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Sample records for systems macromolecular assembly

  1. Self-assembling supramolecular systems of different symmetry formed by wedged macromolecular dendrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbina, M. A., E-mail: shcherbina@ispm.ru; Bakirov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Synthetic Polymer Materials (Russian Federation); Yakunin, A. N. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Percec, V. [University of Pennsylvania (United States); Beginn, U. [Universitaet Osnabrueck, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany); Moeller, M. [Institute for Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry (Germany); Chvalun, S. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Synthetic Polymer Materials (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    The main stages of the self-assembling of supramolecular ensembles have been revealed by studying different functional wedged macromolecules: polymethacrylates with tapered side chains based on gallic acid, their macromonomers, and salts of 2,3,4- and 3,4,5-tris(dodecyloxy)benzenesulphonic acid. The first stage is the formation of individual supramolecular aggregates (long cylinders or spherical micelles) due to the weak noncovalent interactions of mesogenic groups and the subsequent ordering in these aggregates, which is accompanied by a decrease in the free energy of the system. Supramolecular aggregates, in turn, form 2D or 3D lattices. The shape of supramolecular aggregates and its change with temperature are delicate functions of the mesogen chemical structure; this circumstance makes it possible to rationally design complex self-assembling systems with the ability to respond smartly to external stimuli. X-ray diffraction analysis allows one to study the structure of supramolecular systems with different degrees of order, determine the type of mesophases formed by these systems, and reveal the phase behavior of the material. Particular attention has been paid to the method for reconstruction of electron density distribution from the relative reflection intensity. The application of a suite of experimental methods, including wide- and small-angle X-ray diffraction, molecular modeling, differential scanning calorimetry, and polarization optical microscopy, allows one to establish the relationship between the shape of the structural unit (molecule or molecular aggregate), the nature of the interaction, and the phase behavior of the material.

  2. Self-assembling supramolecular systems of different symmetry formed by wedged macromolecular dendrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbina, M. A.; Bakirov, A. V.; Yakunin, A. N.; Percec, V.; Beginn, U.; Möller, M.; Chvalun, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The main stages of the self-assembling of supramolecular ensembles have been revealed by studying different functional wedged macromolecules: polymethacrylates with tapered side chains based on gallic acid, their macromonomers, and salts of 2,3,4- and 3,4,5-tris(dodecyloxy)benzenesulphonic acid. The first stage is the formation of individual supramolecular aggregates (long cylinders or spherical micelles) due to the weak noncovalent interactions of mesogenic groups and the subsequent ordering in these aggregates, which is accompanied by a decrease in the free energy of the system. Supramolecular aggregates, in turn, form 2D or 3D lattices. The shape of supramolecular aggregates and its change with temperature are delicate functions of the mesogen chemical structure; this circumstance makes it possible to rationally design complex self-assembling systems with the ability to respond smartly to external stimuli. X-ray diffraction analysis allows one to study the structure of supramolecular systems with different degrees of order, determine the type of mesophases formed by these systems, and reveal the phase behavior of the material. Particular attention has been paid to the method for reconstruction of electron density distribution from the relative reflection intensity. The application of a suite of experimental methods, including wide- and small-angle X-ray diffraction, molecular modeling, differential scanning calorimetry, and polarization optical microscopy, allows one to establish the relationship between the shape of the structural unit (molecule or molecular aggregate), the nature of the interaction, and the phase behavior of the material.

  3. Macromolecular systems for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MuŽíková, G; Laga, R

    2016-10-20

    Vaccines have helped considerably in eliminating some life-threatening infectious diseases in past two hundred years. Recently, human medicine has focused on vaccination against some of the world's most common infectious diseases (AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, etc.), and vaccination is also gaining popularity in the treatment of cancer or autoimmune diseases. The major limitation of current vaccines lies in their poor ability to generate a sufficient level of protective antibodies and T cell responses against diseases such as HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and cancers. Among the promising vaccination systems that could improve the potency of weakly immunogenic vaccines belong macromolecular carriers (water soluble polymers, polymer particels, micelles, gels etc.) conjugated with antigens and immunistumulatory molecules. The size, architecture, and the composition of the high molecular-weight carrier can significantly improve the vaccine efficiency. This review includes the most recently developed (bio)polymer-based vaccines reported in the literature.

  4. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t 1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14 C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  5. Structure studies of macromolecular systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Dušková, Jarmila; Kolenko, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 136 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA MŠk 1K05008 Keywords : structure * X-ray diffraction * synchrotron Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  6. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  7. Coevolutionary constraints in the sequence-space of macromolecular complexes reflect their self-assembly pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2017-07-01

    Is the order in which biomolecular subunits self-assemble into functional macromolecular complexes imprinted in their sequence-space? Here, we demonstrate that the temporal order of macromolecular complex self-assembly can be efficiently captured using the landscape of residue-level coevolutionary constraints. This predictive power of coevolutionary constraints is irrespective of the structural, functional, and phylogenetic classification of the complex and of the stoichiometry and quaternary arrangement of the constituent monomers. Combining this result with a number of structural attributes estimated from the crystal structure data, we find indications that stronger coevolutionary constraints at interfaces formed early in the assembly hierarchy probably promotes coordinated fixation of mutations that leads to high-affinity binding with higher surface area, increased surface complementarity and elevated number of molecular contacts, compared to those that form late in the assembly. Proteins 2017; 85:1183-1189. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-03-04

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro.

  9. Using lanthanoid complexes to phase large macromolecular assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talon, Romain; Kahn, Richard; Durá, M. Asunción; Maury, Olivier; Vellieux, Frédéric M. D.; Franzetti, Bruno; Girard, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A lanthanoid complex, [Eu(DPA) 3 ] 3− , was used to obtain experimental phases at 4.0 Å resolution of PhTET1-12s, a large self-compartmentalized homo-dodecameric protease complex of 444 kDa. Lanthanoid ions exhibit extremely large anomalous X-ray scattering at their L III absorption edge. They are thus well suited for anomalous diffraction experiments. A novel class of lanthanoid complexes has been developed that combines the physical properties of lanthanoid atoms with functional chemical groups that allow non-covalent binding to proteins. Two structures of large multimeric proteins have already been determined by using such complexes. Here the use of the luminescent europium tris-dipicolinate complex [Eu(DPA) 3 ] 3− to solve the low-resolution structure of a 444 kDa homododecameric aminopeptidase, called PhTET1-12s from the archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii, is reported. Surprisingly, considering the low resolution of the data, the experimental electron density map is very well defined. Experimental phases obtained by using the lanthanoid complex lead to maps displaying particular structural features usually observed in higher-resolution maps. Such complexes open a new way for solving the structure of large molecular assemblies, even with low-resolution data

  10. Macromolecular shape and interactions in layer-by-layer assemblies within cylindrical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Lau, K H Aaron; Knoll, Wolfgang; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of polyelectrolytes and proteins within the cylindrical nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes was studied by optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS). AAO has aligned cylindrical, nonintersecting pores with a defined pore diameter d(0) and functions as a planar optical waveguide so as to monitor, in situ, the LbL process by OWS. The LbL deposition of globular proteins, i.e., avidin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was compared with that of linear polyelectrolytes (linear-PEs), both species being of similar molecular weight. LbL deposition within the cylindrical AAO geometry for different pore diameters (d(0) = 25-80 nm) for the various macromolecular species, showed that the multilayer film growth was inhibited at different maximum numbers of LbL steps (n(max)). The value of n(max) was greatest for linear-PEs, while proteins had a lower value. The cylindrical pore geometry imposes a physical limit to LbL growth such that n(max) is strongly dependent on the overall internal structure of the LbL film. For all macromolecular species, deposition was inhibited in native AAO, having pores of d(0) = 25-30 nm. Both, OWS and scanning electron microscopy showed that LbL growth in larger AAO pores (d(0) > 25-30 nm) became inhibited when approaching a pore diameter of d(eff,n_max) = 25-35 nm, a similar size to that of native AAO pores, with d(0) = 25-30 nm. For a reasonable estimation of d(eff,n_max), the actual volume occupied by a macromolecular assembly must be taken into consideration. The results clearly show that electrostatic LbL allowed for compact macromolecular layers, whereas proteins formed loosely packed multilayers.

  11. The monitoring system for macromolecular crystallography beamlines at BSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xian; Chang Guangcai; Gan Quan; Shi Hong; Liu Peng; Sun Gongxing

    2012-01-01

    The monitoring system for macromolecular crystallography beamlines at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) based on LabVIEW is introduced. In order to guarantee a safe, stable, and reliable running for the beamline devices, the system monitors the state of vacuum, cooling-water, optical components, beam, Liquid nitrogen in the beamlines in real time, detects faults and gives the alarm timely. System underlying uses the driver developed for the field devices for data acquisition, Data of collection is uploaded to the data-sharing platform makes it accessible via a network share. The upper system divides modules according to the actual function, and establishes the main interface of the monitoring system of beamline. To Facilitate data storage, management and inquiry, the system use LabSQL toolkit to achieve the interconnection with MySQL database which data of collection is sent to. (authors)

  12. Data Management System at the Photon Factory Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y; Matsugaki, N; Chavas, L M G; Hiraki, M; Igarashi, N; Wakatsuki, S

    2013-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography is a very powerful tool to investigate three-dimensional structures of macromolecules at the atomic level, and is widely spread among structural biology researchers. Due to recent upgrades of the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Photon Factory, beamline throughput has improved, allowing more experiments to be conducted during a user's beam time. Although the number of beamlines has increased, so has the number of beam time applications. Consequently, both the experimental data from users' experiments and data derived from beamline operations have dramatically increased, causing difficulties in organizing these diverse and large amounts of data for the beamline operation staff and users. To overcome this problem, we have developed a data management system by introducing commercial middleware, which consists of a controller, database, and web servers. We have prepared several database projects using this system. Each project is dedicated to a certain aspect such as experimental results, beam time applications, beam time schedule, or beamline operation reports. Then we designed a scheme to link all the database projects.

  13. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Triblock Terpolymers with Complex Macromolecular Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Polymeropoulos, George; Zapsas, George; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Two star triblock terpolymers (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO)3 and one dendritic-like terpolymer [PS-b-P2VP-b-(PEO)2]3 of PS (polystyrene), P2VP (poly(2-vinylpyridine)), and PEO (poly(ethylene oxide)), never reported before, were synthesized by combining atom transfer radical and anionic polymerizations. The synthesis involves the transformation of the -Br groups of the previously reported Br-terminated 3-arm star diblock copolymers to one or two -OH groups, followed by anionic polymerization of ethylene oxide to afford the star or dendritic structure, respectively. The well-defined structure of the terpolymers was confirmed by static light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy. The self-assembly in solution and the morphology in bulk of the terpolymers, studied by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, reveal new insights in the phase separation of these materials with complex macromolecular architecture. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. FitEM2EM--tools for low resolution study of macromolecular assembly and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv Frankenstein

    Full Text Available Studies of the structure and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies often involve comparison of low resolution models obtained using different techniques such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. We present new computational tools for comparing (matching and docking of low resolution structures, based on shape complementarity. The matched or docked objects are represented by three dimensional grids where the value of each grid point depends on its position with regard to the interior, surface or exterior of the object. The grids are correlated using fast Fourier transformations producing either matches of related objects or docking models depending on the details of the grid representations. The procedures incorporate thickening and smoothing of the surfaces of the objects which effectively compensates for differences in the resolution of the matched/docked objects, circumventing the need for resolution modification. The presented matching tool FitEM2EMin successfully fitted electron microscopy structures obtained at different resolutions, different conformers of the same structure and partial structures, ranking correct matches at the top in every case. The differences between the grid representations of the matched objects can be used to study conformation differences or to characterize the size and shape of substructures. The presented low-to-low docking tool FitEM2EMout ranked the expected models at the top.

  15. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Triblock Terpolymers with Complex Macromolecular Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Polymeropoulos, George

    2015-11-25

    Two star triblock terpolymers (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO)3 and one dendritic-like terpolymer [PS-b-P2VP-b-(PEO)2]3 of PS (polystyrene), P2VP (poly(2-vinylpyridine)), and PEO (poly(ethylene oxide)), never reported before, were synthesized by combining atom transfer radical and anionic polymerizations. The synthesis involves the transformation of the -Br groups of the previously reported Br-terminated 3-arm star diblock copolymers to one or two -OH groups, followed by anionic polymerization of ethylene oxide to afford the star or dendritic structure, respectively. The well-defined structure of the terpolymers was confirmed by static light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy. The self-assembly in solution and the morphology in bulk of the terpolymers, studied by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, reveal new insights in the phase separation of these materials with complex macromolecular architecture. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  16. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ordered Macromolecular Assemblies. Final report for May 1, 1988 - June 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-02-11

    The final report describes studies over a 13 year period having to do with photoinduced electron transfer for active chromophores and redox agents, including assembly of the components in water soluble polymers or polypeptides. The findings include observation of long range charge separation and electron transport using laser phototransient spectroscopy. The systems targeted in these studies include peptide assemblies for which helical conformations and aggregation are documented. Oligomeric peptides modified with non-native redox active groups were also selected for investigation. Highly charged polymers or peptides were investigated as host agents that resemble proteins. The overall goal of these investigations focused on the design and characterization of systems capable of artificial photosynthesis.

  17. JBluIce-EPICS control system for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.; Makarov, O.; Hilgart, M.; Pothineni, S.; Urakhchin, A.; Devarapalli, S.; Yoder, D.; Becker, M.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Nagarajan, V.; Smith, J.L.; Fischetti, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) in Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been in growing demand owing to their outstanding beam quality and capacity to measure data from crystals of only a few micrometres in size. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and optical design of these beamlines, a significant effort has been devoted to designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easily accommodate new beamline developments. The GM/CA-CAT beamline controls are based on the power of EPICS for distributed hardware control, the rich Java graphical user interface of Eclipse RCP and the task-oriented philosophy as well as the look and feel of the successful SSRL BluIce graphical user interface for crystallography. These beamline controls feature a minimum number of software layers, the wide use of plug-ins that can be written in any language and unified motion controls that allow on-the-fly scanning and optimization of any beamline component. This paper describes the ways in which BluIce was combined with EPICS and converted into the Java-based JBluIce, discusses the solutions aimed at streamlining and speeding up operations and gives an overview of the tools that are provided by this new open-source control system for facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

  18. Comparison of two self-assembled macromolecular prodrug micelles with different conjugate positions of SN38 for enhancing antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yi Liu,1 Hongyu Piao,1 Ying Gao,1 Caihong Xu,2 Ye Tian,1 Lihong Wang,1 Jinwen Liu,1 Bo Tang,1 Meijuan Zou,1 Gang Cheng1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Food Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN38, an active metabolite of irinotecan (CPT-11, is a remarkably potent antitumor agent. The clinical application of SN38 has been extremely restricted by its insolubility in water. In this study, we successfully synthesized two macromolecular prodrugs of SN38 with different conjugate positions (chitosan-(C10-OHSN38 and chitosan-(C20-OHSN38 to improve the water solubility and antitumor activity of SN38. These prodrugs can self-assemble into micelles in aqueous medium. The particle size, morphology, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release of SN38 and its derivatives, as well as their cytotoxicity, pharmacokinetics, and in vivo antitumor activity in a xenograft BALB/c mouse model were studied. In vitro, chitosan-(C10-OHSN38 (CS-(10sSN38 and chitosan-(C20-OHSN38 (CS-(20sSN38 were 13.3- and 25.9-fold more potent than CPT-11 in the murine colon adenocarcinoma cell line CT26, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC0–24 of SN38 after intravenously administering CS-(10sSN38 and CS-(20sSN38 to Sprague Dawley rats was greatly improved when compared with CPT-11 (both P<0.01. A larger AUC0–24 of CS-(20sSN38 was observed when compared to CS-(10sSN38 (P<0.05. Both of the novel self-assembled chitosan-SN38 prodrugs demonstrated superior anticancer activity to CPT-11 in the CT26 xenograft BALB/c mouse model. We have also investigated the differences between these macromolecular prodrug micelles with regards to enhancing the antitumor activity of SN38. CS-(20sSN38 exhibited better in vivo antitumor activity than CS-(10sSN38 at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg (P<0

  19. Supramolecular Assembly of Comb-like Macromolecules Induced by Chemical Reactions that Modulate the Macromolecular Interactions In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongwei; Fu, Hailin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shih, Kuo-Chih; Ren, Yuan; Anuganti, Murali; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Cheng, Jianjun; Lin, Yao

    2017-08-16

    Supramolecular polymerization or assembly of proteins or large macromolecular units by a homogeneous nucleation mechanism can be quite slow and require specific solution conditions. In nature, protein assembly is often regulated by molecules that modulate the electrostatic interactions of the protein subunits for various association strengths. The key to this regulation is the coupling of the assembly process with a reversible or irreversible chemical reaction that occurs within the constituent subunits. However, realizing this complex process by the rational design of synthetic molecules or macromolecules remains a challenge. Herein, we use a synthetic polypeptide-grafted comb macromolecule to demonstrate how the in situ modulation of interactions between the charged macromolecules affects their resulting supramolecular structures. The kinetics of structural formation was studied and can be described by a generalized model of nucleated polymerization containing secondary pathways. Basic thermodynamic analysis indicated the delicate role of the electrostatic interactions between the charged subunits in the reaction-induced assembly process. This approach may be applicable for assembling a variety of ionic soft matters that are amenable to chemical reactions in situ.

  20. Structure and property relations of macromolecular self-assemblies at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihao

    Hydrophilic polymer chains, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), are attached to glass surfaces by silylation of the silanol groups on glass surfaces with the omega-(methoxyl terminated PEG) trimethoxysilanes. These tethered polymer chains resemble the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of PEG, which exhibit excellent biocompatibility and provide a model system for studying the interactions of proteins with polymer surfaces. The low molecular weight PEGs tend to extend, forming a brush-like monolayer, whereas the longer polymer chains tend to interpenetrate each other, forming a mushroom-like PEG monolayer at the interface. Interactions between a plasma protein, bovine serum albumin, and the PEG-SAMs are investigated in terms of protein adsorption and diffusion on the surfaces by the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The diffusion and aggregation behaviors of the protein on the two monolayers are found to be quite different despite the similarities in adsorption and desorption behaviors. The results are analyzed with a hypothesis of the hydrated surface dynamics. A method of covalently bonding phospholipid molecules to silica substrates followed by loading with free phospholipids is demonstrated to form well organized and stable phospholipid self-assembled monolayers. Surfaces of such SAMs structurally mimic the aqueous sides of phospholipid bilayer membranes. The dynamics of phospholipids and an adsorbed protein, lipase, in the SAMs are probed with FRAP, in terms of lateral diffusion of both phospholipids and protein molecules. The esterase activity of lipase on the SAM surfaces is confirmed by the hydrolysis reaction of a substrate, umbelliferone stearate, showing such lipid SAMs posess biomembrane functionality in terms of interfacial activation of the membranous enzymes. Dynamics of polyethylene oxide and polypropylene oxide tri-block copolymers, PEO-PPO-PEO and PPO-PEO-PPO, at the air/water interface upon thermal stimulation is studied by

  1. Accelerated Development of Supramolecular Corneal Stromal-Like Assemblies from Corneal Fibroblasts in the Presence of Macromolecular Crowders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J; Gorelov, Alexander; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-07-01

    Tissue engineering by self-assembly uses the cells' secretome as a regeneration template and biological factory of trophic factors. Despite the several advantages that have been witnessed in preclinical and clinical settings, the major obstacle for wide acceptance of this technology remains the tardy extracellular matrix formation. In this study, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding (MMC)/excluding volume effect, a biophysical phenomenon that accelerates thermodynamic activities and biological processes by several orders of magnitude, in human corneal fibroblast (HCF) culture. Our data indicate that the addition of negatively charged galactose derivative (carrageenan) in HCF culture, even at 0.5% serum, increases by 12-fold tissue-specific matrix deposition, while maintaining physiological cell morphology and protein/gene expression. Gene analysis indicates that a glucose derivative (dextran sulfate) may drive corneal fibroblasts toward a myofibroblast lineage. Collectively, these results indicate that MMC may be suitable not only for clinical translation and commercialization of tissue engineering by self-assembly therapies, but also for the development of in vitro pathophysiology models.

  2. Fully automated data collection and processing system on macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the PF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Chavas, Leonard M.G.; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Fully automated data collection and processing system has been developed on macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Photon Factory. In this system, the sample exchange, centering and data collection are sequentially performed for all samples stored in the sample exchange system at a beamline without any manual operations. Data processing of collected data sets is also performed automatically. These results are stored into the database system, and users can monitor the progress and results of automated experiment via a Web browser. (author)

  3. Variationally optimal selection of slow coordinates and reaction coordinates in macromolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Frank

    To efficiently simulate and generate understanding from simulations of complex macromolecular systems, the concept of slow collective coordinates or reaction coordinates is of fundamental importance. Here we will introduce variational approaches to approximate the slow coordinates and the reaction coordinates between selected end-states given MD simulations of the macromolecular system and a (possibly large) basis set of candidate coordinates. We will then discuss how to select physically intuitive order paremeters that are good surrogates of this variationally optimal result. These result can be used in order to construct Markov state models or other models of the stationary and kinetics properties, in order to parametrize low-dimensional / coarse-grained model of the dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, European Research Council.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Microparticulate Drug Delivery Systems Composed of Macromolecular Prodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Machida

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecular prodrugs are very useful systems for achieving controlled drug release and drug targeting. In particular, various macromolecule-antitumor drug conjugates enhance the effectiveness and improve the toxic side effects. Also, polymeric micro- and nanoparticles have been actively examined and their in vivo behaviors elucidated, and it has been realized that their particle characteristics are very useful to control drug behavior. Recently, researches based on the combination of the concepts of macromolecular prodrugs and micro- or nanoparticles have been reported, although they are limited. Macromolecular prodrugs enable drugs to be released at a certain controlled release rate based on the features of the macromolecule-drug linkage. Micro- and nanoparticles can control in vivo behavior based on their size, surface charge and surface structure. These merits are expected for systems produced by the combination of each concept. In this review, several micro- or nanoparticles composed of macromolecule-drug conjugates are described for their preparation, in vitro properties and/or in vivo behavior.

  5. ISPyB: an information management system for synchrotron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagenière, Solange; Brenchereau, Patrice; Launer, Ludovic; Ashton, Alun W; Leal, Ricardo; Veyrier, Stéphanie; Gabadinho, José; Gordon, Elspeth J; Jones, Samuel D; Levik, Karl Erik; McSweeney, Seán M; Monaco, Stéphanie; Nanao, Max; Spruce, Darren; Svensson, Olof; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A

    2011-11-15

    Individual research groups now analyze thousands of samples per year at synchrotron macromolecular crystallography (MX) resources. The efficient management of experimental data is thus essential if the best possible experiments are to be performed and the best possible data used in downstream processes in structure determination pipelines. Information System for Protein crystallography Beamlines (ISPyB), a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with an underlying data model allowing for the integration of analyses down-stream of the data collection experiment was developed to facilitate such data management. ISPyB is now a multisite, generic LIMS for synchrotron-based MX experiments. Its initial functionality has been enhanced to include improved sample tracking and reporting of experimental protocols, the direct ranking of the diffraction characteristics of individual samples and the archiving of raw data and results from ancillary experiments and post-experiment data processing protocols. This latter feature paves the way for ISPyB to play a central role in future macromolecular structure solution pipelines and validates the application of the approach used in ISPyB to other experimental techniques, such as biological solution Small Angle X-ray Scattering and spectroscopy, which have similar sample tracking and data handling requirements.

  6. Control and data acquisition system for the macromolecular crystallography beamline of SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qisheng; Huang Sheng; Sun Bo; Tang Lin; He Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline BL17U1 of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is an important platform for structure biological science. High performance of the beamline would benefit the users greatly in their experiment and data acquisition. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and physical design of the beamline, we have made a series of efforts to develop a robust control and data acquisition system, with user-friendly GUI. These were done by adopting EPICS and Blu-Ice systems on the BL17U1 beamline, with considerations on easy accommodation of new beeline components. In this paper, we report the integration of EPICS and Blu-Ice systems. By using the EPICS gateway interface and several new DHS, Blu-Ice was successfully established for the BL17U1 beamline. As a result, the experiment control and data acquisition system is reliable and functional for users. (authors)

  7. Macromolecular therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-09-28

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines - (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorpani, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed

  9. Bacteriophage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A. Aksyuk

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  10. Fuel assembly insertion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhurst, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor facility having fuel bundles: a system for the insertion of a fuel bundle into a position where vertically arranged fuel bundles surround and are adjacent the system comprising, in combination, separate and individual centering devices secured to and disposed on top of each fuel bundle adjacent the position. Each such centering device has a generally box-like cap configuration on the upper end of each fuel bundle and includes: a top wall; first and second side walls, each secured along and upper edge to the top wall; a rear plate attached along opposite vertical edges to the first and second side walls; a front inclined wall joined along an upper edge to the top to the wall and attached along opposite vertical edges first and second side walls; pad means secured to the lower edge of the first and second side walls, the front inclined wall and the rear plate for mounting each centering device on top of an associated fuel bundle; pin means carried by at least two of the pad means engageable with an associated aperature for locating and laterally fixing each centering device on top of its respective fuel bundle. Each front inclined wall of each of the centering devices is orientated on top of its respective fuel bundle to slope upwardly and away from the position where upon downward insertion of a fuel bundle any contact between the lower end of the fuel bundle inserted with a front inclined wall of a centering device will laterally deflect the fuel bundle. Each centering device further includes a central socket means secured to the top wall, and an elongated handling pole pivotally attached to the socket

  11. Pattern fuel assembly loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, H.J.; Gerkey, K.S.; Miller, T.W.; Wylie, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes an interactive system for facilitating preloading of fuel rods into magazines, which comprises: an operator work station adapted for positioning between a supply of fuel rods of predetermined types, and the magazine defining grid locations for a predetermined fuel assembly; display means associated with the work station; scanner means associated with the work station and adapted for reading predetermined information accompanying the fuel rods; a rectangular frame adapted for attachment to one end of the fuel assembly loading magazine; prompter/detector means associated with the frame for detecting insertion of a fuel rod into the magazine; and processing means responsive to the scanner means and the sensing means for prompting the operator via the display means to pre-load the fuel rods into desired grid locations in the magazine. An apparatus is described for facilitating pre-loading of fuel rods in predetermined grid locations of a fuel assembly loading magazine, comprising: a rectangular frame adapted for attachment to one end of the fuel assembly loading magazine; and means associated with the frame for detecting insertion of fuel rods into the magazine

  12. Macromolecular synthesis in algal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, M.R.; Kikuchi, Tadatoshi

    1980-01-01

    The present paper is a review of our experimental results obtained previously on the macromolecular biosyntheses in the cells of blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans as a representative species of prokaryote, and also in those of three species of eukaryotic algae, i.e. Euglena gracilis strain Z, Chlamydomonas reinhardi, and Cyanidium caldarium. In these algal cells, the combined methods consisting of pulse-labelling using 32 P, 3 H- and 14 C-labelled precursors for macromolecules, of their chasing and of the use of inhibitors which block specifically the syntheses of macromolecules such as proteins, RNA and DNA in living cells were very effectively applied for the analyses of the regulatory mechanism in biosyntheses of macromolecules and of the mode of their assembly into the cell structure, especially organelle constituents. Rased on the results obtained thus, the following conclusions are reached: (1) the metabolic pool for syntheses of macromolecules in the cells of prokaryotic blue-green alga is limited to the small extent and such activities couple largely with the photosynthetic mechanism; (2) 70 S ribosomes in the blue-green algal cells are assembled on the surface of thylakoid membranes widely distributed in their cytoplasm; and (3) the cells of eukaryotic unicellular algae used here have biochemical characters specific for already differentiated enzyme system involving in transcription and translation machineries as the same as in higher organisms, but the control mechanism concerning with such macromolecule syntheses are different among each species. (author)

  13. System for assembling nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An automatic system is described for assembling nuclear fuel elements, in particular those employing mixed oxide fuels. The system includes a sealing mechanism which allows movement during the assembling of the fuel element along the assembly stations without excessive release of contaminants. (U.K.)

  14. Assemble-to-order systems: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atan, Z.; Ahmadi, T.; Stegehuis, C.; de Kok, A.G.; Adan, I.J.B.F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the recent literature on assemble-to-order systems. Each assemble-to-order system consists of multiple components and end-products. The components are assembled into the end-products after information on customer demand is received but the decision on what components to

  15. Peripheral pin alignment system for fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    An alignment system is provided for nuclear fuel assemblies in a nuclear core. The core support structure of the nuclear reactor includes upwardly pointing alignment pins arranged in a square grid and engage peripheral depressions formed in the lateral periphery of the lower ends of each of the fuel assemblies of the core. In a preferred embodiment, the depressions are located at the corners of the fuel assemblies so that each depression includes one-quarter of a cylindrical void. Accordingly, each fuel assembly is positioned and aligned by one-quarter of four separate alignment pins which engage the fuel assemblies at their lower exterior corners. (author)

  16. Determination of macromolecular exchange and PO2 in the microcirculation: a simple system for in vivo fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a system with two epi-illumination sources, a DC-regulated lamp for transillumination and mechanical switches for rapid shift of illumination and detection of defined areas (250-750 µm² by fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy. The system permits investigation of standard microvascular parameters, vascular permeability as well as intra- and extravascular PO2 by phosphorescence quenching of Pd-meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl porphine (PORPH. A Pechan prism was used to position a defined region over the photomultiplier and TV camera. In order to validate the system for in vivo use, in vitro tests were performed with probes at concentrations that can be found in microvascular studies. Extensive in vitro evaluations were performed by filling glass capillaries with solutions of various concentrations of FITC-dextran (diluted in blood and in saline mixed with different amounts of PORPH. Fluorescence intensity and phosphorescence decay were determined for each mixture. FITC-dextran solutions without PORPH and PORPH solutions without FITC-dextran were used as references. Phosphorescence decay curves were relatively unaffected by the presence of FITC-dextran at all concentrations tested (0.1 µg/ml to 5 mg/ml. Likewise, fluorescence determinations were performed in the presence of PORPH (0.05 to 0.5 mg/ml. The system was successfully used to study macromolecular extravasation and PO2 in the rat mesentery circulation under controlled conditions and during ischemia-reperfusion.

  17. Precision lens assembly with alignment turning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Fang; Huang, Chien-Yao; Lin, Yi-Hao; Kuo, Hui-Jean; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Chen, Fong-Zhi

    2017-10-01

    The poker chip assembly with high precision lens barrels is widely applied to ultra-high performance optical system. ITRC applies the poker chip assembly technology to the high numerical aperture objective lenses and lithography projection lenses because of its high efficiency assembly process. In order to achieve high precision lens cell for poker chip assembly, an alignment turning system (ATS) is developed. The ATS includes measurement, alignment and turning modules. The measurement module is equipped with a non-contact displacement sensor (NCDS) and an autocollimator (ACM). The NCDS and ACM are used to measure centration errors of the top and the bottom surface of a lens respectively; then the amount of adjustment of displacement and tilt with respect to the rotational axis of the turning machine for the alignment module can be determined. After measurement, alignment and turning processes on the ATS, the centration error of a lens cell with 200 mm in diameter can be controlled within 10 arcsec. Furthermore, a poker chip assembly lens cell with three sub-cells is demonstrated, each sub-cells are measured and accomplished with alignment and turning processes. The lens assembly test for five times by each three technicians; the average transmission centration error of assembly lens is 12.45 arcsec. The results show that ATS can achieve high assembly efficiency for precision optical systems.

  18. Analysis of reconfigurable assembly system framing systems in automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zain Mohamad Zamri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current trend in automotive industry shows increasing demand for multiple models with lean production. Prior to that, automotive manufacturing systems evolved from mass production to flexible automation. Material handling systems and equipment in a single assembly line with multiple models require high investment but with low throughput thus making production cost relatively high. Current assembly process of side structure and undercarriage with downtime occurrence during assembly process affecting production performance (quality, cost and delivery. Manufacturing facilities should allow more flexibility and increase intelligence evolving toward novel reconfigurable assembly systems (RAS. RAS is envisaged capable of increasing factor flexibility and responsiveness by incorporating assembly jig, robot and framing, which could be next generation of world class automotive assembly systems. This project research proposes a new methodology of framework reconfigurable assembly systems principles in automotive framing systems i.e. enhance assembly process between side structure assembly and undercarriage assembly which a new RAS is capable to reconfigure the assembly processes of multiple model on a single assembly line. Simulation software (Witness will be used to simulate and validate current and proposed assembly process. RAS is expected to be a solution for rapid change in structure and for a responsively adjustable production capacity. Quality, cost and delivery are production key parameters that can be achieved by implementing RAS.

  19. Tritium systems test assembly stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, William G.; Michelotti, Roy A.; Anast, Kurt R.; Tesch, Charles

    2004-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium technology Research and Development (R and D) primarily for future fusion power reactors. The facility was conceived in mid 1970's, operations commenced in early 1980's, stabilization and deactivation began in 2000 and were completed in 2003. The facility will remain in a Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) mode until the Department of Energy (DOE) funds demolition of the facility, tentatively in 2009. A safe and stable end state was achieved by the TSTA Facility Stabilization Project (TFSP) in anticipation of long term S and M. At the start of the stabilization project, with an inventory of approximately 140 grams of tritium, the facility was designated a Hazard Category (HC) 2 Non-Reactor Nuclear facility as defined by US Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-1027-92 (1997). The TSTA facility comprises a laboratory area, supporting rooms, offices and associated laboratory space that included more than 20 major tritium handling systems. The project's focus was to reduce the tritium inventory by removing bulk tritium, tritiated water wastes, and tritium-contaminated high-inventory components. Any equipment that remained in the facility was stabilized in place. All of the gloveboxes and piping were rendered inoperative and vented to atmosphere. All equipment, and inventoried tritium contamination, remaining in the facility was left in a safe-and-stable state. The project used the End Points process as defined by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (web page http://www.em.doe.- gov/deact/epman.htmtlo) document and define the end state required for the stabilization of TSTA Facility. The End Points process added structure that was beneficial through virtually all phases of the project. At completion of the facility stabilization project the residual tritium inventory was approximately 3,000 curies, considerably less than the 1.6-gram threshold for a HC 3 facility. TSTA is now

  20. Molecular motor assembly of a biomimetic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Active biological molecules and functional structures can be fabricated into a bio-mimetic system by using molecular assembly method. Such materials can be used for the drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy, and new nanodevice construction.

  1. Polymorphism of lipid self-assembly systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    When lipid molecules are dispersed into an aqueous medium, various self-organized structures are formed, depending on conditions (temperature, concentration, etc), in consequence of the amphipathic nature of the molecules. In addition, lipid self-assembly systems exhibit polymorphic phase transition behavior. Since lipids are one of main components of biomembranes, studies on the structure and thermodynamic properties of lipid self-assembly systems are fundamentally important for the consideration of the stability of biomembranes. (author)

  2. System and method for conveying an assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Eitelhuber, Georg

    2015-01-15

    An apparatus, system, and method for conveying an assembly along a track. A rail can include a first planar side, a second planar side, and a third planar side. The first, second, and third planar sides can be arranged to form at least two acute angles. A carriage assembly can include a drive wheel and at least two roller sets. The drive wheel can be configured to contact the first planar side and is configured to translate the carriage assembly along the rail. The at least two roller sets can be configured to contact the two other sides to maintain the carriage in contact with the rail.

  3. A Microfluidics-HPLC/Differential Mobility Spectrometer Macromolecular Detection System for Human and Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, S. L.; Killeen, K.; Han, J.; Eiceman, G. A.; Kanik, I.; Kidd, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a unique, miniaturized, solute analyzer based on microfluidics technology. The analyzer consists of an integrated microfluidics High Performance Liquid Chromatographic chip / Differential Mobility Spectrometer (?HPLCchip/ DMS) detection system

  4. EAST machine assembly and its measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.T.

    2005-01-01

    The EAST (HT-7U) superconducting tokamak consists of a superconducting poloidal field magnet system, a toroidal field magnet system, a vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, thermal shields and a cryostat vessel. The main parts of the machine have been delivered to ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) successionally from 2003. For its complicated constitution and precise requirement, a reasonable assembly procedure and measurement technique should be defined carefully. Before the assembly procedure, a reference frame has been set up with reference fiducial targets on the wall of the test hall by an industrial measurement system. After the torus of TF coils is formed, a new reference frame will be set up from the position of the TF torus. The vacuum vessel with all inner parts will be installed with reference of the new reference frame. The big size and mass of components, special configuration of the superconducting machine with tight installation tolerances of the HT-7U (EAST) machine result in complicated assembly procedure. The procedure had begun with the installation of the support frame and the base of cryostat vessel last year. In this paper, the requirements of the assembly precise for some key components of the machine are described. The reference frame for the assembly and maintenance is explained. The assembly procedure is introduced

  5. FFTF reactor assembly system technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelsdorf, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the FFTF reactor and plant together with descriptions of core components, core internals, core system, primary and secondary control rod system, reactor instrumentation, reactor vessel and closure head, and supporting test programs

  6. Normal mode analysis of macromolecular systems with the mobile block Hessian method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghysels, An; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Neck, Dimitri; Waroquier, Michel; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, normal mode analysis (NMA) was limited to small proteins, not only because the required energy minimization is a computationally exhausting task, but also because NMA requires the expensive diagonalization of a 3N a ×3N a matrix with N a the number of atoms. A series of simplified models has been proposed, in particular the Rotation-Translation Blocks (RTB) method by Tama et al. for the simulation of proteins. It makes use of the concept that a peptide chain or protein can be seen as a subsequent set of rigid components, i.e. the peptide units. A peptide chain is thus divided into rigid blocks with six degrees of freedom each. Recently we developed the Mobile Block Hessian (MBH) method, which in a sense has similar features as the RTB method. The main difference is that MBH was developed to deal with partially optimized systems. The position/orientation of each block is optimized while the internal geometry is kept fixed at a plausible - but not necessarily optimized - geometry. This reduces the computational cost of the energy minimization. Applying the standard NMA on a partially optimized structure however results in spurious imaginary frequencies and unwanted coordinate dependence. The MBH avoids these unphysical effects by taking into account energy gradient corrections. Moreover the number of variables is reduced, which facilitates the diagonalization of the Hessian. In the original implementation of MBH, atoms could only be part of one rigid block. The MBH is now extended to the case where atoms can be part of two or more blocks. Two basic linkages can be realized: (1) blocks connected by one link atom, or (2) by two link atoms, where the latter is referred to as the hinge type connection. In this work we present the MBH concept and illustrate its performance with the crambin protein as an example

  7. Sub-assembly accident protection instrumentation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, G.J.; Lunt, A.R.W.; Evans, N.J.; Lawrence, L.A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of an incident in a sub-assembly progressing to the stage at which the whole core may be at hazard has to be guarded against. It is proposed that for CDFR specific instrumentation will be provided to protect against this incident. Three such systems are described, these are: Acoustic Boiling Noise Detection, Burst Pin Detection and Individual Sub-Assembly Thermocouple (ISAT) monitoring. In the ISAT case, multiplexers and microprocessors are employed, using novel techniques to ensure failure-to-safety. The role of these systems and the implementation of them in the reactor design are also considered. It is concluded that sufficient protection can be provided for both core and breeder sub-assemblies

  8. A drying system for spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suikki, M.; Warinowski, M.; Nieminen, J.

    2007-06-01

    The report presents a proposed drying apparatus for spent fuel assemblies. The apparatus is used for removing the moisture left in fuel assemblies during intermediate storage and transport. The apparatus shall be installed in connection with the fuel handling cell of an encapsulation plant. The report presents basic requirements for and implementation of the drying system, calculation of the drying process, operation, service and maintenance of the equipment, as well as a cost estimate. Some aspects of the apparatus design are quite specified, but the actual detailed planning and final selection of components have not been included. The report also describes actions for possible malfunction and fault conditions. An objective of the drying system for fuel assemblies is to remove moisture from the assemblies prior to placing the same in a disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel. Drying is performed as a vacuum drying process for vaporizing and draining the moisture present on the surface of the assemblies. The apparatus comprises two pieces of drying equipment. One of the chambers is equipped to take up Lo1-2 fuel assemblies and the other OL1-2 fuel assemblies. The chambers have an internal space sufficient to accommodate also OL3 fuel assemblies, but this requires replacing the internal chamber structure for laying down the assemblies to be dried. The drying chambers can be closed with hatches facing the fuel handling cell. Water vapour pumped out of the chamber is collected in a controlled manner, first by condensing with a heat exchanger and further by freezing in a cold trap. For reasons of safety, the exhaust air of vacuum pumps is further delivered into the ventilation outlet duct of a controlled area. The adequate drying result is ascertained by a low final pressure of about 100 Pa, as well as by a sufficient holding time. The chamber is built for making its cleaning as easy as possible in the event of a fuel rod breaking during a drying, loading or unloading

  9. An approximation for kanban controlled assembly systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topan, E.; Avsar, Z.M.

    2011-01-01

    An approximation is proposed to evaluate the steady-state performance of kanban controlled two-stage assembly systems. The development of the approximation is as follows. The considered continuous-time Markov chain is aggregated keeping the model exact, and this aggregate model is approximated

  10. Classification of the MGR Assembly Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) assembly transfer system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  11. Structure analysis of molecular systems in the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, 2a (2010), k32-k34 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura 2010. Soláň, 14.06.2010-17.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic * X-ray structure analysis * crystallography Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http:// xray .cz/ms/bul2010-2a/hasek.pdf

  12. Practical macromolecular cryocrystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflugrath, J. W., E-mail: jim.pflugrath@gmail.com [Rigaku Americas Corp., 9009 New Trails Drive, The Woodlands, TX 77381 (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Current methods, reagents and experimental hardware for successfully and reproducibly flash-cooling macromolecular crystals to cryogenic temperatures for X-ray diffraction data collection are reviewed. Cryocrystallography is an indispensable technique that is routinely used for single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collection at temperatures near 100 K, where radiation damage is mitigated. Modern procedures and tools to cryoprotect and rapidly cool macromolecular crystals with a significant solvent fraction to below the glass-transition phase of water are reviewed. Reagents and methods to help prevent the stresses that damage crystals when flash-cooling are described. A method of using isopentane to assess whether cryogenic temperatures have been preserved when dismounting screened crystals is also presented.

  13. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  14. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  15. System and method for controlling a combustor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2013-03-05

    A system and method for controlling a combustor assembly are disclosed. The system includes a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly includes a combustor and a fuel nozzle assembly. The combustor includes a casing. The fuel nozzle assembly is positioned at least partially within the casing and includes a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle assembly further defines a head end. The system further includes a viewing device configured for capturing an image of at least a portion of the head end, and a processor communicatively coupled to the viewing device, the processor configured to compare the image to a standard image for the head end.

  16. Tritium systems test assembly quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstiens, F.L.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    A quality assurance program should establish the planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that fusion facilities and their subsystems will perform satisfactorily in service. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) Quality Assurance Program has been designed to assure that the designs, tests, data, and interpretive reports developed at TSTA are valid, accurate, and consistent with formally specified procedures and reviews. The quality consideration in all TSTA activities is directed toward the early detection of quality problems, coupled with timely and positive disposition and corrective action

  17. Tritium Systems Test Assembly operator training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstiens, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Proper operator training is needed to help ensure the safe operation of fusion facilities by personnel who are qualified to carry out their assigned responsibilities. Operators control and monitor the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) during normal, emergency, and maintenance phases. Their performance is critical both to operational safety, assuring no release of tritium to the atmosphere, and to the successful simulation of the fusion reaction progress. Through proper training we are helping assure that TSTA facility operators perform their assignments in a safe and efficient manner and that the operators maintain high levels of operational proficiency through continuing training, retraining, requalification, and recertification

  18. Implementation of a robotic flexible assembly system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the Intelligent Task Automation program, a team developed enabling technologies for programmable, sensory controlled manipulation in unstructured environments. These technologies include 2-D/3-D vision sensing and understanding, force sensing and high speed force control, 2.5-D vision alignment and control, and multiple processor architectures. The subsequent design of a flexible, programmable, sensor controlled robotic assembly system for small electromechanical devices is described using these technologies and ongoing implementation and integration efforts. Using vision, the system picks parts dumped randomly in a tray. Using vision and force control, it performs high speed part mating, in-process monitoring/verification of expected results and autonomous recovery from some errors. It is programmed off line with semiautomatic action planning.

  19. Homogenization Theory for the Prediction of Obstructed Solute Diffusivity in Macromolecular Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Preston; Chehreghanianzabi, Yasaman; Rathinam, Muruhan; Zustiak, Silviya Petrova

    2016-01-01

    The study of diffusion in macromolecular solutions is important in many biomedical applications such as separations, drug delivery, and cell encapsulation, and key for many biological processes such as protein assembly and interstitial transport. Not surprisingly, multiple models for the a-priori prediction of diffusion in macromolecular environments have been proposed. However, most models include parameters that are not readily measurable, are specific to the polymer-solute-solvent system, or are fitted and do not have a physical meaning. Here, for the first time, we develop a homogenization theory framework for the prediction of effective solute diffusivity in macromolecular environments based on physical parameters that are easily measurable and not specific to the macromolecule-solute-solvent system. Homogenization theory is useful for situations where knowledge of fine-scale parameters is used to predict bulk system behavior. As a first approximation, we focus on a model where the solute is subjected to obstructed diffusion via stationary spherical obstacles. We find that the homogenization theory results agree well with computationally more expensive Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, the homogenization theory agrees with effective diffusivities of a solute in dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Lastly, we provide a mathematical formula for the effective diffusivity in terms of a non-dimensional and easily measurable geometric system parameter.

  20. Homogenization Theory for the Prediction of Obstructed Solute Diffusivity in Macromolecular Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Donovan

    Full Text Available The study of diffusion in macromolecular solutions is important in many biomedical applications such as separations, drug delivery, and cell encapsulation, and key for many biological processes such as protein assembly and interstitial transport. Not surprisingly, multiple models for the a-priori prediction of diffusion in macromolecular environments have been proposed. However, most models include parameters that are not readily measurable, are specific to the polymer-solute-solvent system, or are fitted and do not have a physical meaning. Here, for the first time, we develop a homogenization theory framework for the prediction of effective solute diffusivity in macromolecular environments based on physical parameters that are easily measurable and not specific to the macromolecule-solute-solvent system. Homogenization theory is useful for situations where knowledge of fine-scale parameters is used to predict bulk system behavior. As a first approximation, we focus on a model where the solute is subjected to obstructed diffusion via stationary spherical obstacles. We find that the homogenization theory results agree well with computationally more expensive Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, the homogenization theory agrees with effective diffusivities of a solute in dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Lastly, we provide a mathematical formula for the effective diffusivity in terms of a non-dimensional and easily measurable geometric system parameter.

  1. Modular Product Families and Assembly Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    This research centres on assembly systems designed for utilizing product modularization. Altogether, the task for companies has become an issue of managing the overall trade-off between the external market’s desire for variety and the internal efficiency and effectiveness. Product modularization...... a number of theoretical and managerial implications are identified. From a management point of view, the most im-portant finding is that modularization needs to be configured for the two competitive situations, i.e. 1) the volume flexible configuration focusing on generational product variety and 2......) the mix flexible con-figuration focusing on the simultaneous product variety. These two views are in particular different in respect to the understanding of product modularization. All in all, modularization needs to be, and can be, configured in regard to the specific task, which is believed constituting...

  2. Systemic analysis of the caulking assembly process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodean Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights the importance of a caulking process which is nowadays less studied in comparison with the growing of its usage in the automotive industry. Due to the fact that the caulking operation is used in domains with high importance such as shock absorbers and brake systems there comes the demand of this paper to detail the parameters which characterize the process, viewed as input data and output data, and the requirements asked for the final product. The paper presents the actual measurement methods used for analysis the performance of the caulking assembly. All this parameters leads to an analysis algorithm of performance established for the caulking process which it is used later in the paper for an experimental research. The study is a basis from which it will be able to go to further researches in order to optimize the following processing.

  3. SP-100 nuclear assembly test: Test assembly functional requirements and system arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallas, T.T.; Gluck, R.; Motwani, K.; Clay, H.; O'Neill, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the functional requirements and the system that will be tested to validate the reactor, flight shield, and flight controller of the SP-100 Generic Flight System (GFS). The Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) consists of the test article (SP-100 reactor with control devices and the flight shield) and its supporting systems. The NAT test assembly is being designed by GE. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is designing the test cell and vacuum vessel system that will contain the NAT test assembly (Renkey et al. 1989). Preliminary design reviews have been completed and the final design is under way

  4. Tritium system test assembly control system cost estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutz, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The principal objectives of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), which includes the development, demonstration and interfacing of technologies related to the deuterium--tritium fuel cycle for fusion reactor systems, are concisely stated. The various integrated subsystems comprising TSTA and their functions are discussed. Each of the four major subdivisions of TSTA, including the main process system, the environmental and safety systems, supporting systems and the physical plant are briefly discussed. An overview of the Master Data Acquisition and Control System, which will control all functional operation of TSTA, is provided

  5. System and method for conveying an assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Eitelhuber, Georg

    2015-01-01

    angles. A carriage assembly can include a drive wheel and at least two roller sets. The drive wheel can be configured to contact the first planar side and is configured to translate the carriage assembly along the rail. The at least two roller sets can

  6. Development of a virtual manufacturing assembly simulation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M Al-Ahmari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Assembly operations are a key component of modern manufacturing systems. Designing, planning, and conducting assembly operations represent an important part of the cost of a product. Virtual reality provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to manufacturing design, planning, and prototyping. Still there are certain issues (such as data translation, integration of various hardware and software systems, and real-time collision detection faced while applying this advanced technology to the assembly domain. For example, existing works focus on using virtual reality systems and environments mainly to design new products and to plan for assembly. Little focus has been given to develop virtual reality environments that contribute to train operators on assembly operations and to bridge the gap between design and implementation/execution of assembly. Therefore, the research work presented in this article focuses on developing a fully functional virtual manufacturing assembly simulation system that solves the issues related to virtual reality environments. The proposed system uses a virtual environment to create an interactive workbench that can be used for evaluating assembly decisions and training assembly operations. It is a comprehensive system that provides visual, auditory, tactile, as well as force feedback. The system works successfully even with large components.

