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Sample records for systems influence variation

  1. Influence of Design Variations on Systems Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Huff, Edward M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-risk aerospace components have to meet very stringent quality, performance, and safety requirements. Any source of variation is a concern, as it may result in scrap or rework. poor performance, and potentially unsafe flying conditions. The sources of variation during product development, including design, manufacturing, and assembly, and during operation are shown. Sources of static and dynamic variation during development need to be detected accurately in order to prevent failure when the components are placed in operation. The Systems' Health and Safety (SHAS) research at the NASA Ames Research Center addresses the problem of detecting and evaluating the statistical variation in helicopter transmissions. In this work, we focus on the variations caused by design, manufacturing, and assembly of these components, prior to being placed in operation (DMV). In particular, we aim to understand and represent the failure and variation information, and their correlation to performance and safety and feed this information back into the development cycle at an early stage. The feedback of such critical information will assure the development of more reliable components with less rework and scrap. Variations during design and manufacturing are a common source of concern in the development and production of such components. Accounting for these variations, especially those that have the potential to affect performance, is accomplished in a variety ways, including Taguchi methods, FMEA, quality control, statistical process control, and variation risk management. In this work, we start with the assumption that any of these variations can be represented mathematically, and accounted for by using analytical tools incorporating these mathematical representations. In this paper, we concentrate on variations that are introduced during design. Variations introduced during manufacturing are investigated in parallel work.

  2. Genetic Variation in the Dopamine System Influences Intervention Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochellys Diaz Heijtz

    2018-02-01

    Interpretation: Naturally occurring genetic variation in the dopamine system can influence treatment outcomes in children with cerebral palsy. A polygenic dopamine score might be valid for treatment outcome prediction and for designing individually tailored interventions for children with cerebral palsy.

  3. The Influence of Manufacturing Variations on a Crash Energy Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-24

    Crash Energy Management (CEM) systems protect passengers in the event of a train collision. A CEM system distributes crush throughout designated unoccupied crush zones of a passenger rail consist. This paper examines the influence of manufacturing va...

  4. The influence of variation of deuterium's concentration on the immunity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaian, Radu

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen's substitution by deuterium represents an environmental alteration at which the organism (in vivo) and the cells (in vitro), respectively, if they can't accommodate will recede. In this way the variations of deuterium's isotopic abundance can be compared with the environmental factors of stress (variations of temperature, quantity of nourishment, radiations, etc). As different forms of existence of life are more or less sensitive at environment's factors variations, so they respond in different ways to concentration variations of deuterium from the living environment/organism. Consequently the mammals' immunity system (IS) presents different feed-backs. The main results are stressed as follows: - a. The use as alimentary adjuvant of deuterium depleted water (DDW) in prolonged periods (21 days) increased the capacity of unspecific immunity defense against the specific bacterial aggression, both in Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae558) and of Gram-negative (Klebsiella pneumoniae507); - b. The immunosuppression determined by cyclophosphamide-alquilant agent with medullary depletion of white series reduced the survival of inoculated animals, even in the conditions in which the animals have received dietary supplement with DDW; - c. The immunosuppression through medullary depletion due to irradiation reduced also the survival of inoculated animals, even in the conditions in which the animals have received dietary supplement with DDW. Those mentioned herein lead to the hypothesis that prolonged administration of DDW simulates the unspecific immunity defence, probably through the stimulation of the hematogenic marrow and of lymphopoietic and granulopoietic stem cells. (author)

  5. Influence of variation in molar ratio on co-amorphous drug-amino acid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular interactions were investigated within four different co-amorphous drug-amino acid systems, namely indomethacin-tryptophan (Ind-Trp), furosemide-tryptophan (Fur-Trp), indomethacin-arginine (Ind-Arg) and furosemide-arginine (Fur-Arg). The co-amorphous systems were prepared by ball milling...... observed in the 50mol% drug (1:1M ratio) mixtures, with the exception of co-amorphous Ind-Arg where the interactions within the 40mol% drug samples appear equally strong. A particularly large deviation between the theoretical and actual Tgs was observed within co-amorphous Ind-Arg and Fur-Arg systems......-amorphous mixture without additional interactions. The modified equation described the Tgs of the co-amorphous Ind-Arg with excess Arg less well indicating possible further interactions; however, the FTIR and ssNMR data did not support the presence of additional intermolecular drug-amino acid interactions....

  6. Variationally Asymptotically Stable Difference Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goo YoonHoe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterize the h-stability in variation and asymptotic equilibrium in variation for nonlinear difference systems via n∞-summable similarity and comparison principle. Furthermore we study the asymptotic equivalence between nonlinear difference systems and their variational difference systems by means of asymptotic equilibria of two systems.

  7. Factors influencing variation in dentist service rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembowski, D; Milgrom, P; Fiset, L

    1990-01-01

    In the previous article, we calculated dentist service rates for 200 general dentists based on a homogeneous, well-educated, upper-middle-class population of patients. Wide variations in the rates were detected. In this analysis, factors influencing variation in the rates were identified. Variation in rates for categories of dental services was explained by practice characteristics, patient exposure to fluoridated water supplies, and non-price competition in the dental market. Rates were greatest in large, busy practices in markets with high fees. Older practices consistently had lower rates across services. As a whole, these variables explained between 5 and 30 percent of the variation in the rates.

  8. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Gernaey, Krist V; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton-producing aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were located close to the granule surface. Despite this pH profile, more NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface towards the center. The initial value of the background charge and influent bicarbonate concentration were found to greatly influence the simulation result and should be accurately measured. Since the change in pH over the depth of the biofilm was relatively small, the activity potential of the microbial groups affected by the pH did not change more than 5% over the depth of the granules.

  9. Comparison between moving bed-membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems: influence of wastewater salinity variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Trapani, Daniele; Di Bella, Gaetano; Mannina, Giorgio; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2014-06-01

    Two pilot plant systems were investigated for the treatment of wastewater subject to a gradual increase of salinity. In particular, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a moving bed biofilm membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) were analyzed. Carbon and ammonium removal, kinetic constants and membranes fouling rates have been assessed. Both plants showed very high efficiency in terms of carbon and ammonium removal and the gradual salinity increase led to a good acclimation of the biomass, as confirmed by the respirometric tests. Significant biofilm detachments from carriers were experienced, which contributed to increase the irreversible superficial cake deposition. However, this aspect prevented the pore fouling tendency in the membrane module of MB-MBR system. On the contrary, the MBR pilot, even showing a lower irreversible cake deposition, was characterized by a higher pore fouling tendency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Code Size Variation on the Performance of 2D Hybrid ZCC/MD in OCDMA System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matem Rima.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several two dimensional OCDMA have been developed in order to overcome many problems in optical network, enhancing cardinality, suppress Multiple Access Interference (MAI and mitigate Phase Induced Intensity Noise (PIIN. This paper propose a new 2D hybrid ZCC/MD code combining between 1D ZCC spectral encoding where M is its code length and 1D MD spatial spreading where N is its code length. The spatial spreading (N code length offers a good cardinality so it represents the main effect to enhance the performance of the system compared to the spectral (M code length according to the numerical results.

  11. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde Perez, Borja

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing...... the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton producing aerobic ammonium oxidizers (AOB) were located close to the granule surface.Despite this pH profile, more...... NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers (AnAOB), located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface...

  12. Dynamics of nonholonomic systems from variational principles embedded variation identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yongxin; Liu Shixing; Liu Chang; Chang Peng

    2009-01-01

    Nondeterminacy of dynamics, i.e., the nonholonomic or the vakonomic, fundamental variational principles, e.g., the Lagrange-d'Alembert or Hamiltonian, and variational operators, etc., of nonholonomic mechanical systems can be attributed to the non-uniqueness of ways how to realize nonholonomic constraints. Making use of a variation identity of nonholonomic constraints embedded into the Hamilton's principle with the method of Lagrange undetermined multipliers, three kinds of dynamics for the nonholonomic systems including the vakonomic and nonholonomic ones and a new one are obtained if the variation is respectively reduced to three conditional variations: vakonomic variation, Hoelder's variation and Suslov's variation, defined by the identity. Therefore, different dynamics of nonholonomic systems can be derived from an integral variational principle, utilizing one way of embedding constraints into the principle, with different variations. It is verified that the similar embedding of the identity into the Lagrange-d'Alembert principle gives rise to the nonholonomic dynamics but fails to give the vakonomic one unless the constraints are integrable.

  13. Dynamics of nonholonomic systems from variational principles embedded variation identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Yongxin, E-mail: yxguo@lnu.edu.c [College of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Liu Shixing [College of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Liu Chang; Chang Peng [Department of Applied Mechanics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2009-10-19

    Nondeterminacy of dynamics, i.e., the nonholonomic or the vakonomic, fundamental variational principles, e.g., the Lagrange-d'Alembert or Hamiltonian, and variational operators, etc., of nonholonomic mechanical systems can be attributed to the non-uniqueness of ways how to realize nonholonomic constraints. Making use of a variation identity of nonholonomic constraints embedded into the Hamilton's principle with the method of Lagrange undetermined multipliers, three kinds of dynamics for the nonholonomic systems including the vakonomic and nonholonomic ones and a new one are obtained if the variation is respectively reduced to three conditional variations: vakonomic variation, Hoelder's variation and Suslov's variation, defined by the identity. Therefore, different dynamics of nonholonomic systems can be derived from an integral variational principle, utilizing one way of embedding constraints into the principle, with different variations. It is verified that the similar embedding of the identity into the Lagrange-d'Alembert principle gives rise to the nonholonomic dynamics but fails to give the vakonomic one unless the constraints are integrable.

  14. Consumer trait variation influences tritrophic interactions in salt marsh communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Anne Randall; Hanley, Torrance C; Orozco, Nohelia P; Zerebecki, Robyn A

    2015-07-01

    The importance of intraspecific variation has emerged as a key question in community ecology, helping to bridge the gap between ecology and evolution. Although much of this work has focused on plant species, recent syntheses have highlighted the prevalence and potential importance of morphological, behavioral, and life history variation within animals for ecological and evolutionary processes. Many small-bodied consumers live on the plant that they consume, often resulting in host plant-associated trait variation within and across consumer species. Given the central position of consumer species within tritrophic food webs, such consumer trait variation may play a particularly important role in mediating trophic dynamics, including trophic cascades. In this study, we used a series of field surveys and laboratory experiments to document intraspecific trait variation in a key consumer species, the marsh periwinkle Littoraria irrorata, based on its host plant species (Spartina alterniflora or Juncus roemerianus) in a mixed species assemblage. We then conducted a 12-week mesocosm experiment to examine the effects of Littoraria trait variation on plant community structure and dynamics in a tritrophic salt marsh food web. Littoraria from different host plant species varied across a suite of morphological and behavioral traits. These consumer trait differences interacted with plant community composition and predator presence to affect overall plant stem height, as well as differentially alter the density and biomass of the two key plant species in this system. Whether due to genetic differences or phenotypic plasticity, trait differences between consumer types had significant ecological consequences for the tritrophic marsh food web over seasonal time scales. By altering the cascading effects of the top predator on plant community structure and dynamics, consumer differences may generate a feedback over longer time scales, which in turn influences the degree of trait

  15. Adult sex ratio variation : Implications for breeding system evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szekely, T.; Weissing, F. J.; Komdeur, J.

    Adult sex ratio (ASR) exhibits immense variation in nature, although neither the causes nor the implications of this variation are fully understood. According to theory, the ASR is expected to influence sex roles and breeding systems, as the rarer sex in the population has more potential partners to

  16. Skin dose variation: influence of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This research aimed to quantitatively evaluate the differences in percentage dose of maximum for 6MV and 18MV x-ray beams within the first lcm of interactions. Thus provide quantitative information regarding the basal, dermal and subcutaneous dose differences achievable with these two types of high-energy x-ray beams. Percentage dose of maximum build up curves are measured for most clinical field sizes using 6MV and 18MV x-ray beams. Calculations are performed to produce quantitative results highlighting the percentage dose of maximum differences delivered to various depths within the skin and subcutaneous tissue region by these two beams Results have shown that basal cell layer doses are not significantly different for 6MV and 18Mv x-ray beams At depths beyond the surface and basal cell layer there is a measurable and significant difference in delivered dose. This variation increases to 20% of maximum and 22% of maximum at Imm and 1cm depths respectively. The percentage variations are larger for smaller field sizes where the photon in phantom component of the delivered dose is the most significant contributor to dose By producing graphs or tables of % dose differences in the build up region we can provide quantitative information to the oncologist for consideration (if skin and subcutaneous tissue doses are of importance) during the beam energy selection process for treatment. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. Genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Darren; Rodríguez, Rafael L.

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of phenotypic variation arise in part from plasticity owing to social interactions, and these patterns contribute, in turn, to the form of selection that shapes the variation we observe in natural populations. This proximate–ultimate dynamic brings genetic variation in social environments to the forefront of evolutionary theory. However, the extent of this variation remains largely unknown. Here, we use a member of the Enchenopa binotata species complex of treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae) to assess how mate preferences are influenced by genetic variation in the social environment. We used full-sibling split-families as ‘treatment’ social environments, and reared focal females alongside each treatment family, describing the mate preferences of the focal females. With this method, we detected substantial genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences. The mate preferences of focal females varied according to the treatment families along with which they grew up. We discuss the evolutionary implications of the presence of such genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences, including potential contributions to the maintenance of genetic variation, the promotion of divergence, and the adaptive evolution of social effects on fitness-related traits. PMID:23698010

  18. Individual Variation in Life History Characteristics Can Influence Extinction Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, H I

    2001-01-01

    The white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) shows great individual variation in the age at maturation. This study examines the consequences of model assumptions about individual variation in the age at maturation on predicted population viability. I considered: (1) the effects of variation in age at maturation alone; (2) the effects of heritability; and (3) the influence of a stable and an altered selective regime. Two selective regimes represented conditions before and after the impoundment of a river, blocking access of anadromous white sturgeon populations to the ocean. In contrast to previous simulation studies, I found that increased individual variation in the age at maturity did not necessarily lead to a higher likelihood of persistence. Individual variation increased the simulated likelihood of persistence when the variation was heritable and the selective regime had changed such that the mean age at maturity was no longer optimal.

  19. Cytoplasmic genetic variation and extensive cytonuclear interactions influence natural variation in the metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A.; Li, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes...... was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation...... in metabolomic networks. This suggests that cytoplasmic genomes must be included in any future analysis of natural variation....

  20. Temporal variations and spatial distributions of heavy metals in a wastewater-irrigated soil-eggplant system and associated influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shiwei; Liu, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Ding, Jian; Yang, Wenzhi; Bai, Xiaojuan; Naeem, Sajid; Zhang, Yingmei

    2018-05-30

    Heavy metal pollution in farmlands is highly concerned as crops' easy-uptake of heavy metal can ultimately affect consumers. In order to offer suggestions on cultivating safe quality vegetable, specifically eggplant which is widely consumed for its nutritional value and antioxidant activity, a field study was undertaken to investigate the temporal variations and spatial distributions of heavy metals in a wastewater-irrigated soil-eggplant system. In the present study, eggplants were planted in the farmlands of Weichuan village (WC) (relatively unpolluted field), Liangzhuang village (LZ) (moderately polluted field) and Minqin village (MQ) (seriously polluted field) to elucidate their temporal uptake processes of heavy metals described by the sigmoid model. Eggplant tissues from severely polluted farmlands were found with higher heavy metal concentrations and lower yields compared with other two groups. What is more, 25 farmlands along the Dongdagou stream (heavy metals polluted stream) were chosen to analyze the spatial distribution of heavy metals in soils and eggplants. Heavy metal concentrations in eggplants decreased with the decline of heavy metal concentrations in soil from upstream (pollution source) to downstream. Moreover, several methods were employed to assess bioavailability of heavy metals in soils. All the bioavailable heavy metals were found in linear positive correlations with heavy metal concentrations. Meanwhile, linear correlations were found between heavy metals in soils and eggplants. At last, redundancy analysis was used to investigate the effects of soil properties (pH, organic matter and texture of soils) and heavy metals on eggplants' uptake. The results indicated that soil heavy metals had a dominant impact on their accumulations in eggplant fruit, with a variance contribution of 78.0%, while soil properties had a regulatory effect, with a variance contribution of 5.2%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of flood variation on seasonal floodplain vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of flooding variation on floodplain vegetation in the Nxaraga Lagoon seasonal floodplains by sampling community composition and soil nutrient content in 1997, when flood levels were unusually low, and again in 2010 when flood levels were unusually high. In each of the eight ...

