differences were found in fSVI responses to PAP between patients with LV end-systolic volume (LVESV index ≥ and < the median value (62.0 ml/m2, P for interaction, 0.034, with a significant fSVI increase in patients with a high LVESV index (P = 0.023.Conclusion: In patients with HF, LV systolic dysfunction, and fMR, PAP can alleviate fMR without any overall changes in forward SV. However, MR alleviation due to PAP

  18. Variation of the Korotkoff Stethoscope Sounds During Blood Pressure Measurement: Analysis Using a Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; He, Peiyu; Liu, Chengyu; Li, Taiyong; Murray, Alan; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-11-01

    Korotkoff sounds are known to change their characteristics during blood pressure (BP) measurement, resulting in some uncertainties for systolic and diastolic pressure (SBP and DBP) determinations. The aim of this study was to assess the variation of Korotkoff sounds during BP measurement by examining all stethoscope sounds associated with each heartbeat from above systole to below diastole during linear cuff deflation. Three repeat BP measurements were taken from 140 healthy subjects (age 21 to 73 years; 62 female and 78 male) by a trained observer, giving 420 measurements. During the BP measurements, the cuff pressure and stethoscope signals were simultaneously recorded digitally to a computer for subsequent analysis. Heartbeats were identified from the oscillometric cuff pressure pulses. The presence of each beat was used to create a time window (1 s, 2000 samples) centered on the oscillometric pulse peak for extracting beat-by-beat stethoscope sounds. A time-frequency two-dimensional matrix was obtained for the stethoscope sounds associated with each beat, and all beats between the manually determined SBPs and DBPs were labeled as "Korotkoff." A convolutional neural network was then used to analyze consistency in sound patterns that were associated with Korotkoff sounds. A 10-fold cross-validation strategy was applied to the stethoscope sounds from all 140 subjects, with the data from ten groups of 14 subjects being analyzed separately, allowing consistency to be evaluated between groups. Next, within-subject variation of the Korotkoff sounds analyzed from the three repeats was quantified, separately for each stethoscope sound beat. There was consistency between folds with no significant differences between groups of 14 subjects (P = 0.09 to P = 0.62). Our results showed that 80.7% beats at SBP and 69.5% at DBP were analyzed as Korotkoff sounds, with significant differences between adjacent beats at systole (13.1%, P = 0.001) and diastole (17.4%, P < 0

  19. Validation of the YuWell YE690A upper-arm blood pressure monitor, for clinic use and self-measurement, according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor YuWell YE690A for blood pressure measurement according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured sequentially in 33 adult Chinese (12 women, 44.2 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the YE690A device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. All the blood pressure requirements were fulfilled. The YuWell YE690A device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 79/99, 96/99, and 97/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 72/99, 95/99, and 98/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Thirty-one and 25 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). No participant for systolic and two participants for diastolic blood pressure had all the three device-observer comparisons greater than 5 mmHg. The YuWell blood pressure monitor YE690A has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010 and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement in adults.

  20. Comparison of invasive and oscillometric blood pressure measurement techniques in anesthetized camelids

    OpenAIRE

    Aarnes, Turi K.; Hubbell, John A.E.; Lerche, Phillip; Bednarski, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of the oscillometric method for arterial blood pressure (ABP) monitoring in anesthetized camelids. Twenty camelids were anesthetized and systolic ABP (SABP), mean ABP (MABP), and diastolic ABP (DABP) were measured directly and using the oscillometric method. The mean difference between SABP measurements was −9.9 ± 21.9 mmHg with a range of −76 to 54 mmHg, and the 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were −33 to 53 mmHg. The difference between DABP measurements was −1...

  1. Automated measurement of office, home and ambulatory blood pressure in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, Anastasios; Stergiou, George S

    2014-01-01

    1. Hypertension and atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexist and are strong risk factors for stroke. Current guidelines for blood pressure (BP) measurement in AF recommend repeated measurements using the auscultatory method, whereas the accuracy of the automated devices is regarded as questionable. This review presents the current evidence on the feasibility and accuracy of automated BP measurement in the presence of AF and the potential for automated detection of undiagnosed AF during such measurements. 2. Studies evaluating the use of automated BP monitors in AF are limited and have significant heterogeneity in methodology and protocols. Overall, the oscillometric method is feasible for static (office or home) and ambulatory use and appears to be more accurate for systolic than diastolic BP measurement. 3. Given that systolic hypertension is particularly common and important in the elderly, the automated BP measurement method may be acceptable for self-home and ambulatory monitoring, but not for professional office or clinic measurement. 4. An embedded algorithm for the detection of asymptomatic AF during routine automated BP measurement with high diagnostic accuracy has been developed and appears to be a useful screening tool for elderly hypertensives. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Aortic aneurysm sac pressure measurements after endovascular repair using an implantable remote sensor: initial experience and short-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Kaufman, John A.; Segall, Jocelyn A.; Liem, Timothy K.; Landry, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this single-center study was to report our initial experience with an implantable remote pressure sensor for aneurysm sac pressure measurement in patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) including short-term follow-up. A pressure sensor (EndoSure, Atlanta, GA) was implanted in 12 patients treated with different commercially available aortic endografts for EVAR. Pressure was read pre- and post-EVAR in the operating room. One-month follow-up (30 days ± 6 days) was performed including sac pressure readings and IV contrast CT scans. Variables were compared using the paired Student's t test. An intraprocedure type-I endoleak and a type-III endoleak were successfully treated resulting in decreasing sac pressures. In all patients, post-EVAR systolic sac pressure decreased by an average of 33% (P ≤ 0.005) compared to pre-EVAR measurements. One-month follow-up demonstrated a 47% decrease in systolic sac pressure (P ≤ 0.05). On follow-up CT scans, the average maximum aneurysm diameter pre-EVAR was 6.3 ± 1.6 cm and post-EVAR 6.0 ± 1.7 cm (P≤0.05). The diameter of the aneurysm sac was larger only in one patient with a type-III endoleak. Remote sac pressure measurement may provide important information in addition to imaging and may help to reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. (orig.)

  3. Is hydrotherapy an appropriate form of exercise for elderly patients with biventricular systolic heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveälv, Bente Grüner; Täng, Margareta Scharin; Cider, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Hydrotherapy (exercise in warm water) is considered to be a safe and beneficial method to use in the rehabilitation of stable heart failure patients, but there is little information on the effect of the increased venous return and enhanced preload in elderly patients with biventricular heart failure. We present a case of an elderly man who was recruited to participate in a hydrotherapy study. We compared echocardiographic data during warm water immersion with land measurements, and observed increases in stroke volume from 32 mL (land) to 42 mL (water), left ventricular ejection fraction from 22% to 24%, left ventricular systolic velocity from 4.8 cm/s to 5.0 cm/s and left atrioventricular plane displacement from 2.1 mm to 2.2 mm. By contrast, right ventricular systolic velocity decreased from 11.2 cm/s to 8.4 cm/s and right atrioventricular plane displacement from 8.1 mm to 4.7 mm. The tricuspid pressure gradient rose from 18 mmHg on land to 50 mmHg during warm water immersion. Thus, although left ventricular systolic function was relatively unaffected during warm water immersion, we observed a decrease in right ventricular function with an augmented right ventricular pressure. We recommend further investigations to observe the cardiac effect of warm water immersion on patients with biventricular systolic heart failure and at risk of elevated right ventricular pressure. PMID:23341846

  4. Oscillometric blood pressure measurement: a simple method in screening for peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels; Bruce, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Blood pressure at the ankle level is a reliable indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) is a useful non-invasive screening tool for the early detection of atherosclerosis. In the first part of the study, systolic blood pressures obtained by oscillometry...... of PAD was sufficiently high in subjects over the age of 60 years to warrant screening. The ankle brachial index based on measurements with an oscillometric device was shown reliable in the exclusion of PAD, thereby fulfilling an important criterion for the use in screening....

  5. Self-monitoring of blood pressure during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lihme, Frederikke F; Madsen, Mette E; Lykke, Jacob A

    2017-01-01

    arterial blood pressure (MAP) and were compared using the paired sample t-test. Mean values and differences of systolic and diastolic pressure were plotted in Bland-Altman plots to test the agreement of the measurements. Finally, a mean evaluation score was calculated. RESULTS: One hundred pregnant women...... and instructed each participant in correct measurement and then took three measurements on both arms. The participant then repeated the measurements and filled an evaluation questionnaire. We used a validated semiautomatic device for all measurements. Mean values were calculated for systolic, diastolic and mean...... were included in the study. Mean values of systolic, diastolic and MAP were 110.6, 69.7 and 83.3 mmHg, respectively, as assessed by the hospital staff. The corresponding self-measurements were 111.4, 70.2 and 83.9 mmHg, respectively. Mean differences between hospital and self-measurements were 0.79 mm...

  6. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, R P; Carvalho, P; Couceiro, R; Henriques, J; Antunes, M; Quintal, I; Muehlsteff, J

    2012-01-01

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP. (paper)

  7. The distal blood pressure predicts healing of amputations on the feet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P

    1984-01-01

    The healing of digital and transmetatarsal forefoot amputations was compared with the systolic digital and ankle blood pressure, both measured with a strain-gauge, and with the skin perfusion pressure on the forefoot measured with the isotope washout technique. In 85 out of 134 legs (63 per cent......) the amputation healed. The frequency of healing correlated statistically significantly with all three measures of distal blood pressures, the closest correlation being with the systolic digital blood pressure (SDBP). As measured in 110 cases the healing rates were: SDBP less than 20 mm Hg: four out of 23; SDBP...

  8. Blood pressure measurement in epidemiological investigations in teenagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppieters, Yves; Parent, Florence; Berghmans, Luc; Godin, Isabelle; Leveque, Alain

    2001-01-01

    Background: The use of sphygmomanometers may lead to problems in investigations on health of young people. The purpose of this paper is to present the validation of the blood pressure (BP) collected during the survey 'Youth Heart Health' in Hainaut by using second sample of young people in Hainaut for which BP was measured by a manual taking of tension and by an electronic device. Methods: Validation was done with a control sample of 343 young with five successive BP measures: twice with the mercury sphygmomanometer and three with DXL. We compared the manual and the electronic measures in order to study the correlation between the two methods. The control sample was used in order to compare the BP measurements with the results of the survey on the health of young people in Hainaut. Results: The differences between manual systolic BP and Dinamap measures are significant (differences in averages 3.6 mmHg; d.s. 7.8; 95% CI: 2.8-4.4 mmHg; p < 0.001) and the regression coefficient is -0.015. Diastolic BP is significantly higher with the manual method than with Dinamap (differences in means: 8.2 mmHg; d.s. 7.0; 95% CI: 7.4-8.9 mmHg; p < 0.001) and the coefficient of regression is 0.096. We observe a difference in BP between the general survey and the control group (10.3 mmHg for systolic manual control and of 10.9 mmHg for systolic electronic control; 3.3 mmHg for diastolic manual control and of 11.5 mmHg for diastolic electronic control). Conclusions: The values of BP of the 'Youth Heart Health' are significantly higher. These observations indicate the difficulties in the choice of the tool for measurements of BP in epidemiological investigations in the teenagers. In order to decrease skews of observations in the measurement of BP, it is recommended to use a valid electronic instrument. Dinamap XL is an instrument of choice in such studies of young people. Environmental and organisational factors may also explain the observed difference, which means that survey

  9. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood...... pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. METHODS: For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends...... from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. FINDINGS...

  10. Blood pressure changes in dogs with babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Jacobson

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial blood pressures were measured in 30 dogs with acute babesiosis, 10 each with mild uncomplicated, severe uncomplicated and complicated disease. Ten healthy dogs were used as controls. Hypotension was defined as more than 3 standard deviations below the control mean. Normal mean pressures (±SD were: systolic arterial pressure 151 (±11 mm Hg, diastolic arterial pressure 89 (±8 mm Hg and mean arterial pressure 107 (±10 mmHg. Hypotension was the most frequent abnormality, and increased strikingly in incidence as disease severity increased, with 5/10 dogs in the complicated group being hypotensive for systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures, compared with 2/10 in the severe uncomplicated group and 0/10 in the mild uncomplicated group. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures in the complicated group and severe uncomplicated group, and systolic pressure in the mild uncomplicated group, were significantly lower than in the controls. There were no significant relationships between arterial pressures and age, pulse rate, respiratory rate, temperature, mucous membrane colour or haematocrit. There was a significant negative correlation between arterial pressures and white cell and immature neutrophil counts. Arterial pressures differed significantly between dogs that were clinically collapsed and those that were not, but not between survivors and non-survivors. Pulse pressure (systolic - diastolic was low in 7/10 complicated, 1/10 mild uncomplicated, and 1/10 severe uncomplicated cases, and differed significantly between the complicated and control groups. The high incidence of hypotension in clinically severe babesiosis has important implications for therapy.

  11. Validation of the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 wrist blood pressure measuring devices in adults according to the International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunkan, Sekip; Ilman, Nevzat; Altunkan, Erkan

    2007-04-01

    A variety of automatic blood measurement devices with diverse features have been introduced to the medical markets recently. Among these devices, models that measure at the wrist have become increasingly popular in self measurements. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 wrist blood pressure devices against the mercury sphygmomanometer in adults according to the International Protocol criteria. Fifty-four patients over 30 years of age were studied and classified based on the International Protocol range. Blood pressure measurements at the wrist with the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 were compared with the results obtained by two trained observers using a mercury sphygmomanometer. Nine sequential blood pressure measurements were taken. A total of 33 participants with randomly distributed arm circumferences were selected for both of the validation studies. During each validation study, 99 measurements were obtained for comparison from 33 participants. The first phase was performed on 15 participants and if the device passed this phase, 18 more participants were selected. Mean discrepancies and standard deviations of the device-sphygmomanometer were 0.9+/-9.2 and -2.7+/-9.3 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -1.4+/-8.0 mmHg and 1.4+/-5.7 for diastolic blood pressure in the Samsung and Microlife study groups, respectively. The Samsung SBM-100A passed Phase 1 in 15 participants. Despite the fact that Microlife BP 3BU1-5 passed Phase 1 for diastolic pressure, it failed according to the systolic pressure criteria. Eighteen patients were added and Phase 2 was continued, in which Samsung SBM-100A failed to meet the criteria of Phases 2.1 and 2.2 for adults in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It was found that the Microlife BP 3BU1-5 does not meet the criteria of either of Phases 2.1 and 2.2 for systolic blood pressure and Phase 2.2 for diastolic blood pressure. In this study, Samsung SBM

  12. Validation of the Andon KD-5851 upper arm blood pressure monitor, for self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lili; Jiao, Yinghui; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Lei; Di, Dalin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to validate the Andon KD-5851 upper arm blood pressure (BP) monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010. A total of 33 eligible participants were included in the study. Sequential measurements of BPs were performed using a mercury sphygmomanometer and the device, and the data analysis was carried out following precisely the ESH-IP revision 2010. The device had 82, 98, and 99 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 85, 95, and 99 measurements for diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The average device-observer difference was -0.53±4.00 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -1.15±4.06 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The device passed all the criteria according to the ESH-IP revision 2010. According to the validation results on the basis of the ESH-IP revision 2010, the Andon KD-5851 upper arm BP monitor can be recommended for self/home measurement in adults. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Systolic peak detection in acceleration photoplethysmograms measured from emergency responders in tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Abbott, Derek; Schuurmans, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Photoplethysmogram (PPG) monitoring is not only essential for critically ill patients in hospitals or at home, but also for those undergoing exercise testing. However, processing PPG signals measured after exercise is challenging, especially if the environment is hot and humid. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm that can detect systolic peaks under challenging conditions, as in the case of emergency responders in tropical conditions. Accurate systolic-peak detection is an important first step for the analysis of heart rate variability. Algorithms based on local maxima-minima, first-derivative, and slope sum are evaluated, and a new algorithm is introduced to improve the detection rate. With 40 healthy subjects, the new algorithm demonstrates the highest overall detection accuracy (99.84% sensitivity, 99.89% positive predictivity). Existing algorithms, such as Billauer's, Li's and Zong's, have comparable although lower accuracy. However, the proposed algorithm presents an advantage for real-time applications by avoiding human intervention in threshold determination. For best performance, we show that a combination of two event-related moving averages with an offset threshold has an advantage in detecting systolic peaks, even in heat-stressed PPG signals.

  14. Cuff size influences blood pressure measurement in obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhamed, P. K.; Olsen, M. H.; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we established that a group ofobese children and adolescents had a higher blood pressure(BP) than a healthy control group. In the present study, weinvestigate whether the higher BP in the obese group wasinfluenced by BP cuff sizes.Methods: A total of 104 obese patients aged...... sizes had a significant impact on BP measurements.Despite the influence of cuff size, multiple regressionanalyses revealed that systolic BP was 68 mmHg higherand diastolic BP 32 mmHg higher in the obese groupthan in the control group. A step function, i.e. a sudden fallin BP, was seen at the point...... of switching from small to mediumcuff size in the control group, which suggests that systolicBP was overestimated when using small cuff size andunderestimated when using medium cuff size in subjectswith an AC near 23 cm.Conclusions: BP was higher in the obese group than inthe control group although BP...

  15. The Relationship Between the Metabolic Syndrome and Systolic Inter-Arm Systolic Blood Pressure Difference in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun; Choi, Seong Woo; Park, Jong; Ryu, So Yeon; Han, Mi Ah; Kim, Gwang Seok; Kim, Sung Gil; Oh, Hye Jong; Choi, Cheol Won

    2015-10-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between metabolic syndrome and systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference (sIAD) in Korean adults. This study included 410 adults (235 males, 175 females) who were over 30 years old and had undergone a health check from July to December in 2013. The incidence of high sIAD and metabolic syndrome were 23.4% and 23.2%, respectively. Key study results were as follows: First, the sIAD levels increased significantly with an increase in metabolic syndrome score (p<0.001), shown by sIAD levels after adjusted the variables that affect sIAD levels (age, gender, smoking, drinking, exercising, total cholesterol, and body mass index). These were 4.6±0.7 mmHg for metabolic syndrome score (MSS) 0; 5.8±0.5 mmHg for MSS 1; 6.2±0.6 mmHg for MSS 2, 9.2±0.8 mmHg for MSS 3; and 9.9±1.2 mmHg for MSS ≥4 (p<0.001). Second, the sIAD level of the metabolic syndrome group (9.3±0.7 mmHg) was significantly higher (p<0.001) than for the nonmetabolic syndrome group (5.7±0.3 mmHg). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome and an increased number of its components are associated with the sIAD levels in Korean adults.

  16. A Comparison and Calibration of a Wrist-Worn Blood Pressure Monitor for Patient Management: Assessing the Reliability of Innovative Blood Pressure Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Sarah; Teskey, Robert; Philip, Shona; Simpson, Jeremy A; Lutchmedial, Sohrab

    2018-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines recommend monitoring of blood pressure at home using an automatic blood pressure device for the management of hypertension. Devices are not often calibrated against direct blood pressure measures, leaving health care providers and patients with less reliable information than is possible with current technology. Rigorous assessments of medical devices are necessary for establishing clinical utility. Objective The purpose of our study was 2-fold: (1) to assess the validity and perform iterative calibration of indirect blood pressure measurements by a noninvasive wrist cuff blood pressure device in direct comparison with simultaneously recorded peripheral and central intra-arterial blood pressure measurements and (2) to assess the validity of the measurements thereafter of the noninvasive wrist cuff blood pressure device in comparison with measurements by a noninvasive upper arm blood pressure device to the Canadian hypertension guidelines. Methods The cloud-based blood pressure algorithms for an oscillometric wrist cuff device were iteratively calibrated to direct pressure measures in 20 consented patient participants. We then assessed measurement validity of the device, using Bland-Altman analysis during routine cardiovascular catheterization. Results The precalibrated absolute mean difference between direct intra-arterial to wrist cuff pressure measurements were 10.8 (SD 9.7) for systolic and 16.1 (SD 6.3) for diastolic. The postcalibrated absolute mean difference was 7.2 (SD 5.1) for systolic and 4.3 (SD 3.3) for diastolic pressures. This is an improvement in accuracy of 33% systolic and 73% diastolic with a 48% reduction in the variability for both measures. Furthermore, the wrist cuff device demonstrated similar sensitivity in measuring high blood pressure compared with the direct intra-arterial method. The device, when calibrated to direct aortic pressures, demonstrated the potential to reduce a treatment gap in high blood

  17. Right ventricular systolic pressure measurements in combination with harvest of lung and immune tissue samples in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chi; Park, Sung-Hyun; Hoffman, Carol; Philip, Cecil; Robinson, Linda; West, James; Grunig, Gabriele

    2013-01-16

    The function of the right heart is to pump blood through the lungs, thus linking right heart physiology and pulmonary vascular physiology. Inflammation is a common modifier of heart and lung function, by elaborating cellular infiltration, production of cytokines and growth factors, and by initiating remodeling processes. Compared to the left ventricle, the right ventricle is a low-pressure pump that operates in a relatively narrow zone of pressure changes. Increased pulmonary artery pressures are associated with increased pressure in the lung vascular bed and pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary hypertension is often associated with inflammatory lung diseases, for example chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or autoimmune diseases. Because pulmonary hypertension confers a bad prognosis for quality of life and life expectancy, much research is directed towards understanding the mechanisms that might be targets for pharmaceutical intervention. The main challenge for the development of effective management tools for pulmonary hypertension remains the complexity of the simultaneous understanding of molecular and cellular changes in the right heart, the lungs and the immune system. Here, we present a procedural workflow for the rapid and precise measurement of pressure changes in the right heart of mice and the simultaneous harvest of samples from heart, lungs and immune tissues. The method is based on the direct catheterization of the right ventricle via the jugular vein in close-chested mice, first developed in the late 1990s as surrogate measure of pressures in the pulmonary artery. The organized team-approach facilitates a very rapid right heart catheterization technique. This makes it possible to perform the measurements in mice that spontaneously breathe room air. The organization of the work-flow in distinct work-areas reduces time delay and opens the possibility to simultaneously perform physiology experiments and harvest immune, heart and lung tissues. The

  18. Association of different electrocardiographic patterns with shock index, right ventricle systolic pressure and diameter, and embolic burden score in pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krća Bojana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Some electrocardiographic (ECG patterns are characteristic for pulmonary embolism but exact meaning of the different ECG signs are not well known. The aim of this study was to determine the association between four common ECG signs in pulmonary embolism [complete or incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB, S-waves in the aVL lead, S1Q3T3 sign and negative T-waves in the precordial leads] with shock index (SI, right ventricle diastolic diameter (RVDD and peak systolic pressure (RVSP and embolic burden score (EBS. Methods. The presence of complete or incomplete RBBB, S waves in aVL lead, S1Q3T3 sign and negative T-waves in the precordial leads were determined at admission ECG in 130 consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a single tertiary medical center in a 5-year period. Echocardiography examination with measurement of RVDD and RVSP, multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography (MDCT-PA with the calculation of EBS and SI was determined during the admission process. Multivariable regression models were calculated with ECG parameters as independent variables and the mentioned ultrasound, MDCT-PA parameters and SI as dependent variables. Results. The presence of S-waves in the aVL was the only independent predictor of RVDD (F = 39.430, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.231 and systolic peak right ventricle pressure (F = 29.903, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.185. Negative T-waves in precordial leads were the only independent predictor for EBS (F = 24.177, p < 0.001; R2 = 0.160. Complete or incomplete RBBB was the independent predictor of SI (F = 20.980, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.134. Conclusion. In patients with pulmonary embolism different ECG patterns at admission correlate with different clinical, ultrasound and MDCT-PA parameters. RBBB is associated with shock, Swave in the aVL is associated with right ventricle pressure and negative T-waves with the thrombus burden in the pulmonary tree.

  19. Validation of the Andon KD-5965 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinhua; Li, Zhijie; Li, Guimei; Liu, Zhaoying

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the Andon KD-5965 upper-arm blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adults, with 20 women using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the Andon KD-5965 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 70/99, 91/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 81/99, 99/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-five and 29 participants, for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required≥24). Two and one participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had all three device-observers comparisons greater than 5 mmHg. According to the validation results, with better performance for diastolic blood pressure than that for systolic blood pressure, the Andon automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor KD-5965 fulfilled the requirements of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement in adults.

  20. Interarm differences in systolic blood pressure and mortality among US army veterans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, James; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Kivimäki, Mika

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differences between the arms in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ≥10 mmHg have been associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients with hypertensive and chronic renal disease. For the first time, we examined these relationships in a non-clinical population. DESIGN: Cohort...... an interarm difference of ≥10 and 2.4% of ≥15 mmHg. A 15-year follow-up period gave rise to 246 deaths (64 from cardiovascular disease, CVD). Interarm differences of ≥10 mmHg were associated with an elevated risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, HR, 1.49, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.04-2.14) and CVD...... mortality (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.01-3.69). After adjusting for SBP, DBP, lipids, fasting glucose, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, associations between interarm differences of ≥10 mmHg and all-cause mortality (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.94-1.95) and CVD mortality (1.62, 95% CI 0.84-3.14) were significantly attenuated...

  1. Does the Position or Contact Pressure of the Stethoscope Make Any Difference to Clinical Blood Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP. PMID:25546675

  2. Exploring pharmacist-customer communication: the established blood pressure measurement episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Afonso Neves; Romano, João P

    2010-10-01

    To characterize the communication ritual in the pharmacist-customer dyad during a blood pressure measurement and counselling episode. A Portuguese urban community pharmacy. An exploratory, cross-sectional design was used. Participants were purposively selected and data collected via audio recording, as well as demographics and clinical information via questionnaire. Encounters' verbal content was transcribed verbatim, utterances identified, time stamped, and classified according to a coding scheme of fifteen categories. All data was statistically analyzed using SPSSv17. Four dialogue structures: speaker turn, interactivity, turn density and turn duration measurements. From a total of 51 participants, 72.5% were female with a median age of 66 years. The average systolic blood pressure was 140 mmHg, while the diastolic was 78 mmHg. The blood pressure measurement episode lasted for 5:35 min, with an average of 81 utterances. From all utterances registered, 55.3% were produced by the customer. Visits averaged 38 speaker turns, with an interactivity rate of approximately 7 turns per episode minute. For pharmacists, turn duration averaged 7.0 s and turn density 2.1 utterances. The customers' turns comprised a mean of 8.0 s, with 2.4 utterances. Longer episodes were related to more speaker turns and greater customer turn density and duration, but lower dialogue interactivity. The interactivity rate was also lower when the customers' utterances increased. Pharmacists asked more questions (essentially closed ones), while the customers gave more information. No significant associations were observed between elderly/non-elderly and gender in relation to all communication variables. However, an increased number of speaker turns and closed-questions were associated to a higher systolic pressure. It seems that pharmacists tend to control the content of the dialogue, while customers have more influence on the visit duration and interactivity. Specific hypertensive episodes induce

  3. Discarding the first of three nurse-auscultatory or oscillometric blood pressure measurements does not improve the association of office blood pressure with ABPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, John W; Grossardt, Brandon R

    2010-06-01

    Guidelines for office blood pressure (BP) measurements recommend two or more readings at each visit. It has been suggested that discarding the first reading may improve the diagnostic utility of office readings. We compare two methods of office BP measurement to determine whether discarding the first BP affects their association with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) readings. We studied measurements in 313 mildly hypertensive patients (181 men, median age 51 years) at the end of the washout phase of a hypertension treatment trial. All patients had three auscultatory readings by a trained nurse using a mercury manometer before a 24-h ABPM and three automated readings (Omron 705 CP) to American Heart Association standards after ABPM. Daytime ABPM (09:00-21:00) of systolic BP and diastolic BP were compared with office methods using first only, second and third only, and all three readings. Associations were assessed using Bland-Altman plots and Pearson's correlations. Bland-Altman plots revealed no differences between office methods and daytime ABPM regardless of whether the first reading was included or discarded. Results were similar for both systolic BP and diastolic BP. The Pearson correlations of office method readings with ABPM readings were lowest using the first measurement alone; however, discarding the first measurement did not improve the correlation compared with using all three readings. Discarding the first office BP reading does not change the association of office BP with ABPM or improve the correlation with ABPM values in hypertensive patients.

  4. What Physical Fitness Component Is Most Closely Associated With Adolescents' Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Heloyse E G; Alves, Carlos A S; Gonçalves, Eliane C A; Silva, Diego A S

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to determine which of four selected physical fitness variables, would be most associated with blood pressure changes (systolic and diastolic) in a large sample of adolescents. This was a descriptive and cross-sectional, epidemiological study of 1,117 adolescents aged 14-19 years from southern Brazil. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured by a digital pressure device, and the selected physical fitness variables were body composition (body mass index), flexibility (sit-and-reach test), muscle strength/resistance (manual dynamometer), and aerobic fitness (Modified Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test). Simple and multiple linear regression analyses revealed that aerobic fitness and muscle strength/resistance best explained variations in systolic blood pressure for boys (17.3% and 7.4% of variance) and girls (7.4% of variance). Aerobic fitness, body composition, and muscle strength/resistance are all important indicators of blood pressure control, but aerobic fitness was a stronger predictor of systolic blood pressure in boys and of diastolic blood pressure in both sexes.

  5. Using the area under the curve to reduce measurement error in predicting young adult blood pressure from childhood measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nancy R; Rosner, Bernard A; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Berenson, Gerald S

    2004-11-30

    Tracking correlations of blood pressure, particularly childhood measures, may be attenuated by within-person variability. Combining multiple measurements can reduce this error substantially. The area under the curve (AUC) computed from longitudinal growth curve models can be used to improve the prediction of young adult blood pressure from childhood measures. Quadratic random-effects models over unequally spaced repeated measures were used to compute the area under the curve separately within the age periods 5-14 and 20-34 years in the Bogalusa Heart Study. This method adjusts for the uneven age distribution and captures the underlying or average blood pressure, leading to improved estimates of correlation and risk prediction. Tracking correlations were computed by race and gender, and were approximately 0.6 for systolic, 0.5-0.6 for K4 diastolic, and 0.4-0.6 for K5 diastolic blood pressure. The AUC can also be used to regress young adult blood pressure on childhood blood pressure and childhood and young adult body mass index (BMI). In these data, while childhood blood pressure and young adult BMI were generally directly predictive of young adult blood pressure, childhood BMI was negatively correlated with young adult blood pressure when childhood blood pressure was in the model. In addition, racial differences in young adult blood pressure were reduced, but not eliminated, after controlling for childhood blood pressure, childhood BMI, and young adult BMI, suggesting that other genetic or lifestyle factors contribute to this difference. 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effects of Sacubitril/Valsartan Versus Olmesartan on Central Hemodynamics in the Elderly With Systolic Hypertension: The PARAMETER Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bryan; Cockcroft, John R; Kario, Kazuomi; Zappe, Dion H; Brunel, Patrick C; Wang, Qian; Guo, Weinong

    2017-03-01

    Effective treatment of systolic hypertension in elderly patients remains a major therapeutic challenge. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial with sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696), a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, was conducted to determine its effects versus olmesartan (angiotensin receptor blocker) on central aortic pressures, in elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) with systolic hypertension and pulse pressure >60 mm Hg, indicative of arterial stiffness. Patients (n=454; mean age, 67.7 years; mean seated systolic blood pressure, 158.6 mm Hg; mean seated pulse pressure, 69.7 mm Hg) were randomized to receive once-daily sacubitril/valsartan 200 mg or olmesartan 20 mg, force titrated to double the initial doses after 4 weeks, before primary assessment at 12 weeks. The study extended double-blind treatment for 12 to 52 weeks, during which amlodipine (2.5-5 mg) and subsequently hydrochlorothiazide (6.25-25 mg) were added-on for patients not achieving blood pressure target (secondary assessments at week 12 (central aortic pulse pressure, -2.4 mm Hg, P blood pressure and central aortic systolic pressure, -4.1 mm Hg and -3.6 mm Hg, respectively, both P blood pressure parameters were similar between treatments ( P hypertension and stiff arteries. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Association of physical activity with a systolic blood pressure difference between arms in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Sugiura, Tomonori; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Dohi, Yasuaki

    2018-01-01

    A increase in interarm systolic blood pressure difference (IASBPD) is believed to lead to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and to be a predictor of future cardiovascular events. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that an increased IASBPD is associated with reduced physical activity in older people. Older people who used a geriatric health services facility (n = 147, mean age 83.3 years) were enrolled. The prevalence of IASBPD in individuals with different levels of physical activity and factors that have a crucial effect on IASBPD were investigated. The study participants were divided into three groups according to their physical activity; ambulant persons (group A), wheelchair users (group B) and bedridden persons (group C). Blood pressure around the both brachiums was simultaneously measured using two automated devices. An IASBPD of ≥10 mmHg was considered to be significant IASBPD. The median IASBPD was 4.5 mmHg in the present study participants, and 28 participants (19.0%) had an IASBPD ≥10 mmHg. The IASBPD in group C was greater than that in group A or B. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that physical activity was the independent predictor of IASBPD after adjustment for possible factors. Furthermore, a logistic regression analysis with the end-point of significant IASBPD showed that physical activity is an independent predictor of significant IASBPD. Physical activity simply assessed by moving ability can predict IASBPD in older individuals. In older people, reduced physical activity might indicate the progression of silent or clinical atherosclerosis and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 95-100. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Effect of tender coconut water on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in prehypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farapti Farapti

    2014-02-01

    . Dietary intakes of high potassium will decrease blood pressure (BP. Tender coconut water (TCW is a typical drink high in potassium. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TCW on BP in female teachers and employees prehypertension. Methods: The research was a parallel single blind randomized clinical trial. A total of 32 female prehypertension subjects aged 25-44 years. The subjects were selected using certain criteria and randomly allocated to one of two groups using block randomized, 16 subjects each. The treatment group received TCW 300 ml twice daily for 14 days and nutritional counseling, and the control group received water 300 ml twice daily for 14 days and nutritional counseling. Assessment of BP was done on day 0, day 8, and day 15. Statistical analysis were done using t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Mean dietary intakes of potassium were 1420.28±405.54 mg/day or 30.22±8.63% compared to Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA. During treatment period, potassium intake increased significantly in the treatment group. There were decreased BP in both groups, which were greater in the treatment group, but not statistically significant different (P > 0.05. The mean decrease of systolic BP was significant in treatment group (P = 0.031, meanwhile the mean decrease of diastolic BP was not significant (P=0.134. Conclusion: Tender coconut water 300 ml twice daily for 14 consecutive days has tendency to decrease systolic BP, but not diastolic blood pressure. (Health Science Indones 2013;2: 64-8Key words: coconut water, systolic and diastolic blood pressure

  9. Central Pressure Appraisal: Clinical Validation of a Subject-Specific Mathematical Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tosello

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that aortic blood pressure has a superior prognostic value with respect to brachial pressure for cardiovascular events, but direct measurement is not feasible in daily clinical practice.The aim of the present study is the clinical validation of a multiscale mathematical model for non-invasive appraisal of central blood pressure from subject-specific characteristics.A total of 51 young male were selected for the present study. Aortic systolic and diastolic pressure were estimated with a mathematical model and were compared to the most-used non-invasive validated technique (SphygmoCor device, AtCor Medical, Australia. SphygmoCor was calibrated through diastolic and systolic brachial pressure obtained with a sphygmomanometer, while model inputs consist of brachial pressure, height, weight, age, left-ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, and data from a pulse wave velocity study.Model-estimated systolic and diastolic central blood pressures resulted to be significantly related to SphygmoCor-assessed central systolic (r = 0.65 p <0.0001 and diastolic (r = 0.84 p<0.0001 blood pressures. The model showed a significant overestimation of systolic pressure (+7.8 (-2.2;14 mmHg, p = 0.0003 and a significant underestimation of diastolic values (-3.2 (-7.5;1.6, p = 0.004, which imply a significant overestimation of central pulse pressure. Interestingly, model prediction errors mirror the mean errors reported in large meta-analysis characterizing the use of the SphygmoCor when non-invasive calibration is performed.In conclusion, multi-scale mathematical model predictions result to be significantly related to SphygmoCor ones. Model-predicted systolic and diastolic aortic pressure resulted in difference of less than 10 mmHg in the 51% and 84% of the subjects, respectively, when compared with SphygmoCor-obtained pressures.

  10. Higher ambulatory systolic blood pressure independently associated with enlarged perivascular spaces in basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuna; Yuan, Junliang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Fan, Huimin; Li, Yue; Yin, Jiangmei; Hu, Wenli

    2017-09-01

    Enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS) have been identified as a marker of cerebral small vessel diseases (CSVD). Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) is the strongest predictor of hypertension-related brain damage. However, the relationship between ABP levels and EPVS is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the association between ABP levels and EPVS by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). We prospectively recruited inpatients for physical examinations in our hospital from May 2013 to Jun 2016. 24-hour ABPM data and cranial magnetic resonance imaging information were collected. EPVS in basal ganglia (BG) and centrum semiovale (CSO) were identified and classified into three categories by the severity. White matter hyperintensities were scored by Fazekas scale. Spearman correlation analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to determine the relationship between ABP levels and EPVS. A total of 573 subjects were enrolled in this study. 24-hour, day and night systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels were positively related to higher numbers of EPVS in BG (24-hour SBP: r = 0.23, p blood pressure (DBP) levels increased with an increasing degree of EPVS in CSO (p = 0.04 and 0.049, respectively). But the association disappeared after adjusting for confounders. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that ABP levels were not associated with higher numbers of EPVS in CSO (p > 0.05). DBP levels were not independently associated with the severity of EPVS in BG and CSO. Higher SBP levels were independently associated with EPVS in BG, but not in CSO, which supported EPVS in BG to be a marker of CSVD. Pathogenesis of EPVS in BG and CSO might be different.