  7. Macromolecular crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartunik, H.D.; Phillips, J.C.; Fourme, R.

    1982-01-01

    The use of synchrotron X-ray sources in macromolecular crystallography is described. The properties of synchrotron radiation relevant to macromolecular crystallography are examined. The applications discussed include anomalous dispersion techniques, the acquisition of normal and high resolution data, and kinetic studies of structural changes in macromolecules; protein data are presented illustrating these applications. The apparatus used is described including information on the electronic detectors, the monitoring of the incident beam and crystal cooling. (U.K.)

  8. Setting planned leadtimes in customer-order-driven assembly systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atan, Z.; Kok, de A.G.; Dellaert, N.P.; Janssen, F.B.S.L.P.; Boxel, van R.

    2016-01-01

    We study an assembly system with a number of parallel multistage processes feeding a multistage final assembly process. Each stage has a stochastic throughput time. We assume that the system is controlled by planned leadtimes at each stage. From these planned leadtimes the start and due times of all

  9. Apparatus for integrated fuel assembly inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, H.J.; Burchill, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    In a fuel assembly inspection apparatus, the combination is described comprising: (a) an elongated fixture mounted in a stationary upright position; (b) upper means mounted to an upper portion of the fixture and lower means mounted adjacent to a lower portion of the fixture, the upper and lower means being disposed outwardly from a side of the fixture for supporting a nuclear fuel assembly therebetween and extending along the side of the fixture; (c) a bottom carriage having a central opening adapted to receive the fuel assembly therethrough when supported between the upper and lower means such that the bottom carriage being connected only to, and extending in cantilever fashion outwardly from, the side of the fixture for generally vertical movement along the side of the fixture and along the fuel assembly extending along the side of the fixture; (d) drive means for selectively moving the bottom carriage; and (e) means disposed on the bottom carriage for measuring the envelop, of the fuel assembly when the bottom carriage is moved to and stationed at selected axial positions along the fuel assembly

  10. Debris removal system for a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Dailey, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for working on an elongated nuclear fuel assembly suspended vertically and submerged in a spent fuel pool having fuel assembly racks at the bottom. The system comprises a work platform disposable in the pool and adapted to be supported on the fuel assembly racks. The platform has an opening disposed in registry with a selected one of the underlying racks; guide means carried by the platform for guiding the suspended fuel assembly into the opening and the selected rack to accommodate vertical movement of the fuel assembly into and out of the rack to make different portions of the fuel assembly accessible from the platform; and tool manipulating apparatus disposable on the platform adjacent to the opening, the tool manipulating apparatus including a tool carriage. Tool holders for respectively holding associated tools. Each of the tool holders is mounted on the tool carriage for reciprocating movement with respect along a predetermined axis between extended and retracted conditions

  11. Macromolecular nanotheranostics for multimodal anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huis in't Veld, Ruben; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2011-10-01

    Macromolecular carrier materials based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) are prototypic and well-characterized drug delivery systems that have been extensively evaluated in the past two decades, both at the preclinical and at the clinical level. Using several different imaging agents and techniques, HPMA copolymers have been shown to circulate for prolonged periods of time, and to accumulate in tumors both effectively and selectively by means of the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Because of this, HPMA-based macromolecular nanotheranostics, i.e. formulations containing both drug and imaging agents within a single formulation, have been shown to be highly effective in inducing tumor growth inhibition in animal models. In patients, however, as essentially all other tumor-targeted nanomedicines, they are generally only able to improve the therapeutic index of the attached active agent by lowering its toxicity, and they fail to improve the efficacy of the intervention. Bearing this in mind, we have recently reasoned that because of their biocompatibility and their beneficial biodistribution, nanomedicine formulations might be highly suitable systems for combination therapies. In the present manuscript, we briefly summarize several exemplary efforts undertaken in this regard in our labs in the past couple of years, and we show that long-circulating and passively tumor-targeted macromolecular nanotheranostics can be used to improve the efficacy of radiochemotherapy and of chemotherapy combinations.

  12. MIDAS: A Modular DNA Assembly System for Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Kessans, Sarah A; Van de Bittner, Kyle C; Bustamante, Leyla Y; Bundela, Rudranuj; Scott, Barry; Nicholson, Matthew J; Parker, Emily J

    2018-04-20

    A modular and hierarchical DNA assembly platform for synthetic biology based on Golden Gate (Type IIS restriction enzyme) cloning is described. This enabling technology, termed MIDAS (for Modular Idempotent DNA Assembly System), can be used to precisely assemble multiple DNA fragments in a single reaction using a standardized assembly design. It can be used to build genes from libraries of sequence-verified, reusable parts and to assemble multiple genes in a single vector, with full user control over gene order and orientation, as well as control of the direction of growth (polarity) of the multigene assembly, a feature that allows genes to be nested between other genes or genetic elements. We describe the detailed design and use of MIDAS, exemplified by the reconstruction, in the filamentous fungus Penicillium paxilli, of the metabolic pathway for production of paspaline and paxilline, key intermediates in the biosynthesis of a range of indole diterpenes-a class of secondary metabolites produced by several species of filamentous fungi. MIDAS was used to efficiently assemble a 25.2 kb plasmid from 21 different modules (seven genes, each composed of three basic parts). By using a parts library-based system for construction of complex assemblies, and a unique set of vectors, MIDAS can provide a flexible route to assembling tailored combinations of genes and other genetic elements, thereby supporting synthetic biology applications in a wide range of expression hosts.

  13. Macromolecular crowding directs extracellular matrix organization and mesenchymal stem cell behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Zeiger

    Full Text Available Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Macromolecular crowding directs extracellular matrix organization and mesenchymal stem cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Adam S; Loe, Felicia C; Li, Ran; Raghunath, Michael; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2012-01-01

    Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro.

  15. Mechanical valve assembly for xenon 133 gas delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, W.H. (Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston (Australia))

    Some gas delivery systems used in pulmonary ventilation scanning are unable to satisfactorily supply /sup 133/Xe gas to bed-ridden patients. A mechanical gas valve assembly to control the flow of gas in such systems was constructed. A commercially produced /sup 133/Xe gas delivery system when fitted with the new assembly was able to ventilate almost all patients whereas previously this could be achieved with approximately only 50% of patients.

  16. Fuel assembly transfer and storage system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Albert; Thomas, Claude.

    1981-01-01

    Transfer and storage system on a site comprising several reactors and at least one building housing the installations common to all these reactors. The system includes: transfer and storage modules for the fuel assemblies comprising a containment capable of containing several assemblies carried on a transport vehicle, a set of tracks for the modules between the reactors and the common installations, handling facilities associated with each reactor for moving the irradiated assemblies from the reactor to a transfer module placed in loading position on a track serving the reactor and conversely to move the new assemblies from the transfer module to the reactor, and at least one handling facility located in the common installation building for loading the modules with new assemblies [fr

  17. Improvability of assembly systems I: Problem formulation and performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-Y. Chiang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This work develops improvability theory for assembly systems. It consists of two parts. Part I includes the problem formulation and the analysis technique. Part II presents the so-called improvability indicators and a case study.

  18. Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano-Photonics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    freedoms) 3 (3) Carried out initial research work related to semiconductor membrane transfer printing. Based on the customer designed PDMS stamp...for optical characterization and membrane printing/assembly. The system has the following features: Micro-precision alignment with integrated 50 nm...a FL300-12 Automated Alignment System was acquired from Ficontec (USA) Corporation for optical characterization and membrane printing/assembly. The

  19. Root-Contact/Pressure-Plate Assembly For Hydroponic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carlton E.; Loretan, Philip A.; Bonsi, Conrad K.; Hill, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    Hydroponic system includes growth channels equipped with rootcontact/pressure-plate assemblies. Pump and associated plumbing circulate nutrient liquid from reservoir, along bottom of growth channels, and back to reservoir. Root-contact/pressure-plate assembly in each growth channel stimulates growth of roots by applying mild contact pressure. Flat plate and plate connectors, together constitute pressure plate, free to move upward to accommodate growth of roots. System used for growing sweetpotatoes and possibly other tuber and root crops.

  20. Analytical model for macromolecular partitioning during yeast cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinkhabwala, Ali; Khmelinskii, Anton; Knop, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division, whereby a parent cell generates two sibling cells with unequal content and thereby distinct fates, is central to cell differentiation, organism development and ageing. Unequal partitioning of the macromolecular content of the parent cell — which includes proteins, DNA, RNA, large proteinaceous assemblies and organelles — can be achieved by both passive (e.g. diffusion, localized retention sites) and active (e.g. motor-driven transport) processes operating in the presence of external polarity cues, internal asymmetries, spontaneous symmetry breaking, or stochastic effects. However, the quantitative contribution of different processes to the partitioning of macromolecular content is difficult to evaluate. Here we developed an analytical model that allows rapid quantitative assessment of partitioning as a function of various parameters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model exposes quantitative degeneracies among the physical parameters that govern macromolecular partitioning, and reveals regions of the solution space where diffusion is sufficient to drive asymmetric partitioning and regions where asymmetric partitioning can only be achieved through additional processes such as motor-driven transport. Application of the model to different macromolecular assemblies suggests that partitioning of protein aggregates and episomes, but not prions, is diffusion-limited in yeast, consistent with previous reports. In contrast to computationally intensive stochastic simulations of particular scenarios, our analytical model provides an efficient and comprehensive overview of partitioning as a function of global and macromolecule-specific parameters. Identification of quantitative degeneracies among these parameters highlights the importance of their careful measurement for a given macromolecular species in order to understand the dominant processes responsible for its observed partitioning

  1. Recent advances in macromolecular prodrugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular prodrugs (MP) are high molar mass conjugates, typically carrying several copies of a drug or a drug combination, designed to optimize delivery of the drug, that is — its pharmacokinetics. From its advent several decades ago, design of MP has undergone significant development and es...

  2. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, O., E-mail: makarov@anl.gov [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hilgart, M.; Ogata, C.; Pothineni, S. [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cork, C. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  3. Functional self-assembled lipidic systems derived from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Julian R; Samateh, Malick; John, George

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled lipidic amphiphile systems can create a variety of multi-functional soft materials with value-added properties. When employing natural reagents and following biocatalytic syntheses, self-assembling monomers may be inherently designed for degradation, making them potential alternatives to conventional and persistent polymers. By using non-covalent forces, self-assembled amphiphiles can form nanotubes, fibers, and other stimuli responsive architectures prime for further applied research and incorporation into commercial products. By viewing these lipid derivatives under a lens of green principles, there is the hope that in developing a structure-function relationship and functional smart materials that research may remain safe, economic, and efficient.

  4. Coordination in the Decentralized Assembly System with Dual Supply Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a decentralized assembly system that consists of one assembler and two independent suppliers; wherein one supplier is perfectly reliable for the production, while the other generates yield uncertainty. Facing the random market demand, the assembler has to order the components from one supplier in advance and meanwhile requires the other supplier to deliver the components under VMI mode. We construct a Nash game between the supplier and the assembler so as to derive their equilibrium procurement/production strategies. The results show that the channel’s performance is highly undermined by the decentralization between players and also the combination of two supply modes. Compared to the centralized system, we propose an advance payment contract to perfectly coordinate the supply chain performance. The numerical examples indicate some management implications on the supply mode comparison and sensitivity analysis.

  5. Macromolecular HPMA-based nanoparticles with cholesterol for solid-tumor targeting: detailed study of the inner structure of a highly efficient drug delivery system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippov, Sergey K.; Chytil, Petr; Konarev, P. V.; Dyakonova, M.; Papadakis, C. M.; Zhigunov, Alexander; Pleštil, Josef; Štěpánek, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Svergun, D. I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 8 (2012), s. 2594-2604 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09059; GA AV ČR IAAX00500803; GA ČR GAP108/12/0640 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA * cholesterol * SAXS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.371, year: 2012

  6. Macromolecular systems for vaccine delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mužíková, Gabriela; Laga, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S203-S216 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : vaccine delivery * cellular and humoral immunity * polymer immunostimulants Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S203.pdf

  7. Capacity analysis of automatic transport systems in an assembly factory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijm, W.H.M.; Lenstra, J.K.; Tijms, H.C.; Volgenant, A.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a case study concerning the capacity analysis of a completely automated transport system in a flexible assembly environment. Basically, the system is modelled as a network of queues, however, due to its complex nature, product-form network theory is not applicable. Instead, we present an

  8. Subsystem cost data for the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.; Rexroth, V.G.

    1983-01-01

    Details of subsystem costs are among the questions most frequently asked about the $14.4 million Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper presents a breakdown of cost components for each of the 20 major subsystems of TSTA. Also included are details to aid in adjusting the costs to other years, contracting conditions, or system sizes

  9. Hyper bio assembler for 3D cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Fumihito; Yamato, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyper Bio Assembler for Cellular Systems is the first book to present a new methodology for measuring and separating target cells at high speed and constructing 3D cellular systems in vitro. This book represents a valuable resource for biologists, biophysicists and robotic engineers, as well as researchers interested in this new frontier area, offering a better understanding of the measurement, separation, assembly, analysis and synthesis of complex biological tissue, and of the medical applications of these technologies. This book is the outcome of the new academic fields of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology’s Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research in Japan.

  10. System support software for TSTA [Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claborn, G.W.; Mann, L.W.; Nielson, C.W.

    1987-10-01

    The fact that Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) is an experimental facility makes it impossible and undesirable to try to forecast the exact software requirements. Thus the software had to be written in a manner that would allow modifications without compromising the safety requirements imposed by the handling of tritium. This suggested a multi-level approach to the software. In this approach (much like the ISO network model) each level is isolated from the level below and above by cleanly defined interfaces. For example, the subsystem support level interfaces with the subsystem hardware through the software support level. Routines in the software support level provide operations like ''OPEN VALVE'' and CLOSE VALVE'' to the subsystem level. This isolates the subsystem level from the actual hardware. This is advantageous because changes can occur in any level without the need for propagating the change to any other level. The TSTA control system consists of the hardware level, the data conversion level, the operator interface level, and the subsystem process level. These levels are described

  11. Electrode assemblies, plasma apparatuses and systems including electrode assemblies, and methods for generating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C; Grandy, Jon D; Detering, Brent A; Zuck, Larry D

    2013-09-17

    Electrode assemblies for plasma reactors include a structure or device for constraining an arc endpoint to a selected area or region on an electrode. In some embodiments, the structure or device may comprise one or more insulating members covering a portion of an electrode. In additional embodiments, the structure or device may provide a magnetic field configured to control a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Plasma generating modules, apparatus, and systems include such electrode assemblies. Methods for generating a plasma include covering at least a portion of a surface of an electrode with an electrically insulating member to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Additional methods for generating a plasma include generating a magnetic field to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on an electrode.

  12. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Yoreo, J.J.; Bartelt, M.C.; Orme, C.A.; Villacampa, A.; Weeks, B.L.; Miller, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies

  13. Operating experience and procedures at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Cole, S.P.; Jenkins, E.M.; Wilhelm, R.C.; Cole, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Operating procedures are important for the safe and efficient operation of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). TSTA has been operating for four years with tritium in a safe and efficient manner. The inventory of tritium in the process loop is 100 grams and several milestone runs have been completed. This paper describes the methods used to operate TSTA. 3 refs., 1 fig

  14. Coiled coil peptides and polymer-peptide conjugates: synthesis, self-assembly, characterization and potential in drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert; Laga, Richard; Braunová, Alena; Filippov, Sergey K.; Bogomolova, Anna; Bednárová, Lucie; Vaněk, O.; Ulbrich, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2014), s. 2590-2599 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP207/12/J030 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0802 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : coiled coil * self-assembly * hydrophilic polymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 5.750, year: 2014

  15. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly applicability to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), is operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The objectives of the TSTA project are to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate the exhaust gas processing and tritium related safety systems for the magnetic fusion energy program. The applicability of these processes for the ITER Tokamak is discussed

  16. PLC based control system for RAM assembly test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.S.; Kumar, Vinaya; Chandra, Umesh

    1994-01-01

    The flexibility, expandability, ease of programming and diagnostic features makes the programmable logic controller (PLC) suitable for a variety of control applications in engineering system test facilities. A PLC based control system for RAM assembly test facility (RATF) and for testing the related hydraulic components is being developed and installed at BARC. This paper describes the approach taken for meeting the control requirements and illustrates the PLC software that has been developed. (author). 1 fig

  17. Development of tritium technology at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is dedicated to the development, demonstration, and interfacing of technologies related to the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle for large scale fusion reactor systems starting with the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) or the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). This paper briefly describes the fuel cycle and safety systems at TSTA including the Vacuum Facility, Fuel Cleanup, Isotope Separation, Transfer Pumping, Emergency Tritium Cleanup, Tritium Waste Treatment, Tritium Monitoring, Data Acquisition and Control, Emergency Power and Gas Analysis systems. Discussed in further detail is the experimental program proposed for the startup and testing of these systems

  18. Storage, transportation and disposal system for used nuclear fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, John M.; Wagner, John C.

    2017-01-10

    An integrated storage, transportation and disposal system for used fuel assemblies is provided. The system includes a plurality of sealed canisters and a cask sized to receive the sealed canisters in side by side relationship. The plurality of sealed canisters include an internal basket structure to receive a plurality of used fuel assemblies. The internal basket structure includes a plurality of radiation-absorbing panels and a plurality of hemispherical ribs generally perpendicular to the canister sidewall. The sealed canisters are received within the cask for storage and transportation and are removed from the cask for disposal at a designated repository. The system of the present invention allows the handling of sealed canisters separately or collectively, while allowing storage and transportation of high burnup fuel and damaged fuel to the designated repository.

  19. Simulations of curved assemblies in soft matter and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Cong

    regularly packed regions with local hexagonal order and vacancies. A similar lattice structure has been observed in experiments in which mutually attractive colloidal particles pack on the surface of a spherical droplet (G. Meng, J. Paulose, D. R. Nelson, and V. N. Manoharan, ''Elastic instability of a crystal growing on a curved surface'', Science 343, 634-637 (2014).), suggesting that the two systems experience a similar form of geometric frustration. We therefore study the adsorption and packing of spherical particles on a spherical template, as a function of the strength and range of interparticle attractions, as well as the radius of the spherical template. We observe that the adsorbed particles form two different classes of packing arrangements, one with icosahedrally ordered topological defects, and the other with highly disordered defects and vacancies. The latter regime is consistent with experiments on colloidal packing on spherical droplets and the immature HIV lattice. Our results suggest that the transition between these regimes is controlled by the range of the interparticle attractions. In the last chapter, we study a model for the assembly and budding of a capsid on a membrane, such as occurs during the exit of the immature HIV virus from a cell. We use a coarse-grained subunit model to represent the capsid proteins, and a fluid membrane model to represent the cell membrane. We find that the size and structure of the assembled capsid depends sensitively on the timescale of budding.

  20. Structural analysis of nanoparticulate carriers for encapsulation of macromolecular drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelov, Borislav; Garamus, V.M.; Drechsler, M.; Angelova, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 235, Jun (2017), s. 83-89 ISSN 0167-7322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000447; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:OP VVV - ELIBIO(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000447; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : self-assembled nanocarriers * liquid crystalline phase transitions * cationic lipids * macromolecular drugs Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 3.648, year: 2016

  1. AutoAssemblyD: a graphical user interface system for several genome assemblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Adonney Allan de Oliveira; de Sá, Pablo Henrique Caracciolo Gomes; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the amount of biological data generated. Thus, bioinformatics has become important because new methods and algorithms are necessary to manipulate and process such data. However, certain challenges have emerged, such as genome assembly using short reads and high-throughput platforms. In this context, several algorithms have been developed, such as Velvet, Abyss, Euler-SR, Mira, Edna, Maq, SHRiMP, Newbler, ALLPATHS, Bowtie and BWA. However, most such assemblers do not have a graphical interface, which makes their use difficult for users without computing experience given the complexity of the assembler syntax. Thus, to make the operation of such assemblers accessible to users without a computing background, we developed AutoAssemblyD, which is a graphical tool for genome assembly submission and remote management by multiple assemblers through XML templates. AssemblyD is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/autoassemblyd. It requires Sun jdk 6 or higher.

  2. Coding the Assembly of Polyoxotungstates with a Programmable Reaction System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de la Oliva, Andreu; Sans, Victor; Miras, Haralampos N; Long, De-Liang; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-05-01

    Chemical transformations are normally conducted in batch or flow mode, thereby allowing the chemistry to be temporally or spatially controlled, but these approaches are not normally combined dynamically. However, the investigation of the underlying chemistry masked by the self-assembly processes that often occur in one-pot reactions and exploitation of the potential of complex chemical systems requires control in both time and space. Additionally, maintaining the intermediate constituents of a self-assembled system "off equilibrium" and utilizing them dynamically at specific time intervals provide access to building blocks that cannot coexist under one-pot conditions and ultimately to the formation of new clusters. Herein, we implement the concept of a programmable networked reaction system, allowing us to connect discrete "one-pot" reactions that produce the building block{W 11 O 38 } ≡ {W 11 } under different conditions and control, in real time, the assembly of a series of polyoxometalate clusters {W 12 O 42 } ≡ {W 12 }, {W 22 O 74 } ≡ {W 22 } 1a, {W 34 O 116 } ≡ {W 34 } 2a, and {W 36 O 120 } ≡ {W 36 } 3a, using pH and ultraviolet-visible monitoring. The programmable networked reaction system reveals that is possible to assemble a range of different clusters using {W 11 }-based building blocks, demonstrating the relationship between the clusters within the family of iso-polyoxotungstates, with the final structural motif being entirely dependent on the building block libraries generated in each separate reaction space within the network. In total, this approach led to the isolation of five distinct inorganic clusters using a "fixed" set of reagents and using a fully automated sequence code, rather than five entirely different reaction protocols. As such, this approach allows us to discover, record, and implement complex one-pot reaction syntheses in a more general way, increasing the yield and reproducibility and potentially giving access to

  3. Current operations and experiments at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) has continued to move toward operation of a fully-integrated, full-sized, computer-controlled fusion fuel processing loop. Concurrent, nonloop experiments have answered important questions on new components and issues such as palladium diffusion membranes, ceramic electrolysis cells, regenerable tritium getters, laser Raman spectroscopy, unregenerable tritium inventory on molecular sieves, tritium contamination problems and decontamination methods, and operating data on reliability, emissions, doses, and wastes generated. 4 refs., 2 figs

  4. Macromolecular crystallography research at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, K.K.; Chidamrabam, R.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen positions in small molecules of biological interest at Trombay have provided valuable information that has been used in protein and enzyme structure model-building and in developing hydrogen bond potential functions. The new R-5 reactor is expected to provide higher neutron fluxes and also make possible small-angle neutron scattering studies of large biomolecules and bio-aggregates. In the last few years infrastructure facilities have also been established for macromolecular x-ray crystallography research. Meanwhile, the refinement of carbonic hydrases and lyysozyme structures have been carried out and interesting results obtained on protein dynamics and structure-function relationships. Some interesting presynaptic toxin phospholipases have also taken up for study. (author)

  5. Software design for the Tritium System Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claborn, G.W.; Heaphy, R.T.; Lewis, P.S.; Mann, L.W.; Nielson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The control system for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) must execute complicated algorithms for the control of several sophisticated subsystems. It must implement this control with requirements for easy modifiability, for high availability, and provide stringent protection for personnel and the environment. Software techniques used to deal with these requirements are described, including modularization based on the structure of the physical systems, a two-level hierarchy of concurrency, a dynamically modifiable man-machine interface, and a specification and documentation language based on a computerized form of structured flowcharts

  6. Software design for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claborn, G.W.; Keaphy, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    The control system for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) must execute complicated algorithms for the control of several sophisticated subsystems. It must implement this control with requirements for easy modifiability, for high availability, and provide stringent protection for personnel and the environment. Software techniques used to deal with these requirements are described, including modularization based on the structure of the physical systems, a two-level hierarchy of concurrency, a dynamically modifiable manmachine interface, and a specification and documentation language based on a computerized form of structured flowcharts

  7. Mounting Systems for Structural Members, Fastening Assemblies Thereof, and Vibration Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Mounting systems for structural members, fastening assemblies thereof, and vibration isolation systems including the same are provided. Mounting systems comprise a pair of mounting brackets, each clamped against a fastening assembly forming a mounting assembly. Fastening assemblies comprise a spherical rod end comprising a spherical member having a through opening and an integrally threaded shaft, first and second seating members on opposite sides of the spherical member and each having a through opening that is substantially coaxial with the spherical member through opening, and a partially threaded fastener that threadably engages each mounting bracket forming the mounting assembly. Structural members have axial end portions, each releasably coupled to a mounting bracket by the integrally threaded shaft. Axial end portions are threaded in opposite directions for permitting structural member rotation to adjust a length thereof to a substantially zero strain position. Structural members may be vibration isolator struts in vibration isolation systems.

  8. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, Kevin George [Pocatello, ID; Garcia, Humberto Enrique [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael George [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-04-17

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  9. Block copolymer systems: from single chain to self-assembled nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Cristiano; Schmidt, Vanessa; Aissou, Karim; Borsali, Redouane

    2010-10-19

    Recent advances in the field of macromolecular engineering applied to the fabrication of nanostructured materials using block copolymer chains as elementary building blocks are described in this feature article. By highlighting some of our work in the area and accounting for the contribution of other groups, we discuss the relationship between the physical-chemical properties of copolymer chains and the characteristics of nano-objects originating from their self-assembly in solution and in bulk, with emphasis on convenient strategies that allow for the control of composition, functionality, and topology at different levels of sophistication. In the case of micellar nanoparticles in solution, in particular, we present approaches leading to morphology selection via macromolecular architectural design, the functionalization of external solvent-philic shells with biomolecules (polysaccharides and proteins), and the maximization of micelle loading capacity by the suitable choice of solvent-phobic polymer segments. The fabrication of nanomaterials mediated by thin block copolymer films is also discussed. In this case, we emphasize the development of novel polymer chain manipulation strategies that ultimately allow for the preparation of precisely positioned nanodomains with a reduced number of defects via block-selective chemical reactivity. The challenges facing the soft matter community, the urgent demand to convert huge public and private investments into consumer products, and future possible directions in the field are also considered herein.

  10. Systems engineering studies of on-orbit assembly operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, George W.

    1991-01-01

    While the practice of construction has a long history, the underlying theory of construction is relatively young. Very little has been documented as to techniques of logistic support, construction planning, construction scheduling, construction testing, and inspection. The lack of 'systems approaches' to construction processes is certainly one of the most serious roadblocks to the construction of space structures. System engineering research efforts at CSC are aimed at developing concepts and tools which contribute to a systems theory of space construction. The research is also aimed at providing means for trade-offs of design parameters for other research areas in CSC. Systems engineering activity at CSC has divided space construction into the areas of orbital assembly, lunar base construction, interplanetary transport vehicle construction, and Mars base construction. A brief summary of recent results is given. Several models for 'launch-on-time' were developed. Launch-on-time is a critical concept to the assembly of such Earth-orbiting structures as the Space Station Freedom, and to planetary orbiters such as the Mars transfer vehicle. CSC has developed a launch vehicle selection model which uses linear programming to find optimal combinations of launch vehicles of various sizes (Atlas, Titan, Shuttles, HLLV's) to support SEI missions. Recently, the Center developed a cost trade-off model for studying on orbit assembly logistics. With this model it was determined that the most effective size of the HLLV would be in the range of 120 to 200 metric tons to LEO, which is consistent with the choices of General Stafford's Synthesis Group Report. A second-generation Dynamic Construction Activities Model ('DYCAM') process model has been under development, based on our past results in interruptability and our initial DYCAM model. This second-generation model is built on the paradigm of knowledge-based expert systems. It is aimed at providing answers to two questions: (1

  11. Managing lifelike behavior in a dynamic self-assembled system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropp, Chad; Bachelard, Nicolas; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    Self-organization can arise outside of thermodynamic equilibrium in a process of dynamic self-assembly. This is observed in nature, for example in flocking birds, but can also be created artificially with non-living entities. Such dynamic systems often display lifelike properties, including the ability to self-heal and adapt to environmental changes, which arise due to the collective and often complex interactions between the many individual elements. Such interactions are inherently difficult to predict and control, and limit the development of artificial systems. Here, we report a fundamentally new method to manage dynamic self-assembly through the direct external control of collective phenomena. Our system consists of a waveguide filled with mobile scattering particles. These particles spontaneously self-organize when driven by a coherent field, self-heal when mechanically perturbed, and adapt to changes in the drive wavelength. This behavior is governed by particle interactions that are completely mediated by coherent wave scattering. Compared to hydrodynamic interactions which lead to compact ordered structures, our system displays sinusoidal degeneracy and many different steady-state geometries that can be adjusted using the external field.

  12. Status and prospects of macromolecular crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    technique that could be completely automated in most cases. ... major challenge in macromolecular crystallography today is ... tial characterization of crystals in the home source and make a ... opportunities for a generation of structural biolo-.

  13. Tritium Systems Test Assembly: design for major device fabrication review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Sherman, R.H.

    1977-06-01

    This document has been prepared for the Major Device Fabrication Review for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). The TSTA is dedicated to the development, demonstration, and interfacing of technologies related to the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle for fusion reactor systems. The principal objectives for TSTA are: (a) demonstrate the fuel cycle for fusion reactor systems; (b) develop test and qualify equipment for tritium service in the fusion program; (c) develop and test environmental and personnel protective systems; (d) evaluate long-term reliability of components; (e) demonstrate long-term safe handling of tritium with no major releases or incidents; and (f) investigate and evaluate the response of the fuel cycle and environmental packages to normal, off-normal, and emergency situations. This document presents the current status of a conceptual design and cost estimate for TSTA. The total cost to design, construct, and operate TSTA through FY-1981 is estimated to be approximately $12.2 M

  14. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform 13 C, 15 N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific 13 C and 15 N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions

  15. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  16. Self-Assembling Multifunctional Peptide Dimers for Gene Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitae Ryu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembling multifunctional peptide was designed for gene delivery systems. The multifunctional peptide (MP consists of cellular penetrating peptide moiety (R8, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 specific sequence (GPLGV, pH-responsive moiety (H5, and hydrophobic moiety (palmitic acid (CR8GPLGVH5-Pal. MP was oxidized to form multifunctional peptide dimer (MPD by DMSO oxidation of thiols in terminal cysteine residues. MPD could condense pDNA successfully at a weight ratio of 5. MPD itself could self-assemble into submicron micelle particles via hydrophobic interaction, of which critical micelle concentration is about 0.01 mM. MPD showed concentration-dependent but low cytotoxicity in comparison with PEI25k. MPD polyplexes showed low transfection efficiency in HEK293 cells expressing low level of MMP-2 but high transfection efficiency in A549 and C2C12 cells expressing high level of MMP-2, meaning the enhanced transfection efficiency probably due to MMP-induced structural change of polyplexes. Bafilomycin A1-treated transfection results suggest that the transfection of MPD is mediated via endosomal escape by endosome buffering ability. These results show the potential of MPD for MMP-2 targeted gene delivery systems due to its multifunctionality.

  17. The tritium systems test assembly: Overview and recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The fusion technology development program for tritium in the US is centered around the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The TSTA is a full-scale system of reactor exhaust gas reprocessing for an ITER-sized machine. That is, TSTA has the capacity to process tritium in a closed loop mode at the rate of 1 kg per day, requiring a tritium inventory of about 100 g. The TSTA program also interacts with all other tritium-related fusion technology programs in the US and all major programs abroad. This report summarizes the current status, results and interactions of the TSTA. Special emphasis is given to operations in May/June using large compound cryopumps that completed the fuel loop integration of all TSTA subsystems for the first time. 6 refs., 2 figs

  18. Assembly, destruction and manipulation of atomic, molecular and complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Padellec, Arnaud Pierre Frederic

    2003-04-01

    In this report for Accreditation to Supervise Researches (HDR), the author first indicates his professional curriculum (diplomas, teaching activities, responsibilities in the field of education and research, publications), and then proposes a presentation of his scientific works and researches. He notably proposes an overview of the different experimental techniques he implemented: CRYRING storage ring, confluent beams, flow post-discharge with mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe, crossed beams, and so on. He reports works dealing with the manipulation and destruction of atomic, molecular and complex systems: detachment of atomic anions by electronic impact, detachment and dissociation of small carbon aggregates by electronic impact, dissociative recombination, dissociative ionisation and excitation, creation of pairs of ions, manipulation of sodium fluoride aggregates. He finally presents research projects regarding the assembly of molecular and complex systems

  19. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  20. Beyond assemblies: system convergence and multi-materiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, Tom

    2012-03-01

    The architectural construction industry has become increasingly more specialized over the past 50 years, creating a culture of layer thinking over part-to-whole thinking. Building systems and technologies are often cobbled together in conflicting and uncorrelated ways, even when referred to as 'integrated', such as by way of building information modeling. True integration of building systems requires rethinking how systems and architectural morphologies can push and pull on one another, creating not only innovation in technology but in aesthetics. The revolution in composite materials, with unprecedented plasticity and performance features, opens up a huge range of possibilities for achieving this kind of convergence. Composites by nature fuse envelope and structure, but through various types of inflections, they can also be made to conduct air and fluids through cavities and de-laminations, as well as integrate lighting and energy systems. Assembly as we know it moves away from mineral materials and hardware and toward polymers and 'healing'. Further, when projected into the near-future realm of multi-materiality and 3D manufacturing, possibilities for embedding systems and creating gradients of rigidity and opacity open up, pointing to an entirely new realm of architectural thinking.

  1. Beyond assemblies: system convergence and multi-materiality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiscombe, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The architectural construction industry has become increasingly more specialized over the past 50 years, creating a culture of layer thinking over part-to-whole thinking. Building systems and technologies are often cobbled together in conflicting and uncorrelated ways, even when referred to as 'integrated', such as by way of building information modeling. True integration of building systems requires rethinking how systems and architectural morphologies can push and pull on one another, creating not only innovation in technology but in aesthetics. The revolution in composite materials, with unprecedented plasticity and performance features, opens up a huge range of possibilities for achieving this kind of convergence. Composites by nature fuse envelope and structure, but through various types of inflections, they can also be made to conduct air and fluids through cavities and de-laminations, as well as integrate lighting and energy systems. Assembly as we know it moves away from mineral materials and hardware and toward polymers and 'healing'. Further, when projected into the near-future realm of multi-materiality and 3D manufacturing, possibilities for embedding systems and creating gradients of rigidity and opacity open up, pointing to an entirely new realm of architectural thinking.

  2. Thermosensitive Self-Assembling Block Copolymers as Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Filippo Palmieri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembling block copolymers (poloxamers, PEG/PLA and PEG/PLGA diblock and triblock copolymers, PEG/polycaprolactone, polyether modified poly(Acrylic Acid with large solubility difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties have the property of forming temperature dependent micellar aggregates and, after a further temperature increase, of gellifying due to micelle aggregation or packing. This property enables drugs to be mixed in the sol state at room temperature then the solution can be injected into a target tissue, forming a gel depot in-situ at body temperature with the goal of providing drug release control. The presence of micellar structures that give rise to thermoreversible gels, characterized by low toxicity and mucomimetic properties, makes this delivery system capable of solubilizing water-insoluble or poorly soluble drugs and of protecting labile molecules such as proteins and peptide drugs.

  3. Subsystem software for TSTA [Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.W.; Claborn, G.W.; Nielson, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Subsystem Control Software at the Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) must control sophisticated chemical processes through the physical operation of valves, motor controllers, gas sampling devices, thermocouples, pressure transducers, and similar devices. Such control software has to be capable of passing stringent quality assurance (QA) criteria to provide for the safe handling of significant amounts of tritium on a routine basis. Since many of the chemical processes and physical components are experimental, the control software has to be flexible enough to allow for trial/error learning curve, but still protect the environment and personnel from exposure to unsafe levels of radiation. The software at TSTA is implemented in several levels as described in a preceding paper in these proceedings. This paper depends on information given in the preceding paper for understanding. The top level is the Subsystem Control level

  4. Tritium contaminated waste management at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.; Carlson, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos continues to move toward full operation of an integrated, full-sized, computer-controlled fusion fuel processing loop. Concurrent nonloop experiments further the development of advanced tritium technologies and handling methods. Since tritium operations began in June 1984, tritium contaminated wastes have been produced at TSTA that are roughly typical in kind and amount of those to be produced by tritium fueling operations at fusion reactors. Methods of managing these wastes are described, including information on some methods of decontamination so that equipment can be reused. Data are given on the kinds and amounts of wastes and the general level of contamination. Also included are data on environmental emissions and doses to personnel that have resulted from TSTA operations. Particular problems in waste managements are discussed

  5. Nitrogen isotopic composition of macromolecular organic matter in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aléon, Jérôme; Robert, François; Chaussidon, Marc; Marty, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    Nitrogen concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured by ion microprobe scanning imaging in two interplanetary dust particles L2021 K1 and L2036 E22, in which imaging of D/H and C/H ratios has previously evidenced the presence of D-rich macromolecular organic components. High nitrogen concentrations of 10-20 wt% and δ 15N values up to +400‰ are observed in these D-rich macromolecular components. The previous study of D/H and C/H ratios has revealed three different D-rich macromolecular phases. The one previously ascribed to macromolecular organic matter akin the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from carbonaceous chondrites is enriched in nitrogen by one order of magnitude compared to the carbonaceous chondrite IOM, although its isotopic composition is still similar to what is known from Renazzo (δ 15N = +208‰). The correlation observed in macromolecular organic material between the D- and 15N-excesses suggests that the latter originate probably from chemical reactions typical of the cold interstellar medium. These interstellar materials preserved to some extent in IDPs are therefore macromolecular organic components with various aliphaticity and aromaticity. They are heavily N-heterosubstituted as shown by their high nitrogen concentrations >10 wt%. They have high D/H ratios >10 -3 and δ 15N values ≥ +400‰. In L2021 K1 a mixture is observed at the micron scale between interstellar and chondritic-like organic phases. This indicates that some IDPs contain organic materials processed at various heliocentric distances in a turbulent nebula. Comparison with observation in comets suggests that these molecules may be cometary macromolecules. A correlation is observed between the D/H ratios and δ 15N values of macromolecular organic matter from IDPs, meteorites, the Earth and of major nebular reservoirs. This suggests that most macromolecular organic matter in the inner solar system was probably issued from interstellar precursors and further processed

  6. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

  7. The design of macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Gwyndaf; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    Thoughts about the decisions made in designing macromolecular X-ray crystallography experiments at synchrotron beamlines are presented. The measurement of X-ray diffraction data from macromolecular crystals for the purpose of structure determination is the convergence of two processes: the preparation of diffraction-quality crystal samples on the one hand and the construction and optimization of an X-ray beamline and end station on the other. Like sample preparation, a macromolecular crystallography beamline is geared to obtaining the best possible diffraction measurements from crystals provided by the synchrotron user. This paper describes the thoughts behind an experiment that fully exploits both the sample and the beamline and how these map into everyday decisions that users can and should make when visiting a beamline with their most precious crystals

  8. Development of an online UV–visible microspectrophotometer for a macromolecular crystallography beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Nobutaka, E-mail: nobutaka.shimizu@kek.jp [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimizu, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Baba, Seiki; Hasegawa, Kazuya [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kumasaka, Takashi [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    An online UV–visible microspectrophotometer has been developed for the macromolecular crystallography beamline at SPring-8. Details of this spectrophotometer are reported. Measurement of the UV–visible absorption spectrum is a convenient technique for detecting chemical changes of proteins, and it is therefore useful to combine spectroscopy and diffraction studies. An online microspectrophotometer for the UV–visible region was developed and installed on the macromolecular crystallography beamline, BL38B1, at SPring-8. This spectrophotometer is equipped with a difference dispersive double monochromator, a mercury–xenon lamp as the light source, and a photomultiplier as the detector. The optical path is mostly constructed using mirrors, in order to obtain high brightness in the UV region, and the confocal optics are assembled using a cross-slit diaphragm like an iris to eliminate stray light. This system can measure optical densities up to a maximum of 4.0. To study the effect of radiation damage, preliminary measurements of glucose isomerase and thaumatin crystals were conducted in the UV region. Spectral changes dependent on X-ray dose were observed at around 280 nm, suggesting that structural changes involving Trp or Tyr residues occurred in the protein crystal. In the case of the thaumatin crystal, a broad peak around 400 nm was also generated after X-ray irradiation, suggesting the cleavage of a disulfide bond. Dose-dependent spectral changes were also observed in cryo-solutions alone, and these changes differed with the composition of the cryo-solution. These responses in the UV region are informative regarding the state of the sample; consequently, this device might be useful for X-ray crystallography.

  9. Complex macromolecular architectures: synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    ...)s and gluco-polymers, star-branched and dendrimer-like hyperbranched polymers, cyclic polymers, dendrigraft polymers, rod-coil and helix-coil block copolymers are introduced chapter by chapter in the book...

  10. Mass distributions of a macromolecular assembly based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Because of variation in the number and masses of subunits, ... and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) appearances ... 36 linker chains, in agreement with the model proposed ... Each of them is determined by the two integer.

  11. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We

  12. Programming biological operating systems: genome design, assembly and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    The DNA technologies developed over the past 20 years for reading and writing the genetic code converged when the first synthetic cell was created 4 years ago. An outcome of this work has been an extraordinary set of tools for synthesizing, assembling, engineering and transplanting whole bacterial genomes. Technical progress, options and applications for bacterial genome design, assembly and activation are discussed.

  13. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortony, Julia H; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi; Kausik, Ravinath

    2011-01-01

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1 H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1 H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (∼r -3 ) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1 H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 μl) and dilute (≥100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ∼10 A distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  14. New Paradigm for Macromolecular Crystallography Experiments at SSRL: Automated Crystal Screening And Remote Data Collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltis, S.M.; Cohen, A.E.; Deacon, A.; Eriksson, T.; Gonzalez, A.; McPhillips, S.; Chui, H.; Dunten, P.; Hollenbeck, M.; Mathews, I.; Miller, M.; Moorhead, P.; Phizackerley, R.P.; Smith, C.; Song, J.; Bedem, H. van dem; Ellis, P.; Kuhn, P.; McPhillips, T.; Sauter, N.; Sharp, K.

    2009-01-01

    Complete automation of the macromolecular crystallography experiment has been achieved at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) through the combination of robust mechanized experimental hardware and a flexible control system with an intuitive user interface. These highly reliable systems have enabled crystallography experiments to be carried out from the researchers' home institutions and other remote locations while retaining complete control over even the most challenging systems. A breakthrough component of the system, the Stanford Auto-Mounter (SAM), has enabled the efficient mounting of cryocooled samples without human intervention. Taking advantage of this automation, researchers have successfully screened more than 200 000 samples to select the crystals with the best diffraction quality for data collection as well as to determine optimal crystallization and cryocooling conditions. These systems, which have been deployed on all SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines and several beamlines worldwide, are used by more than 80 research groups in remote locations, establishing a new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography experimentation.

  15. Automated data collection for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Graeme; McAuley, Katherine E

    2011-09-01

    An overview, together with some practical advice, is presented of the current status of the automation of macromolecular crystallography (MX) data collection, with a focus on MX beamlines at Diamond Light Source, UK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rail-Guided Multi-Robot System for 3D Cellular Hydrogel Assembly with Coordinated Nanomanipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 3D assembly of micro-/nano-building blocks with multi-nanomanipulator coordinated manipulation is one of the central elements of nanomanipulation. A novel rail-guided nanomanipulation system was proposed for the assembly of a cellular vascular-like hydrogel microchannel. The system was equipped with three nanomanipulators and was restricted on the rail in order to realize the arbitrary change of the end-effectors during the assembly. It was set up with hybrid motors to achieve both a large operating space and a 30 nm positional resolution. The 2D components such as the assembly units were fabricated through the encapsulation of cells in the hydrogel. The coordinated manipulation strategies among the multi-nanomanipulators were designed with vision feedback and were demonstrated through the bottom-up assembly of the vascular-like microtube. As a result, the multi-layered microchannel was assembled through the cooperation of the nanomanipulation system.

  17. Conceptual design of novel IP-conveyor-belt Weissenberg-mode data-collection system with multi-readers for macromolecular crystallography. A comparison between Galaxy and Super Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, N; Sakabe, K; Sasaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Galaxy is a Weissenberg-type high-speed high-resolution and highly accurate fully automatic data-collection system using two cylindrical IP-cassettes each with a radius of 400 mm and a width of 450 mm. It was originally developed for static three-dimensional analysis using X-ray diffraction and was installed on bending-magnet beamline BL6C at the Photon Factory. It was found, however, that Galaxy was also very useful for time-resolved protein crystallography on a time scale of minutes. This has prompted us to design a new IP-conveyor-belt Weissenberg-mode data-collection system called Super Galaxy for time-resolved crystallography with improved time and crystallographic resolution over that achievable with Galaxy. Super Galaxy was designed with a half-cylinder-shaped cassette with a radius of 420 mm and a width of 690 mm. Using 1.0 A incident X-rays, these dimensions correspond to a maximum resolutions of 0.71 A in the vertical direction and 1.58 A in the horizontal. Upper and lower screens can be used to set the frame size of the recorded image. This function is useful not only to reduce the frame exchange time but also to save disk space on the data server. The use of an IP-conveyor-belt and many IP-readers make Super Galaxy well suited for time-resolved, monochromatic X-ray crystallography at a very intense third-generation SR beamline. Here, Galaxy and a conceptual design for Super Galaxy are described, and their suitability for use as data-collection systems for macromolecular time-resolved monochromatic X-ray crystallography are compared.

  18. XML-based assembly visualization for a multi-CAD digital mock-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Ho; Chung, Sung Chong

    2007-01-01

    Using a virtual assembly tool, engineers are able to design accurate and interference free parts without making physical mock-ups. Instead of a single CAD source, several CAD systems are used to design a complex product in a distributed design environment. In this paper, a multi-CAD assembly method is proposed through an XML and the lightweight CAD file. XML data contains a hierarchy of the multi-CAD assembly. The lightweight CAD file produced from various CAD files through the ACIS kemel and InterOp includes not only mesh and B-Rep data, but also topological data. It is used to visualize CAD data and to verify dimensions of the parts. The developed system is executed on desktop computers. It does not require commercial CAD systems to visualize 3D assembly data. Multi-CAD models have been assembled to verify the effectiveness of the developed DMU system on the Internet

  19. The data collection system for failure/maintenance at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M.A.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Bartlit, J.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    A data collection system for obtaining information which can be used to help determine the reliability and vailability of future fusion power plants has been installed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). Failure and maintenance data on components of TSTA's tritium systems have been collected since 1984. The focus of the data collection has been TSTA's Tritium Waste Tratment System (TWT), which has maintained high availability since it became operation in 1982. Data collection is still in progress and a total of 291 failure reports are in the data collection system at this time, 47 of which are from the TWT. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Improvability of assembly systems II: Improvability indicators and case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-Y. Chiang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the performance analysis technique developed in Part I, this paper presents improvability indicators for assembly lines with unreliable machines. In particular, it shows that assembly lines are unimprovable with respect to workforce re-distribution if each buffer is, on the average, close to being half full. These lines are unimprovable with respect to buffer capacity re-distribution if each machine is starved and blocked with almost equal frequency. In addition, the paper provides indicators for identification of bottleneck machines and bottleneck buffers. Finally, the paper reports on an application of these improvability indicators in a case study at an automotive components plant.

  1. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  2. Macromolecular Networks Containing Fluorinated Cyclic Moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-12

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 Nov 2015 – 12 Dec 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Macromolecular Networks Containing Fluorinated Cyclic... FLUORINATED CYCLIC MOIETIES 12 December 2015 Andrew J. Guenthner,1 Scott T. Iacono,2 Cynthia A. Corley,2 Christopher M. Sahagun,3 Kevin R. Lamison,4...Reinforcements Good Flame, Smoke, & Toxicity Characteristics Low Water Uptake with Near Zero Coefficient of Hygroscopic Expansion ∆ DISTRIBUTION A

  3. High Energy X-Ray System Specification for the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the NNSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This specification establishes requirements for an X-Ray System to be used at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to support radiography of experimental assemblies for Laboratory (LANL, LLNL, SNL) programs conducting work at the NNSS.

  4. Quantitative computational models of molecular self-assembly in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marcus; Schwartz, Russell

    2017-05-23

    Molecular self-assembly is the dominant form of chemical reaction in living systems, yet efforts at systems biology modeling are only beginning to appreciate the need for and challenges to accurate quantitative modeling of self-assembly. Self-assembly reactions are essential to nearly every important process in cell and molecular biology and handling them is thus a necessary step in building comprehensive models of complex cellular systems. They present exceptional challenges, however, to standard methods for simulating complex systems. While the general systems biology world is just beginning to deal with these challenges, there is an extensive literature dealing with them for more specialized self-assembly modeling. This review will examine the challenges of self-assembly modeling, nascent efforts to deal with these challenges in the systems modeling community, and some of the solutions offered in prior work on self-assembly specifically. The review concludes with some consideration of the likely role of self-assembly in the future of complex biological system models more generally.