  2. Variations of influence quantities in industrial irradiators and their effect on dosimetry performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, R.D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Many environmental factors, including irradiation temperature, post-irradiation storage temperature, dose rate, relative humidity, oxygen content and the energy spectrum may affect the response of dosimetry systems used in industrial radiation processing. Although the effects of individual influence quantities have been extensively studied, the variations of these influence quantities in production irradiators and the complex relationships between the effects of different influence quantities make it difficult to assess the overall effect on the measurement uncertainty. In the development of new dosimetry systems it is important to know the effect of each influence quantity and developers of new dosimetry systems should perform studies over a wide range of irradiation conditions. Analysis parameters and manufacturing specifications should be chosen to minimize the effect of influence quantities in the environments where the dosimeters will be used. Because of possible relationships between different influence quantities, care must be taken to ensure that the response function determined in the calibration of the dosimetry system is applicable for the conditions in which the dosimeters will be used. Reference standard dosimetry systems which have been thoroughly studied and have known relationships between dose response and influence quantities should be used to verify the calibration of routine dosimetry systems under the actual conditions of use. Better understanding of the variations in influence quantities in industrial irradiators may be obtained by modeling or direct measurements and may provide improvements in the calibration of routine dosimetry system and reduction of the overall measurement uncertainty. (author)

  3. Influence of frequency variation in the load behaviour in electric power systems; Influencia da variacao da frequencia no comportamento da carga dos sistemas eletricos de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Sobrinho, Mauro de

    1994-11-01

    This work presents several models for the representation of load-frequency control systems and describes the main characteristics of the load. The composition of the load is described in details, divided by sectors. Finally, simulations of the load-frequency control system is performed. Conclusions are presented.

  4. Influence of waterfall aeration and seasonal temperature variation on the iron and arsenic attenuation rates in an acid mine drainage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Jung; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic seasonal changes in water chemistry and precipitate mineralogy associated with acid-mine drainage (AMD) in the waterfall and creek sections of the Chinkuashih area, northern Taiwan were investigated. Special attention has been paid to the kinetic effects of seasonal temperature variation and waterfall aeration. Precipitation of schwertmannite associated with removal of metals and As are indicated by delicate growth microstructures on precipitate surfaces, X-ray diffraction data, and downstream reductions of metal and As concentrations. Geochemical modeling suggested a downstream increase of the degree of saturation/supersaturation with respect to schwertmannite in the waterfall section, which can be attributed to high Fe 2+ oxidation rates. The waterfall section was characterized by high rates and model rate constants of Fe 2+ oxidation (6.1–6.7 × 10 −6 mol L −1 s −1 and 2.7–2.9 × 10 −2 s −1 ) and Fe (schwertmannite) precipitation (1.7–2.1 × 10 −6 mol L −1 s −1 and 3.5–4.1 × 10 −7 mol L −1 s −1 ). A high As sorption rate (4.7–6.3 × 10 −9 mol L −1 s −1 ) and low As distribution coefficient (7.9–11.8 × 10 −9 mol −1 L) were observed. The creek section showed up to 1–2 orders of magnitude slower rates and lower rate constants than the waterfall section and had seasonal variations comparable to those in areas polluted by AMD elsewhere. The summer rates were 4–5 times higher than the winter rates in the creek section, and are largely attributed to a temperature effect. In contrast, the seasonal differences in rate and rate constant were small in the waterfall section. Several factors associated with the waterfall aeration in addition to elevated temperature and As concentration enhanced Fe and As attenuation in the waterfall section. The waterfall effects on Fe precipitation rate were enhanced when the flow rate was large in the winter. Despite the remarkable removal of metals and As by the rapid

  5. Influence of Compositional Variations on Floc Size and Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H.; Tan, X.; Reed, A. H.; Furukawa, Y.; Zhang, G.

    2010-12-01

    Clay-biopolymer micro aggregates or flocs are abundant in waters, including rivers, lakes, and oceans. Owing to their small size and charged surfaces, fine-grained inorganic sediment particles, mainly clays, interact actively with organic substances, such as organic matter and biogenic polymers, to form aggregates or flocs, typically in the size of 10-1000 μm. The flocs in ocean waters are also termed “marine snow”. These flocs are typically porous, tenuous, and soft in nature. During transport in suspension, they may breakdown and decrease in size if the turbulent shear stress exceeds their strength. They may also collide and form larger ones if the shear stress is relatively small. Since flocs of different size and structure settle at different velocities, understanding their strength is also of essential importance for sediment hydrodynamics, transport, and management. Our study focuses on investigating the influence of compositional variations on floc size and strength so that a better understanding of floc dynamics can be achieved. A laser diffraction-based Cilas® particle size and shape analyzer with controllable fluid circulation velocity was employed to conduct floc size measurements and shape imaging, the latter achieved by a high resolution inverted optical microscope, which is also installed with the size analyzer. Totally two clay minerals, kaolinite and illite, were tested as the model inorganic solid skeleton minerals for floc formation, and two biopolymers, anionic xanthan gum and neutral guar gum, were chosen as analogs of naturally occurring organic matter or biopolymers to simulate clay-biopolymer floc formation. Moreover, the concentration of both organic and inorganic phases was varied. The floc breakage or tensile strength was indirectly estimated by the varied fluid flow velocity in the particle size analyzer’s circulation system. For each individual composition, stable flocs were formed by three different fluid circulating velocities

  6. Balance Systems and the Variational Bicomplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Preston

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we show that the systems of balance equations (balance systems of continuum thermodynamics occupy a natural place in the variational bicomplex formalism. We apply the vertical homotopy decomposition to get a local splitting (in a convenient domain of a general balance system as the sum of a Lagrangian part and a complemental ''pure non-Lagrangian'' balance system. In the case when derivatives of the dynamical fields do not enter the constitutive relations of the balance system, the ''pure non-Lagrangian'' systems coincide with the systems introduced by S. Godunov [Soviet Math. Dokl. 2 (1961, 947-948] and, later, asserted as the canonical hyperbolic form of balance systems in [Müller I., Ruggeri T., Rational extended thermodynamics, 2nd ed., Springer Tracts in Natural Philosophy, Vol. 37, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998].

  7. In the nose of the beholder: are olfactory influences on human mate choice driven by variation in immune system genes or sex hormone levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2010-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is the most polymorphic region of the genome, coding for proteins that mediate human immune response. This polymorphism may be maintained by balancing selection and certain populations show deviations from expected gene frequencies. Supporting this hypothesis, studies into olfactory preferences have suggested that females prefer the scent of males with dissimilar HLA to their own. However, it has also been proposed that androstenones play a role in female mate choice, and as these molecules inhibit the immune system, this has implications for the theory of HLA-driven mate preference. This review will critically analyze the findings of studies investigating olfactory preference in humans, and their implications for these two contrasting theories of mate choice.

  8. Religious influences on human capital variations in imperial Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomila Lankina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical legacies, particularly imperial tutelage and religion, have featured prominently in recent scholarship on political regime variations in post-communist settings, challenging earlier temporally proximate explanations. The overlap between tutelage, geography, and religion has complicated the uncovering of the spatially uneven effects of the various legacies. The author addresses this challenge by conducting sub-national analysis of religious influences within one imperial domain, Russia. In particular, the paper traces how European settlement in imperial Russia has had a bearing on human development in the imperial periphery. The causal mechanism that the paper proposes to account for this influence is the Western communities’ impact on literacy, which is in turn linked in the analysis to the Western Christian, particularly Protestant, roots, of settler populations. The author makes this case by constructing an original dataset based on sub-national data from the hitherto underutilised first imperial census of 1897.

  9. Influence of LOD variations on seismic energy release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riguzzi, F.; Krumm, F.; Wang, K.; Kiszely, M.; Varga, P.

    2009-04-01

    Tidal friction causes significant time variations of geodynamical parameters, among them geometrical flattening. The axial despinning of the Earth due to tidal friction through the change of flattening generates incremental meridional and azimuthal stresses. The stress pattern in an incompressible elastic upper mantle and crust is symmetric to the equator and has its inflection points at the critical latitude close to ±45°. Consequently the distribution of seismic energy released by strong, shallow focus earthquakes should have also sharp maxima at this latitude. To investigate the influence of length of day (LOD) variations on earthquake activity an earthquake catalogue of strongest seismic events (M>7.0) was completed for the period 1900-2007. It is shown with the use of this catalogue that for the studied time-interval the catalogue is complete and consists of the seismic events responsible for more than 90% of released seismic energy. Study of the catalogue for earthquakes M>7.0 shows that the seismic energy discharged by the strongest seismic events has significant maxima at ±45°, what renders probably that the seismic activity of our planet is influenced by an external component, i.e. by the tidal friction, which acts through the variation of the hydrostatic figure of the Earth caused by it. Distribution along the latitude of earthquake numbers and energies was investigated also for the case of global linear tectonic structures, such as mid ocean ridges and subduction zones. It can be shown that the number of the shallow focus shocks has a repartition along the latitude similar to the distribution of the linear tectonic structures. This means that the position of foci of seismic events is mainly controlled by the tectonic activity.

  10. Geographic variation in Medicare and the military healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Kimsey, Linda G; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Nguyen, Louis L; Goodney, Philip; Olaiya, Samuel; Weissman, Joel S

    2017-08-01

    To compare geographic variation in healthcare spending and utilization between the Military Health System (MHS) and Medicare across hospital referral regions (HRRs). Retrospective analysis. Data on age-, sex-, and race-adjusted Medicare per capita expenditure and utilization measures by HRR were obtained from the Dartmouth Atlas for 2007 to 2010. Similarly, adjusted data from 2007 and 2010 were obtained from the MHS Data Repository and patients assigned to HRRs. We compared high- and low-spending regions, and computed coefficient of variation (CoV) and correlation coefficients for healthcare spending, hospital inpatient days, hip surgery, and back surgery between MHS and Medicare patients. We found significant variation in spending and utilization across HRRs in both the MHS and Medicare. CoV for spending was higher in the MHS compared with Medicare, (0.24 vs 0.15, respectively) and CoV for inpatient days was 0.36 in the MHS versus 0.19 in Medicare. The CoV for back surgery was also greater in the MHS compared with Medicare (0.47 vs 0.29, respectively). Per capita Medicare spending per HRR was significantly correlated to adjusted MHS spending (r = 0.3; P spending markets in both systems were not comparable; lower spending markets were located mostly in the Midwest. In comparing 2 systems with similar pricing schemes, differences in spending likely reflect variation in utilization and the influence of local provider culture.

  11. Influence of megapolis on the physical field variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabova, Svetlana; Loktev, Dmitry; Spivak, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The research of geophysical fields in the conditions of megapolis attracts particular interest not only in terms of their influence on the operation of precision equipment and technological processes associated with nanotechnology, but also it is perhaps the most important in terms of the formation of a special human and other biological objects' habitat. Indeed, the megapolis causes significant changes in regime of the physical fields both directly and indirectly. Negative factors of megapolis associated with elevated vibrations of soil as a result of traffic, acoustic load in the construction of infrastructure and transport communications, etc. are complemented by another negative factor, which until quite recently wasn't known much. It is a variation of physical fields (primarily electric and magnetic) induced by anthropogenic activities. As a result of the evolution a man has adapted to the natural regime of physical fields. Therefore, any, even the short-term changes of physical fields in the environment, their deviations from the natural rate can have a significant influence on human health including changes in the psycho-emotional state. In the present work we have evaluated the influence of the megapolis (in our case, Moscow) on the nature and regime of microseismic, electric and acoustic field in the surface atmosphere. We have analyzed data obtained as a result of continuous simultaneous registration of physical fields and meteorological parameters at the Center for geophysical monitoring of Moscow of Institute of Geosphere Dynamics of Russian Academy of Sciences. For determination of the characteristics of physical fields in the megapolis obtained data were compared with the results of the registration carried out at the Geophysical Observatory "Mikhnevo" of IDG RAS (located 85 km south from Moscow). The work is shown that the influence of the megapolis appears to increase the amplitude of physical fields, change of their spectral composition

  12. Adult sex ratio variation: implications for breeding system evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, T; Weissing, F J; Komdeur, J

    2014-08-01

    Adult sex ratio (ASR) exhibits immense variation in nature, although neither the causes nor the implications of this variation are fully understood. According to theory, the ASR is expected to influence sex roles and breeding systems, as the rarer sex in the population has more potential partners to mate with than the more common sex. Changes in mate choice, mating systems and parental care suggest that the ASR does influence breeding behaviour, although there is a need for more tests, especially experimental ones. In the context of breeding system evolution, the focus is currently on operational sex ratios (OSRs). We argue that the ASR plays a role of similar importance and urge researchers to study the ASR and the OSR side by side. Finally, we plead for a dynamic view of breeding system evolution with feedbacks between mating, parenting, OSR and ASR on both ecological and evolutionary time scales. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yizengaw

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ. The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998–2014 of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (Kp>3 have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  14. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Inst. for Scientific Research; Carter, Brett A. [RMIT Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia). SPACE Research Centre

    2017-07-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (K{sub p}>3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  15. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke; Carter, Brett A.

    2017-01-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (K p >3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  16. Identification of basin characteristics influencing spatial variation of river flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazvimavi, D.; Burgers, S.L.G.E.; Stein, A.

    2006-01-01

    The selection of basin characteristics that explain spatial variation of river flows is important for hydrological regionalization as this enables estimation of flow statistics of ungauged basins. A direct gradient analysis method, redundancy analysis, is used to identify basin characteristics,

  17. Host genetic variation influences gene expression response to rhinovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Çalışkan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhinovirus (RV is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs, namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5 and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3. The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases.

  18. Host genetic variation influences gene expression response to rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkan, Minal; Baker, Samuel W; Gilad, Yoav; Ober, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs) in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs), namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5) and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3). The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases.

  19. Factors influencing individual variation in perceptual directional microphone benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Dillon, Harvey; Convery, Elizabeth; Mejia, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Large variations in perceptual directional microphone benefit, which far exceed the variation expected from physical performance measures of directional microphones, have been reported in the literature. The cause for the individual variation has not been systematically investigated. To determine the factors that are responsible for the individual variation in reported perceptual directional benefit. A correlational study. Physical performance measures of the directional microphones obtained after they had been fitted to individuals, cognitive abilities of individuals, and measurement errors were related to perceptual directional benefit scores. Fifty-nine hearing-impaired adults with varied degrees of hearing loss participated in the study. All participants were bilaterally fitted with a Motion behind-the-ear device (500 M, 501 SX, or 501 P) from Siemens according to the National Acoustic Laboratories' non-linear prescription, version two (NAL-NL2). Using the Bamford-Kowal-Bench (BKB) sentences, the perceptual directional benefit was obtained as the difference in speech reception threshold measured in babble noise (SRTn) with the devices in directional (fixed hypercardioid) and in omnidirectional mode. The SRTn measurements were repeated three times with each microphone mode. Physical performance measures of the directional microphone included the angle of the microphone ports to loudspeaker axis, the frequency range dominated by amplified sound, the in situ signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the in situ three-dimensional, articulation-index weighted directivity index (3D AI-DI). The cognitive tests included auditory selective attention, speed of processing, and working memory. Intraparticipant variation on the repeated SRTn's and the interparticipant variation on the average SRTn were used to determine the effect of measurement error. A multiple regression analysis was used to determine the effect of other factors. Measurement errors explained 52% of the variation

  20. Influence of environmental variations on physiological attributes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... tors, those partitioned the photosynthates in achenes. Variation in climatic factors affects photosynthesis and transpiration in different ways on crop plant (Abbate et al., 2004; Baydar and Erbas, 2005). In most plants, as a direct response to temperature, the photosynthetic rate is low at extreme low and high ...

  1. Natural variation in sensory-motor white matter organization influences manifestations of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Michael; Gregory, Sarah; Scahill, Rachael I; Mayer, Isabella Sm; Minkova, Lora; Klöppel, Stefan; Seunarine, Kiran K; Boyd, Lara; Borowsky, Beth; Reilmann, Ralf; Bernhard Landwehrmeyer, G; Leavitt, Blair R; Roos, Raymund Ac; Durr, Alexandra; Rees, Geraint; Rothwell, John C; Langbehn, Douglas; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2016-12-01

    While the HTT CAG-repeat expansion mutation causing Huntington's disease (HD) is highly correlated with the rate of pathogenesis leading to disease onset, considerable variance in age-at-onset remains unexplained. Therefore, other factors must influence the pathogenic process. We asked whether these factors were related to natural biological variation in the sensory-motor system. In 243 participants (96 premanifest and 35 manifest HD; 112 controls), sensory-motor structural MRI, tractography, resting-state fMRI, electrophysiology (including SEP amplitudes), motor score ratings, and grip force as sensory-motor performance were measured. Following individual modality analyses, we used principal component analysis (PCA) to identify patterns associated with sensory-motor performance, and manifest versus premanifest HD discrimination. We did not detect longitudinal differences over 12 months. PCA showed a pattern of loss of caudate, grey and white matter volume, cortical thickness in premotor and sensory cortex, and disturbed diffusivity in sensory-motor white matter tracts that was connected to CAG repeat length. Two further major principal components appeared in controls and HD individuals indicating that they represent natural biological variation unconnected to the HD mutation. One of these components did not influence HD while the other non-CAG-driven component of axial versus radial diffusivity contrast in white matter tracts were associated with sensory-motor performance and manifest HD. The first component reflects the expected CAG expansion effects on HD pathogenesis. One non-CAG-driven component reveals an independent influence on pathogenesis of biological variation in white matter tracts and merits further investigation to delineate the underlying mechanism and the potential it offers for disease modification. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4615-4628, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cultural Variation in Parental Influence on Mate Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Park, Justin H.; Duncan, Lesley A.