  11. Noninvasive calculation of the aortic blood pressure waveform from the flow velocity waveform: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennin, Samuel; Mayer, Alexia; Li, Ye; Fok, Henry; Clapp, Brian; Alastruey, Jordi; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2015-09-01

    Estimation of aortic and left ventricular (LV) pressure usually requires measurements that are difficult to acquire during the imaging required to obtain concurrent LV dimensions essential for determination of LV mechanical properties. We describe a novel method for deriving aortic pressure from the aortic flow velocity. The target pressure waveform is divided into an early systolic upstroke, determined by the water hammer equation, and a diastolic decay equal to that in the peripheral arterial tree, interposed by a late systolic portion described by a second-order polynomial constrained by conditions of continuity and conservation of mean arterial pressure. Pulse wave velocity (PWV, which can be obtained through imaging), mean arterial pressure, diastolic pressure, and diastolic decay are required inputs for the algorithm. The algorithm was tested using 1) pressure data derived theoretically from prespecified flow waveforms and properties of the arterial tree using a single-tube 1-D model of the arterial tree, and 2) experimental data acquired from a pressure/Doppler flow velocity transducer placed in the ascending aorta in 18 patients (mean ± SD: age 63 ± 11 yr, aortic BP 136 ± 23/73 ± 13 mmHg) at the time of cardiac catheterization. For experimental data, PWV was calculated from measured pressures/flows, and mean and diastolic pressures and diastolic decay were taken from measured pressure (i.e., were assumed to be known). Pressure reconstructed from measured flow agreed well with theoretical pressure: mean ± SD root mean square (RMS) error 0.7 ± 0.1 mmHg. Similarly, for experimental data, pressure reconstructed from measured flow agreed well with measured pressure (mean RMS error 2.4 ± 1.0 mmHg). First systolic shoulder and systolic peak pressures were also accurately rendered (mean ± SD difference 1.4 ± 2.0 mmHg for peak systolic pressure). This is the first noninvasive derivation of aortic pressure based on fluid dynamics (flow and wave speed) in the

  12. Walnut consumption in a weight reduction intervention: effects on body weight, biological measures, blood pressure and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Cheryl L; Flatt, Shirley W; Barkai, Hava-Shoshana; Pakiz, Bilge; Heath, Dennis D

    2017-12-04

    Dietary strategies that help patients adhere to a weight reduction diet may increase the likelihood of weight loss maintenance and improved long-term health outcomes. Regular nut consumption has been associated with better weight management and less adiposity. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of a walnut-enriched reduced-energy diet to a standard reduced-energy-density diet on weight, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and satiety. Overweight and obese men and women (n = 100) were randomly assigned to a standard reduced-energy-density diet or a walnut-enriched (15% of energy) reduced-energy diet in the context of a behavioral weight loss intervention. Measurements were obtained at baseline and 3- and 6-month clinic visits. Participants rated hunger, fullness and anticipated prospective consumption at 3 time points during the intervention. Body measurements, blood pressure, physical activity, lipids, tocopherols and fatty acids were analyzed using repeated measures mixed models. Both study groups reduced body weight, body mass index and waist circumference (time effect p weight was -9.4 (0.9)% vs. -8.9 (0.7)% (mean [SE]), for the standard vs. walnut-enriched diet groups, respectively. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both groups at 3 months, but only the walnut-enriched diet group maintained a lower systolic blood pressure at 6 months. The walnut-enriched diet group, but not the standard reduced-energy-density diet group, reduced total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at 6 months, from 203 to 194 mg/dL and 121 to 112 mg/dL, respectively (p weight loss that is comparable to a standard reduced-energy-density diet in the context of a behavioral weight loss intervention. Although weight loss in response to both dietary strategies was associated with improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, the walnut-enriched diet promoted more favorable effects on LDL-C and systolic blood pressure. The trial

  13. Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabin, Jessica Mira; Tambs, Kristian; Saltvedt, Ingvild; Sund, Erik; Holmen, Jostein

    2017-05-31

    A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. In Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in

  14. Automated Versus Manual Blood Pressure Measurement: A Randomized Crossover Trial in the Emergency Department of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan: Are Third World Countries Ready for the Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Kanaan; Shahnawaz, Saba; Rasool, Mariam; Chaudhry, Huwad; Ahuja, Gul; Shahnawaz, Sara

    2016-09-15

    Hypertension has proven to be a strong liability with 13.5% of all mortality worldwide being attributed to elevated blood pressures in 2001. An accurate blood pressure measurement lies at the crux of an appropriate diagnosis. Despite the mercury sphygmomanometer being the gold standard, the ongoing deliberation as to whether mercury sphygmomanometers should be replaced with the automated oscillometric devices stems from the risk mercury poses to the environment. This study was performed to check the validity of automated oscillometric blood pressure measurements as compared to the manual blood pressure measurements in Karachi, Pakistan. Blood pressure was recorded in 200 individuals aged 15 and above using both, an automated oscillometric blood pressure device (Dinamap Procare 100) and a manual mercury sphygmomanometer concomitantly. Two nurses were assigned to each patient and the device, arm for taking the reading and nurses were randomly determined. SPSS version 20 was used for analysis. Mean and standard deviation of the systolic and diastolic measurements from each modality were compared to each other and P values of 0.05 or less were considered to be significant. Validation criteria of British Hypertension Society (BHS) and the US Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) were used. Two hundred patients were included. The mean of the difference of systolic was 8.54 ± 9.38 while the mean of the difference of diastolic was 4.21 ± 7.88. Patients were further divided into three groups of different systolic blood pressure 120 to = 150 and > 150, their means were 6.27 ± 8.39 (p-value 0.175), 8.91 ± 8.96 (p-value 0.004) and 10.98 ± 10.49 (p-value 0.001) respectively. In our study 89 patients were previously diagnosed with hypertension; their difference of mean systolic was 9.43 ± 9.89 (p-value 0.000) and difference of mean diastolic was 4.26 ± 7.35 (p-value 0.000). Systolic readings from a previously validated device are not reliable

  15. Sleep deprivation increases blood pressure in healthy normotensive elderly and attenuates the blood pressure response to orthostatic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Rébecca; Lanfranchi, Paola A; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-03-01

    To determine how aging affects the impact of sleep deprivation on blood pressure at rest and under orthostatic challenge. Subjects underwent a night of sleep and 24.5 h of sleep deprivation in a crossover counterbalanced design. Sleep laboratory. Sixteen healthy normotensive men and women: 8 young adults (mean 24 years [SD 3.1], range 20-28 years) and 8 elderly adults (mean 64.1 years [SD 3.4], range 60-69 years). Sleep deprivation. Brachial cuff arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured in semi-recumbent and upright positions. These measurements were compared across homeostatic sleep pressure conditions and age groups. Sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in elderly but not young adults. Moreover, sleep deprivation attenuated the systolic blood pressure orthostatic response in both age groups. Our results suggest that sleep deprivation alters the regulatory mechanisms of blood pressure and might increase the risk of hypertension in healthy normotensive elderly.

  16. Differences in blood pressure by measurement technique in neurocritically ill patients: A technological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Abhijit V; Wilson, Daren; Chalise, Prabhakar; Nazzaro, Jules; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Vavilala, Monica S

    2018-01-01

    Blood pressure data may vary by measurement technique. We performed a technological assessment of differences in blood pressure measurement between non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) and invasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) in neurocritically ill patients. After IRB approval, a prospective observational study was performed to study differences in systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) values measured by NIBP arm, ABP at level of the phlebostatic axis (ABP heart) and ABP at level of the external auditory meatus (ABP brain) at 30 and 45-degree head of bed elevation (HOB) using repeated measure analysis of covariance and correlation coefficients. Overall, 168 patients were studied with median age of 57 ± 15 years, were mostly female (57%), with body mass index ≤30 (66%). Twenty-three percent (n = 39) had indwelling intracranial pressure monitors, and 19.7% (n = 33) received vasoactive agents. ABP heart overestimated ABP brain for SBP (11.5 ± 2.7 mmHg, p ABP heart overestimated NIBP arm for SBP (8 ± 1.5 mmHg, p ABP heart overestimates MAP compared to ABP brain and NIBP arm. Using ABP heart data overestimates CPP and may be responsible for not achieving SBP, MAP or CPP targets aimed at the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ratio of systolic blood pressure to left ventricular end-diastolic pressure at the time of primary percutaneous coronary intervention predicts in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Michael; Venkatesh, Kiran; Caughey, Melissa; Rayson, Robert; Dai, Xuming; Stouffer, George A; Yeung, Michael

    2017-09-01

    To determine the ability of simple hemodynamic parameters obtained at the time of cardiac catheterization to predict in-hospital mortality following ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Hemodynamic parameters measured at the time of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) could potentially identify high-risk patients who would benefit from aggressive hemodynamic support in the Cardiac Catheterization laboratory. This is a retrospective single-center study of 219 consecutive patients with STEMI. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and aortic diastolic blood pressure were obtained after successful revascularization. The prognostic ability of LVEDP, pulse pressure, and SBP/LVEDP ratio were compared to major mortality risk scores. Patients had a mean age of 60 ±14 years, were predominantly white (73%), male (64%), with anterior wall infarcts in 39%. Comorbidities included diabetes mellitus (27%), heart failure (9%), and chronic kidney disease (7%). In-hospital mortality was 9%. Patients with SBP/LVEDP ≤ 4 had increased risk of in-hospital death (32% vs. 5.3%, P  4. The area under curve (AUC) for SBP/LVEDP ratio for in-hospital mortality (0.69) was more predictive than LVEDP (0.61, P = 0.04) or pulse pressure (0.55, P = 0.02) but similar to Shock Index (ratio of heart rate to SBP) and Modified Shock Index (ratio of HR to mean arterial pressure). An SBP/LVEDP ratio ≤ 4 identified a group of STEMI patients at high risk of in-hospital death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Peripheral arterial volume distensibility: significant differences with age and blood pressure measured using an applied external pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Murray, Alan

    2011-01-01

    A new arterial distensibility measurement technique was assessed in 100 healthy normotensive subjects. Arterial transmural pressures on the whole right arm were reduced with a 50 cm long cuff inflated to 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmHg. The electrocardiogram, and finger and ear photoplethysmograms were recorded simultaneously. Arm pulse propagation time, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and arterial volume distensibility were determined. With a 40 mmHg reduction in transmural pressure, arm pulse propagation time increased from 61 to 83 ms, PWV decreased from 12 to 8 m s −1 and arterial distensibility increased from 0.102% to 0.232% per mmHg (all P < 0.0001). At all cuff pressures, arterial distensibility was significantly related to resting mean arterial pressure (MAP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and age, and for systolic blood pressure at 30 and 40 mmHg (all P < 0.05). At 40 mmHg cuff pressure, arterial distensibility fell by 54% for a MAP increase from 75 to 105 mmHg, 57% for a DBP increase from 60 to 90 mmHg and 47% for an age increase from 20 to 70 years. These changes were more than double than those without cuff pressure. Our technique showed that systemic volume distensibility of the peripheral arm artery reduced with age, with a greater effect at higher external and lower transmural pressures

  19. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19.1 million participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Bin; Bentham, James; Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Bixby, Honor; Danaei, Goodarz; Cowan, Melanie J.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Singh, Gitanjali; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Bennett, James E.; Taddei, Cristina; Bilano, Ver; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M.; Djalalinia, Shirin; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Lugero, Charles; Peykari, Niloofar; Zhang, Wan Zhu; Lu, Yuan; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Riley, Leanne M.; Bovet, Pascal; Elliott, Paul; Gu, Dongfeng; Ikeda, Nayu; Jackson, Rod T.; Joffres, Michel; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lam, Tai Hing; Laxmaiah, Avula; Liu, Jing; Miranda, J. Jaime; Mondo, Charles K.; Neuhauser, Hannelore K.; Sundstrom, Johan; Smeeth, Liam; Soric, Maroje; Woodward, Mark; Ezzati, Majid; Abarca-Gomez, Leandra; Abdeen, Ziad A.; Rahim, Hanan Abdul; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M.; Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin; Adams, Robert; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afsana, Kaosar; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Agyemang, Charles; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Al Raddadi, Rajaa; Al Woyatan, Rihab; Ali, Mohamed M.; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Aly, Eman; Amouyel, Philippe; Amuzu, Antoinette; Andersen, Lars Bo; Anderssen, Sigmund A.; Angquist, Lars; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ansong, Daniel; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Araujo, Joana; Ariansen, Inger; Aris, Tahir; Arlappa, Nimmathota; Aryal, Krishna; Arveiler, Dominique; Assah, Felix K.; Assuncao, Maria Cecilia F.; Avdicova, Maria; Azevedo, Ana; Azizi, Fereidoun; Babu, Bontha V.; Bahijri, Suhad; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Bandosz, Piotr; Banegas, Jose R.; Barbagallo, Carlo M.; Barcelo, Alberto; Barkat, Amina; Barros, Aluisio J. D.; Barros, Mauro V.; Bata, Iqbal; Batieha, Anwar M.; Baur, Louise A.; Beaglehole, Robert; Ben Romdhane, Habiba; Benet, Mikhail; Benson, Lowell S.; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Bernotiene, Gailute; Bettiol, Heloisa; Bhagyalaxmi, Aroor; Bharadwaj, Sumit; Bhargava, Santosh K.; Bi, Yufang; Bikbov, Mukharram; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bjertness, Espen; Bjokelund, Cecilia; Blokstra, Anneke; Bo, Simona; Bobak, Martin; Boeing, Heiner; Boggia, Jose G.; Boissonnet, Carlos P.; Bongard, Vanina; Braeckman, Lutgart; Brajkovich, Imperia; Branca, Francesco; Breckenkamp, Juergen; Brenner, Hermann; Brewster, Lizzy M.; Bruno, Graziella; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. (as); Bugge, Anna; Burns, Con; Bursztyn, Michael; de Leon, Antonio Cabrera; Cameron, Christine; Can, Gunay; Candido, Ana Paula C.; Capuano, Vincenzo; Cardoso, Viviane C.; Carlsson, Axel C.; Carvalho, Maria J.; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Caserta, Carmelo A.; Chamukuttan, Snehalatha; Chan, Angelique W.; Chan, Queenie; Chaturvedi, Himanshu K.; Chaturvedi, Nishi; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Fangfang; Chen, Huashuai; Chen, Shuohua; Chen, Zhengming; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Dekkaki, Imane Cherkaoui; Chetrit, Angela; Chiolero, Arnaud; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chirita-Emandi, Adela; Cho, Belong; Cho, Yumi; Chudek, Jerzy; Cifkova, Renata; Claessens, Frank; Clays, Els; Concin, Hans; Cooper, Cyrus; Cooper, Rachel; Coppinger, Tara C.; Costanzo, Simona; Cottel, Dominique; Cowell, Chris; Craig, Cora L.; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Cruz, Juan J.; D'Arrigo, Graziella; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Dallongeville, Jean; Damasceno, Albertino; Dankner, Rachel; Dantoft, Thomas M.; Dauchet, Luc; de Backer, Guy; de Gaetano, Giovanni; de Henauw, Stefaan; de Smedt, Delphine; Deepa, Mohan; Dehghan, Abbas; Delisle, Helene; Deschamps, Valerie; Dhana, Klodian; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto F.; Dias-da-Costa, Juvenal Soares; Diaz, Alejandro; Dickerson, Ty T.; Do, Ha T. P.; Dobson, Annette J.; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Donoso, Silvana P.; Doering, Angela; Doua, Kouamelan; Drygas, Wojciech; Dulskiene, Virginija; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Dzerve, Vilnis; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elzbieta; Eggertsen, Robert; Ekelund, Ulf; El Ati, Jalila; Ellert, Ute; Elosua, Roberto; Erasmus, Rajiv T.; Erem, Cihangir; Eriksen, Louise; Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge; Evans, Alun; Faeh, David; Fall, Caroline H.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Felix-Redondo, Francisco J.; Ferguson, Trevor S.; Fernandez-Berges, Daniel; Ferrante, Daniel; Ferrari, Marika; Ferreccio, Catterina; Ferrieres, Jean; Finn, Joseph D.; Fischer, Krista; Foeger, Bernhard; Foo, Leng Huat; Forslund, Ann-Sofie; Forsner, Maria; Fortmann, Stephen P.; Fouad, Heba M.; Francis, Damian K.; Franco, Maria do Carmo; Franco, Oscar H.; Frontera, Guillermo; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.; Fujita, Yuki; Furusawa, Takuro; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Gareta, Dickman; Garnett, Sarah P.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Gasull, Magda; Gates, Louise; Gavrila, Diana; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Ghasemian, Anoosheh; Ghimire, Anup; Giampaoli, Simona; Gianfagna, Francesco; Giovannelli, Jonathan; Goldsmith, Rebecca A.; Goncalves, Helen; Gonzalez Gross, Marcela; Gonzalez Rivas, Juan P.; Gottrand, Frederic; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Grafnetter, Dusan; Grajda, Aneta; Gregor, Ronald D.; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Grontved, Anders; Gruden, Grabriella; Grujic, Vera; Guan, Ong Peng; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guerrero, Ramiro; Guessous, Idris; Guimaraes, Andre L.; Gulliford, Martin C.; Gunnlaugsdottir, Johanna; Gunter, Marc; Gupta, Prakash C.; Gureje, Oye; Gurzkowska, Beata; Gutierrez, Laura; Gutzwiller, Felix; Hadaegh, Farzad; Halkjaer, Jytte; Hambleton, Ian R.; Hardy, Rebecca; Harikumar, Rachakulla; Hata, Jun; Hayes, Alison J.; He, Jiang; Hendriks, Marleen Elisabeth; Henriques, Ana; Hernandez Cadena, Leticia; Herqutanto, N. N.; Herrala, Sauli; Heshmat, Ramin; Hihtaniemi, Ilpo Tapani; Ho, Sai Yin; Ho, Suzanne C.; Hobbs, Michael; Hofman, Albert; Dinc, Gonul Horasan; Hormiga, Claudia M.; Horta, Bernardo L.; Houti, Leila; Howitt, Christina; Htay, Thein Thein; Htet, Aung Soe; Hu, Yonghua; Maria Huerta, Jose; Husseini, Abdullatif S.; Huybrechts, Inge; Hwalla, Nahla; Iacoviello, Licia; Iannone, Anna G.; Ibrahim, M. Mohsen; Ikram, M. Arfan; Irazola, Vilma E.; Islam, Muhammad; Ivkovic, Vanja; Iwasaki, Masanori; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Jafar, Tazeen; Jamrozik, Konrad; Janszky, Imre; Jasienska, Grazyna; Jelakovic, Bojan; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Johansson, Mattias; Jonas, Jost B.; Jorgensen, Torben; Joshi, Pradeep; Juolevi, Anne; Jurak, Gregor; Juresa, Vesna; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kafatos, Anthony; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi; Kasaeian, Amir; Katz, Joanne; Kauhanen, Jussi; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Kavousi, Maryam; Kazakbaeva, Gyulli; Keil, Ulrich; Boker, Lital Keinan; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kelishadi, Roya; Kemper, Han C. G.; Kersting, Mathilde; Key, Timothy; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khalili, Davood; Khang, Young-Ho; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiechl, Stefan; Killewo, Japhet; Kim, Jeongseon; Klumbiene, Jurate; Kolle, Elin; Kolsteren, Patrick; Korrovits, Paul; Koskinen, Seppo; Kouda, Katsuyasu; Koziel, Slawomir; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Krokstad, Steinar; Kromhout, Daan; Kruger, Herculina S.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Kuciene, Renata; Kuh, Diana; Kujala, Urho M.; Kula, Krzysztof; Kulaga, Zbigniew; Kumar, R. Krishna; Kurjata, Pawel; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Lachat, Carl; Landrove, Orlando; Lanska, Vera; Lappas, Georg; Larijani, Bagher; Laugsand, Lars E.; Le, Nguyen Bao Khanh; Le, Tuyen D.; Leclercq, Catherine; Lee, Jeannette; Lee, Jeonghee; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lekhraj, Rampal; Leon-Munoz, Luz M.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Li, Yanping; Lilly, Christa L.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Fernanda Lima-Costa, M.; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Lin, Xu; Linneberg, Allan; Lissner, Lauren; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Lorbeer, Roberto; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Eugenio Lozano, Jose; Luksiene, Dalia; Lundqvist, Annamari; Lunet, Nuno; Lytsy, Per; Ma, Guansheng; Ma, Jun; Machado-Coelho, George L. L.; Machi, Suka; Maggi, Stefania; Magliano, Dianna J.; Majer, Marjeta; Makdisse, Marcia; Malekzadeh, Reza; Malhotra, Rahul; Rao, Kodavanti Mallikharjuna; Malyutina, Sofia; Manios, Yannis; Mann, Jim I.; Manzato, Enzo; Margozzini, Paula; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Marrugat, Jaume; Martorell, Reynaldo; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.; Matijasevich, Alicia; Matsha, Tandi E.; Mbanya, Jean Claude N.; Posso, Anselmo J. Mc Donald; McFarlane, Shelly R.; McGarvey, Stephen T.; McLachlan, Stela; McLean, Rachael M.; McNulty, Breige A.; Khir, Amir Sharifuddin Md; Mediene-Benchekor, Sounnia; Medzioniene, Jurate; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Meisinger, Christa; Menezes, Ana Maria B.; Menon, Geetha R.; Meshram, Indrapal I.; Metspalu, Andres; Mi, Jie; Mikkel, Kairit; Miller, Jody C.; Francisco Miquel, Juan; Jaime Miranda, J.; Misigoj-Durakovic, Marjeta; Mohamed, Mostafa K.; Mohammad, Kazem; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Mohan, Viswanathan; Yusoff, Muhammad Fadhli Mohd; Moller, Niels C.; Molnar, Denes; Momenan, Amirabbas; Monyeki, Kotsedi Daniel K.; Moreira, Leila B.; Morejon, Alain; Moreno, Luis A.; Morgan, Karen; Moschonis, George; Mossakowska, Malgorzata; Mostafa, Aya; Mota, Jorge; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeel; Motta, Jorge; Muiesan, Maria L.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Murphy, Neil; Mursu, Jaakko; Musil, Vera; Nagel, Gabriele; Naidu, Balkish M.; Nakamura, Harunobu; Namsna, Jana; Nang, Ei Ei K.; Nangia, Vinay B.; Narake, Sameer; Maria Navarrete-Munoz, Eva; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Neal, William A.; Nenko, Ilona; Nervi, Flavio; Nguyen, Nguyen D.; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Nieto-Martinez, Ramfis E.; Niiranen, Teemu J.; Ning, Guang; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Nishtar, Sania; Noale, Marianna; Noboa, Oscar A.; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Norat, Teresa; Noto, Davide; Al Nsour, Mohannad; O'Reilly, Dermot; Oh, Kyungwon; Olinto, Maria Teresa A.; Oliveira, Isabel O.; Omar, Mohd Azahadi; Onat, Altan; Ordunez, Pedro; Osmond, Clive; Ostojic, Sergej M.; Otero, Johanna A.; Overvad, Kim; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Paccaud, Fred Michel; Padez, Cristina; Pahomova, Elena; Pajak, Andrzej; Palli, Domenico; Palmieri, Luigi; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Panza, Francesco; Papandreou, Dimitrios; Parnell, Winsome R.; Parsaeian, Mahboubeh; Pecin, Ivan; Pednekar, Mangesh S.; Peer, Nasheeta; Peeters, Petra H.; Peixoto, Sergio Viana; Pelletier, Catherine; Peltonen, Markku; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Marina Perez, Rosa; Peters, Annette; Petkeviciene, Janina; Pham, Son Thai; Pigeot, Iris; Pikhart, Hynek; Pilav, Aida; Pilotto, Lorenza; Pitakaka, Freda; Plans-Rubio, Pedro; Polakowska, Maria; Polasek, Ozren; Porta, Miquel; Portegies, Marileen L. P.; Pourshams, Akram; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Prashant, Mathur; Price, Jacqueline F.; Puiu, Maria; Punab, Margus; Qasrawi, Radwan F.; Qorbani, Mostafa; Radic, Ivana; Radisauskas, Ricardas; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Raitakari, Olli; Raj, Manu; Rao, Sudha Ramachandra; Ramos, Elisabete; Rampal, Sanjay; Rangel Reina, Daniel A.; Rasmussen, Finn; Redon, Josep; Reganit, Paul Ferdinand M.; Ribeiro, Robespierre; Riboli, Elio; Rigo, Fernando; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.; Robinson, Sian M.; Robitaille, Cynthia; Rodriguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Rodriguez-Villamizar, Laura A.; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Rosengren, Annika; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Rui, Ornelas; Sandra Ruiz-Betancourt, Blanca; Russo Horimoto, Andrea R. V.; Rutkowski, Marcin; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Sachdev, Harshpal S.; Saidi, Olfa; Sakarya, Sibel; Salanave, Benoit; Salazar Martinez, Eduardo; Salmeron, Diego; Salomaa, Veikko; Salonen, Jukka T.; Salvetti, Massimo; Sanchez-Abanto, Jose; Sans, Susana; Santos, Diana; Santos, Ina S.; dos Santos, Renata Nunes; Santos, Rute; Saramies, Jouko L.; Sardinha, Luis B.; Margolis, Giselle Sarganas; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Savva, Savvas C.; Scazufca, Marcia; Schargrodsky, Herman; Schneider, Ione J.; Schultsz, Constance; Schutte, Aletta E.; Sen, Abhijit; Senbanjo, Idowu O.; Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Sharma, Sanjib K.; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Shibuya, Kenji; Shin, Dong Wook; Shin, Youchan; Siantar, Rosalynn; Sibai, Abla M.; Santos Silva, Diego Augusto; Simon, Mary; Simons, Judith; Simons, Leon A.; Sjotrom, Michael; Skovbjerg, Sine; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw; Smith, Margaret C.; Snijder, Marieke B.; So, Hung-Kwan; Sobngwi, Eugene; Soderberg, Stefan; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Sonestedt, Emily; Song, Yi; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Jerome, Charles Sossa; Soumare, Aicha; Staessen, Jan A.; Starc, Gregor; Stathopoulou, Maria G.; Stavreski, Bill; Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Stehle, Peter; Stein, Aryeh D.; Stergiou, George S.; Stessman, Jochanan; Stieber, Jutta; Stoeckl, Doris; Stocks, Tanja; Stokwiszewski, Jakub; Stronks, Karien; Strufaldi, Maria Wany; Sun, Chien-An; Sung, Yn-Tz; Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul; Sy, Rody G.; Tai, E. Shyong; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Tang, Line; Tang, Xun; Tanser, Frank; Tao, Yong; Tarawneh, Mohammed Rasoul; Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina B.; Taylor, Anne; Theobald, Holger; Thijs, Lutgarde; Thuesen, Betina H.; Tjonneland, Anne; Tolonen, Hanna K.; Topbas, Murat; Topor-Madry, Roman; Jose Tormo, Maria; Torrent, Maties; Traissac, Pierre; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trinh, Oanh T. H.; Trivedi, Atul; Tshepo, Lechaba; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Turley, Maria L.; Tynelius, Per; Tzourio, Christophe; Ueda, Peter; Ugel, Eunice; Ulmer, Hanno; Uusitalo, Hannu M. T.; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Valvi, Damaskini; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Herck, Koen; van Rossem, Lenie; van Valkengoed, Irene G. M.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vatten, Lars; Vega, Tomas; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Veronesi, Giovanni; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Verstraeten, Roosmarijn; Victora, Cesar G.; Viet, Lucie; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Vineis, Paolo; Vioque, Jesus; Virtanen, Jyrki K.; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Viswanathan, Bharathi; Vollenweider, Peter; Vrdoljak, Ana; Vrijheid, Martine; Wade, Alisha N.; Wagner, Aline; Walton, Janette; Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon Wan; Wang, Ming-Dong; Wang, Qian; Wang, Ya Xing; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Wareham, Nicholas; Wederkopp, Niels; Weerasekera, Deepa; Whincup, Peter H.; Widhalm, Kurt; Widyahening, Indah S.; Wiecek, Andrzej; Wijga, Alet H.; Wilks, Rainford J.; Willeit, Peter; Williams, Emmanuel A.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Wong, Tien Yin; Wong-McClure, Roy A.; Woo, Jean; Wu, Aleksander Giwercman; Wu, Frederick C.; Wu, Shou Ling; Xu, Haiquan; Yan, Weili; Yang, Xiaoguang; Ye, Xingwang; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Younger-Coleman, Novie O.; Yusoff, Ahmad F.; Zambon, Sabina; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Zeng, Yi; Zhao, Dong; Zhao, Wenhua; Zheng, Yingffeng; Zhu, Dan; Zimmermann, Esther; Zuniga Cisneros, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Background Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood

  20. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015 : a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19.1 million participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Bin; Bentham, James; Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Bixby, Honor; Danaei, Goodarz; Cowan, Melanie J.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Singh, Gitanjali M; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Bennett, James E.; Taddei, Cristina; Bilano, Ver; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M.; Djalalinia, Shirin; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Lugero, Charles; Peykari, Niloofar; Zhang, Wan Zhu; Lu, Yuan; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Riley, Leanne M.; Bovet, Pascal; Elliott, Paul; Gu, Dongfeng; Ikeda, Nayu; Jackson, Rod T.; Joffres, Michel; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lam, Tai Hing; Laxmaiah, Avula; Liu, Jing; Miranda, J. Jaime; Mondo, Charles K.; Neuhauser, Hannelore K.; Sundstrom, Johan; Smeeth, Liam; Soric, Maroje; Woodward, Mark; Ezzati, Majid; Abarca-Gomez, Leandra; Abdeen, Ziad A.; Rahim, Hanan Abdul; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin; Adams, Robert; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afsana, Kaosar; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Kromhout, Daan

    2017-01-01

    Background Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood

  1. Cardiovascular disease mortality and years of life lost attributable to non-optimal systolic blood pressure and hypertension in northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepanlou, Sadaf G; Newson, Roger B; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Masoud M; Rezanejad Asl, Parisa; Etemadi, Arash; Khademi, Hooman; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Pharoah, Paul D; Abnet, Christian C; Brennan, Paul; Bofetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M; Kamangar, Farin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-03-01

    High blood pressure is the second most important risk factor of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in Iran. It is imperative to estimate the burden of CVDs that can be averted if high blood pressure is controlled at the population level. The aim of the current study was to estimate the avertable CVD mortality in the setting of Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). Over 50,000 participants were recruited and followed for a median of 7 years. The exposures of interest in this study were non-optimal systolic blood pressure (SBP) and hypertension measured at baseline. Deaths by cause have been precisely recorded. The Population Attributable Fraction (PAF) of deaths and Years of Life Lost (YLLs) due to CVDs attributable to exposures of interest were calculated. Overall, 223 deaths due to ischemic heart disease (IHD), 207 deaths due to cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), and 460 deaths due to all CVDs could be averted if the SBP of all subjects in the study were optimal. Similarly, 5,560 YLLs due to IHD, 4,771 YLLs due to CVA, and 11,135 YLLs due to CVDs could be prevented if SBP were optimal. In all age groups, the avertable deaths and YLLs were higher due to IHD compared with CVA. Deaths and YLLs attributable to non-optimal SBP in women were less than men. A very large proportion of CVD deaths can be averted if blood pressure is controlled in Iran. Effective interventions in primary and secondary health care setting are mandatory to be implemented as early as possible.

  2. Does the position or contact pressure of the stethoscope make any difference to clinical blood pressure measurements: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP.

  3. Validation of the inverse pulse wave transit time series as surrogate of systolic blood pressure in MVAR modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, Pedro; Okida, Sergio; Oliveira, Maurício G; Moraes, Raimes

    2013-11-01

    Short-term cardiovascular regulation mediated by the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system has been investigated by multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) modeling, providing insightful analysis. MVAR models employ, as inputs, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and respiratory waveforms. ECG (from which HR series is obtained) and respiratory flow waveform (RFW) can be easily sampled from the patients. Nevertheless, the available methods for acquisition of beat-to-beat SBP measurements during exams hamper the wider use of MVAR models in clinical research. Recent studies show an inverse correlation between pulse wave transit time (PWTT) series and SBP fluctuations. PWTT is the time interval between the ECG R-wave peak and photoplethysmography waveform (PPG) base point within the same cardiac cycle. This study investigates the feasibility of using inverse PWTT (IPWTT) series as an alternative input to SBP for MVAR modeling of the cardiovascular regulation. For that, HR, RFW, and IPWTT series acquired from volunteers during postural changes and autonomic blockade were used as input of MVAR models. Obtained results show that IPWTT series can be used as input of MVAR models, replacing SBP measurements in order to overcome practical difficulties related to the continuous sampling of the SBP during clinical exams.