  5. DNA fragments assembly based on nicking enzyme system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3'-end or 5'-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB.

  6. Topology evolution in macromolecular networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kryven, I.

    2014-01-01

    Governed by various intermolecular forces, molecular networks tend to evolve from simple to very complex formations that have random structure. This randomness in the connectivity of the basic units can still be captured employing distributional description of the state of the system; the evolution

  7. Improvements in or relating to cooling systems for nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubivy, A.G.; Batjukov, V.I.; Shkhian, T.G.; Fadeev, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system is proposed which can be used to cool a set of nuclear fuel assemblies arranged in a reactor core or placed in a container for spent fuel assemblies. The object of the invention is to provide a system which would prevent leakage of coolant from the vessel in the event of a rupture of the coolant supply pipeline externally of the vessel. In the case of the reactor cooling system the level of the coolant is stopped from dropping below the level of the active portion of the fuel assemblies and thus prevents a breakdown of the reactor. (UK)

  8. Industrial-scale spray layer-by-layer assembly for production of biomimetic photonic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogman, K C; Cohen, R E; Hammond, P T; Rubner, M F; Wang, B N

    2013-12-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly is a powerful and flexible thin film process that has successfully reproduced biomimetic photonic systems such as structural colour. While most of the seminal work has been carried out using slow and ultimately unscalable immersion assembly, recent developments using spray layer-by-layer assembly provide a platform for addressing challenges to scale-up and manufacturability. A series of manufacturing systems has been developed to increase production throughput by orders of magnitude, making commercialized structural colour possible. Inspired by biomimetic photonic structures we developed and demonstrated a heat management system that relies on constructive reflection of near infrared radiation to bring about dramatic reductions in heat content.

  9. Thiomers for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Hoffer, Martin H; Kafedjiiski, Krum

    2004-11-01

    In recent years thiolated polymers (thiomers) have appeared as a promising new tool in oral drug delivery. Thiomers are obtained by the immobilisation of thio-bearing ligands to mucoadhesive polymeric excipients. By the formation of disulfide bonds with mucus glycoproteins, the mucoadhesive properties of thiomers are up to 130-fold improved compared with the corresponding unmodified polymers. Owing to the formation of inter- and intramolecular disulfide bonds within the thiomer itself, matrix tablets and particulate delivery systems show strong cohesive properties, resulting in comparatively higher stability, prolonged disintegration times and a more controlled drug release. The permeation of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs through the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa can be improved by the use of thiomers. Furthermore, some thiomers exhibit improved inhibitory properties towards GI peptidases. The efficacy of thiomers in oral drug delivery has been demonstrated by various in vivo studies. A pharmacological efficacy of 1%, for example, was achieved in rats by oral administration of calcitonin tablets comprising a thiomer. Furthermore, tablets comprising a thiomer and pegylated insulin resulted in a pharmacological efficacy of 7% after oral application to diabetic mice. Low-molecular-weight heparin embedded in thiolated polycarbophil led to an absolute bioavailability of > or = 20% after oral administration to rats. In these studies, formulations comprising the corresponding unmodified polymer had only a marginal or no effect. These results indicate drug carrier systems based on thiomers appear to be a promising tool for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

  10. Optimum Assembly Sequence Planning System Using Discrete Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Özmen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Assembly refers both to the process of combining parts to create a structure and to the product resulting therefrom. The complexity of this process increases with the number of pieces in the assembly. This paper presents the assembly planning system design (APSD program, a computer program developed based on a matrix-based approach and the discrete artificial bee colony (DABC algorithm, which determines the optimum assembly sequence among numerous feasible assembly sequences (FAS. Specifically, the assembly sequences of three-dimensional (3D parts prepared in the computer-aided design (CAD software AutoCAD are first coded using the matrix-based methodology and the resulting FAS are assessed and the optimum assembly sequence is selected according to the assembly time optimisation criterion using DABC. The results of comparison of the performance of the proposed method with other methods proposed in the literature verify its superiority in finding the sequence with the lowest overall time. Further, examination of the results of application of APSD to assemblies consisting of parts in different numbers and shapes shows that it can select the optimum sequence from among hundreds of FAS.

  11. Macromolecular scaffolding: the relationship between nanoscale architecture and function in multichromophoric arrays for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Schwartz, Erik; Finlayson, Chris E; Liscio, Andrea; Otten, Matthijs B J; Trapani, Sara; Müllen, Klaus; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H; Nolte, Roeland J M; Rowan, Alan E; Samorì, Paolo

    2010-02-23

    The optimization of the electronic properties of molecular materials based on optically or electrically active organic building blocks requires a fine-tuning of their self-assembly properties at surfaces. Such a fine-tuning can be obtained on a scale up to 10 nm by mastering principles of supramolecular chemistry, i.e., by using suitably designed molecules interacting via pre-programmed noncovalent forces. The control and fine-tuning on a greater length scale is more difficult and challenging. This Research News highlights recent results we obtained on a new class of macromolecules that possess a very rigid backbone and side chains that point away from this backbone. Each side chain contains an organic semiconducting moiety, whose position and electronic interaction with neighboring moieties are dictated by the central macromolecular scaffold. A combined experimental and theoretical approach has made it possible to unravel the physical and chemical properties of this system across multiple length scales. The (opto)electronic properties of the new functional architectures have been explored by constructing prototypes of field-effect transistors and solar cells, thereby providing direct insight into the relationship between architecture and function.

  12. Fuel cleanup system for the tritium systems test assembly: design and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, E.C.; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A major subsystem of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly is the Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) whose functons are to: (1) remove impurities in the form of argon and tritiated methane, water, and ammonia from the reactor exhaust stream and (2) recover tritium for reuse from the tritiated impurities. To do this, a hybrid cleanup system has been designed which utilizes and will test concurrently two differing technologies - one based on disposable, hot metal (U and Ti) getter beds and a second based on regenerable cryogenic asdorption beds followed by catalytic oxidation of impurities to DTO and stackable gases and freezout of the resultant DTO to recover essentially all tritium for reuse

  13. Systems and methods for preventing flashback in a combustor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present application include a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly may include a combustion chamber, a first plenum, a second plenum, and one or more elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes. Each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a first length at least partially disposed within the first plenum and configured to receive a first fluid from the first plenum. Moreover, each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a second length disposed downstream of the first length and at least partially disposed within the second plenum. The second length may be formed of a porous wall configured to allow a second fluid from the second plenum to enter the second length and create a boundary layer about the porous wall.

  14. Nuclear reactor, fuel assembly and neutron measuring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Murase, Michio; Zukeran, Atsushi; Moriya, Kimiaki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor improved with the efficiency of used fuels and fuel economy by increasing a rated power and reducing exchange fuels. Namely, in a BWR type reactor at present, a thermal limit value is determined by conducting nuclear calculation of the reactor core based on data of reactor flow rate measurement and data of neutron flux measurement. However, since the neutron calculation of the reactor core is based on fuel assemblies while the points for the neutron measurement are present at the outside of the fuel assemblies, errors are caused. A margin including the errors has been used as a thermal limit value during operation. In the present invention, neutron fluxes in the fuel assembly as a base of the nuclear calculation can be measured by the same number of neutron detector tubes, but the number of the measuring points is increased to four times. With such procedures, errors caused by the difference of the neutron calculation and values at neutron measuring points can be reduced. As a result, a margin of the thermal limit value is reduced to increase the degree of freedom of reactor operation. Then, the economical property of the reactor operation can be improved. (N.H.)

  15. Fluid moderator control system fuel assembly seal connector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, L.; Tower, S.N.; Klassen, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fuel assemblies having one or more flow channels therethrough, a core support plate having one or more flow channels therethrough, and seal connectors for sealingly connecting the one or more flow channels in the core support plate with the one or more flow channels in the fuel assemblies. The seal connectors each comprises a first portion and second portion each comprising an elongated member having a flow channel therethrough and being in substantial axial alignment with each other and being separated by a space therebetween, means for sealingly connecting the first portion o one or the one or more flow channels in the fuel assemblies, means for sealingly connecting the second portion to the first portion and for allowing relative motion between the portions, means for limiting the relative motion of the first and second portion in directions toward and away from each other, means for reconnectingly connecting and resealingly sealing the second portion to one of the one or more flow channels in the core support plate. It comprises a slip fit connection whereby the remote end of the second portion fits within whereby the remote end of the second portion fits within an opening in the core support plate which is in flow communication with the one or more flow channels in the core support plate and further comprises a ball and cones seal in series with axially spaced ring seals

  16. Distributed computing for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krissinel, Evgeny; Uski, Ville; Lebedev, Andrey; Winn, Martyn; Ballard, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Modern crystallographic computing is characterized by the growing role of automated structure-solution pipelines, which represent complex expert systems utilizing a number of program components, decision makers and databases. They also require considerable computational resources and regular database maintenance, which is increasingly more difficult to provide at the level of individual desktop-based CCP4 setups. On the other hand, there is a significant growth in data processed in the field, which brings up the issue of centralized facilities for keeping both the data collected and structure-solution projects. The paradigm of distributed computing and data management offers a convenient approach to tackling these problems, which has become more attractive in recent years owing to the popularity of mobile devices such as tablets and ultra-portable laptops. In this article, an overview is given of developments by CCP4 aimed at bringing distributed crystallographic computations to a wide crystallographic community.

  17. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Robin L., E-mail: robin.owen@diamond.ac.uk; Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7FT (United Kingdom); Doré, Andrew S. [Heptares Therapeutics Ltd, BioPark, Welwyn Garden City AL7 3AX (United Kingdom); Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan [The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    A systematic increase in lifetime is observed in room-temperature protein and virus crystals through the use of reduced exposure times and a fast detector. A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A{sub 2A} adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macromolecular crystallography.

  18. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A systematic increase in lifetime is observed in room-temperature protein and virus crystals through the use of reduced exposure times and a fast detector. A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A 2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macromolecular crystallography

  19. Progress in rational methods of cryoprotection in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, Thomas; Juers, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the average thermal contractions (294→72 K) of 26 different cryosolutions are presented and discussed in conjunction with other recent advances in the rational design of protocols for cryogenic cooling in macromolecular crystallography. Cryogenic cooling of macromolecular crystals is commonly used for X-ray data collection both to reduce crystal damage from radiation and to gather functional information by cryogenically trapping intermediates. However, the cooling process can damage the crystals. Limiting cooling-induced crystal damage often requires cryoprotection strategies, which can involve substantial screening of solution conditions and cooling protocols. Here, recent developments directed towards rational methods for cryoprotection are described. Crystal damage is described in the context of the temperature response of the crystal as a thermodynamic system. As such, the internal and external parts of the crystal typically have different cryoprotection requirements. A key physical parameter, the thermal contraction, of 26 different cryoprotective solutions was measured between 294 and 72 K. The range of contractions was 2–13%, with the more polar cryosolutions contracting less. The potential uses of these results in the development of cryocooling conditions, as well as recent developments in determining minimum cryosolution soaking times, are discussed

  20. Structural Polymorphism in a Self-Assembled Tri-Aromatic Peptide System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Noam; Lei, Jiangtao; Zhan, Chendi; Shimon, Linda J W; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Wei, Guanghong; Gazit, Ehud

    2018-04-24

    Self-assembly is a process of key importance in natural systems and in nanotechnology. Peptides are attractive building blocks due to their relative facile synthesis, biocompatibility, and other unique properties. Diphenylalanine (FF) and its derivatives are known to form nanostructures of various architectures and interesting and varied characteristics. The larger triphenylalanine peptide (FFF) was found to self-assemble as efficiently as FF, forming related but distinct architectures of plate-like and spherical nanostructures. Here, to understand the effect of triaromatic systems on the self-assembly process, we examined carboxybenzyl-protected diphenylalanine (z-FF) as a minimal model for such an arrangement. We explored different self-assembly conditions by changing solvent compositions and peptide concentrations, generating a phase diagram for the assemblies. We discovered that z-FF can form a variety of structures, including nanowires, fibers, nanospheres, and nanotoroids, the latter were previously observed only in considerably larger or co-assembly systems. Secondary structure analysis revealed that all assemblies possessed a β-sheet conformation. Additionally, in solvent combinations with high water ratios, z-FF formed rigid and self-healing hydrogels. X-ray crystallography revealed a "wishbone" structure, in which z-FF dimers are linked by hydrogen bonds mediated by methanol molecules, with a 2-fold screw symmetry along the c-axis. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed conformations similar to the crystal structure. Coarse-grained MD simulated the assembly of the peptide into either fibers or spheres in different solvent systems, consistent with the experimental results. This work thus expands the building block library for the fabrication of nanostructures by peptide self-assembly.

  1. Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly; Wilson, Merrill Anderson; Ohm, Ted R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Peterson, David; Chen, Christopher M.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Dyer, deceased, Paul Nigel

    2007-10-09

    Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

  2. Computerized tomographic x-ray scanner system and gantry assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyd, D.P.; Lanzara, G.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a scanner assembly. It comprises: a support head, a C-shaped gantry, means for supporting the gantry in the support head for rotating movement, an x-ray source mounted on one side of the gantry for independent movement with respect to a detector array along the gantry, the x-ray source projecting x-rays across the gantry, and a detector array mounted on the other side of a gantry for independent movement with respect to the x-ray source along the gantry, the detector array serving to receive the projected x-rays

  3. A public database of macromolecular diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Marek; Langner, Karol M; Cymborowski, Marcin; Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Sroka, Piotr; Zheng, Heping; Cooper, David R; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Elsliger, Marc André; Burley, Stephen K; Minor, Wladek

    2016-11-01

    The low reproducibility of published experimental results in many scientific disciplines has recently garnered negative attention in scientific journals and the general media. Public transparency, including the availability of `raw' experimental data, will help to address growing concerns regarding scientific integrity. Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has led the way in requiring the public dissemination of atomic coordinates and a wealth of experimental data, making the field one of the most reproducible in the biological sciences. However, there remains no mandate for public disclosure of the original diffraction data. The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography (IRRMC) has been developed to archive raw data from diffraction experiments and, equally importantly, to provide related metadata. Currently, the database of our resource contains data from 2920 macromolecular diffraction experiments (5767 data sets), accounting for around 3% of all depositions in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), with their corresponding partially curated metadata. IRRMC utilizes distributed storage implemented using a federated architecture of many independent storage servers, which provides both scalability and sustainability. The resource, which is accessible via the web portal at http://www.proteindiffraction.org, can be searched using various criteria. All data are available for unrestricted access and download. The resource serves as a proof of concept and demonstrates the feasibility of archiving raw diffraction data and associated metadata from X-ray crystallographic studies of biological macromolecules. The goal is to expand this resource and include data sets that failed to yield X-ray structures in order to facilitate collaborative efforts that will improve protein structure-determination methods and to ensure the availability of `orphan' data left behind for various reasons by individual investigators and/or extinct structural genomics

  4. Sag compensation system for assembly of MDT-chambers for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashkov, A.V.; Glonti, G.L.; Gongadze, A.L.; Evtukhovich, P.G.; Il'yushenko, E.N.; Kotov, S.A.; Kruchonok, V.G.; Tskhadadze, Eh.G.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Shelkov, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    The description of a system of the devices created for compensation of the gravitational deflection of the drift chamber during its assembly is presented. By means of this system during stage-by-stage gluing of layers of tube drift detectors to the chamber the transversal deflection considerably decreases and by that high accuracy of mutual position of separate tubes is provided. The devices were applied at assembly of 74 MDT-chambers of the ATLAS experiment. Design values of deformation of the chambers as well as the results of measurement of transversal deflections obtained during the assembly with the use of the system of sag compensation are given. Testing of chambers on the X-ray tomograph at CERN has shown that the accuracy of the positions of separate signal wires inside the assembled chambers is within the limits of the required 20 μm

  5. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some ...

  6. Celebrating macromolecular crystallography: A personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Zapatero, Celerino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century has seen an enormous advance in the knowledge of the atomic structures that surround us. The discovery of the first crystal structures of simple inorganic salts by the Braggs in 1914, using the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, provided the critical elements to unveil the atomic structure of matter. Subsequent developments in the field leading to macromolecular crystallography are presented with a personal perspective, related to the cultural milieu of Spain in the late 1950’s. The journey of discovery of the author, as he developed professionally, is interwoven with the expansion of macromolecular crystallography from the first proteins (myoglobin, hemoglobin to the ‘coming of age’ of the field in 1971 and the discoveries that followed, culminating in the determination of the structure of the ribosomes at the turn of the century. A perspective is presented exploring the future of the field and also a reflection about the future generations of Spanish scientists.El siglo XX ha sido testigo del increíble avance que ha experimentado el conocimiento de la estructura atómica de la materia que nos rodea. El descubrimiento de las primeras estructuras atómicas de sales inorgánicas por los Bragg en 1914, empleando difracción de rayos X con cristales, proporcionó los elementos clave para alcanzar tal conocimiento. Posteriores desarrollos en este campo, que condujeron a la cristalografía macromolecular, se presentan aquí desde una perspectiva personal, relacionada con el contexto cultural de la España de la década de los 50. La experiencia del descubrimiento científico, durante mi desarrollo profesional, se integra en el desarrollo de la cristalografía macromolecular, desde las primeras proteínas (míoglobina y hemoglobina, hasta su madurez en 1971 que, con los posteriores descubrimientos, culmina con la determinación del la estructura del ribosoma. Asimismo, se explora el futuro de esta disciplina y se

  7. Design and Testing of the Fusion Virtual Assembly System FVAS1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengcheng Long; Songlin Liu; Yican Wu

    2006-01-01

    Virtual assembly (VA), utilizing virtual reality (VR) technologies to plan and evaluate assembly process, retains the benefits (time-saving, inexpensive and no hazardous) of VR technologies and conquers the shortcoming of physical prototypes, such as long circle, high cost, low precision, and so on. Presented in this paper is the Fusion Virtual Assembly System FVAS 1.0 that makes possible engineering application for assemblies of large-scale complex nuclear facilities. FVAS 1.0 is designed to support the planning, evaluation and demonstration of assembly process, and training assemblers, and to work on PC (personal computer) platform. In this paper, architecture and main features of FVAS are introduced firstly. Then, design of the key sections (such as collision detection, virtual roaming) are described in detail. Finally, some successful application cases are presented. To enhance the real-time performance for large-scale nuclear facilities simulation, a policy based on separation of display scene and collision detection scene has been adopted. The display scene can be predigested to reduce the time of scene refreshment, and the collision detection performance is greatly improved by using the mature interference check ability of commercial CAD systems. Convenient observation mechanism brings more practicability. So a multi-viewpoints roaming scheme has been utilized to facilitate users' assembly operation. Users can obtain much optical information from multiple angles by switching between multi-viewpoints. The ESAT superconducting tokamak is characterized by large volume, complicated constitution and high assembly precision, e.g. the strict precision requirement in the assembly for the three tori (the tori of vacuum vessel, thermal shield, and toroidal coil). FVAS 1.0 has succeeded in demonstrating the assembly process of ESAT components. Furthermore, FVAS 1.0 has been applied to evaluate FDS-I (Fusion-Driven Sub-critical system) concept from assembly point of

  8. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7FT (United Kingdom); Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J. [Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory R92, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Moraes, Isabel [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-17

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  9. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams

  10. Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

  11. Supervisory Control Technique For An Assembly Workstation As A Dynamic Discrete Event System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cristina CERNEGA

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a control problem statement in the framework of supervisory control technique for the assembly workstations. A desired behaviour of an assembly workstation is analysed. The behaviour of such a workstation is cyclic and some linguistic properties are established. In this paper, it is proposed an algorithm for the computation of the supremal controllable language of the closed system desired language. Copyright © 2001 IFAC.

  12. Adaptation of a Filter Assembly to Assess Microbial Bioburden of Pressurant Within a Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benardini, James N.; Koukol, Robert C.; Schubert, Wayne W.; Morales, Fabian; Klatte, Marlin F.

    2012-01-01

    A report describes an adaptation of a filter assembly to enable it to be used to filter out microorganisms from a propulsion system. The filter assembly has previously been used for particulates greater than 2 micrometers. Projects that utilize large volumes of nonmetallic materials of planetary protection concern pose a challenge to their bioburden budget, as a conservative specification value of 30 spores per cubic centimeter is typically used. Helium was collected utilizing an adapted filtration approach employing an existing Millipore filter assembly apparatus used by the propulsion team for particulate analysis. The filter holder on the assembly has a 47-mm diameter, and typically a 1.2-5 micrometer pore-size filter is used for particulate analysis making it compatible with commercially available sterilization filters (0.22 micrometers) that are necessary for biological sampling. This adaptation to an existing technology provides a proof-of-concept and a demonstration of successful use in a ground equipment system. This adaptation has demonstrated that the Millipore filter assembly can be utilized to filter out microorganisms from a propulsion system, whereas in previous uses the filter assembly was utilized for particulates greater than 2 micrometers.

  13. An Efficient and Versatile Means for Assembling and Manufacturing Systems in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Hafley, Robert A.; Komendera, Erik; Correll, Nikolaus; King, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Within NASA Space Science, Exploration and the Office of Chief Technologist, there are Grand Challenges and advanced future exploration, science and commercial mission applications that could benefit significantly from large-span and large-area structural systems. Of particular and persistent interest to the Space Science community is the desire for large (in the 10- 50 meter range for main aperture diameter) space telescopes that would revolutionize space astronomy. Achieving these systems will likely require on-orbit assembly, but previous approaches for assembling large-scale telescope truss structures and systems in space have been perceived as very costly because they require high precision and custom components. These components rely on a large number of mechanical connections and supporting infrastructure that are unique to each application. In this paper, a new assembly paradigm that mitigates these concerns is proposed and described. A new assembly approach, developed to implement the paradigm, is developed incorporating: Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots, Electron-Beam welding, robotic handling/manipulation, operations assembly sequence and path planning, and low precision weldable structural elements. Key advantages of the new assembly paradigm, as well as concept descriptions and ongoing research and technology development efforts for each of the major elements are summarized.

  14. ULtiMATE system for rapid assembly of customized TAL effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiao Yang

    Full Text Available Engineered TAL-effector nucleases (TALENs and TALE-based constructs have become powerful tools for eukaryotic genome editing. Although many methods have been reported, it remains a challenge for the assembly of designer-based TALE repeats in a fast, precise and cost-effective manner. We present an ULtiMATE (USER-based Ligation Mediated Assembly of TAL Effector system for speedy and accurate assembly of customized TALE constructs. This method takes advantage of uracil-specific excision reagent (USER to create multiple distinct sticky ends between any neighboring DNA fragments for specific ligation. With pre-assembled templates, multiple TALE DNA-binding domains could be efficiently assembled in order within hours with minimal manual operation. This system has been demonstrated to produce both functional TALENs for effective gene knockout and TALE-mediated gene-specific transcription activation (TALE-TA. The feature of both ease-of-operation and high efficiency of ULtiMATE system makes it not only an ideal method for biologic labs, but also an approach well suited for large-scale assembly of TALENs and any other TALE-based constructions.

  15. Towards Robust Predictive Fault–Tolerant Control for a Battery Assembly System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybold Lothar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the modeling and fault-tolerant control of a real battery assembly system which is under implementation at the RAFI GmbH company (one of the leading electronic manufacturing service providers in Germany. To model and control the battery assembly system, a unified max-plus algebra and model predictive control framework is introduced. Subsequently, the control strategy is enhanced with fault-tolerance features that increase the overall performance of the production system being considered. In particular, it enables tolerating (up to some degree mobile robot, processing and transportation faults. The paper discusses also robustness issues, which are inevitable in real production systems. As a result, a novel robust predictive fault-tolerant strategy is developed that is applied to the battery assembly system. The last part of the paper shows illustrative examples, which clearly exhibit the performance of the proposed approach.

  16. The role of macromolecular stability in desiccation tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns a study on the molecular interactions that play a role in the macromolecular stability of desiccation-tolerant higher plant organs. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used as the main experimental technique to assess macromolecular

  17. Principles and Overview of Sampling Methods for Modeling Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Tatiana; Moffatt, Ryan; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Shehu, Amarda

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of macromolecular structure and dynamics is fundamental to understanding how macromolecules carry out their functions in the cell. Significant advances have been made toward this end in silico, with a growing number of computational methods proposed yearly to study and simulate various aspects of macromolecular structure and dynamics. This review aims to provide an overview of recent advances, focusing primarily on methods proposed for exploring the structure space of macromolecules in isolation and in assemblies for the purpose of characterizing equilibrium structure and dynamics. In addition to surveying recent applications that showcase current capabilities of computational methods, this review highlights state-of-the-art algorithmic techniques proposed to overcome challenges posed in silico by the disparate spatial and time scales accessed by dynamic macromolecules. This review is not meant to be exhaustive, as such an endeavor is impossible, but rather aims to balance breadth and depth of strategies for modeling macromolecular structure and dynamics for a broad audience of novices and experts.

  18. The assembly and use of continuous flow systems for chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Joshua; Jamison, Timothy F

    2017-11-01

    The adoption of and opportunities in continuous flow synthesis ('flow chemistry') have increased significantly over the past several years. Continuous flow systems provide improved reaction safety and accelerated reaction kinetics, and have synthesised several active pharmaceutical ingredients in automated reconfigurable systems. Although continuous flow platforms are commercially available, systems constructed 'in-lab' provide researchers with a flexible, versatile, and cost-effective alternative. Herein, we describe the assembly and use of a modular continuous flow apparatus from readily available and affordable parts in as little as 30 min. Once assembled, the synthesis of a sulfonamide by reacting 4-chlorobenzenesulfonyl chloride with dibenzylamine in a single reactor coil with an in-line quench is presented. This example reaction offers the opportunity to learn several important skills including reactor construction, charging of a back-pressure regulator, assembly of stainless-steel syringes, assembly of a continuous flow system with multiple junctions, and yield determination. From our extensive experience of single-step and multistep continuous flow synthesis, we also describe solutions to commonly encountered technical problems such as precipitation of solids ('clogging') and reactor failure. Following this protocol, a nonspecialist can assemble a continuous flow system from reactor coils, syringes, pumps, in-line liquid-liquid separators, drying columns, back-pressure regulators, static mixers, and packed-bed reactors.

  19. Macromolecular organization of xyloglucan and cellulose in pea epicotyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Maclachlan, G.

    1984-01-01

    Xyloglucan is known to occur widely in the primary cell walls of higher plants. This polysaccharide in most dicots possesses a cellulose-like main chain with three of every four consecutive residues substituted with xylose and minor addition of other sugars. Xyloglucan and cellulose metabolism is regulated by different processes; since different enzyme systems are probably required for the synthesis of their 1,4-β-linkages. A macromolecular complex composed of xyloglucan and cellulose only was obtained from elongating regions of etiolated pea stems. It was examined by light microscopy using iodine staining, by radioautography after labeling with [ 3 H]fructose, by fluorescence microscopy using a fluorescein-lectin (fructose-binding) as probe, and by electron microscopy after shadowing. The techniques all demonstrated that the macromolecule was present in files of cell shapes, referred to here as cell-wall ghosts, in which xyloglucan was localized both on and between the cellulose microfibrils

  20. Thermodynamics of Macromolecular Association in Heterogeneous Crowding Environments: Theoretical and Simulation Studies with a Simplified Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tadashi; Yu, Isseki; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-11-23

    The cytoplasm of a cell is crowded with many different kinds of macromolecules. The macromolecular crowding affects the thermodynamics and kinetics of biological reactions in a living cell, such as protein folding, association, and diffusion. Theoretical and simulation studies using simplified models focus on the essential features of the crowding effects and provide a basis for analyzing experimental data. In most of the previous studies on the crowding effects, a uniform crowder size is assumed, which is in contrast to the inhomogeneous size distribution of macromolecules in a living cell. Here, we evaluate the free energy changes upon macromolecular association in a cell-like inhomogeneous crowding system via a theory of hard-sphere fluids and free energy calculations using Brownian dynamics trajectories. The inhomogeneous crowding model based on 41 different types of macromolecules represented by spheres with different radii mimics the physiological concentrations of macromolecules in the cytoplasm of Mycoplasma genitalium. The free energy changes of macromolecular association evaluated by the theory and simulations were in good agreement with each other. The crowder size distribution affects both specific and nonspecific molecular associations, suggesting that not only the volume fraction but also the size distribution of macromolecules are important factors for evaluating in vivo crowding effects. This study relates in vitro experiments on macromolecular crowding to in vivo crowding effects by using the theory of hard-sphere fluids with crowder-size heterogeneity.

  1. GoldenBraid: An Iterative Cloning System for Standardized Assembly of Reusable Genetic Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Falconi, Erica Elvira; Zandalinas, Sara I.; Juárez, Paloma; Fernández-del-Carmen, Asun; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Biology requires efficient and versatile DNA assembly systems to facilitate the building of new genetic modules/pathways from basic DNA parts in a standardized way. Here we present GoldenBraid (GB), a standardized assembly system based on type IIS restriction enzymes that allows the indefinite growth of reusable gene modules made of standardized DNA pieces. The GB system consists of a set of four destination plasmids (pDGBs) designed to incorporate multipartite assemblies made of standard DNA parts and to combine them binarily to build increasingly complex multigene constructs. The relative position of type IIS restriction sites inside pDGB vectors introduces a double loop (“braid”) topology in the cloning strategy that allows the indefinite growth of composite parts through the succession of iterative assembling steps, while the overall simplicity of the system is maintained. We propose the use of GoldenBraid as an assembly standard for Plant Synthetic Biology. For this purpose we have GB-adapted a set of binary plasmids for A. tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation. Fast GB-engineering of several multigene T-DNAs, including two alternative modules made of five reusable devices each, and comprising a total of 19 basic parts are also described. PMID:21750718

  2. Generalized Born Models of Macromolecular Solvation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, Donald; Case, David A.

    2000-10-01

    It would often be useful in computer simulations to use a simple description of solvation effects, instead of explicitly representing the individual solvent molecules. Continuum dielectric models often work well in describing the thermodynamic aspects of aqueous solvation, and approximations to such models that avoid the need to solve the Poisson equation are attractive because of their computational efficiency. Here we give an overview of one such approximation, the generalized Born model, which is simple and fast enough to be used for molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and nucleic acids. We discuss its strengths and weaknesses, both for its fidelity to the underlying continuum model and for its ability to replace explicit consideration of solvent molecules in macromolecular simulations. We focus particularly on versions of the generalized Born model that have a pair-wise analytical form, and therefore fit most naturally into conventional molecular mechanics calculations.

  3. Material flow enhancement in production assembly lines under application of zoned order picking systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Živanić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduced research work relates to the possibility of material flow enhancement in production systems, with the apostrophe on material order picking in production assembly lines. The paper presents basic rules and the results related to formed computer models of zoned order picking systems under the application of developed bound cavities method.

  4. A Versatile System for USER Cloning-Based Assembly of Expression Vectors for Mammalian Cell Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær

    2014-01-01

    , in addition the system is fully extendable by other users. The vector system is designed to facilitate high-throughput genome-scale studies of mammalian cells, such as the newly sequenced CHO cell lines, through the ability to rapidly generate high-fidelity assembly of customizable gene expression vectors....

  5. Toolchain concept for the automated assembly of micro-optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Sebastian; Müller, Tobias; Brecher, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In micro-optical assembly, the mastering of the steps of passive and active alignment, bonding, and part feeding as well as their interdependencies are crucial to the success of an automation solution. Process development is therefore complex and time consuming. Separation of assembly process planning and assembly execution decouples both phases so that production and process development can take place in parallel and even in spatially separated stations. The work presented in this paper refines the concept of flexible assembly systems by separating the phases of assembly process planning and assembly execution by providing a dedicated process development platform on the one hand and by providing automatisms regarding the transfer from the development platform into industrial production on the other. For this purpose, two key concepts are being developed by the research carried out at Fraunhofer IPT. The paper introduces the overall approach and formalisms as well as a form of notation based on part lists, product features and key characteristics and it shows industrial use cases the approach has been applied to. Key characteristics are constraints on spatial relations and they are expressed in terms of optical functions or geometric constraints which need to be fulfilled. In the paper, special attention is paid to the illustration of the end-user perspective.

  6. Reuse of assembly systems: a great ecological and economical potential for facility suppliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weule, Hartmut; Buchholz, Carsten

    2001-02-01

    In addition to the consumer goods, capital goods offer a great potential for ecological and economic optimization. In view of this fact the project WiMonDi (Re-Use of Assembly Systems as new Business Fields), started in September 1998, focuses a marketable Remanufacturing and Re-Use of modules and components of assembly systems by using technically and organizationally continuous concepts. The objective of the closed Facility-Management-System is to prolong the serviceable lifespan of assembly facilities through the organized dismantling, refurbishment and reconditioning of the assembly facilities as well as their components. Therefore, it is necessary to develop easible and methodical strategies to realize a workable Re-Use concept. Within the project the focus is based on the optimization of Re-Use-strategies - the direct Re-Use, the Re-Use including Refurbishment as well as Material Recycling. The decision for an optimal strategy depends on economical (e.g. residual value, cost/benefit of relevant processes, etc.), ecological (e.g. pollutant components /substances), etc.) and technical parameters (e.g. reliability, etc.). For the purpose to integrate the total cost-of-ownership of products or components, WiMonDi integrates the costs of the use of products as well as the Re-Use costs/benefits. To initiate the conception of new distribution and user models between the supplier and the user of assembly facilities the described approach is conducted in close cooperation between Industry and University.

  7. Data base for failure/maintenance at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    A data collection system for obtaining availability/reliability data on fusion technology has been installed at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The system is fashioned after the Centralized Reliability Data Organization developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data collection system is currently being used at TSTA and is working well. The amount of data that has been collected at TSTA to date is not sufficient to indicate meaningful trends in availability analysis

  8. Functions of nonmuscle myosin II in assembly of the cellular contractile system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Shutova

    Full Text Available The contractile system of nonmuscle cells consists of interconnected actomyosin networks and bundles anchored to focal adhesions. The initiation of the contractile system assembly is poorly understood structurally and mechanistically, whereas system's maturation heavily depends on nonmuscle myosin II (NMII. Using platinum replica electron microscopy in combination with fluorescence microscopy, we characterized the structural mechanisms of the contractile system assembly and roles of NMII at early stages of this process. We show that inhibition of NMII by a specific inhibitor, blebbistatin, in addition to known effects, such as disassembly of stress fibers and mature focal adhesions, also causes transformation of lamellipodia into unattached ruffles, loss of immature focal complexes, loss of cytoskeleton-associated NMII filaments and peripheral accumulation of activated, but unpolymerized NMII. After blebbistatin washout, assembly of the contractile system begins with quick and coordinated recovery of lamellipodia and focal complexes that occurs before reappearance of NMII bipolar filaments. The initial formation of focal complexes and subsequent assembly of NMII filaments preferentially occurred in association with filopodial bundles and concave actin bundles formed by filopodial roots at the lamellipodial base. Over time, accumulating NMII filaments help to transform the precursor structures, focal complexes and associated thin bundles, into stress fibers and mature focal adhesions. However, semi-sarcomeric organization of stress fibers develops at much slower rate. Together, our data suggest that activation of NMII motor activity by light chain phosphorylation occurs at the cell edge and is uncoupled from NMII assembly into bipolar filaments. We propose that activated, but unpolymerized NMII initiates focal complexes, thus providing traction for lamellipodial protrusion. Subsequently, the mechanical resistance of focal complexes activates a

  9. Optimization of Two-Level Disassembly/Remanufacturing/Assembly System with an Integrated Maintenance Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhour Guiras

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With an increase of environmental pressure on economic activities, reverse flow is increasingly important. It seeks to save resources, eliminate waste, and improve productivity. This paper investigates the optimization of the disassembly, remanufacturing and assembly system, taking into account assembly-disassembly system degradation. An analytical model is developed to consider disassembly, remanufacturing of used/end-of-life product and assembly of the finished product. The finished product is composed of remanufactured and new components. A maintenance policy is sequentially integrated to reduce the system unavailability. The aim of this study is to help decision-makers, under certain conditions, choose the most cost-effective process for them to satisfy the customer as well as to adapt to the potential risk that can perturb the disassembly-assembly system. A heuristic is developed to determine the optimal ordered date of the used end-of-life product as well as the optimum release dates of new external components. The results reveal that considering some remanufacturing and purchase components costs, the proposed model is more economical in comparison with a model without remanufactured parts. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the impact of the variation of the ordering cost and quality of the used end-of-life product on the system profitability. Finally, the risk due to system repair periods is discussed, which has an impact on managerial decision-making.

  10. A Digital Interface for the Part Designers and the Fixture Designers for a Reconfigurable Assembly System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwa V. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a web-based framework for interfacing product designers and fixture designers to fetch the benefits of early supplier involvement (ESI to a reconfigurable assembly system (RAS. The interfacing of the two members requires four steps, namely, collaboration chain, fixture supplier selection, knowledge share, and accommodation of service facilities so as to produce multiple products on a single assembly line. The interfacing not only provokes concurrency in the activities of product and fixture designer but also enables the assembly systems to tackle the spatial and generational variety. Among the four stages of interfacing, two steps are characterized by optimization issues, one from the product customer side and the other from the fixture designer side. To impart promptness in the optimization and hence the interaction, computationally economic tools are also presented in the paper for both of the supplier selection and fixture design optimization.

  11. An assembly system based on industrial robot with binocular stereo vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Xiao, Nanfeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an electronic part and component assembly system based on an industrial robot with binocular stereo vision. Firstly, binocular stereo vision with a visual attention mechanism model is used to get quickly the image regions which contain the electronic parts and components. Secondly, a deep neural network is adopted to recognize the features of the electronic parts and components. Thirdly, in order to control the end-effector of the industrial robot to grasp the electronic parts and components, a genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed to compute the transition matrix and the inverse kinematics of the industrial robot (end-effector), which plays a key role in bridging the binocular stereo vision and the industrial robot. Finally, the proposed assembly system is tested in LED component assembly experiments, and the results denote that it has high efficiency and good applicability.

  12. Tritium handling experience in vacuum systems at TSTA [Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Jenkins, E.M.; Walthers, C.R.; Yoshida, H.; Fukui, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Compound cryopumps have been added to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) integrated fusion fuel loop. Operations have been performed which closely simulate an actual fusion reactor pumping scenario. In addition, performance data have been taken that support the concept of using coconut charcoal as a sorbent at 4K for pumping helium. Later tests show that coconut charcoal may be used to co-pump D,T and He mixtures on a single 4K panel. Rotary spiral pumps have been used successfully in several applications at TSTA and have acquired more than 9000 hours of maintenance-free operation. Metal bellows pumps have been used to back the spiral pumps and have been relatively trouble free in loop operations. Bellows pumps also have more than 9000 hours of maintenance-free operation. 5 refs., 6 figs

  13. Developing An Effective Strategy to Configure Assembly Systems Using Lean Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Eswaramoorthi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry has been pushed to adopt more effective production strategies to meet the challenges of shorter life cycle, higher quality, lower cost and wider variety of customer demands. This increased emphasis on achieving highly adaptive manufacturing with reduction in manufacturing costs and better utilization of manufacturing resources force to implementing new and efficient management techniques in their manufacturing operations. Some of the established tools in this context are lean practices. In manufacturing, assembly is one of the major activities that combine the machined components into final product. Decision on appropriate facility layout and viable assembly sequence (line balancing adaptable to takt time requirement with cost benefit is a challenging task. This paper proposes an integrated cost model for a typical assembly process to determine cost per part more precisely by considering seven types of "contributing factors". This procedure is performed under different takt time conditions to configure the assembly system in terms of cost per piece and to decide the adaptable layout. A prototype assembly system is established in this research to demonstrate the effectiveness of the cost model. The results show that there are significant variations in cost per piece with respect to changes in layout configurations and takt time.

  14. Ready to Assemble: Grading State Higher Education Accountability Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeman, Chad; Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    States need strong higher education systems, now more than ever. In the tumultuous, highly competitive 21st century economy, citizens and workers need knowledge, skills, and credentials in order to prosper. Yet many colleges and universities are falling short. To give all students the best possible postsecondary education, states must create…

  15. Interrogating the architecture of protein assemblies and protein interaction networks by cross-linking mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fan; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are involved in almost all processes of the living cell. They are organized through extensive networks of interaction, by tightly bound macromolecular assemblies or more transiently via signaling nodes. Therefore, revealing the architecture of protein complexes and protein interaction

  16. Probing the Composition, Assembly and Activity of Protein Molecular Machines using Native Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waterbeemd, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in general, are powerful analytical tools for studying proteins and protein complexes. Native mass spectrometry may provide accurate mass measurements of large macromolecular assemblies enabling the investigation of their composition and stoichiometry.

  17. Development of an online UV-visible microspectrophotometer for a macromolecular crystallography beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobutaka; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Baba, Seiki; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of the UV-visible absorption spectrum is a convenient technique for detecting chemical changes of proteins, and it is therefore useful to combine spectroscopy and diffraction studies. An online microspectrophotometer for the UV-visible region was developed and installed on the macromolecular crystallography beamline, BL38B1, at SPring-8. This spectrophotometer is equipped with a difference dispersive double monochromator, a mercury-xenon lamp as the light source, and a photomultiplier as the detector. The optical path is mostly constructed using mirrors, in order to obtain high brightness in the UV region, and the confocal optics are assembled using a cross-slit diaphragm like an iris to eliminate stray light. This system can measure optical densities up to a maximum of 4.0. To study the effect of radiation damage, preliminary measurements of glucose isomerase and thaumatin crystals were conducted in the UV region. Spectral changes dependent on X-ray dose were observed at around 280 nm, suggesting that structural changes involving Trp or Tyr residues occurred in the protein crystal. In the case of the thaumatin crystal, a broad peak around 400 nm was also generated after X-ray irradiation, suggesting the cleavage of a disulfide bond. Dose-dependent spectral changes were also observed in cryo-solutions alone, and these changes differed with the composition of the cryo-solution. These responses in the UV region are informative regarding the state of the sample; consequently, this device might be useful for X-ray crystallography.

  18. Design of cellulose ether-based macromolecular prodrugs of ciprofloxacin for extended release and enhanced bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad; Abbas, Nazia Shahana; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Sher, Muhammad; Edgar, Kevin J

    2018-07-01

    The present study reveals the syntheses of hydroxypropylcellulose‑(HPC) and hydroxyethylcellulose‑(HEC) based macromolecular prodrugs (MPDs) of ciprofloxacin (CIP) using homogeneous reaction methodology. Covalently loaded drug content (DC) of each prodrug was quantified using UV-Vis spectrophotometry to determine degree of substitution (DS). HPC-ciprofloxacin (HPC-CIP) conjugates showed DS of CIP in the range 0.87-1.15 whereas HEC-ciprofloxacin (HEC-CIP) conjugates showed DS range 0.51-0.75. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that HPC-CIP conjugate 2 and HEC-CIP conjugate 6 self-assembled into nanoparticles of 150-300 and 180-250nm, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed HPC-CIP conjugate 2 and HEC-CIP conjugate 6 as monodisperse systems. In vitro drug release studies indicated 15 and 43% CIP release from HPC-CIP conjugate 2 after 6h in simulated gastric and simulated intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), respectively. HEC-CIP conjugate 6 showed 16% and 46% release after 6h in SGF and SIF, respectively. HPC-CIP conjugate 2 and HEC-CIP conjugate 6 exhibited half-lives of 10.87 and 11.71h, respectively with area under the curve values of 164 and 175hμgmL -1 , respectively, indicating enhanced bioavailability and improved pharmacokinetic profiles in animal model. Equal antibacterial activities to that of unmodified CIP confirmed their competitive efficacies. Cytotoxicity studies supported their non-toxic nature and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  20. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of self-assembling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael L; Shinoda, Wataru

    2008-08-08

    Relentless increases in the size and performance of multiprocessor computers, coupled with new algorithms and methods, have led to novel applications of simulations across chemistry. This Perspective focuses on the use of classical molecular dynamics and so-called coarse-grain models to explore phenomena involving self-assembly in complex fluids and biological systems.

  1. Optimal FCFS allocation rules for periodic-review assemble-to-order systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, K.; Kok, de A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In Assemble-To-Order (ATO) systems, situations may arise in which customer demand must be backlogged due to a shortage of some components, leaving available stock of other components unused. Such unused component stock is called remnant stock. Remnant stock is a consequence of both component

  2. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A. [ABT Systems, LLC, Annville, PA (United States); Prahl, D. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  3. The System of Automatic Control of Complexity Work Evaluation in Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo HLAVATÝ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is about a task of creating of an automated system for the evaluation of the complexity and the prediction of labour input of fitting and assembly operations, which used for manufacturing of machine-building item.

  4. System for determining the local power in the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolstad, Erik; Korpas, T.-H.; Leyse, R.H.; Smith, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    System for determining the local power in the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor which includes a rod conducting the heat and electricity, along which axial areas act as a gamma radiation thermometer. Each area includes a thermal bridge, a cold source and a pair of junctions acting as thermocouples so placed that they measure the temperature difference between the thermal bridge and the cold source. The power created by the fuel assembly near each area acting as gamma thermometer is found from this difference in temperature [fr

  5. Surfaces wettability and morphology modulation in a fluorene derivative self-assembly system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xinhua, E-mail: caoxhchem@163.com; Gao, Aiping; Zhao, Na; Yuan, Fangyuan; Liu, Chenxi; Li, Ruru

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The different structures could be obtained in this self-assembly system. • A water-drop could freely roll on the xerogel film with the sliding angle of 15.0. • The superhydrophobic surface can be obtained via supramolecular self-assembly. - Abstract: A new organogelator based on fluorene derivative (gelator 1) was designed and synthesized. Organogels could be obtained via the self-assembly of the derivative in acetone, toluene, ethyl acetate, hexane, DMSO and petroleum ether. The self-assembly process was thoroughly characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis, FT-IR and the contact angle. Surfaces with different morphologies and wetting properties were formed via the self-assembly of gelator 1 in the six different solvents. Interestingly, a superhydrophobic surface with a contact angle of 150° was obtained from organogel 1 in DMSO and exhibited the lotus-effect. The sliding angle necessary for a water droplet to move on the glass was only 15°. Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces were attributed as the main driving forces for gel formation.

  6. Position indicating systems and reed contact unit assemblies for such systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxworthy, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Specifications are given for a position indicating system for determining the position of a movable member inside a sealed container such as the position of a control rod in a nuclear reactor. The system comprises a magnetic flux producing member mounted to the movable member so as to move with it, a series of magnetic reed contact units mounted along the outside of the sealed container to be individually actuated by the flux producer as the movable member moves within the sealed container to indicate the position of this member. Each of the reed contact units is connected to a source of alternating electric current to produce a magnetic flux field to minimize the flux differential between the actuated and unactuated reed contact positions. A second aspect of the invention provides for a low operating flux differential reed contact unit assembly for a position indicating system such that it is actuated by the magnetic member at one magnetic flux level and deactivated at a second level. There is a source of alternating current connected to a coil surrounding the reed contact unit so as to produce an alternating magnetic flux with amplitude less than the difference between the two levels. Variations are given, also diagrams and benefits. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly with a shock absorber system especially for seismic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    Hydraulic system for absorbing impacts imparted to fuel assemblies. Internal buffers that brace the fuel assemblies so as to restrain their longitudinal displacement, rest against mobile spring buffers. Some of these spring buffers have plungers sliding in hollow tubular guide uprights provided with longitudinal slots. The end of each upright is closed by a plate fitted with an orifice. When an earthquake forces the plunger and spring buffer assemblies to move, the water under pressure in the upright guide tubes stop this movement. This water, which gushes from the holes in the plates, enables the displacement to take place at a controlled rate at which the forces applied are absorbed in complete safety. The plungers gradually close up the slots in the guide uprights, thereby progressively reducing the section through which the water inside the guide upright can flow out. The resistance increases progressively and protects the structure of the reactor core [fr

  8. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  9. Sequential recovery of macromolecular components of the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Baoyan; Laiho, Marikki

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is involved in a number of cellular processes of importance to cell physiology and pathology, including cell stress responses and malignancies. Studies of macromolecular composition of the nucleolus depend critically on the efficient extraction and accurate quantification of all macromolecular components (e.g., DNA, RNA, and protein). We have developed a TRIzol-based method that efficiently and simultaneously isolates these three macromolecular constituents from the same sample of purified nucleoli. The recovered and solubilized protein can be accurately quantified by the bicinchoninic acid assay and assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or by mass spectrometry. We have successfully applied this approach to extract and quantify the responses of all three macromolecular components in nucleoli after drug treatments of HeLa cells, and conducted RNA-Seq analysis of the nucleolar RNA.

  10. A versatile system for USER cloning-based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mathilde Lund

    Full Text Available A new versatile mammalian vector system for protein production, cell biology analyses, and cell factory engineering was developed. The vector system applies the ligation-free uracil-excision based technique--USER cloning--to rapidly construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple DNA fragments and with maximum flexibility, both for choice of vector backbone and cargo. The vector system includes a set of basic vectors and a toolbox containing a multitude of DNA building blocks including promoters, terminators, selectable marker- and reporter genes, and sequences encoding an internal ribosome entry site, cellular localization signals and epitope- and purification tags. Building blocks in the toolbox can be easily combined as they contain defined and tested Flexible Assembly Sequence Tags, FASTs. USER cloning with FASTs allows rapid swaps of gene, promoter or selection marker in existing plasmids and simple construction of vectors encoding proteins, which are fused to fluorescence-, purification-, localization-, or epitope tags. The mammalian expression vector assembly platform currently allows for the assembly of up to seven fragments in a single cloning step with correct directionality and with a cloning efficiency above 90%. The functionality of basic vectors for FAST assembly was tested and validated by transient expression of fluorescent model proteins in CHO, U-2-OS and HEK293 cell lines. In this test, we included many of the most common vector elements for heterologous gene expression in mammalian cells, in addition the system is fully extendable by other users. The vector system is designed to facilitate high-throughput genome-scale studies of mammalian cells, such as the newly sequenced CHO cell lines, through the ability to rapidly generate high-fidelity assembly of customizable gene expression vectors.