    Contrary to assumptions underlying current psychological theories of human mating, throughout much of human history parents often controlled the mating behavior of their children. In the present research, the authors tested the hypothesis that the level of parental influence on mating is associated

  3. Seasonal variations in the fouling diatom community structure from a monsoon influenced tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.

    Seasonal variations in the fouling diatom community from a monsoon influenced tropical estuary were investigated. The community composition did not differ significantly between stainless steel and polystyrene substrata due to dominance by Navicula...

  4. Flanking Variation Influences Rates of Stutter in Simple Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August E. Woerner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been posited that the longest uninterrupted stretch (LUS of tandem repeats, as defined by the number of exactly matching repeating motif units, is a better predictor of rates of stutter than the parental allele length (PAL. While there are cases where this hypothesis is likely correct, such as the 9.3 allele in the TH01 locus, there can be situations where it may not apply as well. For example, the PAL may capture flanking indel variations while remaining insensitive to polymorphisms in the repeat, and these haplotypic changes may impact the stutter rate. To address this, rates of stutter were contrasted against the LUS as well as the PAL on different flanking haplotypic backgrounds. This study shows that rates of stutter can vary substantially depending on the flanking haplotype, and while there are cases where the LUS is a better predictor of stutter than the PAL, examples to the contrary are apparent in commonly assayed forensic markers. Further, flanking variation that is 7 bp from the repeat region can impact rates of stutter. These findings suggest that non-proximal effects, such as DNA secondary structure, may be impacting the rates of stutter in common forensic short tandem repeat markers.

  5. Influence of air temperature variations on incidence of epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Ivan; Vincenti, Vincenzo; Benatti, Mario; Macri, Gian Franco; Comelli, Denis; Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Epistaxis is the most common ear, nose, and throat emergency observed in the emergency department (ED). An increased frequency of this condition has been observed during cooler months, but the results of available studies are controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonality and association of epistaxis presentations to a large urban ED with variations of air temperature and humidity. This study was a retrospective case series. Information on all the patients who presented for epistaxis in the ED of the Academic Hospital of Parma during the years 2003-2012 and ages ≥ 14 years were retrieved from the hospital data base, excluding those attributable to trauma. The chronologic data of all visits were associated with climate data (air temperature and humidity) by univariate linear regression analysis. Among the 819,596 ED patients seen throughout the observational period, 5404 were admitted for epistaxis. Of these, 5220 were discharged from the ED, whereas 184 (3.4%) needed hospital admission. A strong seasonality of epistaxis was observed, with a peak during winter. A strong negative correlation was also found between the daily number of epistaxes and the mean daily temperature in the whole population as well as in patient subgroups (those undergoing anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy, or those with hypertension, inherited bleeding disorders, liver cirrhosis, or advanced malignancy). A weaker correlation was also found between air humidity and epistaxis but only in certain subgroups. The results of this study provided a contribution to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of epistaxis and for specific health policies that should also be planned by considering the seasonality of nosebleed.

  6. Density of asphalt paving mixtures: Measurements, variations, and influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solaimanian, M.

    1990-01-01

    The first part describes the results of a research study to determine the effectiveness of the Troxler Model 4640 Thin Lift Nuclear Density Gauge. The densities obtained from cores and the nuclear density gauge from seven construction projects were compared. A linear regression technique was used to investigate how well the core densities could be predicted from nuclear densities. Correlation coefficients were determined to indicate the degree of correlation between the core and nuclear densities. Using a statistical analysis technique, the range of differences between core and nuclear measurements was established for specified confidence levels for each project. Analysis of the data indicated that the accuracy of this gauge is highly material dependent. While acceptable results were obtained with limestone mixtures, the gauge did not perform satisfactorily with mixtures containing siliceous aggregate. The data presented in this paper indicate that the gauge could be used as a quality control tool provided that a calibration is developed for each project. The maximum theoretical specific gravities of asphalt-aggregate paving mixtures obtained from different methods were compared. The study included experimental work and analysis of the resulting data. The agreement between results obtained from the Texas C-14 method and the Rice method were excellent. Results obtained by backcalculating theoretical maximum densities from a single Rice test were also found to be satisfactory. Theoretical approach based on bulk specific gravity of aggregate is not recommended because of yielding significantly low theoretical maximum specific gravities and high relative densities. The last two parts summarize density levels and corresponding variations obtained from fifty-seven construction projects throughout the state of Texas

  7. Influence of Temperature Variation on Optical Receiver Sensitivity and its Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the influence of temperature variation on the sensitivity of an avalanche-photodiode-based optical receiver applied in the free space optical communication link is discussed. Communication systems of this type are exposed to a wide range of operating temperatures, which markedly affect many photodiode and preamplifier parameters. The paper presents a receiver sensitivity calculation, taking into consideration the temperature dependence of avalanche photodiode gain, excess noise factor, dark current and thermal noise of preamplifier resistances, and describes the compensation of temperature effects on photodiode gain based on a corresponding change in the reverse voltage applied to the diode. The calculations are demonstrated on the connection of a small-area silicon APD operating in the wavelength range from 820 to 1150 nm with a transimpedance preamplifier using a bipolar junction transistor.

  8. Individual variation in life history characteristics can influence extinction risk (vol 144, pg 61, 2001) Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) shows great individual variation in the age at maturation. This study examines the consequences of model assumptions about individual variation in the age at maturation on predicted population viability. I considered: (1) the effects of variation in age at maturation alone; (2) the effects of heritability; and (3) the influence of a stable and an altered selective regime. Two selective regimes represented conditions before and after the impoundment of a river, blocking access of anadromous white sturgeon populations to the ocean. In contrast to previous simulation studies, I found that increased individual variation in the age at maturity did not necessarily lead to a higher likelihood of persistence. Individual variation increased the simulated likelihood of persistence when the variation was heritable and the selective regime had changed such that the mean age at maturity was no longer optimal.

  9. Influence of the variation potential on photosynthetic flows of light energy and electrons in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhova, Ekaterina; Mudrilov, Maxim; Vodeneev, Vladimir; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    Local damage (mainly burning, heating, and mechanical wounding) induces propagation of electrical signals, namely, variation potentials, which are important signals during the life of plants that regulate different physiological processes, including photosynthesis. It is known that the variation potential decreases the rate of CO 2 assimilation by the Calvin-Benson cycle; however, its influence on light reactions has been poorly investigated. The aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the variation potential on the light energy flow that is absorbed, trapped and dissipated per active reaction centre in photosystem II and on the flow of electrons through the chloroplast electron transport chain. We analysed chlorophyll fluorescence in pea leaves using JIP-test and PAM-fluorometry; we also investigated delayed fluorescence. The electrical signals were registered using extracellular electrodes. We showed that the burning-induced variation potential stimulated a nonphotochemical loss of energy in photosystem II under dark conditions. It was also shown that the variation potential gradually increased the flow of light energy absorbed, trapped and dissipated by photosystem II. These changes were likely caused by an increase in the fraction of absorbed light distributed to photosystem II. In addition, the variation potential induced a transient increase in electron flow through the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Some probable mechanisms for the influence of the variation potential on the light reactions of photosynthesis (including the potential role of intracellular pH decrease) are discussed in the work.

  10. Influence of variation of etching conditions on the sensitivity of PADC detectors with a new evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiechtner-Scharrer, A.; Mayer, S.; Boschung, M.; Whitelaw, A.

    2011-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institut, a personal neutron dosimetry system based on chemically etched poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) detectors and an automatic track counting (Autoscan 60) for neutron dose evaluations has been in routine use since 1998. Today, the hardware and the software of the Autoscan 60 are out of date, no spare components are available anymore and more sophisticated image-analysis systems are already developed. Therefore, a new evaluation system, the 'TASLIMAGE', was tested thoroughly in 2009 for linearity, reproducibility, influence of etching conditions and so forth, with the intention of replacing the Autoscan 60 in routine evaluations. The TASLIMAGE system is based on a microscope (high-quality Nikon optics) and an ultra-fast three-axis motorised control for scanning the detectors. In this paper, the TASLIMAGE system and its possibilities for neutron dose calculation are explained in more detail and the study of the influence of the variation of etching conditions on the sensitivity and background of the PADC detectors is described. The etching temperature and etching duration were varied, which showed that the etching conditions do not have a significant influence on the results of non-irradiated detectors. However, the sensitivity of irradiated detectors decreases by 5 % per 1 deg. C when increasing the etching temperature. For the variation of the etching duration, the influence on the sensitivity of irradiated detectors is less pronounced. (authors)

  11. Lack of influence of GTP cyclohydrolase gene (GCH1 variations on pain sensitivity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionne Raymond A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To assess the effect of variations in GTP cyclohydrolase gene (GCH1 on pain sensitivity in humans. Methods Thermal and cold pain sensitivity were evaluated in a cohort of 735 healthy volunteers. Among this cohort, the clinical pain responses of 221 subjects after the surgical removal of impacted third molars were evaluated. Genotyping was done for 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose heterozygosity > 0.2 in GCH1. Influence of the genetic variations including SNPs and haplotypes on pain sensitivity were analyzed. Results Minor allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium show significant differences in European Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. Association analyses in European Americans do not replicate the previously reported important influence of GCH1 variations on pain sensitivity. Conclusion Considering population stratification, previously reported associations between GCH1 genetic variations and pain sensitivity appear weak or negligible in this well characterized model of pain.

  12. Dynamic Influences of Wind Power on The Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosas, Pedro Andrè Carvalho

    2004-01-01

    between different wind turbines.Here the wind speed model is applied to a constant rotational speed wind turbine/farm, but the model is suit-able to variable speed wind turbine/farm as well. The cases presented here illustrate the influences of the wind power on the power systemquality and stability...... integration due to the low spatial correlation of the wind speed. The voltage quality analysed in a Brazilian power system and in the Nordel power system from connecting largeamount of wind power showed very small voltage variations. The frequency variations analysed from the Nordel showed also small varia...

  13. [Influence of a variation potential on photosynthesis in pumpkin seedlings (Cucurbita pepo L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, V S; Shesterneva, O N; Surova, L M; Rumiantsev, E A; Vodeneev, V A

    2013-01-01

    The influence of a variation potential on photosynthesis in pumpkin seedlings (Cucurbita pepo L.) was investigated in our work. It was shown that the variation potential induced by cotyledon burning propagates into a leaf. It decreases CO2 assimilation and transpiration as well as increases nonphotochemical quenching. Investigation of isolated chloroplasts showed that lowering of the pH in incubation medium from 6.9-7.2 to 6.5 increases nonphotochemical quenching. It was proposed that lowering of the cytoplasmic pH induced by the variation potential takes place in the photosynthetic response development.

  14. Nonterminals and codings in defining variations of OL-systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven

    1974-01-01

    The use of nonterminals versus the use of codings in variations of OL-systems is studied. It is shown that the use of nonterminals produces a comparatively low generative capacity in deterministic systems while it produces a comparatively high generative capacity in nondeterministic systems. Fina....... Finally it is proved that the family of context-free languages is contained in the family generated by codings on propagating OL-systems with a finite set of axioms, which was one of the open problems in [10]. All the results in this paper can be found in [71] and [72].......The use of nonterminals versus the use of codings in variations of OL-systems is studied. It is shown that the use of nonterminals produces a comparatively low generative capacity in deterministic systems while it produces a comparatively high generative capacity in nondeterministic systems...

  15. The influence of nitride thickness variations on the switching speed of MNOS memory transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1978-01-01

    The influence of nitride thickness variations on the switching speed of MNOS memory transistors is examined. The switching time constant is calculated as a function of the nitride thickness using a model of modified Fowler-Nordheim injection. The calculated characteristics compare well with measu......The influence of nitride thickness variations on the switching speed of MNOS memory transistors is examined. The switching time constant is calculated as a function of the nitride thickness using a model of modified Fowler-Nordheim injection. The calculated characteristics compare well...

  16. Variation in Payment Rates under Medicare's Inpatient Prospective Payment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, Sam; Ryan, Andrew M; Mijanovich, Tod; Blustein, Jan

    2017-04-01

    To measure variation in payment rates under Medicare's Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) and identify the main payment adjustments that drive variation. Medicare cost reports for all Medicare-certified hospitals, 1987-2013, and Dartmouth Atlas geographic files. We measure the Medicare payment rate as a hospital's total acute inpatient Medicare Part A payment, divided by the standard IPPS payment for its geographic area. We assess variation using several measures, both within local markets and nationally. We perform a factor decomposition to identify the share of variation attributable to specific adjustments. We also describe the characteristics of hospitals receiving different payment rates and evaluate changes in the magnitude of the main adjustments over time. Data downloaded from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Dartmouth Atlas. In 2013, Medicare paid for acute inpatient discharges at a rate 31 percent above the IPPS base. For the top 10 percent of discharges, the mean rate was double the IPPS base. Variations were driven by adjustments for medical education and care to low-income populations. The magnitude of variation has increased over time. Adjustments are a large and growing share of Medicare hospital payments, and they create significant variation in payment rates. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Striking variations in consultation rates with general practice reveal family influence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, M.; Dijk, L. van; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bakker, D.H. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reasons why patients decide to consult a general practitioner vary enormously. While there may be individual reasons for this variation, the family context has a significant and unique influence upon the frequency of individuals' visits. The objective of this study was to explore

  18. Striking variations in consultation rates with general practice reveal family influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, Mieke; Dijk, Liset van; Bosch, Wil J.H.M. van den; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Bakker, Dinny H. de; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The reasons why patients decide to consult a general practitioner vary enormously. While there may be individual reasons for this variation, the family context has a significant and unique influence upon the frequency of individuals' visits. The objective of this study was to explore

  19. The Influence of Circadian Variation on Aetiological Markers of Ankle Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Chris; Marrin, Kelly; Page, Richard; Greig, Matt

    2018-03-15

    Clinical and functional assessments are performed regularly in sporting environments to screen for performance deficits and injury risk. Circadian rhythms have been demonstrated to affect human performance, however the influence of time of day on a battery of multiple ankle injury risk factors has yet to be established within athletic populations. To investigate the influence of circadian variation on a battery of tests, used to screen for ankle aetiological risk factors. Randomised crossover design. University laboratory. Thirty-three semi-professional soccer players (age 24.9 ± 4.4 years; height 1.77 ± 0.17 m; body mass 75.47 ± 7.98 kg) completed three randomized experimental trials (07:00 h, 12:00 h, 19:00 h) Main Outcome Measures: Trials involved the completion of a standardized test battery comprising Biodex Stability System (BSS), Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), isokinetic inversion: eversion ratio, joint position sense, and a drop landing inversion cutting manoeuvre. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significantly (P < 0.05) lower values for all BSS indicia; Overall Stability Index (1.10 ± 0.31 a.u), Anterior-Posterior (0.76 ± 0.21 a.u) and Medio-Lateral (0.68 ± 0.23) at 12:00 h when compared to 07:00 h. (1.30 ± 0.45 a.u; 0.96 ± 0.26 a.u; 0.82 ± 0.40 a.u) respectively. However, no significant (P ≥ 0.05) main effects for time of day were reported for any other test. Circadian influence on ankle aetiological risk factors was task dependent, with measures of proprioception, strength and SEBT displaying no circadian variation, indicating no association between time of day and markers of injury risk. However, the BSS displayed improved performance at midday, indicating postural stability tasks requiring unanticipated movements to display a time of day effect and potential increased injury risk. Consequently, time of testing for this task should be standardized to ensure correct interpretations of assessments and/or interventions.