  4. Prospective clinical study to evaluate an oscillometric blood pressure monitor in pet rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Luca; Veladiano, Irene A; Schrank, Magdalena; Candaten, Matteo; Mollo, Antonio

    2018-02-27

    Rabbits are particularly sensitive to develop hypotension during sedation or anaesthesia. Values of systolic or mean non-invasive arterial blood pressure below 80 or 60 mmHg respectively are common under anaesthesia despite an ongoing surgery. A reliable method of monitoring arterial blood pressure is extremely important, although invasive technique is not always possible due to the anatomy and dimension of the artery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between a new oscillometric device for non-invasive arterial blood pressure measurement and the invasive method. Moreover the trending ability of the device, ability to identify changes in the same direction with the invasive methods, was evaluated as well as the sensibility of the device in identifying hypotension arbitrarily defined as invasive arterial blood pressure below 80 or 60 mmHg. Bland-Altman analysis for repeated measurements showed a poor agreement between the two methods; the oscillometric device overestimated the invasive arterial blood pressure, particularly at high arterial pressure values. The same analysis repeated considering oscillometric measurement that match invasive mean pressure lower or equal to 60 mmHg showed a decrease in biases and limits of agreement between methods. The trending ability of the device, evaluated with both the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot was poor. Concordance rate of mean arterial blood pressure was higher than systolic and diastolic pressure although inferior to 90%. The sensibility of the device in detecting hypotension defined as systolic or mean invasive arterial blood pressure lower than 80 or 60 mmHg was superior for mean oscillometric pressure rather than systolic. A sensitivity of 92% was achieved with an oscillometric measurement for mean pressure below 65 mmHg instead of 60 mmHg. Non-invasive systolic blood pressure is less sensitive as indicator of hypotension regardless of the cutoff limit considered. Although mean invasive

  5. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CHRONOTHERAPY IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH AN INSUFFICIENT DEGREE OF SLEEP-TIME SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE DECLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrenko O. V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP circadian rhythm violation, manifested as an insufficient degree of its sleep-time relative decline, is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. The main method of the correction is chronotherapeutic approach, when at least one antihypertensive drug is taken at bedtime. However, most researchers focus on normalizing the daily profile of systolic blood pressure (SBP and do not pay enough attention to changes in the daily profile of diastolic blood pressure (DBP and blood pressure in general. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of the chronotherapeutic approach on the SBP and DBP levels and the DBP daily profile in hypertensive patients with an insufficient degree of sleep-time relative SBP decline. The study included 12 patients with arterial hypertension (AH with an insufficient degree of sleep-time relative SBP decline. Participants were divided into two groups: group 1 included patients who take at least one antihypertensive drug at bedtime, group 2 – patients who take all antihypertensive drugs in the morning. All patients underwent 24-hour blood pressure monitoring using the computer system «Cardiosens» (KhAI Medica, Ukraine, with the oscillometric method of BP measuring when enrolling in the study and after 3 months. The type of SBP and DBP diurnal profile, the mean values of SBP, DBP and hyperbaric indices were determined and compared between groups 1 and 2 at each visit, as well as within groups between visits. The results showed that the SBP daily profile normalization in patients with insufficient degree of sleep-time relative SBP decline from group 2 was achieved only in 11 % of cases, and in group 1 SBP and DBP daily profile normalized in 1/3 patients. In some patients from group 2 SBP and DBP daily profile converted into the overdipper type, while in group 1 overdippers did not appear at the end of the study. It was concluded that conversion of daily DBP profile to overdipper as a consequence

  6. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015 : a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19·1 million participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, B.; Bentham, James; Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Bixby, Honor; Danaei, Goodarz; Cowan, Melanie J.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Singh, Gitanjali; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Bennett, James E.; Taddei, Cristina; Bilano, Ver; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M.; Djalalinia, Shirin; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Lugero, Charles; Peykari, Niloofar; Zhang, Wan Zhu; Lu, Yuan; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Riley, Leanne M.; Bovet, Pascal; Elliott, Paul; Gu, Dongfeng; Ikeda, Nayu; Jackson, Rod T.; Joffres, Michel; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lam, Tai Hing; Laxmaiah, Avula; Liu, Jing; Miranda, J. Jaime; Mondo, Charles K.; Neuhauser, Hannelore K.; Sundström, Johan; Smeeth, Liam; Sorić, Maroje; Woodward, Mark; Ezzati, Majid; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra; Abdeen, Ziad A.; Rahim, Hanan Abdul; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M.; Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin; Adams, Robert; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afsana, Kaosar; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Agyemang, Charles; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Al Raddadi, Rajaa; Al Woyatan, Rihab; Ali, Mohamed M.; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Aly, Eman; Amouyel, Philippe; Amuzu, Antoinette; Andersen, Lars Bo; Anderssen, Sigmund A.; Ängquist, Lars; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ansong, Daniel; Aounallah-Skhiri, Hajer; Araújo, Joana; Ariansen, Inger; Aris, Tahir; Arlappa, Nimmathota; Aryal, Krishna; Arveiler, Dominique; Assah, Felix K.; Assunção, Maria Cecília F.; Avdicová, Mária; Azevedo, Ana; Azizi, Fereidoun; Babu, Bontha V.; Bahijri, Suhad; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Bandosz, Piotr; Banegas, José R.; Barbagallo, Carlo M.; Barceló, Alberto; Barkat, Amina; Barros, Aluisio J.D.; Barros, Mauro V.; Bata, Iqbal; Batieha, Anwar M.; Baur, Louise A.; Beaglehole, Robert; Romdhane, Habiba Ben; Benet, Mikhail; Benson, Lowell S.; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Bernotiene, Gailute; Bettiol, Heloisa; Bhagyalaxmi, Aroor; Bharadwaj, Sumit; Bhargava, Santosh K.; Bi, Yufang; Bikbov, Mukharram; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bjertness, Espen; Björkelund, Cecilia; Blokstra, Anneke; Bo, Simona; Bobak, Martin; Boeing, Heiner; Boggia, Jose G.; Boissonnet, Carlos P.; Bongard, Vanina; Braeckman, Lutgart; Brajkovich, Imperia; Branca, Francesco; Breckenkamp, Juergen; Brenner, Hermann; Brewster, Lizzy M.; Bruno, Graziella; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Bugge, Anna; Burns, Con; Bursztyn, Michael; de León, Antonio Cabrera; Cacciottolo, Joseph; Cameron, Christine; Can, Günay; Cândido, Ana Paula C.; Capuano, Vincenzo; Cardoso, Viviane C.; Carlsson, Axel C.; Carvalho, Maria J.; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Caserta, Carmelo A.; Chamukuttan, Snehalatha; Chan, Angelique W.; Chan, Queenie; Chaturvedi, Himanshu K.; Chaturvedi, Nishi; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Fangfang; Chen, Huashuai; Chen, Shuohua; Chen, Zhengming; Cheng, Yu Ching; Dekkaki, Imane Cherkaoui; Chetrit, Angela; Chiolero, Arnaud; Chiou, Shu Ti; Chirita-Emandi, Adela; Cho, Belong; Cho, Yumi; Chudek, Jerzy; Cifkova, Renata; Claessens, Frank; Clays, Els; Concin, Hans; Cooper, Cyrus; Cooper, Rachel; Coppinger, Tara C.; Costanzo, Simona; Cottel, Dominique; Cowell, Chris; Craig, Cora L.; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Cruz, Juan J.; D'Arrigo, Graziella; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Dallongeville, Jean; Damasceno, Albertino; Danaei, Goodarz; Dankner, Rachel; Dantoft, Thomas M.; Dauchet, Luc; De Backer, Guy; De Bacquer, Dirk; de Gaetano, Giovanni; De Henauw, Stefaan; De Smedt, Delphine; Deepa, Mohan; Dehghan, Abbas; Delisle, Hélène; Deschamps, Valérie; Dhana, Klodian; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto F.; Dias-da-Costa, Juvenal Soares; Diaz, Alejandro; Dickerson, Ty T.; Do, Ha T.P.; Dobson, Annette J.; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Donoso, Silvana P.; Döring, Angela; Doua, Kouamelan; Drygas, Wojciech; Dulskiene, Virginija; Džakula, Aleksandar; Dzerve, Vilnis; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elzbieta; Eggertsen, Robert; Ekelund, Ulf; El Ati, Jalila; Ellert, Ute; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erasmus, Rajiv T.; Erem, Cihangir; Eriksen, Louise; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge; Evans, Alun; Faeh, David; Fall, Caroline H.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Felix-Redondo, Francisco J.; Ferguson, Trevor S.; Fernández-Bergés, Daniel; Ferrante, Daniel; Ferrari, Marika; Ferreccio, Catterina; Ferrieres, Jean; Finn, Joseph D.; Fischer, Krista; Föger, Bernhard; Foo, Leng Huat; Forslund, Ann Sofie; Forsner, Maria; Fortmann, Stephen P.; Fouad, Heba M.; Francis, Damian K.; do Carmo Franco, Maria; Franco, Oscar H.; Frontera, Guillermo; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.; Fujita, Yuki; Furusawa, Takuro; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Gareta, Dickman; Garnett, Sarah P.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Gasull, Magda; Gates, Louise; Gavrila, Diana; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Ghasemian, Anoosheh; Ghimire, Anup; Giampaoli, Simona; Gianfagna, Francesco; Giovannelli, Jonathan; Goldsmith, Rebecca A.; Gonçalves, Helen; Gross, Marcela Gonzalez; González Rivas, Juan P.; Gottrand, Frederic; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Grafnetter, Dušan; Grajda, Aneta; Gregor, Ronald D.; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Grøntved, Anders; Gruden, Grabriella; Grujic, Vera; Gu, Dongfeng; Guan, Ong Peng; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guerrero, Ramiro; Guessous, Idris; Guimaraes, Andre L.; Gulliford, Martin C.; Gunnlaugsdottir, Johanna; Gunter, Marc J.; Gupta, Prakash C.; Gureje, Oye; Gurzkowska, Beata; Gutierrez, Laura; Gutzwiller, Felix; Hadaegh, Farzad; Halkjær, Jytte; Hambleton, Ian R.; Hardy, Rebecca; Harikumar, Rachakulla; Hata, Jun; Hayes, Alison J.; He, Jiang; Hendriks, Marleen Elisabeth; Henriques, Ana; Cadena, Leticia Hernandez; Herrala, Sauli; Heshmat, Ramin; Hihtaniemi, Ilpo Tapani; Ho, Sai Yin; Ho, Suzanne C.; Hobbs, Michael; Hofman, Albert; Dinc, Gonul Horasan; Hormiga, Claudia M.; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Houti, Leila; Howitt, Christina; Htay, Thein Thein; Htet, Aung Soe; Hu, Yonghua; Huerta, José María; Husseini, Abdullatif S.; Huybrechts, Inge; Hwalla, Nahla; Iacoviello, Licia; Iannone, Anna G.; Ibrahim, M. Mohsen; Ikram, M. Arfan; Irazola, Vilma E.; Islam, Muhammad; Ivkovic, Vanja; Iwasaki, Masanori; Jackson, Rod T.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Jafar, Tazeen; Jamrozik, Konrad; Janszky, Imre; Jasienska, Grazyna; Jelakovic, Bojan; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Joffres, Michel; Johansson, Mattias; Jonas, Jost B; Jørgensen, Torben; Joshi, Pradeep; Juolevi, Anne; Jurak, Gregor; Jureša, Vesna; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kafatos, Anthony; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi; Kasaeian, Amir; Katz, Joanne; Kauhanen, Jussi; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Kavousi, Maryam; Kazakbaeva, Gyulli; Keil, Ulrich; Boker, Lital Keinan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kelishadi, Roya; Kemper, Han C.G.; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Kersting, Mathilde; Key, Timothy J.; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khalili, Davood; Khang, Young Ho; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kiechl, Stefan; Killewo, Japhet; Kim, Jeongseon; Klumbiene, Jurate; Kolle, Elin; Kolsteren, Patrick; Korrovits, Paul; Koskinen, Seppo; Kouda, Katsuyasu; Koziel, Slawomir; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Krokstad, Steinar; Kromhout, Daan; Kruger, Herculina S.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Kuciene, Renata; Kuh, Diana; Kujala, Urho M.; Kula, Krzysztof; Kulaga, Zbigniew; Krishna Kumar, R.; Kurjata, Pawel; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lachat, Carl; Lam, Tai Hing; Landrove, Orlando; Lanska, Vera; Lappas, Georg; Larijani, Bagher; Laugsand, Lars E.; Laxmaiah, Avula; Le Nguyen Bao, Khanh; Le, Tuyen D.; Leclercq, Catherine; Lee, Jeannette; Lee, Jeonghee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lekhraj, Rampal; León-Muñoz, Luz M.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Li, Yanping; Lilly, Christa L.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda; Lin, Hsien Ho; Lin, Xu; Linneberg, Allan; Lissner, Lauren; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Lorbeer, Roberto; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Lozano, José Eugenio; Luksiene, Dalia; Lundqvist, Annamari; Lunet, Nuno; Lytsy, Per; Ma, Guansheng; Ma, Jun; Machado-Coelho, George L.L.; Machi, Suka; Maggi, Stefania; Magliano, Dianna J.; Majer, Marjeta; Makdisse, Marcia; Malekzadeh, Reza; Malhotra, Rahul; Rao, Kodavanti Mallikharjuna; Malyutina, Sofia; Manios, Yannis; Mann, Jim I.; Manzato, Enzo; Margozzini, Paula; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Marrugat, Jaume; Martorell, Reynaldo; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.; Matijasevich, Alicia; Matsha, Tandi E.; Mbanya, Jean Claude N.; McDonald Posso, Anselmo J.; McFarlane, Shelly R.; McGarvey, Stephen T.; McLachlan, Stela; McLean, Rachael M.; McNulty, Breige A.; MdKhir, Amir Sharifuddin; Mediene-Benchekor, Sounnia; Medzioniene, Jurate; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Meisinger, Christa; Menezes, Ana Maria B.; Menon, Geetha R.; Meshram, Indrapal I.; Metspalu, Andres; Mi, Jie; Mikkel, Kairit; Miller, Jody C.; Miquel, Juan-Francisco; Mišigoj-Durakovic, Marjeta; Mohamed, Mostafa K.; Mohammad, Kazem; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mohd Yusoff, Muhammad Fadhli; Møller, Niels C.; Molnár, Dénes; Momenan, Amirabbas; Mondo, Charles K.; Monyeki, Kotsedi Daniel K.; Moreira, Leila B.; Morejon, Alain; Moreno, Luis A.; Morgan, Karen; Moschonis, George; Mossakowska, Malgorzata; Mota, Jorge; Mostafa, Aya; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeel; Motta, Jorge; Muiesan, Maria L.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Murphy, Neil; Mursu, Jaakko; Musil, Vera; Nagel, Gabriele; Naidu, Balkish M.; Nakamura, Harunobu; Námešná, Jana; Nang, Ei Ei K.; Nangia, Vinay B.; Narake, Sameer; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva Maria; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Neal, William A.; Nenko, Ilona; Nervi, Flavio; Nguyen, Nguyen D.; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis E.; Niiranen, Teemu J.; Ning, Guang; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Nishtar, Sania; Noale, Marianna; Noboa, Oscar A.; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Norat, Teresa; Noto, Davide; Al Nsour, Mohannad; O'Reilly, Dermot; Oh, Kyungwon; Olinto, Maria Teresa A.; Oliveira, Isabel O.; Omar, Mohd Azahadi; Onat, Altan; Ordunez, Pedro; Osmond, Clive; Ostojic, Sergej M.; Otero, Johanna A.; Overvad, Kim; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Paccaud, Fred Michel; Padez, Cristina; Pahomova, Elena; Pajak, Andrzej; Palli, Domenico; Palmieri, Luigi; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Panza, Francesco; Papandreou, Dimitrios; Parnell, Winsome R.; Parsaeian, Mahboubeh; Pecin, Ivan; Pednekar, Mangesh S.; Peer, Nasheeta; Peeters, Petra H.; Peixoto, Sergio Viana; Pelletier, Catherine; Peltonen, Markku; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Pérez, Rosa Marina; Peters, Annette; Petkeviciene, Janina; Pham, Son Thai; Pigeot, Iris; Pikhart, Hynek; Pilav, Aida; Pilotto, Lorenza; Pitakaka, Freda; Plans-Rubió, Pedro; Polakowska, Maria; Polašek, Ozren; Porta, Miquel; Portegies, Marileen L.P.; Pourshams, Akram; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Prashant, Mathur; Price, Jacqueline F.; Puiu, Maria; Punab, Margus; Qasrawi, Radwan F.; Qorbani, Mostafa; Radic, Ivana; Radisauskas, Ricardas; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raj, Manu; Rao, Sudha Ramachandra; Ramachandran, Ambady; Ramos, Elisabete; Rampal, Sanjay; Rangel Reina, Daniel A.; Rasmussen, Finn; Redon, Josep; Reganit, Paul Ferdinand M.; Ribeiro, Robespierre; Riboli, Elio; Rigo, Fernando; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.; Robinson, Sian M.; Robitaille, Cynthia; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; del Cristo Rodriguez-Perez, María; Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Rosengren, Annika; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Rui, Ornelas; Ruiz-Betancourt, Blanca Sandra; Russo Horimoto, Andrea R.V.; Rutkowski, Marcin; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Sachdev, Harshpal S.; Saidi, Olfa; Sakarya, Sibel; Salanave, Benoit; Martinez, Eduardo Salazar; Salmerón, Diego; Salomaa, Veikko; Salonen, Jukka T.; Salvetti, Massimo; Sánchez-Abanto, Jose; Sans, Susana; Santos, Diana; Santos, Ina S.; dos Santos, Renata Nunes; Santos, Rute; Saramies, Jouko L.; Sardinha, Luis B.; Margolis, Giselle Sarganas; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Saum, Kai Uwe; Savva, Savvas C.; Scazufca, Marcia; Schargrodsky, Herman; Schneider, Ione J.; Schultsz, Constance; Schutte, Aletta E.; Schutte, Aletta E.; Sen, Abhijit; Senbanjo, Idowu O.; Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Sharma, Sanjib K.; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Shibuya, Kenji; Shin, Dong Wook; Shin, Youchan; Siantar, Rosalynn; Sibai, Abla M.; Santos Silva, Diego Augusto; Simon, Mary; Simons, Judith; Simons, Leon A; Sjöström, Michael; Skovbjerg, Sine; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw; Smith, Margaret C.; Snijder, Marieke B.; So, Hung Kwan; Sobngwi, Eugène; Söderberg, Stefan; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Sonestedt, Emily; Song, Yi; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Soric, Maroje; Jérome, Charles Sossa; Soumare, Aicha; Staessen, Jan A.; Starc, Gregor; Stathopoulou, Maria G.; Stavreski, Bill; Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Stehle, Peter; Stein, Aryeh D.; Stergiou, George S.; Stessman, Jochanan; Stieber, Jutta; Stöckl, Doris; Stocks, Tanja; Stokwiszewski, Jakub; Stronks, Karien; Strufaldi, Maria Wany; Sun, Chien An; Sung, Yn Tz; Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul; Sy, Rody G.; Tai, E. Shyong; Tammesoo, Mari Liis; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Tang, Line; Tang, Xun; Tao, Yong; Tanser, Frank; Tarawneh, Mohammed Rasoul; Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina B.; Taylor, Anne; Theobald, Holger; Thijs, Lutgarde; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbek; Tjonneland, Anne; Tolonen, Hanna K.; Tolstrup, Janne S.; Topbas, Murat; Topór-Madry, Roman; Tormo, María José; Torrent, Maties; Traissac, Pierre; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trinh, Oanh T.H.; Trivedi, Atul; Tshepo, Lechaba; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Turley, Maria L.; Tynelius, Per; Tzourio, Christophe; Ueda, Peter; Ugel, Eunice; Ulmer, Hanno; Uusitalo, Hannu M.T.; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Valvi, Damaskini; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Van Herck, Koen; van Rossem, Lenie; Van Valkengoed, Irene G M; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vatten, Lars; Vega, Tomas; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Veronesi, Giovanni; Verschuren, W. M.Monique; Verstraeten, Roosmarijn; Victora, Cesar G.; Viet, Lucie; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Vineis, Paolo; Vioque, Jesus; Virtanen, Jyrki K.; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Viswanathan, Bharathi; Vollenweider, Peter; Voutilainen, Sari; Vrdoljak, Ana; Vrijheid, Martine; Wade, Alisha N.; Wagner, Aline; Walton, Janette; Wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon; Wang, Ming Dong; Wang, Qian; Wang, Ya Xing; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wederkopp, Niels; Weerasekera, Deepa; Whincup, Peter H.; Widhalm, Kurt; Widyahening, Indah S.; Wijga, Alet H; Wiecek, Andrzej; Wilks, Rainford J.; Willeit, Johann; Willeit, Peter; Williams, Emmanuel A.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Wong, Tien-Yin; Wong-McClure, Roy A.; Woo, Jean; Woodward, Mark; Woodward, Mark; Wu, Aleksander Giwercman; Wu, Frederick C.; Wu, Shou Ling; Xu, Haiquan; Yan, Weili; Yang, Xiaoguang; Ye, Xingwang; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Younger-Coleman, Novie O.; Yusoff, Ahmad F.; Yusoff, Muhammad Fadhli M.; Zambon, Sabina; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhao, Dong; Zhao, Wenhua; Zheng, Yingffeng; Zimmermann, Esther; Cisneros, Julio Zuñiga; Zhu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Background Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood

  7. The usefulness of contrast during exercise echocardiography for the assessment of systolic pulmonary pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Ana

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAPs can be accurately estimated, non-invasively, using continuous-wave Doppler (CWD ultrasound measurement of the peak velocity of a tricuspid regurgitant (TR jet. However, it is often difficult to obtain adequate tricuspid regurgitation signals for measurement of PAPs, what could lead to its underestimation. Therefore, utilization of air-blood-saline contrast has been implemented for the improvement of Doppler signal in several clinical contexts. It is now recommended in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension. Physical activity is severely restricted in patients with PAH, being exertional dypnea the most typical symptom. Exercise stress echo-Doppler imaging allows assessment of the response to exercise. It is an excellent screening test for patients with suspected PAH. Our purpose was to evaluate the value and accuracy of agitated saline with blood contrast echocardiography, in the improvement of the Doppler signal, to quantify PAPs during treadmill exercise-echocardiography. Purpose To evaluate the value of contrast echocardiography, using agitated saline with blood, in the improvement of the Doppler signal used to quantify the pulmonary artery systolic pressure during exercise. Methods From a total of 41 patients (pts, we studied 38 pts (93%, 35 women, aged 54 ± 12 years-old. 27 with the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, 10 with history of pulmonary embolism and one patient with a suspected idiopathic PAH, who were referred to the Unity of Heart Failure and Pulmonary Hypertension for screening of PAH. According to the Unity protocol, a transthoracic echocardiogram was made, in left decubitus (LD, with evaluation of right ventricle-right atria gradient (RV/RAg. A peripheral venous access was obtained, with a 3-way stopcock and the patients were placed in orthostatism (O, with a new evaluation of RV/RAg. Exercise echocardiography (EE was begun, with evaluation of RV

  8. Central blood pressure in children and adolescents: non-invasive development and testing of novel transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T Y; Qasem, A; Ayer, J G; Butlin, M; O'Meagher, S; Melki, C; Marks, G B; Avolio, A; Celermajer, D S; Skilton, M R

    2017-12-01

    Central blood pressure can be estimated from peripheral pulses in adults using generalised transfer functions (TF). We sought to create and test age-specific non-invasively developed TFs in children, with comparison to a pre-existing adult TF. We studied healthy children from two sites at two time points, 8 and 14 years of age, split by site into development and validation groups. Radial and carotid pressure waveforms were obtained by applanation tonometry. Central systolic pressure was derived from carotid waveforms calibrated to brachial mean and diastolic pressures. Age-specific TFs created in the development groups (n=50) were tested in the validation groups aged 8 (n=137) and 14 years (n=85). At 8 years of age, the age-specific TF estimated 82, 99 and 100% of central systolic pressure values within 5, 10 and 15 mm Hg of their measured values, respectively. This TF overestimated central systolic pressure by 2.2 (s.d. 3.7) mm Hg, compared to being underestimated by 5.6 (s.d. 3.9) mm Hg with the adult TF. At 14 years of age, the age-specific TF estimated 60, 87 and 95% of values within 5, 10 and 15 mm Hg of their measured values, respectively. This TF underestimated central systolic pressure by 0.5 (s.d. 6.7) mm Hg, while the adult TF underestimated it by 6.8 (s.d. 6.0) mm Hg. In conclusion, age-specific TFs more accurately predict central systolic pressure measured at the carotid artery in children than an existing adult TF.

  9. Prospective blood pressure measurement in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, V G; Yadav, B; Jeyaseelan, L; Deborah, M N; Jacob, S; Alexander, S; Varughese, S; John, G T

    2014-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control at home is difficult when managed only with office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM). In this prospective study, the reliability of BP measurements in renal transplant patients with OBPM and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) was compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) as the gold standard. Adult patients who had living-related renal transplantation from March 2007 to February 2008 had BP measured by two methods; OBPM and ABPM at pretransplantation, 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th), and 9(th) months and all the three methods: OBPM, ABPM, and HBPM at 6 months after transplantation. A total of 49 patients, age 35 ± 11 years, on prednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate were evaluated. A total of 39 were males (79.6%). Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) measured by OBPM were higher than HBPM when compared with ABPM. When assessed using OBPM and awake ABPM, both SBP and DBP were significantly overestimated by OBPM with mean difference of 3-12 mm Hg by office SBP and 6-8 mm Hg for office DBP. When HBPM was compared with mean ABPM at 6 months both the SBP and DBP were overestimated by and 7 mm Hg respectively. At 6 months post transplantation, when compared with ABPM, OBPM was more specific than HBPM in diagnosing hypertension (98% specificity, Kappa: 0.88 vs. 89% specificity, Kappa: 0.71). HBPM was superior to OBPM in identifying patients achieving goal BP (89% specificity, Kappa: 0.71 vs. 50% specificity Kappa: 0.54). In the absence of a gold standard for comparison the latent class model analysis still showed that ABPM was the best tool for diagnosing hypertension and monitoring patients reaching targeted control. OBPM remains an important tool for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in renal transplant recipients. HBPM and ABPM could be used to achieve BP control.

  10. Prospective blood pressure measurement in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V G David

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP control at home is difficult when managed only with office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM. In this prospective study, the reliability of BP measurements in renal transplant patients with OBPM and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM was compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM as the gold standard. Adult patients who had living-related renal transplantation from March 2007 to February 2008 had BP measured by two methods; OBPM and ABPM at pretransplantation, 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th , and 9 th months and all the three methods : OBPM, ABPM, and HBPM at 6 months after transplantation. A total of 49 patients, age 35 ± 11 years, on prednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate were evaluated. A total of 39 were males (79.6%. Systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP measured by OBPM were higher than HBPM when compared with ABPM. When assessed using OBPM and awake ABPM, both SBP and DBP were significantly overestimated by OBPM with mean difference of 3-12 mm Hg by office SBP and 6-8 mm Hg for office DBP. When HBPM was compared with mean ABPM at 6 months both the SBP and DBP were overestimated by and 7 mm Hg respectively. At 6 months post transplantation, when compared with ABPM, OBPM was more specific than HBPM in diagnosing hypertension (98% specificity, Kappa : 0.88 vs. 89% specificity, Kappa : 0.71. HBPM was superior to OBPM in identifying patients achieving goal BP (89% specificity, Kappa : 0.71 vs. 50% specificity Kappa : 0.54. In the absence of a gold standard for comparison the latent class model analysis still showed that ABPM was the best tool for diagnosing hypertension and monitoring patients reaching targeted control. OBPM remains an important tool for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in renal transplant recipients. HBPM and ABPM could be used to achieve BP control.

  11. Retinopathy of Prematurity Is Associated with Increased Systolic Blood Pressure in Adults Who Were Born Preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Anna; Jacobson, Lena; Östergren, Jan; Hellström, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Adults born preterm are at risk of developing cardiovascular morbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and blood pressure (BP) and salivary cortisol levels during adulthood. Sixty-nine subjects (mean age 22.6 years) were included. Subjects were adults who were: (a) ex-preterm infants with severe ROP (n = 22), born at gestational age (GA) <30 weeks with a birth weight (BW) <1,000 g, (b) ex-preterm infants with no/mild ROP (n = 21), born at GA <28 weeks with a BW <1,000 g, or (c) full-term controls (n = 26). Anthropometric data, office BP, ambulatory BP, and morning and evening salivary cortisol were analyzed. As adults, ex-preterm infants with severe ROP had on average 7.4 mm Hg higher systolic office BP than those with no/mild ROP (p = 0.019) and controls (p = 0.007). A high cortisol level, tall height, and severe ROP were independent predictors of higher ambulatory systolic BP during adulthood in forward stepwise regression analysis, independent of GA. Our results indicate that preterm infants with severe abnormal retinal vascular development during the neonatal period may be at an increased risk for increased BP during adulthood. We found no differences between those with no/mild ROP as infants and controls with regard to BP data. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. How well can blood pressure be controlled? Progress report on the Systolic Hypertension in Europe Follow-Up Study (Syst-Eur 2

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    Sarti Cinzia

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled Systolic Hypertension in Europe trial (Syst-Eur 1 proved that blood pressure (BP lowering therapy starting with nitrendipine reduces the risk of cardiovascular complications in elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension. In an attempt to confirm the safety of long-term antihypertensive therapy based on a dihydropyridine, the Syst-Eur patients remained in open follow-up after the end of Syst-Eur 1. This paper presents the second progress report of this follow-up study (Syst-Eur 2. It describes BP control and adherence to study medications. Methods After the end of Syst-Eur 1 all patients, treated either actively or with placebo, were invited either to continue or to start antihypertensive treatment with the same drugs as previously used in the active treatment arm. In order to reach the target BP (sitting SBP Results Of the 3787 eligible patients, 3516 (93% entered Syst-Eur 2. At the last available visit, 72% of the patients were taking nitrendipine. SBP/DBP at entry in Syst-Eur 2 averaged 160/83 mmHg in the former placebo group and 151/80 mmHg in the former active-treatment group. At the last follow-up visit SBP/DBP in the patients previously randomised to placebo or active treatment had decreased by 16/5 mmHg and 7/5 mmHg, respectively. The target BP was reached by 74% of the patients. Conclusion Substantial reductions in systolic BP may be achieved in older patients with isolated systolic hypertension with a treatment strategy starting with the dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, nitrendipine, with the possible addition of enalapril and/or hydrochlorothiazide.

  13. Alterations of Blood Flow Through Arteries Following Atherectomy and the Impact on Pressure Variation and Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Brian D; Vallez, Lauren J; Sun, Biyuan; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany B; Abraham, John P; Staniloae, Cezar S

    2016-09-01

    Simulations were made of the pressure and velocity fields throughout an artery before and after removal of plaque using orbital atherectomy plus adjunctive balloon angioplasty or stenting. The calculations were carried out with an unsteady computational fluid dynamic solver that allows the fluid to naturally transition to turbulence. The results of the atherectomy procedure leads to an increased flow through the stenotic zone with a coincident decrease in pressure drop across the stenosis. The measured effect of atherectomy and adjunctive treatment showed decrease the systolic pressure drop by a factor of 2.3. Waveforms obtained from a measurements were input into a numerical simulation of blood flow through geometry obtained from medical imaging. From the numerical simulations, a detailed investigation of the sources of pressure loss was obtained. It is found that the major sources of pressure drop are related to the acceleration of blood through heavily occluded cross sections and the imperfect flow recovery downstream. This finding suggests that targeting only the most occluded parts of a stenosis would benefit the hemodynamics. The calculated change in systolic pressure drop through the lesion was a factor of 2.4, in excellent agreement with the measured improvement. The systolic and cardiac-cycle-average pressure results were compared with measurements made in a multi-patient study treated with orbital atherectomy and adjunctive treatment. The agreements between the measured and calculated systolic pressure drop before and after the treatment were within 3%. This excellent agreement adds further confidence to the results. This research demonstrates the use of orbital atherectomy to facilitate balloon expansion to restore blood flow and how pressure measurements can be utilized to optimize revascularization of occluded peripheral vessels.

  14. Validation of the AVITA BPM63S upper arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Liu, Ming; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the AVITA BPM63S upper arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (14 women, mean age of 47 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the AVITA BPM63S device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. All the blood pressure requirements were fulfilled. The AVITA BPM63S device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 68/99, 89/99, and 96/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 75/99, 95/99, and 97/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also achieved the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-four and 25 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). One and two participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had all three device-observers differences greater than 5 mmHg. The AVITA BPM63S automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement at home in adults.

  15. Microalbuminuria Measured by three Different Methods, Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Elderly Swedish Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gösta Florvall

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalbuminuria is associated with hypertension and is a strong risk factor for subsequent chronic disease, both renal and coronary heart disease (CHD, Presently there are several methods available for measurement of microalbuminuria. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the three different methods gave similar information or if one of the assays were superior to the others. Blood pressure, inflammatory markers and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity were correlated with urine albumin analysed with a point-of-care testing (POCT instrument, nephelometric determination of albumin and albumin/creatinine ratio in elderly males. The study population consisted of 103 diabetic and 603 nondiabetic males (age 77 years in a cross-sectional study. We analyzed urine albumin with a HemoCue® Urine Albumin POCT instrument and a ProSpec® nephelometer and albumin/creatinine ratio. There were strong correlations between both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and all three urine albumin methods (p < 0.0001. There were also significant correlations between the different urine albumin measurements and serum amyloid A component, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. The three different urine albumin methods studied provided similar information in relation to cardiovascular disease. There was a strong correlation between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and microalbuminuria in both the whole study population and in nondiabetic males emphasizing the role of hypertension in glomerular damage. The good correlation between the studied urine albumin measurements show that all three methods can be used for monitoring urine albumin excretion.

  16. [Intervention of systolic pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in rats under cold stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C F; Wang, S G; Peng, Y G; Shi, Y; Du, Y P; Shi, G X; Wen, T; Wang, Y K; Su, H

    2016-06-20

    To investigate the effects of different drugs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in spontaneously hypertensive rats under cold stress. A total of 40 male spontaneously hypertensive rats aged 10 weeks (160~200 g) were given adaptive feeding for 7 days at a temperature of 20±1°C and then randomly divided into control group, cold stress group, metoprolol group, amlodipine group, and benazepril group, with 8 rats in each group. SBP, body weight, and heart rate were measured once a week. After the rats were sacrificed by exsanguination, left ventricular weight (LVW) was measured, and left ventricular weight index (LVWI; mg/g) was calculated. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure the concentrations of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin-II (Ang-II) in plasma and myocardium, and the chemical method was used to measure the concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) in plasma and myocardium. RT-PCR was used to measure the mRNA expression of endothelin-A receptor. Compared with the cold stress group, all medication groups showed significant reductions in SBP since week 5 (Pcold stress group showed a significant increase in LVWI compared with the control group (3.38±0.27 mg/g vs 2.89±0.19 mg/g, Pcold stress group (2.98±0.28 mg/g vs 3.38±0.27 mg/g, Pcold stress group showed a significant reduction in plasma NO concentration compared with the control group (104.9±19.5 μmol/L vs 129.3±17.8 μmol/L, Pcold stress group, all the medication groups showed significant increases in blood NO concentration (Pcold stress group showed a significant increase in myocardial ET-1 concentration compared with the control group (6.3±1.5 pg/100 mg vs 4.5±1.9 pg/100 mg, Pcold stress group, the amlodipine group showed a significant reduction in myocardial ET-1 concentration (4.4±1.0 pg/100 mg vs 6.3±1.5 pg/100 mg, Pcold stress group had significantly higher mRNA expression of endothelin-A receptor than the control group (0.86±0.23 vs 0.45±0.16, Pcold

  17. Evaluation of the impact of atmospheric pressure in different seasons on blood pressure in patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Marek; Cieślik-Guerra, Urszula I; Kotas, Rafał; Mazur, Piotr; Marańda, Witold; Piotrowicz, Maciej; Sakowicz, Bartosz; Napieralski, Andrzej; Trzos, Ewa; Uznańska-Loch, Barbara; Rechciński, Tomasz; Kurpesa, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure is the most objective weather factor because regardless of if outdoors or indoors it affects all objects in the same way. The majority of previous studies have used the average daily values of atmospheric pressure in a bioclimatic analysis and have found no correlation with blood pressure changes. The main objective of our research was to assess the relationship between atmospheric pressure recorded with a frequency of 1 measurement per minute and the results of 24-h blood pressure monitoring in patients with treated hypertension in different seasons in the moderate climate of the City of Łódź (Poland). The study group consisted of 1662 patients, divided into 2 equal groups (due to a lower and higher average value of atmospheric pressure). Comparisons between blood pressure values in the 2 groups were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. We observed a significant difference in blood pressure recorded during the lower and higher range of atmospheric pressure: on the days of the spring months systolic (p = 0.043) and diastolic (p = 0.005) blood pressure, and at nights of the winter months systolic blood pressure (p = 0.013). A significant inverse relationship between atmospheric pressure and blood pressure during the spring days and, only for systolic blood pressure, during winter nights was observed. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):783-792. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  18. Inter-arm blood pressure difference in hospitalized elderly patients--is it consistent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Weiss, Avraham; Beloosesky, Yichayaou; Morag-Koren, Nira; Green, Hefziba; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-07-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure difference (IAD) is recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. Its reproducibility in the elderly is unknown. The authors determined the prevalence and reproducibility of IAD in hospitalized elderly patients. Blood pressure was measured simultaneously in both arms on two different days in elderly individuals hospitalized in a geriatric ward. The study included 364 elderly patients (mean age, 85±5 years). Eighty-four patients (23%) had systolic IAD >10 and 62 patients (17%) had diastolic IAD >10 mm Hg. A total of 319 patients had two blood pressure measurements. Systolic and diastolic IAD remained in the same category in 203 (64%) and 231 (72%) patients, respectively. Correlations of systolic and diastolic IAD between the two measurements were poor. Consistency was not affected by age, body mass index, comorbidities, or treatment. IAD is extremely common in hospitalized elderly patients, but, because of poor consistency, its clinical significance in this population is uncertain. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The effect of comorbidity on glycemic control and systolic blood pressure in type 2 diabetes: a cohort study with 5 year follow-up in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijks, H.; Biermans, M.; Bor, H.; Weel, C. van; Lagro-Janssen, T.; Grauw, W. de; Schermer, T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To explore the longitudinal effect of chronic comorbid diseases on glycemic control (HbA1C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods: In a representative primary care cohort of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in The Netherlands (n = 610), we tested

  20. Pressure-volume Relationship in the Stress-echocardiography Laboratory: Does (Left Ventricular End-diastolic) Size Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardini, Tonino; Mulieri, Louis A; Salvadori, Stefano; Costantino, Marco Fabio; Scali, Maria Chiara; Marzilli, Mario; Picano, Eugenio

    2017-02-01

    The variation between rest and peak stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation is an afterload-independent index of left ventricular contractility. Whether and to what extent it depends on end-diastolic volume remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the dependence of the delta rest-stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation on end-diastolic volume in patients with negative stress echo and all ranges of resting left ventricular function. We analyzed interpretable data obtained in 891 patients (593 men, age 63 ± 12 years) with ejection fraction 47% ± 12%: 338 were normal or near-normal or hypertensive; 229 patients had coronary artery disease; and 324 patients had ischemic or nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. They were studied with exercise (n = 172), dipyridamole (n = 482) or dobutamine (n = 237) stress echocardiography. The end-systolic pressure-volume relation was evaluated at rest and peak stress from raw measurement of systolic arterial pressure by cuff sphygmomanometer and end-systolic volume by biplane Simpson rule 2-dimensional echocardiography. Absolute values of delta rest-stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation were higher for exercise and dobutamine than for dipyridamole. In the overall population, an inverse relationship between end-systolic pressure-volume relation and end-diastolic volume was present at rest (r 2 = 0.69, P stress (r 2 = 0.56, P stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation was considered (r 2 = 0.13). Left ventricular end-diastolic volume does not affect the rest-stress changes in end-systolic pressure-volume relation in either normal or abnormal left ventricles during physical or pharmacological stress. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyperglycemia and nocturnal systolic blood pressure are associatedwith left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in hypertensive diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felício João S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine if hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients, when compared to patients with essential hypertension have an increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI and a worse diastolic function, and if this fact would be related to 24-h pressoric levels changes. Methods Ninety-one hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM (group-1 [G1], 59 essential hypertensive patients (group-2 [G2] and 26 healthy controls (group-3 [G3] were submitted to 24-h Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM and echocardiography (ECHO with Doppler. We calculated an average of fasting blood glucose (AFBG values of G1 from the previous 4.2 years and a glycemic control index (GCI (percentual of FBG above 200 mg/dl. Results G1 and G2 did not differ on average of diurnal systolic and diastolic BP. However, G1 presented worse diastolic function and a higher average of nocturnal systolic BP (NSBP and LVMI (NSBP = 132 ± 18 vs 124 ± 14 mmHg; P 2; P 165 mg/dl showed an additional risk of LVH (P Conclusion This study suggests that hyperglycemia and higher NSBP levels should be responsible for an increased prevalence of LVH in hypertensive patients with Type 2 DM.