  11. THE PROJECT OF THE EXPERT SYSTEM TO SUPPORTING OF SELECTION OF PARTS AND ASSEMBLIES OF MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian RZYDZIK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper the design of the expert system that supports mechanical engineer in the process of selecting the parts and assemblies was presented. In the description of the proposed expert system, was made reference to the general form of such systems, that consist of such components as: user interface, inference engine, knowledge base and database. It also, scenario that describes the steps of the use of the proposed expert system was presented. Finally, an example of the use the expert system during the selection of the components of the drive system was shown.

  12. Atomic force microscopy imaging of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sergio; Billingsley, Daniel; Thomson, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews amplitude modulation (AM) AFM in air and its applications to high-resolution imaging and interpretation of macromolecular complexes. We discuss single DNA molecular imaging and DNA-protein interactions, such as those with topoisomerases and RNA polymerase. We show how relative humidity can have a major influence on resolution and contrast and how it can also affect conformational switching of supercoiled DNA. Four regimes of AFM tip-sample interaction in air are defined and described, and relate to water perturbation and/or intermittent mechanical contact of the tip with either the molecular sample or the surface. Precise control and understanding of the AFM operational parameters is shown to allow the user to switch between these different regimes: an interpretation of the origins of topographical contrast is given for each regime. Perpetual water contact is shown to lead to a high-resolution mode of operation, which we term SASS (small amplitude small set-point) imaging, and which maximizes resolution while greatly decreasing tip and sample wear and any noise due to perturbation of the surface water. Thus, this chapter provides sufficient information to reliably control the AFM in the AM AFM mode of operation in order to image both heterogeneous samples and single macromolecules including complexes, with high resolution and with reproducibility. A brief introduction to AFM, its versatility and applications to biology is also given while providing references to key work and general reviews in the field.

  13. Development of In-pile Plug Assembly and Primary Shutter for Cold Neutron Guide System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Won; Cho, Yeong Garp; Ryu, Jeong Soo; Lee, Jung Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The HANARO, a 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor in Korea, will be equipped with a neutron guide system, in order to transport cold neutrons from the neutron source to the neutron scattering instruments in the neutron guide hall near the reactor building. The neutron guide system of HANARO consists of the in-pile plug assembly with in-pile guides, the primary shutter with in-shutter guides, the neutron guides in the guide shielding room with dedicated secondary shutters, and the neutron guides connected to the instruments in the neutron guide hall. The functions of the in-pile plug assembly are to shield the reactor environment from a nuclear radiation and to support the neutron guides and maintain them precisely oriented. The primary shutter is a mechanical device to be installed just after the in-pile plug assembly, which stops neutron flux on demand. This report describes the mechanical design, fabrication, and installation procedure of the in-pile plug assembly and the primary shutter for the neutron guide system at HANARO. A special tool and procedure for a replacement of in-pile plug and guide cassette is also presented with the interface condition in the reactor hall.

  14. A simple and versatile system for the ATP-dependent assembly of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Mai T; Fei, Jia; Cruz-Becerra, Grisel; Kadonaga, James T

    2017-11-24

    Chromatin is the natural form of DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus and is the substrate for diverse biological phenomena. The functional analysis of these processes ideally would be carried out with nucleosomal templates that are assembled with customized core histones, DNA sequences, and chromosomal proteins. Here we report a simple, reliable, and versatile method for the ATP-dependent assembly of evenly spaced nucleosome arrays. This minimal chromatin assembly system comprises the Drosophila nucleoplasmin-like protein (dNLP) histone chaperone, the imitation switch (ISWI) ATP-driven motor protein, core histones, template DNA, and ATP. The dNLP and ISWI components were synthesized in bacteria, and each protein could be purified in a single step by affinity chromatography. We show that the dNLP-ISWI system can be used with different DNA sequences, linear or circular DNA, bulk genomic DNA, recombinant or native Drosophila core histones, native human histones, the linker histone H1, the non-histone chromosomal protein HMGN2, and the core histone variants H3.3 and H2A.V. The dNLP-ISWI system should be accessible to a wide range of researchers and enable the assembly of customized chromatin with specifically desired DNA sequences, core histones, and other chromosomal proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Development of Vision System for Dimensional Measurement for Irradiated Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jungcheol; Kwon, Yongbock; Park, Jongyoul; Woo, Sangkyun; Kim, Yonghwan; Jang, Youngki; Choi, Joonhyung; Lee, Kyuseog

    2006-01-01

    In order to develop an advanced nuclear fuel, a series of pool side examination (PSE) is performed to confirm in-pile behavior of the fuel for commercial production. For this purpose, a vision system was developed to measure for mechanical integrity, such as assembly bowing, twist and growth, of the loaded lead test assembly. Using this vision system, three(3) times of PSE were carried out at Uljin Unit 3 and Kori Unit 2 for the advanced fuels, PLUS7 TM and 16ACE7 TM , developed by KNFC. Among the main characteristics of the vision system is very simple structure and measuring principal. This feature enables the equipment installation and inspection time to reduce largely, and leads the PSE can be finished without disturbance on the fuel loading and unloading activities during utility overhaul periods. And another feature is high accuracy and repeatability achieved by this vision system

  16. Human Factors and Their Effects on Human-Centred Assembly Systems - A Literature Review-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Abubakar, M. I.

    2017-09-01

    If a product has more than one component, then it must be assembled. Assembly of products relies on assembly systems or lines in which assembly of each product is often carried out manually by human workers following assembly sequences in various forms. It is widely understood that efficiency of assembling a product by reducing assembly times (therefore costs) is vital particularly for small and medium-sized manufacturing companies to survive in an increasingly competitive market. Ideally, it is helpful for pre-determining efficiency or productivity of a human-centred assembly system at the early design stage. To date, most research on performance of an assembly system using modelling simulation methods is focused on its “operational functions”. The term used in a narrow sense always indicates the performance of the “operational system”, which does not incorporate the effect of human factors that may also affect the system performance. This paper presents a research outcome of findings through a literature review-based study by identifying possible human factors that mostly affect the performance on human-centred manufacturing systems as part of the research project incorporating parameters of human factors into a DES (discrete event simulation) tool.

  17. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  18. Recovery of reactor electrical assemblies using differential de-encapsulation to remove dielectric insulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubrig, J.G.; Hammerstone, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    State-of-the-art de-encapsulation technologies associated with the conventional dielectric insulation systems employed in the construction of electrical coils and power distribution systems do not allow for accurate fatigue/failure analysis or reliable recovery of costly assembly components. Differential de-encapsulation allows for the selective removal of contemporary thermoset resin based insulation systems to allow non-destructive penetration of insulation wall thicknesses to both examine critical areas and recover high performance metallic and non-metallic inserts for remanufacture; significantly reducing replacement costs and reactor downtime. The authors' analysis describes how the availability of engineering data from the selective and non-destructive removal of insulation materials will aid in the evaluation of original manufacture, materials and procedures; enabling redesign to enhance subsequent on line performance. They also discuss why the ability to recover coil and core assemblies for remanufacture will have a major economic impact on reactor management costs

  19. DRUGAS: implantable telemetric system for measuring the portal venous pressure: assembly aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Roland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing an implantable, telemetric pressure measuring system for venous applications makes a high degree of miniaturization necessary. Thus the influence on the measurement environment is minimized and the risk of thrombosis at small flow blood velocities is decreased. But these systems are limited in terms of accuracy and resolution. The asked system requirements could only be reached by optimising the assembly and encapsulation techniques. To achieve the high degree of miniaturization numerical simulations were performed on the shape and size of the implant and led to the development of a specific metal housing consisting of two main components. A small measuring chamber will be placed into the portal vein and is rigidly fixed to a flat circular part that contains the pressure sensor chip and a transponder board and will be located outside on top of the vein. The main focus of the assembly process was based on a stress-free design and mounting of the components.

  20. Self-assembly via anisotropic interactions : Modeling association kinetics of patchy particle systems and self-assembly induced by critical Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Self-assembly, the non-dissipative spontaneous formation of structural order spans many length scales, from amphiphilic molecules forming micelles to stars forming galaxies. This thesis mainly deals with systems on the colloidal length scale where the size of a particle is between a nanometer and a

  1. Engineering work plan for container venting system drill press assembly troubleshooting. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prather, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    This work plan is for troubleshooting the current CVS drill press to ensure that the drill bit assembly doesn't bind in the press plate. A drill press assembly has been fabricated for the Container Venting System (CVS). The drill bit assembly has bound in the press plate in previous revisions of this design. Initial troubleshooting of the drill press per Rev. 0 of this work plan was performed at the 200W Kaiser Machine Shop under Work Package 2H9401670F, Internal Work Order E20027. The drill press operated without jamming. Then, during the pre-operational test on 11/14/17 and the operational test on 11/17/94, two drum lids were drilled. Immediately after the test on 11/17/94, the drill was again operated, and it jammed. An inspection found shavings at the bottom of the drill bit assembly, between the drill bit sleeve and the press plate bore. This revised work plan provides direction for the machine shop to diagnose and correct this recent problem

  2. MxCuBE: a synchrotron beamline control environment customized for macromolecular crystallography experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabadinho, José; Beteva, Antonia; Guijarro, Matias; Rey-Bakaikoa, Vicente; Spruce, Darren

    2010-01-01

    MxCuBE is a beamline control environment optimized for the needs of macromolecular crystallography. This paper describes the design of the software and the features that MxCuBE currently provides. The design and features of a beamline control software system for macromolecular crystallography (MX) experiments developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. This system, MxCuBE, allows users to easily and simply interact with beamline hardware components and provides automated routines for common tasks in the operation of a synchrotron beamline dedicated to experiments in MX. Additional functionality is provided through intuitive interfaces that enable the assessment of the diffraction characteristics of samples, experiment planning, automatic data collection and the on-line collection and analysis of X-ray emission spectra. The software can be run in a tandem client-server mode that allows for remote control and relevant experimental parameters and results are automatically logged in a relational database, ISPyB. MxCuBE is modular, flexible and extensible and is currently deployed on eight macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the ESRF. Additionally, the software is installed at MAX-lab beamline I911-3 and at BESSY beamline BL14.1

  3. Development of a Liquid Scintillator-Based Active Interrogation System for LEU Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Plenteda, Romano; Mascahrenas, Nicholas; Cronholm, L. Marie; Aspinall, Michael; Joyce, Malcolm; Tomanin, Alice; Peerani, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA, in collaboration with the Joint Research Center (Ispra, IT) and Hybrid Instruments (Lancaster, UK), has developed a full scale, liquid scintillator-based active interrogation system to determine uranium (U) mass in fresh fuel assemblies. The system implements an array of moderate volume (∼1000 ml) liquid scintillator detectors, a multichannel pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system, and a high-speed data acquisition and signal processing system to assess the U content of fresh fuel assemblies. Extensive MCNPX-PoliMi modelling has been carried out to refine the system design and optimize the detector performance. These measurements, traditionally performed with 3 He-based assay systems (e.g., Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar [UNCL], Active Well Coincidence Collar [AWCC]), can now be performed with higher precision in a fraction of the acquisition time. The system uses a high-flash point, non-hazardous scintillating fluid (EJ309) enabling their use in commercial nuclear facilities and achieves significantly enhanced performance and capabilities through the combination of extremely short gate times, adjustable energy detection threshold, real-time PSD electronics, and high-speed, FPGA-based data acquisition. Given the possible applications, this technology is also an excellent candidate for the replacement of select 3 He-based systems. Comparisons to existing 3 He-based active interrogation systems are presented where possible to provide a baseline performance reference. This paper will describe the laboratory experiments and associated modelling activities undertaken to develop and initially test the prototype detection system. (authors)

  4. Balancing a Mixed-Model Assembly System in the Footwear Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi , Parisa; Rebelo , Rui ,; Soeiro Ferreira , José

    2017-01-01

    Part 7: Operations Planning, Scheduling and Control; International audience; Portuguese footwear industry has improved dramatically to become one of the main world players. This work is part of a project in cooperation with a large footwear company, operating a new automated assembly equipment, integrating various lines. Balancing such lines implies going from an almost manual preparation executed by experienced operators, to a planning supported by optimisation systems. These complex mixed-m...

  5. On-line system for monitoring of boiling in nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerkcan, E.; Kozma, R.; Verhoef, J.P.; Nabeshima, K.

    1996-01-01

    An important goal of nuclear reactor instrumentation is the continuous monitoring of the state of the reactor and the detection of deviations from the normal behaviour at an early stage. Early detection of anomalies enables one to make the necessary steps in order to prevent further damage of nuclear fuel. In the present paper, an on-line core monitoring system is described by means of which boiling anomaly in nuclear reactor fuel assemblies can be detected. (author). 9 refs, 7 figs

  6. Design amp Validation Of E-Rpm Adjustment Assembly For Mechanical Governor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi kumar manhotra

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper detailing the problem of speed fluctuation of IDI engine Rpm i.e. hunting and dipping. It is due to E-RPM adjustment assembly for mechanical centrifugal flyweight governor system. E-RPM adjustment assembly works mainly for high speed adjustment ampidle speed adjustment. In mechanical centrifugal flyweight governor system of IDI engine issue at idle rpm hunting and dipping issue was reported in field.New designs of plunger type stopper cover with compressed coil spring are proposed for E-RPM adjustment assembly for mechanical centrifugal fly-weight governor system. 3D-Modeling of new design is done on Seimens NX. Kinematic simulation was done with the help of Altairs Motion-View amp Motion-Solver. Based on the results from MBD the prototype is made and tested in engine. As per the test results from engine testing with new design there is no hunting and dipping problem is reported at idle rpm.

  7. Fiber-Based, Injection-Molded Optofluidic Systems: Improvements in Assembly and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to fabricate polymer optofluidic systems by means of injection molding that allow the insertion of standard optical fibers. The chip fabrication and assembly methods produce large numbers of robust optofluidic systems that can be easily assembled and disposed of, yet allow precise optical alignment and improve delivery of optical power. Using a multi-level chip fabrication process, complex channel designs with extremely vertical sidewalls, and dimensions that range from few tens of nanometers to hundreds of microns can be obtained. The technology has been used to align optical fibers in a quick and precise manner, with a lateral alignment accuracy of 2.7 ± 1.8 μm. We report the production, assembly methods, and the characterization of the resulting injection-molded chips for Lab-on-Chip (LoC applications. We demonstrate the versatility of this technology by carrying out two types of experiments that benefit from the improved optical system: optical stretching of red blood cells (RBCs and Raman spectroscopy of a solution loaded into a hollow core fiber. The advantages offered by the presented technology are intended to encourage the use of LoC technology for commercialization and educational purposes.

  8. Development of 3-D Flow Analysis Code for Fuel Assembly using Unstructured Grid System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kim, Jong Eun; Ahn, Jong Ki; Yang, Seung Yong [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Final objective of this study is to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system. In order to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system, the following researches are made: - Development of numerical algorithm for CFD code's solver - Grid and geometric connectivity data - Development of software(PowerCFD code) for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system - Modulation of software(PowerCFD code) - Development of turbulence model - Development of analysis module of RANS/LES hybrid models - Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer - Basic study on LES analysis - Development of main frame on pre/post processors based on GUI - Algorithm for fully-developed flow.

  9. Development of 3-D Flow Analysis Code for Fuel Assembly using Unstructured Grid System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kim, Jong Eun; Ahn, Jong Ki; Yang, Seung Yong

    2007-03-01

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Final objective of this study is to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system. In order to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system, the following researches are made: - Development of numerical algorithm for CFD code's solver - Grid and geometric connectivity data - Development of software(PowerCFD code) for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system - Modulation of software(PowerCFD code) - Development of turbulence model - Development of analysis module of RANS/LES hybrid models - Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer - Basic study on LES analysis - Development of main frame on pre/post processors based on GUI - Algorithm for fully-developed flow

  10. Structural changes in the ordering processes of macromolecular compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Tashiro, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to clarify the microscopically-viewed relationship between the conformational ordering process and the aggregation process of the macromolecular chains in the phase transitions from melt to solid or from solution to gel, the time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectra and small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering data have been analyzed in an organized manner. Two concrete examples were presented. (1) In the gelation phenomenon of syndiotactic polystyrene-organic solvent system, the ordered TTGG conformation is formed and develops with time. This conformational ordering is accelerated by the aggregation of these chain segments, resulting in the formation of macroscopic gel network. (2) In the isothermal crystallization process from the melt of polyethylene, the following ordering mechanism was revealed. The conformationally-disordered short trans conformers appear at first in the random coils of the melt. These disordered trans sequences grow to longer and more regular trans sequences of the orthorhombic-type crystal and then the isolated lamellae are formed. Afterwards, the stacked lamellar structure is developed without change of lamellar thickness but with small decrease in the long period, indicating an insertion of new lamellae between the already produced lamellar layers

  11. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  12. Macromolecular diffusion in crowded media beyond the hard-sphere model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pablo M; Garcés, Josep Lluís; Madurga, Sergio; Mas, Francesc

    2018-04-25

    The effect of macromolecular crowding on diffusion beyond the hard-core sphere model is studied. A new coarse-grained model is presented, the Chain Entanglement Softened Potential (CESP) model, which takes into account the macromolecular flexibility and chain entanglement. The CESP model uses a shoulder-shaped interaction potential that is implemented in the Brownian Dynamics (BD) computations. The interaction potential contains only one parameter associated with the chain entanglement energetic cost (Ur). The hydrodynamic interactions are included in the BD computations via Tokuyama mean-field equations. The model is used to analyze the diffusion of a streptavidin protein among different sized dextran obstacles. For this system, Ur is obtained by fitting the streptavidin experimental long-time diffusion coefficient Dlongversus the macromolecular concentration for D50 (indicating their molecular weight in kg mol-1) dextran obstacles. The obtained Dlong values show better quantitative agreement with experiments than those obtained with hard-core spheres. Moreover, once parametrized, the CESP model is also able to quantitatively predict Dlong and the anomalous exponent (α) for streptavidin diffusion among D10, D400 and D700 dextran obstacles. Dlong, the short-time diffusion coefficient (Dshort) and α are obtained from the BD simulations by using a new empirical expression, able to describe the full temporal evolution of the diffusion coefficient.

  13. Research on multi - channel interactive virtual assembly system for power equipment under the “VR+” era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yilong; Duan, Xitong; Wu, Lei; He, Jin; Xu, Wu

    2017-06-01

    With the development of the “VR+” era, the traditional virtual assembly system of power equipment has been unable to satisfy our growing needs. In this paper, based on the analysis of the traditional virtual assembly system of electric power equipment and the application of VR technology in the virtual assembly system of electric power equipment in our country, this paper puts forward the scheme of establishing the virtual assembly system of power equipment: At first, we should obtain the information of power equipment, then we should using OpenGL and multi texture technology to build 3D solid graphics library. After the completion of three-dimensional modeling, we can use the dynamic link library DLL package three-dimensional solid graphics generation program to realize the modularization of power equipment model library and power equipment model library generated hidden algorithm. After the establishment of 3D power equipment model database, we set up the virtual assembly system of 3D power equipment to separate the assembly operation of the power equipment from the space. At the same time, aiming at the deficiency of the traditional gesture recognition algorithm, we propose a gesture recognition algorithm based on improved PSO algorithm for BP neural network data glove. Finally, the virtual assembly system of power equipment can really achieve multi-channel interaction function.

  14. Report on achievements of research and development of an automatic sewing system in fiscal 1988. High-tech assembling sub-system; 1998 nendo jido hosei system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Haiteku assemble sub system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-03-01

    The Automatic Sewing System Technology Research Association was commissioned from the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology on research of a production system by apparel types and systematization of an experiment plant. As the research on systematizing the experiment plant, the association is tackling with the researches on a high-speed laser cutting sub-system, a flexible sewing sub-system, a hi-tech assembling sub-system, and a three-dimensional flexible pressing sub-system. This paper reports the achievement of the research and development on the hi-tech assembling sub-system. This system was studied by grouping the system into a seam sewing technology and a three-dimensional sewing technology. The former technology deals with the processes of seam sewing of the side of the left body part in a model wear, sew-up margin division, straightening, and back center seam sewing. The latter technology deals with the sleeve fitting process. Although these processes are the subject of automated system, it is difficult to automate the back collar sewing, shoulder sewing and front collar sewing after the back center seam sewing process to just before the sleeve fitting process. Therefore, these processes are processed by retrofitting and three-dimensional sewing devices, and a control computer to transmit, receive and control the information required for the devices. The utilizing conditions of the sub-system constituting devices and the component technologies are tabulated in a table. (NEDO)

  15. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourme, Roger, E-mail: roger.fourme@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, Eric [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dhaussy, Anne-Claire [CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Maréchal Juin, 14000 Caen (France); Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Prangé, Thierry [LCRB (UMR 8015 CNRS), Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75270 Paris (France); Ascone, Isabella [ENSCP (UMR CNRS 7223), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mezouar, Mohamed [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kahn, Richard [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined.

  16. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) as a characterization technique for nanostructured self-assembled amphiphile systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aurelia W; Pascual-Izarra, Carlos; Pas, Steven J; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2009-01-08

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has potential as a novel rapid characterization method for self-assembly amphiphile systems; however, a lack of systematic correlation of PALS parameters with structural attributes has limited its more widespread application. In this study, using the well-characterized phytantriol/water and the phytantriol/vitamin E acetate/water self-assembly amphiphile systems, the impact of systematic structural changes controlled by changes in composition and temperature on PALS parameters has been studied. The PALS parameters (orthopositronium (oPs) lifetime and intensity signatures) were shown to be sensitive to the molecular packing and mobility of the self-assembled lipid molecules in various lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, enabling differentiation between liquid crystalline structures. The oPs lifetime, related to the molecular packing and mobility, is correlated with rheological properties of the individual mesophases. The oPs lifetime links the lipid chain packing and mobility in the various mesophases to resultant macroscopic properties, such as permeability, which is critical for the use of these mesophase structures as diffusion-controlled release matrices for active liposoluble compounds.

  17. Measurements on spent-fuel assemblies at Arkansas Nuclear One using the Fork system. Final report, January 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.I.; Bronowski, D.R.; Bosler, G.E.; Siebelist, R.; Priore, J.; Hansford, C.H.; Sullivan, S.

    1997-03-01

    The Fork measurement system has been used to examine spent-fuel assemblies at the two reactors of Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Entergy Operations, Inc. The Unit 1 reactor is a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design, and the Unit 2 reactor is a Combustion Engineering (CE) design. The neutron and gamma-ray emissions from individual spent-fuel assemblies were measured in the storage pools by raising each assembly pathway out of the storage rack and performing a measurement near the center of the assembly. The overall accuracy of the measurements after corrections is about 2%. Thirty-four assemblies were examined at Unit 1, and forty-one assemblies at Unit 2. The average deviation of the burnup measurements from the calibration was 3.0% at Unit 1 and 3.5% at Unit 2, indicating 2 to 3% random variation among the reactor records. There was no indication of clearly anomalous assemblies. Axial Scans of the variation in neutron and gamma ray emission were obtained by collecting data at several locations along the length of three assemblies at Unit 2. Two of these assemblies were nonstandard in that each contained a small neutron source. The sources were detected by the axial scans. The test program was a cooperative effort involving Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Entergy Operations, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy

  18. Experimental investigation of a two-phase closed thermosyphon assembly for passive containment cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Nyung [Kyunghee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    After the Fukushima accident, increasing interest has been raised in passive safety systems that maintain the integrity of the containment building. To improve the reliability and safety of nuclear power plants, long-term passive cooling concepts have been developed for advanced reactors. In a previous study, the proposed design was based on an ordinary cylindrical Two-Phase Closed Thermosyphon (TPCT). The exact assembly size and number of TPCTs should be elaborated upon through accurate calculations based on experiments. While the ultimate goal is to propose an effective MPHP design for the PCCS and experimentally verify its performance, a TPCT assembly that was manufactured based on the conceptual design in this paper was tested.

  19. A low-cost multichannel analyzer with data reduction assembly for continuous air monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoghi, B.; Lee, Y.; Nelson, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a microcontroller-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) with a data reduction assembly (DRA) for a plutonium continuous air monitor (CAM) system. The MCA is capable of detecting the airborne alpha emitters in the presence of radon daughter products. The pulse output from the preamplifier has been stretched to allow the peak detector sufficient time to capture the pulse height. The pulse amplitude conversion, the data acquisition, and the output functions are carried out fully by software. The DRA consists of a data reduction unit (DRU) and its operator interface panel. The data reduction assembly has the ability to be networked to a single PC with up to 332 different CAM's remotely connected to it

  20. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E., E-mail: berman@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, PO Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2014-04-08

    A description of the upgraded beamline X25 at the NSLS, operated by the PXRR and the Photon Sciences Directorate serving the Macromolecular Crystallography community, is presented. Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community.

  1. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E.

    2014-01-01

    A description of the upgraded beamline X25 at the NSLS, operated by the PXRR and the Photon Sciences Directorate serving the Macromolecular Crystallography community, is presented. Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community

  2. Overview of CMS robotic silicon module assembly hardware based on Aerotech Gantry Positioning system.

    CERN Multimedia

    Honma, Alan

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the robotic silicon module assembly pilot project is to fully automate the gluing and pick and placement of silicon sensors and front-end hybrid onto a carbon-fibre frame. The basis for thesystem is the Aerotech Gantry Positioning System (AGS10000) machineshown in the centre of the picture. To the left is the PC which contains the controller card and runs the user interface. To the rightis the rack of associated electronics which interfaces with the CERNbuilt tooling and vacuum chuck system.

  3. Shared robotic system: automated pipette calibration and pipette tip filter assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, J.H. Jr.; Dyches, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    At the Savannah River Laboratory a Zymate Laboratory Automation System has been developed to perform two completely independent tasks within one work cell. One operation is the precise calibration of pipettes; the other is the assembly of a filter in a pipette tip. Since neither task requires full robot time, the shared system is an economical means of robotizing both processes. These are tedious, repetitive, time consuming tasks; and human operators fail to yield constant results. Automation insures a repeatable process which increases product quality

  4. Extension of lattice cluster theory to strongly interacting, self-assembling polymeric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Karl F

    2009-02-14

    A new extension of the lattice cluster theory is developed to describe the influence of monomer structure and local correlations on the free energy of strongly interacting and self-assembling polymer systems. This extension combines a systematic high dimension (1/d) and high temperature expansion (that is appropriate for weakly interacting systems) with a direct treatment of strong interactions. The general theory is illustrated for a binary polymer blend whose two components contain "sticky" donor and acceptor groups, respectively. The free energy is determined as an explicit function of the donor-acceptor contact probabilities that depend, in turn, on the local structure and both the strong and weak interactions.

  5. Control of Macromolecular Architectures for Renewable Polymers: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuanbing

    The development of sustainable polymers from nature biomass is growing, but facing fierce competition from existing petrochemical-based counterparts. Controlling macromolecular architectures to maximize the properties of renewable polymers is a desirable approach to gain advantages. Given the complexity of biomass, there needs special consideration other than traditional design. In the presentation, I will talk about a few case studies on how macromolecular architectures could tune the properties of sustainable bioplastics and elastomers from renewable biomass such as resin acids (natural rosin) and plant oils.

  6. A translator writing system for microcomputer high-level languages and assemblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W. R.; Knight, J. C.; Noonan, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    In order to implement high level languages whenever possible, a translator writing system of advanced design was developed. It is intended for routine production use by many programmers working on different projects. As well as a fairly conventional parser generator, it includes a system for the rapid generation of table driven code generators. The parser generator was developed from a prototype version. The translator writing system includes various tools for the management of the source text of a compiler under construction. In addition, it supplies various default source code sections so that its output is always compilable and executable. The system thereby encourages iterative enhancement as a development methodology by ensuring an executable program from the earliest stages of a compiler development project. The translator writing system includes PASCAL/48 compiler, three assemblers, and two compilers for a subset of HAL/S.

  7. Acoustic methods for high-throughput protein crystal mounting at next-generation macromolecular crystallographic beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Christian G; Kuczewski, Anthony; Stearns, Richard; Ellson, Richard; Olechno, Joseph; Orville, Allen M; Allaire, Marc; Soares, Alexei S; Héroux, Annie

    2013-09-01

    To take full advantage of advanced data collection techniques and high beam flux at next-generation macromolecular crystallography beamlines, rapid and reliable methods will be needed to mount and align many samples per second. One approach is to use an acoustic ejector to eject crystal-containing droplets onto a solid X-ray transparent surface, which can then be positioned and rotated for data collection. Proof-of-concept experiments were conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source on thermolysin crystals acoustically ejected onto a polyimide `conveyor belt'. Small wedges of data were collected on each crystal, and a complete dataset was assembled from a well diffracting subset of these crystals. Future developments and implementation will focus on achieving ejection and translation of single droplets at a rate of over one hundred per second.

  8. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393, Japan) (Japan); Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo [NDD Corporation (1-1-6 Jounan, Mito, Ibaraki 310-0803, Japan) (Japan); Ito, Masahiro [NESI Inc. (4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393, Japan) (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  9. Design of a beam shaping assembly for an accelerator-based BNCT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stichelbaut, F.; Forton, E.; Jongen, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A complete BNCT system based on a high-intensity proton accelerator is developed by the IBA company. The neutron beam is produced via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction using a solid lithium target. The neutron energy spectrum is tailored with a beam shaping assembly surrounding the target. This device is the object of an extensive R and D project and is fully designed with the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX. The emphasis is put on the treatment quality, notably the radiation dose at the skin level, and the achievable neutron flux. (author)

  10. Self-assembled systems of water soluble metal 8-hydroxyquinolates with surfactants and conjugated polyelectrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burrows, Hugh D.; Costa, Telma; Luisa Ramos, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the interaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate (8-HQS) with the metal ions Al(III) and Zn(II) in aqueous solution in the presence of tetraalkylammonium surfactants using UV/vis absorption, fluorescence, NMR spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements, complemented by ...... assembly between the conjugated polyelectrolyte and the metal/8-HQS complex, as demonstrated by electronic energy transfer. The potential of these systems in sensing, light harvesting, and electron injection/transport layers in organic semiconductor devices is discussed....

  11. Benchmarks of subcriticality in accelerator-driven system at Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Ho Pyeon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Basic research on the accelerator-driven system is conducted by combining 235U-fueled and 232Th-loaded cores in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly with the pulsed neutron generator (14 MeV neutrons and the proton beam accelerator (100 MeV protons with a heavy metal target. The results of experimental subcriticality are presented with a wide range of subcriticality level between near critical and 10,000 pcm, as obtained by the pulsed neutron source method, the Feynman-α method, and the neutron source multiplication method.

  12. NASA Wrangler: Automated Cloud-Based Data Assembly in the RECOVER Wildfire Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John; Carroll, Mark; Gill, Roger; Wooten, Margaret; Weber, Keith; Blair, Kindra; May, Jeffrey; Toombs, William

    2017-01-01

    NASA Wrangler is a loosely-coupled, event driven, highly parallel data aggregation service designed to take advantageof the elastic resource capabilities of cloud computing. Wrangler automatically collects Earth observational data, climate model outputs, derived remote sensing data products, and historic biophysical data for pre-, active-, and post-wildfire decision making. It is a core service of the RECOVER decision support system, which is providing rapid-response GIS analytic capabilities to state and local government agencies. Wrangler reduces to minutes the time needed to assemble and deliver crucial wildfire-related data.

  13. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy glovebox assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ''cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  14. Acceptance of failed SNF [spent nuclear fuel] assemblies by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for delivery; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. This document discusses acceptance of failed spent fuel assemblies by the Federal Waste Management System. 18 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs

  15. COUPLED SIMULATION OF GAS COOLED FAST REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLY WITH NESTLE CODE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Osusky

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on coupled calculation of the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor. The proper modelling of coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics is the corner stone for future safety assessment of the control and emergency systems. Nowadays, the system and channel thermal-hydraulic codes are accepted by the national regulatory authorities in European Union for license purposes, therefore the code NESTLE was used for the simulation. The NESTLE code is a coupled multigroup neutron diffusion code with thermal-hydraulic sub-channel code. In the paper, the validation of NESTLE code 5.2.1 installation is presented. The processing of fuel assembly homogeneous parametric cross-section library for NESTLE code simulation is made by the sequence TRITON of SCALE code package system. The simulated case in the NESTLE code is one fuel assembly of GFR2400 concept with reflective boundary condition in radial direction and zero flux boundary condition in axial direction. The results of coupled calculation are presented and are consistent with the GFR2400 study of the GoFastR project.

  16. Micro-vision servo control of a multi-axis alignment system for optical fiber assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weihai; Yu, Fei; Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Jianbin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel optical fiber assembly system featuring a multi-axis alignment function based on micro-vision feedback control. It consists of an active parallel alignment mechanism, a passive compensation mechanism, a micro-gripper and a micro-vision servo control system. The active parallel alignment part is a parallelogram-based design with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) function to achieve precise rotation without fatal lateral motion. The passive mechanism, with five degrees of freedom (5-DOF), is used to implement passive compensation for multi-axis errors. A specially designed 1-DOF micro-gripper mounted onto the active parallel alignment platform is adopted to grasp and rotate the optical fiber. A micro-vision system equipped with two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras is introduced to observe the small field of view and obtain multi-axis errors for servo feedback control. The two CCD cameras are installed in an orthogonal arrangement—thus the errors can be easily measured via the captured images. Meanwhile, a series of tracking and measurement algorithms based on specific features of the target objects are developed. Details of the force and displacement sensor information acquisition in the assembly experiment are also provided. An experiment demonstrates the validity of the proposed visual algorithm by achieving the task of eliminating errors and inserting an optical fiber to the U-groove accurately. (paper)

  17. Simulation and development of a multi-leg homogeniser concentrating assembly for concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system with electrical rating analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-03-09

    Concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system utilizing multi-junction solar cells, is the main focus for current research, offering highest efficiency among all photovoltaic systems. The main aspect of CPV system is the design and performance of concentrating assembly, as it determines the performance of whole CPV system. However, the conventional design of CPV concentrating assembly dedicates one concentrator for each solar cell, in which single concentrator is capable to concentrate solar radiation onto single solar cell. This paper proposes a novel concentrating assembly for CPV system, which is designed to concentrate solar radiation onto four multi-junction solar cells with a single set of concentrators. The proposed design not only can reduce the number of concentrators and assembly efforts for CPV systems, but also achieved an acceptance angle of 1°. In this paper, the proposed multi-leg homogeniser CPV concentrating assembly is designed, developed, experimentally tested and verified through ray tracing simulation. The paper also discuss the development of mini, precise and accurate but cost effective two axis solar tracker for CPV system, which can be installed at any location even at rooftop of residential buildings, unlike conventional large scale CPV systems. Moreover, through the electrical rating analysis of the developed CPV system, its performance can be accurately estimated in any region. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation and development of a multi-leg homogeniser concentrating assembly for concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system with electrical rating analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad; Chua, Kian Jon Ernest; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    Concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system utilizing multi-junction solar cells, is the main focus for current research, offering highest efficiency among all photovoltaic systems. The main aspect of CPV system is the design and performance of concentrating assembly, as it determines the performance of whole CPV system. However, the conventional design of CPV concentrating assembly dedicates one concentrator for each solar cell, in which single concentrator is capable to concentrate solar radiation onto single solar cell. This paper proposes a novel concentrating assembly for CPV system, which is designed to concentrate solar radiation onto four multi-junction solar cells with a single set of concentrators. The proposed design not only can reduce the number of concentrators and assembly efforts for CPV systems, but also achieved an acceptance angle of 1°. In this paper, the proposed multi-leg homogeniser CPV concentrating assembly is designed, developed, experimentally tested and verified through ray tracing simulation. The paper also discuss the development of mini, precise and accurate but cost effective two axis solar tracker for CPV system, which can be installed at any location even at rooftop of residential buildings, unlike conventional large scale CPV systems. Moreover, through the electrical rating analysis of the developed CPV system, its performance can be accurately estimated in any region. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. INTRODUCTION: New trends in simulating colloids and self-assembling systems New trends in simulating colloids and self-assembling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, Giuseppe; Kahl, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    relatively high number of contributions as an indicator that the topics presented at these workshops represent substantial scientific developments. The particular motivation to organize these two workshops came from the fact that experimental work in colloidal physics is advancing rapidly around the globe. In contrast, theoretical and simulation approaches to investigate the wide range of new and surprising physical phenomena of colloidal systems is lagging behind this experimental progress. This is the more deploring since theory and simulation might provide a more profound understanding of many phenomena in soft and bio-related physics, such as phase behaviour, self-assembly strategies, or rheological properties, to name but a few. Furthermore this insight might help to guide experiment to design new colloid-based materials with desired properties. The declared aim of the two workshops was thus to bring together scientists who have contributed in recent time to new developments in colloidal physics and to share and discuss their latest innovations. While CECAM workshops traditionally bring together scientists from the theoretical and simulator communities, from the very beginning the organizers considered it an indispensable necessity to invite experimentalists. And indeed, the organizers are happy to confirm that the participation of experimentalists, theoreticians, and simulators was highly fruitful and mutually inspiring: discussions between all communities did help to understand the possibilities and limitations imposed by experiment, theory, and simulations. Reuniting thus all forces, the workshop did contribute to a deeper understanding in colloidal physics and has helped to address future aspects that might lead to more applied problems of technological relevance. The first workshop, entitled 'Computer Simulation Approaches to Study Self-Assembly: From Patchy Nano-Colloids to Virus Capsides', (organized by Jonathan Doye—University Of Oxford, Ard A Louis

  20. Overview of tritium processing development at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been operating with tritium since June 1984. Presently there are some 50 g of tritium in the main processing loop. This 50 g has been sufficient to do a number of experiments involving the cryogenic distillation isotope separation system and to integrate the fuel cleanup system into the main fuel processing loop. In January 1986 two major experiments were conducted. During these experiments the fuel cleanup system was integrated, through the transfer pumping system, with the isotope separation system, thus permitting testing on the integrated fuel processing loop. This integration of these systems leaves only the main vacuum system to be integrated into the TSTA fuel processing loop. In September 1986 another major tritium experiment was performed in which the integrated loop was operated, the tritium inventory increased to 50 g and additional measurements on the performance of the distillation system were taken. In the period June 1984 through September 1986 the TSTA system has processed well over 10 8 Ci of tritium. Total tritium emissions to the environment over this period have been less than 15 Ci. Personnel exposures during this period have totaled less than 100 person-mRem. To date, the development of tritium technology at TSTA has proceeded in progressive and orderly steps. In two years of operation with tritium, no major design flows have been uncovered

  1. Launch Lock Assemblies with Reduced Preload and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Launch lock assemblies with reduced preload are provided. The launch lock assembly comprises first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and a pair of retracting assemblies. Each retracting assembly comprises a pair of toothed members having interacting toothed surfaces. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement. When the releasable clamp device is actuated, the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement and one toothed member of each retracting assembly moves in an opposite direction relative to the other one toothed member of the other retracting assembly to define an axial gap on each side of the first mount piece.

  2. Development and characterization of the control assembly system for the large 2400 MWth Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Rimpault, G.; Morin, F.; Bosq, J.C.; Coddington, P.; Mikityuk, K.; Chawla, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper is related to the design and neutronic characterization of the principal control assembly system for the reference large (2400 MWth) Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), which makes use of ceramic-ceramic (CERCER) plate-type fuel-elements with (U-Pu) carbide fuel contained within a SiC inert matrix. For the neutronic calculations, the deterministic code system ERANOS-2.0 has been used, in association with a full core model including a European fast reactor (EFR)-type pattern for the control assemblies as a starting point. More specifically, the core contains a total of 33 control (control system device: CSD) and safety (diverse safety device: DSD) assemblies implemented in three banks. In the design of the new control assembly system, particular attention was given to the heat generation within the assemblies, so that both neutronic and thermal-hydraulic constraints could be appropriately accounted for. The thermal-hydraulic calculations have been performed with the code COPERNIC, significant coolant mass flow rates being found necessary to maintain acceptable cladding temperatures of the absorber pins. Complementary to the design study, neutronic investigations have been performed to assess the impact of the control assemblies in the GFR core in greater detail (rod interactions, shift of the flux, peaking factors, etc.). Thus, considerable shadowing effects have been observed between the first bank and the safety bank, as also between individual assemblies within the first bank. Large anti-shadowing effects also occur, the most prominent being that between the two CSD banks, where the total assembly worth is almost doubled in comparison to the sum of the individual values. Additional investigations have been performed and, in this context, it has been found that computation of the first-order eigenvalue and the eigenvalue separation is a robust tool to anticipate control assembly interactions in a large fast-spectrum core. One interesting

  3. Preliminary design study of an alternate heat source assembly for a Brayton isotope power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the preliminary design of an alternate heat source assembly (HSA) intended for use in the Brayton isotope power system (BIPS). The BIPS converts thermal energy emitted by a radioactive heat source into electrical energy by means of a closed Brayton cycle. A heat source heat exchanger configuration was selected and optimized. The design consists of a 10 turn helically wound Hastelloy X tube. Thermal analyses were performed for various operating conditions to ensure that post impact containment shell (PICS) temperatures remain within specified limits. These limits are essentially satisfied for all modes of operation except for the emergency cooling system for which the PICS temperatures are too high. Neon was found to be the best choice for a fill gas for auxiliary cooling system operation. Low cycle fatigue life, natural frequency, and dynamic loading requirements can be met with minor modifications to the existing HSA.

  4. Experiments on a ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ohno, Hideo; Naruse, Yuji; Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.; Binning, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser are developed in Japan and is tested with tritium in Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to confirm the feasibility as possible upgrades for the fuel cleanup system (PCU). The ceramic electrolysis cell made of stabilized zirconia was operated at 630 0 C for an extended period with a mixture of 3% T 2 O in He carrier gas in the circulation system with oxidizing catalyst bed. The palladium diffuser was tested with circulated pure tritium gas at 280 0 C to verify the compatibility of the alloy with tritium, since the 3 He produced in the metal could cause a degradation. The isotopic effects were also measured for both devices

  5. Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2006-01-01

    Nano-science and nano-technology are rapidly developing scientific and technological areas that deal with physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on nano-meter scale – one millionth of a millimeter. Self-organization and pattern formation play crucial role on nano-scales and promise new, effective routes to control various nano-scales processes. This book contains lecture notes written by the lecturers of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems" that took place in St Etienne de Tinee, France, in the fall 2004. They give examples of self-organization phenomena on micro- and nano-scale as well as examples of the interplay between phenomena on nano- and macro-scales leading to complex behavior in various physical, chemical and biological systems. They discuss such fascinating nano-scale self-organization phenomena as self-assembly of quantum dots in thin solid films, pattern formation in liquid crystals caused by light, self-organi...

  6. Managing bottlenecks in manual automobile assembly systems using discrete event simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa, M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Batch model lines are quite handy when the demand for each product is moderate. However, they are characterised by high work-in-progress inventories, lost production time when changing over models, and reduced flexibility when it comes to altering production rates as product demand changes. On the other hand, mixed model lines can offer reduced work-in-progress inventory and increased flexibility. The object of this paper is to illustrate that a manual automobile assembling system can be optimised through managing bottlenecks by ensuring high workstation utilisation, reducing queue lengths before stations and reducing station downtime. A case study from the automobile industry is used for data collection. A model is developed through the use of simulation software. The model is then verified and validated before a detailed bottleneck analysis is conducted. An operational strategy is then proposed for optimal bottleneck management. Although the paper focuses on improving automobile assembly systems in batch mode, the methodology can also be applied in single model manual and automated production lines.

  7. Flotillin scaffold activity contributes to type VII secretion system assembly in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mielich-Süss

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins are ubiquitous chaperones that promote efficient interactions between partners of multi-enzymatic protein complexes; although they are well studied in eukaryotes, their role in prokaryotic systems is poorly understood. Bacterial membranes have functional membrane microdomains (FMM, a structure homologous to eukaryotic lipid rafts. Similar to their eukaryotic counterparts, bacterial FMM harbor a scaffold protein termed flotillin that is thought to promote interactions between proteins spatially confined to the FMM. Here we used biochemical approaches to define the scaffold activity of the flotillin homolog FloA of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, using assembly of interacting protein partners of the type VII secretion system (T7SS as a case study. Staphylococcus aureus cells that lacked FloA showed reduced T7SS function, and thus reduced secretion of T7SS-related effectors, probably due to the supporting scaffold activity of flotillin. We found that the presence of flotillin mediates intermolecular interactions of T7SS proteins. We tested several small molecules that interfere with flotillin scaffold activity, which perturbed T7SS activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that flotillin assists in the assembly of S. aureus membrane components that participate in infection and influences the infective potential of this pathogen.

  8. Analytical Kinematics and Coupled Vibrations Analysis of Mechanical System Operated by Solar Array Drive Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M.; Wei, C.; Jalali, A.; Sattar, R.

    2017-07-01

    To address the impact of solar array (SA) anomalies and vibrations on performance of precision space-based operations, it is important to complete its accurate jitter analysis. This work provides mathematical modelling scheme to approximate kinematics and coupled micro disturbance dynamics of rigid load supported and operated by solar array drive assembly (SADA). SADA employed in analysis provides a step wave excitation torque to activate the system. Analytical investigations into kinematics is accomplished by using generalized linear and Euler angle coordinates, applying multi-body dynamics concepts and transformations principles. Theoretical model is extended, to develop equations of motion (EoM), through energy method (Lagrange equation). The main emphasis is to research coupled frequency response by determining energies dissipated and observing dynamic behaviour of internal vibratory systems of SADA. The disturbance model captures discrete active harmonics of SADA, natural modes and vibration amplifications caused by interactions between active harmonics and structural modes of mechanical assembly. The proposed methodology can help to predict true micro disturbance nature of SADA operating rigid load. Moreover, performance outputs may be compared against actual mission requirements to assess precise spacecraft controller design to meet next space generation stringent accuracy goals.

  9. Self-Assembly of Multi-nanozymes to Mimic an Intracellular Antioxidant Defense System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyan; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Chaoqun; Ju, Enguo; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, for the first time, we constructed a novel multi-nanozymes cooperative platform to mimic intracellular antioxidant enzyme-based defense system. V2 O5 nanowire served as a glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimic while MnO2 nanoparticle was used to mimic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). Dopamine was used as a linker to achieve the assembling of the nanomaterials. The obtained V2 O5 @pDA@MnO2 nanocomposite could serve as one multi-nanozyme model to mimic intracellular antioxidant enzyme-based defense procedure in which, for example SOD, CAT, and GPx co-participate. In addition, through assembling with dopamine, the hybrid nanocomposites provided synergistic antioxidative effect. Importantly, both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that our biocompatible system exhibited excellent intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) removal ability to protect cell components against oxidative stress, showing its potential application in inflammation therapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Simulation and development of a multi-leg homogeniser concentrating assembly for concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system with electrical rating analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhan, Muhammad; Chua, Kian Jon Ernest; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel multi-leg homogeniser concentrating assembly is developed for CPV system. • Single set of concentrator, concentrates sunlight on 4 MJCs with 1° acceptance angle. • The system performance is analyzed through experiment and ray tracing simulation. • Mini two axis solar tracker, with high tracking accuracy, is developed and tested. • Electrical rating analysis accurately estimates CPV system performance in any region. - Abstract: Concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system utilizing multi-junction solar cells, is the main focus for current research, offering highest efficiency among all photovoltaic systems. The main aspect of CPV system is the design and performance of concentrating assembly, as it determines the performance of whole CPV system. However, the conventional design of CPV concentrating assembly dedicates one concentrator for each solar cell, in which single concentrator is capable to concentrate solar radiation onto single solar cell. This paper proposes a novel concentrating assembly for CPV system, which is designed to concentrate solar radiation onto four multi-junction solar cells with a single set of concentrators. The proposed design not only can reduce the number of concentrators and assembly efforts for CPV systems, but also achieved an acceptance angle of 1°. In this paper, the proposed multi-leg homogeniser CPV concentrating assembly is designed, developed, experimentally tested and verified through ray tracing simulation. The paper also discuss the development of mini, precise and accurate but cost effective two axis solar tracker for CPV system, which can be installed at any location even at rooftop of residential buildings, unlike conventional large scale CPV systems. Moreover, through the electrical rating analysis of the developed CPV system, its performance can be accurately estimated in any region.

  11. Preliminary analysis of the safety and environmental impact of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.V.; Jalbert, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) is a facility dedicated to the development of technologies associated with the D-T fuel cycle of future fusion reactors while demonstrating that TSTA can be operated safely with no significant losses to the environment. During the initial design stage of TSTA, a safety analysis was performed which investigated the effects of major subsystem component failure, the meteorology and seismicity of the site and their possible effect on the facility, and accident scenarios which result in tritium releases. Major releases of tritium to the environment are considered highly improbable since they require a compound failure of primary and secondary containment, along with either a breach of the building or a failure of the Emergency Tritium Cleanup system. Accidental releases caused by natural phenomena (earthquake, tornado, etc.) are considered highly improbable

  12. Efficient systemic DNA delivery to the tumor by self-assembled nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailin; Xie, Xinhua; Guo, Jiaoli; Wei, Weidong; Wu, Minqing; Liu, Peng; Kong, Yanan; Yang, Lu; Hung, Mien-Chie; Xie, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    There are few delivery agents that could deliver gene with high efficiency and low toxicity, especially for animal experiments. Therefore, creating vectors with good delivery efficiency and safety profile is a meaningful work. We have developed a self-assembled gene delivery system (XM001), which can more efficiently deliver DNA to multiple cell lines and breast tumor, as compared to commercial delivery agents. In addition, systemically administrated XM001-BikDD (BikDD is a mutant form of proapoptotic gene Bik) significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells and prolonged the life span in implanted nude mice. This study demonstrates that XM001 is an efficient and widespread transfection agent, which could be a promising tumor delivery vector for cancer targeted therapy.