  20. Methodology for dimensional variation analysis of ITER integrated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, F. Javier; Trouvé, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-Jacques; Reich, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Tokamak dimensional management methodology, based on 3D variation analysis, is presented. • Dimensional Variation Model implementation workflow is described. • Methodology phases are described in detail. The application of this methodology to the tolerance analysis of ITER Vacuum Vessel is presented. • Dimensional studies are a valuable tool for the assessment of Tokamak PCR (Project Change Requests), DR (Deviation Requests) and NCR (Non-Conformance Reports). - Abstract: The ITER machine consists of a large number of complex systems highly integrated, with critical functional requirements and reduced design clearances to minimize the impact in cost and performances. Tolerances and assembly accuracies in critical areas could have a serious impact in the final performances, compromising the machine assembly and plasma operation. The management of tolerances allocated to part manufacture and assembly processes, as well as the control of potential deviations and early mitigation of non-compliances with the technical requirements, is a critical activity on the project life cycle. A 3D tolerance simulation analysis of ITER Tokamak machine has been developed based on 3DCS dedicated software. This integrated dimensional variation model is representative of Tokamak manufacturing functional tolerances and assembly processes, predicting accurate values for the amount of variation on critical areas. This paper describes the detailed methodology to implement and update the Tokamak Dimensional Variation Model. The model is managed at system level. The methodology phases are illustrated by its application to the Vacuum Vessel (VV), considering the status of maturity of VV dimensional variation model. The following topics are described in this paper: • Model description and constraints. • Model implementation workflow. • Management of input and output data. • Statistical analysis and risk assessment. The management of the integration studies based on

  1. Methodology for dimensional variation analysis of ITER integrated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, F. Javier, E-mail: FranciscoJavier.Fuentes@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon—CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Trouvé, Vincent [Assystem Engineering & Operation Services, rue J-M Jacquard CS 60117, 84120 Pertuis (France); Cordier, Jean-Jacques; Reich, Jens [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon—CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Tokamak dimensional management methodology, based on 3D variation analysis, is presented. • Dimensional Variation Model implementation workflow is described. • Methodology phases are described in detail. The application of this methodology to the tolerance analysis of ITER Vacuum Vessel is presented. • Dimensional studies are a valuable tool for the assessment of Tokamak PCR (Project Change Requests), DR (Deviation Requests) and NCR (Non-Conformance Reports). - Abstract: The ITER machine consists of a large number of complex systems highly integrated, with critical functional requirements and reduced design clearances to minimize the impact in cost and performances. Tolerances and assembly accuracies in critical areas could have a serious impact in the final performances, compromising the machine assembly and plasma operation. The management of tolerances allocated to part manufacture and assembly processes, as well as the control of potential deviations and early mitigation of non-compliances with the technical requirements, is a critical activity on the project life cycle. A 3D tolerance simulation analysis of ITER Tokamak machine has been developed based on 3DCS dedicated software. This integrated dimensional variation model is representative of Tokamak manufacturing functional tolerances and assembly processes, predicting accurate values for the amount of variation on critical areas. This paper describes the detailed methodology to implement and update the Tokamak Dimensional Variation Model. The model is managed at system level. The methodology phases are illustrated by its application to the Vacuum Vessel (VV), considering the status of maturity of VV dimensional variation model. The following topics are described in this paper: • Model description and constraints. • Model implementation workflow. • Management of input and output data. • Statistical analysis and risk assessment. The management of the integration studies based on

  2. Influence of common preanalytical variations on the metabolic profile of serum samples in biobanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliniaux, Ophélie; Gaillard, Gwenaelle; Lion, Antoine; Cailleu, Dominique; Mesnard, François; Betsou, Fotini

    2011-01-01

    A blood pre-centrifugation delay of 24 h at room temperature influenced the proton NMR spectroscopic profiles of human serum. A blood pre-centrifugation delay of 24 h at 4°C did not influence the spectroscopic profile as compared with 4 h delays at either room temperature or 4°C. Five or ten serum freeze–thaw cycles also influenced the proton NMR spectroscopic profiles. Certain common in vitro preanalytical variations occurring in biobanks may impact the metabolic profile of human serum.

  3. Influence of common preanalytical variations on the metabolic profile of serum samples in biobanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliniaux, Ophelie [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie EA 3900-BioPI (France); Gaillard, Gwenaelle [Biobanque de Picardie (France); Lion, Antoine [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie EA 3900-BioPI (France); Cailleu, Dominique [Batiment Serres-Transfert, rue de Mai/rue Dallery, Plateforme Analytique (France); Mesnard, Francois, E-mail: francois.mesnard@u-picardie.fr [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie EA 3900-BioPI (France); Betsou, Fotini [Integrated Biobank of Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    2011-12-15

    A blood pre-centrifugation delay of 24 h at room temperature influenced the proton NMR spectroscopic profiles of human serum. A blood pre-centrifugation delay of 24 h at 4 Degree-Sign C did not influence the spectroscopic profile as compared with 4 h delays at either room temperature or 4 Degree-Sign C. Five or ten serum freeze-thaw cycles also influenced the proton NMR spectroscopic profiles. Certain common in vitro preanalytical variations occurring in biobanks may impact the metabolic profile of human serum.

  4. Applications of exterior difference systems to variations in discrete mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zheng; Li Hongbo

    2008-01-01

    In discrete mechanics, difference equations describe the fundamental physical laws and exhibit many geometric properties. Can these equations be obtained in a geometric way? Using some techniques in exterior difference systems, we investigate the discrete variational problem. As an application, we give a positive answer to the above question for the discrete Newton's, Euler-Lagrange, and Hamilton's equations

  5. Influence of variations in creep curve on creep behavior of a high-temperature structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko

    1986-01-01

    It is one of the key issues for a high-temperature structural design guideline to evaluate the influence of variations in creep curve on the creep behavior of a high-temperature structure. In the present paper, a comparative evaluation was made to clarify such influence. Additional consideration was given to the influence of the relationship between creep rupture life and minimum creep rate, i.e., the Monkman-Grant's relationship, on the creep damage evaluation. The consideration suggested that the Monkman-Grant's relationship be taken into account in evaluating the creep damage behavior, especially the creep damage variations. However, it was clarified that the application of the creep damage evaluation rule of ASME B and P.V. Code Case N-47 to the ''standard case'' which was predicted from the average creep property would predict the creep damage on the safe side. (orig./GL)

  6. Mapping genetic influences on the corticospinal motor system in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheeran, B J; Ritter, C; Rothwell, J C

    2009-01-01

    of the contribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and variable number tandem repeats. In humans, the corticospinal motor system is essential to the acquisition of fine manual motor skills which require a finely tuned coordination of activity in distal forelimb muscles. Here we review recent brain mapping......It is becoming increasingly clear that genetic variations account for a certain amount of variance in the acquisition and maintenance of different skills. Until now, several levels of genetic influences were examined, ranging from global heritability estimates down to the analysis...... studies that have begun to explore the influence of functional genetic variation as well as mutations on function and structure of the human corticospinal motor system, and also the clinical implications of these studies. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the primary motor hand area revealed...

  7. Variational discretization of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of simple systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Yoshimura, Hiroaki

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we develop variational integrators for the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of simple closed systems. These integrators are obtained by a discretization of the Lagrangian variational formulation of nonequilibrium thermodynamics developed in (Gay-Balmaz and Yoshimura 2017a J. Geom. Phys. part I 111 169–93 Gay-Balmaz and Yoshimura 2017b J. Geom. Phys. part II 111 194–212) and thus extend the variational integrators of Lagrangian mechanics, to include irreversible processes. In the continuous setting, we derive the structure preserving property of the flow of such systems. This property is an extension of the symplectic property of the flow of the Euler–Lagrange equations. In the discrete setting, we show that the discrete flow solution of our numerical scheme verifies a discrete version of this property. We also present the regularity conditions which ensure the existence of the discrete flow. We finally illustrate our discrete variational schemes with the implementation of an example of a simple and closed system.

  8. THE AZYGOS VENOUS SYSTEM AND ITS ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiki Sudhakara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Azygos veins are important cavocaval and portacaval junctions, which form a collateral circulation in caval vein occlusion and in portal hypertension, cirrhosis of liver. The unpaired azygos venous system consists of azygos vein, hemiazygos vein and accessory azygos vein. This system of veins, along with its mediastinal, bronchial and oesophageal tributaries drains most of the body wall of trunk, namely posterior abdominal and thoracic wall. Anatomical variations of this unpaired azygos venous system are clinically important. AIMS To study and report the occurrence of anatomical variations of the unpaired azygos venous system in the region of East Godavari District, Andhra Pradesh (India. METHODS The present study was carried out in the Department of Anatomy, KIMS & RF, Amalapuram and G.S.L. Medical College, Rajahmundry over a period of 2 years. The present study was conducted on 60 cadavers (irrespective of age and sex. The entire course of the azygos venous system in these 60 cadavers was carefully observed and documented. RESULTS Anatomical variations were present in 16.66% of cases, out of which three distinct types were identified. 6.6% exhibited two separate azygos venous systems with no communications, 5% with communication between the left brachiocephalic vein and the azygos vein and 5% presence of post-aortic venous channels. CONCLUSION Variations of azygos venous system may be wrongly dubbed as aneurysm, lymphadenopathy or other abnormalities while reporting a CT scan of mediastinum. Venous anomalies are also detected only during surgery. The most troublesome intraoperative hazard is haemorrhage, which is mainly of venous origin. To avoid such situations is to have an awareness and knowledge of the expected venous anomalies.

  9. On the foundation of a variational principle for decaying systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szasz, G.I.

    1976-01-01

    Taking into account the circumstances that the decay of an unstable microscopic system into two fragments is established by the counting of one of the decay products in a detector, the observed exponential decay law then asserts only knowledge of the spatiotemporal behaviour of the probability density (and therewith knowledge of the decaying state) at a large finite distance from the site of decay. We therefore formulate a variational principle, of which stationary functions show this decay behaviour. In addition to the resonant wave functions there are also solutions of the variational principle, which decrease exponentially with increasing distance, i.e., functions which could be used to describe the bound states. As the time-dependent treatment shows, the decaying states cannot occur in isolation in a scattering process. The mathematical characterisation of the decaying states via a variational principle is incorporated in a theory of open physical systems. In contradiction to the variational principle of Schroedinger our principle does not provide complete knowledge of the quantum states, but this is not needed in order to describe the decay. (orig.) [de

  10. Assessment of Radiation Background Variation for Moving Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rennie, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toevs, James Waldo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Darrin J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abhold, Mark Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-13

    The introduction points out that radiation backgrounds fluctuate across very short distances: factors include geology, soil composition, altitude, building structures, topography, and other manmade structures; and asphalt and concrete can vary significantly over short distances. Brief descriptions are given of the detection system, experimental setup, and background variation measurements. It is concluded that positive and negative gradients can greatly reduce the detection sensitivity of an MDS: negative gradients create opportunities for false negatives (nondetection), and positive gradients create a potentially unacceptable FAR (above 1%); the location of use for mobile detection is important to understand; spectroscopic systems provide more information for screening out false alarms and may be preferred for mobile use; and mobile monitor testing at LANL accounts for expected variations in the background.

  11. A variational method in out-of-equilibrium physical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Mario J

    2013-12-09

    We propose a new variational principle for out-of-equilibrium dynamic systems that are fundamentally based on the method of Lagrange multipliers applied to the total entropy of an ensemble of particles. However, we use the fundamental equation of thermodynamics on differential forms, considering U and S as 0-forms. We obtain a set of two first order differential equations that reveal the same formal symplectic structure shared by classical mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. From this approach, a topological torsion current emerges of the form , where Aj and ωk denote the components of the vector potential (gravitational and/or electromagnetic) and where ω denotes the angular velocity of the accelerated frame. We derive a special form of the Umov-Poynting theorem for rotating gravito-electromagnetic systems. The variational method is then applied to clarify the working mechanism of particular devices.

  12. Daily variation of the radon concentration indoors and outdoors and the influence of meteorological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Butterweck, G.; Reineking, A.

    1994-01-01

    Series of continuous radon measurements in the open atmosphere and in a dwelling, including the parallel measurement of meteorological parameters, were performed over a period of several weeks. The radon concentration in indoor and outdoor air depends on meteorological conditions. In the open atmosphere the radon concentration varies between 1 and 100 Bq m -3 , depending on weather conditions and time of day. During time periods of low turbulent air exchange (high pressure weather with clear night sky), especially in the night and early morning hours (night inversion layer), the diurnal variation of the radon concentration showed a pronounced maximum. Cloudy and windy weather conditions yield a small diurnal variation of the radon concentration. Indoors, the average level and the diurnal variation of the indoor radon concentration is also influenced by meteorological conditions. The measurements are consistent with a dependence of indoor radon concentrations on indoor-outdoor pressure differences. 11 refs., 4 figs

  13. Example Solar Electric Propulsion System asteroid tours using variational calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Exploration of the asteroid belt with a vehicle utilizing a Solar Electric Propulsion System has been proposed in past studies. Some of those studies illustrated multiple asteroid rendezvous with trajectories obtained using approximate methods. Most of the inadequacies of those approximations are overcome in this paper, which uses the calculus of variations to calculate the trajectories and associated payloads of four asteroid tours. The modeling, equations, and solution techniques are discussed, followed by a presentation of the results.

  14. The influence of different space-related physiological variations on exercise capacity determined by oxygen uptake kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, J.

    Oxygen uptake kinetics, following defined variations of work load changes allow to estimate the contribution of aerob and anaerob energy supply which is the base for determining work capacity. Under the aspect of long duration missions with application of adequate dosed countermeasures, a reliable estimate of the astronaut's work capacity is important to adjust the necessary inflight training. Since the kinetics of oxygen uptake originate in the working muscle group itself, while measurements are performed at the mouth, various influences within the oxygen transport system might disturb the determinations. There are not only detraining effects but also well-known other influences, such as blood- and fluid shifts induced by weightlessness. They might have an impact on the circulatory system. Some of these factors have been simulated by immersion, blood donation, and changing of the body position.

  15. Patient-specific factors influence somatic variation patterns in von Hippel?Lindau disease renal tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Suzanne S.; Mitchell, Asia D.; Heskett, Michael B.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; S?nmez, Kemal; Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development is presumed to be an evolutionary process that is influenced by genetic background and environment. In laboratory animals, genetics and environment are variables that can largely be held constant. In humans, it is possible to compare independent tumours that have developed in the same patient, effectively constraining genetic and environmental variation and leaving only stochastic processes. Patients affected with von Hippel?Lindau disease are at risk of developing multiple...

  16. Dynamic influences of wind power on the power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    The thesis first presents the basics influences of wind power on the power system stability and quality by pointing out the main power quality issues of wind power in a small-scale case and following, the expected large-scale problems are introduced. Secondly, a dynamic wind turbine model that supports power quality assessment of wind turbines is presented. Thirdly, an aggregate wind farm model that support power quality and stability analysis from large wind farms is presented. The aggregate wind farm model includes the smoothing of the relative power fluctuation from a wind farm compared to a single wind turbine. Finally, applications of the aggregate wind farm model to the power systems are presented. The power quality and stability characteristics influenced by large-scale wind power are illustrated with three cases. In this thesis, special emphasis has been given to appropriate models to represent the wind acting on wind farms. The wind speed model to a single wind turbine includes turbulence and tower shadow effects from the wind and the rotational sampling turbulence due to the rotation of the blades. In a park scale, the wind speed model to the wind farm includes the spatial coherence between different wind turbines. Here the wind speed model is applied to a constant rotational speed wind turbine/farm, but the model is suitable to variable speed wind turbine/farm as well. The cases presented here illustrate the influences of the wind power on the power system quality and stability. The flicker and frequency deviations are the main power quality parameters presented. The power system stability concentrates on the voltage stability and on the power system oscillations. From the cases studied, voltage and the frequency variations were smaller than expected from the large-scale wind power integration due to the low spatial correlation of the wind speed. The voltage quality analysed in a Brazilian power system and in the Nordel power system from connecting large

  17. Seasonal temperature variation influences climate suitability for dengue, chikungunya, and Zika transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, John H; Childs, Marissa L; Caldwell, Jamie M; Mordecai, Erin A

    2018-05-01

    Dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus epidemics transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes have recently (re)emerged and spread throughout the Americas, Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and elsewhere. Understanding how environmental conditions affect epidemic dynamics is critical for predicting and responding to the geographic and seasonal spread of disease. Specifically, we lack a mechanistic understanding of how seasonal variation in temperature affects epidemic magnitude and duration. Here, we develop a dynamic disease transmission model for dengue virus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that integrates mechanistic, empirically parameterized, and independently validated mosquito and virus trait thermal responses under seasonally varying temperatures. We examine the influence of seasonal temperature mean, variation, and temperature at the start of the epidemic on disease dynamics. We find that at both constant and seasonally varying temperatures, warmer temperatures at the start of epidemics promote more rapid epidemics due to faster burnout of the susceptible population. By contrast, intermediate temperatures (24-25°C) at epidemic onset produced the largest epidemics in both constant and seasonally varying temperature regimes. When seasonal temperature variation was low, 25-35°C annual average temperatures produced the largest epidemics, but this range shifted to cooler temperatures as seasonal temperature variation increased (analogous to previous results for diurnal temperature variation). Tropical and sub-tropical cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Fortaleza, and Salvador, Brazil; Cali, Cartagena, and Barranquilla, Colombia; Delhi, India; Guangzhou, China; and Manila, Philippines have mean annual temperatures and seasonal temperature ranges that produced the largest epidemics. However, more temperate cities like Shanghai, China had high epidemic suitability because large seasonal variation offset moderate annual average temperatures. By accounting for seasonal