  2. [Blood pressure in 6- to 45-month-old children. Apropos of a study of 264 children from nurseries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérard, E; Boutté, P; Macone, F; Albertini, M; Mariani, R

    1988-03-01

    The systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure and pulse rate were measured among 264 children aged 6 to 45 months, during routine check-up in 4 day-nurseries. We took the mean value of 3 successive measurements taken at one minute intervals on the upper arm of calm, asymptomatic children, with an automatic oscillometric monitor (Dinamap). When the mean systolic blood pressure was greater than 110 mmHg, the measurement was repeated. The results were related to weight, height and age and to personal and/or family history. The systolic pressure was steady with a 97th percentile at 110 mmHg. The diastolic pressure presented two levels: 97th percentile at 81 mmHg before 24 months and 73 mmHg afterwards. Nine children born to toxemic mothers, and 14 having required neonatal hospital care, had lower diastolic pressure. The other family or personal data were not linked to particular pressure groups.

  3. Differences Between Right and Left Arm Blood Pressures in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Fred; Hunt, William C.; Hardy, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Recommendations vary on whether blood pressures should be measured in the right or in the left arm because no frequency distributions for a pressure difference between the arms exist. We took a total of 12 blood pressure determinations in both arms of 174 elderly persons and analyzed the data by a least-squares components of variance method. The mean difference between the arms (right minus left) was 0.93 mm of mercury for systole and 0.70 mm of mercury for diastole. For systole the proportio...

  4. Admission Systolic Blood Pressure Predicts the Number of Blood Pressure Medications at Discharge in Patients With Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Shiue, Harn; Boehme, Amelia K; Albright, Karen C; Venkatraman, Anand; Kumar, Gyanendra; Lyerly, Michael J; Hays-Shapshak, Angela; Mirza, Maira; Gropen, Toby I; Harrigan, Mark R

    2018-03-01

    Control of systolic blood pressure (SBP) after primary intracerebral hemorrhage improves outcomes. Factors determining the number of blood pressure medications (BPM) required for goal SBP<160 mm Hg at discharge are unknown. We hypothesized that higher admission-SBPs require a greater number of BPM for goal discharge-SBP<160 mm Hg, and investigated factors influencing this goal. We conducted a retrospective review of 288 patients who presented with primary intracerebral hemorrhage. Admission-SBP was obtained. Primary outcome was the number of BPM at discharge. Comparison was made between patients presenting with and without a history of hypertension, and patients discharged on <3 and ≥3 BPM. Patients with hypertension history had a higher median admission-SBP compared with those without (180 vs. 157 mm Hg, P=0.0001). In total, 133 of 288 (46.2%) patients were discharged on <3 BPM; 155/288 (53.8%) were discharged on ≥3 BPM. Hypertension history (P<0.0001) and admission-SBP (P<0.0001) predicted the number of BPM at discharge. In patients without hypertension history, every 10 mm Hg increase in SBP resulted in an absolute increase of 0.5 BPM at discharge (P=0.0011), whereas in those with hypertension, the absolute increase was 1.3 BPM (P=0.0012). In comparison with patients discharged on <3 BPM, patients discharged on ≥3 BPM were more likely to have a higher median admission-SBP, be younger in age, belong to the African-American race, have a history of diabetes, have higher median admission-National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin Scale of 4 to 5 at discharge. An understanding of the factors influencing BPM at discharge may help clinicians better optimize blood pressure control both before and after discharge.

  5. Measures of total stress-induced blood pressure responses are associated with vascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzaro, Pietro; Seccia, Teresa; Vulpis, Vito; Schirosi, Gabriella; Serio, Gabriella; Battista, Loredana; Pirrelli, Anna

    2005-09-01

    The role of cardiovascular reactivity to study hypertension, and the assessment methods, are still controversial. We aimed to verify the association of hypertension and vascular damage with several measures of cardiovascular response. We studied 40 patients with normal-high (132 +/- 1/87 +/- 1 mm Hg) blood pressure (Group 1) and 80 untreated hypertensive subjects. Postischemic forearm vascular resistance (mFVR) served to differentiate hypertensive subjects (142 +/- 2/92 +/- 1 mm Hg v 143 +/- 2/94 +/- 2 mm Hg, P = NS) with a lower (Group 2) and higher (Group 3) hemodynamic index of vascular damage (4.8 +/- .05 v 6.3 +/- .09, P blood pressure, heart rate, forearm blood flow, and vascular resistance. Reactivity measures included: a) change from baseline, b) residualized score, c) cumulative change from baseline and residualized score, and d) total reactivity as area-under-the-curve (AUC), including changes occurring during baseline and recovery phases. The AUC of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mFVR progressively increased in the groups (P AUC of SBP, DBP, and forearm blood flow and resistance demonstrated the highest (P AUC of SBP (beta = 0.634) and forearm blood flow (beta = -0.337) were predictive (P blood pressure stress response, as AUC, including baseline and recovery phases, was significantly better associated with hypertension and vascular damage than the other reactivity measures studied.

  6. [Measuring the blood pressure in both arms is of little use; longitudinal study into blood pressure differences between both arms and its reproducibility in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleefstra, N; Houweling, S T; Meyboom-de Jong, B; Bilo, H J G

    2007-07-07

    To determine the prevalence of inter-arm blood pressure differences > 10 mmHg in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and to determine whether these differences are consistent over time. Descriptive. In an evaluation study of 169 DM2 patients from 5 general practices in 2003 and 2004, different methods of oscillatory measurement were used to investigate inter-arm blood pressure differences > 10 mmHg systolic or diastolic. These methods were: one measurement in each arm non-simultaneously (method A), one measurement simultaneously (B) and the mean of two simultaneous measurements (C). With method A an inter-arm blood pressure difference was found in 33% of patients. This percentage diminished to 9 with method C. In 44% (n = 7) of the patients in whom method C detected a relevant blood pressure difference, this difference was not found with method A. In 79% of patients the inter-arm blood pressure difference was not reproduced after one year. In daily practice, one non-simultaneous blood pressure measurement in each arm (method A) was of little value for identification of patients with inter-arm blood pressure differences. The reproducibility was poor one year later. Bilateral blood pressure measurement is therefore of little value.

  7. Reference data for distal blood pressure in healthy elderly and middle-aged individuals measured with the strain gauge technique. Part I: Resting distal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine; Vammen, Birthe; Yoshinaka, Emmy

    2008-01-01

    pressure and DBPtoe - DBPankle) were found in the new reference data compared to the old. No significant difference between the mean values of the gradient (DBPankle - systolic arm blood pressure) was found between the old and new reference data, although the variation was significantly wider in the new......Objective. Most patients referred to our department for distal blood pressure (DBP) determination on suspicion of arterial peripheral vascular disease (apvd) are more than 60 years of age, whereas the only available reference data for resting pressure are based on data from healthy individuals aged....... Material and methods. Group I comprised 31 healthy persons aged between 61 and 87 years and group II 14 healthy middle-aged hospital staff members aged between 45 and 58 years. Strict rules of inclusion were followed. Results. For group I, significantly greater gradients (DBPtoe - systolic arm blood...

  8. Serum Endoglin Levels in Patients Suffering from Systemic Sclerosis and Elevated Systolic Pulmonary Arterial Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Ximena Coral-Alvarado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is the main cause of morbimortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc. Increased Eng expression has been demonstrated in SSc patients. Objective. Ascertaining serum levels of Eng in SSc patients with and without elevated systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP and comparing them with that of healthy volunteers. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out. A commercial ELISA kit was used for measuring serum concentrations of Eng in 60 subjects: 40 patients with SSc with and without elevated sPAP, compared to 20 healthy control subjects. Elevated sPAP was detected by echocardiogram. Results. No association between positive Eng and elevated sPAP was found when compared to the SSc without elevated sPAP group (OR=2.85; 0.65–12.88 95% CI; P=.11; however, an association was found between positive Eng and elevated sPAP compared to healthy controls (OR=23.22; 2.46–1050.33 95% CI; P=.001, and weak association was found between the positive Eng with SSc without elevated sPAP group compared to healthy controls (OR=8.14, 0.8–393.74 95% CI; P=.046. Conclusion. Raised serum levels of Eng in SSc patients compared to healthy controls were found, suggesting a role for Eng in SSc vasculopathy and not just in elevated sPAP. However, prospective studies are needed to verify such observations.

  9. Effects of garlic on blood pressure in patients with and without systolic hypertension: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Kurt M; Coleman, Craig I; Teevan, Colleen; Vachhani, Payal; White, C Michael

    2008-12-01

    Garlic has been suggested to lower blood pressure; however, studies evaluating this parameter have provided conflicting results. To examine the effect of garlic on blood pressure in patients with and without elevated systolic blood pressure (SPB) through meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials in humans evaluating garlic's effect on blood pressure. All databases were searched from their inception through June 26, 2008, using the key words garlic, Allium sativum, and allicin. A manual search of published literature was used to identify additional relevant studies. To be included in the analysis, studies must have been written in English or German and reported endpoints of SBP or diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Studies whose population had a mean baseline SBP greater than 140 mm Hg were evaluated separately from those whose population had lower baseline blood pressures. Garlic's effect on SBP and DBP was treated as a continuous variable and weighted mean differences were calculated using a random-effects model. Ten trials were included in the analysis; 3 of these had patients with elevated SBP. Garlic reduced SBP by 16.3 mm Hg (95% CI 6.2 to 26.5) and DBP by 9.3 mm Hg (95% CI 5.3 to 13.3) compared with placebo in patients with elevated SBP. However, the use of garlic did not reduce SBP or DBP in patients without elevated SBP. There was only a minor degree of heterogeneity in the analyses and publication bias did not appear to influence the results. This meta-analysis suggests that garlic is associated with blood pressure reductions in patients with an elevated SBP although not in those without elevated SBP. Future research should focus on the impact of garlic on clinical events and the assessment of the long-term risk of harm.

  10. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19·1 million participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-07

    Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. We pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19·1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127·0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125·7-128·3) in men and 122·3 mm Hg (121·0-123·6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78·7 mm Hg (77·9-79·5) for men and 76·7 mm Hg (75·9-77·6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24·1% (21·4-27·1) in men and 20·1% (17·8-22·5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the estimated trends in these super-regions had larger uncertainty than in high-income super-regions. By contrast, mean blood pressure might have increased in east and southeast

  11. Hyperbolic isometries of systolic complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prytula, Tomasz Pawel

    The main topics of this thesis are the geometric features of systolic complexesarising from the actions of hyperbolic isometries. The thesis consists ofan introduction followed by two articles.Given a hyperbolic isometry h of a systolic complex X, our central theme isto study the minimal displace......The main topics of this thesis are the geometric features of systolic complexesarising from the actions of hyperbolic isometries. The thesis consists ofan introduction followed by two articles.Given a hyperbolic isometry h of a systolic complex X, our central theme isto study the minimal...... algebraic-topological features of systolic groups. In addition, we provide newexamples of systolic groups.In the first article we show that the minimal displacement set of a hyperbolicisometry of a systolic complex is quasi-isometric to the product of a tree andthe real line. We use this theorem...

  12. Relationship of central and peripheral blood pressure to left ventricular mass in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lahiguera, Francisco J; Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, Jose A; Gonzalez, Carmen; Martín, Joaquin; Pascual, Jose M

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of central and peripheral blood pressure to left ventricular mass. Cross-sectional study that included 392 never treated hypertensive individuals. Measurement of office, 24-h ambulatory, and central blood pressure (obtained using applanation tonometry) and determination of left ventricular mass by echocardiography were performed in all patients. In a multiple regression analysis, with adjustment for age, gender and metabolic syndrome, 24-h blood pressure was more closely related to ventricular mass than the respective office and central blood pressures. Systolic blood pressures always exhibited a higher correlation than diastolic blood pressures in all 3 determinations. The correlation between left ventricular mass index and 24-h systolic blood pressure was higher than that of office (P<.002) or central systolic blood pressures (P<.002). Changes in 24-h systolic blood pressure caused the greatest variations in left ventricular mass index (P<.001). In our population of untreated middle-aged hypertensive patients, left ventricular mass index is more closely related to 24-h ambulatory blood pressure than to office or central blood pressure. Central blood pressure does not enable us to better identify patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. A relative difference in systolic blood pressure between arms by synchronal measurement and conventional cardiovascular risk factors are associated with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Suematsu, Yasunori; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-06-01

    It is not known the relationships between a difference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) or diastolic BP (DBP) between arms by synchronal measurement and the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD), and between a difference in BP between arms and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. We enrolled 425 consecutive patients (M/F = 286/139, 67 ± 13 year) who were admitted to our University Hospital and in whom we could measure the absolute (|rt. BP - lt. BP|) and relative (rt. BP - lt. BP) differences in SBP and DBP using a nico PS-501(®) (Parama-Tech). We divided all patients into those who did and did not have CAD. The relative differences in SBP between arms in patients with CAD were significantly lower than those in patients without CAD. However, the relative difference in SBP between arms was not a predictor of the presence of CAD. We also divided 267 patients who underwent coronary angiography into tertiles according to the Gensini score (low, middle, and high score groups). Interestingly, the middle + high score groups showed significantly lower relative differences in SBP between arms than the low score group. The mean Korotkoff sound graph in the middle + high Gensini score group was significantly higher than that in the low Gensini score group. Among conventional cardiovascular risk factors and nico parameters, the relative difference in SBP between arms in addition to the risk factors (age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus) was associated with the score by a logistic regression analysis. In conclusion, the relative difference in SBP between arms as well as conventional risk factors may be associated with the severity of coronary arteriosclerosis.

  14. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Blood Pressure: A Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis-Sobrinho, César; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Moreira, Carla; Abreu, Sandra; Lopes, Luís; Oliveira-Santos, José; Mota, Jorge; Santos, Rute

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular indices 2 years later, and to determine whether changes in cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with cardiovascular indices at a 2-year follow-up in adolescents. The sample comprised 734 adolescents (349 girls) aged 12-18 years followed for 3 years from the LabMed Physical Activity Study. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by the 20-meter shuttle run test. Height, weight, waist circumference, and resting blood pressure (BP) were measured according to standard procedures. Regression analyses showed a significant inverse association between cardiorespiratory fitness at baseline and systolic BP (B = -0.126; P = .047) and rate pressure product (B = -29.94; P = .016), at follow-up after adjustments for age, sex, height, pubertal stage, socioeconomic status, and waist circumference. Significant differences were found between cardiorespiratory fitness groups (fit vs unfit) at baseline and systolic BP and rate pressure product at follow-up (P fitness changes and systolic BP (P = .024) and rate pressure product (P = .014), after adjustment for age, sex, height, pubertal status, socioeconomic status, and waist circumference. Changes in cardiorespiratory fitness during adolescence were associated with cardiovascular indices over a 2-year period. Adolescents with persistently low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness exhibited the highest levels of systolic BP and rate pressure product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Calibrated Method of Massage Therapy Decreases Systolic Blood Pressure Concomitant With Changes in Heart Rate Variability in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgin, Kurt A; Kaprelian, Anthony; Gutierrez, Roberto; Jha, Vidyasagar; Wilson, Christopher G; Dobyns, Abigail; Xu, Karen H; Curras-Collazo, Margarita C

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method for applying calibrated manual massage pressures by using commonly available, inexpensive sphygmomanometer parts and validate the use of this approach as a quantitative method of applying massage therapy to rodents. Massage pressures were monitored by using a modified neonatal blood pressure (BP) cuff attached to an aneroid gauge. Lightly anesthetized rats were stroked on the ventral abdomen for 5 minutes at pressures of 20 mm Hg and 40 mm Hg. Blood pressure was monitored noninvasively for 20 minutes following massage therapy at 5-minute intervals. Interexaminer reliability was assessed by applying 20 mm Hg and 40 mm Hg pressures to a digital scale in the presence or absence of the pressure gauge. With the use of this method, we observed good interexaminer reliability, with intraclass coefficients of 0.989 versus 0.624 in blinded controls. In Long-Evans rats, systolic BP dropped by an average of 9.86% ± 0.27% following application of 40 mm Hg massage pressure. Similar effects were seen following 20 mm Hg pressure (6.52% ± 1.7%), although latency to effect was greater than at 40 mm Hg. Sprague-Dawley rats behaved similarly to Long-Evans rats. Low-frequency/high-frequency ratio, a widely-used index of autonomic tone in cardiovascular regulation, showed a significant increase within 5 minutes after 40 mm Hg massage pressure was applied. The calibrated massage method was shown to be a reproducible method for applying massage pressures in rodents and lowering BP. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Arterial wave reflection and subclinical left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Takei, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Takuya; Koshaka, Shun; Palmieri, Vittorio; Elkind, Mitchell Sv; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2011-03-01

    Increased arterial wave reflection is a predictor of cardiovascular events and has been hypothesized to be a cofactor in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Whether increased wave reflection is inversely associated with left-ventricular (LV) systolic function in individuals without heart failure is not clear. Arterial wave reflection and LV systolic function were assessed in 301 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study using two-dimensional echocardiography and applanation tonometry of the radial artery to derive central arterial waveform by a validated transfer function. Aortic augmentation index (AIx) and wasted energy index (WEi) were used as indices of wave reflection. LV systolic function was measured by LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Mitral annulus peak systolic velocity (Sm), peak longitudinal strain and strain rate were measured. Participants with history of coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, LVEF less than 50% or wall motion abnormalities were excluded. Mean age of the study population was 68.3 ± 10.2 years (64.1% women, 65% hypertensive). LV systolic function by TDI was lower with increasing wave reflection, whereas LVEF was not. In multivariate analysis, TDI parameters of LV longitudinal systolic function were significantly and inversely correlated to AIx and WEi (P values from 0.05 to 0.002). In a community cohort without heart failure and with normal LVEF, an increased arterial wave reflection was associated with subclinical reduction in LV systolic function assessed by novel TDI techniques. Further studies are needed to investigate the prognostic implications of this relationship.

  17. Inconsistency between simultaneous blood pressure measurements in the arm, forearm, and leg in anesthetized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidan, Ilan; Sidi, Avner; Ben-Menachem, Erez; Tene, Yael; Berkenstadt, Haim

    2014-02-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of simultaneous noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement in the arm, forearm, and ankle in anesthetized children. Prospective, randomized study. University medical center. 101 ASA physical status 1 and 2 children (aged 1-8 yrs) scheduled for elective surgery with general anesthesia. Simultaneous NIBP measurements were recorded at the arm, forearm, and ankle at 5-minute intervals. The systolic blood pressure difference between the arm-forearm or the arm-ankle was within the ± 10% range in 63% and 29% of measurements, and within the ± 20% range in 85% and 67% of measurements, respectively. The diastolic blood pressure difference between the arm-forearm or the arm-ankle was within the ± 10% range in 42% and 44% and within the ± 20% range in 67% and 74% of measurements, respectively. In patients in whom the initial three NIBP measurements were within the ± 20% range between the forearm and arm, 86% of the subsequent measurements were also within that limit. Forearm and ankle NIBP measurements are unreliable and inconsistent with NIBP measured in the arm of anesthetized children. These alternative BP measurement sites are not reliable in accuracy (comparison with reference "gold" standard) and precision (reproducibility). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Validation of the OMRON M7 (HEM-780-E) blood pressure measuring device in a population requiring large cuff use according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Feghali, Ramzi N; Topouchian, Jirar A; Pannier, Bruno M; El Assaad, Hiba A; Asmar, Roland G

    2007-06-01

    A high percentage of hypertensive patients present an arm circumference of over 32 cm; the use of a large cuff is therefore recommended. Validation studies are usually performed in the general population using a standard-size cuff. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of the Omron M7 device in a population with an arm circumference ranging from 32 to 42 cm. A validation study was performed according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. This protocol is divided into two phases: the first phase is performed on 15 selected participants (45 pairs of blood-pressure measurements); if the device passes this phase, 18 supplementary participants are included (54 pairs of blood-pressure measurements), making a total number of 33 participants (99 pairs of blood-pressure measurements), on whom the analysis is performed. For each participant, four blood-pressure measurements were performed simultaneously by two trained observers, using mercury sphygmomanometers fitted with a Y tube; the measurements alternated with three by the test device. The difference between the blood-pressure value given by the device and that obtained by the two observers (mean of the two observations) was calculated for each measure. The 99 pairs of blood-pressure differences were classified into three categories (Society of Hypertension protocol. The Omron M7 device passed the first and the second phases of the validation process. The average differences between the two observers were 1.5+/-3.2 and -0.5+/-2.2 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, and those between the device and the mercury sphygmomanometer were -1.6+/-6.7 for systolic blood pressure and -0.12+/-4.0 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure Readings that differ by less than 5, 10 and 15 mmHg for systolic blood-pressure and diastolic blood-pressure values fulfill the recommendation criteria of the European Society of Hypertension protocol. The Omron M7 (HEM-780-E) device

  20. Effects of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure in hypertensive patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alinezhad-Namaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan is a holy month for Muslims and fasting in this month is the rule for any healthy matured person. Nutritional and behavioral changes occurred during Ramadan fasting may lead to several physiological change, such as blood pressure (2. Studies evaluated the effects of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure in hypertensive patients, are scarce and reported inadequate results. In this paper a systematic review was performed to accumulate the results of published literature designed to evaluate blood pressure changes in hypertensive patients due to Ramadan fasting. All prospective, English studies which evaluated the effects of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure in hypertensive patients and measured systolic and diastolic blood pressure twice at least ( before Ramadan and during last week of Ramadan or after Ramadan fasting were included in systematic review . Five studies reported the effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure in hypertensive patients in full text. Although significant reduction in systolic blood pressure during Ramadan fasting were seen in 3 studies (3-5, other 3 studies reported no significant difference between systolic blood pressure before and after Ramadan fasting (6, 7. Among 6 studies that reviewed in this paper, 4 studies reported no significant changes in diastolic blood pressure (4, 6, 7. While 2 other studies reported significant reduction in systolic blood pressure after Ramadan fasting (3, 5. This systematic review suggested that Ramadan fasting can be safe in treated essential hypertensive patients with continuation of previous medications. Also it can improve systolic and diastolic blood pressures.

  1. Adaptive control with self-tuning for non-invasive beat-by-beat blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Masamichi; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Tanaka, Shinobu; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Up to now, we have successfully carried out the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement of blood pressure (BP) in the root of finger, superficial temporal and radial artery based on the volume-compensation technique with reasonable accuracy. The present study concerns with improvement of control method for this beat-by-beat BP measurement. The measurement system mainly consists of a partial pressurization cuff with a pair of LED and photo-diode for the detection of arterial blood volume, and a digital self-tuning control method. Using healthy subjects, the performance and accuracy of this system were evaluated through comparison experiments with the system using a conventional empirically tuned PID controller. The significant differences of BP measured in finger artery were not showed in systolic (SBP), p=0.52, and diastolic BP (DBP), p=0.35. With the advantage of the adaptive control with self-tuning method, which can tune the control parameters without disturbing the control system, the application area of the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement method will be broadened.

  2. Blood pressure normalization post-jugular venous balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Zohara; Grewal, Prabhjot; Cen, Steven; DeBarge-Igoe, Frances; Yu, Jinhee; Arata, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This study is the first in a series investigating the relationship between autonomic nervous system dysfunction and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in multiple sclerosis patients. We screened patients for the combined presence of the narrowing of the internal jugular veins and symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleeping disorders, headache, thermal intolerance, bowel/bladder dysfunction) and determined systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses to balloon angioplasty. The criteria for eligibility for balloon angioplasty intervention included ≥ 50% narrowing in one or both internal jugular veins, as determined by the magnetic resonance venography, and ≥ 3 clinical symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and post-balloon angioplasty. Among patients who were screened, 91% were identified as having internal jugular veins narrowing (with obstructing lesions) combined with the presence of three or more symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Balloon angioplasty reduced the average systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, blood pressure categorization showed a biphasic response to balloon angioplasty. The procedure increased blood pressure in multiple sclerosis patients who presented with baseline blood pressure within lower limits of normal ranges (systolic ≤ 105 mmHg, diastolic ≤ 70 mmHg) but decreased blood pressure in patients with baseline blood pressure above normal ranges (systolic ≥ 130 mmHg, diastolic ≥ 80 mmHg). In addition, gender differences in baseline blood pressure subcategories were observed. The coexistence of internal jugular veins narrowing and symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction suggests that the two phenomena may be related. Balloon angioplasty corrects blood pressure deviation in multiple sclerosis patients undergoing internal jugular vein dilation. Further studies should investigate the

  3. Computer model analysis of the radial artery pressure waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwid, H A; Taylor, L A; Smith, N T

    1987-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of aortic and radial artery pressures are reviewed, and a model of the cardiovascular system is presented. The model is based on resonant networks for the aorta and axillo-brachial-radial arterial system. The model chosen is a simple one, in order to make interpretation of the observed relationships clear. Despite its simplicity, the model produces realistic aortic and radial artery pressure waveforms. It demonstrates that the resonant properties of the arterial wall significantly alter the pressure waveform as it is propagated from the aorta to the radial artery. Although the mean and end-diastolic radial pressures are usually accurate estimates of the corresponding aortic pressures, the systolic pressure at the radial artery is often much higher than that of the aorta due to overshoot caused by the resonant behavior of the radial artery. The radial artery dicrotic notch is predominantly dependent on the axillo-brachial-radial arterial wall properties, rather than on the aortic valve or peripheral resistance. Hence the use of the radial artery dicrotic notch as an estimate of end systole is unreliable. The rate of systolic upstroke, dP/dt, of the radial artery waveform is a function of many factors, making it difficult to interpret. The radial artery waveform usually provides accurate estimates for mean and diastolic aortic pressures; for all other measurements it is an inadequate substitute for the aortic pressure waveform. In the presence of low forearm peripheral resistance the mean radial artery pressure may significantly underestimate the mean aortic pressure, as explained by a voltage divider model.

  4. Allergic rhinitis and arterial blood pressure: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallioglu, O; Polat, C; Akyigit, A; Cetiner, H; Duzer, S

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the likelihood of allergic rhinitis and potential co-morbidities, and to assess whether allergic rhinitis is associated with arterial blood pressure and hypertension. In this population-based study, 369 adults with allergic rhinitis and asthma were assessed via a questionnaire and immunoglobulin E levels. There were four groups: control (n = 90), allergic rhinitis (n = 99), asthma (n = 87) and hypertension (n = 93). Arterial blood pressure was measured in all groups. There were no significant differences in systolic or diastolic blood pressure between males and females in any group. Pairwise comparisons revealed no significant differences between: the control and allergic rhinitis groups, the control and asthma groups, or the allergic rhinitis and asthma groups. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure values of males and females were significantly higher in the hypertension group than the allergic rhinitis group. There were no significant differences in systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure for seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis patients. Rhinitis was not associated with increased blood pressure. Allergic rhinitis can coincide with asthma and hypertension. The findings do not support the need for blood pressure follow up in allergic rhinitis patients.

  5. Forward coronary flow normally seen in systole is the result of both forward and concealed back flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, J. A.; Breuls, N. P.; Laird, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Normally systolic coronary blood flow is almost entirely forward. As perfusion pressure was lowered through the autoregulatory range in open-chest dogs, net systolic back flow appeared at approximately 70 mm Hg. Imposing a series resistance (Rs), which impedes both forward and back flow, abolished

  6. The effect of chronic digitalization on pump function in systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassapoyannes, C A; Easterling, B M; Chavda, K; Chavda, K K; Movahed, M R; Welch, G W

    2001-10-01

    Short- and intermediate-term use of cardiac glycosides promotes inotropy and improves the ejection fraction in systolic heart failure. To determine whether chronic digitalization alters left ventricular function and performance. Eighty patients with mild-to-moderate systolic heart failure (baseline ejection fraction < or =45%) participated from our institution in a multi-center, chronic, randomized, double-blind study of digitalis vs. placebo. Of the 40 survivors, 38 (20 allocated to the digitalis arm and 18 to the placebo arm) were evaluated at the end of follow-up (mean, 48.4 months). Left ventricular systolic function was assessed by both nuclear ventriculography and echocardiography. The ejection fraction was measured scintigraphically, while the ventricular volumes were computed echocardiographically. The groups did not differ, at baseline or end-of-study, with respect to the ejection fraction and the loading conditions (arterial pressure, ventricular volumes and heart rate) by either intention-to-treat or actual-treatment-received analysis. Over the course of the trial, the digitalis arm exhibited no significant increase in the use of diuretics (18%, P=0.33), in distinction from the placebo group (78%, P=0.004), and a longer stay on study drug among those patients who withdrew from double-blind treatment (28.6 vs. 11.4 months, P=0.01). Following chronic use of digitalis for mild-to-moderate heart failure, cross-sectional comparison with a control group from the same inception cohort showed no appreciable difference in systolic function or performance. Thus, the suggested clinical benefit cannot be explained by an inotropic effect.

  7. Simultaneous blood pressure measurement in both arms in hypertensive and nonhypertensive adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Reyes, Salvador; Forsyth-MacQuarrie, Avril M; García de Alba-García, Javier Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    When blood pressure (BP) is taken for the first time, it should be measured in both arms; follow-up measurements should be taken in the arm with the highest BP. However, in clinical practice, this recommendation is rarely followed. Identify the degree of differences in BP between the right and the left arm in individuals with normal and high BP. We measured BP in 111 hypertensive and 80 normotensive patients in both arms at the same time using identical Omron HEM 725 CIC automatic sphygmomanometers. The devices were then switched to the other arm and another set of readings was taken. The absolute and relative difference in BP between arms was calculated from the average of these two readings. We categorized differences as at least 5, at least 10, and at least 20 mmHg for systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP). The BP was higher in the right arm, with no statistical significance. The relative differences were also not significant: SBP 1.1±7.1 and DBP 0.21±5.0. However, the absolute differences were significant at an individual level, with a systolic difference of 5.4±4.8 mmHg and a diastolic difference of 3.9 ±3.2 mmHg. The percentages of absolute SBP/DBP differences more than 5 mmHg (21.4%/20.4%) and more than 10 mmHg (15.7%/4.7%) were considerable. The range of arm differences was clinically significant; in hypertensives, the SBP/DBP was -13.2 to +15/-9.2 to +9.6 mmHg and in nonhypertensives it was -12.9 to +15.6/-9.7 to +10.1 mmHg. Although on average there was no clinically significant relative difference between arms, absolute differences at an individual level were often clinically significant. Failure to determine interarm BP differences will lead to erroneous clinical decisions.

  8. Mean intraocular pressure in hypertensive adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irum, S.; Malik, A.M.; Saeed, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the mean Intraocular Pressure (IOP) in already diagnosed adult hypertensive patients with different grades of hypertension. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from March 2012 to Aug 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 178 already diagnosed hypertensive patients were selected. A detailed history of ocular or systemic diseases was taken. Intraocular pressure was measured with help of Goldmann applanation tonometer. Three consecutive readings of IOP of each eye were taken at 30 minutes interval and mean calculated. Blood pressure was recorded in seated position from right upper arm, by mercury sphygmomanometer. Blood pressure measurements were determined by taking the mean value of three systolic and diastolic readings. Results: The results of intraocular pressure (IOP) between various grades of hypertension were determined. There was an increase in mean IOP with rise in blood pressure. The subjects with grade I hypertension showed a mean IOP of 13.95 ± 3.74 mmHg, while grade II and grade III hypertensive subjects had mean IOPs as 18.10 ± 3.32 and 20.21 ± 2.52 mmHg respectively. Conclusion: A higher value of mean IOP was found with increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressures. (author)

  9. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Jerson R; Westerhof, Berend E; de Jonge, Nicolaas; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Westers, Paul; Chamuleau, Steven; van Dijk, Diederik; Rodermans, Ben F M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Lahpor, Jaap R

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and echocardiography may provide useful physiological information regarding cardiac support in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). We investigated the accuracy and characteristics of noninvasive blood pressure during cf-LVAD support. Noninvasive arterial pressure waveforms were recorded with Nexfin (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). First, these measurements were validated simultaneously with invasive arterial pressures in 29 intensive care unit patients. Next, the association between blood pressure responses and measures derived by echocardiography, including left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions (LVEDDs), left ventricular end-systolic dimensions (LVESDs), and left ventricular shortening fraction (LVSF) were determined during pump speed change procedures in 30 outpatients. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms by the Nexfin monitor slightly underestimated invasive measures during cf-LVAD support. Differences between noninvasive and invasive measures (mean ± SD) of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressures were -7.6 ± 5.8, -7.0 ± 5.2, -6.9 ± 5.1, and -0.6 ± 4.5 mm Hg, respectively (all blood pressure responses did not correlate with LVEDD, LVESD, or LVSF, while LVSF correlated weakly with both pulse pressure (r = 0.24; p = 0.005) and (dP(art)/dt)max (r = 0.25; p = 0.004). The dicrotic notch in the pressure waveform was a better predictor of aortic valve opening (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.87) than pulse pressure (AUC = 0.64) and (dP(art)/dt)max (AUC = 0.61). Patients with partial support rather than full support at 9,000 rpm had a significant change in systolic pressure, pulse pressure, and (dP(art)/dt)max during ramp studies, while echocardiographic measures did not change. Blood pressure measurements by Nexfin were reliable and may thereby act as a compliment to the assessment of the cf-LVAD patient.

  10. Ambulatory (24 h) blood pressure and arterial stiffness measurement in Marfan syndrome patients: a case control feasibility and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Matthias; Nouri, Ghazaleh; Hametner, Bernhard; Parragh, Stephanie; Köster, Jelena; Mortensen, Kai; Schwarz, Achim; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Wassertheurer, Siegfried

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this work is the investigation of measures of ambulatory brachial and aortic blood pressure and indices of arterial stiffness and aortic wave reflection in Marfan patients. A case-control study was conducted including patients with diagnosed Marfan syndrome following Ghent2 nosology and healthy controls matched for sex, age and daytime brachial systolic blood pressure. For each subject a 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and 24 h pulse wave analysis measurement was performed. All parameters showed a circadian pattern whereby pressure dipping was more pronounced in Marfan patients. During daytime only Marfan patients with aortic root surgery showed increased pulse wave velocity. In contrast, various nighttime measurements, wave reflection determinants and circadian patterns showed a significant difference. The findings of our study provide evidence that ambulatory measurement of arterial stiffness parameters is feasible and that these determinants are significantly different in Marfan syndrome patients compared to controls in particular at nighttime. Further investigation is therefore indicated.

  11. Validation of the HONSUN LD-578 blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jie; Huang, Qi-Fang; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor LD-578 (HONSUN Group, Shanghai, China) for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the LD-578 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 15 participants in phase 1 and a further 18 participants in phase 2 of the validation study. Data analysis was performed using the ESHIP Analyzer. The LD-578 device successfully passed phase 1 of the validation study with a number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for at least 32 of 45, 41 of 45, and 45 of 45 measurements (required 25, 35, and 40), respectively. The device also achieved the targets for phase 2.1, with 67 of 99, 90 of 99, and 98 of 99 differences within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and with 69 of 99, 95 of 99, and 98 of 99 within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. In phase 2.2, 24 participants had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required >or=22) for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The HONSUN upper arm blood pressure monitor LD-578 can be recommended for home use in adults.

  12. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in patients with hyperthyroidism before the introduction of therapy and on therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased secretion of thyroid gland hormones affects the cardiovascular system by increasing heart rate and often by increasing systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We examined the influence of elevated thyroid hormone on blood pressure. Blood pressure monitoring was performed prior to the introduction of therapy in people with increased FT4 and on therapy when FT4 was in the normal range. We analyzed 32 people, of which 26 women had normal blood pressure values measured by blood pressure monitoring. Average age 45 and body mass index 27 kg/m2. Blood pressure was measured by monitoring blood pressure for 24 hours. On average, before the introduction of the therapy, it was 133/83 mmHg P 96 / min. The blood pressure on average on therapy with tireosuppressive was 128/82 mmHg P 74 / min. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney paired test shows a significant P <0.05 higher systolic blood pressure and pulse rate during the day and night before the treatment, when FT4 was higher, than the time when medication was taking, when the FT4 was in the normal range. No significant difference was found for diastolic blood pressure before the introduction of therapy and during therapy with tireosuppressives. When values of FT4 are increased, monitoring of blood pressure shows significantly higher values of systolic blood pressure and pulse during day and night compared to systolic blood pressure and pulse values when FT4 is in the normal range.

  13. Validation of the Rossmax CF175 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the Rossmax CF175 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (17 women, mean age 46 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the Rossmax CF175 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. All the blood pressure requirements were fulfilled. The Rossmax CF175 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 78/99, 94/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 81/99, 96/99, and 97/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also achieved the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-nine participants, for both of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). Only one participant for diastolic blood pressure had all three device-observers comparisons greater than 5 mmHg. The Rossmax automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor CF175 fulfilled the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for blood pressure measurement in adults.

  14. Assessment of the DIXTAL DX-2710 Automated Oscillometric Device for Blood Pressure Measurement with the Validation Protocols of the British Hypertension Society (BHS and the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele M. P. Mano

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the Dixtal DX2710 automated oscillometric device used for blood pressure measurement according to the protocols of the BHS and the AAMI. METHODS: Three blood pressure measurements were taken in 94 patients (53 females 15 to 80 years. The measurements were taken randomly by 2 observers trained to measure blood pressure with a mercury column device connected with an automated device. The device was classified according to the protocols of the BHS and AAMI. RESULT: The mean of blood pressure levels obtained by the observers was 148±38/93±25 mmHg and that obtained with the device was 148±37/89±26 mmHg. Considering the differences between the measurements obtained by the observer and those obtained with the automated device according to the criteria of the BHS, the following classification was adopted: "A" for systolic pressure (69% of the differences < 5; 90% < 10; and 97% < 15 mmHg; and "B" for diastolic pressure (63% of the differences < 5; 83% < 10; and 93% < 15 mmHg. The mean and standard deviation of the differences were 0±6.27 mmHg for systolic pressure and 3.82±6.21 mmHg for diastolic pressure. CONCLUSION: The Dixtal DX2710 device was approved according to the international recommendations.