  13. Image processor of model-based vision system for assembly robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moribe, H.; Nakano, M.; Kuno, T.; Hasegawa, J.

    1987-01-01

    A special purpose image preprocessor for the visual system of assembly robots has been developed. The main function unit is composed of lookup tables to utilize the advantage of semiconductor memory for large scale integration, high speed and low price. More than one unit may be operated in parallel since it is designed on the standard IEEE 796 bus. The operation time of the preprocessor in line segment extraction is usually 200 ms per 500 segments, though it differs according to the complexity of scene image. The gray-scale visual system supported by the model-based analysis program using the extracted line segments recognizes partially visible or overlapping industrial workpieces, and detects these locations and orientations

  14. Fusion fuel purification during the Tritium Systems Test Assembly 3-week loop experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    During the time period from April 19, 1989--May 5, 1989, the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted its longest continuous integrated loop operation to date. This provided an opportunity to test some hitherto unproven capabilities of the TSTA Fuel Cleanup System (FCU). Previous FCU tests were reported. The purpose of the FCU is to remove impurities from a stream of hydrogen isotopes (Q 2 ) representative of torus exhaust gas. During this run impurities loadings ranging from 60 to 179 sccm of 90% N 2 and 10% CH 4 were fed to the FCU. Each of the two FCU main flow molecular sieve beds (MSB's) were filled to breakthrough three times. The MSB's were regenerated during loop operations. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Mechatronic Development and Vision Feedback Control of a Nanorobotics Manipulation System inside SEM for Nanodevice Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT have been developed in recent decades for nanodevices such as nanoradios, nanogenerators, carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs and so on, indicating that the application of CNTs for nanoscale electronics may play a key role in the development of nanotechnology. Nanorobotics manipulation systems are a promising method for nanodevice construction and assembly. For the purpose of constructing three-dimensional CNTFETs, a nanorobotics manipulation system with 16 DOFs was developed for nanomanipulation of nanometer-scale objects inside the specimen chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Nanorobotics manipulators are assembled into four units with four DOFs (X-Y-Z-θ individually. The rotational one is actuated by a picomotor. That means a manipulator has four DOFs including three linear motions in the X, Y, Z directions and a 360-degree rotational one (X-Y-Z-θ stage, θ is along the direction rotating with X or Y axis. Manipulators are actuated by picomotors with better than 30 nm linear resolution and <1 micro-rad rotary resolution. Four vertically installed AFM cantilevers (the axis of the cantilever tip is vertical to the axis of electronic beam of SEM served as the end-effectors to facilitate the real-time observation of the operations. A series of kinematic derivations of these four manipulators based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H notation were established. The common working space of the end-effectors is 2.78 mm by 4.39 mm by 6 mm. The manipulation strategy and vision feedback control for multi-manipulators operating inside the SEM chamber were been discussed. Finally, application of the designed nanorobotics manipulation system by successfully testing of the pickup-and-place manipulation of an individual CNT onto four probes was described. The experimental results have shown that carbon nanotubes can be successfully picked up with this nanorobotics manipulation system.

  16. Mechatronic Development and Vision Feedback Control of a Nanorobotics Manipulation System inside SEM for Nanodevice Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Wang, Yaqiong; Yang, Bin; Li, Guanghui; Chen, Tao; Nakajima, Masahiro; Sun, Lining; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed in recent decades for nanodevices such as nanoradios, nanogenerators, carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) and so on, indicating that the application of CNTs for nanoscale electronics may play a key role in the development of nanotechnology. Nanorobotics manipulation systems are a promising method for nanodevice construction and assembly. For the purpose of constructing three-dimensional CNTFETs, a nanorobotics manipulation system with 16 DOFs was developed for nanomanipulation of nanometer-scale objects inside the specimen chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nanorobotics manipulators are assembled into four units with four DOFs (X-Y-Z-θ) individually. The rotational one is actuated by a picomotor. That means a manipulator has four DOFs including three linear motions in the X, Y, Z directions and a 360-degree rotational one (X-Y-Z-θ stage, θ is along the direction rotating with X or Y axis). Manipulators are actuated by picomotors with better than 30 nm linear resolution and SEM) served as the end-effectors to facilitate the real-time observation of the operations. A series of kinematic derivations of these four manipulators based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) notation were established. The common working space of the end-effectors is 2.78 mm by 4.39 mm by 6 mm. The manipulation strategy and vision feedback control for multi-manipulators operating inside the SEM chamber were been discussed. Finally, application of the designed nanorobotics manipulation system by successfully testing of the pickup-and-place manipulation of an individual CNT onto four probes was described. The experimental results have shown that carbon nanotubes can be successfully picked up with this nanorobotics manipulation system. PMID:27649180

  17. Mechatronic Development and Vision Feedback Control of a Nanorobotics Manipulation System inside SEM for Nanodevice Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Wang, Yaqiong; Yang, Bin; Li, Guanghui; Chen, Tao; Nakajima, Masahiro; Sun, Lining; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-09-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed in recent decades for nanodevices such as nanoradios, nanogenerators, carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) and so on, indicating that the application of CNTs for nanoscale electronics may play a key role in the development of nanotechnology. Nanorobotics manipulation systems are a promising method for nanodevice construction and assembly. For the purpose of constructing three-dimensional CNTFETs, a nanorobotics manipulation system with 16 DOFs was developed for nanomanipulation of nanometer-scale objects inside the specimen chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nanorobotics manipulators are assembled into four units with four DOFs (X-Y-Z-θ) individually. The rotational one is actuated by a picomotor. That means a manipulator has four DOFs including three linear motions in the X, Y, Z directions and a 360-degree rotational one (X-Y-Z-θ stage, θ is along the direction rotating with X or Y axis). Manipulators are actuated by picomotors with better than 30 nm linear resolution and <1 micro-rad rotary resolution. Four vertically installed AFM cantilevers (the axis of the cantilever tip is vertical to the axis of electronic beam of SEM) served as the end-effectors to facilitate the real-time observation of the operations. A series of kinematic derivations of these four manipulators based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) notation were established. The common working space of the end-effectors is 2.78 mm by 4.39 mm by 6 mm. The manipulation strategy and vision feedback control for multi-manipulators operating inside the SEM chamber were been discussed. Finally, application of the designed nanorobotics manipulation system by successfully testing of the pickup-and-place manipulation of an individual CNT onto four probes was described. The experimental results have shown that carbon nanotubes can be successfully picked up with this nanorobotics manipulation system.

  18. Microbial community assembly patterns under incipient conditions in a basaltic soil system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, A.; Stegen, J.; Alves Meira Neto, A.; Wang, Y.; Chorover, J.; Troch, P. A. A.; Maier, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    In sub-surface environments, the biotic components are critically linked to the abiotic processes. However, there is limited understanding of community establishment, functional associations, and community assembly processes of such microbes in sub-surface environments. This study presents the first analysis of microbial signatures in an incipient terrestrial basalt soil system conducted under controlled conditions. A sub-meter scale sampling of a soil mesocosm revealed the contrasting distribution patterns of simple soil parameters such as bulk density and electrical conductivity. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene indicated the presence of a total 40 bacterial and archaeal phyla, with high relative abundance of Actinobacteria on the surface and highest abundance of Proteobacteria throughout the system. Community diversity patterns were inferred to be dependent on depth profile and average water content in the system. Predicted functional gene analysis suggested mixotrophy lifestyles with both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms, likelihood of a unique salt tolerant methanogenic pathway with links to novel Euryarchea, signatures of an incomplete nitrogen cycle, and predicted enzymes of extracellular iron (II) to iron (III) conversion followed by intracellular uptake, transport and regulation. Null modeling revealed microbial community assembly was predominantly governed by variable selection, but the influence of the variable selection did not show systematic spatial structure. The presence of significant heterogeneity in predicted functions and ecologically deterministic shifts in community composition in a homogeneous incipient basalt highlights the complexity exhibited by microorganisms even in the simplest of environmental systems. This presents an opportunity to further develop our understanding of how microbial communities establish, evolve, impact, and respond in sub-surface environments.

  19. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Mayola, Albert; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  20. Visualization of the Serratia Type VI Secretion System Reveals Unprovoked Attacks and Dynamic Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Gerc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Type VI secretion system (T6SS is a bacterial nanomachine that fires toxic proteins into target cells. Deployment of the T6SS represents an efficient and widespread means by which bacteria attack competitors or interact with host organisms and may be triggered by contact from an attacking neighbor cell as a defensive strategy. Here, we use the opportunist pathogen Serratia marcescens and functional fluorescent fusions of key components of the T6SS to observe different subassemblies of the machinery simultaneously and on multiple timescales in vivo. We report that the localization and dynamic behavior of each of the components examined is distinct, revealing a multi-stage and dynamic assembly process for the T6SS machinery. We also show that the T6SS can assemble and fire without needing a cell contact trigger, defining an aggressive strategy that broadens target range and suggesting that activation of the T6SS is tailored to survival in specific niches.

  1. Visualization of the Serratia Type VI Secretion System Reveals Unprovoked Attacks and Dynamic Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerc, Amy J.; Diepold, Andreas; Trunk, Katharina; Porter, Michael; Rickman, Colin; Armitage, Judith P.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial nanomachine that fires toxic proteins into target cells. Deployment of the T6SS represents an efficient and widespread means by which bacteria attack competitors or interact with host organisms and may be triggered by contact from an attacking neighbor cell as a defensive strategy. Here, we use the opportunist pathogen Serratia marcescens and functional fluorescent fusions of key components of the T6SS to observe different subassemblies of the machinery simultaneously and on multiple timescales in vivo. We report that the localization and dynamic behavior of each of the components examined is distinct, revealing a multi-stage and dynamic assembly process for the T6SS machinery. We also show that the T6SS can assemble and fire without needing a cell contact trigger, defining an aggressive strategy that broadens target range and suggesting that activation of the T6SS is tailored to survival in specific niches. PMID:26387948

  2. Manufacturing of a Secretoneurin Drug Delivery System with Self-Assembled Protamine Nanoparticles by Titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheicher, Bernhard; Lorenzer, Cornelia; Gegenbauer, Katrin; Partlic, Julia; Andreae, Fritz; Kirsch, Alexander H.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Werzer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Since therapeutic peptides and oligonucleotides are gathering interests as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are becoming of great importance. Thereby, the possibility to design drug delivery systems according to the therapeutic needs of APIs enhances clinical implementation. Over the last years, the focus of our group was laid on protamine-oligonucleotide-nanoparticles (so called proticles), however, the possibility to modify the size, zeta potential or loading efficiencies was limited. Therefore, at the present study we integrated a stepwise addition of protamine (titration) into the formation process of proticles loaded with the angiogenic neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN). A particle size around 130 nm was determined when proticles were assembled by the commonly used protamine addition at once. Through application of the protamine titration process it was possible to modify and adjust the particle size between approx. 120 and 1200 nm (dependent on mass ratio) without influencing the SN loading capacity. Dynamic light scattering pointed out that the difference in particle size was most probably the result of a secondary aggregation. Initially-formed particles of early stages in the titration process aggregated towards bigger assemblies. Atomic-force-microscopy images also revealed differences in morphology along with different particle size. In contrast, the SN loading was only influenced by the applied mass ratio, where a slight saturation effect was observable. Up to 65% of deployed SN could be imbedded into the proticle matrix. An in-vivo biodistribution study (i.m.) showed a retarded distribution of SN from the site of injection after the application of a SN-proticle formulation. Further, it was demonstrated that SN loaded proticles can be successfully freeze-dried and resuspended afterwards. To conclude, the integration of the protamine titration process offers new possibilities for the formulation of proticles in

  3. Two-Stage orders sequencing system for mixed-model assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemczak, M.; Skolud, B.; Krenczyk, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the paper, the authors focus on the NP-hard problem of orders sequencing, formulated similarly to Car Sequencing Problem (CSP). The object of the research is the assembly line in an automotive industry company, on which few different models of products, each in a certain number of versions, are assembled on the shared resources, set in a line. Such production type is usually determined as a mixed-model production, and arose from the necessity of manufacturing customized products on the basis of very specific orders from single clients. The producers are nowadays obliged to provide each client the possibility to determine a huge amount of the features of the product they are willing to buy, as the competition in the automotive market is large. Due to the previously mentioned nature of the problem (NP-hard), in the given time period only satisfactory solutions are sought, as the optimal solution method has not yet been found. Most of the researchers that implemented inaccurate methods (e.g. evolutionary algorithms) to solving sequencing problems dropped the research after testing phase, as they were not able to obtain reproducible results, and met problems while determining the quality of the received solutions. Therefore a new approach to solving the problem, presented in this paper as a sequencing system is being developed. The sequencing system consists of a set of determined rules, implemented into computer environment. The system itself works in two stages. First of them is connected with the determination of a place in the storage buffer to which certain production orders should be sent. In the second stage of functioning, precise sets of sequences are determined and evaluated for certain parts of the storage buffer under certain criteria.

  4. Crowding-facilitated macromolecular transport in attractive micropost arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Fan-Tso; Lin, Po-Keng; Chien, Wei; Hung, Cheng-Hsiang; Yu, Ming-Hung; Chou, Chia-Fu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2017-05-02

    Our study of DNA dynamics in weakly attractive nanofabricated post arrays revealed crowding enhances polymer transport, contrary to hindered transport in repulsive medium. The coupling of DNA diffusion and adsorption to the microposts results in more frequent cross-post hopping and increased long-term diffusivity with increased crowding density. We performed Langevin dynamics simulations and found maximum long-term diffusivity in post arrays with gap sizes comparable to the polymer radius of gyration. We found that macromolecular transport in weakly attractive post arrays is faster than in non-attractive dense medium. Furthermore, we employed hidden Markov analysis to determine the transition of macromolecular adsorption-desorption on posts and hopping between posts. The apparent free energy barriers are comparable to theoretical estimates determined from polymer conformational fluctuations.

  5. Stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithms for macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Compartment-based (lattice-based) reaction-diffusion algorithms are often used for studying complex stochastic spatio-temporal processes inside cells. In this paper the influence of macromolecular crowding on stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations is investigated. Reaction-diffusion processes are considered on two different kinds of compartmental lattice, a cubic lattice and a hexagonal close packed lattice, and solved using two different algorithms, the stochastic simulation algorithm and the spatiocyte algorithm (Arjunan and Tomita 2010 Syst. Synth. Biol. 4, 35-53). Obstacles (modelling macromolecular crowding) are shown to have substantial effects on the mean squared displacement and average number of molecules in the domain but the nature of these effects is dependent on the choice of lattice, with the cubic lattice being more susceptible to the effects of the obstacles. Finally, improvements for both algorithms are presented.

  6. Diffusion accessibility as a method for visualizing macromolecular surface geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yingssu; Holton, Thomas; Yeates, Todd O

    2015-10-01

    Important three-dimensional spatial features such as depth and surface concavity can be difficult to convey clearly in the context of two-dimensional images. In the area of macromolecular visualization, the computer graphics technique of ray-tracing can be helpful, but further techniques for emphasizing surface concavity can give clearer perceptions of depth. The notion of diffusion accessibility is well-suited for emphasizing such features of macromolecular surfaces, but a method for calculating diffusion accessibility has not been made widely available. Here we make available a web-based platform that performs the necessary calculation by solving the Laplace equation for steady state diffusion, and produces scripts for visualization that emphasize surface depth by coloring according to diffusion accessibility. The URL is http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/DiffAcc/. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  7. Modeling the multi-scale mechanisms of macromolecular resource allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Laurence; Yurkovich, James T; King, Zachary A

    2018-01-01

    As microbes face changing environments, they dynamically allocate macromolecular resources to produce a particular phenotypic state. Broad 'omics' data sets have revealed several interesting phenomena regarding how the proteome is allocated under differing conditions, but the functional consequen...... and detail how mathematical models have aided in our understanding of these processes. Ultimately, such modeling efforts have helped elucidate the principles of proteome allocation and hold promise for further discovery....

  8. Quantifying input uncertainty in an assemble-to-order system simulation with correlated input variables of mixed types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akçay, A.E.; Biller, B.

    2014-01-01

    We consider an assemble-to-order production system where the product demands and the time since the last customer arrival are not independent. The simulation of this system requires a multivariate input model that generates random input vectors with correlated discrete and continuous components. In

  9. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliermans,; Carl, B [Augusta, GA

    2012-08-07

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  10. Numerical modeling assistance system in finite element analysis for the structure of an assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Norihiro; Nishida, Akemi; Kawakami, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Iigaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The objective of structural analysis and seismic response analysis are well recognized and utilized as one of sophisticated analysis tools for design objects in the nuclear engineering. The way to design nuclear facilities is always in compromising with many index, such as costs, performance, robustness and so on, but the most important issues is the safety. It is true the structural analysis and seismic response analysis plays an important role to insure the safety, since it is well known that Japan is always facing to the earthquake. In this paper, a numerical analysis's controlling and managing system is implemented on a supercomputer, which controls the modelling process and data treating for structural robustness, although a numerical analysis's manager only controls a structural analysis by finite element method. The modeling process is described by the list of function ID and its procedures in a data base. The analytical modeling manager executes the process by order of the lists for simulation procedures. The manager controls the intention of an analysis by changing the analytical process one to another. Modeling process was experimentally found that may subject to the intention of designing index. The numerical experiments were carried out with static analyses and dynamic analyses. The results of its experiment introduce reasonable discussion to understand the accuracy of simulation. In the numerical experiments, K, supercomputer is utilized by using parallel computing resource with the controlling and managing system. The structural analysis and seismic response analysis are done by the FIEST, finite element analysis for the structure of an assembly, which carries out the simulation by gathering components. As components are attached to one another to build an assembly, and, therefore, the interactions between the components due to differences in material properties and their connection conditions considerably affect the behavior of an assembly. FIESTA is

  11. Towards a compact and precise sample holder for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Gergely; Rossi, Christopher; Janocha, Robert; Sorez, Clement; Lopez-Marrero, Marcos; Astruc, Anthony; McCarthy, Andrew; Belrhali, Hassan; Bowler, Matthew W; Cipriani, Florent

    2017-10-01

    Most of the sample holders currently used in macromolecular crystallography offer limited storage density and poor initial crystal-positioning precision upon mounting on a goniometer. This has now become a limiting factor at high-throughput beamlines, where data collection can be performed in a matter of seconds. Furthermore, this lack of precision limits the potential benefits emerging from automated harvesting systems that could provide crystal-position information which would further enhance alignment at beamlines. This situation provided the motivation for the development of a compact and precise sample holder with corresponding pucks, handling tools and robotic transfer protocols. The development process included four main phases: design, prototype manufacture, testing with a robotic sample changer and validation under real conditions on a beamline. Two sample-holder designs are proposed: NewPin and miniSPINE. They share the same robot gripper and allow the storage of 36 sample holders in uni-puck footprint-style pucks, which represents 252 samples in a dry-shipping dewar commonly used in the field. The pucks are identified with human- and machine-readable codes, as well as with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. NewPin offers a crystal-repositioning precision of up to 10 µm but requires a specific goniometer socket. The storage density could reach 64 samples using a special puck designed for fully robotic handling. miniSPINE is less precise but uses a goniometer mount compatible with the current SPINE standard. miniSPINE is proposed for the first implementation of the new standard, since it is easier to integrate at beamlines. An upgraded version of the SPINE sample holder with a corresponding puck named SPINEplus is also proposed in order to offer a homogenous and interoperable system. The project involved several European synchrotrons and industrial companies in the fields of consumables and sample-changer robotics. Manual handling of mini

  12. A 3D Image Filter for Parameter-Free Segmentation of Macromolecular Structures from Electron Tomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rubbiya A.; Landsberg, Michael J.; Knauth, Emily; Morgan, Garry P.; Marsh, Brad J.; Hankamer, Ben

    2012-01-01

    3D image reconstruction of large cellular volumes by electron tomography (ET) at high (≤5 nm) resolution can now routinely resolve organellar and compartmental membrane structures, protein coats, cytoskeletal filaments, and macromolecules. However, current image analysis methods for identifying in situ macromolecular structures within the crowded 3D ultrastructural landscape of a cell remain labor-intensive, time-consuming, and prone to user-bias and/or error. This paper demonstrates the development and application of a parameter-free, 3D implementation of the bilateral edge-detection (BLE) algorithm for the rapid and accurate segmentation of cellular tomograms. The performance of the 3D BLE filter has been tested on a range of synthetic and real biological data sets and validated against current leading filters—the pseudo 3D recursive and Canny filters. The performance of the 3D BLE filter was found to be comparable to or better than that of both the 3D recursive and Canny filters while offering the significant advantage that it requires no parameter input or optimisation. Edge widths as little as 2 pixels are reproducibly detected with signal intensity and grey scale values as low as 0.72% above the mean of the background noise. The 3D BLE thus provides an efficient method for the automated segmentation of complex cellular structures across multiple scales for further downstream processing, such as cellular annotation and sub-tomogram averaging, and provides a valuable tool for the accurate and high-throughput identification and annotation of 3D structural complexity at the subcellular level, as well as for mapping the spatial and temporal rearrangement of macromolecular assemblies in situ within cellular tomograms. PMID:22479430

  13. What Macromolecular Crowding Can Do to a Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular environment represents an extremely crowded milieu, with a limited amount of free water and an almost complete lack of unoccupied space. Obviously, slightly salted aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of a biomolecule of interest are too simplistic to mimic the “real life” situation, where the biomolecule of interest scrambles and wades through the tightly packed crowd. In laboratory practice, such macromolecular crowding is typically mimicked by concentrated solutions of various polymers that serve as model “crowding agents”. Studies under these conditions revealed that macromolecular crowding might affect protein structure, folding, shape, conformational stability, binding of small molecules, enzymatic activity, protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions, and pathological aggregation. The goal of this review is to systematically analyze currently available experimental data on the variety of effects of macromolecular crowding on a protein molecule. The review covers more than 320 papers and therefore represents one of the most comprehensive compendia of the current knowledge in this exciting area. PMID:25514413

  14. Macromolecular target prediction by self-organizing feature maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gisbert; Schneider, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Rational drug discovery would greatly benefit from a more nuanced appreciation of the activity of pharmacologically active compounds against a diverse panel of macromolecular targets. Already, computational target-prediction models assist medicinal chemists in library screening, de novo molecular design, optimization of active chemical agents, drug re-purposing, in the spotting of potential undesired off-target activities, and in the 'de-orphaning' of phenotypic screening hits. The self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm has been employed successfully for these and other purposes. Areas covered: The authors recapitulate contemporary artificial neural network methods for macromolecular target prediction, and present the basic SOM algorithm at a conceptual level. Specifically, they highlight consensus target-scoring by the employment of multiple SOMs, and discuss the opportunities and limitations of this technique. Expert opinion: Self-organizing feature maps represent a straightforward approach to ligand clustering and classification. Some of the appeal lies in their conceptual simplicity and broad applicability domain. Despite known algorithmic shortcomings, this computational target prediction concept has been proven to work in prospective settings with high success rates. It represents a prototypic technique for future advances in the in silico identification of the modes of action and macromolecular targets of bioactive molecules.

  15. Design and application of a C++ macromolecular class library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W; Shindyalov, I N; Pu, C; Bourne, P E

    1994-01-01

    PDBlib is an extensible object oriented class library written in C++ for representing the 3-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules. PDBlib forms the kernel of a larger software framework being developed for assiting in knowledge discovery from macromolecular structure data. The software design strategy used by PDBlib, how the library may be used and several prototype applications that use the library are summarized. PDBlib represents the structural features of proteins, DNA, RNA, and complexes thereof, at a level of detail on a par with that which can be parsed from a Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry. However, the memory resident representation of the macromolecule is independent of the PDB entry and can be obtained from other back-end data sources, for example, existing relational databases and our own object oriented database (OOPDB) built on top of the commercial object oriented database, ObjectStore. At the front-end are several prototype applications that use the library: Macromolecular Query Language (MMQL) is based on a separate class library (MMQLlib) for building complex queries pertaining to macromolecular structure; PDBtool is an interactive structure verification tool; and PDBview, is a structure rendering tool used either as a standalone tool or as part of another application. Each of these software components are described. All software is available via anonymous ftp from cuhhca.hhmi.columbia.edu.

  16. Effect of island shape on dielectrophoretic assembly of metal nanoparticle chains in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Haitao; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Liu, Weiyu; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Zhou, Yaopei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Conductive island shape influences the dynamic process occurring in DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. • The DEP-assembled nanoparticle wires form a straighter conduction path with the increase in the geometric angle of conductive island tip. • The different island shapes distort the DEP force distribution and increase the local electrothermally induced fluid flow to different extents, which is important for the morphology and electrical conductance quality of the DEP-assembled metal nanoparticle chains. - Abstract: The electrical conduction quality of an electric circuit connection formed by dielectrophoretic (DEP)-assembled metal nanoparticle wires between small conductive elements plays a significant role in electronic devices. One of the major challenges for improving the electrical conductance of nanowires is optimizing their geometric morphology. So far, the electrical conduction quality has been enhanced by optimizing the AC frequency and conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions. Herein, the effect of the conductive island shapes on the dynamic process occurring in a DEP assembly of 10 nm gold nanoparticles was investigated in a conductive-island-based microelectrode system. The nanoparticle wires between the microelectrodes were assembled in situ from colloidal suspensions. The wires were grown in a much straighter route by increasing the geometric angle of the conductive-island tip. To validate the experiments, the effects of mutual DEP interactions and electrothermally induced fluid flow on the dynamic behavior of particle motion for different island geometric configurations in the conductive-island-based microelectrode system were determined by numerical simulations. The simulation results are consistent with those of experiments. This indicates that different conductive island shapes change the distribution of DEP force and increase the electrothermally induced fluid flow to

  17. An Automatic Assembling System for Sealing Rings Based on Machine Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to grab and place the sealing rings of battery lid quickly and accurately, an automatic assembling system for sealing rings based on machine vision is developed in this paper. The whole system is composed of the light sources, cameras, industrial control units, and a 4-degree-of-freedom industrial robot. Specifically, the sealing rings are recognized and located automatically with the machine vision module. Then industrial robot is controlled for grabbing the sealing rings dynamically under the joint work of multiple control units and visual feedback. Furthermore, the coordinates of the fast-moving battery lid are tracked by the machine vision module. Finally the sealing rings are placed on the sealing ports of battery lid accurately and automatically. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system can grab the sealing rings and place them on the sealing port of the fast-moving battery lid successfully. More importantly, the proposed system can improve the efficiency of the battery production line obviously.

  18. Principles of designing cyber-physical system of producing mechanical assembly components at Industry 4.0 enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjanov, A. V.; Zakoldaev, D. A.; Shukalov, A. V.; Zharinov, I. O.

    2018-03-01

    The task of developing principles of cyber-physical system constitution at the Industry 4.0 company of the item designing components of mechanical assembly production is being studied. The task has been solved by analyzing the components and technologies, which have some practical application in the digital production organization. The list of components has been defined and the authors proposed the scheme of the components and technologies interconnection in the Industry 4.0 of mechanical assembly production to make an uninterrupted manufacturing route of the item designing components with application of some cyber-physical systems.

  19. Application of assembly module to high-temperature gas-cooled reactor full-scope simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sifeng; Li Fu; Ma Yuanle; Shi Lei

    2007-01-01

    According to the circumstances that exist in the reactor full-scope simulators development as long development cycle, very difficult upgrade and narrow range of applicability, a kind of new model was developed based on assembly module which root in Linux kernel and successfully applied to the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor full-scope simulator system. The simulation results are coincident with the experimental ones, and it indicates that the new model based on assembly module is feasible to design of high-temperature gas cooled reactor simulation system. (authors)

  20. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  1. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  2. Enhancing Three-dimensional Movement Control System for Assemblies of Machine-Building Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, O. N.; Andreeva, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Aspects of enhancing three-dimensional movement control system are given in the paper. Such system is to be used while controlling assemblies of machine-building facilities, which is a relevant issue. The base of the system known is three-dimensional movement control device with optical principle of action. The device consists of multi point light emitter and light receiver matrix. The processing of signals is enhanced to increase accuracy of measurements by switching from discrete to analog signals. Light receiver matrix is divided into four areas, and the output value of each light emitter in each matrix area is proportional to its luminance level. Thus, determing output electric signal value of each light emitter in corresponding area leads to determing position of multipoint light emitter and position of object tracked. This is done by using Case-based reasoning method, the precedent in which is described as integral signal value of each matrix area, coordinates of light receivers, which luminance level is high, and decision to be made in this situation.

  3. Improving anticancer activity and reducing systemic toxicity of doxorubicin by self-assembled polymeric micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Maling; Shi Huashan; Guo Gang; Men Ke; Zhang Juan; Li Zhiyong; Luo Feng; Qian Zhiyong; Wei Yuquan; Zheng Lan; Zhao Xia

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to improve anticancer activity and reduce systemic toxicity of doxorubicin (Dox), we encapsulated Dox in monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) micelles by a novel self-assembly procedure without using surfactants, organic solvents or vigorous stirring. These Dox encapsulated MPEG-PCL (Dox/MPEG-PCL) micelles with drug loading of 4.2% were monodisperse and ∼ 20 nm in diameter. The Dox can be released from the Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles; the Dox-release at pH 5.5 was faster than that at pH 7.0. Encapsulation of Dox in MPEG-PCL micelles enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of Dox on the C-26 colon carcinoma cell in vitro, and slowed the extravasation of Dox in the transgenic zebrafish model. Compared to free Dox, Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles were more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in the subcutaneous C-26 colon carcinoma and Lewis lung carcinoma models, and prolonging survival of mice bearing these tumors. Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles also induced lower systemic toxicity than free Dox. In conclusion, incorporation of Dox in MPEG-PCL micelles enhanced the anticancer activity and decreased the systemic toxicity of Dox; these Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles are an interesting formulation of Dox and may have potential clinical applications in cancer therapy.

  4. Improving anticancer activity and reducing systemic toxicity of doxorubicin by self-assembled polymeric micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou Maling; Shi Huashan; Guo Gang; Men Ke; Zhang Juan; Li Zhiyong; Luo Feng; Qian Zhiyong; Wei Yuquan [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zheng Lan; Zhao Xia, E-mail: anderson-qian@163.com [West China Second University Hospital, West China Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-03-04

    In an attempt to improve anticancer activity and reduce systemic toxicity of doxorubicin (Dox), we encapsulated Dox in monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) micelles by a novel self-assembly procedure without using surfactants, organic solvents or vigorous stirring. These Dox encapsulated MPEG-PCL (Dox/MPEG-PCL) micelles with drug loading of 4.2% were monodisperse and {approx} 20 nm in diameter. The Dox can be released from the Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles; the Dox-release at pH 5.5 was faster than that at pH 7.0. Encapsulation of Dox in MPEG-PCL micelles enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of Dox on the C-26 colon carcinoma cell in vitro, and slowed the extravasation of Dox in the transgenic zebrafish model. Compared to free Dox, Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles were more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in the subcutaneous C-26 colon carcinoma and Lewis lung carcinoma models, and prolonging survival of mice bearing these tumors. Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles also induced lower systemic toxicity than free Dox. In conclusion, incorporation of Dox in MPEG-PCL micelles enhanced the anticancer activity and decreased the systemic toxicity of Dox; these Dox/MPEG-PCL micelles are an interesting formulation of Dox and may have potential clinical applications in cancer therapy.

  5. Research project on accelerator-driven subcritical system using FFAG accelerator and Kyoto University critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Unesaki, Hironobu; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanigaki, Minoru; Mori, Yoshiharu; Shiroya, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Ishi, Y.; Fukumoto, Shintaro

    2005-01-01

    The KART (Kumatori Accelerator-driven Reactor Test facility) project started in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University in fiscal year 2002 with the grant by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the basis feasibility of accelerator driven system (ADS), studying the effect of incident neutron energy on the effective multiplication factor in a subcritical nuclear fuel system. For this purpose, a variable-energy FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) accelerator complex is being constructed to be coupled with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The FFAG proton accelerator complex consists of ion-beta, booster and main rings. This system aims to attain 1 μA proton beam with energy range from 20 to 150 MeV with a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The first beam from the FFAG complex is expected to be available by the end of FY 2005, and the experiment on ADS with KUCA and the FFAG complex (FFAG-KUCA experiment) will start in FY 2006. Before the FFAG-KUCA experiment starts, preliminary experiments with 14 MeV neutrons are currently being performed using a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator coupled with the KUCA. Experimental data are analyzed using continuous energy Monte-Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and MNCP-X. (author)

  6. Study of weld quality real-time monitoring system for auto-body assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Yong-Bing; Chen, Guan-Long

    2005-12-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is widely used for the auto-body assembly in automotive industry. But RSW suffers from a major problem of inconsistent quality from weld to weld. The major problem is the complexity of the basic process that may involve material coatings, electrode force, electrode wear, fit up, etc. Therefore weld quality assurance is still a big challenge and goal. Electrode displacement has proved to be a particularly useful signal which correlates well with weld quality. This paper introduces a novel auto-body spot weld quality monitoring system which uses electrode displacement as the quality parameter. This system chooses the latest laser displacement sensor with high resolution to measure the real-time electrode displacement. It solves the interference problem of sensor mounting by designing special fixture, and can be successfully applied on the portable welding machine. It is capable of evaluating weld quality and making diagnosis of process variations such as surface asperities, shunting, worn electrode and weld expansion with real-time electrode displacement. As proved by application in the workshop, the monitoring system has good stability and reliability, and is qualified for monitoring weld quality in process.

  7. A modification design and adjusting test for instruments and control system of critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Manrong; Li Guangjian

    1996-12-01

    A more reliable and safe control system and it's instruments for HFETRCA (high flux engineering test reactor critical assembly) have been built. In the system high performance CMOS unit was used, which has high integration, strong anti-interference and high trigger threshold. In the design of control rod driving circuit, the speed negative feedback principle was applied that results in more stable rotating rate of motors of transmission mechanism and more flexibility of adjusting rod speed. In order to improve reactor safety in accident, additional control circuit is equipped, by which not only control rods with electromagnet will rapidly drop but also other control rods will insert at the speed of 2∼6 times faster than the normal inserting speed. The key technique in the adjustment and new method of anti-interference are also introduced. After more than 40 times physical experiments with (4 x 4 - 4) fuel element in HFETRC, it is proved that the design and adjustment of the system is successful and they can be used as a reference to others. (3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  8. Five years of tritium handling experience at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a facility designed to develop and demonstrate, in full scale, technologies necessary for safe and efficient operation of tritium systems required for tokamak fusion reactors. TSTA currently consists of systems for evacuating reactor exhaust gas with compound cryopumps; for removing impurities from plasma exhaust gas and recovering the chemically-combined tritium; for separating the isotopes of hydrogen; for transfer pumping; or storage of hydrogen isotopes; for gas analysis; and for assuring safety by the necessary control, monitoring, and tritium removal from effluent streams. TSTA also has several small scale experiments to develop and test new equipment and processes necessary for fusion reactors. In this paper, data on component reliability, failure types and rates, and waste quantities are presented. TSTA has developed a Quality Assurance program for preparing and controlling the documentation of the procedures required for the design, purchase, and operation of the tritium systems. Operational experience under normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions is presented. One unique aspect of operations at TSTA is that the design personnel for the TSTA systems are also part of the operating personnel. This has allowed for the relatively smooth transition from design to operations. TSTA has been operated initially as a research facility. As the system is better defined, operations are proceeding toward production modes. The DOE requirements for the operation of a tritium facility like TSTA include personnel training, emergency preparedness, radiation protection, safety analysis, and preoperational appraisals. The integration of these requirements into TSTA operations is discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Large branched self-assembled DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, Paul; Waelti, Christoph; Middelberg, Anton P J; Davies, A Giles

    2007-01-01

    Many biological molecules have been demonstrated to self-assemble into complex structures and networks by using their very efficient and selective molecular recognition processes. The use of biological molecules as scaffolds for the construction of functional devices by self-assembling nanoscale complexes onto the scaffolds has recently attracted significant attention and many different applications in this field have emerged. In particular DNA, owing to its inherent sophisticated self-organization and molecular recognition properties, has served widely as a scaffold for various nanotechnological self-assembly applications, with metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles, proteins, macromolecular complexes, inter alia, being assembled onto designed DNA scaffolds. Such scaffolds may typically contain multiple branch-points and comprise a number of DNA molecules selfassembled into the desired configuration. Previously, several studies have used synthetic methods to produce the constituent DNA of the scaffolds, but this typically constrains the size of the complexes. For applications that require larger self-assembling DNA complexes, several tens of nanometers or more, other techniques need to be employed. In this article, we discuss a generic technique to generate large branched DNA macromolecular complexes

  10. Two men with multiple disabilities carry out an assembly work activity with the support of a technology system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Green, Vanessa A; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca

    2013-10-01

    To assess whether two persons with multiple disabilities could learn a work activity (i.e., assembling trolley wheels) with the support of a technology system. After an initial baseline, the study compared the effects of intervention sessions relying on the technology system (which called the participants to the different workstations and provided feedback and final stimulation) with the effects of intervention sessions carried out without technology. The two types of intervention sessions were conducted according to an alternating treatments design. Eventually, only intervention sessions relying on the technology system were used. Both participants managed to assemble wheels independently during intervention sessions relying on the technology system while they failed during sessions without the system. Their performance was strengthened during the final part of the study, in which only sessions with the system occurred. Technology may be critical in helping persons with multiple disabilities manage multi-step work activities.

  11. Rigid Biopolymer Nanocrystal Systems for Controlling Multicomponent Nanoparticle Assembly and Orientation in Thin Film Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jennifer [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-10-31

    We have discovered techniques to synthesize well-defined DN conjugated nanostructures that are stable in a wide variety of conditions needed for DNA mediated assembly. Starting from this, we have shown that DNA can be used to control the assembly and integration of semiconductor nanocrystals into thin film devices that show photovoltaic effects.

  12. Achievement report for fiscal 1990 on the research and development of automatic sewing system. High-tech assemble subsystem; 1990 nendo jido hosei system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. High tech assemble system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    In a comprehensive operational test conducted for the automatic overlapping seam sewing system being studied under the above-named large-scale industrial technology development project, it is confirmed that it attains the target levels in product qualities such as accuracy and in productivity and flexibility. It is further confirmed in an experimental plant that the system fully discharges its duty. In the research and development of the ventral coordination control type assemble sewing technology, modification and research and development of the hardware and software, system construction, and operational adjustment are accomplished. In the comprehensive study of operation, data are collected for the evaluation of functioning during system operation, operational reliability, compatibility with multiple-product/small-amount production, sewed product quality stability, etc. In the study of systematization for the experimental plant, conditions for interlocking and sequence are defined, which are improved while system operation proceeds. Furthermore, studies are conducted about 3-dimensional sewing technologies and retrofitted sewing machines. (NEDO)

  13. ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) system description for second simulated fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The ROSA-IV Program's Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a test facility for integral simulation of thermal-hydraulic response of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) and transients. In this facility, the PWR core nuclear fuel rods are simulated using electric heater rods. The simulated fuel assembly which was installed during the facility construction was replaced with a new one in 1988. The first test with this second simulated fuel assembly was conducted in December 1988. This report describes the facility configuration and characteristics as of this date (December 1988) including the new simulated fuel assembly design and the facility changes which were made during the testing with the first assembly as well as during the renewal of the simulated fuel assembly. (author)

  14. Long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography - First successful native SAD experiment close to the sulfur edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelius, O.; Duman, R.; El Omari, K.; Mykhaylyk, V.; Wagner, A.

    2017-11-01

    Phasing of novel macromolecular crystal structures has been challenging since the start of structural biology. Making use of anomalous diffraction of natively present elements, such as sulfur and phosphorus, for phasing has been possible for some systems, but hindered by the necessity to access longer X-ray wavelengths in order to make most use of the anomalous scattering contributions of these elements. Presented here are the results from a first successful experimental phasing study of a macromolecular crystal structure at a wavelength close to the sulfur K edge. This has been made possible by the in-vacuum setup and the long-wavelength optimised experimental setup at the I23 beamline at Diamond Light Source. In these early commissioning experiments only standard data collection and processing procedures have been applied, in particular no dedicated absorption correction has been used. Nevertheless the success of the experiment demonstrates that the capability to extract phase information can be even further improved once data collection protocols and data processing have been optimised.

  15. Organ specific acute toxicity of the carcinogen trans-4-acetylaminostilbene is not correlated with macromolecular binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, A; Neumann, H G

    1986-09-01

    trans-4-Acetylaminostilbene (trans-AAS) is acutely toxic in rats and lesions are produced specifically in the glandular stomach. Toxicity is slightly increased by pretreating the animals with phenobarbital (PB) and is completely prevented by pretreatment with methylcholanthrene (MC). The prostaglandin inhibitors, indomethacin and acetyl salicylic acid, do not reduce toxicity. The high efficiency of MC suggested that toxicity is caused by reactive metabolites. trans-[3H]-AAS was administered orally to untreated and to PB- or MC-pretreated female Wistar rats and target doses in different tissues were measured by means of covalent binding to proteins, RNA and DNA. Macromolecular binding in the target tissue of poisoned animals was significantly lower than in liver and kidney and comparable to other non-target tissues. Pretreatment with MC lowered macromolecular binding in all extrahepatic tissues but not in liver. These findings are not in line with tissue specific metabolic activation. The only unique property of the target tissue, glandular stomach, that we observed was a particular affinity for the systemically available parent compound. In the early phase of poisoning, tissue concentrations were exceedingly high and the stomach function was impaired.

  16. Can visco-elastic phase separation, macromolecular crowding and colloidal physics explain nuclear organisation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iborra Francisco J

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell nucleus is highly compartmentalized with well-defined domains, it is not well understood how this nuclear order is maintained. Many scientists are fascinated by the different set of structures observed in the nucleus to attribute functions to them. In order to distinguish functional compartments from non-functional aggregates, I believe is important to investigate the biophysical nature of nuclear organisation. Results The various nuclear compartments can be divided broadly as chromatin or protein and/or RNA based, and they have very different dynamic properties. The chromatin compartment displays a slow, constrained diffusional motion. On the other hand, the protein/RNA compartment is very dynamic. Physical systems with dynamical asymmetry go to viscoelastic phase separation. This phase separation phenomenon leads to the formation of a long-lived interaction network of slow components (chromatin scattered within domains rich in fast components (protein/RNA. Moreover, the nucleus is packed with macromolecules in the order of 300 mg/ml. This high concentration of macromolecules produces volume exclusion effects that enhance attractive interactions between macromolecules, known as macromolecular crowding, which favours the formation of compartments. In this paper I hypothesise that nuclear compartmentalization can be explained by viscoelastic phase separation of the dynamically different nuclear components, in combination with macromolecular crowding and the properties of colloidal particles. Conclusion I demonstrate that nuclear structure can satisfy the predictions of this hypothesis. I discuss the functional implications of this phenomenon.

  17. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  18. A Chemical Alphabet for Macromolecular Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; McGuiness, Daniel Tunç; Marshall, Alan; Smith, Jeremy; Taylor, Stephen

    2018-06-08

    Molecular communications in macroscale environments is an emerging field of study driven by the intriguing prospect of sending coded information over olfactory networks. For the first time, this article reports two signal modulation techniques (on-off keying-OOK, and concentration shift keying-CSK) which have been used to encode and transmit digital information using odors over distances of 1-4 m. Molecular transmission of digital data was experimentally investigated for the letter "r" with a binary value of 01110010 (ASCII) for a gas stream network channel (up to 4 m) using mass spectrometry (MS) as the main detection-decoding system. The generation and modulation of the chemical signals was achieved using an automated odor emitter (OE) which is based on the controlled evaporation of a chemical analyte and its diffusion into a carrier gas stream. The chemical signals produced propagate within a confined channel to reach the demodulator-MS. Experiments were undertaken for a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with different diffusion coefficient values in air at ambient conditions. Representative compounds investigated include acetone, cyclopentane, and n-hexane. For the first time, the binary code ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is combined with chemical signaling to generate a molecular representation of the English alphabet. Transmission experiments of fixed-width molecular signals corresponding to letters of the alphabet over varying distances are shown. A binary message corresponding to the word "ion" was synthesized using chemical signals and transmitted within a physical channel over a distance of 2 m.

  19. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques.

  20. Acceptance of non-fuel assembly hardware by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high-priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high-level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for delivery; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 12 figs., 43 tabs

  1. A simple and accurate approximation for the order fill rates in lost-sales Assemble-to-Order systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, K.M.R.; Güllü, R.; van Houtum, Geert-Jan; Vliegen, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider an Assemble-to-Order system with multiple end-products. Demands for an end-product follow a Poisson process and each end-product requires a fixed set of components. We are interested in the order fill rates, i.e., the percentage of demands for which all requested components

  2. 75 FR 3253 - Lamb Assembly and Test, LLC, Subsidiary of Mag Industrial Automation Systems, Machesney Park, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,516] Lamb Assembly and Test, LLC, Subsidiary of Mag Industrial Automation Systems, Machesney Park, IL; Notice of Negative... workers of Lamb Technicon, a division of Unova, Warren, Michigan and Lake Orion, Michigan were previously...

  3. Mineral Surface-Templated Self-Assembling Systems: Case Studies from Nanoscience and Surface Science towards Origins of Life Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Gillams

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence relates the wide range of benefits mineral surfaces offer for the development of early living systems, including adsorption of small molecules from the aqueous phase, formation of monomeric subunits and their subsequent polymerization, and supramolecular assembly of biopolymers and other biomolecules. Each of these processes was likely a necessary stage in the emergence of life on Earth. Here, we compile evidence that templating and enhancement of prebiotically-relevant self-assembling systems by mineral surfaces offers a route to increased structural, functional, and/or chemical complexity. This increase in complexity could have been achieved by early living systems before the advent of evolvable systems and would not have required the generally energetically unfavorable formation of covalent bonds such as phosphodiester or peptide bonds. In this review we will focus on various case studies of prebiotically-relevant mineral-templated self-assembling systems, including supramolecular assemblies of peptides and nucleic acids, from nanoscience and surface science. These fields contain valuable information that is not yet fully being utilized by the origins of life and astrobiology research communities. Some of the self-assemblies that we present can promote the formation of new mineral surfaces, similar to biomineralization, which can then catalyze more essential prebiotic reactions; this could have resulted in a symbiotic feedback loop by which geology and primitive pre-living systems were closely linked to one another even before life’s origin. We hope that the ideas presented herein will seed some interesting discussions and new collaborations between nanoscience/surface science researchers and origins of life/astrobiology researchers.

  4. Mineral Surface-Templated Self-Assembling Systems: Case Studies from Nanoscience and Surface Science towards Origins of Life Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J; Jia, Tony Z

    2018-05-08

    An increasing body of evidence relates the wide range of benefits mineral surfaces offer for the development of early living systems, including adsorption of small molecules from the aqueous phase, formation of monomeric subunits and their subsequent polymerization, and supramolecular assembly of biopolymers and other biomolecules. Each of these processes was likely a necessary stage in the emergence of life on Earth. Here, we compile evidence that templating and enhancement of prebiotically-relevant self-assembling systems by mineral surfaces offers a route to increased structural, functional, and/or chemical complexity. This increase in complexity could have been achieved by early living systems before the advent of evolvable systems and would not have required the generally energetically unfavorable formation of covalent bonds such as phosphodiester or peptide bonds. In this review we will focus on various case studies of prebiotically-relevant mineral-templated self-assembling systems, including supramolecular assemblies of peptides and nucleic acids, from nanoscience and surface science. These fields contain valuable information that is not yet fully being utilized by the origins of life and astrobiology research communities. Some of the self-assemblies that we present can promote the formation of new mineral surfaces, similar to biomineralization, which can then catalyze more essential prebiotic reactions; this could have resulted in a symbiotic feedback loop by which geology and primitive pre-living systems were closely linked to one another even before life’s origin. We hope that the ideas presented herein will seed some interesting discussions and new collaborations between nanoscience/surface science researchers and origins of life/astrobiology researchers.

  5. Workshop on algorithms for macromolecular modeling. Final project report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, B.; Hermans, J.; Skeel, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    A workshop was held on algorithms and parallel implementations for macromolecular dynamics, protein folding, and structural refinement. This document contains abstracts and brief reports from that workshop.