  18. Seasonal temperature variation influences climate suitability for dengue, chikungunya, and Zika transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Huber

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue, chikungunya, and Zika virus epidemics transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes have recently (reemerged and spread throughout the Americas, Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and elsewhere. Understanding how environmental conditions affect epidemic dynamics is critical for predicting and responding to the geographic and seasonal spread of disease. Specifically, we lack a mechanistic understanding of how seasonal variation in temperature affects epidemic magnitude and duration. Here, we develop a dynamic disease transmission model for dengue virus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that integrates mechanistic, empirically parameterized, and independently validated mosquito and virus trait thermal responses under seasonally varying temperatures. We examine the influence of seasonal temperature mean, variation, and temperature at the start of the epidemic on disease dynamics. We find that at both constant and seasonally varying temperatures, warmer temperatures at the start of epidemics promote more rapid epidemics due to faster burnout of the susceptible population. By contrast, intermediate temperatures (24-25°C at epidemic onset produced the largest epidemics in both constant and seasonally varying temperature regimes. When seasonal temperature variation was low, 25-35°C annual average temperatures produced the largest epidemics, but this range shifted to cooler temperatures as seasonal temperature variation increased (analogous to previous results for diurnal temperature variation. Tropical and sub-tropical cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Fortaleza, and Salvador, Brazil; Cali, Cartagena, and Barranquilla, Colombia; Delhi, India; Guangzhou, China; and Manila, Philippines have mean annual temperatures and seasonal temperature ranges that produced the largest epidemics. However, more temperate cities like Shanghai, China had high epidemic suitability because large seasonal variation offset moderate annual average temperatures. By accounting

  19. Probabilistic frequency variations of structure-soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.W.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    During earthquakes, structure-soil systems act as filters greatly amplifying the response of equipment whose frequencies are at or near their natural frequencies. Thus, the estimation of these structure-soil system frequencies assumes significant importance both for safety and cost. Actual in-situ frequencies of structures differ from calculated frequencies due both to variations in mathematical modelling techniques and to variations of material properties. This paper studies the second source only. This variability is usually gauged by the 'worst case' analyses technique in which extreme high- and low- parameter values are assumed and the associated frequencies are used as upper and lower bounds. This approach is not entirely satisfactory because it does not provide any indication of the probability of these limits being exceeded, of the distribution between these limits, or of the level of conservation introduced into the design process. The present approach provides this additional information. The emphasis in this part is both on developing the methodology and on the results obtained. It covers both the fixed-base structure and the effects of soil-structure interaction. Empirical data on concrete proerties were obtained from previously published results. Much less is known about variability of soil properties, so the soil structure interaction coefficients are assumed to be normally distributed. As data on the variation of soil properties become available, they can be readily incorporated via the methodology developed here. (Auth.)

  20. The processing of Brazilian Portuguese anaphora and the influence of dialectal variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cláudia Mesquita Lacerda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate whether different types of recovery [se, Ø, ele(a] may influence the coreferential processing of reflective structures, relating to these, the semantics of the verbal predicate. To verify whether the dialectal variation of the use of anaphora “se” (use, removal, and replacement could influence the processing of these structures, we performed a self-paced reading experiment in Minas Gerais and Paraíba. The results showed a significant effect on the type of retrieval, indicating the possibility of the influence of verb type. It is believed that syntactic constraints of the Binding theory (Chomsky, 1981 were activated in early stages of processing (NICOL; SWINNEY, 1989, however, the interpretability from the verbal semantics and the discursive question related to usage factors (range meant that there was a re-examination by the parser.

  1. Variation in the Breeding System of Prunella vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Luping; Widrlechner, Mark P

    2011-05-01

    Prunella vulgaris (Lamiaceae), commonly known as selfheal, is a perennial herb with a long history of use in traditional medicine. Recent studies have found that P. vulgaris possesses anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antibacterial properties, and it is likely that this will lead to increased commercial demand for this species. To date, research publications on P. vulgaris cultivation and genetics are scarce. Using accessions originally collected from different geographical regions, we investigated the breeding system of this species by observing variation in floral morphology, time of pollen release, and selfed-seed set in bagged flowers and isolated plants. Two types of floral morphology, one with exerted styles, extending past open corollas when viewed from above, and the other with shorter, inserted styles, were found among 30 accessions. Two accessions originally collected from Asia uniformly displayed exerted styles, and 27 accessions had inserted styles. One accession from Oregon displayed variation in this trait among individual plants. Microscopic observation of seven accessions, including ones with both exerted and inserted styles, revealed that they all release pollen to some degree before the flowers open. Using bagged flowers, we found that selfed-seed set varied widely among eight accessions, ranging from 6% to 94%. However, bagging may underestimate seed set for some accessions. The two accessions with the lowest rates when using bagged flowers increased in seed set by 350% and 158%, respectively, when we evaluated single, unbagged plants in isolation cages. The accession with 6% selfed-seed set when bagged also had exerted styles. These findings suggest that mating systems in P. vulgaris may be in the process of evolutionary change and that understanding breeding-system variation should be useful in developing efficient seed-regeneration protocols and breeding and selection strategies for this species.

  2. Genetic Variation in Functional Traits Influences Arthropod Community Composition in Aspen (Populus tremula L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathryn M.; Ingvarsson, Pär K.; Jansson, Stefan; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores. PMID:22662190

  3. Genetic variation in functional traits influences arthropod community composition in aspen (Populus tremula L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Robinson

    Full Text Available We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

  4. Nonterminals, homomorphisms and codings in different variations of OL-systems. II. Nondeterministic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Rozenberg, Grzegorz; Salomaa, Arto

    1974-01-01

    Continuing the work begun in Part I of this paper, we consider now variations of nondeterministic OL-systems. The present Part II of the paper contains a systematic classification of the effect of nonterminals, codings, weak codings, nonerasing homomorphisms and homomorphisms for all basic variat...

  5. The influence of chromosome density variations on the increase in nuclear disorder strength in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Soo; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic structural changes have long been observed in cancer cells and used as a marker in cancer diagnosis. Recent development of an optical technique, partial-wave spectroscopy (PWS), enabled more sensitive detection of nanoscale structural changes in early carcinogenesis in terms of the disorder strength related to density variations. These nanoscale alterations precede the well-known microscopic morphological changes. We investigate the influence of nuclear density variations due to chromosome condensation on changes of disorder strength by computer simulations of model chromosomes. Nuclear configurations with different degrees of chromosome condensation are realized from simulations of decondensing chromosomes and the disorder strength is calculated for these nuclear configurations. We found that the disorder strength increases significantly for configurations with slightly more condensed chromosomes. Coupled with PWS measurements, the simulation results suggest that the chromosome condensation and the resulting spatial density inhomogeneity may represent one of the earliest events in carcinogenesis

  6. Causes and consequences of range size variation: the influence of traits, speciation, and extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Vamosi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous variation in species richness observed among related clades across the tree of life has long caught the imagination of biologists. Recently, there has been growing attention paid to the possible contribution of range size variation, either alone or in combination with putative key innovations, to these patterns. Here, we review three related topics relevant to range size evolution, speciation, and extinction. First, we provide a brief overview of the debate surrounding patterns and mechanisms for phylogenetic signal in range size. Second, we discuss some recent findings regarding the joint influence of traits and range size on diversification. Finally, we present the preliminary results of a study investigating whether range size is negatively correlated with contemporary extinction risk in flowering plants.

  7. Surgeon Influence on Variation in Receipt of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy for Women With Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma; Hofer, Timothy P

    2018-01-01

    Rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) have markedly increased but we know little about the influence of surgeons on variability of the procedure in the community. To quantify the influence of the attending surgeon on rates of CPM and clinician attitudes that explained it. In this population-based survey study, we identified 7810 women with stages 0 to II breast cancer treated in 2013 to 2015 through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries of Georgia and Los Angeles County. Surveys were sent approximately 2 months after surgery. Surveys were also sent to 488 attending surgeons identified by the patients. We conducted multilevel analyses to examine the impact of surgeon influence on variations in patient receipt of CPM using information from patient and surgeon surveys merged to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. A total of 5080 women responded to the survey (70% response rate), and 377 surgeons responded (77% response rate). The mean (SD) age of responding women was 61.9 (11) years; 28% had an increased risk of second primary cancer, and 16% received CPM. Half of surgeons (52%) practiced for more than 20 years and 30% treated more than 50 new patients with breast cancer annually. Attending surgeon explained a large amount (20%) of the variation in CPM, controlling for patient factors. The odds of a patient receiving CPM increased almost 3-fold (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.1-3.4) if she saw a surgeon with a practice approach 1 SD above a surgeon with the mean CPM rate (independent of age, diagnosis date, BRCA status, and risk of second primary). One-quarter (25%) of the surgeon influence was explained by attending attitudes about initial recommendations for surgery and responses to patient requests for CPM. The estimated rate of CPM was 34% for surgeons who least favored initial breast conservation and were least reluctant to perform CPM vs 4% for surgeons who most favored initial breast conservation and were most

  8. Experimental study of the influence of flow passage subtle variation on mixed-flow pump performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Hao; Cao, Shuliang

    2014-05-01

    In the mixed-flow pump design, the shape of the flow passage can directly affect the flow capacity and the internal flow, thus influencing hydraulic performance, cavitation performance and operation stability of the mixed-flow pump. However, there is currently a lack of experimental research on the influence mechanism. Therefore, in order to analyze the effects of subtle variations of the flow passage on the mixed-flow pump performance, the frustum cone surface of the end part of inlet contraction flow passage of the mixed-flow pump is processed into a cylindrical surface and a test rig is built to carry out the hydraulic performance experiment. In this experiment, parameters, such as the head, the efficiency, and the shaft power, are measured, and the pressure fluctuation and the noise signal are also collected. The research results suggest that after processing the inlet flow passage, the head of the mixed-flow pump significantly goes down; the best efficiency of the mixed-flow pump drops by approximately 1.5%, the efficiency decreases more significantly under the large flow rate; the shaft power slightly increases under the large flow rate, slightly decreases under the small flow rate. In addition, the pressure fluctuation amplitudes on both the impeller inlet and the diffuser outlet increase significantly with more drastic pressure fluctuations and significantly lower stability of the internal flow of the mixed-flow pump. At the same time, the noise dramatically increases. Overall speaking, the subtle variation of the inlet flow passage leads to a significant change of the mixed-flow pump performance, thus suggesting a special attention to the optimization of flow passage. This paper investigates the influence of the flow passage variation on the mixed-flow pump performance by experiment, which will benefit the optimal design of the flow passage of the mixed-flow pump.

  9. On the influence of moisture and load variations on the strength behavior of wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: It is demonstrated in this paper that the influence of moisture- and load variations on lifetime and residual strength (re-cycle strength) of wood can be considered by theories previously developed by the author. The common, controlling factor is creep, which can be modified very easily...... by introducing a special moisture dependent relaxation time in the well-known Power-Law creep expression. Because basic failure mechanisms in wood are invariant with respect to loading modes, it is suggested that a number of methods used in design of wood structures can be generalized/simplified to apply...

  10. Influences of spatial and temporal variation on fish-habitat relationships defined by regression quantiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, J.B.; Cade, B.S.; Terrell, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    We used regression quantiles to model potentially limiting relationships between the standing crop of cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki and measures of stream channel morphology. Regression quantile models indicated that variation in fish density was inversely related to the width:depth ratio of streams but not to stream width or depth alone. The spatial and temporal stability of model predictions were examined across years and streams, respectively. Variation in fish density with width:depth ratio (10th-90th regression quantiles) modeled for streams sampled in 1993-1997 predicted the variation observed in 1998-1999, indicating similar habitat relationships across years. Both linear and nonlinear models described the limiting relationships well, the latter performing slightly better. Although estimated relationships were transferable in time, results were strongly dependent on the influence of spatial variation in fish density among streams. Density changes with width:depth ratio in a single stream were responsible for the significant (P 80th). This suggests that stream-scale factors other than width:depth ratio play a more direct role in determining population density. Much of the variation in densities of cutthroat trout among streams was attributed to the occurrence of nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (a possible competitor) or connectivity to migratory habitats. Regression quantiles can be useful for estimating the effects of limiting factors when ecological responses are highly variable, but our results indicate that spatiotemporal variability in the data should be explicitly considered. In this study, data from individual streams and stream-specific characteristics (e.g., the occurrence of nonnative species and habitat connectivity) strongly affected our interpretation of the relationship between width:depth ratio and fish density.

  11. A Variational Approach to the Modeling of MIMO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jraifi A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of the optimization of the quality of service for multiple input multiple output (MIMO systems in 3G (third generation, we develop a method for modeling MIMO channel . This method, which uses a statistical approach, is based on a variational form of the usual channel equation. The proposed equation is given by with scalar variable . Minimum distance of received vectors is used as the random variable to model MIMO channel. This variable is of crucial importance for the performance of the transmission system as it captures the degree of interference between neighbors vectors. Then, we use this approach to compute numerically the total probability of errors with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and then predict the numbers of antennas. By fixing SNR variable to a specific value, we extract informations on the optimal numbers of MIMO antennas.

  12. Ionic interactions in biological and physical systems: a variational treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry is about chemical reactions. Chemistry is about electrons changing their configurations as atoms and molecules react. Chemistry has for more than a century studied reactions as if they occurred in ideal conditions of infinitely dilute solutions. But most reactions occur in salt solutions that are not ideal. In those solutions everything (charged) interacts with everything else (charged) through the electric field, which is short and long range extending to the boundaries of the system. Mathematics has recently been developed to deal with interacting systems of this sort. The variational theory of complex fluids has spawned the theory of liquid crystals (or vice versa). In my view, ionic solutions should be viewed as complex fluids, particularly in the biological and engineering context. In both biology and electrochemistry ionic solutions are mixtures highly concentrated (to approximately 10 M) where they are most important, near electrodes, nucleic ids, proteins, active sites of enzymes, and ionic channels. Ca2+ is always involved in biological solutions because the concentration (really free energy per mole) of Ca2+ in a particular location is the signal that controls many biological functions. Such interacting systems are not simple fluids, and it is no wonder that analysis of interactions, such as the Hofmeister series, rooted in that tradition has not succeeded as one would hope. Here, we present a variational treatment of ard spheres in a frictional dielectric with the hope that such a treatment of an lectrolyte as a complex fluid will be productive. The theory automatically extends to spatially nonuniform boundary conditions and the nonequilibrium systems and flows they produce. The theory is unavoidably self-consistent since differential equations are derived (not assumed) from models of (Helmholtz free) nergy and dissipation of the electrolyte. The origin of the Hofmeister series is (in my view) an inverse problem that becomes well posed when

  13. Influence of Information Systems on Business Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrij Lipaj

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering increased competition nowadays, businesses strive to gain competitive advantage, increase their economic indicators, work productivity and efficiency, reduce costs and get other benefits through implementation of integrated information systems. By improving internal processes and financial performance of the company, the general business performance could be influenced by the deployment of such information system (IS. In order to identify tangible and intangible benefits of IS implementation, influence on business performance, business processes and areas that are being affected, analysis of scientific literature, research synthesis and generalizations have been made.

  14. Examining Water Quality Variations of Tidal Pond System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T. F. M.; Cui, W.

    2014-12-01

    Brackish tidal shrimp ponds, traditionally referred to as gei wais, have been constructed along coastal areas in many parts of the world. The regular exchange of pond water with the surrounding coastal environment is important as it brings shrimp larvae and nutrients, etc. into and out of the pond. Such a water exchange can reduce the quality of the receiving waters; though there are opposing views recently because farming practices are becoming more sustainable while other sources of pollutions in the surroundings are increasing. This project monitors the water quality of a tidal shrimp pond and its receiving water at high temporal resolution. The pond is located within the wetland complex of Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong, China. Water quality parameters (i.e., dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, pH, water depth and chlorophyll) were recorded at 15-minute interval from December 2013 to March 2014 within the pond and also at its receiving water which is a water channel within a mangrove forest. Data reveals both daily and fortnightly fluctuations. Daily variations in mangrove correspond to both tidal flushing and insolation, whereas those within the pond correspond mainly to insolation. For example, dissolved oxygen in mangrove shows two peaks daily which correlate with tidal elevation, and that within the pond shows only one peak which correlates with sunlight. Dissolved oxygen within the pond also shows a fortnightly pattern that corresponds to the schedule of water exchange. Such high temporal resolution of monitoring reveals the two-way water quality influences between the pond and the mangrove. It sheds insights that can possibly lead to refinement of water exchange practice and water sampling schedule given the temporal variations of the water quality both inside and outside the pond. It thus enables us to take a step closer in adopting more sustainable farming practices despite increasing pollution in the surrounding areas.