  15. Development and validation of optimal cut-off value in inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference for prediction of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, Akira; Kusunose, Kenya; Kageyama, Norihito; Sumitomo, Masayuki; Abe, Masahiro; Fujinaga, Hiroyuki; Sata, Masataka

    2018-01-01

    An inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (IAD) is associated with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to develop and validate the optimal cut-off value of IAD as a predictor of major adverse cardiac events in patients with arteriosclerosis risk factors. From 2009 to 2014, 1076 patients who had at least one cardiovascular risk factor were included in the analysis. We defined 700 randomly selected patients as a development cohort to confirm that IAD was the predictor of cardiovascular events and to determine optimal cut-off value of IAD. Next, we validated outcomes in the remaining 376 patients as a validation cohort. The blood pressure (BP) of both arms measurements were done simultaneously using the ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) form of automatic device. The primary endpoint was the cardiovascular event and secondary endpoint was the all-cause mortality. During a median period of 2.8 years, 143 patients reached the primary endpoint in the development cohort. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, IAD was the strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 1.03, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.05, p=0.005). The receiver operating characteristic curve revealed that 5mmHg was the optimal cut-off point of IAD to predict cardiovascular events (p<0.001). In the validation cohort, the presence of a large IAD (IAD ≥5mmHg) was significantly associated with the primary endpoint (p=0.021). IAD is significantly associated with future cardiovascular events in patients with arteriosclerosis risk factors. The optimal cut-off value of IAD is 5mmHg. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Line pressure effects on differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Evans, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differential pressure transducers in experimental pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems was evaluated. Transient differential pressure measurements made using a simple calibration proportionality relating differential pressure to output voltage could have large measurement uncertainties. A more sophisticated calibration equation was derived to incorporate the effects of zero shifts and sensitivity shifts as pressure in the pressure sensing line changes with time. A comparison made between the original calibration proportionality equation and the derived compensation equation indicates that potential measurement uncertainties can be reduced

  17. Validation of the SCIAN LD-735 wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Qi; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor SCIAN LD-735 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured sequentially in 33 adult Chinese participants (10 women, mean age 44.8 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the SCIAN LD-735 device (one supervisor). A total of 99 pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The SCIAN LD-735 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 86/99, 97/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 85/99, 98/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. In total, 30 and 33 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). No participant had all of the three device-observer comparisons greater than 5 mmHg for systolic or diastolic blood pressure. The SCIAN wrist blood pressure monitor LD-735 has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  18. Validation of the AVITA BPM17 wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Qi; Liu, Chang-Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor AVITA BPM17 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese (19 men, 45.7 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the AVITA BPM17 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The AVITA BPM17 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 94/99, 98/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 92/99, 99/99, and 99/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also fulfilled the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Overall, 32 participants for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observerss differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). None had all the three device-observers comparisons greater than 5 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The AVITA wrist blood pressure monitor BPM17 has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  19. Systolic blood pressure, routine kidney variables and renal ultrasonographic findings in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffin, Elien Rl; Paepe, Dominique; Ghys, Liesbeth Fe; De Roover, Katrien; Van de Maele, Isabel; Saunders, Jimmy H; Duchateau, Luc; Daminet, Sylvie

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Hypertension is a common cause of proteinuria in HIV-infected people. In cats, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection appears to be associated with proteinuria. Therefore, the results from systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements in naturally infected FIV-positive cats were reviewed to assess whether hypertension contributes to the observed proteinuria in these cats. Ultrasonographic findings in FIV-positive cats were reviewed to complete renal assessment and to extend the scant knowledge on renal ultrasonography in cats. Methods Data from client-owned, naturally infected FIV-positive cats were retrospectively reviewed. To obtain a control group, records were reviewed from age-matched, privately owned, FIV-negative cats. Results Data from 91 FIV-infected and 113 control cats were compared. FIV-infected cats showed a significantly lower SBP ( P 0.4) occurred more frequently in FIV-infected cats ( P <0.001). Renal ultrasonography showed abnormalities in 60/91 FIV-infected cats, with hyperechogenic cortices in 39/91 and enlarged kidneys in 31/91. Conclusions and relevance Hypertension can be excluded as a common cause of renal damage leading to proteinuria in FIV-infected cats. Proteinuria and poorly concentrated urine are common in naturally infected FIV-positive cats, in contrast to azotaemia. Clinicians should cautiously interpret ultrasonographic abnormalities as these occur in over half of FIV-infected cats.

  20. Right ventricular pressure response to exercise in adults with isolated ventricular septal defect closed in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Thomas; Lindberg, Harald; Lund, May Brit; Holmstrom, Henrik; Dohlen, Gaute; Thaulow, Erik

    2018-06-01

    We previously demonstrated an abnormally high right ventricular systolic pressure response to exercise in 50% of adolescents operated on for isolated ventricular septal defect. The present study investigated the prevalence of abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response in 20 adult (age 30-45 years) patients who underwent surgery for early ventricular septal defect closure and its association with impaired ventricular function, pulmonary function, or exercise capacity. The patients underwent cardiopulmonary tests, including exercise stress echocardiography. Five of 19 patients (26%) presented an abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response to exercise ⩾ 52 mmHg. Right ventricular systolic function was mixed, with normal tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and fractional area change, but abnormal tricuspid annular systolic motion velocity (median 6.7 cm/second) and isovolumetric acceleration (median 0.8 m/second2). Left ventricular systolic and diastolic function was normal at rest as measured by the peak systolic velocity of the lateral wall and isovolumic acceleration, early diastolic velocity, and ratio of early diastolic flow to tissue velocity, except for ejection fraction (median 53%). The myocardial performance index was abnormal for both the left and right ventricle. Peak oxygen uptake was normal (mean z score -0.4, 95% CI -2.8-0.3). There was no association between an abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response during exercise and right or left ventricular function, pulmonary function, or exercise capacity. Abnormal right ventricular pressure response is not more frequent in adult patients compared with adolescents. This does not support the theory of progressive pulmonary vascular disease following closure of left-to-right shunts.

  1. Left Atrial Systolic Force in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cioffi, Giovanni; Cramariuc, Dana; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    LASF in the total study population was 21 ± 14 kdynes/cm(2) . The determinants of LASF were higher age, heart rate, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) mass, mitral peak early velocity, maximal LA volume, and longer mitral deceleration time (multiple R(2) = 0.37, P ...Background: There is a limited knowledge about left atrial (LA) systolic force (LASF) and its key determinants in patients with asymptomatic mild-moderate aortic stenosis (AS). Methods: We used baseline clinic and echocardiographic data from 1,566 patients recruited in the simvastatin ezetimibe...... in aortic stenosis study evaluating the effect of placebo-controlled combined simvastatin and ezetimibe treatment in asymptomatic AS. The LASF was calculated by Manning's method. Low and high LASF were defined as 95th percentile of the distribution within the study population, respectively. Results: Mean...

  2. Relationship between Intra Ocular Pressure and Some Risk Factors, In Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihanian Faeze

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High intra ocular pressure (IOP often is related with open angle glaucoma. Although patients with high IOP are disposable to risk of open angle glaucoma, most of them never given it. In this study we evaluated association of hypertension and some other underlying causes with high IOP in population of patients referred to Amiralmomenin hospital during 2011-2012. This was a descriptive prospective study. Population was included patients with high IOP referred during 2012 to Amiralmomenin Hospital in Rasht. 180 patients with high IOP entered in the study. IOP of both eyes, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in admission were measured by expert assistant of ophthalmology and recorded. 55% of our patients were women. The mean age of them was 67.64±11.88 years. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure were respectively 128.66 ± 16.71 and 77.00 ± 9.02 mmHg. The re was a significant relation between gender, history of hypertension, alcohol abuse, hyperlipidemia and cardiac disease with high IOP in right eye (p0.05. Our study showed that systolic blood pressure can predict the high IOP. The results indicate a high impact of intraocular pressure on measures of blood pressure in an Iranian sample population.

  3. Development of optoelectronic monitoring system for ear arterial pressure waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Satoshi; Imachi, Yu; Yagi, Tamotsu; Imachi, Kou; Ono, Toshirou; Man-i, Masando

    1994-02-01

    Invasive intra-arterial blood pressure measurement is the most accurate method but not practical if the subject is in motion. The apparatus developed by Wesseling et al., based on a volume-clamp method of Penaz (Finapres), is able to monitor continuous finger arterial pressure waveforms noninvasively. The limitation of Finapres is the difficulty in measuring the pressure of a subject during work that involves finger or arm action. Because the Finapres detector is attached to subject's finger, the measurements are affected by inertia of blood and hydrostatic effect cause by arm or finger motion. To overcome this problem, the authors made a detector that is attached to subject's ear and developed and optoelectronic monitoring systems for ear arterial pressure waveform (Earpres). An IR LEDs, photodiode, and air cuff comprised the detector. The detector was attached to a subject's ear, and the space adjusted between the air cuff and the rubber plate on which the LED and photodiode were positioned. To evaluate the accuracy of Earpres, the following tests were conducted with participation of 10 healthy male volunteers. The subjects rested for about five minutes, then performed standing and squatting exercises to provide wide ranges of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure. Intra- and inter-individual standard errors were calculated according to the method of van Egmond et al. As a result, average, the averages of intra-individual standard errors for earpres appeared small (3.7 and 2.7 mmHg for systolic and diastolic pressure respectively). The inter-individual standard errors for Earpres were about the same was Finapres for both systolic and diastolic pressure. The results showed the ear monitor was reliable in measuring arterial blood pressure waveforms and might be applicable to various fields such as sports medicine and ergonomics.

  4. Predictors of right ventricular function as measured by tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Iversen, Kasper K; Akkan, Dilek

    2009-01-01

    in heart failure patients, in particular with reduced septal longitudinal motion. TAPSE is decreased in patients with heart failure of ischemic etiology. However, the absolute reduction in TAPSE is small and seems to be of minor importance in the clinical utilization of TAPSE whether applied as a measure...... of right ventricular systolic function or as a prognostic factor....

  5. Non-contact tonometry synchronized with cardiac rhythm and its relationship with blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, A; González-Méijome, J M; Fernandes, P; Jorge, J; Almeida, J B; Parafita, M A

    2006-07-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine the differences between non-synchronized intraocular pressure (IOP_N) and intraocular pressure readings synchronized with cardiac pulse and try to determine if these parameters are related to blood pressure values. One hundred and sixty-five right eyes from 165 volunteers (107 females, 58 males) aged from 19 to 73 years (mean +/- S.D., 29.93 +/- 11.17) were examined with the Nidek NT-4000, a new non-contact tonometer that allows the measurement of IOP synchronized with the cardiac rhythm. IOP measurements in the four different modes of synchronization were taken in a randomized order. Three measures of each parameter were taken and then averaged. The blood pressure was determined three times with a portable manometer and mean values of systolic and diastolic pressure and the pulse rate were computed. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was determined as being 1/3 of systolic plus 2/3 of diastolic blood pressure. The mean +/- S.D. values for the standard intraocular pressure (IOP_N: 14.76 +/- 2.86), intraocular pressure in the systolic instant or peak (IOP_P: 14.99 +/- 2.85), intraocular pressure in the middle instant between heartbeats or middle (IOP_M: 14.68 +/- 2.76), and intraocular pressure in the diastolic instant or bottom (IOP_B: 13.86 +/- 2.61) were obtained. The IOP_P was higher than the remaining values. A significant difference in mean IOP existed between IOP_B and the remaining modes of measuring (p non-synchronized and the remaining synchronized parameters in a significant way. Other than a weak association with MAP, no significant correlation between IOP and BP was found. The measurements of IOP readings for the three modes are consistent with timings during the cardiac cycle and IOP pulse cycle.

  6. Pressure Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  7. Validation of the AVITA BPM15S wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Zhang, Lu; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor AVITA BPM15S for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol revision 2010 of the European Society of Hypertension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 Chinese adults (15 women, mean age 51 years) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the AVITA BPM15S device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The AVITA BPM15S device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg were 85/99, 94/99, and 98/99, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 82/99, 96/99, and 98/99, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The device also achieved the criteria in part 2 of the validation study. Thirty-two and 28 participants for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥ 24). No participant had all of the three device-observer comparisons greater than 5 mmHg for systolic or diastolic blood pressure. The AVITA wrist blood pressure monitor BPM15S fulfilled the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010 and hence can be recommended for home use in an adult population.

  8. Systolic trees and systolic language recognition by tree automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinby, M

    1983-01-01

    K. Culik II, J. Gruska, A. Salomaa and D. Wood have studied the language recognition capabilities of certain types of systolically operating networks of processors (see research reports Cs-81-32, Cs-81-36 and Cs-82-01, Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada). In this paper, their model for systolic VLSI trees is formalised in terms of standard tree automaton theory, and the way in which some known facts about recognisable forests and tree transductions can be applied in VLSI tree theory is demonstrated. 13 references.

  9. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heon; Kim, Seok Yeon; Lee, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jae Kyun; Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 ± 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV V /LV V ) were calculated. RV V /LV V was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 ± 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV V /LV V and PASP (R = 0.82, p V /LV V were 0.990 and 0.892. RV V /LV V was 1.01 ± 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 ± 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P V /LV V , sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  10. Community-based blood pressure measurement by non-health workers using electronic devices: a validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Reidpath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Population monitoring and screening of blood pressure is an important part of any population health strategy. Qualified health workers are expensive and often unavailable for screening. Non-health workers with electronic blood pressure monitors are increasingly used in community-based research. This approach is unvalidated. In a poor, urban community we compared blood pressure measurements taken by non-health workers using electronic devices against qualified health workers using mercury sphygmomanometers. Method: Fifty-six adult volunteers participated in the research. Data were collected by five qualified health workers, and six non-health workers. Participants were randomly allocated to have their blood pressure measured on four consecutive occasions by alternating a qualified health worker with a non-health worker. Descriptive statistics and graphs, and mixed effects linear models to account for the repeated measurement were used in the analysis. Results: Blood pressure readings by non-health workers were more reliable than those taken by qualified health workers. There was no significant difference between the readings taken by qualified health workers and those taken by non-health workers for systolic blood pressure. Non-health workers were, on average, 5–7 mmHg lower in their measures of blood pressure than the qualified health workers (95%HPD: −2.9 to −10.0 for diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion: The results provide empirical evidence that supports the practice of non-health workers using electronic devices for BP measurement in community-based research and screening. Non-health workers recorded blood pressures that differed from qualified health workers by no more than 10 mmHg. The approach is promising, but more research is needed to establish the generalisability of the results.

  11. Body size at birth and blood pressure among children in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, C M; Egger, P; Dada, O; Delgado, H; Kylberg, E; Lavin, P; Tang, G H; von Hertzen, H; Shiell, A W; Barker, D J

    2001-02-01

    Studies in developed countries have shown that reduced fetal growth is related to raised blood pressure in childhood and adult life. Little is known about this association in developing countries, where fetal growth retardation is common. In 1994-1995, we measured blood pressure in 1570 3-6-year-old children living in China, Guatemala, Chile, Nigeria and Sweden. We related their blood pressure to patterns of fetal growth, as measured by body proportions at birth. The children were all born after 37 weeks gestation and weighed more than 2.5 kg at birth. In each country, blood pressure was positively related to the child's current weight. After adjusting for this and gender, systolic pressure was inversely related to size at birth in all countries except Nigeria. In Chile, China and Guatemala, children who were proportionately small at birth had raised systolic pressure. For example, in Chile, systolic pressure adjusted for current weight increased by 4.9 mmHg (95% CI : 2.1, 7.7) for every kilogram decrease in birthweight, by 1 mmHg (95% CI : 0.4, 1.6) for every centimetre decrease in birth length, and by 1.3 mmHg (95% CI : 0.4, 2.2) for every centimetre decrease in head circumference at birth. In Sweden, systolic pressure was higher in children who were disproportionately small, that is thin, at birth. Systolic pressure increased by 0.3 mmHg (95% CI : 0.0, 0.6) for every unit (kg/m3) decrease in ponderal index at birth. These associations were independent of the duration of gestation. Raised blood pressure among children in three samples from China, Central and South America is related to proportionate reduction in body size at birth, which results from reduced growth throughout gestation. The relation between fetal growth and blood pressure may be different in African populations. Proportionately reduced fetal growth is the prevalent pattern of fetal growth retardation in developing countries, and is associated with chronic undernutrition among women. Improvement

  12. Validation of the Kingyield BP210 wrist blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension-International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Fang; Huang, Qi-Fang; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2012-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric wrist blood pressure monitor BP210 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese participants (21 women, 51 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the BP210 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 15 participants in phase 1 and a further 18 participants in phase 2 of the validation study. Data analysis was conducted using the ESHIP analyzer. The BP210 device successfully passed phase 1 of the validation study with a number of absolute differences between device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for at least 33/45, 44/45, and 44/45 measurements, respectively. The device also achieved the targets for phase 2.1, with 77/99, 95/99, and 97/99 differences within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively for systolic blood pressure, and with 78/99, 97/99, and 99/99 within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively for diastolic blood pressure. In phase 2.2, 29 and 25 participants had at least two of the three device-observers differences within 5 mmHg (required≥22) for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The Kingyield wrist blood pressure monitor BP210 has passed the International Protocol requirements, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  13. Comparison of invasive and oscillometric blood pressure measurement techniques in anesthetized camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnes, Turi K; Hubbell, John A E; Lerche, Phillip; Bednarski, Richard M

    2012-08-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of the oscillometric method for arterial blood pressure (ABP) monitoring in anesthetized camelids. Twenty camelids were anesthetized and systolic ABP (SABP), mean ABP (MABP), and diastolic ABP (DABP) were measured directly and using the oscillometric method. The mean difference between SABP measurements was -9.9 ± 21.9 mmHg with a range of -76 to 54 mmHg, and the 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were -33 to 53 mmHg. The difference between DABP measurements was -1.8 ± 15.6 mmHg with a range of -81 to 36 mmHg, and the 95% LOA were -32 to 29 mmHg. The difference between MABP measurements was -2.9 ± 17.0 mmHg with a range of -81 to 36 mmHg, and the 95% LOA were -30 to 36 mmHg. Accurate ABP monitoring in anesthetized camelids cannot be accomplished using the oscillometric method.

  14. The difference in blood pressure readings between arms and survival: primary care cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher E; Taylor, Rod S; Shore, Angela C; Campbell, John L

    2012-03-20

    To determine whether a difference in systolic blood pressure readings between arms can predict a reduced event free survival after 10 years. Cohort study. Rural general practice in Devon, United Kingdom. 230 people receiving treatment for hypertension in primary care. Bilateral blood pressure measurements recorded at three successive surgery attendances. Cardiovascular events and deaths from all causes during a median follow-up of 9.8 years. At recruitment 24% (55/230) of participants had a mean interarm difference in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more and 9% (21/230) of 15 mm Hg or more; these differences were associated with an increased risk of all cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 6.5 and 3.1, 1.6 to 6.0, respectively). The risk of death was also increased in 183 participants without pre-existing cardiovascular disease with an interarm difference in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more or 15 mm Hg or more (2.6, 1.4 to 4.8 and 2.7, 1.3 to 5.4). An interarm difference in diastolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more was weakly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events or death. Differences in systolic blood pressure between arms can predict an increased risk of cardiovascular events and all cause mortality over 10 years in people with hypertension. This difference could be a valuable indicator of increased cardiovascular risk. Bilateral blood pressure measurements should become a routine part of cardiovascular assessment in primary care.

  15. Methyl mercury, but not inorganic mercury, associated with higher blood pressure during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ellen M; Herbstman, Julie B; Lin, Yu Hong; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Halden, Rolf U; Witter, Frank R; Goldman, Lynn R

    2017-04-01

    Prior studies addressing associations between mercury and blood pressure have produced inconsistent findings; some of this may result from measuring total instead of speciated mercury. This cross-sectional study of 263 pregnant women assessed total mercury, speciated mercury, selenium, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in umbilical cord blood and blood pressure during labor and delivery. Models with a) total mercury or b) methyl and inorganic mercury were evaluated. Regression models adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, prepregnancy body mass index, neighborhood income, parity, smoking, n-3 fatty acids and selenium. Geometric mean total, methyl, and inorganic mercury concentrations were 1.40µg/L (95% confidence interval: 1.29, 1.52); 0.95µg/L (0.84, 1.07); and 0.13µg/L (0.10, 0.17), respectively. Elevated systolic BP, diastolic BP, and pulse pressure were found, respectively, in 11.4%, 6.8%, and 19.8% of mothers. In adjusted multivariable models, a one-tertile increase of methyl mercury was associated with 2.83mmHg (0.17, 5.50) higher systolic blood pressure and 2.99mmHg (0.91, 5.08) higher pulse pressure. In the same models, an increase of one tertile of inorganic mercury was associated with -1.18mmHg (-3.72, 1.35) lower systolic blood pressure and -2.51mmHg (-4.49, -0.53) lower pulse pressure. No associations were observed with diastolic pressure. There was a non-significant trend of higher total mercury with higher systolic blood pressure. We observed a significant association of higher methyl mercury with higher systolic and pulse pressure, yet higher inorganic mercury was significantly associated with lower pulse pressure. These results should be confirmed with larger, longitudinal studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Physiological effects of a companion robot on blood pressure of older people in residential care facility: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hayley; MacDonald, Bruce; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of interacting with the companion robot, Paro, on blood pressure and heart rate of older people in a residential care facility. This study used a repeated measures design. Twenty-one residents in rest home and hospital level care had their blood pressure taken three times; before, during and after interacting with the seal robot. Four residents who did not interact with the robot were excluded from the final analysis (final n = 17). The final analysis found that systolic and diastolic blood pressure changed significantly over time as did heart rate. Planned comparisons revealed that systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly from baseline to when residents had Paro (systolic, P = 0.048; diastolic, P = 0.05). Diastolic blood pressure increased significantly after Paro was withdrawn (P = 0.03). Interacting with Paro has a physiological effect on cardiovascular measures, which is similar to findings with live animals. © 2013 ACOTA.

  17. ORANGE JUICE AND BLOOD PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. VALIM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Blood pressure is the force of blood against artery walls. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg and recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (as the heart contracts over diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes between beats. High blood pressure (hypertension is defined as chronically elevated high blood pressure, with systolic blood pressure (SBP of 140 mm Hg or greater, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP of 90 mm Hg or greater. High blood pressure (HBP, smoking, abnormal blood lipid levels, obesity and diabetes are risk factors for coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US. Lifestyle modifications such as engaging in regular physical activity, quitting smoking and eating a healthy diet (limiting intake of saturated fat and sodium and increasing consumption of fiber, fruits and vegetables are advocated for the prevention, treatment, and control of HBP. As multiple factors influence blood pressure, the effects of each factor are typically modest, particularly in normotensive subjects, yet the combined effects can be substantial. Nutrition plays an important role in influencing blood pressure. Orange juice should be included as part of any low sodium diet and/or any blood pressure reducing eating plan, as it is sodium free, fat-free and can help meet recommended levels of potassium intake that may contribute to lower BP.

  18. Evaluating combined effect of noise and heat on blood pressure changes among males in climatic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Bastami, Mohamad Taghi; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to noise and heat causes individuals to experience some changes in the function of cardiovascular system in workplaces. This study aimed to find the combined effect of heat and noise on systolic and diastolic types of blood pressure in experimentally controlled conditions. This quasi-experimental study was performed with 12 male students in a climatic chamber in 2014. Blood pressure including systolic and diastolic was measured in the following conditions: 15 min after rest in exposure to heat (40°C, relative humidity [RH]: 30%), exposure to noise with 75, 85, and 95 dB rates in thermal comfort condition (22.1 ± 0.9 wet-bulb globe temperature), and combined exposure to heat (40°C, RH: 30%) and noise with 75, 85, and 95 dB. Friedman test was used to analyze the data. The mean change of systolic blood pressure was different significantly before and after exposure to heat and noise levels including 75, 85, and 95 dB ( P = 0.015, P = 0.001, P > 0.001, P = 0.027, respectively). Although systolic and diastolic blood pressures changed drastically, it was not significantly different in simultaneous exposure to heat and noise. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased in exposure to heat, while exposure to different levels of noise elevates systolic and diastolic blood pressures. However, when exposed to a combination of heat and noise, subtle changes of blood pressure were traced, which can be characterized as average, considering heat-only and noise-only tension situations.

  19. Echocardiographic parameters and survival in Chagas heart disease with severe systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p 70.71 mL/m2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction.

  20. Validation of the fully automated A&D TM-2656 blood pressure monitor according to the British Hypertension Society Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Fang; Liu, Ming; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the fully automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor TM-2656 according to the British Hypertension Society (BHS) Protocol 1993. We recruited individuals until there were 85 eligible participants and their blood pressure could meet the blood pressure distribution requirements specified by the BHS Protocol. For each individual, we sequentially measured the systolic and diastolic blood pressures using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the TM-2656 device (one supervisor). Data analysis was carried out according to the BHS Protocol. The device achieved grade A. The percentage of blood pressure differences within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 62, 85, and 96%, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and 71, 93, and 99%, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. The average (±SD) of the device-observer differences was -2.1±7.8 mmHg (P<0.0001) and -1.1±5.8 mmHg (P<0.0001) for systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively. The A&D upper-arm blood pressure monitor TM-2656 has passed the requirements of the BHS Protocol, and can thus be recommended for blood pressure measurement.

  1. The measurement of adult blood pressure and management of hypertension before elective surgery: Joint Guidelines from the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and the British Hypertension Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, A; McCormack, T; Carlisle, J; Anderson, S; Pichel, A; Beckett, N; Woodcock, T; Heagerty, A

    2016-03-01

    This guideline aims to ensure that patients admitted to hospital for elective surgery are known to have blood pressures below 160 mmHg systolic and 100 mmHg diastolic in primary care. The objective for primary care is to fulfil this criterion before referral to secondary care for elective surgery. The objective for secondary care is to avoid spurious hypertensive measurements. Secondary care should not attempt to diagnose hypertension in patients who are normotensive in primary care. Patients who present to pre-operative assessment clinics without documented primary care blood pressures should proceed to elective surgery if clinic blood pressures are below 180 mmHg systolic and 110 mmHg diastolic. © 2016 The Authors. Anaesthesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Blood pressure and falls in community-dwelling people aged 60 years and older in the VHM&PP cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Diana; Nagel, Gabriele; Kleiner, Andrea; Ulmer, Hanno; Rehberger, Barbara; Concin, Hans; Rapp, Kilian

    2013-05-21

    Falls are one of the major health problems in old people. Different risk factors were identified but only few epidemiological studies analysed the influence of conventionally measured blood pressure on falls. The objective of our study was to investigate the relationship between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and falls. In 3,544 community-dwelling Austrian women and men aged 60 years and older, data on falls within the previous three months were collected by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured by general practitioners within the Vorarlberg Health Monitoring and Prevention Programme (VHM&PP) 90 to 1095 days before the fall assessment. A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted. The models were stratified by gender and adjusted by age, number of medical conditions and subjective feeling of illness. In total, 257 falls in 3,544 persons were reported. In women, high systolic and diastolic blood pressure was associated with a decreased risk of falls. An increase of systolic blood pressure by 10 mmHg and of diastolic blood pressure by 5 mmHg reduced the risk of falling by 9% (OR 0.91, 95% Cl 0.84-0.98) and 8% (OR 0.92, 95% Cl 0.85-0.99), respectively. In men, an increased risk of falls was observed in participants with low systolic or low diastolic blood pressure. Blood pressure was associated with the risk of falls. Hypertensive values decreased the risk in women and low blood pressure increased the risk in men.

  3. Blood pressure patterns in women with gestational hypertension or mild preeclampsia at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Tuuk, K; Tajik, P; Koopmans, C M; van den Berg, P P; Mol, B W J; van Pampus, M G; Groen, H

    2017-03-01

    Gestational hypertension (GH) and mild preeclampsia (PE) represent the most common medical complications of pregnancy, with the majority of cases developing at or near term. There is little knowledge of the course of blood pressure over time in these women. We explored the pattern of systolic and diastolic blood pressure over time in women with GH or mild PE at term participating in the HYPITAT trial, and we attempted to identify clinical factors influencing these blood pressure patterns and the impact of severe hypertension on clinical management. We used data from the HYPITAT trial, that included women with a singleton pregnancy with a fetus in cephalic position between 36 and 41 weeks of gestation with the diagnosis of GH or mild PE. Blood pressure measurements were performed from randomization or admission until delivery or discharge from the hospital. We included the highest blood pressure of each day. We evaluated systolic and diastolic blood pressure change over time, as well as the influence of clinical characteristics and laboratory findings on the course of blood pressure. We used univariate and multivariate regression analysis with a backward stepwise algorithm for the selection of variables. The model with the best fit (lowest AIC) was selected as the final model. We also compared mode of delivery for women with and without severe hypertension. We studied 1076 women who had 4188 blood pressure measurements done. The systolic blood pressure showed a significant non-linear increase over time and for the diastolic blood pressure the pattern was also non-linear. In the multivariable model of systolic blood pressure change over time, nulliparity, ethnicity, systolic blood pressure (at baseline), BMI and LDH at randomization influenced the course of blood pressure. In the diastolic blood pressure model ALT and the baseline diastolic blood pressure had a significant influence. When we explored the association between blood pressure and mode of delivery, it

  4. Association of Inter-Arm Systolic Blood Pressure Difference with Coronary Atherosclerotic Disease Burden Using Calcium Scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Ae Young; Cho, Kyoung Im; Garg, Scot; Kim, Yong Hoon; Shin, Eun Seok

    2017-09-01

    There are no sufficient data on the correlation between inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference and coronary atherosclerosis found using coronary artery calcium score (CACS). We aimed to investigate if the increased difference in inter-arm BP is independently associated with severity of CACS. Patients who had ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors or an intermediate Framingham Risk Score (FRS; ≥10) were enrolled. Inter-arm BP difference was defined as the absolute difference in BP in both arms. Quantitative CACS was measured by using coronary computed tomography angiography with the scoring system. A total of 261 patients were included in this study. Age (r=0.256, parm systolic BP (SBP; r=0.172, p=0.005), mean of left arm SBP (r=0.190, p=0.002), inter-arm SBP difference (r=0.152, p=0.014), and the FRS (r=0.278, parm SBP difference (≥6 mm Hg) was significantly associated with CACS ≥300 [odds ratio (OR) 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-4.22; p=0.022]. In multivariable analysis, the inter-arm SBP difference ≥6 mm Hg was also significantly associated with CACS ≥300 after adjusting for clinical risk factors (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.06-5.19; p=0.036). An increased inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mm Hg) is associated with coronary atherosclerotic disease burden using CACS, and provides additional information for predicting severe coronary calcification, compared to models based on traditional risk factors. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  5. A high-sugar and high-fat diet impairs cardiac systolic and diastolic function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Salvatore; Mauro, Adolfo G; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Marchetti, Carlo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Abbate, Antonio; Toldo, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterized by dyspnea, fatigue, exercise intolerance and cardiac dysfunction. Unhealthy diet has been associated with increased risk of obesity and heart disease, but whether it directly affects cardiac function, and promotes the development and progression of HF is unknown. We fed 8-week old male or female CD-1 mice with a standard diet (SD) or a diet rich in saturated fat and sugar, resembling a "Western" diet (WD). Cardiac systolic and diastolic function was measured at baseline and 4 and 8 weeks by Doppler echocardiography, and left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure (EDP) by cardiac catheterization prior to sacrifice. An additional group of mice received WD for 4 weeks followed by SD (wash-out) for 8 weeks. WD-fed mice experienced a significant decreased in LV ejection fraction (LVEF), reflecting impaired systolic function, and a significant increase in isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT), myocardial performance index (MPI), and LVEDP, showing impaired diastolic function, without any sex-related differences. Switching to a SD after 4 weeks of WD partially reversed the cardiac systolic and diastolic dysfunction. A diet rich in saturated fat and sugars (WD) impairs cardiac systolic and diastolic function in the mouse. Further studies are required to define the mechanism through which diet affects cardiac function, and whether dietary interventions can be used in patients with, or at risk for, HF. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. The efficacy and safety of a proprietary onion-pumpkin extract (OPtain120 on blood pressure: an open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orie Yoshinari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutraceuticals and functional foods are increasingly being used to help manage hypertension. Treatment with either pumpkin or onion can significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure in animal studies. Traditionally, pumpkin has been used to support healthy blood pressure, glucose tolerance and lipid levels. Onion contains high levels of flavonoids, including quercetin, which decreases blood pressure and promotes restoration of healthy endothelial function. However, human trials on these food sources are limited, and the combined effects of pumpkin and onion have not been examined yet. Objective: We performed an open-label clinical study to evaluate the effects of a proprietary onion-pumpkin extract (OPtain120 on systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Methods: Healthy adults with systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP in the elevated range of 140-159 and 80-90 mmHg, respectively, were enrolled in this study. Subjects consumed one capsule of onion-pumpkin extract twice daily for 12 weeks. Daily Home Blood Pressure Measurement (HBPM was taken upon waking and before bed. Office Blood Pressure Measurement (OBPM was taken in-clinic at Week 0, 6, and 12. Results: 52 subjects were screened and 12 were enrolled in the study, with a total of 10 subjects completing the study. Systolic HBPM taken before bed demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from baseline (147.23 mmHg to Week 12 (138.14 mmHg, representing a reduction of 9.09 mmHg (6.17%, p=0.021. Diastolic HBPM taken before bed demonstrated a decrease of 4.06 mmHg (4.46%, p=0.085, a significant reduction from baseline (91.07 mmHg at Week 12 (87.02 mmHg. Non-statistically significant reductions were seen in the early morning Systolic (3.14% and Diastolic (2.57% HBPM and in the Systolic (1.36% OBPM. Conclusion: OPtain120 was safely consumed over a 12-week period. OPtain120 appears to be effective in lowering Systolic Blood Pressure at bedtime in

  7. Smart blood pressure holter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlhan, İlhan

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a wireless blood pressure holter that can be used with smart mobile devices was developed. The developed blood pressure holter consists of two parts, which are a smart mobile device and a cuff. The smart mobile device is used as a recording, control and display device through a developed interface, while the cuff was designed to take measurements from the arm. Resistor-Capacitor (RC) and digital filters were used on the cuff that communicates with the smart mobile device via Bluetooth. The blood pressure was estimated using the Simple Hill Climbing Algorithm (HCA). It is possible to measure instantaneous or programmable blood pressure and heart rate values at certain intervals using this holter. The test was conducted with 30 individuals at different ages with the guidance of a specialist health personnel. The results showed that an accuracy at 93.89% and 91.95% rates could be obtained for systolic and diastolic pressure values, respectively, when compared with those obtained using a traditional sphygmomanometer. The accuracy level for the heart rate was measured as 97.66%. Furthermore, this device was tested day and night in the holter mode in terms of working time, the continuity of the Bluetooth connection and the reliability of the measurement results. The test results were evaluated separately in terms of measurement accuracy, working time, the continuity of the Bluetooth connection and the reliability of the measurement results. The measurement accuracy for systolic, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate values was obtained as 93.89%, 91.95% and 97.66%, respectively. The maximum number of measurements which can be conducted with four 1000 mA alkaline batteries at 20 min intervals was found approximately 79 (little more than 24 h). In addition, it was determined that the continuity of the Bluetooth connection and the reliability of the measurement results were automatically achieved through the features in the interface developed for the

  8. Serum proatrial natriuretic peptide does not increase with higher systolic blood pressure in obese men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla L; Andersen, Ulrik B; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    ventricular mass (LVM). METHODS: We examined 103 obese healthy medication-free men. We measured 24-hour ambulatory BP (ABP). LVM was calculated using the Cornell voltage-duration product method. Fasting serum concentrations of midregional proatrial NP (MR-proANP), a surrogate for active ANP, were measured....... Linear regression analysis was used to calculate age-adjusted standardised regression coefficients (β). RESULTS: LVM and BP increased across systolic ABP quartiles (mean LVM±SD: 1599.1±387.2 mm ms in first vs 2188.5±551.3 mm ms in fourth quartile, pABP±SD: 114.5±4.2 mm Hg in first...... vs 149.0±7.7 mm Hg in fourth quartile, pABP was robustly associated with LVM (ß=0.48, pABP (ß=-0.32, p=0.004) and with diastolic ABP (ß=-0.45, p

  9. A Study on Anthropometric Measurements, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Food Intakes Among Different Social Status and Ethnicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarirad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Metabolic syndrome is a disorder that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate some risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and food intakes among people who lived in Ahvaz City, Iran. Methods It was a filed study that was conducted on 211 subjects who participated in health exhibition. Socioeconomic status and ethnicity were asked by a general questionnaire. Weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference (WC and WC to hip circumference ratio (WHR were obtained. Blood sugar was measured by a glucometer. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were obtained and dietary intakes were assessed by a brief instrument. Results There was a significant difference in weight, height, WC, WHR and systolic blood pressure among different jobs. Workers had more intakes of cake and sweets. Arab subjects had more intakes of bread and fishes and Persians more intakes of vegetables. Soda, chocolate and candy were more consumed by Kurd ethnicity. Conclusions Job may be accounted as an important effective socioeconomic factor related to metabolic syndrome risk factors; also different cultures due to different ethnicities may have an influence on lifestyle and dietary intakes.