  6. Highly ordered self-assembly of one-dimensional nanoparticles in amphiphilic molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hwan

    2009-02-01

    Two kinds of one-dimensional (1D) nanoparticles, stable rod-like nanoparticles with highly controlled surface charge density (cROD) and non-covalently functionalized isolated single wall carbon nanotubes (p-SWNT) that were readily redispersible in water, have been developed. Using these 1D nanoparticles, various highly ordered superstructures of 1D nanoparticles by molecular self-assembling based on electrostatic interaction in amphiphilic molecular systems (two different cationic liposome systems) have been investigated. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of highly ordered self-assembly of 1D nanoparticles based on electrostatic interaction between 1D nanoparticles and amphiphilic molecules. The cRODs have been developed by free radical polymerization of a mixture of polymerizable cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium 4-vinylbenzoate (CTVB), and hydrotropic salt sodium 4-styrenesulfonate (NaSS) in aqueous solution. The surface charge of the cROD was controlled by varying the NaSS concentration during the polymerization process and the charge variation was interpreted in terms of the overcharging effect in colloidal systems. The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements showed that the diameter of cROD is constant at 4 nm and the particle length ranges from 20 nm to 85 nm, depending on the NaSS concentration. The cRODs are longest when the NaSS concentration is 5 mol % which corresponds to the charge inversion or neutral point. The SANS and zeta potential measurements showed that the Coulomb interactions between the particles are strongly dependent on the NaSS concentration and the zeta potential of the cRODs changes from positive to negative (+ 12.8 mV ∼ - 44.2 mV) as the concentration of NaSS increases from 0 mol % to 40 mol %. As the NaSS concentration is further increased, the zeta potential is saturated at approximately - 50 mV. The p-SWNTs have been developed by 1) dispersing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water using

  7. System for manipulating radioactive fuel rods within a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolino, R.W.; King, W.E.; Blickenderfer, J.L.; Roth, C.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A tool is described for manipulating the peripherally located fuel rods of a fuel assembly so that the rods can be visually inspected. The fuel assembly includes top and bottom nozzles, each of which is connected to a support skeleton, as well as grids, and wherein the rods are retained within the grids and confined between the top and bottom nozzles thereof. It consists of: (a) a fixture that is detachably connectable to one of the nozzles of the fuel assembly. The fixture having holes therein, (b) rotating means pivotally mountable within the holes of the fixture for selectively gripping and rotating the rod, and (c) a displacing means mounted on the fixture for reciprocably displacing the rods within the fuel assembly, including a lifting assembly and a push-down assembly for lifting and pushing down a selected one of the rods, respectively, whereby the rods can be selectively rotated, lifted, and pushed down in order to expose portions of the rods which are normally hidden to visual inspection while the nozzles stay connected to the support skeleton and the rods stay confined between the top and bottom nozzles of the fuel assembly

  8. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  9. Ultra-Precise Assembly of Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.T.; Simon, R.; Polosky, M.; Christenson, T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes a three year effort to develop an automated microassembly workcell for the assembly of LIGA (Lithography Galvonoforming Abforming) parts. Over the last several years, Sandia has developed processes for producing surface machined silicon and LIGA parts for use in weapons surety devices. Some of these parts have outside dimensions as small as 100 micron, and most all have submicron tolerances. Parts this small and precise are extremely difficult to assembly by hand. Therefore, in this project, we investigated the technologies required to develop a robotic workcell to assembly these parts. In particular, we concentrated on micro-grippers, visual servoing, micro-assembly planning, and parallel assembly. Three different micro-grippers were tested: a pneumatic probe, a thermally actuated polysilicon tweezer, and a LIGA fabricated tweezer. Visual servoing was used to accuracy position two parts relative to one another. Fourier optics methods were used to generate synthetic microscope images from CAD drawings. These synthetic images are used off-line to test image processing routines under varying magnifications and depths of field. They also provide reference image features which are used to visually servo the part to the desired position. We also investigated a new aspect of fine motion planning for the micro-domain. As parts approach 1-10 {micro}m or less in outside dimensions, interactive forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces become major factors which greatly change the assembly sequence and path plans. We developed the mathematics required to determine the goal regions for pick up, holding, and release of a micro-sphere being handled by a rectangular tool. Finally, we implemented and tested the ability to assemble an array of LIGA parts attached to two 3 inch diameter wafers. In this way, hundreds of parts can be assembled in parallel rather than assembling each part individually.

  10. Metabolic growth rate control in Escherichia coli may be a consequence of subsaturation of the macromolecular biosynthetic apparatus with substrates and catalytic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Pedersen, Steen

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the Escherichia coli cell is considered as a system designed for rapid growth, but limited by the medium. We propose that this very design causes the cell to become subsaturated with precursors and catalytic components at all levels of macromolecular biosynthesis and leads to a mol...

  11. Between-cycle laser system for depressurization and resealing of modified design nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    A laser beam is used to puncture fuel cladding for release of contained pressurized fission gas from plenum sections or irradiated fuel pins. Exhausted fission gases are collected and trapped for safe disposal. The laser beam, adjusted to welding mode, is subsequently used to reseal the puncture holes. The fuel assembly is returned to additional irradiation or, if at end of reactivity lifetime, is routed to reprocess. The fuel assembly design provides graded cladding lengths, by rows or arrays, such that the cladding of each component fuel element of the assembly is accessible to laser beam reception

  12. Exciplex formation and energy transfer in a self-assembled metal-organic hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Ritesh; Rao, K Venkata; George, Subi J; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2012-05-07

    Exciting assemblies: A metal-organic self-assembly of pyrenebutyric acid (PBA), 1,10-phenanthroline (o-phen), and Mg(II) shows solid-state fluorescence originating from a 1:1 PBA-o-phen exciplex. This exciplex fluorescence is sensitized by another residual PBA chromophore through an excited-state energy-transfer process. The solvent polarity modulates the self-assembly and the corresponding exciplex as well as the energy transfer, resulting in tunable emission of the hybrid (see figure). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bringing macromolecular machinery to life using 3D animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Janet H

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid rise in the use of three-dimensional (3D) animation to depict molecular and cellular processes. Much of the growth in molecular animation has been in the educational arena, but increasingly, 3D animation software is finding its way into research laboratories. In this review, I will discuss a number of ways in which 3d animation software can play a valuable role in visualizing and communicating macromolecular structures and dynamics. I will also consider the challenges of using animation tools within the research sphere. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Protein crystal growth studies at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Long, Marianna M.; Moore, Karen M.; Harrington, Michael; McDonald, William T.; Smith, Craig D.; Bray, Terry; Lewis, Johanna; Crysel, William B.; Weise, Lance D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) has been involved in fundamental studies of protein crystal growth (PCG) in microgravity and in our earth-based laboratories. A large group of co-investigators from academia and industry participated in these experiments by providing protein samples and by performing the x-ray crystallographic analysis. These studies have clearly demonstrated the usefulness of a microgravity environment for enhancing the quality and size of protein crystals. Review of the vapor diffusion (VDA) PCG results from nineteen space shuttle missions is given in this paper

  15. SASSIE: A program to study intrinsically disordered biological molecules and macromolecular ensembles using experimental scattering restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Joseph E.; Raghunandan, Sindhu; Nanda, Hirsh; Krueger, Susan

    2012-02-01

    A program to construct ensembles of biomolecular structures that are consistent with experimental scattering data are described. Specifically, we generate an ensemble of biomolecular structures by varying sets of backbone dihedral angles that are then filtered using experimentally determined restraints to rapidly determine structures that have scattering profiles that are consistent with scattering data. We discuss an application of these tools to predict a set of structures for the HIV-1 Gag protein, an intrinsically disordered protein, that are consistent with small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. We have assembled these algorithms into a program called SASSIE for structure generation, visualization, and analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins and other macromolecular ensembles using neutron and X-ray scattering restraints. Program summaryProgram title: SASSIE Catalogue identifier: AEKL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 991 624 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 826 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python, C/C++, Fortran Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: 32- and 64-bit Linux (Ubuntu 10.04, Centos 5.6) and Mac OS X (10.6.6) RAM: 1 GB Classification: 3 External routines: Python 2.6.5, numpy 1.4.0, swig 1.3.40, scipy 0.8.0, Gnuplot-py-1.8, Tcl 8.5, Tk 8.5, Mac installation requires aquaterm 1.0 (or X window system) and Xcode 3 development tools. Nature of problem: Open source software to generate structures of disordered biological molecules that subsequently allow for the comparison of computational and experimental results is limiting the use of scattering resources. Solution method: Starting with an all atom model of a protein, for example, users can input

  16. Brain transcriptome sequencing and assembly of three songbird model systems for the study of social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N. Balakrishnan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emberizid sparrows (emberizidae have played a prominent role in the study of avian vocal communication and social behavior. We present here brain transcriptomes for three emberizid model systems, song sparrow Melospiza melodia, white-throated sparrow Zonotrichia albicollis, and Gambel’s white-crowned sparrow Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii. Each of the assemblies covered fully or in part, over 89% of the previously annotated protein coding genes in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata, with 16,846, 15,805, and 16,646 unique BLAST hits in song, white-throated and white-crowned sparrows, respectively. As in previous studies, we find tissue of origin (auditory forebrain versus hypothalamus and whole brain as an important determinant of overall expression profile. We also demonstrate the successful isolation of RNA and RNA-sequencing from post-mortem samples from building strikes and suggest that such an approach could be useful when traditional sampling opportunities are limited. These transcriptomes will be an important resource for the study of social behavior in birds and for data driven annotation of forthcoming whole genome sequences for these and other bird species.

  17. An impact test system design and its applications to dynamic buckling of a spacer grid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Sheng, E-mail: liusheng_05@126.com; Fan, Chenguang; Yang, Yiren

    2016-11-15

    This study is aimed at investigating the dynamic buckling load, dynamic stiffness, damping and buckling characteristics of the spacer grid assembly (SGA). A pendulum impact test system is designed to experiment the buckling of SGAs. Three criterions are discussed and compared to determine the buckling loads of SGAs: B-R criterion, energy criterion and extreme value criterion. Two approaches are applied to calculate the dynamic stiffness of SGAs: One method is natural period method based on the hypothesis of harmonic motion of the pendulum whose period is approximated because of the passivation and tailing of the impact force time history; and the other is energy method based on the conservation of mechanical energy. The equivalent viscous damping is defined as the resultant cause of dissipation and is obtained by the energy principle. The impact force time history loses its approximate symmetry after buckling occurs. The impact force and displacement reach their maxima almost at the same time at pre-buckling states but not post-buckling states. Vertical straps in SGA are found to be transversely shared by horizontal straps at the buckling position. The buckling of SGA results from the lack of strength of complete structure; and the strength of material has no effects on the buckling.

  18. Study of thermal and electrical properties exhibited by two ferroelectric self assembly systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, V. N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2011-04-01

    Two series of inter hydrogen bonded ferroelectric liquid crystals have been isolated. In one of the series hydrogen bond is formed between p- n-alkyloxy benzoic acids and (S)-1,2-cholo-3-(4-hydroxy) phenyl propionic acid (CTy + nOBA) while in the other it is formed between p- n-alkyl benzoic acids and (S)-1,2-cholo-3-(4-hydroxy) phenyl propionic acid (CTy + nBA). Detailed synthetic route for the isolation of these compounds is discussed. Formation of the ferroelectric self assembly systems has been evinced through FTIR studies. The positional influence of oxygen atom is investigated from the thermal and electrical characterization of both the series. Polarizing optical microscope (POM) studies on CTy + nBA hydrogen bonded complexes reveals that they exhibit single phase variance while the other complex CTy + nOBA exhibit rich phase polymorphism. It is observed that the presence of oxygen atom enhances phase abundance. Phase diagrams for both the complexes are constructed from the DSC and POM studies. Dielectric relaxations and activation energies have been carried out for various phases in CTy + 8OBA and CTy + 8BA complexes. It has been observed that the oxygen atom originates type I relaxation process. Two molecular modeling have been assigned to account for the dielectric relaxation process observed in both the HBFLC series.

  19. Recent palladium membrane reactor development at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.; Birdsell, S.A.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The palladium membrane reactor (PMR) is proving to be a simple and effective means for recovering hydrogen isotopes from fusion fuel impurities such as methane and water. This device directly combines two techniques which have long been utilized for hydrogen processing, namely catalytic shift reactions and palladium/silver permeators. A proof-of-principle (PMR) has been constructed and tested at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first tests with this device showed that is was effective for the proposed purpose. Initial work concluded that a nickel catalyst was an appropriate choice for use in a PMR. More detailed testing of the PMR with such a catalyst was performed and reported in other works. It was shown that a nickel catalyst-packed PMR did, indeed, recover hydrogen from water and methane with efficiencies approaching 100% in a single processing pass. These experiments were conducted over an extended period of time and no failure or need for regeneration was encountered. These positive results have prompted further PMR development. Topics addressed include alternate PMR geometries and initial testing of the PMR with tritium. These are the subjects of this paper

  20. A quantum CISC compiler and scalable assembler for quantum computing on large systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas; Spoerl, Andreas; Glaser, Steffen [Dept. Chemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Using the cutting edge high-speed parallel cluster HLRB-II (with a total LINPACK performance of 63.3 TFlops/s) we present a quantum CISC compiler into time-optimised or decoherence-protected complex instruction sets. They comprise effective multi-qubit interactions with up to 10 qubits. We show how to assemble these medium-sized CISC-modules in a scalable way for quantum computation on large systems. Extending the toolbox of universal gates by optimised complex multi-qubit instruction sets paves the way to fight decoherence in realistic Markovian and non-Markovian settings. The advantage of quantum CISC compilation over standard RISC compilations into one- and two-qubit universal gates is demonstrated inter alia for the quantum Fourier transform (QFT) and for multiply-controlled NOT gates. The speed-up is up to factor of six thus giving significantly better performance under decoherence. - Implications for upper limits to time complexities are also derived.

  1. Improvements of MCOR: A Monte Carlo depletion code system for fuel assembly reference calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippayakul, C.; Ivanov, K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park (United States); Misu, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, An AREVA and SIEMENS Company, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the improvements of MCOR, a Monte Carlo depletion code system for fuel assembly reference calculations. The improvements of MCOR were initiated by the cooperation between the Penn State Univ. and AREVA NP to enhance the original Penn State Univ. MCOR version in order to be used as a new Monte Carlo depletion analysis tool. Essentially, a new depletion module using KORIGEN is utilized to replace the existing ORIGEN-S depletion module in MCOR. Furthermore, the online burnup cross section generation by the Monte Carlo calculation is implemented in the improved version instead of using the burnup cross section library pre-generated by a transport code. Other code features have also been added to make the new MCOR version easier to use. This paper, in addition, presents the result comparisons of the original and the improved MCOR versions against CASMO-4 and OCTOPUS. It was observed in the comparisons that there were quite significant improvements of the results in terms of k{sub inf}, fission rate distributions and isotopic contents. (authors)

  2. Self-assembling colloidal system for the ocular administration of cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschmann, Christoph; Tessmar, Joerg; Schoeberl, Simon; Strauß, Olaf; Luschmann, Karl; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a self-assembling micellar system to deliver cyclosporine A (CsA) in an aqueous solution to the cornea. Two nonionic surfactants of the poly(ethylene glycol)-fatty alcohol ether type (Sympatens AS and Sympatens ACS) were characterized in terms of micelle size, shape, and charge, and their encapsulation efficiency for CsA. In an in situ single dose bioavailability study, the corneal CsA levels were determined in an enucleated porcine eye model. A commercial formulation and a 2% CsA olive oil solution served as references. Both surfactants formed spherical micelles with a size of 9 to 12 nm in water. A concentration as low as 0.3% (wt/vol) Sympatens AS was sufficient to entrap therapeutic levels of at least 0.1% (wt/vol) CsA. In the porcine in situ model, exceptionally high drug levels in the cornea were obtained for the micellar CsA solution (1557 ± 407 ngCsA/gcornea). They were significantly higher than those of Restasis (545 ± 137 ngCsA/gcornea) or the olive oil solution (452 ± 142 ngCsA/gcornea). In conclusion, we have shown a promising simple and efficient approach for the application of CsA in an aqueous solution to the cornea to treat inflammatory corneal diseases.

  3. Grinding assembly, grinding apparatus, weld joint defect repair system, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eric D.; Watkins, Arthur D.; Bitsoi, Rodney J.; Pace, David P.

    2005-09-27

    A grinding assembly for grinding a weld joint of a workpiece includes a grinder apparatus, a grinder apparatus includes a grinding wheel configured to grind the weld joint, a member configured to receive the grinding wheel, the member being configured to be removably attached to the grinder apparatus, and a sensor assembly configured to detect a contact between the grinding wheel and the workpiece. The grinding assembly also includes a processing circuitry in communication with the grinder apparatus and configured to control operations of the grinder apparatus, the processing circuitry configured to receive weld defect information of the weld joint from an inspection assembly to create a contour grinding profile to grind the weld joint in a predetermined shape based on the received weld defect information, and a manipulator having an end configured to carry the grinder apparatus, the manipulator further configured to operate in multiple dimensions.

  4. Verification of the burn-up of spent fuel assemblies by means of the Consulha containment/surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, G.; Gourlez, P.

    1991-01-01

    CONSULHA is a containment/surveillance system which has been developed as part of the French Support Programme for the IAEA Safeguards in cooperation with EURATOM and was designed to meet the IAEA EURATOM requirements for the verification of nuclear materials. This system will make it possible to count movements and verify irradiation of spent fuel assemblies in industrial facilities such as reprocessing plants and nuclear reactors

  5. Analysis of Alternative Rework Strategies for Printed Wiring Assembly Manufacturing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Driels, Morris; Klegka, John S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting the cost of test, diagnosis, and rework activities in the manufacture of printed wiring assemblies (PWA's). Rework is defined as all actions taken to correct or improve the basic assembly process. These actions may include those of inspectors and solder touchup technicians who do not add value to the PWA, but whose actions are required in order to produce acceptable yields from the manufacturing process. Two alternative rework strategies for cont...

  6. Effects of pressure and temperature on the self-assembled fully hydrated nanostructures of monoolein-oil systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yaghmur, A.; Kriechbaum, M.; Amenitsch, H.; Steinhart, Miloš; Laggner, P.; Rappolt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2010), s. 1177-1185 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : lyotropic lipid mesophases * X-ray-diffraction * bicontinuous cubic phases Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.269, year: 2010

  7. Vibration reduction at the engine-pumps assembly of the main moderator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holostencu, Adriana; Dinu, Marius

    2005-01-01

    Problem of decreasing vibrations in the main moderator motor at Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1 is presented. The moderator pumps are of centrifugal, vertical, single stage and double suction type. Each pump is provided with a main motor (690 Kw, 50 Hz, 6 KV) capable of full rotative speed and a secondary motor, also known as 'pony motor' (15 Kw, 50 Hz, 380 V) capable of a quarter of the full speed. At starting-commissioning stage of Cernavoda NPP, the vibration level in the moderator pump - motor assembly had an average value of 6 mm/s with spurious peaks up to 8 mm/s. It has to be mentioned that operation with a high vibration level may lead to: - a premature wear of the motor bearings; - extra stresses and fatigue in the material of pump and associated pipes. In order to maintain vibration speed to the design limit, the NPP personnel have started investigations since 1997. The main activities were: - verification of the vibration measuring loops; - checking the torque of the bolts that hold the motor's case; - measuring the start-up and nominal currents of the motors in order to determine any phase unbalance; - adjusting the spring hangers from the pumps discharge with simultaneous monitoring of the motor vibration level; - installation of rubber pads in the gap between the motor lugs and the existing seismic supports. None of these actions revealed deviations from the installation requirements or operating parameters. In 1999, a contract with EUROTEST S. A and Stevenson was signed, in order to find a solution to reduce the vibration level. The EUROTEST/ Stevenson action plan contains de following main activities: 1. Creating a calculus model of the moderator system, based on the design drawings provided by Cernavoda NPP; 2. Preparing and performing the vibration measurements in various points of the system; 3. Analyzing the measurements results; 4. Calibrating the calculus model created in step 1, according with the field measurements; 5. Propose a solution to reduce

  8. Structured flowcharts for control logic specification in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, C.W.; Claborn, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) contains several subsystems employing sophisticated chemical and physical processes to purify, transport, and capture the isotopes of hydrogen. The ultimate responsibility for the correct and safe operation of these subsystems lies with their designers. However, the logic is implemented in a computer system with program control. A means to insure unambiguous specification of the control logic in a form understandable to both the non-programming designers and the software staff was required. The computer programs are written in RATFOR, a language providing clear control structures and powerful symbol definition facilities. However, the actual code was considered unsatisfactory as a means of primary specification by the non-programming designers. On the other hand, simple English language descriptions of the desired behavior were not precise enough to insure correctness. Experimentation with traditional flowcharts proved that they were more difficult to follow than the RATFOR code. On the other hand, the use of structured flowcharts derived from those introduced by Nassi and Shneidermanl have proven to be very powerful. Using simple geometric forms for the basic control structures such as loops and conditional tests, and by using expansion rather than connection as the means of reducing any flowchart to a single page, a specification that is both understandable and precise has been obtained. A computer code automates the production and modification of these flowcharts. Combining these flowcharts with primitive subroutines which hide most of the details of control implementation has provided an effective medium for algorithm specification and validation. Examples of the flowcharts and the language used to specify them will be given

  9. Hyperbranched Polyethylenebased Macromolecular Architectures: Synthesis, Characterization, and Selfassembly

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Sulami, Ahlam

    2018-05-01

    "Chain walking” catalytic polymerization CWCP is a powerful tool for the one-pot synthesis of a unique class of hyperbranched polyethylene HBPE-based macromolecules with a controllable molecular weight, topology, and composition. This dissertation focuses on new synthetic routes to prepare HBPE-based macromolecular architectures by combining the CWCP technique with ring opening polymerization ROP, atom–transfer radical polymerization ATRP, and “click” chemistry. Taking advantage of end-functionalized HBPE, and a new ethynyl-soketal star-shape agent, we were able to synthesize different types of the HBPE-based architectures including hyperbranched-on-hyperbranched core-shell nanostructure, and miktoarm-star-HBPE-based block copolymers. The first part of the dissertation provides a general introduction to the synthesis of polyethylene types with controllable structures. Well-defined polyethylene with different macromolecule architectures were synthesized either for academic or industrial purposes. In the second part, the HBPE with different topologies was synthesized by CWCP, using a α-diimine Pd (II) catalyst. The effect of the temperature and pressure on the catalyst activity and polymer properties, including branch content, molecular weight, distribution, and thermal properties were studied. Two series of samples were synthesized: a) serial samples (A) under pressures of 1, 5, and 27 atm at 5˚C, and b) serial samples (B) at temperatures of 5, 15, and 35 ˚C under 5 atm. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1H NMR, and gel permeation chromatography, GPC, analysis were used to calculate the branching content, molecular weight, and distribution, whereas differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to record the melting and glass transition temperatures as well as the degree of the crystallinity. Well-defined HBPE-based core diblock copolymers with predictable amphiphilic properties are studied in the third part of the project. Hyperbranched

  10. Variable effects of soman on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, R.K.; Zwierzynski, D.J.; Stone, K.K.; Culp, D.J.; Marin, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the anticholinesterase agent, soman, on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea, in vitro. We mounted pieces of ferret trachea in Ussing-type chambers. Secreted sulfated macromolecules were radiolabeled by adding 500 microCi of 35 SO 4 to the submucosal medium and incubating for 17 hr. Soman added to the submucosal side produced a concentration-dependent increase in radiolabeled macromolecular release with a maximal secretory response (mean +/- SD) of 202 +/- 125% (n = 8) relative to the basal secretion rate at a concentration of 10 - 7 M. The addition of either 10 -6 M pralidoxime (acetylcholinesterase reactivator) or 10 -6 M atropine blocked the response to 10 -7 M soman. At soman concentrations greater than 10 -7 M, secretion rate decreased and was not significantly different from basal secretion. Additional experiments utilizing acetylcholine and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, suggest that inhibition of secretion by high concentrations of soman may be due to a secondary antagonistic effect of soman on muscarinic receptors

  11. Dendrimer-based Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents: Characteristics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Kobayashi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous macromolecular MRI contrast agents prepared employing relatively simple chemistry may be readily available that can provide sufficient enhancement for multiple applications. These agents operate using a ~100-fold lower concentration of gadolinium ions in comparison to the necessary concentration of iodine employed in CT imaging. Herein, we describe some of the general potential directions of macromolecular MRI contrast agents using our recently reported families of dendrimer-based agents as examples. Changes in molecular size altered the route of excretion. Smaller-sized contrast agents less than 60 kDa molecular weight were excreted through the kidney resulting in these agents being potentially suitable as functional renal contrast agents. Hydrophilic and larger-sized contrast agents were found better suited for use as blood pool contrast agents. Hydrophobic variants formed with polypropylenimine diaminobutane dendrimer cores created liver contrast agents. Larger hydrophilic agents are useful for lymphatic imaging. Finally, contrast agents conjugated with either monoclonal antibodies or with avidin are able to function as tumor-specific contrast agents, which also might be employed as therapeutic drugs for either gadolinium neutron capture therapy or in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  12. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  13. Enzymes as Green Catalysts for Precision Macromolecular Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Shin-ichiro; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Shunsaku; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2016-02-24

    The present article comprehensively reviews the macromolecular synthesis using enzymes as catalysts. Among the six main classes of enzymes, the three classes, oxidoreductases, transferases, and hydrolases, have been employed as catalysts for the in vitro macromolecular synthesis and modification reactions. Appropriate design of reaction including monomer and enzyme catalyst produces macromolecules with precisely controlled structure, similarly as in vivo enzymatic reactions. The reaction controls the product structure with respect to substrate selectivity, chemo-selectivity, regio-selectivity, stereoselectivity, and choro-selectivity. Oxidoreductases catalyze various oxidation polymerizations of aromatic compounds as well as vinyl polymerizations. Transferases are effective catalysts for producing polysaccharide having a variety of structure and polyesters. Hydrolases catalyzing the bond-cleaving of macromolecules in vivo, catalyze the reverse reaction for bond forming in vitro to give various polysaccharides and functionalized polyesters. The enzymatic polymerizations allowed the first in vitro synthesis of natural polysaccharides having complicated structures like cellulose, amylose, xylan, chitin, hyaluronan, and chondroitin. These polymerizations are "green" with several respects; nontoxicity of enzyme, high catalyst efficiency, selective reactions under mild conditions using green solvents and renewable starting materials, and producing minimal byproducts. Thus, the enzymatic polymerization is desirable for the environment and contributes to "green polymer chemistry" for maintaining sustainable society.

  14. Engineering scale tests of mechanical disassembly and short stroke shearing systems for FBR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kitagaki, Toru; Koizumi, Kenji; Hirano, Hiroyasu; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Washiya, Tadahiro; Kawabe, Yukinari; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki

    2011-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) have been developing an advanced head-end process based on mechanical disassembly and short stroke shearing systems as a part of Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development (FaCT). Fuel pins for a fast reactor are installed within a hexagonal shaped wrapper tube made of stainless steel. In order to reprocess the fast reactor fuel pins, they must be removed from the wrapper tube and transported to the shearing system without failure. In addition, the advanced aqueous reprocessing process, called 'NEXT' (New Extraction System for TRU Recovery) process requires a solution of the spent fuel with relatively high concentration (500g/L). JAEA and JAPC have developed the mechanical disassembly and the short stroke shearing technology which is expected to make fragmented fuel to satisfy these requirements. This paper reports the results of engineering scale tests on the mechanical disassembly and short stroke shearing systems. These tests were carried out with simulated FBR fuel assembly and removed pins. The mechanical cutting method has been developed to avoid fuel pin failure during disassembly operation. The cutting process is divided into two modes, so called 'slit-cut' for cutting the wrapper tube and 'crop-cut' for the end plug region of the fuel pin bundle. In the slit-cut mode, the depth of cutting was automatically controlled based on the calculated wastage of the cutting tool and deformation of the wrapper tube which had been measured before the cutting. This procedure was confirmed to minimize the fuel pin failure which was hard to prevent in the case of laser cutting. The cutting speed was also controlled automatically by the electric current of the cutting motor to lower the load of the cutting tool. The removed fuel pins were transported to the shearing machine, whose fuel shearing magazine width was set to be narrow to realize the suitable configuration for the short stroke shearing

  15. Three-dimensional electron microscopy of macromolecular assemblies: visualization of biological molecules in their native state

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank, J

    2006-01-01

    ... Clusters 2.8 Support Grids 33 33 3 Principle of Image Formation in the Transmission Electron Microscope 34 3.1 Introduction 34 3.2 The Weak-Phase Object Approximation 35 3.3 The Contrast Transfer...

  16. The In-Situ One-Step Synthesis of a PDC Macromolecular Pro-Drug and the Fabrication of a Novel Core-Shell Micell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cui-Yun; Yang, Sa; Li, Zhi-Ping; Huang, Can; Ning, Qian; Huang, Wen; Yang, Wen-Tong; He, Dongxiu; Sun, Lichun

    2016-01-01

    The development of slow release nano-sized carriers for efficient antineoplastic drug delivery with a biocompatible and biodegradable pectin-based macromolecular pro-drug for tumor therapy has been reported in this study. Pectin-doxorubicin conjugates (PDC), a macromolecular pro-drug, were prepared via an amide condensation reaction, and a novel amphiphilic core-shell micell based on a PDC macromolecular pro-drug (PDC-M) was self-assembled in situ, with pectin as the hydrophilic shell and doxorubicin (DOX) as the hydrophobic core. Then the chemical structure of the PDC macromolecular pro-drug was identified by both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR), and proved that doxorubicin combined well with the pectin and formed macromolecular pro-drug. The PDC-M were observed to have an unregularly spherical shape and were uniform in size by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average particle size of PDC-M, further measured by a Zetasizer nanoparticle analyzer (Nano ZS, Malvern Instruments), was about 140 nm. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading were 57.82% ± 3.7% (n = 3) and 23.852% ±2.3% (n = 3), respectively. The in vitro drug release behaviors of the resulting PDC-M were studied in a simulated tumor environment (pH 5.0), blood (pH 7.4) and a lysosome media (pH 6.8), and showed a prolonged slow release profile. Assays for antiproliferative effects and flow cytometry of the resulting PDC-M in HepG2 cell lines demonstrated greater properties of delayed and slow release as compared to free DOX. A cell viability study against endothelial cells further revealed that the resulting PDC-M possesses excellent cell compatibilities and low cytotoxicities in comparison with that of the free DOX. Hemolysis activity was investigated in rabbits, and the results also demonstrated that the PDC-M has greater compatibility in comparison with free DOX. This shows that the resulting PDC-M can ameliorate the

  17. Carbon dot-Au(i)Ag(0) assembly for the construction of an artificial light harvesting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Jayasmita; Aditya, Teresa; Pal, Tarasankar

    2018-03-06

    Artificial light harvesting systems (LHS) with inorganic counterparts are considered to be robust as well as mechanistically simple, where the system follows the donor-acceptor principle with an unchanged structural pattern. Plasmonic gold or silver nanoparticles are mostly chosen as inorganic counterparts to design artificial LHS. To capitalize on its electron accepting capability, Au(i) has been considered in this work for the synergistic stabilization of a system with intriguingly fluorescing silver(0) clusters produced in situ. Thus a stable fluorescent Au(i)Ag(0) assembly is generated with electron accepting capabilities. On the other hand, carbon dots have evolved as new fluorescent probes due to their unique physicochemical properties. Utilizing the simple electronic behavior of carbon dots, an electronic interaction between the fluorescent Au(i)Ag(0) and a carbon dot has been investigated for the construction of a new artificial light harvesting system. This coinage metal assembly allows surface energy transfer where it acts as an acceptor, while the carbon dot behaves as a good donor. The energy transfer efficiency has been calculated experimentally to be significant (81.3%) and the Au(i)Ag(0)-carbon dot assembly paves the way for efficient artificial LHS.

  18. ROSA-V large scale test facility (LSTF) system description for the third and fourth simulated fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Ohtsu, Iwao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    The Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a full-height and 1/48 volumetrically scaled test facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for system integral experiments simulating the thermal-hydraulic responses at full-pressure conditions of a 1100 MWe-class pressurized water reactor (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) and other transients. The LSTF can also simulate well a next-generation type PWR such as the AP600 reactor. In the fifth phase of the Rig-of-Safety Assessment (ROSA-V) Program, eighty nine experiments have been conducted at the LSTF with the third simulated fuel assembly until June 2001, and five experiments have been conducted with the newly-installed fourth simulated fuel assembly until December 2002. In the ROSA-V program, various system integral experiments have been conducted to certify effectiveness of both accident management (AM) measures in beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs) and improved safety systems in the next-generation reactors. In addition, various separate-effect tests have been conducted to verify and develop computer codes and analytical models to predict non-homogeneous and multi-dimensional phenomena such as heat transfer across the steam generator U-tubes under the presence of non-condensable gases in both current and next-generation reactors. This report presents detailed information of the LSTF system with the third and fourth simulated fuel assemblies for the aid of experiment planning and analyses of experiment results. (author)

  19. An incomplete assembly with thresholding algorithm for systems of reaction-diffusion equations in three space dimensions IAT for reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Peter K.

    2003-01-01

    Solving systems of reaction-diffusion equations in three space dimensions can be prohibitively expensive both in terms of storage and CPU time. Herein, I present a new incomplete assembly procedure that is designed to reduce storage requirements. Incomplete assembly is analogous to incomplete factorization in that only a fixed number of nonzero entries are stored per row and a drop tolerance is used to discard small values. The algorithm is incorporated in a finite element method-of-lines code and tested on a set of reaction-diffusion systems. The effect of incomplete assembly on CPU time and storage and on the performance of the temporal integrator DASPK, algebraic solver GMRES and preconditioner ILUT is studied

  20. Development of concepts for low-cost energy storage assemblies for annual cycle energy system applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G. H.; Cooper, D. L.; Cummings, C. A.; Reiber, E. E.

    1981-10-01

    Low cost energy storage assemblies were developed. In the search for low overall cost assemblies, many diverse concepts and materials were postulated and briefly evaluated. Cost rankings, descriptions, and discussions of the concepts were presented from which ORNL selected the following three concepts for the Phase 2 development: (1) a site constructed tank with reinforced concrete walls formed with specialized modular blocks which eliminates most concrete form work and provides integral R-20 insulation designated ORNLFF; (2) a site constructed tank with earth supported walls that are formed from elements common to residential, in-ground swimming pools, designated SWPL; (3) and a site assembled tank used in underground utility vaults, designated UTLBX. Detailed designs of free standing versions of the three concepts are presented.

  1. Study on a transportation and emplacement system of pre-assembled EBS module for HLW geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awano, Toshihiko; Kanno, Takeshi; Katsumata, Syunsuke; Kosuge, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    HLW disposal is one of the largest issue to utilize Nuclear power safely. In the past study, the concept, which buffer materials and Overpacked waste were transported into underground respectively, have shown. The concept of pre-assembled engineered barrier has advantage to simplify the logistics and emplacement procedure, however there are difficulties to support heavy weight of pre-assembled package by equipment under the condition of little clearance between tunnel and package. In this study, Combination of air bearing and two degree-of-freedom wheels were suggested for transportation, and air jack was suggested for unloading and emplacement system. Also, whole system for transportation and emplacement procedure was designed, and Scale model test was examined to evaluate the feasibility of these concept and functions. (author)

  2. OCTOPUS: an innovative multimodal diffractometer for neutron macromolecular crystallography across the length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeley, M.P.; Andersen, K.; Kreuz, M.; Giroud, B.; McSweeney, S.; Mitchell, E.; Teixeira, S.C.M.; Forsyth, V.T.

    2011-01-01

    We propose to construct a novel protein diffractometer at position H112B. The new instrument will deliver major efficiency gains, as well as offering greatly extended flexibility through the option of several easily interchangeable modes of operation. This proposal builds on the demonstrable need to extend ILL's capacity for high resolution structural studies of protein systems, as well as a need to widen the scope of biological crystallography - in particular for monochromatic studies at both high and low resolution. The development will be carried out in close collaboration with structural biologists at the ESRF, and engineered in such a way that the user interface of the instrument (from sample to software) will be transparently identifiable to a large, dynamic, and driven community of European synchrotron X-ray macromolecular crystallographers. (authors)

  3. Block copolymer libraries: modular versatility of the macromolecular Lego system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeijer, Bas G G; Wouters, Daan; Yin, Zhihui; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2004-12-21

    The synthesis and characterization of a new 4 x 4 library of block copolymers based on polystyrene and poly(ethylene oxide) connected by an asymmetrical octahedral bis(terpyridine) ruthenium complex at the block junction are described, while initial studies on the thin film morphology of the components of the library are presented by the use of Atomic Force Microscopy, demonstrating the impact of a library approach to derive structure-property relationships.

  4. Systems and methods for creation of conducting networks of magnetic particles through dynamic self-assembly process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhko, Oleksiy [Woodridge, IL; Aronson, Igor [Darien, IL; Kwok, Wai-Kwong [Downers Grove, IL

    2011-01-25

    Self-assembly of magnetic microparticles in AC magnetic fields. Excitation of the system by an AC magnetic field provides a variety of patterns that can be controlled by adjusting the frequency and the amplitude of the field. At low particle densities the low-frequency magnetic excitation favors cluster phase formation, while high frequency excitation favors chains and netlike structures. For denser configurations, an abrupt transition to the network phase was obtained.

  5. Plant X-tender: An extension of the AssemblX system for the assembly and expression of multigene constructs in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machens, Fabian; Coll, Anna; Baebler, Špela; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Gruden, Kristina

    2018-01-01

    Cloning multiple DNA fragments for delivery of several genes of interest into the plant genome is one of the main technological challenges in plant synthetic biology. Despite several modular assembly methods developed in recent years, the plant biotechnology community has not widely adopted them yet, probably due to the lack of appropriate vectors and software tools. Here we present Plant X-tender, an extension of the highly efficient, scar-free and sequence-independent multigene assembly strategy AssemblX, based on overlap-depended cloning methods and rare-cutting restriction enzymes. Plant X-tender consists of a set of plant expression vectors and the protocols for most efficient cloning into the novel vector set needed for plant expression and thus introduces advantages of AssemblX into plant synthetic biology. The novel vector set covers different backbones and selection markers to allow full design flexibility. We have included ccdB counterselection, thereby allowing the transfer of multigene constructs into the novel vector set in a straightforward and highly efficient way. Vectors are available as empty backbones and are fully flexible regarding the orientation of expression cassettes and addition of linkers between them, if required. We optimised the assembly and subcloning protocol by testing different scar-less assembly approaches: the noncommercial SLiCE and TAR methods and the commercial Gibson assembly and NEBuilder HiFi DNA assembly kits. Plant X-tender was applicable even in combination with low efficient homemade chemically competent or electrocompetent Escherichia coli. We have further validated the developed procedure for plant protein expression by cloning two cassettes into the newly developed vectors and subsequently transferred them to Nicotiana benthamiana in a transient expression setup. Thereby we show that multigene constructs can be delivered into plant cells in a streamlined and highly efficient way. Our results will support faster

  6. Plant X-tender: An extension of the AssemblX system for the assembly and expression of multigene constructs in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukan, Tjaša; Machens, Fabian; Coll, Anna; Baebler, Špela; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Gruden, Kristina

    2018-01-01

    Cloning multiple DNA fragments for delivery of several genes of interest into the plant genome is one of the main technological challenges in plant synthetic biology. Despite several modular assembly methods developed in recent years, the plant biotechnology community has not widely adopted them yet, probably due to the lack of appropriate vectors and software tools. Here we present Plant X-tender, an extension of the highly efficient, scar-free and sequence-independent multigene assembly strategy AssemblX, based on overlap-depended cloning methods and rare-cutting restriction enzymes. Plant X-tender consists of a set of plant expression vectors and the protocols for most efficient cloning into the novel vector set needed for plant expression and thus introduces advantages of AssemblX into plant synthetic biology. The novel vector set covers different backbones and selection markers to allow full design flexibility. We have included ccdB counterselection, thereby allowing the transfer of multigene constructs into the novel vector set in a straightforward and highly efficient way. Vectors are available as empty backbones and are fully flexible regarding the orientation of expression cassettes and addition of linkers between them, if required. We optimised the assembly and subcloning protocol by testing different scar-less assembly approaches: the noncommercial SLiCE and TAR methods and the commercial Gibson assembly and NEBuilder HiFi DNA assembly kits. Plant X-tender was applicable even in combination with low efficient homemade chemically competent or electrocompetent Escherichia coli. We have further validated the developed procedure for plant protein expression by cloning two cassettes into the newly developed vectors and subsequently transferred them to Nicotiana benthamiana in a transient expression setup. Thereby we show that multigene constructs can be delivered into plant cells in a streamlined and highly efficient way. Our results will support faster

  7. A computer-oriented system for assembling and displaying land management information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot L. Amidon

    1964-01-01

    Maps contain information basic to land management planning. By transforming conventional map symbols into numbers which are punched into cards, the land manager can have a computer assemble and display information required for a specific job. He can let a computer select information from several maps, combine it with such nonmap data as treatment cost or benefit per...

  8. Species sorting during biofilm assembly by artificial substrates deployed in a cold seep system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei Peng

    2014-10-17

    Studies focusing on biofilm assembly in deep-sea environments are rarely conducted. To examine the effects of substrate type on microbial community assembly, biofilms were developed on different substrates for different durations at two locations in the Red Sea: in a brine pool and in nearby bottom water (NBW) adjacent to the Thuwal cold seep II. The composition of the microbial communities in 51 biofilms and water samples were revealed by classification of pyrosequenced 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Together with the microscopic characteristics of the biofilms, the results indicate a stronger selection effect by the substrates on the microbial assembly in the brine pool compared with the NBW. Moreover, the selection effect by substrate type was stronger in the early stages compared with the later stages of the biofilm development. These results are consistent with the hypotheses proposed in the framework of species sorting theory, which states that the power of species sorting during microbial community assembly is dictated by habitat conditions, duration and the structure of the source community. Therefore, the results of this study shed light on the control strategy underlying biofilm-associated marine fouling and provide supporting evidence for ecological theories important for understanding the formation of deep-sea biofilms.

  9. An integrated framework for design, management and operation of reconfigurable assembly systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzini, Massimo; Unglert, Johannes Markus; Gyulai, Dávid; Colledani, Marcello; Jauregui Becker, Juan Manuel; Monostori, László; Urgo, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing has to cope with the continuously increasing variety of products, change of volumes and shortening product life cycles. These trends also affect the automotive sector: the frequent introduction of new models, materials and assembly technologies put the suppliers of make-to-order parts

  10. Species sorting during biofilm assembly by artificial substrates deployed in a cold seep system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei Peng; Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren Mao; Bougouffa, Salim; Yang, Bo; Cao, Hui Luo; Zhang, Gen; Wong, Yue Him; Xu, Wei; Batang, Zenon B.; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Zhang, Xixiang; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Studies focusing on biofilm assembly in deep-sea environments are rarely conducted. To examine the effects of substrate type on microbial community assembly, biofilms were developed on different substrates for different durations at two locations in the Red Sea: in a brine pool and in nearby bottom water (NBW) adjacent to the Thuwal cold seep II. The composition of the microbial communities in 51 biofilms and water samples were revealed by classification of pyrosequenced 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Together with the microscopic characteristics of the biofilms, the results indicate a stronger selection effect by the substrates on the microbial assembly in the brine pool compared with the NBW. Moreover, the selection effect by substrate type was stronger in the early stages compared with the later stages of the biofilm development. These results are consistent with the hypotheses proposed in the framework of species sorting theory, which states that the power of species sorting during microbial community assembly is dictated by habitat conditions, duration and the structure of the source community. Therefore, the results of this study shed light on the control strategy underlying biofilm-associated marine fouling and provide supporting evidence for ecological theories important for understanding the formation of deep-sea biofilms.

  11. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline.

  12. Efficient analysis of macromolecular rotational diffusion from heteronuclear relaxation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosset, Patrice; Hus, Jean-Christophe; Blackledge, Martin; Marion, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    A novel program has been developed for the interpretation of 15 N relaxation rates in terms of macromolecular anisotropic rotational diffusion. The program is based on a highly efficient simulated annealing/minimization algorithm, designed specifically to search the parametric space described by the isotropic, axially symmetric and fully anisotropic rotational diffusion tensor models. The high efficiency of this algorithm allows extensive noise-based Monte Carlo error analysis. Relevant statistical tests are systematically applied to provide confidence limits for the proposed tensorial models. The program is illustrated here using the example of the cytochrome c' from Rhodobacter capsulatus, a four-helix bundle heme protein, for which data at three different field strengths were independently analysed and compared

  13. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microfluidics for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Lisa A.; Spearing, Scott

    2003-01-01

    At NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Iterative Biological Crystallization (IBC) project has begun development on scientific hardware for macromolecular crystallization on the International Space Station (ISS). Currently ISS crystallization research is limited to solution recipes that were prepared on the ground prior to launch. The proposed hardware will conduct solution mixing and dispensing on board the ISS, be fully automated, and have imaging functions via remote commanding from the ground. Utilizing microfluidic technology, IBC will allow for on orbit iterations. The microfluidics LabChip(R) devices that have been developed, along with Caliper Technologies, will greatly benefit researchers by allowing for precise fluid handling of nano/pico liter sized volumes. IBC will maximize the amount of science return by utilizing the microfluidic approach and be a valuable tool to structural biologists investigating medically relevant projects.

  14. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  15. 129 Xe NMR Relaxation-Based Macromolecular Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Muller D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dao, Phuong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jeong, Keunhong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Slack, Clancy C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vassiliou, Christophoros C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Finbloom, Joel A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Francis, Matthew B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Pines, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-29

    A 129Xe NMR relaxation-based sensing approach is reported on that exploits changes in the bulk xenon relaxation rate induced by slowed tumbling of a cryptophane-based sensor upon target binding. The amplification afforded by detection of the bulk dissolved xenon allows sensitive detection of targets. The sensor comprises a xenon-binding cryptophane cage, a target interaction element, and a metal chelating agent. Xenon associated with the target-bound cryptophane cage is rapidly relaxed and then detected after exchange with the bulk. Here we show that large macromolecular targets increase the rotational correlation time of xenon, increasing its relaxation rate. Upon binding of a biotin-containing sensor to avidin at 1.5 μM concentration, the free xenon T2 is reduced by a factor of 4.

  16. E-MSD: the European Bioinformatics Institute Macromolecular Structure Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutselakis, H; Dimitropoulos, D; Fillon, J; Golovin, A; Henrick, K; Hussain, A; Ionides, J; John, M; Keller, P A; Krissinel, E; McNeil, P; Naim, A; Newman, R; Oldfield, T; Pineda, J; Rachedi, A; Copeland, J; Sitnov, A; Sobhany, S; Suarez-Uruena, A; Swaminathan, J; Tagari, M; Tate, J; Tromm, S; Velankar, S; Vranken, W

    2003-01-01

    The E-MSD macromolecular structure relational database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd) is designed to be a single access point for protein and nucleic acid structures and related information. The database is derived from Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries. Relational database technologies are used in a comprehensive cleaning procedure to ensure data uniformity across the whole archive. The search database contains an extensive set of derived properties, goodness-of-fit indicators, and links to other EBI databases including InterPro, GO, and SWISS-PROT, together with links to SCOP, CATH, PFAM and PROSITE. A generic search interface is available, coupled with a fast secondary structure domain search tool.

  17. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Evolving Methods for Macromolecular Gystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Read, Randy J

    2007-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the pre-eminent technique for visualizing the structures of macromolecules at atomic resolution. These structures are central to understanding the detailed mechanisms of biological processes, and to discovering novel therapeutics using a structure-based approach. As yet, structures are known for only a small fraction of the proteins encoded by human and pathogenic genomes. To counter the myriad modern threats of disease, there is an urgent need to determine the structures of the thousands of proteins whose structure and function remain unknown. This volume draws on the expertise of leaders in the field of macromolecular crystallography to illuminate the dramatic developments that are accelerating progress in structural biology. Their contributions span the range of techniques from crystallization through data collection, structure solution and analysis, and show how modern high-throughput methods are contributing to a deeper understanding of medical problems.

  18. MR lymphography with macromolecular Gd-DTPA compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Wagner, S.; Branding, G.; Taupitz, M.; Wolf, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the suitability of macromolecular Gd-DTPA compounds as signal-enhancing lymphographic agents in MR imaging. Two Gd-DTPA polylysin compounds and Gd-DTPA albumin, with molecular weights of 48,000,170,000, and 87,000 daltons, respectively, were tested in rabbits at gadolinium doses of 5 and 15 μmol per animal. Three animals were examined at each dose with T1-weighted sequences. The iliac lymph nodes were imaged prior to and during unilateral endolymphatic infusion into a femoral lymph vessel as well as over a period of 2 hours thereafter. All contrast media showed a homogeneous and pronounced signal enhancement in the lymph nodes during infusion at both doses

  19. THESEUS: maximum likelihood superpositioning and analysis of macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Douglas L; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2006-09-01

    THESEUS is a command line program for performing maximum likelihood (ML) superpositions and analysis of macromolecular structures. While conventional superpositioning methods use ordinary least-squares (LS) as the optimization criterion, ML superpositions provide substantially improved accuracy by down-weighting variable structural regions and by correcting for correlations among atoms. ML superpositioning is robust and insensitive to the specific atoms included in the analysis, and thus it does not require subjective pruning of selected variable atomic coordinates. Output includes both likelihood-based and frequentist statistics for accurate evaluation of the adequacy of a superposition and for reliable analysis of structural similarities and differences. THESEUS performs principal components analysis for analyzing the complex correlations found among atoms within a structural ensemble. ANSI C source code and selected binaries for various computing platforms are available under the GNU open source license from http://monkshood.colorado.edu/theseus/ or http://www.theseus3d.org.

  20. Extracting trends from two decades of microgravity macromolecular crystallization history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A; Snell, Edward H; van der Woerd, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Since the 1980s hundreds of macromolecular crystal growth experiments have been performed in the reduced acceleration environment of an orbiting spacecraft. Significant enhancements in structural knowledge have resulted from X-ray diffraction of the crystals grown. Similarly, many samples have shown no improvement or degradation in comparison to those grown on the ground. A complex series of interrelated factors affect these experiments and by building a comprehensive archive of the results it was aimed to identify factors that result in success and those that result in failure. Specifically, it was found that dedicated microgravity missions increase the chance of success when compared with those where crystallization took place as a parasitic aspect of the mission. It was also found that the chance of success could not be predicted based on any discernible property of the macromolecule available to us.