  15. Behavioral adjustments of African herbivores to predation risk by lions: spatiotemporal variations influence habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeix, M; Loveridge, A J; Chamaillé-Jammes, S; Davidson, Z; Murindagomo, F; Fritz, H; Macdonald, D W

    2009-01-01

    Predators may influence their prey populations not only through direct lethal effects, but also through indirect behavioral changes. Here, we combined spatiotemporal fine-scale data from GPS radio collars on lions with habitat use information on 11 African herbivores in Hwange National Park (Zimbabwe) to test whether the risk of predation by lions influenced the distribution of herbivores in the landscape. Effects of long-term risk of predation (likelihood of lion presence calculated over four months) and short-term risk of predation (actual presence of lions in the vicinity in the preceding 24 hours) were contrasted. The long-term risk of predation by lions appeared to influence the distributions of all browsers across the landscape, but not of grazers. This result strongly suggests that browsers and grazers, which face different ecological constraints, are influenced at different spatial and temporal scales in the variation of the risk of predation by lions. The results also show that all herbivores tend to use more open habitats preferentially when lions are in their vicinity, probably an effective anti-predator behavior against such an ambush predator. Behaviorally induced effects of lions may therefore contribute significantly to structuring African herbivore communities, and hence possibly their effects on savanna ecosystems.

  16. NDVI-Based analysis on the influence of human activities on vegetation variation on Hainan Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongxia; Dai, Shengpei; Xie, Zhenghui; Fang, Jihua

    2018-02-01

    Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) dataset, we analyzed the predicted NDVI values variation and the influence of human activities on vegetation on Hainan Island during 2001-2015. We investigated the roles of human activities in vegetation variation, particularly from 2002 when implemented the Grain-for-Greenprogram on Hainan Island. The trend analysis, linear regression model and residual analysis were used to analyze the data. The results of the study showed that (1) The predicted vegetation on Hainan Island showed an general upward trend with a linear growth rate of 0.0025/10y (phuman activities. (3) In general, human activities had played a positive role in the vegetation increase on Hainan Island, and the residual NDVI trend of this region showed positive outcomes for vegetation variation after implementing ecological engineering projects. However, it indicated a growing risk of vegetation degradation in the coastal region of Hainan Island as a result of rapid urbanization, land reclamation.

  17. The influence of population characteristics on variation in general practice based morbidity estimations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Dungen C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practice based registration networks (GPRNs provide information on morbidity rates in the population. Morbidity rate estimates from different GPRNs, however, reveal considerable, unexplained differences. We studied the range and variation in morbidity estimates, as well as the extent to which the differences in morbidity rates between general practices and networks change if socio-demographic characteristics of the listed patient populations are taken into account. Methods The variation in incidence and prevalence rates of thirteen diseases among six Dutch GPRNs and the influence of age, gender, socio economic status (SES, urbanization level, and ethnicity are analyzed using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Results are expressed in median odds ratios (MOR. Results We observed large differences in morbidity rate estimates both on the level of general practices as on the level of networks. The differences in SES, urbanization level and ethnicity distribution among the networks' practice populations are substantial. The variation in morbidity rate estimates among networks did not decrease after adjusting for these socio-demographic characteristics. Conclusion Socio-demographic characteristics of populations do not explain the differences in morbidity estimations among GPRNs.

  18. Lead in Chinese villager house dust: Geographical variation and influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan; Yang, Wenlin

    2015-01-01

    House dust has been recognized as an important contributor to Pb exposure of children. Here we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate geographical variation of Pb in Chinese villager house dust. The influences of outdoor soil Pb concentrations, dates of construction, house decoration materials, heating types, and site specific pollution on Pb concentrations in house dust were evaluated. The concentrations of Pb in 477 house dust samples collected from twenty eight areas throughout China varied from 12 to 2510 mg/kg, with a median concentration of 42 mg/kg. The median Pb concentrations in different geographical areas ranged from 16 (Zhangjiakou, Hebei) to 195 mg/kg (Loudi, Hunan). No correlations were found between the house dust Pb concentrations and the age of houses, as well as house decoration materials. Whereas outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution may be potential Pb sources. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed that elemental compositions of the house dust were controlled by both anthropogenic and geogenic sources. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the Pb bearing particles in the house dust were also studied. - Highlights: • Geographical variation in house dust Pb concentrations were observed. • Dust Pb concentrations were not associated with house age and decoration materials. • Soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution were potential Pb sources. • Pb bearing particles were identified by SEM-EDX. - The variations of Pb in Chinese villager house dust were controlled by outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution sources.

  19. Big bees do a better job: intraspecific size variation influences pollination effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Willmer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available 1. Bumblebees (Bombus spp. are efficient pollinators of many flowering plants, yet the pollen deposition performance of individual bees has not been investigated. Worker bumblebees exhibit large intraspecific and intra-nest size variation, in contrast with other eusocial bees; and their size influences collection and deposition of pollen grains. 2. Laboratory studies with B. terrestris workers and Vinca minor flowers showed that pollination effectiveness PE, as measured from pollen grains deposited on stigmas in single visits (SVD, was significantly positively related to bee size; larger bees deposited more grains, while the smallest individuals, with proportionally shorter tongues, were unable to collect or deposit pollen in these flowers. Individuals did not increase their pollen deposition over time, so handling experience does not influence SVD in Vinca minor. 3. Field studies using Geranium sanguineum and Echium vulgare, and multiple visiting species, confirmed that individual size affects SVD. All bumblebee species showed positive SVD/size effects, though even the smallest individuals did deposit pollen. Apis with its limited size variation showed no such detectable effect when visiting Geranium flowers. Two abundant hoverfly species also showed size effects, particularly when feeding for nectar on Echium. 4. Mean size of foragers also varied diurnally, with larger individuals active earlier and later, so that pollination effectiveness varies through a day; flowers routinely pollinated by bees may best be served by early morning dehiscence and visits from larger individuals. 5. Thus, while there are well-documented species-level variations in pollination effectiveness, the fine-scale individual differences between foragers should also be taken into account when assessing the reproductive outputs of biotically-pollinated plants.

  20. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS FOR INCLINED AND RETROGRADE EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-01-01

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0 deg. 170 deg. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45 deg., becoming approximately constant for 45 deg. 135 deg. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0 deg. to 180 deg., whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135 deg. < i ≤ 180 deg.), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  1. Temporal variation of pharmaceuticals in an urban and agriculturally influenced stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veach, Allison M.; Bernot, Melody J.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals have become ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Previous studies consistently demonstrate the prevalence of pharmaceuticals in freshwater but we do not yet know how concentrations vary over time within a given system. Two sites in central Indiana with varying land use in the surrounding watershed (suburban and agricultural) were sampled monthly for pharmaceutical concentrations and stream physiochemical parameters. Sediment samples were also collected at each sampling event for measurement of δ 15 N natural abundance and sediment organic content. Across sites and sampling events, twelve pharmaceuticals were detected including acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, cotinine, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, triclosan, and trimethoprim. Sulfathiazole, lincomycin, and tylosin were not detected at either site at any time. The agriculturally-influenced site had comparable pharmaceutical concentrations to the urban-influenced site. In general, pharmaceutical concentrations increased during winter at both sites and decreased during spring and summer. Multiple regression analyses indicated that water column dissolved oxygen, the number of days since precipitation, and solar radiation influenced total pharmaceutical concentration in the urban-influenced site; whereas pH, chlorophyll a concentration, and total amount of rainfall in the previous 10 days influenced total pharmaceutical concentrations in the agriculturally-influenced site. Pharmaceutical concentrations were not correlated with sediment δ 15 N across or within sites. However, sediment in the urban-influenced site had higher mean δ 15 N signatures relative to sediment in the agriculturally-influenced site. These data indicate pharmaceuticals are persistent in aquatic ecosystems influenced by both agricultural and suburban activity. Pharmaceuticals are designed to have a physiological effect; therefore, it is

  2. Temporal variation of pharmaceuticals in an urban and agriculturally influenced stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veach, Allison M., E-mail: amveach@k-state.edu; Bernot, Melody J., E-mail: mjbernot@bsu.edu

    2011-10-01

    Pharmaceuticals have become ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Previous studies consistently demonstrate the prevalence of pharmaceuticals in freshwater but we do not yet know how concentrations vary over time within a given system. Two sites in central Indiana with varying land use in the surrounding watershed (suburban and agricultural) were sampled monthly for pharmaceutical concentrations and stream physiochemical parameters. Sediment samples were also collected at each sampling event for measurement of {delta}{sup 15}N natural abundance and sediment organic content. Across sites and sampling events, twelve pharmaceuticals were detected including acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, cotinine, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, triclosan, and trimethoprim. Sulfathiazole, lincomycin, and tylosin were not detected at either site at any time. The agriculturally-influenced site had comparable pharmaceutical concentrations to the urban-influenced site. In general, pharmaceutical concentrations increased during winter at both sites and decreased during spring and summer. Multiple regression analyses indicated that water column dissolved oxygen, the number of days since precipitation, and solar radiation influenced total pharmaceutical concentration in the urban-influenced site; whereas pH, chlorophyll a concentration, and total amount of rainfall in the previous 10 days influenced total pharmaceutical concentrations in the agriculturally-influenced site. Pharmaceutical concentrations were not correlated with sediment {delta}{sup 15}N across or within sites. However, sediment in the urban-influenced site had higher mean {delta}{sup 15}N signatures relative to sediment in the agriculturally-influenced site. These data indicate pharmaceuticals are persistent in aquatic ecosystems influenced by both agricultural and suburban activity. Pharmaceuticals are designed to have a physiological

  3. An expert system for microbiologically influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, C.E.; Licina, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a damage mechanism that can cause serious degradation of service water system components. MIC can be particularly insidious since damage can occur very quickly, even in environments otherwise resistant to corrosion. Plant operations or maintenance personnel or system engineers typically do not have sufficient expertise to predict when and where MIC may occur or what methods of treatment are effective. An expert system (MICPro) has been devised which provides a tool for utilities to predict where MIC will occur, which systems or components are most susceptible, how operating parameters may affect vulnerability, and how to implement corrective and preventative measures. The system is designed to be simple to use: required inputs are common system parameters and results are presented as numbers from 1 to 10 indicating the likelihood of damage due to the given input. In this paper the structure and operation of the system is described, and future refinements are discussed

  4. Global biogeography of mating system variation in seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, David A; Briscoe Runquist, Ryan D; Moe, Annika M; Geber, Monica A; Goodwillie, Carol; Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier; Eckert, Christopher G; Elle, Elizabeth; Johnston, Mark O; Kalisz, Susan; Ree, Richard H; Sargent, Risa D; Vallejo-Marin, Mario; Winn, Alice A

    2017-03-01

    Latitudinal gradients in biotic interactions have been suggested as causes of global patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation. Plant biologists have long speculated that outcrossing mating systems are more common at low than high latitudes owing to a greater predictability of plant-pollinator interactions in the tropics; however, these ideas have not previously been tested. Here, we present the first global biogeographic analysis of plant mating systems based on 624 published studies from 492 taxa. We found a weak decline in outcrossing rate towards higher latitudes and among some biomes, but no biogeographic patterns in the frequency of self-incompatibility. Incorporating life history and growth form into biogeographic analyses reduced or eliminated the importance of latitude and biome in predicting outcrossing or self-incompatibility. Our results suggest that biogeographic patterns in mating system are more likely a reflection of the frequency of life forms across latitudes rather than the strength of plant-pollinator interactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  5. Genetic influences on variation in female orgasmic function: a twin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kate M; Cherkas, Lynn F; Spector, Tim D

    2005-01-01

    Orgasmic dysfunction in females is commonly reported in the general population with little consensus on its aetiology. We performed a classical twin study to explore whether there were observable genetic influences on female orgasmic dysfunction. Adult females from the TwinsUK register were sent a confidential survey including questions on sexual problems. Complete responses to the questions on orgasmic dysfunction were obtained from 4037 women consisting of 683 monozygotic and 714 dizygotic pairs of female twins aged between 19 and 83 years. One in three women (32%) reported never or infrequently achieving orgasm during intercourse, with a corresponding figure of 21% during masturbation. A significant genetic influence was seen with an estimated heritability for difficulty reaching orgasm during intercourse of 34% (95% confidence interval 27–40%) and 45% (95% confidence interval 38–52%) for orgasm during masturbation. These results show that the wide variation in orgasmic dysfunction in females has a genetic basis and cannot be attributed solely to cultural influences. These results should stimulate further research into the biological and perhaps evolutionary processes governing female sexual function. PMID:17148182

  6. Variation in habitat soundscape characteristics influences settlement of a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Ashlee; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne; Peters, Jason W; Eggleston, David

    2016-01-01

    Coral populations, and the productive reef ecosystems they support, rely on successful recruitment of reef-building species, beginning with settlement of dispersing larvae into habitat favourable to survival. Many substrate cues have been identified as contributors to coral larval habitat selection; however, the potential for ambient acoustic cues to influence coral settlement responses is unknown. Using in situ settlement chambers that excluded other habitat cues, larval settlement of a dominant Caribbean reef-building coral, Orbicella faveolata , was compared in response to three local soundscapes, with differing acoustic and habitat properties. Differences between reef sites in the number of larvae settled in chambers isolating acoustic cues corresponded to differences in sound levels and reef characteristics, with sounds at the loudest reef generating significantly higher settlement during trials compared to the quietest site (a 29.5 % increase). These results suggest that soundscapes could be an important influence on coral settlement patterns and that acoustic cues associated with reef habitat may be related to larval settlement. This study reports an effect of soundscape variation on larval settlement for a key coral species, and adds to the growing evidence that soundscapes affect marine ecosystems by influencing early life history processes of foundational species.

  7. Variation in habitat soundscape characteristics influences settlement of a reef-building coral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee Lillis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coral populations, and the productive reef ecosystems they support, rely on successful recruitment of reef-building species, beginning with settlement of dispersing larvae into habitat favourable to survival. Many substrate cues have been identified as contributors to coral larval habitat selection; however, the potential for ambient acoustic cues to influence coral settlement responses is unknown. Using in situ settlement chambers that excluded other habitat cues, larval settlement of a dominant Caribbean reef-building coral, Orbicella faveolata, was compared in response to three local soundscapes, with differing acoustic and habitat properties. Differences between reef sites in the number of larvae settled in chambers isolating acoustic cues corresponded to differences in sound levels and reef characteristics, with sounds at the loudest reef generating significantly higher settlement during trials compared to the quietest site (a 29.5 % increase. These results suggest that soundscapes could be an important influence on coral settlement patterns and that acoustic cues associated with reef habitat may be related to larval settlement. This study reports an effect of soundscape variation on larval settlement for a key coral species, and adds to the growing evidence that soundscapes affect marine ecosystems by influencing early life history processes of foundational species.

  8. Variational data assimilation system "INM RAS - Black Sea"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmuzin, Eugene; Agoshkov, Valery; Assovskiy, Maksim; Giniatulin, Sergey; Zakharova, Natalia; Kuimov, Grigory; Fomin, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Development of Informational-Computational Systems (ICS) for Data Assimilation Procedures is one of multidisciplinary problems. To study and solve these problems one needs to apply modern results from different disciplines and recent developments in: mathematical modeling; theory of adjoint equations and optimal control; inverse problems; numerical methods theory; numerical algebra and scientific computing. The problems discussed above are studied in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Science (INM RAS) in ICS for Personal Computers (PC). Special problems and questions arise while effective ICS versions for PC are being developed. These problems and questions can be solved with applying modern methods of numerical mathematics and by solving "parallelism problem" using OpenMP technology and special linear algebra packages. In this work the results on the ICS development for PC-ICS "INM RAS - Black Sea" are presented. In the work the following problems and questions are discussed: practical problems that can be studied by ICS; parallelism problems and their solutions with applying of OpenMP technology and the linear algebra packages used in ICS "INM - Black Sea"; Interface of ICS. The results of ICS "INM RAS - Black Sea" testing are presented. Efficiency of technologies and methods applied are discussed. The work was supported by RFBR, grants No. 13-01-00753, 13-05-00715 and by The Ministry of education and science of Russian Federation, project 8291, project 11.519.11.1005 References: [1] V.I. Agoshkov, M.V. Assovskii, S.A. Lebedev, Numerical simulation of Black Sea hydrothermodynamics taking into account tide-forming forces. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, 5-31 [2] E.I. Parmuzin, V.I. Agoshkov, Numerical solution of the variational assimilation problem for sea surface temperature in the model of the Black Sea dynamics. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, 69-94 [3] V.B. Zalesny, N.A. Diansky, V

  9. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  10. Temporal-spatial variation and the influence factors of precipitation in Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Precipitation is a key factor in the water cycle.At the same time,precipitation is the focus of study in meteorology and climatology,ecological environmental assessment,non-point source pollution and so on.Understanding the temporal-spatial variation and the corresponding factors of precipitation has become the object of hydrology and environmentology.Based on the annual precipitation data,we analyzed the spatial distribution of precipitation in Sichuan Province in China as well as the temporal-spatial variation and the corresponding influence factors involved.The results show that the amount of precipitation was abundant,but the spatial distribution was not consistent with it and the amount of precipitation gradually declined from the south-east to the north-west in Sichuan Province,China.Moreover,the spatial distribution was different throughout the years.The result of correlation analysis indicated that elevation,temperature and air pressure were three key factors affecting the amount and distribution of precipitation,and the correlation coefficients were -0.56,0.38 and 0.45 respectively.Notably,the relationship between the slope of topography and precipitation were significantly negative and the average correlation coefficient was -0.28.