  10. Effect of mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure measurement during both cuff inflation and cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Pan, Fan; Murray, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure (BP) measurements during cuff inflation and deflation. BP measurements were taken from each of 40 participants, with three repeat sessions under three randomized cuff deflation/inflation conditions. Cuff pressure was linearly deflated and inflated at a standard rate of 2-3 mmHg/s and also linearly inflated at a fast rate of 5-6 mmHg/s. Manual auscultatory systolic and diastolic BPs, and pulse pressure (SBP, DBP, PP) were measured. Automated BPs were determined from digitally recorded cuff pressures by fitting a polynomial model to the oscillometric pulse amplitudes. The BPs from cuff deflation and inflation were then compared. Repeatable measurements between sessions and between the sequential order of inflation/deflation conditions (all P > 0.1) indicated stability of arterial mechanical behaviour with repeat measurements. Comparing BPs obtained by standard inflation with those from standard deflation, manual SBP was 2.6 mmHg lower (P deflation suggest different arterial mechanical behaviour between arterial opening and closing during BP measurement. We have shown that the mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery during BP measurement differs between cuff deflation and cuff inflation.

  11. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kono, Syoichiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of acute phase blood pressure in patients with acute ischemic stroke by determining whether or not it contributes to clinical outcome. We studied 515 consecutive patients admitted within the first 48 hours after the onset of ischemic strokes, employing systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements recorded within 36 hours after admission. High blood pressure was defined when the mean of at least 2 blood pressure measurements was ≥200 mmHg systolic and/or ≥110 mmHg diastolic at 6 to 24 hours after admission or ≥180 mmHg systolic and/or ≥105 mmHg diastolic at 24 to 36 hours after admission. The high blood pressure group was found to include 16% of the patients. Age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, stroke history, carotid artery stenosis, leukoaraiosis, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and mortality were not significantly correlated with either the high blood pressure or non-high blood pressure group. High blood pressure on admission was significantly associated with a past history of hypertension, kidney disease, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on discharge and the length of stay. On logistic regression analysis, with no previous history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and kidney disease were independent risk factors associated with the presence of high blood pressure [odds ratio (OR), 1.85 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-3.22), 1.89 (95% CI: 1.11-3.22), and 3.31 (95% CI: 1.36-8.04), respectively]. Multi-organ injury may be presented in acute stroke patients with high blood pressure. Patients with high blood pressure had a poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

  12. Evaluating combined effect of noise and heat on blood pressure changes among males in climatic chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Bastami, Mohamad Taghi; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exposure to noise and heat causes individuals to experience some changes in the function of cardiovascular system in workplaces. This study aimed to find the combined effect of heat and noise on systolic and diastolic types of blood pressure in experimentally controlled conditions. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study was performed with 12 male students in a climatic chamber in 2014. Blood pressure including systolic and diastolic was measured in the following conditions: 15 m...

  13. Reference values of fetal peak systolic blood flow Velocity in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of this prospective cross sectional study are (i) to establish new reference values of peak systolic blood flow velocity measurement in the fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA-PSV) following validated methodological guidelines (ii) to correlate peak systolic velocity with gestational age and (iii) to ...

  14. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.

    2017-09-01

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  15. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T; Mendoza, B

    2017-09-01

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  16. [Efficiency between the different measurement patterns of home blood pressure monitoring in the follow-up of hypertensive patients in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León-Robert, Arleen; Hidalgo-García, Isabel; Gascón-Cánovas, Juan; Antón-Botella, José; López-Alegría, Carmen; Campusano Castellanos, Heidi

    2018-03-29

    To identify the most efficient measurement pattern of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) for the follow-up of hypertensive patients in primary care. Validation study of a diagnostic test. Primary care team in Murcia, Spain. One hundred and fifty three hypertensive patients younger than 80 years who met the inclusion criteria, who used HBPM and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Performing HBPM for 24hours. The HBPM protocol consisted of recording 2 measurements in the morning and 2 in the evening for 7 days. With the records obtained, the different HBPM patterns were established (7, 6, 5, 4, 3 days). The ROC curves were used for the analysis, together with the correlation coefficients and the Bland-Altman plots. The best areas under the curve for the systolic pressure of the different HBPM patterns corresponded to the 4-day pattern: 0.837 (0.77-0.90); and the 3 day one: 0.834 (0.77-0.90). As for diastolic pressure, the 7-day pattern had an area under the curve of 0.889 (0.84-0.94); followed by the 3 and 4 days patterns, which had the same statistical result both: 0.834 (0.83-0.94). There were no significant differences between correlation coefficients for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The 3-day pattern showed a lower dispersion in the Bland-Altman plots. The 3 days HBPM pattern is proposed for the follow-up of the hypertensive patient, since it does not have an inferior efficiency to the other patterns. Copyright © 2018 The Author. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Emergence of ethnic differences in blood pressure in adolescence: the determinants of adolescent social well-being and health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Seeromanie; Whitrow, Melissa; Lenguerrand, Erik; Maynard, Maria; Teyhan, Alison; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Der, Geoff

    2010-04-01

    The cause of ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease remains a scientific challenge. Blood pressure tracks from late childhood to adulthood. We examined ethnic differences in changes in blood pressure between early and late adolescence in the United Kingdom. Longitudinal measures of blood pressure, height, weight, leg length, smoking, and socioeconomic circumstances were obtained from London, United Kingdom, schoolchildren of White British (n=692), Black Caribbean (n=670), Black African (n=772), Indian (n=384), and Pakistani and Bangladeshi (n=402) ethnicity at 11 to 13 years and 14 to 16 years. Predicted age- and ethnic-specific means of blood pressure, adjusted for anthropometry and social exposures, were derived using mixed models. Among boys, systolic blood pressure did not differ by ethnicity at 12 years, but the greater increase among Black Africans than Whites led to higher systolic blood pressure at 16 years (+2.9 mm Hg). Among girls, ethnic differences in mean systolic blood pressure were not significant at any age, but while systolic blood pressure hardly changed with age among White girls, it increased among Black Caribbeans and Black Africans. Ethnic differences in diastolic blood pressure were more marked than those for systolic blood pressure. Body mass index, height, and leg length were independent predictors of blood pressure, with few ethnic-specific effects. Socioeconomic disadvantage had a disproportionate effect on blood pressure for girls in minority groups. The findings suggest that ethnic divergences in blood pressure begin in adolescence and are particularly striking for boys. They signal the need for early prevention of adverse cardiovascular disease risks in later life.

  18. Chronobiometric assessment of autogenic training effects upon blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Halberg, F; Cornélissen, G; Saito, Y; Fukuda, K; Otsuka, K; Kikuchi, T

    1996-12-01

    Autogenic training, a method of self-hypnosis, lowers the extent of within-day variation of systolic blood pressure assessed by the circadian double amplitude. The blood pressure and heart rate of ten patients, conventionally diagnosed as having hypertension or white-coat hypertension, were automatically monitored at 30-min intervals for 7 days before autogenic training and again for 7 days, at 1 or 2 months after the start of autogenic training (practiced three times daily). The circadian double amplitude of systolic blood pressure of the patients investigated was 3 to 17 mm Hg lower on autogenic training. In 5 patients, reductions by 7 to 17 mm Hg were statistically significant. These results are regarded as provisional statistics, the utility of which depends on replication. By contrast, the over-all group reduction of the circadian double amplitude of systolic blood pressure by 8 mm Hg on the average can be taken at face value. Autogenic training also lowered the circadian double amplitude of diastolic blood pressure, but the effect was small as was the effect of autogenic training upon the MESOR (a rhythm adjusted mean) and acrophase (a measure of the timing of over-all high values recurring each day). The effect of autogenic training upon the circadian double amplitude of systolic blood pressure suggests its trial as first-line treatment of patients with an excessive circadian blood pressure amplitude, a condition which, even in the absence of an elevated 24-hr, average of blood pressure, is associated with a large increase in the risk of developing ischemic stroke or nephropathy.

  19. SYSTOLIC HYPERTENSION. IMPACT ON CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Eloy Cruz Quesada

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerosis is a multifactor process in which several risk factors are involved. It is the leading cause of death and morbidity in hospital admitted patients, and it may cause a marked decrease in blood flow to all organs of the body.Objective: To determine the impact of systolic hypertension on cerebrovascular disease.Methods: A cross-sectional, observational and analytical study was conducted in 59 death patients who suffered from hypertension. Cerebral arteries were analyzed and atherosclerotic lesion and its variety were quantified by using the atherometric system. The different types of hypertension were considered. Statistical (central tendency measures and comparative (comparison test based on Student’s arithmetic t-test procedures were used.Results: Recent strokes were more frequent in systodiastolic hypertensive patients. There was no significant difference in the injury onset age for both sexes, but women with systolic hypertension were significantly more damaged (from a morphometric point of view. Significant correlation for both groups of hypertensive patients was observed between type of stroke and atherometric system variables.Conclusions: Systolic hypertension is an important factor in the genesis of cerebrovascular disease and is associated with the progression of atherosclerotic plaque.

  20. Measurement of Blood Pressure Using an Arterial Pulsimeter Equipped with a Hall Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Gu Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To measure precise blood pressure (BP and pulse rate without using a cuff, we have developed an arterial pulsimeter consisting of a small, portable apparatus incorporating a Hall device. Regression analysis of the pulse wave measured during testing of the arterial pulsimeter was conducted using two equations of the BP algorithm. The estimated values of BP obtained by the cuffless arterial pulsimeter over 5 s were compared with values obtained using electronic or liquid mercury BP meters. The standard deviation between the estimated values and the measured values for systolic and diastolic BP were 8.3 and 4.9, respectively, which are close to the range of values of the BP International Standard. Detailed analysis of the pulse wave measured by the cuffless radial artery pulsimeter by detecting changes in the magnetic field can be used to develop a new diagnostic algorithm for BP, which can be applied to new medical apparatus such as the radial artery pulsimeter.

  1. [Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palade, D; Iliescu, D; Cotârleţ, Laura; Pandele, G I

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of blood pressure values measured by two methods. 94 hypertensive patients (66 women and 28 men in relation to 2.36/1) were assessed classically and also by ABPM. For statistic evaluation we have used t - Student test, chi2 test, Pearson correlation coefficient and variation coefficient (cv%). It shows significant differences between mean values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure obtained by the 2 methods. ABPM measured values are more accurate compared to clinic, bringing also information on pattern hypertensive therapy.

  2. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezzati, Majid; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background

    Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic

  3. Diagnosis of childhood hypertension: is blood pressure height ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure was also recorded according to the standard method. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure to height ratio were then calculated. Receiver operating curves was used to assess the ability of systolic blood and diastolic blood pressure height ratio to discriminate childhood prehypertension and hypertension.

  4. The Role of Central Blood Pressure Monitoring in the Management of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Adrian; Patarroyo-Aponte, Gabriel; Rahman, Mahboob

    2018-04-19

    Central blood pressure is a novel predictor of cardiovascular risk that can be measured in the clinical setting using currently available technology. This paper will review current available methods of central blood pressure monitoring as well as its impact in cardiac and renal disease. Both aortic and carotid systolic blood pressure are independently associated with cardiovascular mortality and serious cardiac events. Furthermore, studies show that systolic aortic blood pressure has been shown to be superior predictor of cardiovascular as compared to brachial blood pressure. Inhibitors of the renin angiotensin axis may have a beneficial effect on central blood pressure; however, long term studies evaluating the impact of lowering central blood pressure on clinical outcomes are lacking. Central blood pressure is a good predictor of cardiovascular risk. As more studies emerge demonstrating the value of central blood pressure as a therapeutic target, it is possible that targeting central blood pressure may become an important part of the armamentarium to lower cardiovascular risk.

  5. A Pilot Study: Comparison of Arm Versus Ankle Noninvasive Blood Pressure Measurement at 2 Different Levels of Backrest Elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Nicole; Quatrara, Beth D; Conaway, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Standard practice for obtaining noninvasive blood pressure includes arm blood pressure (BP) cuff placement at the level of the heart; however, some critical care patients cannot have BPs taken in their arm because of various conditions, and ankle BPs are frequently used as substitutes. The aim of this study was to determine if there was a significant variation between upper arm and ankle BP measurements at different backrest elevations with consideration of peripheral edema factors. After institutional review board approval was obtained, a pilot study was implemented to evaluate noninvasive BP measurements of the arm and ankle with backrest elevation at 0° and 30° in a population of medical intensive care unit patients. Participants served as their own controls and were randomly assigned to left- versus right-side BP readings. Data were also collected on presence of arm versus ankle edema. A total of 30 participants enrolled in the study and provided 120 BP measurements. Blood pressure readings were analyzed in terms of diastolic and systolic findings as well as backrest elevations and edema presence. Thirteen participants presented with either arm or ankle edema. There was a statistical difference between the systolic arm and ankle BP measurements in the 0° (P = .008) and 30° (P arm and ankle diastolic BP is greater for participants without ankle edema (P = .038, r = 0.54) than for participants with ankle edema (P = .650, r = 0.14), but it is not statistically significant (P = .47). Even though ankle BPs are often substituted for arm BPs when the arm is unable to be used, ankle BPs and arm BPs are not interchangeable. Adjustments in backrest elevation and considerations of edema do not normalize the differences. Blood pressures obtained from the ankle are significantly greater than those obtained from the arm. This information needs to be considered when arms are not available and legs are used as surrogates for the upper arm.

  6. The evolution of systolic blood pressure as a strong predictor of cardiovascular risk and the effectiveness of fixed-dose ARB/CCB combinations in lowering levels of this preferential target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Mourad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Jacques MouradHypertension Unit, Avicenne Hospital – AP-HP and Paris XIII University Bobigny, FranceAbstract: Elevated blood pressure is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Although targets for both diastolic blood pressure (DBP and systolic blood pressure (SBP are defined by current guidelines, DBP has historically taken precedence in hypertension management. However, there is strong evidence that SBP is superior to DBP as a predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, achieving control of SBP is assuming greater importance amongst an aging population. In spite of the growing recognition of the importance of SBP in reducing cardiovascular risk and the emphasis by current guidelines on SBP control, a substantial proportion of patients still fail to achieve SBP targets, and SBP control is achieved much less frequently than DBP control. Thus, new approaches to the management of hypertension are required in order to control SBP and minimize cardiovascular risk. Fixed-dose combination (FDC therapy is an approach that offers the advantages of multiple drug administration and a reduction in regimen complexity that favors compliance. We have reviewed the latest evidence demonstrating the efficacy in targeting SBP of the most recent FDC products; combinations of the calcium channel blocker (CCB, amlodipine, with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, valsartan or olmesartan. In addition, results from studies with new classes of agent are outlined.Keywords: hypertension, systolic blood pressure, angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium channel blocker, combination therapy

  7. Secular trends of blood pressure in A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kitano, Koei

    1986-01-01

    There has been controversy about whether or not radiation exposure plays a major role in advancing age. To preliminarily study this relationship, a statistical analysis was made on blood pressure measurements in a cohort of A-bomb survivors for Adult Health Study carried out during a 22-year period from 1958 through 1980. Systolic blood pressure increased with advancing age in both men and women between 30 and 80 years. During the years 1974 through 1980, it tended to increase in both men and women aged in their thirties and fourties. Diastolic blood pressure for men increased between the ages of 30 and 60 years, and decreased between the ages of 60 and 80 years. It tended to increase from year to year for men. For women, it decreased prior to the 1970's, and thereafter, tended to increase. The parameters, including systolic and diastolic blood pressures and pulse pressure, were independent of exposure doses in the subgroups according to age or sex. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. The effect of metformin on blood pressure and metabolism in nondiabetic hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snorgaard, O; Køber, L; Carlsen, J

    1997-01-01

    ), metformin 500 mg b.i.d. (n = 10), or placebo b.i.d. (n = 5) for 12 weeks. Office blood pressure (oBP), ambulatory blood pressure (aBP), lipoproteins, and oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) were measured/performed before and during treatment. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male and nine female nondiabetic (OGTT) patients......, not significantly different comparing metformin and placebo. Systolic oBP, diastolic aBP, and systolic aBP showed no significant change by treatment. The decline in diastolic oBP was 5 mmHg in the pooled group of metformin-treated patients, P

  9. The Impact of Hearing Protection Devices (HPDs on Blood Pressure in Workers Exposed to Noise: A Cross-sectional Study in a Textile Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported that exposure to workplace noise leads to increase in blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hearing protection devices (HPDs including ear plug and ear muff on the systolic and diastolic blood pressures of workers exposed to workplace noise in a textile industry. A total of 120 male workers that exposed to 95 dB noise were investigated in this study. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures of the workers were measured for three situations of earplug, earmuff and earplug along earmuff applications. Data analyses were conducted through SPSS software (version 20 and statistical tests of ANOVA and Independent Sample Tests. The comparison of mean blood pressure in three situations showed that using ear muff had a significant effect on the systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the workers. Furthermore, the use of ear plug only had an effect on the systolic blood pressure. But, the application of ear muff caused to decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressures only in the third stage of the study. With regard to the results in this study, in order to control the blood pressure changes of the workers, it is recommended to use ear muff in the textile industry.

  10. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significant...... drop was found in all pressures 1 week postoperatively. The decrease followed the systemic pressure and was restored to normal after 6 weeks. In a group of six patients with preoperatively decreased ankle pressure, a significant transient further decrease in the ankle-toe gradient pressure was found...... on the operated side. None of the patients had symptoms from the lowered pressure. We conclude that in patients without signs of ischemia, the postoperative segmental pressure decrease is reversible and therefore not dangerous....

  11. Cell Phone Information Seeking Explains Blood Pressure in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lenette M; Veinot, Tiffany C; Pressler, Susan J

    2018-05-01

    Although cell phone use and Internet access via cell phone is not marked by racial disparities, little is known about how cell phone use relates to blood pressure and health information seeking behaviors. The purposes of this study were to (a) describe Internet activities, cell phone use, and information seeking; (b) determine differences in blood pressure and information seeking between cell phone information seekers and nonseekers; and (c) examine cell phone information seeking as a predictor of blood pressure in African American women. Participants ( N = 147) completed a survey and had their blood pressure measured. Independent-sample t tests showed a significant difference in systolic blood pressure in cell phone information seekers and nonseekers. Linear regression revealed cell phone information seeking as an independent predictor of systolic blood pressure, despite confounders. It is possible that cell phone information seekers were using health information to make decisions about self-management of blood pressure.

  12. Driving environment in Iran increases blood pressure even in healthy taxi drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Navadeh Khodadadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Nowadays, driving is an unseparated part of our new modern lifestyle; and we are exposed to this environment all the days for several hours whether as drivers or as riders. Many reports indicated that Iran is on the top rank of automobile-related morbidity and mortality among developed and even many developing countries that can be due to dangerous driving habits in Iran. We designed this study to find out if environment of driving have clinically important effects on blood pressure (BP and how strong is the effect. We also examined if there were any predictors for the BP rises in driving time.
    • METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 31 healthy male taxi drivers were included through a multistage proportional sampling method in winter and spring 2007. They were referred to the clinic of hypertension in Shafa Hospital, Kerman. A trained nurse measured the BPs. She also did set up the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor (ABPM on the drivers’ left arms for BP recording every 30 minutes during the day. Based on the diurnal recorded BPs, the subjects were allocated into normotensive and hypertensive (systolic BP > 135 or diastolic BP > 85mmHg groups. The difference among the clinic BPs and the driving BPs was examined by t-test in Stata version 8, followed by a multivariate analysis for exploring the main predictors for BP rises in driving time.
    • RESULTS: Both mean systolic and mean diastolic BPs were significantly increased from 116.85 (SE 2.28 and 74.44 (SE 2.22 mmHg in clinic to 138.64 (SE 2.77 and 95.70 (SE 2.55 mmHg during driving, respectively (P = 0.0001. Pulse pressure remained constant (P = 0.87. The difference between clinic's and driving time measurements was higher in hypertensive group. Those with higher systolic blood pressures in clinic had more frequent and higher BP rises in driving time (P = 0.02.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Driving

    • Systolic and Diastolic Left Ventricular Mechanics during and after Resistance Exercise.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Stöhr, Eric J; Stembridge, Mike; Shave, Rob; Samuel, T Jake; Stone, Keeron; Esformes, Joseph I

      2017-10-01

      To improve the current understanding of the impact of resistance exercise on the heart, by examining the acute responses of left ventricular (LV) strain, twist, and untwisting rate ("LV mechanics"). LV echocardiographic images were recorded in systole and diastole before, during and immediately after (7-12 s) double-leg press exercise at two intensities (30% and 60% of maximum strength, one-repetition maximum). Speckle tracking analysis generated LV strain, twist, and untwisting rate data. Additionally, beat-by-beat blood pressure was recorded and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and LV wall stress were calculated. Responses in both exercise trials were statistically similar (P > 0.05). During effort, stroke volume decreased, whereas SVR and LV wall stress increased (P mechanics (P 0.05). Immediately after exercise, systolic LV mechanics returned to baseline levels (P mechanics, but increases diastolic mechanics after exercise, suggesting that resistance exercise has a differential impact on systolic and diastolic heart muscle function. The findings may explain why acute resistance exercise has been associated with reduced stroke volume but chronic exercise training may result in increased LV volumes.

    • Efficacy of a classical antiobesity Unani pharmacopial formulation (Safoof-e-Muhazzil in systolic and diastolic blood pressure: A randomized, open-labeled, controlled clinical study

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Asim Ali Khan

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a Unani formulation in hypertension. A total of 90 patients with total cholesterol level of more than 220 mg/dl with associated conditions were included in this study. A total of 30 patients having a mean systolic blood pressure (BP of 133.86 mmHg comprising Group A received Unani formulation Safoof-e-Muhazzil (SM in its classical powder form in the dose of 5 g twice a day orally. Group B comprising of 30 patients with a mean systolic BP of 133.13 mmHg received same drug, but in compressed tablet form in the same dosage, whereas, 30 patients comprising Group C with a mean systolic BP of 129.45 mmHg, received Atorvastatin 10 mg as a standard control. Patients were evaluated on each follow-up at 2 nd , 4 th and 6 th week. The mean systolic BP in Group A and B before treatment was 133.86 ± 3.028 mmHg and 133.13 ± 2.852 mmHg, which significantly decreased to 119.33 ± 1.922 mmHg (P < 0.001 and 119 ± 1.760 mmHg (P < 0.001 respectively. In the control Group C before treatment BP was 129.45 ± 2.499 mmHg and after treatment it significantly decreased to 124.34 ± 1.794 mmHg (P < 0.01. The percentage change after treatment was 10.85%, 10.61% and 3.94% respectively in each group. Mean diastolic BP in Group A and B before treatment was 85.06 ± 2.11 mmHg and 84.56 ± 1.5 mmHg, which significantly decreased to 79.06 ± 1.56 mmHg (P < 0.001 and 79.96 ± 1.15 mmHg (P < 0.001 respectively, BP before treatment in Group C was 83.23 ± 1.588 mmHg, which was decreased to 124.34 ± 1.794 mmHg (P < 0.01. The study results indicate that the test drug was quite effective in reducing both systolic as well as diastolic BP.

    • Disruption of transitional stages in 24-h blood pressure in renal transplant recipients

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Marcelo E Katz

      2012-03-01

      Full Text Available Patients with kidney replacement exhibit disrupted circadian rhythms. Most studies measuring blood pressure use the dipper/non-dipper classification, which does not consider analysis of transitional stages between low and high blood pressure, confidence intervals nor shifts in the time of peak, while assuming subjective onsets of night and day phases. In order to better understand the nature of daily variation of blood pressure in these patients, we analyzed 24h recordings from 41 renal transplant recipients using the non-symmetrical double-logistic fitting assessment which does not assume abruptness nor symmetry in ascending and descending stages of the blood pressure profile, and a cosine best-fitting regression method (Cosinor. Compared with matched controls, double-logistic fitting showed that the times for most of transitional stages (ascending systolic and descending systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure had a wider distribution along the 24 h. The proportion of individuals without daily blood pressure rhythm in the transplanted group was larger only for systolic arterial pressure, and the amplitude showed no significant difference. Furthermore, the transplant recipient group had a less pronounced slope in descending systolic and ascending mean blood pressure. Cosinor analysis confirmed the phase related changes, showing a wider distribution of times of peak (acrophases. We conclude that daily disruptions in renal transplant recipients can be explained not only by absence in diurnal variation, but also in changes in waveform-related parameters of the rhythm, and that distortions in the phase of the rhythm are the most consistent finding for the patients.

    • Measuring fluid pressure

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Lee, A.S.

      1978-01-01

      A method and apparatus are described for measuring the pressure of a fluid having characteristics that make it unsuitable for connection directly to a pressure gauge. The method is particularly suitable for the periodic measurement of the pressure of a supply of liquid Na to Na-lubricated bearings of pumps for pumping Na from a reservoir to the bearing via a filter, the reservoir being contained in a closed vessel containing an inert blanket gas, such as Ar, above the Na. (UK)

    • Preliminary Blood Pressure Screening in a Representative Sample of Extremely Obese Kuwaiti Adolescents

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Rima Abdul Razzak

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available A relationship between blood pressure (BP and obesity has been found in young adults, but no data are available for adolescents in Kuwait. 257 adolescent (11–19 years participants were categorized into two groups according to their BMI; 48 nonobese (21 males: 43.7% and 27 females: 56.3% with mean age of years and 209 obese (128 males: 61.25% and 81 females: 38.75% with mean age of years. The mean BMI was  kg/m2 for the nonobese group and  kg/m3 for the obese group. Most BP measures based on a single screening were significantly higher in the obese group. The prevalence of elevated BP was significantly higher in the obese subjects (nonobese: 13%; obese: 63%; . In the obese group, there was a significant positive correlation between total sample BMI and all BP measures except the pulse pressure. There was a similar rate of elevated blood pressure between males and females (64% versus 60%; . For both isolated systolic elevated BP and isolated diastolic elevated BP, the prevalences were comparable between the males (systolic: 42%; diastolic: 5% and females (systolic: 34%; diastolic: 14%. Only systolic BP was positively correlated with BMI in obese adolescent males (Spearman ; , with a significant correlation between BMI with diastolic (Spearman ; and mean BP (Spearman ; in females.

    • Vascular Stiffness and Increased Pulse Pressure in the Aging Cardiovascular System

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Jochen Steppan

      2011-01-01

      Full Text Available Aging leads to a multitude of changes in the cardiovascular system, including systolic hypertension, increased central vascular stiffness, and increased pulse pressure. In this paper we will review the effects of age-associated increased vascular stiffness on systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, augmentation index, and cardiac workload. Additionally we will describe pulse wave velocity as a method to measure vascular stiffness and review the impact of increased vascular stiffness as an index of vascular health and as a predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, we will discuss the underlying mechanisms and how these may be modified in order to change the outcomes. A thorough understanding of these concepts is of paramount importance and has therapeutic implications for the increasingly elderly population.

    • Casein-Derived Lactotripeptides Reduce Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in a Meta-Analysis of Randomised Clinical Trials

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ágnes A. Fekete

      2015-01-01

      Full Text Available There is an urgent need to treat individuals with high blood pressure (BP with effective dietary strategies. Previous studies suggest a small, but significant decrease in BP after lactotripeptides (LTP ingestion, although the data are inconsistent. The study aim was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of data from all relevant randomised controlled trials (RCT. Medline, Cochrane library, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched until May 2014. Eligibility criteria were RCT that examined the effects of LTP on BP in adults, with systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP as outcome measures. Thirty RCT met the inclusion criteria, which resulted in 33 sets of data. The pooled treatment effect for SBP was −2.95 mmHg (95% CI: −4.17, −1.73; p < 0.001, and for DBP was −1.51 mmHg (95% CI: −2.21, −0.80; p < 0.001. Sub-group analyses revealed that reduction of BP in Japanese studies was significantly greater, compared with European studies (p = 0.002 for SBP and p < 0.001 for DBP. The 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP response to LTP supplementation was statistically non-significant (p = 0.101 for SBP and p = 0.166 for DBP. Both publication bias and “small-study effect” were identified, which shifted the treatment effect towards less significant SBP and non-significant DBP reduction after LTP consumption. LTP may be effective in BP reduction, especially in Japanese individuals; however sub-group, meta-regression analyses and statistically significant publication biases suggest inconsistencies.

    • The association between blood pressure in adolescents and the consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juice--an exploratory study.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Damasceno, Marta M C; de Araújo, Márcio F M; de Freitas, Roberto W J Freire; de Almeida, Paulo C; Zanetti, Maria L

      2011-06-01

      The objective of this study was to correlate blood pressure levels with the consumption of fruit, vegetables and pulses and fruit juice among Brazilian adolescents. Scientific evidence has shown a relationship between the regular consumption of vegetables and the prevention of cardiovascular disturbances, such as arterial hypertension, cerebrovascular disease and dyslipidemia. A cross-sectional and correlational study was designed involving a random sample of 794 adolescents from 12 private schools located in a metropolitan area in the north-east of Brazil. The subjects responded to a questionnaire structured so as to investigate their regular consumption of fruits, vegetables, pulses and juice. Blood pressure was measured three times, with an interval of one minute between each measurement. The average of the last two measurements was used for the study. The chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman's rank correlation were used to investigate the association between blood pressure and the consumption of fruit, vegetables, pulses and juice. Lower values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were identified in adolescents with a consumption of fruit ≥twice daily (pvegetables and pulses, systolic blood pressure was lower among adolescents who consumed more of this type of food (p=0·021). This study concluded that adolescents who consume more fruit have lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, while those who regularly consume vegetables and pulses also had lower levels of systolic pressure. The results of this study suggest that nurses can develop health education activities in schools to encourage the consumption of fruits, vegetables, pulses and fruit juices, especially among those adolescents who are more likely to develop arterial hypertension. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Is the area under blood pressure curve the best parameter to evaluate 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Fernando; Mion, Décio

    2005-10-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) provides relevant data about blood pressure over a 24-h period. The analysis of parameters to determine the blood pressure profile from these data is of great importance. To calculate areas under systolic and diastolic blood pressure curves (SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC) and compare with systolic and diastolic blood pressure load (SBPL/DBPL) and 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure (24-h SBP/24-h DBP) in order to determine which provides the best correlation with left ventricular mass index (LVMI). ABPM measurements (1143 individuals) were analyzed to obtain 24-h SBP/24-h DBP, SBPL/DBPL, and SBP-AUC/ DBP-AUC, using Spacelabs (90207) and CardioSistemas devices. Left ventricular mass was determined using an echocardiograph HP Sonos 5500 and LVMI was calculated. The correlations between all possible pairs within the group 24-h SBP/SBPL/SBP-AUC and 24-h DBP/DBPL/DBP-AUC were high and statistically significant. The correlations between 24-h SBP/24-h DBP and SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC with SBPL/DBPL close to 100%, were lower than those mentioned above. The correlations of the parameters obtained by ABPM with LVMI were also high and statistically significant, except for blood pressure load between 90 and 100%, and for 24-h SBP of 135 mmHg or less and SBPL higher than 50%. SBPL/DBPL and SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC can be used for the evaluation of ABPM data owing to the strong correlation with 24-h SBP/24-h DBP and with LVMI, except when SBPL is close to 100% or 24-h SBP is below 135 mmHg but SBPL is above 50%. SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC, however, are a better alternative because they do not have the limitations of blood pressure load or even of 24-h blood pressure present.

  2. A comparison of systolic time intervals measured by impedance cardiography and carotid pulse tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Bonde, J; Rehling, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the systolic time intervals (STI) obtained by impedance cardiography and by the conventional carotid technique. This comparison was done with respect to: 1) correlations between variables obtained by the two methods, 2) ability to reflect drug-induced chan......The purpose of this study was to compare the systolic time intervals (STI) obtained by impedance cardiography and by the conventional carotid technique. This comparison was done with respect to: 1) correlations between variables obtained by the two methods, 2) ability to reflect drug...

  3. Reliability of blood pressure parameters for dry weight estimation in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Laowaloet, Suthanit; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Chulakadabba, Adhisabandh; Katavetin, Pisut; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Tungsanga, Kriang; Eiam-Ong, Somchai

    2013-02-01

    Chronic volume overload resulting from interdialytic weight gain and inadequate fluid removal plays a significant role in poorly controlled high blood pressure. Although bioimpedance has been introduced as an accurate method for assessing hydration status, the instrument is not available in general hemodialysis (HEMO) centers. This study was conducted to explore the correlation between hydration status measured by bioimpedance and blood pressure parameters in chronic HEMO patients. Multifrequency bioimpedance analysis was used to determine pre- and post-dialysis hydration status in 32 stable HEMO patients. Extracellular water/total body water (ECW/TBW) determined by sum of segments from bioimpedance analysis was used as an index of hydration status. The mean age was 57.9 ± 16.4 years. The mean dry weight and body mass index were 57.7 ± 14.5 kg and 22.3 ± 4.7 kg/m(2), respectively. Pre-dialysis ECW/TBW was significantly correlated with only pulse pressure (r = 0.5, P = 0.003) whereas post-dialysis ECW/TBW had significant correlations with pulse pressure, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.6, P = 0.001, r = 0.4, P = 0.04, r = -0.4, and P = 0.02, respectively). After dialysis, the mean values of ECW/TBW, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure were significantly decreased. ECW/TBW was used to classify the patients into normohydration (≤ 0.4) and overhydration (>0.4) groups. Systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure significantly reduced after dialysis in the normohydration group but did not significantly change in the overhydration group. Pre-dialysis pulse pressure, post-dialysis pulse pressure, and post-dialysis systolic blood pressure in the overhydration group were significantly higher than normohydration group. Due to the simplicity and cost, blood pressure parameters, especially pulse pressure, might be a simple reference for clinicians to determine hydration status in HEMO

  4. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Soon Chun Hyang University, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyun [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 {+-} 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}) were calculated. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 {+-} 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} and PASP (R = 0.82, p < 0.001). The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} were 0.990 and 0.892. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was 1.01 {+-} 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 {+-} 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P <0.05). With 0.9 as the cutoff for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  5. Inter-arm blood pressure difference in type 2 diabetes: a barrier to effective management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher E; Greaves, Colin J; Evans, Philip H; Dickens, Andy; Campbell, John L

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have identified a substantial prevalence of a blood pressure difference between arms in various populations, but not patients with type 2 diabetes. Recognition of such a difference would be important as a potential cause of underestimation of blood pressure. To measure prevalence of an inter-arm blood pressure difference in patients with type 2 diabetes, and to estimate how frequently blood pressure measurements could be erroneously underestimated if an inter-arm difference is unrecognised. Cross-sectional study. Five surgeries covered by three general practices, Devon, England. Patients with type 2 diabetes underwent bilateral simultaneous blood pressure measurements using a validated protocol. Mean blood pressures were calculated for each arm to derive mean systolic and diastolic differences, and to estimate point prevalence of predefined magnitudes of difference. A total of 101 participants were recruited. Mean age was 66 years (standard deviation [SD] = 13.9 years); 59% were male, and mean blood pressure was 138/79 mmHg (SD = 15/10 mmHg). Ten participants (10%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4 to 16) had a systolic inter-arm difference > or =10 mmHg; 29 (29%; 95% CI = 20 to 38) had a diastolic difference >/=5 mmHg; and three (3%; 95% CI = 0 to 6) a diastolic difference > or =10 mmHg. No confounding variable was observed to account for the magnitude of an inter-arm difference. A systolic inter-arm difference > or =10 mmHg was observed in 10% of patients with diabetes. Failure to recognise this would misclassify half of these as normotensive rather than hypertensive using the lower-reading arm. New patients with type 2 diabetes should be screened for an inter-arm blood pressure difference.

  6. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on 24-hour blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Stefanie Zuern

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients with arterial hypertension, increased blood pressure (BP variability contributes to end organ damage independently from mean levels of arterial BP. Increased BP variability has been linked to alterations in autonomic function including sympathetic overdrive. We hypothesized that catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN confers beneficial effects on BPV. Methods and Results: Eleven consecutive patients with therapy-refractory arterial hypertension (age 68.9±7.0 years; baseline systolic BP 189±23mmHg despite medication with 5.6±2.1 antihypertensive drugs underwent bilateral RDN. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed before RDN and six months thereafter. BPV was primarily assessed by means of standard deviation of 24-hour systolic arterial blood pressures (SDsys. Secondary measures of BPV were maximum systolic blood pressure (MAXsys and maximum difference between two consecutive readings of systolic BP (deltamaxsys over 24 hours. Six months after RDN, SDsys, MAXsys and deltamaxsys were significantly reduced from 16.9±4.6mmHg to 13.5±2.5mmHg (p=0.003, from 190±22mmHg to 172±20mmHg (p<0.001 and from 40±15mmHg to 28±7mmHg (p=0.006, respectively, without changes in concomitant antihypertensive therapy. Reductions of SDsys, MAXsys and deltamaxsys were observed in 10/11 (90.9%, 11/11 (100% and 9/11 (81.8% patients, respectively. Although we noted a significant reduction of systolic office blood pressure by 30.4±27.7mmHg (p=0.007, there was only a trend in reduction of average systolic BP assessed from ABPM (149±19mmHg to 142±18mmHg; p=0.086.Conclusions: In patients with therapy-refractory arterial hypertension, RDN leads to significant reductions of BP variability. Effects of RDN on BPV over 24 hours were more pronounced than on average levels of BP.