  1. Macromolecular contrast agents for MR mammography: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Brasch, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Macromolecular contrast media (MMCM) encompass a new class of diagnostic drugs that can be applied with dynamic MRI to extract both physiologic and morphologic information in breast lesions. Kinetic analysis of dynamic MMCM-enhanced MR data in breast tumor patients provides useful estimates of tumor blood volume and microvascular permeability, typically increased in cancer. These tumor characteristics can be applied to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, to define the angiogenesis status of cancers, and to monitor tumor response to therapy. The most immediate challenge to the development of MMCM-enhanced mammography is the identification of those candidate compounds that demonstrate the requisite long intravascular distribution and have the high tolerance necessary for clinical use. Potential mammographic applications and limitations of various MMCM, defined by either experimental animal testing or clinical testing in patients, are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  2. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray induced radiation damage studies employing a model protein–DNA complex revealed a striking partition of damage sites. The DNA component was observed to be far more resistant to specific damage compared with the protein. Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N 1 —C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses

  3. A biomimetic colorimetric logic gate system based on multi-functional peptide-mediated gold nanoparticle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Li, Wang; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Pei; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shou-Zhuo

    2016-04-28

    In natural biological systems, proteins exploit various functional peptide motifs to exert target response and activity switch, providing a functional and logic basis for complex cellular activities. Building biomimetic peptide-based bio-logic systems is highly intriguing but remains relatively unexplored due to limited logic recognition elements and complex signal outputs. In this proof-of-principle work, we attempted to address these problems by utilizing multi-functional peptide probes and the peptide-mediated nanoparticle assembly system. Here, the rationally designed peptide probes function as the dual-target responsive element specifically responsive to metal ions and enzymes as well as the mediator regulating the assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Taking advantage of Zn2+ ions and chymotrypsin as the model inputs of metal ions and enzymes, respectively, we constructed the peptide logic system computed by the multi-functional peptide probes and outputted by the readable colour change of AuNPs. In this way, the representative binary basic logic gates (AND, OR, INHIBIT, NAND, IMPLICATION) have been achieved by delicately coding the peptide sequence, demonstrating the versatility of our logic system. Additionally, we demonstrated that the three-input combinational logic gate (INHIBIT-OR) could also be successfully integrated and applied as a multi-tasking biosensor for colorimetric detection of dual targets. This nanoparticle-based peptide logic system presents a valid strategy to illustrate peptide information processing and provides a practical platform for executing peptide computing or peptide-related multiplexing sensing, implying that the controllable nanomaterial assembly is a promising and potent methodology for the advancement of biomimetic bio-logic computation.

  4. Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  5. Supplemental information for a notice of construction for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This ''Notice of Construction'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 402-80-070, for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State (Figure 1). The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS) the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) will be located in one facility, the Fuels and materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post- irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, to the extent possible, these systems will be dealt with separately. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  6. Self-assembly of POSS-containing block copolymers: fixing the hierarchical structure in networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Libor; Janata, Miroslav; Pleštil, Josef; Zhigunov, Alexander; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2014), s. 126-136 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1459 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200500903 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : block copolymers * self-assembly * POSS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2014

  7. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of gaseous fission products released from fuel assemblies stored in an fbr type reactor. Constitution; A cap provided with means capable of storing gas is adapted to amount to the assembly handling head, for example, by way of threading in a storage rack of spent fuel assemblies consisting of a bottom plate, a top plate and an assembly support mechanism. By previously eliminating the gas inside of the assembly and the cap in the storage rack, gaseous fission products upon loading, if released from fuel rods during storage, are stored in the cap and do not scatter in the storage rack. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  9. Toward three-dimensional microelectronic systems: directed self-assembly of silicon microcubes via DNA surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerhardt, Nico; Merzsch, Stephan; Ledig, Johannes; Bora, Achyut; Waag, Andreas; Tornow, Marc; Mischnick, Petra

    2013-07-02

    The huge and intelligent processing power of three-dimensional (3D) biological "processors" like the human brain with clock speeds of only 0.1 kHz is an extremely fascinating property, which is based on a massively parallel interconnect strategy. Artificial silicon microprocessors are 7 orders of magnitude faster. Nevertheless, they do not show any indication of intelligent processing power, mostly due to their very limited interconnectivity. Massively parallel interconnectivity can only be realized in three dimensions. Three-dimensional artificial processors would therefore be at the root of fabricating artificially intelligent systems. A first step in this direction would be the self-assembly of silicon based building blocks into 3D structures. We report on the self-assembly of such building blocks by molecular recognition, and on the electrical characterization of the formed assemblies. First, planar silicon substrates were functionalized with self-assembling monolayers of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for coupling of oligonucleotides (single stranded DNA) with glutaric aldehyde. The oligonucleotide immobilization was confirmed and quantified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled complementary oligonucleotides. After the individual processing steps, the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Patterned DNA-functionalized layers were fabricated by microcontact printing (μCP) and photolithography. Silicon microcubes of 3 μm edge length as model objects for first 3D self-assembly experiments were fabricated out of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by a combination of reactive ion etching (RIE) and selective wet etching. The microcubes were then surface-functionalized using the same protocol as on planar substrates, and their self-assembly was demonstrated both on patterned silicon surfaces (88% correctly placed cubes), and to cube aggregates by complementary DNA

  10. Bistability in a self-assembling system confined by elastic walls: Exact results in a one-dimensional lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pȩkalski, J.; Ciach, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Almarza, N. G. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-07

    The impact of confinement on self-assembly of particles interacting with short-range attraction and long-range repulsion potential is studied for thermodynamic states corresponding to local ordering of clusters or layers in the bulk. Exact and asymptotic expressions for the local density and for the effective potential between the confining surfaces are obtained for a one-dimensional lattice model introduced by J. Pȩkalski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 144903 (2013)]. The simple asymptotic formulas are shown to be in good quantitative agreement with exact results for slits containing at least 5 layers. We observe that the incommensurability of the system size and the average distance between the clusters or layers in the bulk leads to structural deformations that are different for different values of the chemical potential μ. The change of the type of defects is reflected in the dependence of density on μ that has a shape characteristic for phase transitions. Our results may help to avoid misinterpretation of the change of the type of defects as a phase transition in simulations of inhomogeneous systems. Finally, we show that a system confined by soft elastic walls may exhibit bistability such that two system sizes that differ approximately by the average distance between the clusters or layers are almost equally probable. This may happen when the equilibrium separation between the soft boundaries of an empty slit corresponds to the largest stress in the confined self-assembling system.

  11. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  12. Design of Introspective Circuits for Analysis of Cell-Level Dis-orientation in Self-Assembled Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Jesse Macias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a novel approach to managing complexity in a large self-assembled system, by employing the self-assembling components themselves to address the complexity. Challenges are discussed, including the question of how to deal with elements that are assembled in different orientations from each other, and a solution based on the idea of introspective circuits is described. A methodology for determining a single cell’s orientation from an adjacent cell is given. An algorithm is then described for using such re-oriented edge cells to determine orientation of more-interior cells, thus allowing re-orientation of an entire 2D region of cells. Test procedures are described, and results are presented to show better-than-linear time performance (O(sqrt(n. The significance of this work is discussed, not only in terms of managing arrays of dis-oriented cells, but more importantly as an example of the usefulness of local, distributed self-configuration to create and use introspective circuitry. Finally, future work is discussed, including extension to 3D collections of cells.

  13. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding through an

  14. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G; Pastore, A; Piazza, F; Temussi, P A

    2013-08-02

    conference held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding

  15. A shuttle and space station manipulator system for assembly, docking, maintenance, cargo handling and spacecraft retrieval (preliminary design). Volume 3: Concept analysis. Part 1: Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Information backing up the key features of the manipulator system concept and detailed technical information on the subsystems are presented. Space station assembly and shuttle cargo handling tasks are emphasized in the concept analysis because they involve shuttle berthing, transferring the manipulator boom between shuttle and station, station assembly, and cargo handling. Emphasis is also placed on maximizing commonality in the system areas of manipulator booms, general purpose end effectors, control and display, data processing, telemetry, dedicated computers, and control station design.

  16. Constant system for by-channel thermal-hydraulic calculation of fuel assembly operational conditions in reactors with natural and mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogatyrev, I.L.; Bogoslovskaya, G.P.; Zhukov, A.V.; Sorokin, A.P.; Titov, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    System of constants for mass, impulse and energy conservation equations (drag, mixing, heat transfer coefficients, azimuthal unquality of temperature) is reported in region with small Re number for wide range of geometrical assembly parameters. This system can be used in subchannel calculations of assemblies with natural and mixed convection under conditions with loss of flow accident. The formulae are compared with experimental data. 30 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, John R.; Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Judge, Russell A.; Boggon, Titus J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The first protein crystallization experiment in microgravity was launched in April, 1981 and used Germany's Technologische Experimente unter Schwerelosigkeit (TEXUS 3) sounding rocket. The protein P-galactosidase (molecular weight 465Kda) was chosen as the sample with a liquid-liquid diffusion growth method. A sliding device brought the protein, buffer and salt solution into contact when microgravity was reached. The sounding rocket gave six minutes of microgravity time with a cine camera and schlieren optics used to monitor the experiment, a single growth cell. In microgravity a strictly laminar diffusion process was observed in contrast to the turbulent convection seen on the ground. Several single crystals, approx 100micron in length, were formed in the flight which were of inferior but of comparable visual quality to those grown on the ground over several days. A second experiment using the same protocol but with solutions cooled to -8C (kept liquid with glycerol antifreeze) again showed laminar diffusion. The science of macromolecular structural crystallography involves crystallization of the macromolecule followed by use of the crystal for X-ray diffraction experiments to determine the three dimensional structure of the macromolecule. Neutron protein crystallography is employed for elucidation of H/D exchange and for improved definition of the bound solvent (D20). The structural information enables an understanding of how the molecule functions with important potential for rational drug design, improved efficiency of industrial enzymes and agricultural chemical development. The removal of turbulent convection and sedimentation in microgravity, and the assumption that higher quality crystals will be produced, has given rise to the growing number of crystallization experiments now flown. Many experiments can be flown in a small volume with simple, largely automated, equipment - an ideal combination for a microgravity experiment. The term "protein crystal growth

  18. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  19. Doses of the staff during the spent fuel assemblies transportation and storage in Nuhmos 56V concrete system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoyan, V.; Muradyan, A.

    2003-01-01

    The NUHMOS 56V concrete system provides long-term interim storage (50 years) for spent fuel assemblies, which have been out of the reactor for a sufficient period of time. It consists from horizontal storage modules. The fuel assemblies are confined in a helium atmosphere by a canister containment pressure vessel. The canister is protected and shielded by a massive reinforced concrete module. Decay heat is removed from the canister and concrete module by a passive natural draft convection ventilation system. The project of storage does not foresee the radiation monitoring inside of building and around it. But we provided and realize the radiation monitoring program around storage, it includes tree phases: - determination the zero background around the building before storage put in exploiting; - monitoring of the radioactive particles in air (additional aspiration plant); dose rate monitoring by portable dosimeters and soil monitoring during the process of the fuel storage; - constantly after the completion the fuel storage process - monitoring of the radioactive particles in air (additional aspiration plant); dose rate monitoring by portable dosimeters, and soil monitoring. Also designed the dose rate monitoring by the dosimeter RME 3 with the transfer of data by radio channel to central monitor. The canistered spent fuel assemblies are transferred from the plant's spent fuel pool to the concrete storage modules in a transfer cask. The cask is aligned with the storage module and the canister and inserted into the module by means of a hydraulic ram. The system is a totally passive installation that is designed to provide shielding and safe confinement of spent fuel for a range of postulated accident conditions and natural phenomena. (authors)

  20. Environment-induced self-assembly in phase separated block copolymer systems: A SANS investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Naba K.; Thompson, Sandra; Roy Choudhury, Namita; Knott, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of non-selective solvent on the large-scale mesoscopic ordering in asymmetric block copolymers, poly(styrene-block-ethylene/butylene-block-styrene) (SEBS) using small angle neutron scattering technique (SANS). SANS measurements were carried out over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. Evolution of the self-assembled phase morphology in such polymer with the thermodynamic selectivity of solvent, temperature and concentration has been discussed. Correlation between morphology and thermorheological behavior of the gels has also been established

  1. Driving Forces of the Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Systems: Partially Ordered Mesophases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, M. A.; Chvalun, S. N.

    2018-06-01

    The main aspects are considered of the self-organization of a new class of liquid crystalline compounds, rigid sector-shaped and cone-shaped dendrons. Theoretical approaches to the self-assembly of different amphiphilic compounds (lipids, bolaamphiphiles, block copolymers, and polyelectrolytes) are described. Particular attention is given to the mesophase structures that emerge during the self-organization of mesophases characterized by intermediate degrees of ordering, e.g., plastic crystals, the rotation-crystalline phase in polymers, ordered and disordered two-dimensional columnar phases, and bicontinuous cubic phases of different symmetry.

  2. Morphology-tunable and photoresponsive properties in a self-assembled two-component gel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifeng; Xu, Miao; Yi, Tao; Xiao, Shuzhang; Zhou, Zhiguo; Li, Fuyou; Huang, Chunhui

    2007-01-02

    Photoresponsive C3-symmetrical trisurea self-assembling building blocks containing three azobenzene groups (LC10 and LC4) at the rim were designed and synthesized. By introducing a trisamide gelator (G18), which can self-aggregate through hydrogen bonds of acylamino moieties to form a fibrous network, the mixture of LC10 (or LC4) and G18 forms an organogel with coral-like supramolecular structure from 1,4-dioxane. The cooperation of hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic diversity between these components are the main contributions to the specific superstructure. The two-component gel exhibits reversible photoisomerization from trans to cis transition without breakage of the gel state.

  3. High-Resolution Spore Coat Architecture and Assembly of Bacillus Spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Elhadj, S; Plomp, M

    2011-03-14

    Elucidating the molecular architecture of bacterial and cellular surfaces and its structural dynamics is essential to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis, immune response, physicochemical interactions, environmental resistance, and provide the means for identifying spore formulation and processing attributes. I will discuss the application of in vitro atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studies of high-resolution coat architecture and assembly of several Bacillus spore species. We have demonstrated that bacterial spore coat structures are phylogenetically and growth medium determined. We have proposed that strikingly different species-dependent coat structures of bacterial spore species are a consequence of sporulation media-dependent nucleation and crystallization mechanisms that regulate the assembly of the outer spore coat. Spore coat layers were found to exhibit screw dislocations and two-dimensional nuclei typically observed on inorganic and macromolecular crystals. This presents the first case of non-mineral crystal growth patterns being revealed for a biological organism, which provides an unexpected example of nature exploiting fundamental materials science mechanisms for the morphogenetic control of biological ultrastructures. We have discovered and validated, distinctive formulation-specific high-resolution structural spore coat and dimensional signatures of B. anthracis spores (Sterne strain) grown in different formulation condition. We further demonstrated that measurement of the dimensional characteristics of B. anthracis spores provides formulation classification and sample matching with high sensitivity and specificity. I will present data on the development of an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures on the B. anthracis surfaces. These studies demonstrate that AFM can probe microbial surface architecture, environmental dynamics and the life cycle of bacterial and cellular systems at near

  4. Functionalization of Planet-Satellite Nanostructures Revealed by Nanoscopic Localization of Distinct Macromolecular Species

    KAUST Repository

    Rossner, Christian; Roddatis, Vladimir; Lopatin, Sergei; Vana, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The development of a straightforward method is reported to form hybrid polymer/gold planet-satellite nanostructures (PlSNs) with functional polymer. Polyacrylate type polymer with benzyl chloride in its backbone as a macromolecular tracer

  5. Sample handling for kinetics and molecular assembly in flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). National Flow Cytometry Resource]|[Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine; Seamer, L.C.; Kuckuck, F.; Prossnitz, E.; Edwards, B. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine; Posner, G. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01

    Flow cytometry discriminates particle associated fluorescence from the fluorescence of the surrounding medium. It permits assemblies of macromolecular complexes on beads or cells to be detected in real-time with precision and specificity. The authors have investigated two types of robust sample handling systems which provide sub-second resolution and high throughput: (1) mixers which use stepper-motor driven syringes to initiate chemical reactions in msec time frames; and (2) flow injection controllers with valves and automated syringes used in chemical process control. In the former system, the authors used fast valves to overcome the disparity between mixing 100 {micro}ls of sample in 100 msecs and delivering sample to a flow cytometer at 1 {micro}l/sec. Particles were detected within 100 msec after mixing, but turbulence was created which lasted for 1 sec after injection of the sample into the flow cytometer. They used optical criteria to discriminate particles which were out of alignment due to the turbulent flow. Complex sample handling protocols involving multiple mixing steps and sample dilution have also been achieved. With the latter system they were able to automate sample handling and delivery with intervals of a few seconds. The authors used a fluidic approach to defeat turbulence caused by sample introduction. By controlling both sheath and sample with individual syringes, the period of turbulence was reduced to {approximately} 200 msecs. Automated sample handling and sub-second resolution should permit broad analytical and diagnostic applications of flow cytometry.

  6. Development of High Throughput Salt Separation System with Integrated Liquid Salt Separation - Salt Distillation Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sangwoon; Park, K. M.; Kim, J. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2013-01-15

    The capacity of a salt distiller should be sufficiently large to reach the throughput of uranium electro-refining process. In this study, an assembly composing a liquid separation sieve and a distillation crucible was developed for the sequential operation of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation in the same tower. The feasibility of the sequential salt separation was examined by the rotation test of the sieve-crucible assembly and sequential operation of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation. The adhered salt in the uranium deposits was removed successfully. The salt content in the deposits was below 0.1 wt% after the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation - salt distillation. From the results of this study, it could be concluded that efficient salt separation can be realized by the sequential operation of liquid salt separation and vacuum distillation in one distillation tower since the operation procedures are simplified and no extra operation of cooling and reheating is necessary.

  7. Bottom-up strategies for the assembling of magnetic systems using nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, V.; Hillion, A.; Robert, A.; Loiselet, O.; Khadra, G.; Capiod, P.; Albin, C.; Boisron, O.; Le Roy, D.; Bardotti, L.; Tournus, F.; Tamion, A.

    2018-05-01

    In the frame of the 20th Anniversary of the Journal of Nanoparticle Research (JNR), our aim is to start from the historical context 20 years ago and to give some recent results and perspectives concerning nanomagnets prepared from clusters preformed in the gas phase using the low-energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) technique. In this paper, we focus our attention on the typical case of Co clusters embedded in various matrices to study interface magnetic anisotropy and magnetic interactions as a function of volume concentrations, and on still current and perspectives through two examples of binary metallic 3d-5d TM (namely CoPt and FeAu) cluster assemblies to illustrate size-related and nanoalloy phenomena on magnetic properties in well-defined mass-selected clusters. The structural and magnetic properties of these cluster assemblies were investigated using various experimental techniques that include high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, and synchrotron techniques such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Depending on the chemical nature of both NPs and matrix, we observe different magnetic responses compared to their bulk counterparts. In particular, we show how finite size effects (size reduction) enhance their magnetic moment and how specific relaxation in nanoalloys can impact their magnetic anisotropy.

  8. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature

  9. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature.

  10. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution with interatomic scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lunin, Vladimir Y. [Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGMBC, 1 Rue L. Fries, 67404 Illkirch and IBMC, 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Faculty of Sciences, Nancy University, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Modelling deformation electron density using interatomic scatters is simpler than multipolar methods, produces comparable results at subatomic resolution and can easily be applied to macromolecules. A study of the accurate electron-density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution (better than ∼1.0 Å) requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool that is conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8–1.0 Å, the number of experimental data is insufficient for full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark data sets gave results that were comparable in quality with the results of multipolar refinement and superior to those for conventional models. Applications to several data sets of both small molecules and macromolecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  11. Polycapillary x-ray optics for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, S.M.; Gibson, W.M.; Carter, D.C.; Sisk, R.C.; Ho, J.X.

    1996-01-01

    Polycapillary x-ray optics have found potential application in many different fields, including antiscatter and magnification in mammography, radiography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray lithography, and x-ray diffraction techniques. In x-ray diffraction, an optic is used to collect divergent x-rays from a point source and redirect them into a quasi-parallel, or slightly focused beam. Monolithic polycapillary optics have been developed recently for macromolecular crystallography and have already shown considerable gains in diffracted beam intensity over pinhole collimation. Development is being pursued through a series of simulations and prototype optics. Many improvements have been made over the stage 1 prototype reported previously, which include better control over the manufacturing process, reducing the diameter of the output beam, and addition of a slight focusing at the output of the optic to further increase x-ray flux at the sample. The authors report the characteristics and performance of the stage 1 and stage 2 optics

  12. A beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmore, H.A.; Earnest, T.; Kim, S.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Robinson, A.L.

    1994-08-01

    A beamline for macromolecular crystallography has been designed for the ALS. The source will be a 37-pole wiggler with a, 2-T on-axis peak field. The wiggler will illuminate three beamlines, each accepting 3 mrad of horizontal aperture. The central beamline will primarily be used for multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion measurements in the wavelength range from 4 to 0.9 angstrom. The beamline optics will comprise a double-crystal monochromator with a collimating pre-mirror and a double-focusing mirror after the monochromator. The two side stations will be used for fixed-wavelength experiments within the wavelength range from 1.5 to 0.95 angstrom. The optics will consist of a conventional vertically focusing cylindrical mirror followed by an asymmetrically cut curved-crystal monochromator. This paper presents details of the optimization of the wiggler source for crystallography, gives a description of the beamline configuration, and discusses the reasons for the choices made

  13. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity generated by a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, N I; Yin, D C; Harata, K; Kiyoshi, T; Fujiwara, M; Tanimoto, Y

    2006-09-01

    About 30% of the protein crystals grown in space yield better X-ray diffraction data than the best crystals grown on the earth. The microgravity environments provided by the application of an upward magnetic force constitute excellent candidates for simulating the microgravity conditions in space. Here, we describe a method to control effective gravity and formation of protein crystals in various levels of effective gravity. Since 2002, the stable and long-time durable microgravity generated by a convenient type of superconducting magnet has been available for protein crystal growth. For the first time, protein crystals, orthorhombic lysozyme, were grown at microgravity on the earth, and it was proved that this microgravity improved the crystal quality effectively and reproducibly. The present method always accompanies a strong magnetic field, and the magnetic field itself seems to improve crystal quality. Microgravity is not always effective for improving crystal quality. When we applied this microgravity to the formation of cubic porcine insulin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals, we observed no dependence of effective gravity on crystal quality. Thus, this kind of test will be useful for selecting promising proteins prior to the space experiments. Finally, the microgravity generated by the magnet is compared with that in space, considering the cost, the quality of microgravity, experimental convenience, etc., and the future use of this microgravity for macromolecular crystal growth is discussed.

  14. Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov [Molecular Biology Consortium 12003 S. Pulaski Rd. #166 Alsip, IL 60803 U.S.A (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Recent advances in CMOS technology have allowed the production of large surface area detectors suitable for macromolecular crystallography experiments [1]. The Molecular Biology Consortium (MBC) Beamline 4.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, has installed a 2952 x 2820 mm RDI CMOS-8M detector with funds from NIH grant S10OD012073. The detector has a 20nsec dead pixel time and performs well with shutterless data collection strategies. The sensor obtains sharp point response and minimal optical distortion by use of a thin fiber-optic plate between the phosphor and sensor module. Shutterless data collections produce high-quality redundant datasets that can be obtained in minutes. The fine-sliced data are suitable for processing in standard crystallographic software packages (XDS, HKL2000, D*TREK, MOSFLM). Faster collection times relative to the previous CCD detector have resulted in a record number of datasets collected in a calendar year and de novo phasing experiments have resulted in publications in both Science and Nature [2,3]. The faster collections are due to a combination of the decreased overhead requirements of shutterless collections combined with exposure times that have decreased by over a factor of 2 for images with comparable signal to noise of the NOIR-1 detector. The overall increased productivity has allowed the development of new beamline capabilities and data collection strategies.

  15. Macromolecular refinement by model morphing using non-atomic parameterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowtan, Kevin; Agirre, Jon

    2018-02-01

    Refinement is a critical step in the determination of a model which explains the crystallographic observations and thus best accounts for the missing phase components. The scattering density is usually described in terms of atomic parameters; however, in macromolecular crystallography the resolution of the data is generally insufficient to determine the values of these parameters for individual atoms. Stereochemical and geometric restraints are used to provide additional information, but produce interrelationships between parameters which slow convergence, resulting in longer refinement times. An alternative approach is proposed in which parameters are not attached to atoms, but to regions of the electron-density map. These parameters can move the density or change the local temperature factor to better explain the structure factors. Varying the size of the region which determines the parameters at a particular position in the map allows the method to be applied at different resolutions without the use of restraints. Potential applications include initial refinement of molecular-replacement models with domain motions, and potentially the use of electron density from other sources such as electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) as the refinement model.

  16. Colloidal chirality in wormlike micellar systems exclusively originated from achiral species: Role of secondary assembly and stimulus responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenrong; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-09-15

    Colloidal chirality in wormlike micellar systems exclusively originated from achiral species and discussion of the role of secondary assembly of fiber-like aggregates in chirality generation were presented in this paper. Herein, formation of colloidal wormlike micelles for the first time incorporated chirality and redox-responsiveness into one design via noncovalent interaction. A dual-stimuli-responsive gel of wormlike micelles which were designed by employing a dual-responsive cationic surfactant (FTMA) and a strong gelator (AzoNa4) and regulated by redox reaction and host-guest inclusion is presented. Both the redox and host-guest interaction play an important role in regulating the viscosity and supramolecular chirality of gels of the wormlike micelles. The supramolecular chirality and viscosity of the wormlike micelle gels were switched reversibly by exerting chemical redox onto the ferrocenyl groups. For the amphiphile FTMA containing redox-active ferrocenyl group, reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocenyl groups leads to the charge and hydrophobicity changes of FTMA, therefore change its self-assembly behavior. Of equal interest, β-CD successfully detached the wormlike micelles via the recognition-inclusion behavior with FTMA and invalidate the H-bond and hydrophobic interaction between FTMA and AzoH4. This designed system provides a new strategy to tune the supramolecular chirality of colloidal aggregates and explore the specific packing mode detail within the micelles or the secondary assembly of the inter-micelles. We anticipate this dual-responsive H-bond-directed chiral gel switch could propose a new strategy when researchers designing new, multi-responsive functional gel materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoxic tumor environments exhibit disrupted collagen I fibers and low macromolecular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samata M Kakkad

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1 fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions.

  18. Olfactory nerve transport of macromolecular drugs to the brain. A problem in olfactory impaired patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Junpei; Miwa, Takaki

    2012-01-01

    Nasal administration of macromolecular drugs (including peptides and nanoparticles) has the potential to enable drug delivery system beyond the blood brain barrier (BBB) via olfactory nerve transport. Basic research on drug deliver systems to the brain via nasal administration has been well reported. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is associated with the development and growth of the central nervous system. Clinical application of IGF-I with nasal administration is intended to enable drug delivery to brain through the BBB. Uptake of IGF-I in the olfactory bulb and central nervous system increased according to the dosage of nasally administered IGF-I in normal ICR mice, however IGF-I uptake in the trigeminal nerve remained unchanged. Olfactory nerve transport is important for the delivery of nasally administered IGF-I to the brain in vivo. Because a safe olfactory nerve tracer has not been clinically available, olfactory nerve transport has not been well studied in humans. Nasal thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) administration has been safely used to assess the direct pathway to the brain via the nose in healthy volunteers with a normal olfactory threshold. 201 Tl olfactory nerve transport has recently been shown to decrease in patients with hyposmia. The olfactory nerve transport function in patients with olfactory disorders will be determined using 201 Tl olfacto-scintigraphy for the exclusion of candidates in a clinical trial to assess the usefulness of nasal administration of IGF-I. (author)

  19. Side-chain-controlled self-assembly of polystyrene-polypeptide miktoarm star copolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Junnila, Susanna

    2012-03-27

    We show how the self-assembly of miktoarm star copolymers can be controlled by modifying the side chains of their polypeptide arms, using A 2B and A 2B 2 type polymer/polypeptide hybrids (macromolecular chimeras). Initially synthesized PS 2PBLL and PS 2PBLL 2 (PS, polystyrene; PBLL, poly(ε-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-l-lysine) ) miktoarms were first deprotected to PS 2PLLHCl and PS 2PLLHCl 2 miktoarms (PLLHCl, poly(l-lysine hydrochloride)) and then complexed ionically with sodium dodecyl sulfonate (DS) to give the supramolecular complexes PS 2PLL(DS) and PS 2(PLL(DS)) 2. The solid-state self-assemblies of these six miktoarm systems were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS). The side chains of the polypeptide arms were observed to have a large effect on the solubility, polypeptide conformation, and self-assembly of the miktoarms. Three main categories were observed: (i) lamellar self-assemblies at the block copolymer length scale with packed layers of α-helices in PS 2PBLL and PS 2PBLL 2; (ii) charge-clustered polypeptide micelles with less-defined conformations in a nonordered lattice within a PS matrix in PS 2PLLHCl and PS 2PLLHCl 2; (iii) lamellar polypeptide-surfactant self-assemblies with β-sheet conformation in PS 2PLL(DS) and PS 2(PLL(DS)) 2 which dominate over the formation of block copolymer scale structures. Differences between the 3- and 4-arm systems illustrate how packing frustration between the coil-like PS arms and rigid polypeptide conformations can be relieved by the right number of arms, leading to differences in the extent of order. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. A Decentralized Approach to the Formulation of Hypotheses: A Hierarchical Structural Model for a Prion Self-Assembled System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyang; Zhang, Feifei; Song, Chao; Shi, Pengfei; Zhu, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Innovation in hypotheses is a key transformative driver for scientific development. The conventional centralized hypothesis formulation approach, where a dominant hypothesis is typically derived from a primary phenomenon, can, inevitably, impose restriction on the range of conceivable experiments and legitimate hypotheses, and ultimately impede understanding of the system of interest. We report herein the proposal of a decentralized approach for the formulation of hypotheses, through initial preconception-free phenomenon accumulation and subsequent reticular logical reasoning processes. The two-step approach can provide an unbiased, panoramic view of the system and as such should enable the generation of a set of more coherent and therefore plausible hypotheses. As a proof-of-concept demonstration of the utility of this open-ended approach, a hierarchical model has been developed for a prion self-assembled system, allowing insight into hitherto elusive static and dynamic features associated with this intriguing structure.

  1. Multilayer Thin Films Sequential Assembly of Nanocomposite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Decher, Gero

    2012-01-01

    This second, comprehensive edition of the pioneering book in this field has been completely revised and extended, now stretching to two volumes. The result is a comprehensive summary of layer-by-layer assembled, truly hybrid nanomaterials and thin films, covering organic, inorganic, colloidal, macromolecular and biological components, plus the assembly of nanoscale films derived from them on surfaces. Praise for the first edition: "... highly recommended to anyone interested in the field... and to scientists and researchers active in materials development..." –Polymer News With contri

  2. Self-Assembled Hydrogel Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gama

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogel nanoparticles—also referred to as polymeric nanogels or macromolecular micelles—are emerging as promising drug carriers for therapeutic applications. These nanostructures hold versatility and properties suitable for the delivery of bioactive molecules, namely of biopharmaceuticals. This article reviews the latest developments in the use of self-assembled polymeric nanogels for drug delivery applications, including small molecular weight drugs, proteins, peptides, oligosaccharides, vaccines and nucleic acids. The materials and techniques used in the development of self-assembling nanogels are also described.

  3. Defining the Architecture of the Core Machinery for the Assembly of Fe-S Clusters in Human Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakh, Oleksandr; Ranatunga, Wasantha; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas S; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Although Fe-S clusters may assemble spontaneously from elemental iron and sulfur in protein-free systems, the potential toxicity of free Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , and S 2- ions in aerobic environments underscores the requirement for specialized proteins to oversee the safe assembly of Fe-S clusters in living cells. Prokaryotes first developed multiprotein systems for Fe-S cluster assembly, from which mitochondria later derived their own system and became the main Fe-S cluster suppliers for eukaryotic cells. Early studies in yeast and human mitochondria indicated that Fe-S cluster assembly in eukaryotes is centered around highly conserved Fe-S proteins (human ISCU) that serve as scaffolds upon which new Fe-S clusters are assembled from (i) elemental sulfur, provided by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent cysteine desulfurase (human NFS1) and its stabilizing-binding partner (human ISD11), and (ii) elemental iron, provided by an iron-binding protein of the frataxin family (human FXN). Further studies revealed that all of these proteins could form stable complexes that could reach molecular masses of megadaltons. However, the protein-protein interaction surfaces, catalytic mechanisms, and overall architecture of these macromolecular machines remained undefined for quite some time. The delay was due to difficulties inherent in reconstituting these very large multiprotein complexes in vitro or isolating them from cells in sufficient quantities to enable biochemical and structural studies. Here, we describe approaches we developed to reconstitute the human Fe-S cluster assembly machinery in Escherichia coli and to define its remarkable architecture. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling of RFID-Enabled Real-Time Manufacturing Execution System in Mixed-Model Assembly Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To quickly respond to the diverse product demands, mixed-model assembly lines are well adopted in discrete manufacturing industries. Besides the complexity in material distribution, mixed-model assembly involves a variety of components, different process plans and fast production changes, which greatly increase the difficulty for agile production management. Aiming at breaking through the bottlenecks in existing production management, a novel RFID-enabled manufacturing execution system (MES, which is featured with real-time and wireless information interaction capability, is proposed to identify various manufacturing objects including WIPs, tools, and operators, etc., and to trace their movements throughout the production processes. However, being subject to the constraints in terms of safety stock, machine assignment, setup, and scheduling requirements, the optimization of RFID-enabled MES model for production planning and scheduling issues is a NP-hard problem. A new heuristical generalized Lagrangian decomposition approach has been proposed for model optimization, which decomposes the model into three subproblems: computation of optimal configuration of RFID senor networks, optimization of production planning subjected to machine setup cost and safety stock constraints, and optimization of scheduling for minimized overtime. RFID signal processing methods that could solve unreliable, redundant, and missing tag events are also described in detail. The model validity is discussed through algorithm analysis and verified through numerical simulation. The proposed design scheme has important reference value for the applications of RFID in multiple manufacturing fields, and also lays a vital research foundation to leverage digital and networked manufacturing system towards intelligence.

  5. Systems analysis determining critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions on ASST magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arden, C.S.

    1993-04-01

    During the assembly process through the completion of the Accelerator Surface String Test (ASST) phase one test, Magnet Systems Division Reliability Engineering has tracked all the known discrepancies utilizing the Failure Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action System (FRACAS) and data base. This paper discusses the critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions (lessons learned) based on actual data for the ASST magnets. The ASST magnets include seven Brookhaven Lab Dipoles (DCA-207 through 213), fourteen Fermi Lab Dipoles (DCA-310 through 323) and five Lawrence Berkeley Lab Quadrupoles (QCC-402 through 406). Between all the ASST magnets built there were one hundred eighty six (186) class one discrepancies reported out of approximately eleven hundred total discrepancy reports. The class one or critical discrepancies are defined as form, fit, function, safety or reliability problem. Each and every ASST magnet is considered a success, as they all achieved the quench performance requirements and were capable of being incorporated into the string test. This paper also discuss some specific magnet discrepancies, including failure cause(s), corrective action and possible open issues

  6. Systems analysis determining critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions on ASST magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arden, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    During the assembly process through the completion of the Accelerator Surface String Test (ASST) phase one test, Magnet Systems Division Reliability Engineering has tracked all the known discrepancies utilizing the Failure Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action System (FRACAS) and data base. This paper discusses the critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions (lessons learned) based on actual data for the ASST magnets. The ASST magnets include seven Brookhaven Lab Dipoles (DCA-207 through 213), fourteen Fermi Lab Dipoles (DCA-310 through 323) and five Lawrence Berkeley Lab Quadrupoles (QCC-402 through 406). Between all the ASST magnets built there were one hundred eighty six (186) class one discrepancies reported out of approximately eleven hundred total discrepancy reports. The class one or critical discrepancies are defined as form, fit, function, safety or reliability problem. Each and every ASST magnet is considered a success, as they all achieved the quench performance requirements and were capable of being incorporated into the string test. This paper will also discuss some specific magnet discrepancies, including failure cause(s), corrective action and possible open issues

  7. Reflector-moderated critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.; Jarvis, G.A.; Byers, C.C.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments with reflector-moderated critical assemblies were part of the Rover Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). These assemblies were characterized by thick D 2 O or beryllium reflectors surrounding large cavities that contained highly enriched uranium at low average densities. Because interest in this type of system has been revived by LASL Plasma Cavity Assembly studies, more detailed descriptions of the early assemblies than had been available in the unclassified literature are provided. (U.S.)

  8. Key steps in type III secretion system (T3SS) towards translocon assembly with potential sensor at plant plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Dong, Hansong

    2015-09-01

    Many plant- and animal-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from bacterial cells into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. The effector translocation occurs through an integral component of T3SS, the channel-like translocon, assembled by hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteinaceous translocators in a two-step process. In the first, hydrophilic translocators localize to the tip of a proteinaceous needle in animal pathogens, or a proteinaceous pilus in plant pathogens, and associate with hydrophobic translocators, which insert into host plasma membranes in the second step. However, the pilus needs to penetrate plant cell walls in advance. All hydrophilic translocators so far identified in plant pathogens are characteristic of harpins: T3SS accessory proteins containing a unitary hydrophilic domain or an additional enzymatic domain. Two-domain harpins carrying a pectate lyase domain potentially target plant cell walls and facilitate the penetration of the pectin-rich middle lamella by the bacterial pilus. One-domain harpins target plant plasma membranes and may play a crucial role in translocon assembly, which may also involve contrapuntal associations of hydrophobic translocators. In all cases, sensory components in the target plasma membrane are indispensable for the membrane recognition of translocators and the functionality of the translocon. The conjectural sensors point to membrane lipids and proteins, and a phosphatidic acid and an aquaporin are able to interact with selected harpin-type translocators. Interactions between translocators and their sensors at the target plasma membrane are assumed to be critical for translocon assembly. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  9. The role of intrinsic disorder and dynamics in the assembly and function of the type II secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuang; Shevchik, Vladimir E; Shaw, Rosie; Pickersgill, Richard W; Garnett, James A

    2017-10-01

    Many Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacteria use a type II secretion system (T2SS) to transport proteins out of the cell. These exported proteins or substrates play a major role in toxin delivery, maintaining biofilms, replication in the host and subversion of host immune responses to infection. We review the current structural and functional work on this system and argue that intrinsically disordered regions and protein dynamics are central for assembly, exo-protein recognition, and secretion competence of the T2SS. The central role of intrinsic disorder-order transitions in these processes may be a particular feature of type II secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing the fuel burn-up measuring system for 106 irradiated assemblies of Dalat reactor by using gamma spectrometer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Minh Tuan; Pham Quang Huy; Tran Tri Vien; Trang Cao Su; Tran Quoc Duong; Dang Tran Thai Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    The fuel burn-up is an important parameter needed to be monitored and determined during a reactor operation and fuel management. The fuel burn-up can be calculated using computer codes and experimentally measured. This work presents the theory and experimental method applied to determine the burn-up of the irradiated and 36% enriched VVR-M2 fuel type assemblies of Dalat reactor. The method is based on measurement of Cs-137 absolute specific activity using gamma spectrometer. Designed measuring system consists of a collimator tube, high purity Germanium detector (HPGe) and associated electronics modules and online computer data acquisition system. The obtained results of measurement are comparable with theoretically calculated results. (author)

  11. The Detector Control System of the ATLAS SemiCondutor Tracker during Macro-Assembly and Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Basiladze, S; Bates, R L; Bell, P; Bingefors, N; Böhm, J; Brenner, R; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Clark, A; Codispoti, G; Colijn, A P; D'Auria, S; Dorholt, O; Doherty, F; Ferrari, P; Ferrère, D; Górnicki, E; Koperny, S; Lefèvre, R; Lindquist, L-E; Malecki, P; Mikulec, B; Mohn, B; Pater, J; Pernegger, H; Phillips, P; Robichaud-Véronneau, A; Robinson, D; Roe, S; Sandaker, H; Sfyrla, A; Stanecka, E; Stastny, J; Viehhauser, G; Vossebeld, J; Wells, P

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is one of the largest existing semiconductor detectors. It is situated between the Pixel detector and the Transition Radiation Tracker at one of the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During 2006-2007 the detector was lowered into the ATLAS cavern and installed in its final position. For the assembly, integration and commissioning phase, a complete Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the safe operation of the tracker. This included control of the individual powering of the silicon modules, a bi-phase cooling system and various types of sensors monitoring the SCT environment and the surrounding test enclosure. The DCS software architecture, performance and operational experience will be presented in the view of a validation of the DCS for the final SCT installation and operation phase.

  12. Macromolecular query language (MMQL): prototype data model and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindyalov, I N; Chang, W; Pu, C; Bourne, P E

    1994-11-01

    Macromolecular query language (MMQL) is an extensible interpretive language in which to pose questions concerning the experimental or derived features of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. MMQL portends to be intuitive with a simple syntax, so that from a user's perspective complex queries are easily written. A number of basic queries and a more complex query--determination of structures containing a five-strand Greek key motif--are presented to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the language. The predominant features of MMQL are a filter and pattern grammar which are combined to express a wide range of interesting biological queries. Filters permit the selection of object attributes, for example, compound name and resolution, whereas the patterns currently implemented query primary sequence, close contacts, hydrogen bonding, secondary structure, conformation and amino acid properties (volume, polarity, isoelectric point, hydrophobicity and different forms of exposure). MMQL queries are processed by MMQLlib; a C++ class library, to which new query methods and pattern types are easily added. The prototype implementation described uses PDBlib, another C(++)-based class library from representing the features of biological macromolecules at the level of detail parsable from a PDB file. Since PDBlib can represent data stored in relational and object-oriented databases, as well as PDB files, once these data are loaded they too can be queried by MMQL. Performance metrics are given for queries of PDB files for which all derived data are calculated at run time and compared to a preliminary version of OOPDB, a prototype object-oriented database with a schema based on a persistent version of PDBlib which offers more efficient data access and the potential to maintain derived information. MMQLlib, PDBlib and associated software are available via anonymous ftp from cuhhca.hhmi.columbia.edu.

  13. Macromolecular weight specificity in covalent binding of bromobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.D.; Dent, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Bromobenzene is a hepatotoxicant that causes centrilobular necrosis. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholanthrene decreases and phenobarbital pretreatment enhances the hepatotoxic action of this compound. We have investigated the macromolecular weight specificity of the covalent interactions of bromobenzene with liver macromolecules following incubation of [ 14 C]bromobenzene in isolated hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were prepared from Fischer-344 rats treated for 3 days with 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital, or normal saline. After a 1-hr incubation, total covalent binding, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-equilibrium dialysis, was twofold less in hepatocytes from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats and sixfold greater in hepatocytes from phenobarbital-treated rats, as compared to hepatocytes from control animals. Analysis of the arylated macromolecules by electrophoresis on 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide disc gels indicated that in the first 1 to 3 min of incubation substantial amounts of covalently bound radiolabel were associated with macromolecules of between 20,000 and 40,000. The amount of radioactivity associated with these macromolecules rapidly diminished in hepatocytes from control and 3-methylcholanthrene-treated animals. In hepatocytes from phenobarbital-treated animals, the amount of radioactivity associated with macromolecules, 20,000, increased throughout the incubation. The amount of radiolabel associated with macromolecules, 20,000, increased in all incubations. When nontoxic doses of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a specific inhibitor of serine proteases, were added to control hepatocytes incubated with [ 14 C]-bromobenzene, the decrease in radioactivity associated with larger (greater than 20,000) macromolecules was inhibited and a corresponding lack of increase in radioactivity associated with smaller macromolecules was observed

  14. Making microenvironments: A look into incorporating macromolecular crowding into in vitro experiments, to generate biomimetic microenvironments which are capable of directing cell function for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benny, Paula; Raghunath, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetic microenvironments are key components to successful cell culture and tissue engineering in vitro. One of the most accurate biomimetic microenvironments is that made by the cells themselves. Cell-made microenvironments are most similar to the in vivo state as they are cell-specific and produced by the actual cells which reside in that specific microenvironment. However, cell-made microenvironments have been challenging to re-create in vitro due to the lack of extracellular matrix composition, volume and complexity which are required. By applying macromolecular crowding to current cell culture protocols, cell-made microenvironments, or cell-derived matrices, can be generated at significant rates in vitro. In this review, we will examine the causes and effects of macromolecular crowding and how it has been applied in several in vitro systems including tissue engineering.

  15. Role of Ocrl1 and Inpp5E in primary cilia assembly and maintenance: a phosphatidylinositol phosphatase relay system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhivanan K

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kayalvizhi Madhivanan,* Swetha Ramadesikan,* R Claudio Aguilar Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The primary cilium (PC is a plasma membrane-derived structure of great importance for cell and organismal physiology. Indeed, abnormalities in assembly or function of the PC trigger the onset of a group of genetic diseases collectively known as ciliopathies. In recent years, it has become evident that the integrity and function of the PC depends substantially on signaling elements such as phosphoinositides (PI and their regulators. Because phospholipids such as PI(4,5P2 constitute recruitment platforms for cytoskeleton, signaling, and trafficking machinery, control over their levels is critical for PC function. Although information about phosphoinositol phosphate (PIP kinases in the PC is scarce, a growing body of evidence supports a role for PIP phosphatases in cilia assembly/maintenance. Indeed, deficiencies in two 5′ PIP phosphatases, Inpp5E and Ocrl1, are clearly linked to ciliopathies like Joubert/MORM syndromes, or ciliopathy-associated diseases like Lowe syndrome. Here, we review the unique roles of these proteins and their specific site of action for ensuring ciliary integrity. Further, we discuss the possibility that a phosphatase relay system able to pass PI control from a preciliary to an intraciliary compartment is in place to ensure PC integrity/function. Keywords: primary cilia, Ocrl1, Inpp5E, Pip2, Pip3

  16. Achievement report for fiscal 1989 on the research and development of automatic sewing system. High-tech assemble subsystem; 1989 nendo jido hosei system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. High tech assemble subsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-03-01

    A report is compiled about the above-named system being developed under the large-scale industrial technology development project. In the research and development of automatic sewing technologies, the cloth manipulation type module is being improved and the entirety of the automatic sewing system and a cloth opening system are under development, and now they are believed to be usable in the experimental plant. In the research and development of opening seam press technologies, overall design improvement and manufacture are accomplished for the opening seam press system based on the result of systematization researches, and the system is now fit for conveying and positioning the cloth on its way from the previous stage to the next stage. In the research on the ventral coordination control type assemble sewing technology, every unit involved is improved, designed, and manufactured, and software programs for their control are also developed and improved. It is now enhanced in reliability, operationality, workability, and seam quality, and is expected to be usable in the experimental plant. As for the research on retrofitting, it is found in a reliability test that its reliability is still short of the target value of 99.9%. (NEDO)

  17. AR-NE3A, a New Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline for Pharmaceutical Applications at the Photon Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Sasajima, Kumiko; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Mori, Takeharu; Toyoshima, Akio; Kishimoto, Shunji; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Amano, Yasushi; Warizaya, Masaichi; Sakashita, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput techniques for macromolecular crystallography have highlighted the importance of structure-based drug design (SBDD), and the demand for synchrotron use by pharmaceutical researchers has increased. Thus, in collaboration with Astellas Pharma Inc., we have constructed a new high-throughput macromolecular crystallography beamline, AR-NE3A, which is dedicated to SBDD. At AR-NE3A, a photon flux up to three times higher than those at existing high-throughput beams at the Photon Factory, AR-NW12A and BL-5A, can be realized at the same sample positions. Installed in the experimental hutch are a high-precision diffractometer, fast-readout, high-gain CCD detector, and sample exchange robot capable of handling more than two hundred cryo-cooled samples stored in a Dewar. To facilitate high-throughput data collection required for pharmaceutical research, fully automated data collection and processing systems have been developed. Thus, sample exchange, centering, data collection, and data processing are automatically carried out based on the user's pre-defined schedule. Although Astellas Pharma Inc. has a priority access to AR-NE3A, the remaining beam time is allocated to general academic and other industrial users.

  18. Sub-channel analysis of LBE-cooled fuel assemblies of accelerator driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, X.; Hwang, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    In the frame of the European PDS-XADS project, two concepts of the sub-critical reactor core cooled by liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) were proposed. In this paper, the local thermal-hydraulic behavior of both LBE-cooled fuel assemblies was analyzed. For this purpose, the sub-channel analysis code MATRA was selected, and modification was made for its applications to XADS conditions. Compared to the small core concept, the large core concept has a much lower temperatures of coolant, cladding and fuel pins. This enables a short-term realization of the core design using available technologies. The high power density of the small core results in high local temperatures of coolant, cladding and fuel. Both coolant velocity and cladding temperature are such that special attention has to be paid to avoid corrosion and erosion damage of cladding materials. A parametric study shows that under the parameters considered, mixing coefficient has the biggest effect on the coolant temperature distribution, whereas the cladding temperature is strongly affected by the selection of heat transfer correlations. (author)

  19. System for measuring spacer pin pitch in a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Kenji; Tateishi, Yoshinori; Mano, Tadashi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To reduce the period for discriminating whether or not spacer pin pitch is satisfactory by simultaneously inserting a number of reference rods into a nuclear fuel assembly spacer ring element of a reactor and arranging them such that they can be simultaneously withdrawn to simplify the withdrawing operation. Structure: A spacer provided with a ring element which clamps a nuclear fuel element is supported on a spacer support with a rod secured to the support as a guide and is secured to the support by securing means. A vertically movable structure with a reference rod provided upright and thru-holes formed in two support plates provided in the same row as the spacer ring element is operated by a fluid pressure mechanism to simultaneously insert the reference rod into the spacer ring element. The reference rod is mounted in support plates via ball bearings such that it is slightly movable in the horizontal direction, and it is aligned with respect to the core of the ring element. The intercore distance of the reference rod is measured with the reference rod inserted in the ring element, thereby measuring the space pin pitch. From the results of measurement, discrimination as to whether the spacer is satisfactory or not is made. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok; Oh, Dongseok; Yoon, Kyungho; Kim, Hyungkyu; Kim, Jaeyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  1. TPX assembly plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.