  11. PRDM9 variation strongly influences recombination hot-spot activity and meiotic instability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Lam, Kwan-Wood G; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; May, Celia A; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2010-10-01

    PRDM9 has recently been identified as a likely trans regulator of meiotic recombination hot spots in humans and mice. PRDM9 contains a zinc finger array that, in humans, can recognize a short sequence motif associated with hot spots, with binding to this motif possibly triggering hot-spot activity via chromatin remodeling. We now report that human genetic variation at the PRDM9 locus has a strong effect on sperm hot-spot activity, even at hot spots lacking the sequence motif. Subtle changes within the zinc finger array can create hot-spot nonactivating or enhancing variants and can even trigger the appearance of a new hot spot, suggesting that PRDM9 is a major global regulator of hot spots in humans. Variation at the PRDM9 locus also influences aspects of genome instability-specifically, a megabase-scale rearrangement underlying two genomic disorders as well as minisatellite instability-implicating PRDM9 as a risk factor for some pathological genome rearrangements.

  12. Influence of Temperature to Thermal Properties of U-Zr Alloy With The Zr Content Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslina-Br-Ginting; Masrukan; M-Husna-Al-Hasa

    2007-01-01

    Have been done thermal of characteristic covering heat stability, heat capacities, enthalpy and also phase changes from uranium, zirkonium and U-Zr alloy with the Zr content variation of Zr 2 %, 6 %, 10% and 14% weight. Change of the temperature and composition anticipated will cause the characteristic of thermal to uranium metal, zirkonium and also U-Zr alloy. Therefore at this research was conducted using analysis influence of temperature to thermal of characteristic of uranium, zirkonium and U-Zr alloy with the Zr content variation by using DTA and DSC. Result of analysis indicate that the uranium metal at temperature 662 o C stable in phase α. Above at temperature, uranium metal experience of the phase change indicated by formed the thermochemical reaction as much 3 endothermic peak. At temperature 667.16 o C, happened by the phase change of α become the phase β with the enthalpy 2,3034 cal/g, at temperature 773.05 o C happened by the phase change β becoming phase γ 2,8725 cal/g and also at temperature 1125.26 the o C uranium metal experience the phenomenon become to melt with the enthalpy 2,1316 cal/g. (author)

  13. Influence of fluid-property variation on turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical annular CHANNEL FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joong Hun Bae; Jung Yul Yoo; Haecheon Choi

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The influence of variable fluid property on turbulent convective heat transfer is investigated using direct numerical simulations. We consider thermally-developing flows of air and supercritical-pressure CO 2 in a vertical annular channel where the inner wall is heated with a constant heat flux and the outer wall is insulated. Turbulence statistics show that the heat and momentum transport characteristics of variable-property flows are significantly different from those of constant-property flows. The difference is mainly caused by the spatial and temporal variations of fluid density. The non-uniform density distribution causes fluid particles to be accelerated either by expansion or buoyancy force, while the temporal density fluctuations change the heat and momentum transfer via transport of turbulent mass flux, ρ'u' i . Both effects of the spatial and temporal variations of density are shown to be important in the analysis of turbulent convective heat transfer for supercritical-pressure fluids. For variable-property heated air flows, however, the effect of temporal density fluctuations can be neglected at low Mach number, which is in good accordance with the Morkovin's hypothesis. (authors)

  14. Influence of Poisson's ratio variation on lateral spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, M.-K.; Tai, N.-Ha; Chen, B.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to measure the surface morphologies and the mechanical properties of nanostructures. The force acting on the AFM cantilever can be obtained by multiplying the spring constant of AFM cantilever and the corresponding deformation. To improve the accuracy of force experiments, the spring constant of AFM cantilever must be calibrated carefully. Many methods, such as theoretical equations, the finite element method, and the use of reference cantilever, were reported to obtain the spring constant of AFM cantilevers. For the cantilever made of single crystal, the Poisson's ratio varies with different cantilever-crystal angles. In this paper, the influences of Poisson's ratio variation on the lateral spring constant and axial spring constant of rectangular and V-shaped AFM cantilevers, with different tilt angles and normal forces, were investigated by the finite element analysis. When the cantilever's tilt angle is 20 deg. and the Poisson's ratio varies from 0.02 to 0.4, the finite element results show that the lateral spring constants decrease 11.75% for the rectangular cantilever with 1 μN landing force and decrease 18.60% for the V-shaped cantilever with 50 nN landing force, respectively. The influence of Poisson's ratio variation on axial spring constant is less than 3% for both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers. As the tilt angle increases, the axial spring constants for rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers decrease substantially. The results obtained can be used to improve the accuracy of the lateral force measurement when using atomic force microscopy

  15. Geology and photometric variation of solar system bodies with minor atmospheres: implications for solid exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuka; Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments-Planetary geology-Solar System-Extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  16. Striking variations in consultation rates with general practice reveal family influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spreeuwenberg Peter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reasons why patients decide to consult a general practitioner vary enormously. While there may be individual reasons for this variation, the family context has a significant and unique influence upon the frequency of individuals' visits. The objective of this study was to explore which family factors can explain the differences between strikingly high, and correspondingly low, family consultation rates in families with children aged up to 21. Methods Data were used from the second Dutch national survey of general practice. This survey extracted from the medical records of 96 practices in the Netherlands, information on all consultations with patients during 2001. We defined, through multilevel analysis, two groups of families. These had respectively, predominantly high, and low, contact frequencies due to a significant family influence upon the frequency of the individual's first contacts. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to analyse which of the family factors, related to shared circumstances and socialisation conditions, can explain the differences in consultation rates between the two groups of families. Results In almost 3% of all families, individual consultation rates decrease significantly due to family influence. In 11% of the families, individual consultation rates significantly increase due to family influence. While taking into account the health status of family members, family factors can explain family consultation rates. These factors include circumstances such as their economic status and number of children, as well as socialisation conditions such as specific health knowledge and family beliefs. The chance of significant low frequencies of contact due to family influences increases significantly with factors such as, paid employment of parents in the health care sector, low expectations of general practitioners' care for minor ailments and a western cultural background. Conclusion Family

  17. Hook tool manufacture in New Caledonian crows: behavioural variation and the influence of raw materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, Barbara C; Sugasawa, Shoko; St Clair, James J H; Rutz, Christian

    2015-11-18

    New Caledonian crows use a range of foraging tools, and are the only non-human species known to craft hooks. Based on a small number of observations, their manufacture of hooked stick tools has previously been described as a complex, multi-stage process. Tool behaviour is shaped by genetic predispositions, individual and social learning, and/or ecological influences, but disentangling the relative contributions of these factors remains a major research challenge. The properties of raw materials are an obvious, but largely overlooked, source of variation in tool-manufacture behaviour. We conducted experiments with wild-caught New Caledonian crows, to assess variation in their hooked stick tool making, and to investigate how raw-material properties affect the manufacture process. In Experiment 1, we showed that New Caledonian crows' manufacture of hooked stick tools can be much more variable than previously thought (85 tools by 18 subjects), and can involve two newly-discovered behaviours: 'pulling' for detaching stems and bending of the tool shaft. Crows' tool manufactures varied significantly: in the number of different action types employed; in the time spent processing the hook and bending the tool shaft; and in the structure of processing sequences. In Experiment 2, we examined the interaction of crows with raw materials of different properties, using a novel paradigm that enabled us to determine subjects' rank-ordered preferences (42 tools by 7 subjects). Plant properties influenced: the order in which crows selected stems; whether a hooked tool was manufactured; the time required to release a basic tool; and, possibly, the release technique, the number of behavioural actions, and aspects of processing behaviour. Results from Experiment 2 suggested that at least part of the natural behavioural variation observed in Experiment 1 is due to the effect of raw-material properties. Our discovery of novel manufacture behaviours indicates a plausible scenario for the

  18. Factors influencing the variations of ejection fraction during exercise in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassand, J.P.; Faivre, R.; Berthout, P.; Maurat, J.P.; Cardot, J.C.; Verdenet, J.; Bidet, R.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of left ventricular volume variations and regurgitant fraction variations upon left ventricular ejection fraction during exercise was examined using equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients suffering from aortic regurgitation. Ejection fraction (EF), regurgitant fraction (RF), end diastolic volume (EDV) and end systolic volume (ESV) variations from rest to peak exercise were determined in 44 patients suffering from chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) and in 8 healthy volunteers (C). In C, EF increased (+0.10±0.03, P<0.01) and ESV decreased significantly (-23%±12%, P<0.01), RF and EDV did not vary significantly. In AR patients, EF, EDV and ESV did not vary significantly because of important scattering of individual values. Changes in EF and ESV were inversely correlated (r=-0.79, P<0.01) and RF decreased significantly (-0.12±0.10, P<0.01). Volumes and EF changes during exercise occurred in three different ways. In a 1st subgroup of 7 patients, EF increased (+0.09±0.03, P<0.05) in conjunction with a reduction of ESV (-24%±12%, P<0.05) without a significant change in EDV. In a 2nd group of 22 patients, EF decreased (-0.04±0.07, P<0.01) in association with an increase in ESV (+17%±16%, P<0.01) and no changes in EDV. In a 3rd subgroup of 15 patients, EF decreased (-0.02±0.06, P<0.01) despite a reduction in ESV (-7%±6%, P<0.01) because of a dramatic EDV decrease (-10%±6%, P<0.05). In this subgroup, changes in EF were inversely correlated with changes in ESV (r=-0.55, P<0.01) and positively related to EDV variations (r=0.42, P=0.02). EDV changes were weakly, but significantly, correlated to RF decrease (r=0.39, P<0.05). We conclude that changes in left ventricular ejection fraction during exercise in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation are significantly related in some patients to changes in ventricular loading conditions as well as contractile state. (orig./MG)

  19. Structural system identification based on variational mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Abdollah; Ozbulut, Osman E.; Harris, Devin K.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a new structural identification method is proposed to identify the modal properties of engineering structures based on dynamic response decomposition using the variational mode decomposition (VMD). The VMD approach is a decomposition algorithm that has been developed as a means to overcome some of the drawbacks and limitations of the empirical mode decomposition method. The VMD-based modal identification algorithm decomposes the acceleration signal into a series of distinct modal responses and their respective center frequencies, such that when combined their cumulative modal responses reproduce the original acceleration response. The decaying amplitude of the extracted modal responses is then used to identify the modal damping ratios using a linear fitting function on modal response data. Finally, after extracting modal responses from available sensors, the mode shape vector for each of the decomposed modes in the system is identified from all obtained modal response data. To demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm, a series of numerical, laboratory, and field case studies were evaluated. The laboratory case study utilized the vibration response of a three-story shear frame, whereas the field study leveraged the ambient vibration response of a pedestrian bridge to characterize the modal properties of the structure. The modal properties of the shear frame were computed using analytical approach for a comparison with the experimental modal frequencies. Results from these case studies demonstrated that the proposed method is efficient and accurate in identifying modal data of the structures.

  20. Promise and Capability of NASA's Earth Observing System to Monitor Human-Induced Climate Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), developed as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) and launched on Terra in December 1999 and Aqua in May 2002, is designed to meet the scientific needs for satellite remote sensing of clouds, aerosols, water vapor, and land and ocean surface properties. This sensor and multi-platform observing system is especially well suited to observing detailed interdisciplinary components of the Earth s surface and atmosphere in and around urban environments, including aerosol optical properties, cloud optical and microphysical properties of both liquid water and ice clouds, land surface reflectance, fire occurrence, and many other properties that influence the urban environment and are influenced by them. In this presentation I will summarize the current capabilities of MODIS and other EOS sensors currently in orbit to study human-induced climate variations.

  1. Variation in stable isotopes of freshwater mussel shells in a Kentucky river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, A. M.; Haag, W.; Price, S.; Weisrock, D.

    2017-12-01

    Isotopic signatures in freshwater mussel shells can reflect environmental differences among streams and human impacts on river systems. In the southeastern United States, mussels exhibit extraordinary biodiversity, serve an important role as filter feeders, and are sensitive to environmental change. Additionally, their long life-span (up to 50 years) and seasonal shell deposition can permit high-resolution environmental reconstructions. We examined variation in shell stable isotope values among mussel species and locations throughout the Licking River system in Kentucky. We sampled 8 species at 11 locations. These species represented a range of life-history traits, and locations were distributed among tributaries and the main stem of the Licking River. Samples of the outer organic periostracum layer were analysed for organic δ13C and δ15N, while organic δ15N and inorganic δ13C and δ18O were measured in the inner carbonate portion of the shell. At the same location, preliminary results show variations 2‰ in δ13C and 1‰ in δ15N between different species. We suspect these relationships are due to variations in diet and/or body size. Some, though not all, specimens show variation along the growth axis. For the same species at different locations, preliminary results showed a range of 4‰ in δ13C and 10‰ in δ15N values. Isotope ratios of specimens from the main stem were distinct from those of specimens from the river's largest tributary. Overall, δ13C shows distinct values for each tributary, while δ15N shows a general decline downstream. These variations are likely the result of environmental factors such as the degree of karstification and the ratio of forest to pasture within the catchment. We hope to use this study to identify if any isotopically distinct sources, such as fertilizers or animal manure, contribute to the high nutrient load in these systems. These results represent an exploratory effort to describe watershed-scale and mussel

  2. Temporal Variations of Water Productivity in Irrigated Corn: An Analysis of Factors Influencing Yield and Water Use across Central Nebraska.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Carr

    Full Text Available Water Productivity (WP of a crop defines the relationship between the economic or physical yield of the crop and its water use. With this concept it is possible to identify disproportionate water use or water-limited yield gaps and thereby support improvements in agricultural water management. However, too often important qualitative and quantitative environmental factors are not part of a WP analysis and therefore neglect the aspect of maintaining a sustainable agricultural system. In this study, we examine both the physical and economic WP in perspective with temporally changing environmental conditions. The physical WP analysis was performed by comparing simulated maximum attainable corn yields per unit of water using the crop model Hybrid-Maize with observed data from 2005 through 2013 from 108 farm plots in the Central Platte and the Tri Basin Natural Resource Districts of Nebraska. In order to expand the WP analysis on external factors influencing yields, a second model, Maize-N, was used to estimate optimal nitrogen (N-fertilizer rate for specific fields in the study area. Finally, a vadose zone flow and transport model, HYDRUS-1D for simulating vertical nutrient transport in the soil, was used to estimate locations of nitrogen pulses in the soil profile. The comparison of simulated and observed data revealed that WP was not on an optimal level, mainly due to large amounts of irrigation used in the study area. The further analysis illustrated year-to-year variations of WP during the nine consecutive years, as well as the need to improve fertilizer management to favor WP and environmental quality. In addition, we addressed the negative influence of groundwater depletion on the economic WP through increasing pumping costs. In summary, this study demonstrated that involving temporal variations of WP as well as associated environmental and economic issues can represent a bigger picture of WP that can help to create incentives to sustainably

  3. Influence of diurnal variation and fasting on serum iron concentrations in a community-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Leonard T; Buse, Joshua D; Baskin, Leland; Sadrzadeh, S M Hossein; Naugler, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Serum iron is an important clinical test to help identify cases of iron deficiency or overload. Fluctuations caused by diurnal variation and diet are thought to influence test results, which may affect clinical patient management. We examined the impact of these preanalytical factors on iron concentrations in a large community-based cohort. Serum iron concentration, blood collection time, fasting duration, patient age and sex were obtained for community-based clinical testing from the Laboratory Information Service at Calgary Laboratory Services for the period of January 2011 to December 2015. A total of 276,307 individual test results were obtained. Iron levels were relatively high over a long period from 8:00 to 15:00. Mean concentrations were highest at blood collection times of 11:00 for adult men and 12:00 for adult women and children, however iron levels peaked as late as 15:00 in teenagers. With regard to fasting, iron levels required approximately 5h post-prandial time to return to a baseline, except for children and teenage females where no significant variation was seen until after 11h fasting. After 10h fasting, iron concentrations in all patient groups gradually increased to higher levels compared to earlier fasting times. Serum iron concentrations remain reasonably stable during most daytime hours for testing purposes. In adults, blood collection after 5 to 9h fasting provides a representative estimate of a patient's iron levels. For patients who have fasted overnight, i.e. ≥12h fasting, clinicians should be aware that iron concentrations may be elevated beyond otherwise usual levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Latitudinal range influences the seasonal variation in the foraging behavior of marine top predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Villegas-Amtmann