  7. Seaweed intake and blood pressure levels in healthy pre-school Japanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Keiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined whether dietary factors might affect blood pressure in children. We purposed to investigate whether seaweed intake is associated with blood pressure level among Japanese preschool children. Methods The design of the study was cross-sectional and it was conducted in autumn 2006. Subjects were healthy preschoolers aged 3-6 years in Aichi, Japan. Blood pressure and pulse were measured once by an automated sphygmomanometer, which uses oscillometric methods. Dietary data, including seaweed intake, were assessed using 3-day dietary records covering 2 consecutive weekdays and 1 weekend day. Of a total of 533 children, 459 (86.1 percent agreed to be enrolled in our study. Finally, blood pressure measurement, complete dietary records and parent-reported height and weight were obtained for 223 boys and 194 girls. Results When we examined Spearman's correlation coefficients, seaweed intake was significantly negatively related to systolic blood pressure in girls (P = 0.008. In the one-way analysis of covariance for blood pressure and pulse after adjustments for age and BMI, the boys with the lowest, middle and highest tertiles of seaweed intake had diastolic blood pressure readings of 62.8, 59.3 and 59.6 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.11, trend P = 0.038. Girls with higher seaweed intake had significantly lower systolic blood pressure readings (102.4, 99.2 and 96.9 mmHg for girls with the lowest, middle and highest tertiles of seaweed intake, respectively; P = 0.037, trend P = 0.030. Conclusion Our study showed that seaweed intake was negatively related to diastolic blood pressure in boys and to systolic blood pressure in girls. This suggests that seaweed might have beneficial effects on blood pressure among children.

  8. THE EFFECT OF HORMONE THERAPY ON MEAN BLOOD PRESSURE AND VISIT-TO-VISIT BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: RESULTS FROM THE WOMEN’S HEALTH INITIATIVE RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Daichi; Wang, Lu; Lamonte, Michael J.; Allison, Matthew; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bavry, Anthony A.; Martin, Lisa W.; Aragaki, Aaron; Newman, Jonathan D.; Swica, Yael; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mean and visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure are associated with an increased cardiovascular disease risk. We examined the effect of hormone therapy on mean and VVV of blood pressure in postmenopausal women from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) randomized controlled trials. Methods Blood pressure was measured at baseline and annually in the two WHI hormone therapy trials in which 10,739 and 16,608 postmenopausal women were randomized to conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, 0.625 mg/day) or placebo, and CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 2.5 mg/day) or placebo, respectively. Results At the first annual visit (Year 1), mean systolic blood pressure was 1.04 mmHg (95% CI 0.58, 1.50) and 1.35 mmHg (95% CI 0.99, 1.72) higher in the CEE and CEE+MPA arms respectively compared to corresponding placebos. These effects remained stable after Year 1. CEE also increased VVV of systolic blood pressure (ratio of VVV in CEE vs. placebo, 1.03, Pblood pressure increased at Year 1, and the differences in the CEE and CEE+MPA arms vs. placebos also continued to increase after Year 1. Further, both CEE and CEE+MPA significantly increased VVV of systolic blood pressure (ratio of VVV in CEE vs. placebo, 1.04, Pblood pressure. PMID:24991872

  9. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY TO FIND THE DIFFERENCE IN SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE BETWEEN ARMS AS A RISK MARKER FOR DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Uday Subhash Bande; Anish Anthony Tekkinadath

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diabetic nephropathy is the commonest cause of end-stage renal disease in the developed world. Recent studies have demonstrated that a difference in systolic blood pressure between arms is associated with cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. It is considered a predictor for cardiovascular disease and a surrogate marker for early kidney damage among patients with both type 2 diabetes and hypertension. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim was to investigate an associ...

  10. Validation of two automatic devices for self-measurement of blood pressure according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension: the Omron M6 (HEM-7001-E) and the Omron R7 (HEM 637-IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topouchian, Jirar A; El Assaad, Mohamed A; Orobinskaia, Ludmila V; El Feghali, Ramzi N; Asmar, Roland G

    2006-06-01

    Two electronic devices for self-measurement of blood pressure - a brachial monitor, the Omron M6, and a wrist monitor, the Omron R7 - were evaluated in two separate studies according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. The International Validation Protocol is divided into two phases: the first phase is performed on 15 selected participants (45 pairs of blood pressure measurements); if the device passes this phase, 18 supplementary participants are included (54 pairs of blood pressure measurements) making a total number of 33 participants (99 pairs of blood pressure measurements) on whom the final validation is performed. The same methodology recommended by the European Society of Hypertension protocol was applied for both studies. In each study and for each participant, four blood pressure measurements were taken simultaneously by two trained observers using mercury sphygmomanometers alternately with three measurements taken by the tested device. The difference between the blood pressure value given by the device and that obtained by the two observers (mean of the two observers) was calculated for each measure. The 99 pairs of blood pressure differences were classified into three categories (M6 device, and 0.2+/-4.2 and 0.2+/-2.9 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, for the Omron R7 device. For both devices, readings differing by less than 5, 10 and 15 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure values fulfill the recommendation criteria of the International Protocol as well as the individual analysis. The Omron M6 (HEM-7001-E) and the Omron R7 (HEM 637-IT) devices fulfilled the validation recommendations of the International Protocol.

  11. Correlation between the trajectory of systolic blood pressure and new renal damage in a nonhypertensive population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Dao; Tian, Jun; Liu, Jie; Li, Li-Jie; Huang, Yu-Ling; Cao, Xin-Ying; Ning, Chun-Hong; Zhao, Quan-Hui; Yu, Jun-Xing; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Jing; Gao, Jing-Sheng; Wu, Shou-Ling

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the correlation between the trajectory of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and new renal damage in a nonhypertensive population. This prospective cohort study included a total of 14 382 nonhypertensive individuals, employees of Kailuan Group of Companies, who took part in five healthy examinations in 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2010-2011, 2012-2013, and 2014-2015, and had complete data. These individuals were divided into four groups according to the different trajectories of SBP: low-low, low-stable, middle-high, and high-high groups. The correlation between the trajectory of SBP and new renal damage in a nonhypertensive population was analyzed using a multivariate Cox's proportional hazard regression model. (a) A total of 14 382 individuals had complete data and the average age of these individuals was 44.6±10.8 years. Among these, 10 888 (75.7%) individuals were men and 3494 (24.3%) individuals were women. (b) These individuals were divided into four groups according to different trajectories of blood pressure: low-low group, accounting for 13.15% (blood pressure was group, accounting for 53.91% (blood pressure was between 115 and 116 mmHg); middle-high group, accounting for 28.77% (blood pressure was between 125 and 131 mmHg); and high-high group, accounting for 4.6% (blood pressure was between 126 and 151 mmHg). (c) With the increase in the trajectory of SBP, the detection rate of renal damage increased gradually. From the low-low group to the high-high group, the detection rates of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m were 2.3, 2.4, 3.6, and 4.3%, respectively; the positive rates of urinary protein were 1.7, 2.9, 3.8, and 5.5%, respectively; and the detection rates of eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m or positive urinary protein were 4, 5.2, 7.3, and 9.3%, respectively (Pgroup, the risk of eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m increased by nearly 1.5 times in the high-high group and in

  12. Racial Differences in Abnormal Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Measures: Results From the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cora E.; Diaz, Keith M.; Carson, April P.; Kim, Yongin; Calhoun, David; Yano, Yuichiro; Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) measures have been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independent of clinic blood pressure (BP). African Americans have higher clinic BP compared with Whites but few data are available on racial differences in ABPM measures. METHODS We compared ABPM measures between African American (n = 178) and White (n = 103) participants at the Year 5 Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study visit. BP was measured during a study visit and the second and third measurements were averaged. ABPM was conducted over the following 24 hours. RESULTS Mean ± SD age of participants was 29.8±3.8 years and 30.8±3.5 years for African Americans and Whites, respectively. Mean daytime systolic BP (SBP) was 3.90 (SD 1.18) mm Hg higher among African Americans compared with Whites (P ABPM was higher among African Americans compared with Whites. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest racial differences in several ABPM measures exist. PMID:25376639

  13. Inter-arm blood pressure differences in young, healthy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Prokupetz, Alex; Gordon, Barak; Morag-Koren, Nira; Grossman, Ehud

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence and magnitude of inter-arm BP difference (IAD) in young healthy patients is not well characterized. Flight academy applicants and designated aviators undergo annual evaluation that includes blood pressure (BP) measurement on both arms. All BP measurements performed from January 1, 2012, to April 30, 2012, were recorded and IAD was calculated. Results were compared between patients in whom BP was initially measured in the right arm (group 1), those in whom BP was initially measured in the left arm (group 2), and those in whom the arm in which BP was initially measured was not recorded (group 3). A total of 877 healthy patients had BP measured during the study period. In the entire group, mean systolic BP was the same in both arms. Absolute IAD was 5.6±5.5 mm Hg for systolic and 4.7±4.5 mm Hg for diastolic BP. IAD >10 mm Hg was recorded in 111 (12.6%) and 77 (8.8%) patients for systolic and diastolic BP, respectively. IAD was the same in the 3 groups and was unrelated to age, body mass index, and heart rate, but was related to systolic BP. IAD is common in young healthy patients, is not dependent on which arm was measured first, and unrelated to age, body mass index, and heart rate. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of wet-cupping on blood pressure in hypertensive patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyeidi, Nouran A; Aseri, Khaled S; Matbouli, Shadia M; Sulaiamani, Albaraa A; Kobeisy, Sumayyah A

    2015-11-01

    Although cupping remains a popular treatment modality worldwide, its efficacy for most diseases, including hypertension, has not been scientifically evaluated. We aimed to determine the efficacy of wet-cupping for high blood pressure, and the incidence of the procedure's side effects in the intervention group. This is a randomized controlled trial conducted in the General Practice Department at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between May 2013 and February 2014. There were two groups (40 participants each): intervention group undergoing wet-cupping (hijama) in addition to conventional hypertension treatment, and a control group undergoing only conventional hypertension treatment. Three wet-cupping sessions were performed every other day. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured using a validated automatic sphygmomanometer. The follow-up period was 8 weeks. Wet-cupping provided an immediate reduction of systolic blood pressure. After 4 weeks of follow-up, the mean systolic blood pressure in the intervention group was 8.4 mmHg less than in the control group (P=0.046). After 8 weeks, there were no significant differences in blood pressures between the intervention and control groups. In this study, wet-cupping did not result in any serious side effects. Wet-cupping therapy is effective for reducing systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients for up to 4 weeks, without serious side effects. Wet-cupping should be considered as a complementary hypertension treatment, and further studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01987583.

  15. Noise exposure at school and blood pressure in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadhilah Ihsani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The increasing prevalence of primary hypertension has motivated researchers to identify influencing factors, one of which is noise. There have been few studies on a relationships between noise exposure and blood pressure in children, and none have dealt exclusively with adolescents. Objective To assess for an association between noise exposure at school and blood pressure in adolescents.   Methods To identify noisy and quiet schools, the mean noise levels of 192 senior high schools in Medan were measured using sound level meters. One noisy school and one quiet school were randomly selected for inclusion (mean noise levels of  68.2 and  53.8 dB, respectively. Students from both schools underwent blood pressure measurements by mercury sphygmomanometer. Their Body weights and heights were obtained for body mass index calculations. Subjects filled questionnaires and their parents were interviewed regarding history of illnesses. Results Of the 271 adolescents recruited, 136 (50.2% were from the noisy school. Adolescents from the noisy school had higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures [121.6 (SD 13.87 mmHg and 71.1 (SD 8.15 mmHg, respectively], than those from the quiet school [111.8 (SD 12.61 mmHg and 63.8 (SD 8.05 mmHg, respectively]. After adjusting for other factors, noise had a significant, moderate, positive association with systolic and diastolic blood pressures [β = 0.452; B = 6.21 (95% CI 3.86-8.55 mmHg; and β = 0.473; B = 4.18 (95% CI 2.41 to 5.94 mmHg, respectively]. Conclusion Adolescents from a noisy school have a greater risk of higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures than those from a quiet school.

  16. Serum leptin levels correlation with high blood pressure in adult females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Z.; Shahid, K.U.; Mazahir, I.; Lakho, G.R.; Nafees, M.

    2006-01-01

    To measure serum leptin levels and compare them in lean and obese subjects and to identify correlation between serum leptin levels, heart rate and hypertension in lean and obese subjects among adult females. Seventy female subjects with different body mass indices were selected from OPD of Jinnah Medical and Dental College Hospital (OPD), Karachi. Heart rate was counted manually; blood pressure was measured by mercury sphygmomanometer while serum leptin was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The outcomes hypertension and heart rate were correlated to risk factor leptin. Mean heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and serum leptin levels of obese people were 90+-1, 142+-2, 89+-1 and 24.13+-1.7 respectively, which were significantly higher as compared to lean subjects (p<0.05). All the parameters correlated positively and significantly with increasing BMI. There was a relationship of tachycardia and hypertension with high serum leptin levels in obesity. Serum leptin levels increase with the level of obesity. Hyper-leptinemia is associated with tachycardia and increases in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in obesity via complex mechanisms. (author)

  17. Perceived Discrimination and Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping Among Hispanics: The Influence of Social Support and Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos Jose; Gwathmey, TanYa M; Jin, Zhezhen; Schwartz, Joseph; Beech, Bettina M; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the relationship of perceived racism to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in Hispanics. We explored possible associations between ABP nocturnal dipping and perceived racism in a Hispanic cohort. Participants included 180 community-dwelling Hispanics from the Northern Manhattan Study. Measures included perceived racism, socioeconomic status, social support, and ABP monitoring. Nocturnal ABP nondipping was defined as a less than 10% decline in the average asleep systolic blood pressure relative to the awake systolic blood pressure. Overall, 77.8% of participants reported some form of perceived racism (Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire scores >1.0). Greater social support was associated with less perceived discrimination (Spearman r = -0.54, p pressure levels during daytime exposures to discrimination.

  18. Could self-measured office blood pressure be a hypertension screening tool for limited-resources settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Martin R; Espeche, Walter G; Stavile, Rodolfo N; Balbín, Eduardo; Leiva Sisnieguez, Betty C; Leiva Sisnieguez, Carlos E; March, Carlos E; Cor, Susana; Eugenio Acero, Irma; Carbajal, Horacio A

    2018-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) was assessed by patients themselves in recently published trials. Self-measured office blood pressure (SMOBP) seems particularly interesting for limited health resources regions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between SMOBP values and those estimated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Six hundred seventy-seven patients were evaluated using both, SMOBP and ABPM. The differences between SMOBP and daytime ABPM were evaluated with paired "t" test. The correlations among SMOBP and ABPM were estimated using Pearson's r. The accuracy of SMOBP to identify abnormal ABPM was determined using area under ROC curve (AUC). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for different SMOBP cut-points. Using the average of three readings, systolic SMOBP was higher (3.7 (14.2) mmHg, p 95%) to identify individuals with hypertension in the ABPM; SMOBP < 130/80 mmHg reasonably discarded abnormal ABPM. In conclusion, a high proportion of individuals could be classified adequately using SMOBP, reducing the necessity of healthcare resources and supporting its utility for screening purposes.

  19. Changes in blood pressure, bmi and ecg patterns in women using low-dose contraceptives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, S.; Rahim, M.; Javed, M.; Qureshi, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the cardiovascular risk factors in users of second generation contraceptives by recording changes in body mass index, blood pressure and electrocardiogram. Sixty four women volunteered for this study (age range 20-35 years), belonging to low-income group with similar socio-cultural background. The Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by measuring height and weight of the subjects, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and ECG recording by standard method. The group means, standard deviations and coefficient correlation for interrelationship among variables in respective groups of subjects were calculated using relevant statistical method and software program. There was no significant difference between BMI of two types of contraceptive users as compared to non users, but BMI was significantly correlated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressures in injectable users as compared to controls. ECG alterations frequently observed in contraceptive users (40%) as compared to controls were normal findings. It was observed that women aged < 30 years and using contraceptives for more than three years had a tendency to gain weight and developed a mild increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressures. (author)

  20. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khoshdel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ali Reza Khoshdel1,2, Shane Carney2, Alastair Gillies21Faculty of Medicine, Aja University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran; 2John Hunter Hospital, Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NS W, AustraliaAbstract: Despite the increasing popularity of blood pressure (BP wrist monitors for self-BP measurement at home, device validation and the effect of arm position remains an issue. This study focused on the validation of the Omron HEM-609 wrist BP device, including an evaluation of the impact of arm position and pulse pressure on BP measurement validation. Fifty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease were selected (age 65 ± 10 years. Each patient had two measurements with a mercury sphygmomanometer and three measurements with the wrist BP device (wrist at the heart level while the horizontal arm supported [HORIZONTAL], hand supported on the opposite shoulder [SHOULDER], and elbow placed on a desk [DESK], in random order. The achieved systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP wrist-cuff readings were compared to the mercury device and the frequencies of the readings within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg of the gold standard were computed and compared with the British Hypertension Society (BHS and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI protocols. The results showed while SBP readings with HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions were significantly different from the mercury device (mean difference = 7.1 and 13.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05, the DESK position created the closest reading to mercury (mean difference = 3.8, P > 0.1. Approximately 71% of SBP readings with the DESK position were within ±10 mmHg, whereas it was 62.5% and 34% for HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions, respectively. Wrist DBP attained category D with BHS criteria with all three arm positions. Bland–Altman plots illustrated that the wrist monitor systematically underestimated SBP and DBP values. However a reading adjustment of 5 and 10 mm

  1. Prevalence of masked uncontrolled hypertension according to the number of office blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyoles, E; Camafort, M; Domenech, M; Coca, A; Sobrino, J

    2015-11-01

    The reported prevalence of masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH) varies because many studies are not comparable as they use different measurement methodologies. To evaluate the influence of the number of office blood pressure readings on the prevalence of MUCH we conducted a cross-sectional, multicenter study in treated hypertensive patients. We carried out an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study in 33 Spanish hospital-based hypertension units, involving 35 investigators and 12 Autonomous Communities. Six blood pressure readings and a 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were performed in treated hypertensive patients. The means of the first 3 readings (P123), the 2nd, 3rd and 4th readings (P234), the 3rd, 4th and 5th readings (P345) and the last 3 readings (P456) were compared with mean 24-h blood pressure. MUCH was defined as office blood pressure <140/90mmHg and 24-h blood pressure ≥130/80mmHg, considering the first 3 readings (MUCH123), the 2nd, 3rd and 4th readings (MUCH234), the 3rd, 4th and 5th readings (MUCH345) and the last 3 readings (MUCH456). We included 498 hypertensive patients. Mean (standard deviation) office blood pressure measurements were: (P123) 141(18)/82(11); (P234) 139(17)/81(11); (P345) 138(17)/81(11) and (P456) 137(16)/80(10) mmHg. Mean 24-h blood pressure was 127(13.8)/75(9.5) mmHg. The correlation coefficients between ambulatory and office systolic/diastolic blood pressure were (P123):0.48/0.50; (P234):0.50/0.52; (P345):0.50/0.54; and (P456):0.50/0.55 (p<0.001, all). The prevalences of MUCH123, MUCH234, MUCH345 and MUCH456 were 14.5%, 18.9%, 19.5% and 21.1%, respectively. The prevalence of MUCH diagnosis depends on the serial office blood pressure readings, being much higher for the last three blood pressure readings. Discarding the first and second office blood pressure measures seems to be the most accurate method for diagnosing MUCH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina

  2. Effects of adrenalectomy, adrenal regeneration, and renal irradiation on blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, M.; Casarett, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenalectomized, adrenal-enucleated and adrenal-intact rats were sham-irradiated or received an x-ray dose of 1100 rad bilaterally to temporarily exteriorized kidneys. Systolic blood pressures were measured at 10, 25, 40, 60, and 80 days after irradiation. At 100 days after irradiation the rats were sacrificed for gross pathologic examination and renal histopathologic studies of the kidneys. Adrenalectomy alone caused a significant drop in blood pressure which persisted throughout the experiment; adrenal regeneration in adrenal-enucleated rats or in those adrenalectomized rats in which adrenal tissue regenerated caused a significant increase in systolic blood pressure after 80 days postirradiation. Irradiation of adrenal-intact, adrenal-regenerating, or adrenalectomized rats did not cause significant elevation of blood pressure in comparison with that of the corresponding nonirradiated controls. Rats showing subtle renal histological changes usually showed somewhat higher blood pressures than rats showing no renal histological changes; a few rats which became severely hypertensive showed considerable histopathological changes in kidneys and other organs

  3. Flow-related Right Ventricular - Pulmonary Arterial Pressure Gradients during Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Buchan, Tayler A; Esfandiari, Sam; Granton, John T; Goodman, Jack M; Mak, Susanna

    2018-06-06

    The assumption of equivalence between right ventricular and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure is fundamental to several assessments of right ventricular or pulmonary vascular hemodynamic function. Our aims were to 1) determine whether systolic pressure gradients develop across the right ventricular outflow tract in healthy adults during exercise, 2) examine the potential correlates of such gradients, and 3) consider the effect of such gradients on calculated indices of right ventricular function. Healthy untrained and endurance-trained adult volunteers were studied using right-heart catheterization at rest and during submaximal cycle ergometry. Right ventricular and pulmonary artery pressures were simultaneously transduced, and cardiac output was determined by thermodilution. Systolic pressures, peak and mean gradients, and indices of chamber, vascular, and valve function were analyzed offline. Summary data are reported as mean ± standard deviation or median [interquartile range]. No significant right ventricular outflow tract gradients were observed at rest (mean gradient = 4 [3-5] mmHg), and calculated effective orifice area was 3.6±1.0 cm2. Right ventricular systolic pressure increases during exercise were greater than that of pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Accordingly, mean gradients developed during light exercise (8 [7-9] mmHg) and increased during moderate exercise (12 [9-14] mmHg, p < 0.001). The magnitude of the mean gradient was linearly related to cardiac output (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.001). In healthy adults without pulmonic stenosis, systolic pressure gradients develop during exercise, and the magnitude is related to blood flow rate.

  4. Ballroom dance: chronic responses on blood pressure in medicated hypertensives. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Christina de Souza Guidarini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of physical exercise for patients with systemic hypertension is well established in the literature. However, ballroom dance has been little investigated in this context. The objective of this study was to determine the chronic effect of ballroom dance on blood pressure in medicated hypertensives. The sample was the number of blood pressure measurements obtained during the patients’ participation in the dance program. Thus, 92 blood pressure measurements were taken and divided into four groups: 1 pre-session systolic blood pressure, 2 post-session systolic blood pressure, 3 pre-session diastolic blood pressure, 4 post-session diastolic blood pressure. We used a mercury sphygmomanometer and stethoscope. As measuring protocol, we considered the Brazilian Guidelines. Blood pressure was measured before and after each ballroom dance session. The mean age of the 23 medicated hypertensive patients studied was 62.5 ± 7 years and 34.8% of them were male. Forty sessions were held three times a week, lasting one hour/session. The mean pre-session systolic blood pressure was 131,8 ± 17mmHg and 117,8±13mmHg after the session, with statistically significant difference (p <0.001; in diastolic blood pressure values were 70,7±6mmHg and 67,7±9mmHg (p <0.075. We conclude that ballroom dance can contribute to a better control of blood pressure in medicated hypertensive patients, which may be considered as a cardiac rehabilitation exercise.

  5. LB03.04: SPHYGMOMANOMETER CUFF CONSTRUCTION AND MATERIALS AFFECT TRANSMISSION OF PRESSURE FROM CUFF TO ARTERIAL WALL. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF HUMAN PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS AND DICOM DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P; Naqvi, S; Mandal, P; Potluri, P

    2015-06-01

    Sphygmomanometer cuff pressure during deflation is assumed to equal systolic arterial pressure at the point of resumption of flow. Previous studies demonstrated that pressure decreases with increasing depth of soft tissues whilst visco-elastic characteristics of the arm tissue cause spatial and temporal variation in pressure magnitude. These generally used non-anatomical axisymmetrical arm simulations without incorporating arterial pressure variation. We used data from a volunteer's Magnetic Resonance (MR) arm scan and investigated the effect of variations in cuff materials and construction on the simulated transmission of pressure from under the cuff to the arterial wall under sinusoidal flow conditions. Pressure was measured under 8 different cuffs using Oxford Pressure Monitor Sensors placed at 90 degrees around the mid upper arm of a healthy male. Each cuff was inflated 3 times to 155 mmHg and then deflated to zero with 90 seconds between inflations. Young's modulus, flexural rigidity and thickness of each cuff was measured.Using DICOM data from the MR scan of the arm, a 3D model was derived using ScanIP and imported into Abaqus for Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Published mechanical properties of arm tissues and geometric non-linearity were assumed. The measured sub-cuff pressures were applied to the simulated arm and pressure was calculated around the brachial arterial wall. which was loaded with a sinusoidal pressure of 125/85 mmHg. FEA estimates of pressure around the brachial artery cuffs varied by up to 27 mmHg SBP and 17 mmHg DBP with different cuffs. Pressures within the cuffs varied up to 27 mmHg. Pressure transmission from the cuff to the arterial surface achieved a 95% transmission ratio with one rubber-bladdered cuff but varied between 76 and 88% for the others. Non-uniform pressure distribution around the arterial wall was strongly related to cuff fabric elastic modulus. Identical size cuffs with a separate rubber bladder produced peri

  6. Revisiting the association of blood pressure with mortality in oldest old people in China: community based, longitudinal prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yue-Bin; Gao, Xiang; Yin, Zhao-Xue; Chen, Hua-Shuai; Luo, Jie-Si; Brasher, Melanie Sereny; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Li, Tian-Tian; Zeng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the associations of blood pressure with all cause mortality and cause specific mortality at three years among oldest old people in China. Design Community based, longitudinal prospective study. Setting 2011 and 2014 waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey, conducted in 22 Chinese provinces. Participants 4658 oldest old individuals (mean age 92.1 years). Main outcome measures All cause mortality and cause specific mortality assessed at three year follow-up. Results 1997 deaths were recorded at three year follow-up. U shaped associations of mortality with systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure were identified; values of 143.5 mm Hg, 101 mm Hg, and 66 mm Hg conferred the minimum mortality risk, respectively. After adjustment for covariates, the U shaped association remained only for systolic blood pressure (minimum mortality risk at 129 mm Hg). Compared with a systolic blood pressure value of 129 mm Hg, risk of all cause mortality decreased for values lower than 107 mm Hg (from 1.47 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.17) to 1.08 (1.01 to 1.17)), and increased for values greater than 154 mm Hg (from 1.08 (1.01 to 1.17) to 1.27 (1.02 to 1.58)). In the cause specific analysis, compared with a middle range of systolic blood pressure (107-154 mm Hg), higher values (>154 mm Hg) were associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 2.02)); lower values (blood pressure and all cause mortality at three years among oldest old people in China. This association could be explained by the finding that higher systolic blood pressure predicted a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and that lower systolic blood pressure predicted a higher risk of death from non-cardiovascular causes. These results emphasise the importance of revisiting blood pressure management or establishing specific guidelines for management among oldest

  7. Association of adiposity measures with blood lipids and blood pressure in children aged 8-11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, Vicente Martínez; Aguilar, Fernando Salcedo; Martínez, Montserrat Solera; López, Mairena Sánchez; Gutiérrez, Ricardo Franquelo; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2007-09-01

    To examine the association of body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST) and percentage body fat (%BF) from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) with blood lipids, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in children. Cross-sectional study was conducted on 1280 schoolchildren aged 8-11 years from the Cuenca province (Spain). Data collection was conducted under standardized conditions, taking several measurements of each variable to enhance accuracy. Analyses were performed using age-adjusted correlation coefficients, and multiple linear regression adjusted for age, BMI, TST and %BF. Correlations between %BF and apolipoprotein (apo) B, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol/HDL-c ratio and DBP were higher than those for BMI and TST. In contrast, the correlations between BMI, and apo A-I and SBP were higher than those for %BF and TST. The results were similar across the sexes. The correlations between each of the three measures of body fatness, and blood lipids and blood pressure were highest in children with greatest BMI and %BF. When analyses were adjusted for the three body fatness measures, %BF showed stronger associations than did BMI or TST with blood lipids and blood pressure, with the exception of apo A-I and SBP, which were more closely associated with BMI. %BF from BIA is more strongly associated than either BMI or TST with most of the blood lipid fractions in schoolchildren aged 8-11 years.

  8. Systolic Blood Pressure Accuracy Enhancement in the Electronic Palpation Method Using Pulse Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    adrenalin) or vasodilating (Nipride or Nitromex) medicines. Also painkillers and anesthetics (Oxanest, Diprivan, Fentanyl and Rapifen) may have affected...the measurements. It is hard to distinguish the effects of medication and assess their relation to blood pressure errors and pulse shapes...CONCLUSION During this study, 51 cardiac operated patients were measured to define the effects of arterial stiffening on the accuracy of the

  9. Perceived unfairness at work, social and personal resources, and resting blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael T

    2014-02-01

    By drawing from theoretical perspectives suggesting that unfair conditions threaten fundamental psychological needs, perceived unfairness at work was proposed and tested as a predictor of resting blood pressure. As part of the Midlife Development in the United States Biomarkers project, participants completed questionnaires measuring perceived unfairness, self-esteem and coworker support. Resting blood pressure readings were also recorded as part of a larger physical examination. Results indicate that perceived unfairness at work was associated with higher resting diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Perceived unfairness was most strongly related to diastolic and systolic blood pressure among women with low levels of coworker support. Contrary to predictions, self-esteem did not moderate the association between perceived unfairness and blood pressure. These results suggest that high blood pressure may be a mechanism linking unfairness to negative health outcomes and point to coworker support as a moderator of the perceived unfairness-blood pressure relationship among women. Further research is needed exploring the mediating mechanisms linking unfair treatment at work to blood pressure and health. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Determination of Relations between Systolic Blood Pressure and Heart Attack in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Association Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Payam Shariatpanahi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Today, the high prevalence of diabetes and its complications are one of the most important public health issues worldwide. For this reason, finding relations between diabetes risk factors is very effective in preventing and reducing complications. For discovering these relations, the data mining methods can be used. By extracting association rules, which is one of the data mining techniques, we can discover the relations between a large numbers of variables in a disease. Materials and Methods: The population of this study was 1046 patients with type 2 diabetes, whose data had recorded between 2011 and 2014 at the Special Clinic for Diabetes in Tehran's Imam Khomeini Hospital. After pre-processing step with SPSS19 software, 573 people entered the analysis phase. The FP-Growth algorithm was applied to the data set to discover the relations between heart attack and other risk factors using Rapid miner5 software. Relations, after extraction, were given to the doctor to confirm clinical validation. Results: The obtained results of studying these 573 people (Including 292 (51% women and 281 (49% men, with age range 27 to 82 years showed that the lack of blood pressure, creatinine and diastolic blood pressure at its normal level, despite higher systolic blood pressure level than normal, doesn't increase the probability of heart attack. Conclusion: Using association rules is a good way of identifying relations between the risk factors of a disease. Also, it can provide new hypotheses to do epidemiological studies for researchers.

  11. Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Lotte [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Buczynska, Anna [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Walgraeve, Christophe [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); Delcloo, Andy [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom); Van Grieken, Rene [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); De Backer, Hugo [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Nemery, Benoit, E-mail: ben.nemery@med.kuleuven.be [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nawrot, Tim S. [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

  12. The relationship between blood viscosity and blood pressure in a random sample of the population aged 55 to 74 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowkes, F G; Lowe, G D; Rumley, A; Lennie, S E; Smith, F B; Donnan, P T

    1993-05-01

    Blood viscosity is elevated in hypertensive subjects, but the association of viscosity with arterial blood pressure in the general population, and the influence of social, lifestyle and disease characteristics on this association, are not established. In the Edinburgh Artery Study, 1592 men and women aged 55-74 years selected randomly from the general population attended a university clinic. A fasting blood sample was taken for the measurement of blood viscosity and its major determinants (haematocrit, plasma viscosity and fibrinogen). Systolic pressure was related univariately to blood viscosity (P viscosity (P index. Diastolic pressure was related univariately to blood viscosity (P viscosity (P viscosity and systolic pressure was confined to males. Blood viscosity was associated equally with systolic and diastolic pressures in males, and remained independently related on multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, social class, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, angina, HDL and non-HDL cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, and haematocrit.

  13. Statistical analysis of simulation-generated time series : Systolic vs. semi-systolic correlation on the Connection Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, T.; Lippert, Th.; Petkov, N.; Schilling, K.

    1992-01-01

    Autocorrelation becomes an increasingly important tool to verify improvements in the state of the simulational art in Latice Gauge Theory. Semi-systolic and full-systolic algorithms are presented which are intensively used for correlation computations on the Connection Machine CM-2. The

  14. 8-isorpostanes – markers for oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea patients with systolic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherneva RV

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Radostina Vlaeva Cherneva,1 Ognian Borisov Georgiev,1 Daniela Stoichkova Petrova,1 Emil Ivanov Manov,2 Sylvia Rumenova Ruseva,3 Vanio Ivanov Mitev,3 Julia Ivanova Petrova4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria; 3Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory of Synthesis and Analysis of Bioactive Substances, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria; 4Department of Neurology, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria Objective: Increased oxidative stress is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but remains disputed in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Among oxidative stress markers, isorpostanes are considered to be the most sensitive and specific. Aims: The aim of the study was to compare urinary isorpostanes in patients with OSA and systolic dysfunction to patients with OSA and preserved ejection fraction (EF and determine their role as markers for increased oxidative stress and early cardiac damage. Materials and methods: Urinary 8F2-isorpostanes were measured in 30 patients with OSA and mild systolic dysfunction (EF = 45.7% ± 6.17% and compared to 15 patients with OSA and normal EF (EF = 60.3% ± 6.3%. Univariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of left systolic dysfunction. Correlations between 8-isorpostanes, anthropometric, metabolic, and sleep study characteristics were explored. In addition, in 19 patients the effect of bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP therapy was evaluated during a 3 month follow-up. Markers of hemodynamic stress, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide and oxidative stress, measured by 8-isorpostanes were compared before and after the follow-up. Results: Urinary levels of 8-isorpostanes were significantly higher in the group with mild systolic dysfunction

  15. Travoprost lowers intraocular pressure in healthy student volunteers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... African volunteers in a randomized double masked, placebo controlled, crossover, single centre study. Pulse rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate were also measured. Mean IOP was lower than baseline values up to 72 hours after instillation but the mean IOP was significantly lower in the eyes ...

  16. Dose related anxiolytic effects of diazepam: relation with serum electrolytes, plasma osmolality and systolic blood pressure (sbp) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, R.; Haleem, D.J.; Haleem, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Diazepam is an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant drug that also induces hypnosis. Changes in serum electrolyte balance, plasma osmolality and systolic blood pressure (SBP) are often associated with stress-induced anxiety. Administration of diazepam has been show to decrease stress-induced enhancement of hypothalamic pituitary adrenal cortical (HPA) axis. The present is designed to monitor the anxiolytic effects of different doses of diazepam (1 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and its association with changes of serum electrolyte balance, plasma osmolality and SBP in rats. Administration of diazepam at doses of 1 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg elicited anxiolytic effects monitored in light-dark transition test and increased serum concentration of electrolytes and plasma osmolality. Serum levels of magnesium as well as SBP decreased. The results are discussed in context of anxiolytic effects of diazepam to be mediated via a modulation of stress-induced increase in the activity of HPA-axis arid electrolytes balance. (author)

  17. Mitral annular systolic velocity as a marker of preclinical systolic dysfunction among patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daskalov Ivaylo Rilkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate early changes in left ventricular longitudinal systolic function in patients with hypertension (HTN with and without concomitant diastolic dysfunction (DD and the clinical implications of these findings. Method We enrolled 299 patients with HTN and 297 age-matched patients with HTN and DD and compared both groups with an age-matched control group consisting of 100 healthy subjects. The long axis systolic function was investigated by determining the average peak systolic velocity of the septal and lateral mitral sites (Smavg using spectral pulsed wave tissue Doppler imaging (TDI. Results We found a strong negative trend toward the reduction of velocity, which is dependent on the grade of HTN, on the magnitude of DD, and also on the gender and age of the subjects (r=−0.891/-0.580; p Conclusion The strength of the study is the analysis of incremental changes in longitudinal contraction in patients with different stage of HTN but not so many the classification of the degree of systolic dysfunction. The importance of our results lies in the fact that these initial changes in systolic contraction could be used as an early sign that should prompt optimization of the treatment of HTN.