    1993-01-01

    The TPX machine will be assembled in the TFTR Test Cell at the Plasma Physics Laboratory, utilizing the existing TFTR machine foundation. Preparation of the area for assembly will begin after completion of the decontamination and decommissioning phase on TFTR and certification that the radiation levels remaining, if any, are consistent with the types of operations planned. Assembly operations begin with the arrival of the first components, and conclude, approximately 24 months later, with the successful completion of the integrated systems tests and the achievement of a first plasma

  2. AutoDrug: fully automated macromolecular crystallography workflows for fragment-based drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Yingssu; McPhillips, Scott E.; González, Ana; McPhillips, Timothy M.; Zinn, Daniel; Cohen, Aina E.; Feese, Michael D.; Bushnell, David; Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C. David; Ludaescher, Bertram; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Soltis, S. Michael

    2013-01-01

    New software has been developed for automating the experimental and data-processing stages of fragment-based drug discovery at a macromolecular crystallography beamline. A new workflow-automation framework orchestrates beamline-control and data-analysis software while organizing results from multiple samples. AutoDrug is software based upon the scientific workflow paradigm that integrates the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource macromolecular crystallography beamlines and third-party processing software to automate the crystallography steps of the fragment-based drug-discovery process. AutoDrug screens a cassette of fragment-soaked crystals, selects crystals for data collection based on screening results and user-specified criteria and determines optimal data-collection strategies. It then collects and processes diffraction data, performs molecular replacement using provided models and detects electron density that is likely to arise from bound fragments. All processes are fully automated, i.e. are performed without user interaction or supervision. Samples can be screened in groups corresponding to particular proteins, crystal forms and/or soaking conditions. A single AutoDrug run is only limited by the capacity of the sample-storage dewar at the beamline: currently 288 samples. AutoDrug was developed in conjunction with RestFlow, a new scientific workflow-automation framework. RestFlow simplifies the design of AutoDrug by managing the flow of data and the organization of results and by orchestrating the execution of computational pipeline steps. It also simplifies the execution and interaction of third-party programs and the beamline-control system. Modeling AutoDrug as a scientific workflow enables multiple variants that meet the requirements of different user groups to be developed and supported. A workflow tailored to mimic the crystallography stages comprising the drug-discovery pipeline of CoCrystal Discovery Inc. has been deployed and successfully

  3. Self-assembling surfactant-like peptide A6K as potential delivery system for hydrophobic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yongzhu Chen,1 Chengkang Tang,2 Jie Zhang,2 Meng Gong,3 Bo Su,2 Feng Qiu4 1Periodical Press, 2Core Facility of West China Hospital, 3Laboratory of Endocrinology and Metabolism, West China Hospital, 4Laboratory of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Translational Neuroscience Centre, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Finding a suitable delivery system to improve the water solubility of hydrophobic drugs is a critical challenge in the development of effective formulations. In this study, we used A6K, a self-assembling surfactant-like peptide, as a carrier to encapsulate and deliver hydrophobic pyrene.Methods: Pyrene was mixed with A6K by magnetic stirring to form a suspension. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence, and cell uptake measurements were carried out to study the features and stability of the nanostructures, the state and content of pyrene, as well as the pyrene release profile.Results: The suspension formed contained pyrene monomers trapped in the hydrophobic cores of the micellar nanofibers formed by A6K, as well as nanosized pyrene crystals wrapped up and stabilized by the nanofibers. The two different encapsulation methods greatly increased the concentration of pyrene in the suspension, and formation of pyrene crystals wrapped up by A6K nanofibers might be the major contributor to this effect. Furthermore, the suspension system could readily release and transfer pyrene into living cells.Conclusion: A6K could be further exploited as a promising delivery system for hydrophobic drugs. Keywords: pyrene, self-assembling peptide, micelles, nanofibers, drug delivery  

  4. Formation of linear and crosslinked polyurethane nanoparticles that self-assemble differently in acetone and in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Serkis-Rodzen, Magdalena; Špírková, Milena; Matějíček, P.; Štěpánek, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 106, May (2017), s. 119-127 ISSN 0300-9440 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06700S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyurethane water dispersion * nanoparticles * self-assembly Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 2.858, year: 2016

  5. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  6. Operation of the TSTA (Tritium Systems Test Assembly) with 100 gram tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, R.H.; Bartlit, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    In March of 1988 full operation of the 4-column isotope separation system (ISS) was realized in runs that approximated the design load of tritium. Previous operations had been fraught with operating difficulties principally due to external systems. This report will examine the recent highly successful 6-day period of operation. During this time the system was cooled from room temperature, loaded with hydrogen isotopes including 109 grams of tritium, integrated with the transfer pumping, impurity injection, and impurity removal systems, as well as the remote computer control system. At the end of the operation 12 grams of tritium having a measured purity of 99.987% (remainder deuterium) were offloaded from the system. Observed profiles in the columns in general agree with computer models. A Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate (HETP) of 5.0 cm is confirmed. 3 refs., 5 figs

  7. About Small Streams and Shiny Rocks: Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we have grown diffraction quality protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. With this technology volumes smaller than achievable with any laboratory pipette can be dispensed with high accuracy. We have performed a feasibility study in which we crystallized several proteins with the aid of a LabChip device. The protein crystals are of excellent quality as shown by X-ray diffraction. The advantages of this new technology include improved accuracy of dispensing for small volumes, complete mixing of solution constituents without bubble formation, highly repeatable recipe and growth condition replication, and easy automation of the method. We have designed a first LabChip device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode and can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents. We are currently testing this design. Upon completion additional crystallization techniques, such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility aboard the International Space Station.

  8. A vibrating membrane bioreactor (VMBR): Macromolecular transmission-influence of extracellular polymeric substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2009-01-01

    The vibrating membrane bioreactor (VMBR) system facilitates the possibility of conducting a separation of macromolecules (BSA) from larger biological components (yeast cells) with a relatively high and stable macromolecular transmission at sub-critical flux. This is not possible to achieve...... for a static non-vibrating membrane module. A BSA transmission of 74% has been measured in the separation of 4g/L BSA from 8 g/L dry weight yeast cells in suspension at sub-critical flux (20L/(m(2) h)). However, this transmission is lower than the 85% BSA transmission measured for at pure 4g/L BSA solution....... This can be ascribed to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the yeast cells. The initial fouling rate for constant sub-critical flux filtration of unwashed yeast cells is 3-4 times larger than for washed yeast cells (18(mbar/h)/5(mbar/h)). At sub-critical flux, an EPS transmission...

  9. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wei

    Full Text Available In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association.

  10. Effects of macromolecular crowding on protein conformational changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many protein functions can be directly linked to conformational changes. Inside cells, the equilibria and transition rates between different conformations may be affected by macromolecular crowding. We have recently developed a new approach for modeling crowding effects, which enables an atomistic representation of "test" proteins. Here this approach is applied to study how crowding affects the equilibria and transition rates between open and closed conformations of seven proteins: yeast protein disulfide isomerase (yPDI, adenylate kinase (AdK, orotidine phosphate decarboxylase (ODCase, Trp repressor (TrpR, hemoglobin, DNA beta-glucosyltransferase, and Ap(4A hydrolase. For each protein, molecular dynamics simulations of the open and closed states are separately run. Representative open and closed conformations are then used to calculate the crowding-induced changes in chemical potential for the two states. The difference in chemical-potential change between the two states finally predicts the effects of crowding on the population ratio of the two states. Crowding is found to reduce the open population to various extents. In the presence of crowders with a 15 A radius and occupying 35% of volume, the open-to-closed population ratios of yPDI, AdK, ODCase and TrpR are reduced by 79%, 78%, 62% and 55%, respectively. The reductions for the remaining three proteins are 20-44%. As expected, the four proteins experiencing the stronger crowding effects are those with larger conformational changes between open and closed states (e.g., as measured by the change in radius of gyration. Larger proteins also tend to experience stronger crowding effects than smaller ones [e.g., comparing yPDI (480 residues and TrpR (98 residues]. The potentials of mean force along the open-closed reaction coordinate of apo and ligand-bound ODCase are altered by crowding, suggesting that transition rates are also affected. These quantitative results and qualitative trends will

  11. Constructing irregular surfaces to enclose macromolecular complexes for mesoscale modeling using the discrete surface charge optimization (DISCO) algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Beard, Daniel A; Schlick, Tamar

    2003-12-01

    Salt-mediated electrostatics interactions play an essential role in biomolecular structures and dynamics. Because macromolecular systems modeled at atomic resolution contain thousands of solute atoms, the electrostatic computations constitute an expensive part of the force and energy calculations. Implicit solvent models are one way to simplify the model and associated calculations, but they are generally used in combination with standard atomic models for the solute. To approximate electrostatics interactions in models on the polymer level (e.g., supercoiled DNA) that are simulated over long times (e.g., milliseconds) using Brownian dynamics, Beard and Schlick have developed the DiSCO (Discrete Surface Charge Optimization) algorithm. DiSCO represents a macromolecular complex by a few hundred discrete charges on a surface enclosing the system modeled by the Debye-Hückel (screened Coulombic) approximation to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and treats the salt solution as continuum solvation. DiSCO can represent the nucleosome core particle (>12,000 atoms), for example, by 353 discrete surface charges distributed on the surfaces of a large disk for the nucleosome core particle and a slender cylinder for the histone tail; the charges are optimized with respect to the Poisson-Boltzmann solution for the electric field, yielding a approximately 5.5% residual. Because regular surfaces enclosing macromolecules are not sufficiently general and may be suboptimal for certain systems, we develop a general method to construct irregular models tailored to the geometry of macromolecules. We also compare charge optimization based on both the electric field and electrostatic potential refinement. Results indicate that irregular surfaces can lead to a more accurate approximation (lower residuals), and the refinement in terms of the electric field is more robust. We also show that surface smoothing for irregular models is important, that the charge optimization (by the TNPACK

  12. Improved inter-assembly heat transfer modeling under low flow conditions for the Super System Code (SSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Super System Code (SSC) was developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the thermal hydraulic analysis of natural circulation transients, operational transients, and other system wide transients in nuclear power plants. SSC is a generic, best estimate code that models the in-vessel components, heat transport loops, plant protection systems and plant control systems. SSC also simulates the balance of plant when interfaced with the MINET code. SSC has been validated against both numerical and experimental data bases and is now used by several outside users. An important area of interest in LMFBR transient analysis is the prediction of the response of the reactor core under low flow conditions, such as experienced during a natural circulation event. Under these circumstances there are many physical phenomena which must be modeled to provide an adequate representation by a computer code simulation. The present version of SSC contains numerous models which account for most of the major phenomena. However, one area where the present model in SSC is being improved is in the representation of heat transfer and buoyancy effects under low flow operation. To properly improve the present version, the addition of models to represent certain inter-assembly effects is required

  13. Stretchable All-Gel-State Fiber-Shaped Supercapacitors Enabled by Macromolecularly Interconnected 3D Graphene/Nanostructured Conductive Polymer Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panpan; Jin, Zhaoyu; Peng, Lele; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Dan; Jin, Yong; Yu, Guihua

    2018-05-01

    Nanostructured conductive polymer hydrogels (CPHs) have been extensively applied in energy storage owing to their advantageous features, such as excellent electrochemical activity and relatively high electrical conductivity, yet the fabrication of self-standing and flexible electrode-based CPHs is still hampered by their limited mechanical properties. Herein, macromolecularly interconnected 3D graphene/nanostructured CPH is synthesized via self-assembly of CPHs and graphene oxide macrostructures. The 3D hybrid hydrogel shows uniform interconnectivity and enhanced mechanical properties due to the strong macromolecular interaction between the CPHs and graphene, thus greatly reducing aggregation in the fiber-shaping process. A proof-of-concept all-gel-state fibrous supercapacitor based on the 3D polyaniline/graphene hydrogel is fabricated to demonstrate the outstanding flexibility and mouldability, as well as superior electrochemical properties enabled by this 3D hybrid hydrogel design. The proposed device can achieve a large strain (up to ≈40%), and deliver a remarkable volumetric energy density of 8.80 mWh cm -3 (at power density of 30.77 mW cm -3 ), outperforming many fiber-shaped supercapacitors reported previously. The all-hydrogel design opens up opportunities in the fabrication of next-generation wearable and portable electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Investigation of Supramolecular Coordination Self-Assembly and Polymerization Confined on Metal Surfaces Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao

    Organic molecules are envisioned as the building blocks for design and fabrication of functional devices in future, owing to their versatility, low cost and flexibility. Although some devices such as organic light-emitting diode (OLED) have been already applied in our daily lives, the field is still in its infancy and numerous challenges still remain. In particular, fundamental understanding of the process of organic material fabrication at a molecular level is highly desirable. This thesis focuses on the design and fabrication of supramolecular and macromolecular nanostructures on a Au(111) surface through self-assembly, polymerization and a combination of two. We used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as an experimental tool and Monte Carlo (MC) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations as theoretical tools to characterize the structures of these systems and to investigate the mechanisms of the self-assembly and polymerization processes at a single-molecular level. The results of this thesis consist of four parts as below: Part I addresses the mechanisms of two-dimensional multicomponent supramolecular self-assembly via pyridyl-Fe-terpyridyl coordination. Firstly, we studied four types of self-assembled metal-organic systems exhibiting different dimensionalities using specifically-designed molecular building blocks. We found that the two-dimensional system is under thermodynamic controls while the systems of lower dimension are under kinetic controls. Secondly, we studied the self-assembly of a series of cyclic supramolecular polygons. Our results indicate that the yield of on-surface cyclic polygon structures is very low independent of temperature and concentration and this phenomenon can be attributed to a subtle competition between kinetic and thermodynamic controls. These results shed light on thermodynamic and kinetic controls in on-surface coordination self-assembly. Part II addresses the two-dimensional supramolecular self-assembly of porphyrin

  15. Tuning the Cavity Size and Chirality of Self-Assembling 3D DNA Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R.; Zhang, Fei; MacCulloch, Tara; Fahmi, Noureddine; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Liu, Yan; Seeman, Nadrian C. [Department; Yan, Hao

    2017-08-02

    The foundational goal of structural DNA nanotechnology—the field that uses oligonucleotides as a molecular building block for the programmable self-assembly of nanostructured systems—was to use DNA to construct three-dimensional (3D) lattices for solving macromolecular structures. The programmable nature of DNA makes it an ideal system for rationally constructing self-assembled crystals and immobilizing guest molecules in a repeating 3D array through their specific stereospatial interactions with the scaffold. In this work, we have extended a previously described motif (4 × 5) by expanding the structure to a system that links four double-helical layers; we use a central weaving oligonucleotide containing a sequence of four six-base repeats (4 × 6), forming a matrix of layers that are organized and dictated by a series of Holliday junctions. In addition, we have assembled mirror image crystals (l-DNA) with the identical sequence that are completely resistant to nucleases. Bromine and selenium derivatives were obtained for the l- and d-DNA forms, respectively, allowing phase determination for both forms and solution of the resulting structures to 3.0 and 3.05 Å resolution. Both right- and left-handed forms crystallized in the trigonal space groups with mirror image 3-fold helical screw axes P32 and P31 for each motif, respectively. The structures reveal a highly organized array of discrete and well-defined cavities that are suitable for hosting guest molecules and allow us to dictate a priori the assembly of guest–DNA conjugates with a specified crystalline hand.

  16. Investigation of Characteristics of Passive Heat Removal System Based on the Assembled Heat Transfer Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangcheng Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To get an insight into the operating characteristics of the passive residual heat removal system of molten salt reactors, a two-phase natural circulation test facility was constructed. The system consists of a boiling loop absorbing the heat from the drain tank, a condensing loop consuming the heat, and a steam drum. A steady-state experiment was carried out, in which the thimble temperature ranged from 450°C to 700°C and the system pressure was controlled at levels below 150 kPa. When reaching a steady state, the system was operated under saturated conditions. Some important parameters, including heat power, system resistance, and water level in the steam drum and water tank were investigated. The experimental results showed that the natural circulation system is feasible in removing the decay heat, even though some fluctuations may occur in the operation. The uneven temperature distribution in the water tank may be inevitable because convection occurs on the outside of the condensing tube besides boiling with decreasing the decay power. The instabilities in the natural circulation loop are sensitive to heat flux and system resistance rather than the water level in the steam drum and water tank. RELAP5 code shows reasonable results compared with experimental data.

  17. Investigation of characteristics of passive heat removal system based on the assembled heat transfer tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiang Cheng; Yan, Changqi; Meng, Zhao Ming; Chen, Kailun; Song, Shao Chuang; Yang, Zong Hao; Yu, Jie [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2016-12-15

    To get an insight into the operating characteristics of the passive residual heat removal system of molten salt reactors, a two-phase natural circulation test facility was constructed. The system consists of a boiling loop absorbing the heat from the drain tank, a condensing loop consuming the heat, and a steam drum. A steady-state experiment was carried out, in which the thimble temperature ranged from 450 .deg. C to 700 .deg. C and the system pressure was controlled at levels below 150 kPa. When reaching a steady state, the system was operated under saturated conditions. Some important parameters, including heat power, system resistance, and water level in the steam drum and water tank were investigated. The experimental results showed that the natural circulation system is feasible in removing the decay heat, even though some fluctuations may occur in the operation. The uneven temperature distribution in the water tank may be inevitable because convection occurs on the outside of the condensing tube besides boiling with decreasing the decay power. The instabilities in the natural circulation loop are sensitive to heat flux and system resistance rather than the water level in the steam drum and water tank. RELAP5 code shows reasonable results compared with experimental data.

  18. Methodology on Investigating the Influences of Automated Material Handling System in Automotive Assembly Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffar, Seha; Azni Jafar, Fairul; Jamaludin, Zamberi

    2016-02-01

    A case study was selected as a method to collect data in actual industry situation. The study aimed to assess the influences of automated material handling system in automotive industry by proposing a new design of integration system through simulation, and analyze the significant effect and influence of the system. The method approach tool will be CAD Software (Delmia & Quest). The process of preliminary data gathering in phase 1 will collect all data related from actual industry situation. It is expected to produce a guideline and limitation in designing a new integration system later. In phase 2, an idea or concept of design will be done by using 10 principles of design consideration for manufacturing. A full factorial design will be used as design of experiment in order to analyze the performance measured of the integration system with the current system in case study. From the result of the experiment, an ANOVA analysis will be done to study the performance measured. Thus, it is expected that influences can be seen from the improvement made in the system.

  19. Strut Attachment System for In-Space Robotic Assembly, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The size of space systems is currently limited to payload envelopes of existing launch vehicles. Due to this and the customized nature of satellites, existing space...

  20. Development and Testing of Autonomous On-Orbit Assembly and Servicing Systems Using the SPHERES Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With the increasing ambition to usher in a new era of exploration beyond our planet and solar system, the scope and complexity of challenges that space technologists...

  1. A Basis for an Assembly Processor for COTS-Based Systems (APCS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carney, David

    2003-01-01

    .... The framework is based on Barry Boehm's familiar spiral development process. However, it is primarily intended for projects that make significant use of commercial components and other preexisting software as elements of the system to be fielded...

  2. Strut Attachment System for In-Space Robotic Assembly, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The size of space systems is currently limited to payload envelopes of existing launch vehicles. Due to this and the customized nature of satellites, existing space...

  3. Evolution of International Space Station GN&C System Across ISS Assembly Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roscoe; Frank, K. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system for the International Space Station is initially implemented by the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) which was built by the Khrunichev Space Center under direct contract to Boeing. This element (Stage 1A/R) was launched on 20 November 1998 and is currently operating on-orbit. The components and capabilities of the FGB Motion Control System (MCS) are described. The next ISS element, which has GN&C functionality will be the Service Module (SM) built by Rocket Space Corporation-Energia. This module is scheduled for launch (Stage 1R) in early 2000. Following activation of the SM GN&C system, the FGB MCS is deactivated and no longer used. The components and capabilities of the SM GN&C system are described. When a Progress vehicle is attached to the ISS it can be used for reboost operations, based on commands provided by the Mission Control Center-Moscow. When a data connection is implemented between the SM and the Progress, the SM can command the Progress thrusters for attitude control and reboosts. On Stage 5A, the U.S. GN&C system will become activated when the U.S. Laboratory is de loyed and installed (launch schedule is currently TBD). The U.S. GN&C system provides non-propulsive control capabilities to support micro-gravity operations and minimize the use of propellant for attitude control, and an independent capability for determining the ISS state vector, attitude, attitude rate. and time.. The components and capabilities of the U.S. GN&C system are described and the interactions between the U.S. and Russian Segment GN&C systems are also described.

  4. Self-Assembly of Infinite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Summers

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We review some recent results related to the self-assembly of infinite structures in the Tile Assembly Model. These results include impossibility results, as well as novel tile assembly systems in which shapes and patterns that represent various notions of computation self-assemble. Several open questions are also presented and motivated.

  5. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  6. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  7. Self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles as a novel ophthalmic delivery system for dexamethasone: Improving preocular retention and ocular bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Li; Han, Shun; Shen, Jinqiu; Zhu, Jiabi; Zhu, Chunliu; Zhang, Xinxin; Gan, Yong

    2010-08-30

    The object of this study was to design novel self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles (cubosomes) as an ophthalmic delivery system for dexamethasone (DEX) to improve its preocular retention and ocular bioavailability. DEX cubosome particles were produced by fragmenting a cubic crystalline phase of monoolein and water in the presence of stabilizer Poloxamer 407. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXR) profiles revealed its internal structure as Pn3m space group, indicating the diamond cubic phase. In vitro, the apparent permeability coefficient of DEX administered in cubosomes exhibited a 4.5-fold (F1) and 3.5-fold (F2) increase compared to that of Dex-Na phosphate eye drops. Preocular retention studies revealed that the retention of cubosomes was significantly longer than that of solution and carbopol gel, with AUC(0-->180min) of Rh B cubosomes being 2-3-fold higher than that of the other two formulations. In vivo pharmacokinetics in aqueous humor was evaluated by microdialysis, which indicated a 1.8-fold (F1) increase in AUC(0-->240min) of DEX administered in cubosomes relative to that of Dex-Na phosphate eye drops, with about an 8-fold increase compared to that of DEX suspension. Corneal cross-sections after incubation with DEX cubosomes demonstrated an unaffected corneal structure and tissue integrity, which indicated the good biocompatibility of DEX cubosomes. In conclusion, self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles might represent a promising vehicle for effective ocular drug delivery. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phase-Separated Liposomes Enhance the Efficiency of Macromolecular Delivery to the Cellular Cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Ashby, Grant; Nagib, Fatema; Mendicino, Morgan; Zhao, Chi; Gadok, Avinash K; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2017-10-01

    From viruses to organelles, fusion of biological membranes is used by diverse biological systems to deliver macromolecules across membrane barriers. Membrane fusion is also a potentially efficient mechanism for the delivery of macromolecular therapeutics to the cellular cytoplasm. However, a key shortcoming of existing fusogenic liposomal systems is that they are inefficient, requiring a high concentration of fusion-promoting lipids in order to cross cellular membrane barriers. Toward addressing this limitation, our experiments explore the extent to which membrane fusion can be amplified by using the process of lipid membrane phase separation to concentrate fusion-promoting lipids within distinct regions of the membrane surface. We used confocal fluorescence microscopy to investigate the integration of fusion-promoting lipids into a ternary lipid membrane system that separated into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered membrane phases. Additionally, we quantified the impact of membrane phase separation on the efficiency with which liposomes transferred lipids and encapsulated macromolecules to cells, using a combination of confocal fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Here we report that concentrating fusion-promoting lipids within phase-separated lipid domains on the surfaces of liposomes significantly increases the efficiency of liposome fusion with model membranes and cells. In particular, membrane phase separation enhanced the delivery of lipids and model macromolecules to the cytoplasm of tumor cells by at least 4-fold in comparison to homogenous liposomes. Our findings demonstrate that phase separation can enhance membrane fusion by locally concentrating fusion-promoting lipids on the surface of liposomes. This work represents the first application of lipid membrane phase separation in the design of biomaterials-based delivery systems. Additionally, these results lay the ground work for developing fusogenic liposomes that are triggered by physical and

  9. Assembly, installation and commissioning of the new halo current sensors system for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peruzzo, S.; Fullard, K.; Grando, L.; Huntley, S.; Lam, N.; Pomaro, N.; Riccardo, V.; Sonato, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the halo current sensors (HCS) diagnostic enhancement project for JET. The HCS system includes four sets of probes located in four octants equally spaced along the toroidal coordinate, with a total of 24 Rogowski coils and 5 toroidal field pick-up coils. These sensors are meant to provide a measurement of the current flowing through each single tile of the upper dump plate and an estimate of the total poloidal halo current flowing through the first wall structures. The HCS system was installed in the JET vacuum vessel in March 2005 during the 2004/2005 shutdown and the acquisition of signals started during the restart phase of the machine in autumn 2005. This paper firstly summarises the critical aspects encountered during the final phase of the procurement of the system and the in-vessel installation, which was accomplished using the remote handling system. The paper then focuses on the analysis and interpretation of the data collected during the functional commissioning of the new system, carried out during the restart phase of the machine preceding the experimental campaigns

  10. An att site-based recombination reporter system for genome engineering and synthetic DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael J; Ducos-Galand, Magaly; Val, Marie-Eve; Mazel, Didier

    2017-07-14

    Direct manipulation of the genome is a widespread technique for genetic studies and synthetic biology applications. The tyrosine and serine site-specific recombination systems of bacteriophages HK022 and ΦC31 are widely used for stable directional exchange and relocation of DNA sequences, making them valuable tools in these contexts. We have developed site-specific recombination tools that allow the direct selection of recombination events by embedding the attB site from each system within the β-lactamase resistance coding sequence (bla). The HK and ΦC31 tools were developed by placing the attB sites from each system into the signal peptide cleavage site coding sequence of bla. All possible open reading frames (ORFs) were inserted and tested for recombination efficiency and bla activity. Efficient recombination was observed for all tested ORFs (3 for HK, 6 for ΦC31) as shown through a cointegrate formation assay. The bla gene with the embedded attB site was functional for eight of the nine constructs tested. The HK/ΦC31 att-bla system offers a simple way to directly select recombination events, thus enhancing the use of site-specific recombination systems for carrying out precise, large-scale DNA manipulation, and adding useful tools to the genetics toolbox. We further show the power and flexibility of bla to be used as a reporter for recombination.

  11. Tritium experiments on components for fusion fuel processing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.; Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Under a collaborative agreement between US and Japan, two tritium processing components, a palladium diffuser and a ceramic electrolysis cell have been tested with tritium for application to a Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for plasma exhaust processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fundamental characteristics, compatibility with tritium, impurities effects with tritium, and long-term behavior of the components, were studied over a three year period. Based on these studies, an integrated process loop, ''JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' equipped with above components was installed at the TSTA for full scale demonstration of the plasma exhaust reprocessing

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Ritsuo

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively utilize nuclear fuels by increasing the reactivity of a fuel assembly and reduce the concentration at the central region thereof upon completion of the burning. Constitution: A fuel assembly is bisected into a central region and a peripheral region by disposing an inner channel box within a channel box. The flow rate of coolants passing through the central region is made greater than that in the peripheral region. The concentration of uranium 235 of the fuel rods in the central region is made higher. In such a structure, since the moderating effect in the central region is improved, the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased and the uranium concentration in the central region upon completion of the burning can be reduced, fuel economy and effective utilization of uranium can be attained. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Synergistic Effect of Binary Mixed-Pluronic Systems on Temperature Dependent Self-assembly Process and Drug Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Fen Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed Pluronic micelles from very hydrophobic and very hydrophilic copolymers were selected to scrutinize the synergistic effect on the self-assembly process as well as the solubilization capacity of ibuprofen. The tendency of mixing behavior between parent copolymers was systematically examined from two perspectives: different block chain lengths at same hydrophilicity (L92 + F108, +F98, +F88, and +F68, as well as various hydrophobicities at the same PPO moiety (L92 + F88, +F87, and +P84. Temperature-dependent micellization in these binary systems was clearly inspected by the combined use of high sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter (HSDSC and dynamic light scattering (DLS. Changes in heat capacity and size of aggregates at different temperatures during the whole micellization process were simultaneously observed and examined. While distinction of block chain length between parent copolymers increases, the monodispersity of the binary Pluronic systems decreases. However, parent copolymers with distinct PPO moieties do not affirmatively lead to non-cooperative binding, such as the L92 + P84 system. The addition of ibuprofen promotes micellization as well as stabilizes aggregates in the solution. The partial replacement of the hydrophilic Pluronic by a more hydrophobic Pluronic L92 would increase the total hydrophobicity of mixed Pluronics used in the system to substantially enhance the solubility of ibuprofen. The solubility of ibuprofen in the 0.5 wt % L92 + 0.368 wt % P84 system is as high as 4.29 mg/mL, which is 1.4 times more than that of the 0.868 wt % P84 system and 147 times more than that in pure water at 37 °C.

  15. Dexamethasone attenuates grain sorghum dust extract-induced increase in macromolecular efflux in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, S R; Ikezaki, H; Gao, X P; Rubinstein, I

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dexamethasone attenuates grain sorghum dust extract-induced increase in macromolecular efflux from the in situ hamster cheek pouch and, if so, whether this response is specific. By using intravital microscopy, we found that an aqueous extract of grain sorghum dust elicited significant, concentration-dependent leaky site formation and increase in clearance of FITC-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran; mol mass, 70 kDa) from the in situ hamster cheek pouch (P grain sorghum dust extract- and substance P-induced increases in macromolecular efflux from the in situ hamster cheek pouch in a specific fashion.

  16. An acoustic on-chip goniometer for room temperature macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, C G; Axford, D; Edwards, A M J; Gildea, R J; Morris, R H; Newton, M I; Orville, A M; Prince, M; Topham, P D; Docker, P T

    2017-12-05

    This paper describes the design, development and successful use of an on-chip goniometer for room-temperature macromolecular crystallography via acoustically induced rotations. We present for the first time a low cost, rate-tunable, acoustic actuator for gradual in-fluid sample reorientation about varying axes and its utilisation for protein structure determination on a synchrotron beamline. The device enables the efficient collection of diffraction data via a rotation method from a sample within a surface confined droplet. This method facilitates efficient macromolecular structural data acquisition in fluid environments for dynamical studies.

  17. The Joint Structural Biology Group beam lines at the ESRF: Modern macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, E P

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has evolved considerably over the last decade. Data sets in under an hour are now possible on high throughput beam lines leading to electron density and, possibly, initial models calculated on-site. There are five beam lines currently dedicated to macromolecular crystallography: the ID14 complex and BM-14 (soon to be superseded by ID-29). These lines handle over five hundred projects every six months and demand is increasing. Automated sample handling, alignment and data management protocols will be required to work efficiently with this demanding load. Projects developing these themes are underway within the JSBG.

  18. Aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes as revealed by microscopic radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tetsuji [Shinshu University, Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

    2007-07-01

    This mini-review reports aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes. We have observed the macromolecular synthesis, such as DNA, RNA and proteins, in the mitochondria of various mammalian cells by means of electron microscopic radioautography technique developed in our laboratory. The number of mitochondria per cell, number of labeled mitochondria per cell with 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine and 3H-leucine, precursors for DNA, RNA and proteins, respectively, were counted and the labeling indices at various ages, from fetal to postnatal early days and several months to 1 and 2 years in senescence, were calculated, which showed variations due to aging. (author)

  19. The state of Ghana's local government system: the case of Assembly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. International development organisations have, for a long time, presented Ghana as having a highly functional intergovernment system or decentralisation. While this projection is far from the country's grounded reality, Ghana continues to benefit from the 'misrepresentation' as one of the preferred destinations in the ...

  20. Assembly, installation and commissioning of the JET-EP Halo Current Sensors system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peruzzo, S.; Grando, L.; Pomaro, N.; Sonato, P.; Fullard, K.; Huntley, S.; Lam, N.; Riccardo, V.

    2006-01-01

    The Halo Current Sensors (HCS) system has been developed under the JET-EP enhancement programme, to allow a more detailed study of the Halo Currents flowing in the upper part of the JET vessel. A better understanding of the origin, distribution and scaling of Halo Currents in tokamaks is one of the critical issues for any next step device, like the ITER project, in particular for the design of the plasma facing components and for a reliable plasma operation at high performances. The HCS system includes four sets of probes located in four octants equally spaced along the toroidal coordinate, each containing up to eight Rogowski coils and two toroidal field pick-up coils. The Rogowski coils are designed to directly measure the current flowing through the tiles of the upper dump plate, whereas the toroidal field pick-up coils are conceived to give an estimate the total poloidal Halo Current flowing through the first wall structures. The HCS system was installed in the JET vacuum vessel in March 2005 during the 2004/05 Shutdown and started the acquisition of signals during the restart phase of the machine in autumn 2005. This paper will highlight and discuss the critical aspects and the lessons learned during the final phase of the procurement of the system; the in-vessel installation, accomplished by means of remote handling system, and the pre-commissioning tests executed on the system will be described in detail. The paper will then focus on the analysis and interpretation of the data collected during the functional commissioning of the new system, carried out during the restart phase of the machine preceding the experimental campaigns. Since the beginning of operation the HCS signals showed the effects of several noise sources, increased by the low sensitivity of the probes, due to design geometrical constraints. The expected pick-up of stray magnetic fields was quite easily compensated through a correlation with other existing magnetic diagnostics. Moreover the

  1. Development of measuring system for automobile unit assembly equipment; Jidosha buhin seisan setsubi no keisoku system kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, M; Uchishiba, I; Fukunishi, T; Umemura, H [Toyota Motor Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    This measuring system has two characteristics. The first characteristic is to shorten lead time from system design to production. The second characteristic is to accomplish system construction simply without computer technical knowledge. This measuring system consists of hardware module which are standardized according to functions and software packages which are composed of various functions. This system is put together according to purpose. When it was introduced into production line, it could shorten lead time of 1/3. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Superamphiphilic nanocontainers based on the resorcinarene - Cationic surfactant system: Synergetic self-assembling behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynanova, Gulnara A.; Bekmukhametova, Alina M.; Kashapov, Ruslan R.; Ziganshina, Albina Yu.; Zakharova, Lucia Ya.

    2016-05-01

    Self-organization in the mixed system based on water-soluble aminomethylated calix[4]arene with sulfonatoethyl groups at the lower rim and classical cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide has been studied by the methods of tensiometry, conductometry, spectrophotometry, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering. The values of the critical association concentration, the size and zeta potential values, and the solubilization capacity of mixed aggregates toward the hydrophobic probe (Sudan I) were determined.

  3. Photoactive assemblies of organic compounds and biomolecules: drug-protein supramolecular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vayá Pérez, Ignacio; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie Lyria; Jiménez Molero, María Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The properties of singlet and triplet excited states are strongly medium-dependent. Hence, these species constitute valuable tools as reporters to probe compartmentalised microenvironments, including drug@protein supramolecular systems. In the present review, the attention is focused on the photophysical properties of the probe drugs (rather than those of the protein chromophores) using transport proteins (serum albumins and 1-acid glycoproteins) as hosts. Specifically, f...

  4. Effect of fatty acids on self-assembly of soybean lecithin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, C A; Valiente, M; Pons, R; Montalvo, G

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing interest in natural formulations for drug administration and functional foods, it is desirable a good knowledge of the phase behavior of lecithin/fatty acid formulations. Phase structure and properties of ternary lecithin/fatty acids/water systems are studied at 37°C, making emphasis in regions with relatively low water and fatty acid content. The effect of fatty acid saturation degree on the phase microstructure is studied by comparing a fully saturated (palmitic acid, C16:0), monounsaturated (oleic acid, C18:1), and diunsaturated (linoleic acid, C18:2) fatty acids. Phase determinations are based on a combination of polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements. Interestingly, unsaturated (oleic acid and linoleic acid) fatty acid destabilizes the lamellar bilayer. Slight differences are observed between the phase diagrams produced by the unsaturated ones: small lamellar, medium cubic and large hexagonal regions. A narrow isotropic fluid region also appears on the lecithin-fatty acid axis, up to 8wt% water. In contrast, a marked difference in phase microsctructure was observed between unsaturated and saturated systems in which the cubic and isotropic fluid phases are not formed. These differences are, probably, a consequence of the high Krafft point of the C16 saturated chains that imply rather rigid chains. However, unsaturated fatty acids result in more flexible tails. The frequent presence of, at least, one unsaturated chain in phospholipids makes it very likely a better mixing situation than in the case of more rigid chains. This swelling potential favors the formation of reverse hexagonal, cubic, and micellar phases. Both unsaturated fatty acid systems evolve by aging, with a reduction of the extension of reverse hexagonal phase and migration of the cubic phase to lower fatty acid and water contents. The kinetic stability of the systems seems to be controlled by the unsaturation of fatty acids. Copyright © 2015

  5. On the development of an integrated mechanical analysis system applied to PWR nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A general data base has been developed in order to handle any data used in the mechanical design. This data base required the development of a DBMS, based on an extended network scheme or navigational scheme, which allows the creation of any data base configuration defined by a Data Base Description Language. It is written in Fortran 5 Language and generates a Data Manipulation Language in standard Fortran ''Call''. This general data base is essentially composed of two combined parts: one allowing to describe any mechanical structure and the other defining a material data base. This sytem is presently in a prototype state and used to test and define the final architecture of the data base and the structure of the elementary data. At the same time the research effort has been devoted to the coupling between the data base and the aplication programs (Data Processor DP). This requires the development of an application programs data base and a process design management system, which is able, with a Data Processor Description Language, to generate the application file and the related data. The main objectives in developing such a system are: - Application of standard calculation methods to a data base sub-system, - Implementation of a data modification in the design process, - Rapid generation of new applications. (orig.)

  6. Membrane self assembly in mixed DMPC/NaC systems by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, M.A.; Lombardo, D.; Lesieur, P.; Kisselev, A.M.; Borbely, S.; Simonova, T.N.; Barsukov, L.I.

    2008-01-01

    Morphological transition in a mixed system of the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)/sodium cholate (NaC) has been investigated by small-angle scattering of neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS). Structural investigation, performed as a function of temperature and NaC concentration, show that the system containing 15 mM DMPC and 6 mM NaC reveals a strong dependence of SANS spectra on the temperature. The morphological transformations has been interpreted as a micelle-to-vesicle transition which is induced by the temperature variation (TI-MVT). The main features of the obtained results show that the temperature effect are far less profound in the system containing 2 or 12 mM NaC and can be assigned to small morfological changes within the same population of particles (vesicular or micellar, respectively). The main features of the structural analysis suggest that structural transformations at the TI-MVT proceed in the following sequence: globular micelles - rod-like micelles - polymer-like micelles - unilamellar vesicles. More specifically the globular and rod like micelles present an ellipsoidal cross-section rather than circular one, the former being geometrically more favourable for accommodation of bilayer-forming molecules like DMPC into the micellar structures

  7. The Impact of the Availability of Resources, the Allocation of Buffers and Number of Workers on the Effectiveness of an Assembly Manufacturing System

    OpenAIRE

    Kłos Sławomir; Trebuna Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of computer simulation methods in order to analyse the availability of resources, buffers and the impact of the allocation of workers on the throughput and work-in-progress of a manufacturing system. The simulation model of the production system is based on an existing example of a manufacturing company in the automotive industry. The manufacturing system includes both machining and assembly operations. Simulation experiments were conducted vis-à-vis the av...

  8. Ultra-Portable Smartphone Controlled Integrated Digital Microfluidic System in a 3D-Printed Modular Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yafia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Portable sensors and biomedical devices are influenced by the recent advances in microfluidics technologies, compact fabrication techniques, improved detection limits and enhanced analysis capabilities. This paper reports the development of an integrated ultraportable, low-cost, and modular digital microfluidic (DMF system and its successful integration with a smartphone used as a high-level controller and post processing station. Low power and cost effective electronic circuits are designed to generate the high voltages required for DMF operations in both open and closed configurations (from 100 to 800 V. The smartphone in turn commands a microcontroller that manipulate the voltage signals required for droplet actuation in the DMF chip and communicates wirelessly with the microcontroller via Bluetooth module. Moreover, the smartphone acts as a detection and image analysis station with an attached microscopic lens. The holder assembly is fabricated using three-dimensional (3D printing technology to facilitate rapid prototyping. The holder features a modular design that enables convenient attachment/detachment of a variety of DMF chips to/from an electrical busbar. The electrical circuits, controller and communication system are designed to minimize the power consumption in order to run the device on small lithium ion batteries. Successful controlled DMF operations and a basic colorimetric assay using the smartphone are demonstrated.

  9. The self-assembly, aggregation and phase transitions of food protein systems in one, two and three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Fischer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of proteins is of fundamental relevance in a number of daily phenomena, as important and diverse as blood coagulation, medical diseases, or cooking an egg in the kitchen. Colloidal food systems, in particular, are examples that have great significance for protein aggregation, not only for their importance and implications, which touches on everyday life, but also because they allow the limits of the colloidal science analogy to be tested in a much broader window of conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, concentration and temperature. Thus, studying the aggregation and self-assembly of proteins in foods challenges our understanding of these complex systems from both the molecular and statistical physics perspectives. Last but not least, food offers a unique playground to study the aggregation of proteins in three, two and one dimensions, that is to say, in the bulk, at air/water and oil/water interfaces and in protein fibrillation phenomena. In this review we will tackle this very ambitious task in order to discuss the current understanding of protein aggregation in the framework of foods, which is possibly one of the broadest contexts, yet is of tremendous daily relevance. (review article)

  10. The self-assembly, aggregation and phase transitions of food protein systems in one, two and three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Fischer, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The aggregation of proteins is of fundamental relevance in a number of daily phenomena, as important and diverse as blood coagulation, medical diseases, or cooking an egg in the kitchen. Colloidal food systems, in particular, are examples that have great significance for protein aggregation, not only for their importance and implications, which touches on everyday life, but also because they allow the limits of the colloidal science analogy to be tested in a much broader window of conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, concentration and temperature. Thus, studying the aggregation and self-assembly of proteins in foods challenges our understanding of these complex systems from both the molecular and statistical physics perspectives. Last but not least, food offers a unique playground to study the aggregation of proteins in three, two and one dimensions, that is to say, in the bulk, at air/water and oil/water interfaces and in protein fibrillation phenomena. In this review we will tackle this very ambitious task in order to discuss the current understanding of protein aggregation in the framework of foods, which is possibly one of the broadest contexts, yet is of tremendous daily relevance.

  11. The self-assembly, aggregation and phase transitions of food protein systems in one, two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Fischer, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The aggregation of proteins is of fundamental relevance in a number of daily phenomena, as important and diverse as blood coagulation, medical diseases, or cooking an egg in the kitchen. Colloidal food systems, in particular, are examples that have great significance for protein aggregation, not only for their importance and implications, which touches on everyday life, but also because they allow the limits of the colloidal science analogy to be tested in a much broader window of conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, concentration and temperature. Thus, studying the aggregation and self-assembly of proteins in foods challenges our understanding of these complex systems from both the molecular and statistical physics perspectives. Last but not least, food offers a unique playground to study the aggregation of proteins in three, two and one dimensions, that is to say, in the bulk, at air/water and oil/water interfaces and in protein fibrillation phenomena. In this review we will tackle this very ambitious task in order to discuss the current understanding of protein aggregation in the framework of foods, which is possibly one of the broadest contexts, yet is of tremendous daily relevance.

  12. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Mario M.; Oliveira, Monica G.N.; Ferreira Junior, Decio B.M.; Santos, Barbara O. dos; Santos, Jorge E. dos

    2009-01-01

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  13. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  14. Development and assembly of equipment for non destructive assay system control using nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Jose Altino Tupinamba

    2006-01-01

    Nondestructive Assay (NDA) is applied to machines and components quality tests. These elements would not have a good performance if they were conceived without concern about the mechanical project quality, used materials, manufacture processes and inspection and maintenance methodology. There are constant developments in high level of technology with the objective of guaranteeing the components quality and the good functioning of these machines, in the mechanics, naval, aeronautical, petrochemical and steel industry, energy and nuclear generation as well. The globalization in the industry lines is a fact, leading to an increase in the multinational projects and products. The following questions arise: how to assure the high quality of components and processes? How to optimize the test methods to assure that the materials do not have defects affecting the performance of the components? The answers to the questions above are found in the application of NDA. The complex materials analysis (inhomogeneous) using NDA requires a detailed study of the sensors response signal. In this work, a measure and control system of non destructive processes was developed, using a radioactive source with a defined energy in function of the material to be analyzed. This system involves: (a) Interface of input/output (I/O) (the Hardware) and (b) graphical Interface (Software). In the non destructive analysis, it is made the comparison of the signal proceeding from the sensor with a signal preset (Set Point) or analogical signal of reference (Base Line), which is adjusted in the I/O Interface. Analyzed the signal, the system will make the decision: (a) to reject or (b) to accept the analyzed material. The I/O Interface is implemented by electronic equipment with a MCS51. The purpose of this interface is to supply conditions to exchange information, using serial RS232, between the sensor and the microcomputer. The graphical Interface (software) is written in visual C++ language (author)

  15. Motor Assembly Plant Saves$85,000 with Compressed Air System Improvements (Bodine Electric's Chicago Facility): Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the Bodine Electric motor assembly plant project

  16. Application of a local linearization technique for the solution of a system of stiff differential equations associated with the simulation of a magnetic bearing assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, K. S.; Mcdaniel, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    A digital local linearization technique was used to solve a system of stiff differential equations which simulate a magnetic bearing assembly. The results prove the technique to be accurate, stable, and efficient when compared to a general purpose variable order Adams method with a stiff option.

  17. High Performance Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) for Space Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Billings, Keith J.; Kisor, Adam; Bennett, William R.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Burke, Kenneth; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative fuel cells provide a pathway to energy storage system development that are game changers for NASA missions. The fuel cell/ electrolysis MEA performance requirements 0.92 V/ 1.44 V at 200 mA/cm2 can be met. Fuel Cell MEAs have been incorporated into advanced NFT stacks. Electrolyzer stack development in progress. Fuel Cell MEA performance is a strong function of membrane selection, membrane selection will be driven by durability requirements. Electrolyzer MEA performance is catalysts driven, catalyst selection will be driven by durability requirements. Round Trip Efficiency, based on a cell performance, is approximately 65%.

  18. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Bassler, E.A.; Huckestein, E.A.; Salton, R.B.; Tower, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel assembly adapted for use with a pressurized water nuclear reactor having capabilities for fluid moderator spectral shift control is described comprising: parallel arranged elongated nuclear fuel elements; means for providing for axial support of the fuel elements and for arranging the fuel elements in a spaced array; thimbles interspersed among the fuel elements adapted for insertion of a rod control cluster therewithin; means for structurally joining the fuel elements and the guide thimbles; fluid moderator control means for providing a volume of low neutron absorbing fluid within the fuel assembly and for removing a substantially equivalent volume of reactor coolant water therefrom, a first flow manifold at one end of the fuel assembly sealingly connected to a first end of the moderator control tubes whereby the first ends are commonly flow connected; and a second flow manifold, having an inlet passage and an outlet passage therein, sealingly connected to a second end of the moderator control tubes at a second end of the fuel assembly

  20. Novel use for polyvinylpyrrolidone as a macromolecular crowder for enhanced extracellular matrix deposition and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Rafi; Lim, Natalie Sheng Jie; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Png, Si Ning; Wohland, Thorsten; Raghunath, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Macromolecular crowding (MMC) is a biophysical effect that governs biochemical processes inside and outside of cells. Since standard cell culture media lack this effect, the physiological performance of differentiated and progenitor cells, including extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, is impaired in vitro. To bring back physiological crowdedness to in vitro systems, we have previously introduced carbohydrate-based macromolecules to culture media and have achieved marked improvements with mixed MMC in terms of ECM deposition and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show here that although this system is successful, it is limited, due to viscosity, to only 33% of the fractional volume occupancy (FVO) of full serum, which we calculated to have an FVO of approximately 54% v/v. We show here that full-serum FVO can be achieved using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) 360 kDa. Under these conditions, ECM deposition in human fibroblasts and MSCs is on par, if not stronger than, with original MMC protocols using carbohydrates, but with a viscosity that is not significantly changed. In addition, we have found that the proliferation rate for bone marrow-derived MSCs and fibroblasts increases slightly in the presence of PVP360, similar to that observed with carbohydrate-based crowders. A palette of MMC compounds is now emerging that enables us to tune the crowdedness of culture media seamlessly from interstitial fluid (9% FVO), in which the majority of tissue cells might be based, to serum environments mimicking intravascular conditions. Despite identical FVO's, individual crowder size effects play a role and different cell types appear to have preferences in terms of FVO and the crowder that this is achieved with. However, in the quest of crowders that we have predicted to have a smoother regulatory approval path, PVP is a highly interesting compound, as it has been widely used in the medical and food industries and shows a novel promising use in cell culture and