  18. Standing orthostatic blood pressure measurements cannot be replaced by sitting measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeuwsma, Anna C; Hartog, Laura C; Kamper, Adriaan M; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk Jg; Kleefstra, Nanne; Van Hateren, Kornelis Jj

    2017-08-01

    As many elderly patients are not able to stand for several minutes, sitting orthostatic blood pressure (BP) measurements are sometimes used as an alternative. We aimed to investigate the difference in BP response and orthostatic hypotension (OH) prevalence between the standard postural change to the sitting and the standing position in a cross-sectional observational study. BP was measured with a continuous BP measurement device during two postural changes, from supine to the sitting and from supine to the standing position. Linear mixed models were used to investigate the differences in changes (Δ) of systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) between the two postural changes. The prevalence and the positive and negative proportions of agreement of OH were calculated of the two postural changes. One hundred and four patients with a mean age of 69 years were included. ΔSBP was significantly larger in the standing position compared with the sitting between 0 and 44 s. ΔDBP was significantly larger in the sitting position compared with the standing 75-224 s after postural change. The prevalence of OH was 66.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 57.2, 75.4) in the standing position and 67.3% (95% CI 58.3, 76.3) in the sitting position. The positive proportion of agreement was 74.8% and the negative proportion of agreement was 49.3%. A clear difference was seen in BP response between the two postural changes. Although no significant difference in prevalence of OH was observed, the positive and negative proportion of agreement of the prevalence of OH were poor to moderate, which indicates a different outcome between both postural changes.

  19. Reactive rise in blood pressure upon cuff inflation: cuff inflation at the arm causes a greater rise in pressure than at the wrist in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmoy, Alexia; Würzner, Grégoire; Ruffieux, Christiane; Hasler, Christopher; Cachat, François; Waeber, Bernard; Burnier, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Cuff inflation at the arm is known to cause an instantaneous rise in blood pressure, which might be due to the discomfort of the procedure and might interfere with the precision of the blood pressure measurement. In this study, we compared the reactive rise in blood pressure induced by cuff inflation when the cuff was placed at the upper arm level and at the wrist. The reactive rise in systolic and diastolic blood pressure to cuff inflation was measured in 34 normotensive participants and 34 hypertensive patients. Each participant was equipped with two cuffs, one around the right upper arm (OMRON HEM-CR19, 22-32 cm) and one around the right wrist (OMRON HEM-CS 19, 17-22 cm; Omron Health Care Europe BV, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands). The cuffs were inflated in a double random order (maximal cuff pressure and position of the cuff) with two maximal cuff pressures: 180 and 240 mmHg. The cuffs were linked to an oscillometric device (OMRON HEM 907; Omron Health Care). Simultaneously, blood pressure was measured continuously at the middle finger of the left hand using photoplethysmography. Three measurements were made at each level of blood pressure at the arm and at the wrist, and the sequence of measurements was randomized. In normotensive participants, no significant difference was observed in the reactive rise in blood pressure when the cuff was inflated either at the arm or at the wrist irrespective of the level of cuff inflation. Inflating a cuff at the arm, however, induced a significantly greater rise in blood pressure than inflating it at the wrist in hypertensive participants for both systolic and diastolic pressures (Pblood pressure response to cuff inflation was independent of baseline blood pressure. The results show that in hypertensive patients, cuff inflation at the wrist produces a smaller reactive rise in blood pressure. The difference between the arm and the wrist is independent of the patient's level of blood pressure.

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. Wain (Louise); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); G. Shi (Gang); T. Johnson (Toby); M. Bochud (Murielle); K. Rice (Kenneth); P. Henneman (Peter); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); G.B. Ehret (Georg); N. Amin (Najaf); M.G. Larson (Martin); V. Mooser (Vincent); D. Hadley (David); M. Dörr (Marcus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); T. Aspelund (Thor); T. Esko (Tõnu); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); S.C. Heath (Simon); M. Laan (Maris); J. Fu (Jingyuan); G. Pistis (Giorgio); J. Luan; G. Lucas (Gavin); N. Pirastu (Nicola); I. Pichler (Irene); A.U. Jackson (Anne); R.J. Webster (Rebecca J.); F.F. Zhang; J. Peden (John); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); H. Campbell (Harry); W. Igl (Wilmar); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); V. Vitart (Veronique); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); S. Trompet (Stella); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); J.C. Chambers (John); X. Guo (Xiuqing); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); B. Kuhnel (Brigitte); L.M. Lopez; O. Polasek (Ozren); M. Boban (Mladen); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); V. Pihur (Vasyl); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Kundu (Suman); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Hwang; R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); Y.A. Wang (Ying); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); J. Laitinen (Jaana); A. Pouta (Anneli); P. Zitting (Paavo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); K.D. Taylor (Kent); T.B. Harris (Tamara); H. Alavere (Helene); T. Haller (Toomas); A. Keis (Aime); M.L. Tammesoo; Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); P. Galan (Pilar); S. Hercberg (Serge); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); S. Eyheramendy (Susana); E. Org (Elin); S. Sõber (Siim); X. Lu (Xiaowen); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); T. Corre (Tanguy); C. Masciullo (Corrado); C. Sala (Cinzia); L. Groop (Leif); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); O. Melander (Olle); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); V. Salomaa (Veikko); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Fabretto (Antonella); F. Faletra (Flavio); S. Ulivi (Shelia); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); M.F. Facheris (Maurizio); F.S. Collins (Francis); R.N. Bergman (Richard); J.P. Beilby (John); J. Hung (Judy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); M. Mangino (Massimo); S.Y. Shin (So Youn); N. Soranzo (Nicole); H. Watkins (Hugh); A. Goel (Anuj); A. Hamsten (Anders); P. Gider (Pierre); M. Loitfelder (Marisa); M. Zeginigg (Marion); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S.S. Najjar (Samer); P. Navarro (Pau); S.H. Wild (Sarah); A.M. Corsi (Anna Maria); A. Singleton (Andrew); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); A.N. Parker (Alex); L.M. Rose (Lynda); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); D.J. Stott (David. J.); M. Orrù (Marco); M. Uda (Manuela); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); X. Li (Xiaohui); J. Scott (James); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); G.L. Burke (Greg); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); A. Döring (Angela); T. Meitinger (Thomas); G.S. Davis; J.M. Starr (John); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); J.H. Lindeman (Jan H.); P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); I.R. König (Inke); J.F. Felix (Janine); R. Clarke; J. Hopewell; H. Ongen (Halit); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); S. Debette (Stéphanie); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); M. Fornage (Myriam); G.F. Mitchell (Gary); H. Holm (Hilma); K. Stefansson (Kari); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); M. Preuss (Michael); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Hayward (Caroline); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); O. Raitakari (Olli); W. Palmas (Walter); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A.F. Wright (Alan); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Farrall (Martin); T.D. Spector (Timothy); L.J. Palmer; J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P. Gasparini (Paolo); D.S. Siscovick (David); D. Altshuler (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Snieder (Harold); C. Gieger (Christian); P. Meneton (Pierre); N.J. Wareham (Nick); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Metspalu (Andres); L.J. Launer (Lenore); R. Rettig (Rainer); D.P. Strachan (David); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); M. Boehnke (Michael); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.R. Järvelin; A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); D. Levy (Daniel); P. Arora (Pankaj); P. Munroe (Patricia); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); M. Caulfield (Mark); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); P. Elliott (Paul); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); I.E. Barroso (Inês)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNumerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N =

  1. The inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Gao, Zhen; Chen, Fei; Xu, Haijun; Dong, Xiao; Ma, Li

    2016-01-01

    The inter-arm systolic blood pressure difference (SBPD) is recommended to be in relation to potential cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies yielded controversial results about the association between an inter-arm SBPD ≥ 10 mmHg or ≥15 mmHg and the risk of cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to investigate this association. We searched PubMed and Embase databases through December 31, 2014, and examined the references of retrieved articles to identify relevant cohort studies. We utilized Newcastle-Ottawa scale to assess the quality of included studies and calculated the summary risk estimates in a fixed/random-effect model. All data analyses were conducted using STATA version 11.0. A total of seven studies were identified. Compared with participants with an inter-arm SBPD arm SBPD ≥ 10 mmHg was 1.58 (95% CI: 1.3-1.93), and the pooled HR of cardiovascular mortality of participants with an inter-arm SBPD ≥ 15 mmHg versus those with an inter-arm SBPD arm SBPD may define a subpopulation at high risk of CVD events.

  2. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure assessed during routine exercise Doppler echocardiography: insights of a real-world setting in patients with elevated pulmonary pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Susanne; Enders-Gier, Patricia; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Aurich, Matthias; Greiner, Sebastian; Hirschberg, Kristof; Katus, Hugo A; Mereles, Derliz

    2018-03-19

    Pulmonary hypertension is a marker of disease severity. Exercise Doppler echocardiography (EDE) has proven to be feasible and reliable to assess pulmonary pressure. Increase in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) has diagnostic and prognostic value in controlled studies. However, its value when assessed during routine examination in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases and resting sPAP > 35 mmHg is not clearly defined. Clinical documentation and offline reevaluation of digitally stored EDE examinations of patients with appropriate clinical indications for EDE were analyzed. N = 278 patients with sPAP at rest > 35 mmHg met inclusion criteria. One patient was lost to follow-up. Mean age of patients was 72 ± 10 years, 178 (64%) of the study population were men. There were no relevant differences among survivors and non-survivors concerning comorbidities. Exercise performance (3.6 ± 1.2 vs. 4.9 ± 1.4 MET, p  45 mm (HR = 2.58, p  42 mmHg (HR = 1.94, p = 0.010) and ΔsPAP increase ≥ 0.23 mmHg/Watt (HF = 1.92, p = 0.010). After multivariate analysis, NYHA functional class III (HR = 2.35, p < 0.001), LA diameter (HR = 2.28, p = 0.003) and sPAP increase ≥ 0.23 mmHg/Watt (HF = 2.19, p = 0.002) remained significant predictors of mortality, whereas a double product (HR = 0.42, p = 0.005) was associated with better prognosis. sPAP assessment during routine EDE provides relevant prognostic information comparable to findings in studies in selected populations. A higher sPAP increase at lower exercise performance shows significant association with increased of mortality.

  3. Blood Pressure and Its Association with Gender, Body Mass Index, Smoking, and Family History among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein H. Alhawari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we will assess the frequency of hypertension among healthy university students and its association with gender, body mass index, smoking, and family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. We screened healthy university students ranging from 18 to 26 years of age. For each participant, we performed blood pressure measurements using a previously validated device and obtained demographic data, body mass index (BMI, smoking status, and family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Out of the total number of 505 participants included in this study, 35.2% have blood pressure between 130/80 and 139/89, and 13.5% have blood pressure of more than 140/90. We found significant gender differences in both systolic pressure (p = 0.003 with mean difference = 18.08 mmHg (CI: 16.13 to 19.9 and diastolic pressure (p = 0.011 with mean difference = 3.6 mmHg (CI: 2.06 to 5.14, higher in males than in females. Upon comparing the mean difference in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure with BMI, we found significant differences in both systolic (p < 0.001 and diastolic (p = 0.002 blood pressure. We also found that smokers have significantly (p = 0.025 higher systolic blood pressure (mean difference = 4.2 mmHg, CI: 3.2 mmHg to 8.8 mmHg, but no significant difference for diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.386, compared to nonsmokers. First-degree family history of both hypertension and cardiovascular diseases affected systolic but not diastolic blood pressure. Taking into account the adverse short- and long-term effect of hypertension, we recommend adopting an awareness program highlighting the importance of screening blood pressure in young adolescent populations, keeping in mind that both high BMI and smoking are important modifiable factors.

  4. Maximum home blood pressure is a useful indicator of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: KAMOGAWA-HBP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyabu, Chikako; Ushigome, Emi; Matsumoto, Shinobu; Tanaka, Toru; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Ohnishi, Masayoshi; Tsunoda, Sei; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Yokota, Isao; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-11-01

    Maximum home systolic blood pressure has been shown to predict target organ damage. We aimed to clarify the association between maximum home systolic blood pressure and urine albumin to creatinine ratio, an indicator of early-phase diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. In 1040 patients, we assessed the relationship of mean or maximum home systolic blood pressure and urine albumin to creatinine ratio, and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of mean or maximum home systolic blood pressure for diabetic nephropathy (urine albumin to creatinine ratio ⩾30 mg/g Cr). Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that mean morning systolic blood pressure ( β = 0.010, p blood pressure ( β = 0.008, p blood pressure was 0.667 (0.634-0.700; p blood pressure, as well as mean home systolic blood pressure, was significantly associated with diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Accuracy of the WatchBP office ABI device for office blood pressure measurement over a wide range of arm sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatini, Paolo; Fania, Claudio; Gasparotti, Federica

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the WatchBP Office ABI monitor for office blood pressure measurement over a wide range of arm circumferences using the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 protocol. The device accuracy was tested in 88 participants whose mean±SD age was 54.5±17.6 years, whose arm circumference was 30.6±8.3 cm (range: 15-46 cm), and whose entry blood pressure (BP) was 138.3±23.4 mmHg for systolic and 83.7±14.6 mmHg for diastolic BP. Four cuffs (small, standard, large, and extra-large) suitable for arm circumferences ranging from 14.0 to 52.0 cm were used. The mean device-observer difference in the 264 separate BP data pairs was 0.7±3.8 mmHg for systolic BP and was 0.0±3.7 mmHg for diastolic BP. These data were in agreement with criterion 1 of the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 standard requirements (≤5±8 mmHg). Moreover, criterion 2 was satisfied, the mean±SD device-observer difference of the 88 participants being 0.7±3.1 and 0.0±3.2 mmHg, respectively, for systolic and diastolic BP. Good agreement between observer and device was present across the whole range of arm circumferences. These data show that the Microlife WatchBP Office ABI monitor satisfied the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 standard requirements across a wide range of arm sizes.

  6. Ambulatory blood pressure profiles in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lior; Bar-Aluma, Bat-El; Krauthammer, Alex; Efrati, Ori; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2018-02-12

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare genetic disease that involves extreme blood pressure fluctuations secondary to afferent baroreflex failure. The diurnal blood pressure profile, including the average, variability, and day-night difference, may have implications for long-term end organ damage. The purpose of this study was to describe the circadian pattern of blood pressure in the FD population and relationships with renal and pulmonary function, use of medications, and overall disability. We analyzed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in 22 patients with FD. Information about medications, disease severity, renal function (estimated glomerular filtration, eGFR), pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV1) and an index of blood pressure variability (standard deviation of systolic pressure) were analyzed. The mean (± SEM) 24-h blood pressure was 115 ± 5.6/72 ± 2.0 mmHg. The diurnal blood pressure variability was high (daytime systolic pressure standard deviation 22.4 ± 1.5 mmHg, nighttime 17.2 ± 1.6), with a high frequency of a non-dipping pattern (16 patients, 73%). eGFR, use of medications, FEV1, and disability scores were unrelated to the degree of blood pressure variability or to dipping status. This FD cohort had normal average 24-h blood pressure, fluctuating blood pressure, and a high frequency of non-dippers. Although there was evidence of renal dysfunction based on eGFR and proteinuria, the ABPM profile was unrelated to the measures of end organ dysfunction or to reported disability.

  7. Letter to editor: Blood pressure, hypertension and lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Yi; Staessen, Jan A

    2018-02-19

    A significant association of office diastolic blood pressure with low-level blood lead exposure was reported in a Brazilian adult population. However, caution should be taken to interpret these results. The multivariable-adjusted association with blood pressure was positive for diastolic blood pressure, but inverse for systolic blood pressure. The association sizes were infinitesimal without clinical relevance. The outcome measures, i.e. blood pressure and the prevalence of hypertension were analysed across categories of the blood lead distribution - not in relation to blood lead as continuous variable. Blood pressure was the average of two oscillometric office readings, whereas ambulatory monitoring is the state-of-the-art.

  8. [Clinical characteristics and medium-term prognosis of patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function. Do they differ in systolic dysfunction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Soledad; Anguita, Manuel; Muñoz, Juan F; Rodríguez, Marcos T; Mesa, Dolores; Franco, Manuel; Ureña, Isabel; Vallés, Federico

    2003-11-01

    To assess the prevalence, clinical profile and medium-term prognosis in patients with heart failure and preserved systolic ventricular function compared to those with systolic dysfunction. 153 patients were included, 62 with preserved systolic ventricular function (left ventricular ejection fraction > or = 45%) and 91 with impaired systolic ventricular function (left ventricular ejection fraction < 45%). The mean follow-up period was 25 10 months. Mean age was similar (66 10 vs. 65 10; p = 0.54). There was a higher proportion of women among patients with preserved systolic function (53% vs. 28%; p < 0.01). Ischemic and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common causes of heart failure in patients with systolic dysfunction, whereas valvular disease and hypertensive cardiopathy were the most common in patients with preserved systolic function. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were more often prescribed in patients with impaired systolic ventricular function (86% vs. 52%; p < 0.01 and 33% vs. 11%; p < 0.01, respectively). There were no differences between the groups in terms of mortality rate (37% vs. 29%), readmission rate for other causes (29% vs. 23%), readmission rate for heart failure (45% vs. 45%), cumulative survival (51% vs. 62%) and the likelihood of not being readmitted for heart failure (50% vs. 52%). In the multivariate analysis, left ventricular ejection fraction was not a predictor of death or readmission because of heart failure. In a large proportion of patients with heart failure, systolic ventricular function is preserved. Despite the clinical differences between patients with preserved and impaired systolic ventricular function, the medium-term prognosis was similar in both groups.

  9. Blood Pressure Variability and Cognitive Function Among Older African Americans: Introducing a New Blood Pressure Variability Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Siny; Sperling, Scott A; Park, Moon Ho; Helenius, Ira M; Williams, Ishan C; Manning, Carol

    2017-09-01

    Although blood pressure (BP) variability has been reported to be associated with cognitive impairment, whether this relationship affects African Americans has been unclear. We sought correlations between systolic and diastolic BP variability and cognitive function in community-dwelling older African Americans, and introduced a new BP variability measure that can be applied to BP data collected in clinical practice. We assessed cognitive function in 94 cognitively normal older African Americans using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Computer Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI). We used BP measurements taken at the patients' three most recent primary care clinic visits to generate three traditional BP variability indices, range, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation, plus a new index, random slope, which accounts for unequal BP measurement intervals within and across patients. MMSE scores did not correlate with any of the BP variability indices. Patients with greater diastolic BP variability were less accurate on the CAMCI verbal memory and incidental memory tasks. Results were similar across the four BP variability indices. In a sample of cognitively intact older African American adults, BP variability did not correlate with global cognitive function, as measured by the MMSE. However, higher diastolic BP variability correlated with poorer verbal and incidental memory. By accounting for differences in BP measurement intervals, our new BP variability index may help alert primary care physicians to patients at particular risk for cognitive decline.

  10. Right ventricular systolic function in hypertensive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oketona OA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available OA Oketona,1 MO Balogun,2 AO Akintomide,2 OE Ajayi,2 RA Adebayo,2 TO Mene-Afejuku,3 OT Oketona,1 OJ Bamikole2 1Fort Nelson General Hospital, Fort Nelson, BC, Canada; 2Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ife, Osun State, Nigeria; 3Department of Medicine, Metropolitan Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA Background: Heart failure (HF is a major cause of cardiovascular admissions and hypertensive heart failure (HHF is the most common cause of HF admissions in sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria inclusive. Right ventricular (RV dysfunction is being increasingly recognized in HF and found to be an independent predictor of adverse outcomes in HF. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of RV systolic dysfunction in HHF by several echocardiographic parameters.Methodology: One hundred subjects with HHF were recruited consecutively into the study along with 50 age and sex-matched controls. All study participants gave written informed consent, and had a full physical examination, blood investigations, 12-lead electrocardiogram, and transthoracic echocardiography. RV systolic function was assessed in all subjects using different methods based on the American Society of Echocardiography guidelines for echocardiographic assessment of the right heart in adults. This included tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE, RV myocardial performance index (MPI, and RV systolic excursion velocity by tissue Doppler (S′.Results: RV systolic dysfunction was found in 53% of subjects with HHF by TAPSE, 56% by RV MPI, and 48% by tissue Doppler systolic excursion S′. RV systolic dysfunction increased with reducing left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF in subjects with HHF.Conclusion: A high proportion of subjects with HHF were found to have RV systolic functional abnormalities using TAPSE, RV MPI, and RV S′. Prevalence of RV systolic dysfunction increased with reducing LVEF. Keywords: right ventricle

  11. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m 2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction

  12. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo, E-mail: dani.rassi@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina e Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos [Instituto do Coração da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins [Instituto de Radiologia da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hotta, Viviane Tiemi [Instituto do Coração da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador [Faculdade de Medicina e Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m{sup 2} were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction.

  13. Impact of a Workplace Health Promotion Program on Employees' Blood Pressure in a Public University.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Y Eng

    Full Text Available Workplace health promotion is important in the prevention of non-communicable diseases among employees. Previous workplace health programs have shown benefits such as lowered disease prevalence, reduced medical costs and improved productivity. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a 6-year workplace health promotion program on employees' blood pressure in a public university.In this prospective cohort study, we included 1,365 employees enrolled in the university's workplace health promotion program, a program conducted since 2008 and using data from the 2008-2013 follow-up period. Participants were permanent employees aged 35 years and above, with at least one follow up measurements and no change in antihypertensive medication during the study period. Baseline socio-demographic information was collected using a questionnaire while anthropometry measurements and resting blood pressure were collected during annual health screening. Changes in blood pressure over time were analyzed using a linear mixed model.The systolic blood pressure in the hypertension subgroup decreased 2.36 mmHg per year (p<0.0001. There was also significant improvement in systolic blood pressure among the participants who were at risk of hypertension (-0.75 mmHg, p<0.001. The diastolic blood pressure among the hypertensive and at risk subgroups improved 1.76 mmHg/year (p<0.001 and 0.56 mmHg/year (p<0.001, respectively. However, there was no change in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure among participants in the healthy subgroup over the 6-year period.This study shows that continuing participation in workplace health promotion program has the potential to improve blood pressure levels among employees.

  14. Body-mass index, blood pressure, and cause-specific mortality in India: a prospective cohort study of 500 810 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajalakshmi, Vendhan; Lacey, Ben; Kanimozhi, Vendhan; Sherliker, Paul; Peto, Richard; Lewington, Sarah

    2018-07-01

    The association between cause-specific mortality and body-mass index (BMI) has been studied mainly in high-income countries. We investigated the relations between BMI, systolic blood pressure, and mortality in India. Men and women aged 35 years or older were recruited into a prospective study from the general population in Chennai, India between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2001. Participants were interviewed (data collected included age, sex, education, socioeconomic status, medical history, tobacco smoking, and alcohol intake) and measured (height, weight, and blood pressure). Deaths were identified by linkage to Chennai city mortality records and through active surveillance by household visits from trained graduate non-medical fieldworkers. After the baseline survey, households were visited once in 2002-05, then biennially until 2015. During these repeat visits, structured narratives of any deaths that took place before March 31, 2015, were recorded for physician coding. During 2013-14, a random sample of participants was also resurveyed as per baseline to assess long-term variability in systolic blood pressure and BMI. Cox regression (standardised for tobacco, alcohol, and social factors) was used to relate mortality rate ratios (RRs) at ages 35-69 years to systolic blood pressure, BMI, or BMI adjusted for usual systolic blood pressure. 500 810 participants were recruited. After exclusion of those with chronic disease or incomplete data, 414 746 participants aged 35-69 years (mean 46 [SD 9]; 45% women) remained. At recruitment, mean systolic blood pressure was 127 mm Hg (SD 15), and mean BMI was 23·2 kg/m 2 (SD 3·8). Correlations of resurvey and baseline measurements were 0·50 for systolic blood pressure and 0·88 for BMI. Low BMI was strongly associated with poverty, tobacco, and alcohol. Of the 29 519 deaths at ages 35-69 years, the cause was vascular for 14 935 deaths (12 504 cardiac, 1881 stroke, and 550 other). Vascular mortality was strongly

  15. Body-mass index, blood pressure, and cause-specific mortality in India: a prospective cohort study of 500 810 adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vendhan Gajalakshmi, PhD

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: The association between cause-specific mortality and body-mass index (BMI has been studied mainly in high-income countries. We investigated the relations between BMI, systolic blood pressure, and mortality in India. Methods: Men and women aged 35 years or older were recruited into a prospective study from the general population in Chennai, India between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2001. Participants were interviewed (data collected included age, sex, education, socioeconomic status, medical history, tobacco smoking, and alcohol intake and measured (height, weight, and blood pressure. Deaths were identified by linkage to Chennai city mortality records and through active surveillance by household visits from trained graduate non-medical fieldworkers. After the baseline survey, households were visited once in 2002–05, then biennially until 2015. During these repeat visits, structured narratives of any deaths that took place before March 31, 2015, were recorded for physician coding. During 2013–14, a random sample of participants was also resurveyed as per baseline to assess long-term variability in systolic blood pressure and BMI. Cox regression (standardised for tobacco, alcohol, and social factors was used to relate mortality rate ratios (RRs at ages 35–69 years to systolic blood pressure, BMI, or BMI adjusted for usual systolic blood pressure. Findings: 500 810 participants were recruited. After exclusion of those with chronic disease or incomplete data, 414 746 participants aged 35–69 years (mean 46 [SD 9]; 45% women remained. At recruitment, mean systolic blood pressure was 127 mm Hg (SD 15, and mean BMI was 23·2 kg/m2 (SD 3·8. Correlations of resurvey and baseline measurements were 0·50 for systolic blood pressure and 0·88 for BMI. Low BMI was strongly associated with poverty, tobacco, and alcohol. Of the 29 519 deaths at ages 35–69 years, the cause was vascular for 14 935 deaths (12 504 cardiac, 1881

  16. Mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and blood pressure in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goharian, Tina S; Gimsing, Anders N; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about blood pressure in relation to circulating natriuretic peptide concentrations and gender in generally healthy adolescents. We studied 15-year-old females and males (n = 335) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS). Blood pressure was measured using...... a standardized protocol, sexual maturity was assessed according to Tanner stage, and as a surrogate for atrial natriuretic peptide, we measured mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) in plasma. Compared with boys, girls had lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mean ± SD: 109.6 ± 9.9 mmHg vs 116.......9 ± 11.4 mmHg, p blood pressure...

  17. Casual and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children with renal scarring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloševski Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Renal scarring is the most common cause of arterial hypertension in children. High blood pressure (BP and microalbuminuria contribute to the progression of chronic renal disease. OBJECTIVE The aims of the study were: to assess BP in children with renal scarring by continuous ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM in comparison to the casual method (CBP, and to determine the correlation between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP and/or casual blood pressure (CBP values and proteinuria in children with renal scarring. METHOD This forward-looking study comprised thirty-five children (26 girls and 9 boys, aged between 3-13 years, 10.4±3.9, X+SD. Blood pressure was measured using the casual method (CBP with a mercury manometer; BP was measured three times and the average was taken as a referent value. ABPM was performed using the oscillometric method with the Space Labs device, model 90207. RESULTS 45.71% of patients were classified as hypertensive by ABPM, while only 22.6% of CBP measurements were above the 95th percentile (p<0.01. "White coat hypertension" was present in 40% of the patients. Non-dipping BP alteration was detected in 37.14% of the patients. CONCLUSION Nocturnal systolic hypertension (systolic non-dipping alteration is very frequent in children with renal scarring. Nocturnal diastolic blood pressure, detectable only via ABPM, is positively correlated with proteinuria and may be an initial sign of the progression of renal scarring. ABPM is more sensitive than CBP in the evaluation of BP in children with renal scarring.

  18. Validation of the SEJOY BP-1307 upper-arm blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Chen, Yi; Chen, Qi; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper-arm blood pressure monitor SEJOY BP-1307 (also called JOYTECH DBP-1307) for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension revision 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese individuals (13 women, 45.1 years of mean age) using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the SEJOY BP-1307 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for judgments in two parts with three grading phases. The average±SD of the device-observer differences was 0.2±4.1 and -1.7±4.7 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The SEJOY BP-1307 device achieved the criteria in both part 1 and part 2 of the validation study. The SEJOY upper-arm blood pressure monitor BP-1307 has passed the requirements of the International Protocol revision 2010, and hence can be recommended for home use in adults.

  19. The difference in blood pressure readings between arms and survival: primary care cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Christopher E; Taylor, Rod S; Shore, Angela C; Campbell, John L

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a difference in systolic blood pressure readings between arms can predict a reduced event free survival after 10 years. Design Cohort study. Setting Rural general practice in Devon, United Kingdom. Participants 230 people receiving treatment for hypertension in primary care. Intervention Bilateral blood pressure measurements recorded at three successive surgery attendances. Main outcome measures Cardiovascular events and deaths from all causes during a median fo...

  20. LOFT fuel rod pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure sensors selected for measuring fuel rod pressure within the LOFT reactor exhibited stable, repeatable operating characteristics during calibrations at temperatures up to 800 0 F and pressures to 2500 psig. All sensors have a nominal sensitivity of .5 millivolts per psi, decreasing monotonically with temperature. Output signal increases linearly with increasing pressure up to 2000 psig. For imposed slow and rapid temperature variations and for pressure applied during these tests, the sensor indicates a pressure at variance with the actual value by up to 15% of reading. However, the imposed temperature rates of change often exceeded the value of -10 0 F/sec. specified for LOFT. The series of tests in an autoclave permit creation of an environment most closely resembling sensor operating conditions within LOFT. For multiple blowdowns and for longtime durations the sensor continued to provide pressure-related output signals. For temperature rates up to -87 0 F/sec, the indicated pressure measurement error remained less than 13% of reading. Adverse effects caused by heating the 1/16 inch O.D. signal cable to 800 0 F contributed only insignificantly to the noted pressure measurement error

  1. Association of betaine with blood pressure in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lulu; Zhao, Mingming; Liu, Wenjin; Li, Xiurong; Chu, Hong; Bai, Youwei; Sun, Zhuxing; Gao, Chaoqing; Zheng, Lemin; Yang, Junwei

    2018-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying elevated blood pressure in dialysis patients are complex as a variety of non-traditional factors are involved. We sought to explore the association of circulating betaine, a compound widely distributed in food, with blood pressure in dialysis patients. We used baseline data of an ongoing cohort study involving patients on hemodialysis. Plasma betaine was measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 327 subjects. Blood pressure level was determined by intradialytic ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The mean age of the patients was 52.6 ± 11.9 years, and 58.4% were male. Average interdialytic ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 138.4 ± 22.7 mm Hg and 84.4 ± 12.5 mm Hg, respectively. Mean plasma betaine level was 37.6 μmol/L. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed significant associations of betaine with both systolic blood pressure (β = -3.66, P = .003) and diastolic blood pressure (β = -2.00, P = .004). The associations persisted even after extensive adjustment for cardiovascular covariates. Subgroup analysis revealed that the association between betaine and blood pressure was mainly limited to female patients. Our data suggest that alteration of circulating betaine possibly contributes to blood pressure regulation in these patients. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Safety, Tolerability, and Antihypertensive Effect of SER100, an Opiate Receptor-Like 1 (ORL-1) Partial Agonist, in Patients With Isolated Systolic Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantola, Ilkka; Scheinin, Mika; Gulbrandsen, Trygve; Meland, Nils; Smerud, Knut T

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the present trial was to evaluate safety, tolerability, and effect on systolic blood pressure (SBP) of SER100 in a small group of patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) in treatment with at least 1 antihypertensive drug. Eligible patients were randomized to either SER100 (10 mg) or placebo in a crossover design, and 2 doses were given subcutaneously (SC), 8 hours apart, on 2 consecutive days. On all treatment days patients were monitored with an ambulatory blood pressure measurement device for 12 daytime hours. Seventeen patients completed treatment. There were no serious or severe adverse events. Relative to placebo SER100 induced an average reduction of SBP during the 2 treatment days of 7.0 mm Hg (P = 0.0032), whereas the average reduction of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) over the same period was 3.8 mm Hg (P = 0.0011). For patients with ISH, this short-term cross-over study of SC SER100 demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and consistent, significant lowering of SBP and DBP. As initial clinical proof of concept for a new class of drugs, a nociceptin agonist peptide, the results were encouraging and warrant further research. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  3. Blood pressure documentation in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ana Carolina Queiroz Godoy; Machado, Juliana Pereira; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the frequency of blood pressure documentation performed by nursing professionals in an emergency department. Methods This is a cross-sectional, observational, descriptive, and analytical study, which included medical records of adult patients admitted to the observation ward of an emergency department, between March and May 2014. Data were obtained through a collection instrument divided into three parts: patient identification, triage data, and blood pressure documentation. For statistical analysis, Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used, with a significance level of α<0.05. Results One hundred fifty-seven records and 430 blood pressure measurements were analyzed with an average of three measurements per patient. Of these measures, 46.5% were abnormal. The mean time from admission to documentation of the first blood pressure measurement was 2.5 minutes, with 42 minutes between subsequent measures. There is no correlation between the systolic blood pressure values and the mean time interval between blood pressure documentations: 0.173 (p=0.031). Conclusion The present study found no correlation between frequency of blood pressure documentation and blood pressure values. The frequency of blood pressure documentation increased according to the severity of the patient and decreased during the length of stay in the emergency department. PMID:28444085

  4. Optimal right heart filling pressure in acute respiratory distress syndrome determined by strain echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Montilla, Romel; Imam, Faryal; Miao, Mi; Stinson, Kathryn; Khan, Akram; Heitner, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Right ventricular (RV) systolic dysfunction is common in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). While preload optimization is crucial in its management, dynamic fluid responsiveness indices lack reliability, and there is no consensus on target central venous pressure (CVP). We analyzed the utility of RV free wall longitudinal strain (RVFWS) in the estimation of optimal RV filling pressure in ARDS. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of clinical data and echocardiograms of patients with ARDS was performed. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tricuspid peak systolic velocity (S'), RV fractional area change (RVFAC), RVFWS, CVP, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured. Fifty-one patients with moderate-severe ARDS were included. There were inverse correlations between CVP and TAPSE, S', RVFAC, RVFWS, and LVEF. The most significant was with RVFWS (r:.74, R 2 :.55, P:.00001). Direct correlations with creatinine and lactate were noted. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that RVFWS -21% (normal reference value) was associated with CVP: 13 mm Hg (AUC: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.83-1.00). Regression model analysis of CVP, and RVFWS interactions established an RVFWS range from -18% to -24%. RVFWS -24% corresponded to CVP: 11 mm Hg and RVFWS -18% to CVP: 15 mm Hg. Beyond a CVP of 15 mm Hg, biventricular systolic dysfunction rapidly ensues. Our data are the first to show that an RV filling pressure of 13±2 mm Hg-as by CVP-correlates with optimal RV mechanics as evaluated by strain echocardiography in patients with moderate-severe ARDS. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of Topical Phenylephrine HCl 2.5% used before Cataract Surgery on Systemic Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Ayıntap

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of topical phenylephrine HCl 2.5% (Mydfrin, used as a fast and effective mydriatic before cataract surgery, on systemic blood pressure. Material and Method: Topical phenylephrine HCl 2.5% was administered 3 times with 5-minute intervals before cataract surgery to 44 eyes of 44 patients. The systemic blood pressure was measured preoperatively and at 15 and 30 minutes. Results: The mean systolic blood pressure before the topical administration of phenylephrine HCl 2.5% was 119.7mmHg, while 15 and 30 minutes later, it was 125.3 mmHg and 121.2 mmHg, respectively. The mean diastolic blood pressure before the topical administration of phenylephrine HCl 2.5% was 75.9 mmHg; 15 and 30 minutes later, it was 76.9 mmHg and 75.3 mmHg, respectively. The increase in systolic blood pressure at 15 and 30 minutes was statistically significant (p=0.003 and p=0.042. The change in diastolic blood pressure was not statistically significant. Discussion: Phenylephrine HCl 2.5%, which is used preoperatively as a fast and effective mydriatic for cataract surgery, can increase the systolic blood pressure. This effect is most significant at 15 minutes and lasts at least 30 minutes. This agent should be used with care in hypertensive patients. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 164-6

  6. Validation of the iHealth BP7 wrist blood pressure monitor, for self-measurement, according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhao, Huadong; Chen, Wan; Li, Ni; Wan, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the iHealth BP7 wireless wrist blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol (ESH-IP) revision 2010. A total of 99 pairs of test device and reference blood pressure measurements (three pairs for each of the 33 participants) were obtained for validation. The ESH-IP revision 2010 for the validation of blood pressure measuring devices in adults was followed precisely. The device produced 66, 87, and 97 measurements within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 72, 93, and 99 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respectively. The mean±SD device-observer difference was -0.7±6.9 mmHg for SBP and -1.0±5.1 mmHg for DBP. The number of participants with two or three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg was 25 for SBP and 26 for DBP; furthermore, there were three participants for SBP and one participant for DBP, with none of the device-observer differences within 5 mmHg. On the basis of the validation results, the iHealth BP7 wireless wrist blood pressure monitor can be recommended for self-measurement in an adult population.

  7. 2D-speckle tracking right ventricular strain to assess right ventricular systolic function in systolic heart failure. Analysis of the right ventricular free and posterolateral walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Stéphanie; Ridon, Héléne; Fertin, Marie; Pentiah, Anju Duva; Goémine, Céline; Petyt, Grégory; Lamblin, Nicolas; Coisne, Augustin; Foucher-Hossein, Claude; Montaigne, David; de Groote, Pascal

    2017-10-15

    Right ventricular (RV) systolic function is a powerful prognostic factor in patients with systolic heart failure. The accurate estimation of RV function remains difficult. The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 2D-speckle tracking RV strain in patients w