    Full Text Available Non-migratory resident species should be capable of modifying their foraging behavior to accommodate changes in prey abundance and availability associated with a changing environment. Populations that are better adapted to change will have higher foraging success and greater potential for survival in the face of climate change. We studied two species of resident central place foragers from temperate and equatorial regions with differing population trends and prey availability associated to season, the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus (CSL whose population is increasing and the endangered Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki (GSL whose population is declining. To determine their response to environmental change, we studied and compared their diving behavior using time-depth recorders and satellite location tags and their diet by measuring C and N isotope ratios during a warm and a cold season. Based on latitudinal differences in oceanographic productivity, we hypothesized that the seasonal variation in foraging behavior would differ for these two species. CSL exhibited greater seasonal variability in their foraging behavior as seen in changes to their diving behavior, foraging areas and diet between seasons. Conversely, GSL did not change their diving behavior between seasons, presenting three foraging strategies (shallow, deep and bottom divers during both. GSL exhibited greater dive and foraging effort than CSL. We suggest that during the warm and less productive season a greater range of foraging behaviors in CSL was associated with greater competition for prey, which relaxed during the cold season when resource availability was greater. GSL foraging specialization suggests that resources are limited throughout the year due to lower primary production and lower seasonal variation in productivity compared to CSL. These latitudinal differences influence their foraging success, pup survival and population growth reflected in

  5. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene influences ERP old/new effects during recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert S; Medrano, Paolo; Boyle, Kaitlin; Smolen, Andrew; Curran, Tim; Nyhus, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Recognition memory is defined as the ability to recognize a previously encountered stimulus and has been associated with spatially and temporally distinct event-related potentials (ERPs). Allelic variations of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) have recently been shown to impact memory performance. Common variants of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) of the SLC6A4 gene result in long (l) and short (s) allelic variants with carriers of the s allele having lowered transcriptional efficiency. Thus, the current study examines the effects polymorphisms of the SLC6A4 gene have on performance and ERP amplitudes commonly associated with recognition memory. Electroencephalogram (EEG), genetic, and behavioral data were collected from sixty participants as they performed an item and source memory recognition task. In both tasks, participants studied and encoded 200 words, which were then mixed with 200 new words during retrieval. Participants were monitored with EEG during the retrieval portion of each memory task. EEG electrodes were grouped into four ROIs, left anterior superior, right anterior superior, left posterior superior, and right posterior superior. ERP mean amplitudes during hits in the item and source memory task were compared to correctly recognizing new items (correct rejections). Results show that s-carriers have decreased mean hit amplitudes in both the right anterior superior ROI 1000-1500ms post stimulus during the source memory task and the left anterior superior ROI 300-500ms post stimulus during the item memory task. These results suggest that individual differences due to genetic variation of the serotonin transporter gene influences recognition memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors influencing variation in physician adenoma detection rates: a theory-based approach for performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Louise; Hunkeler, Enid M; Jensen, Christopher D; Michie, Susan; Lee, Jeffrey K; Doubeni, Chyke A; Zauber, Ann G; Levin, Theodore R; Quinn, Virginia P; Corley, Douglas A

    2016-03-01

    Interventions to improve physician adenoma detection rates for colonoscopy have generally not been successful, and there are little data on the factors contributing to variation that may be appropriate targets for intervention. We sought to identify factors that may influence variation in detection rates by using theory-based tools for understanding behavior. We separately studied gastroenterologists and endoscopy nurses at 3 Kaiser Permanente Northern California medical centers to identify potentially modifiable factors relevant to physician adenoma detection rate variability by using structured group interviews (focus groups) and theory-based tools for understanding behavior and eliciting behavior change: the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation behavior model; the Theoretical Domains Framework; and the Behavior Change Wheel. Nine factors potentially associated with adenoma detection rate variability were identified, including 6 related to capability (uncertainty about which types of polyps to remove, style of endoscopy team leadership, compromised ability to focus during an examination due to distractions, examination technique during withdrawal, difficulty detecting certain types of adenomas, and examiner fatigue and pain), 2 related to opportunity (perceived pressure due to the number of examinations expected per shift and social pressure to finish examinations before scheduled breaks or the end of a shift), and 1 related to motivation (valuing a meticulous examination as the top priority). Examples of potential intervention strategies are provided. By using theory-based tools, this study identified several novel and potentially modifiable factors relating to capability, opportunity, and motivation that may contribute to adenoma detection rate variability and be appropriate targets for future intervention trials. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of stuttering variation on talker group classification in preschool children: Preliminary findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kia N.; Karrass, Jan; Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether variations in disfluencies of young children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) significantly change their talker group classification or diagnosis from stutterer to nonstutterer, and vice versa. Participants consisted of 17 3- to 5-year-old CWS and 9 3- to 5-year-old CWNS, with no statistically significant between-group difference in chronological age (CWS: M = 45.53 months, SD = 8.32; CWNS: M = 47.67 months, SD = 6.69). All participants had speech, language, and hearing development within normal limits, with the exception of stuttering for CWS. Both talker groups participated in a series of speaking samples that varied by: (a) conversational partner [parent and clinician], (b) location [home and clinic], and (c) context [conversation and narrative]. The primary dependent measures for this study were the number of stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD) per total number of spoken words [%SLD] and the ratio of SLD to total disfluencies (TD) [SLD/TD]. Results indicated that significant variability of stuttering did not exist as a result of conversational partner or location. Changes in context, however, did impact the CWS, who demonstrated higher SLD/TD in the conversation sample versus a narrative sample. Consistent with hypotheses, CWS and CWNS were accurately identified as stutterers and nonstutterers, respectively, regardless of changes to conversational partner, location or context for the overall participant sample. Present findings were taken to suggest that during assessment, variations in stuttering frequency resulting from changes in conversational partner, location or context do not significantly influence the diagnosis of stuttering, especially for children not on the talker group classification borderline between CWS and CWNS. PMID:19167719

  8. Accurate sizing of supercapacitors storage system considering its capacitance variation.

    OpenAIRE

    Trieste , Sony; Bourguet , Salvy; Olivier , Jean-Christophe; Loron , Luc; Le Claire , Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper highlights the energy errors made for the design of supercapacitors used as a main energy source. First of all, the paper presents the two definitions of capacitance of a capacitance-voltage dependent material. The number of supercapacitors is important for the application purchasing cost. That is why the paper introduces an analytical model and an electrical model along with an identification method for the capacitance variation. This variation is presented...

  9. Influence of ocean tides on the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation variations from VLBI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubanov, V. S.; Kurdubov, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    The International astrogeodetic standard IERS Conventions (2010) contains a model of the diurnal and semidiurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERPs), the pole coordinates and the Universal Time, arising from lunisolar tides in the world ocean. This model was constructed in the mid-1990s through a global analysis of Topex/Poseidon altimetry. The goal of this study is to try to estimate the parameters of this model by processing all the available VLBI observations on a global network of stations over the last 35 years performed within the framework of IVS (International VLBI Service) geodetic programs. The complexity of the problemlies in the fact that the sought-for corrections to the parameters of this model lie within 1 mm and, thus, are at the limit of their detectability by all currently available methods of ground-based positional measurements. This requires applying universal software packages with a high accuracy of reduction calculations and a well-developed system of controlling the simultaneous adjustment of observational data to analyze long series of VLBI observations. This study has been performed with the QUASAR software package developed at the Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Although the results obtained, on the whole, confirm a high accuracy of the basic model in the IERS Conventions (2010), statistically significant corrections that allow this model to be refined have been detected for some harmonics of the ERP variations.

  10. Genetic variation in GABRA2 moderates peer influence on externalizing behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Trucco, Elisa M; Heitzeg, Mary M; Burmeister, Margit; Zucker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental influences are both important factors in the development of problematic behavior leading to substance use in adolescence. Involvement with delinquent peers also strongly predicts adolescent externalizing behavior. Several lines of evidence support a role of GABRA2 on externalizing behavior related to disinhibition. However, whether this genetic association is influenced by the environment such as peer behavior remains unknown. We examined the moderating role of GABRA2 genetic variation on the socialization model of delinquent peer affiliation (at ages 12-14 years) on externalizing behavior (at ages 15-17 years) in the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS) adolescent sample. The sample consisted of 244 adolescents (75 females and 152 with at least one parent with a DSM-IV lifetime alcohol dependence/abuse diagnosis). Peer delinquent activity reported by the participant and teacher-reported adolescent externalizing behavior (Teacher Report Form (TRF) were assessed. No main effect of the GABRA2 SNP rs279826, which tags a large haplotype, on externalizing behavior was observed. However, there was a statistically reliable GABRA2 × peer delinquency interaction. The effect of peer delinquent involvement on externalizing scores and the rule breaking subscale is significantly stronger for those with the GG genotype compared to A-carriers, whereas there was no effect of genotype on externalizing in the absence of peer delinquent involvement. No interaction was observed for the aggression subscale. Our results suggest that the genetic effect of GABRA2 on externalizing behavior, more specifically on rule breaking is, at least in part, due to its effect on susceptibility to environmental exposure (i.e., peer delinquency).

  11. Individual variation in the propensity to attribute incentive salience to a food cue: influence of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchers, Kyle K; Flagel, Shelly B; O'Donnell, Elizabeth G; Woods, Leah C Solberg; Sarter, Martin; Robinson, Terry E

    2015-02-01

    There is considerable individual variation in the propensity of animals to attribute incentive salience to discrete reward cues, but to date most of this research has been conducted in male rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex influences the propensity to attribute incentive salience to a food cue, using rats from two different outbred strains (Sprague-Dawley [SD] and Heterogeneous Stock [HS]). The motivational value of a food cue was assessed in two ways: (i) by the ability of the cue to elicit approach toward it and (ii) by its ability to act as a conditioned reinforcer. We found that female SD rats acquired Pavlovian conditioned approach behavior slightly faster than males, but no sex difference was detected in HS rats, and neither strain showed a sex difference in asymptotic performance of approach behavior. Moreover, female approach behavior did not differ across estrous cycle. Compared to males, females made more active responses during the test for conditioned reinforcement, although they made more inactive responses as well. We conclude that although there are small sex differences in performance on these tasks, these are probably not due to a notable sex difference in the propensity to attribute incentive salience to a food cue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Meteorological Conditions in the Annual Variation of Environmental Radon Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Márquez, J.L.; Sáez, J.C.; Álvarez, A.; Quiñones, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the correlations that exist between Rn gas, the Rn progeny and the meteorological variables. Also it takes part from the study to observe which variables are responsible of ambient dose equivalent rate variations. The study of correlations between different variables was performed using two methodologies; the first of them is a graphical representation of all variables to observe the temporal evolution of each variable and the second is the application of a Principal Component Analysis. The study of variables behavior has been divided into three periods (day, month and year), considering the presence and absence of rainfall for daily and monthly period. Several correlations have been identified between the Rn gas, Rn progeny and meteorological variables. It has also identified the influence of rainfall on the ambient dose equivalent rate due to the radon progeny. To complete the study, a theoretical model based on an adjustment by the least-squares has been performed to estimate the levels of exhaled radon in atmosphere for any day of the year.

  13. Tidal influence through LOD variations on the temporal distribution of earthquake occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, P.; Gambis, D.; Bizouard, Ch.; Bus, Z.; Kiszely, M.

    2006-10-01

    Stresses generated by the body tides are very small at the depth of crustal earth- quakes (~10^2 N/m2). The maximum value of the lunisolar stress within the depth range of earthquakes is 10^3 N/m2 (at depth of about 600 km). Surface loads, due to oceanic tides, in coastal areas are ~ 104 N/m2. These influences are however too small to affect the outbreak time of seismic events. Authors show the effect on time distribution of seismic activity due to ΔLOD generated by zonal tides for the case of Mf, Mm, Ssa and Sa tidal constituents can be much more effective to trigger earthquakes. According to this approach we show that the tides are not directly triggering the seismic events but through the generated length of day variations. That is the reason why in case of zonal tides a correlation of the lunisolar effect and seismic activity exists, what is not the case for the tesseral and sectorial tides.

  14. The influence of anthropogenic aerosol on multi-decadal variations of historical global climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, L J; Highwood, E J; Dunstone, N J

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of single forcing runs from CMIP5 (the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) simulations shows that the mid-twentieth century temperature hiatus, and the coincident decrease in precipitation, is likely to have been influenced strongly by anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Models that include a representation of the indirect effect of aerosol better reproduce inter-decadal variability in historical global-mean near-surface temperatures, particularly the cooling in the 1950s and 1960s, compared to models with representation of the aerosol direct effect only. Models with the indirect effect also show a more pronounced decrease in precipitation during this period, which is in better agreement with observations, and greater inter-decadal variability in the inter-hemispheric temperature difference. This study demonstrates the importance of representing aerosols, and their indirect effects, in general circulation models, and suggests that inter-model diversity in aerosol burden and representation of aerosol–cloud interaction can produce substantial variation in simulations of climate variability on multi-decadal timescales. (letter)

  15. Lead in Chinese villager house dust: Geographical variation and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan; Yang, Wenlin

    2015-12-01

    House dust has been recognized as an important contributor to Pb exposure of children. Here we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate geographical variation of Pb in Chinese villager house dust. The influences of outdoor soil Pb concentrations, dates of construction, house decoration materials, heating types, and site specific pollution on Pb concentrations in house dust were evaluated. The concentrations of Pb in 477 house dust samples collected from twenty eight areas throughout China varied from 12 to 2510 mg/kg, with a median concentration of 42 mg/kg. The median Pb concentrations in different geographical areas ranged from 16 (Zhangjiakou, Hebei) to 195 mg/kg (Loudi, Hunan). No correlations were found between the house dust Pb concentrations and the age of houses, as well as house decoration materials. Whereas outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution may be potential Pb sources. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed that elemental compositions of the house dust were controlled by both anthropogenic and geogenic sources. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the Pb bearing particles in the house dust were also studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Variation in heart rate influences the assessment of transient ischemic dilation in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, William D; Levin, Daniel P; Demeter, Sandor J

    2007-01-01

    Transient arrhythmias can affect transient ischemic dilation (TID) ratios. This study was initiated to evaluate the frequency and effect of normal heart rate change on TID measures in routine clinical practice. Consecutive patients undergoing stress/rest sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were studied (N = 407). Heart rate at the time of stress and rest imaging were recorded. TID ratios were analyzed in relation to absolute change in heart rate (stress minus rest) for subjects with normal perfusion and systolic function (Group 1, N = 169) and those with abnormalities in perfusion and/or function (Group 2, N = 238). In Group 1, mean TID ratio was inversely correlated with the change in heart rate (r = -0.47, P < 0.0001). For every increase of 10 BPM in heart rate change, the TID ratio decreased by approximately 0.06 (95% confidence interval 0.04–0.07). In Group 2, multiple linear regression demonstrated that the change in heart rate (beta = -0.25, P < 0.0001) and the summed difference score (beta = 0.36, P < 0.0001) were independent predictors of the TID ratio. Normal variation in heart rate between the stress and rest components of myocardial perfusion scans is common and can influence TID ratios in patients with normal and abnormal cardiac scans

  17. Variation in macronutrients in human bank milk: Influencing factors and implications for human milk banking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, K F; Skafte, Ester Lis; Badsberg, Jens Henrik

    1990-01-01

    . There was a large variation in the concentration of energy-yielding macronutrients. The contents of P, F, C, and E in the samples with the highest values (97.5 percentile) were 2.3-, 4.8-, 1.2-, and 2.3-fold, respectively, above the contents in the samples with the lowest values (2.5 percentile). The P content...... decreased exponentially during the 1st 8 months, followed by an increase during the following months. The F content decreased during the 1st 4 months, followed by an almost linear increase. The possible influence of different maternal characteristics on the macronutrient content of the milk was examined...... with a high P content, we have developed a "high-protein" milk with a P content of about 12 g/L (true protein) and an E content of about 725 kcal/L. Thus, by continuous monitoring of macronutrient content in human bank milk it is possible to develop a "high-protein" milk with sufficient P and E content...

  18. Attachment style and oxytocin receptor gene variation interact in influencing social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Domschke, K; Holitschke, K; Ziegler, C; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Reif, A; Deckert, J; Zwanzger, P

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety has been suggested to be promoted by an insecure attachment style. Oxytocin is discussed as a mediator of trust and social bonding as well as a modulator of social anxiety. Applying a gene-environment (G × E) interaction approach, in the present pilot study the main and interactive effects of attachment styles and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variation were probed in a combined risk factor model of social anxiety in healthy probands. Participants (N = 388; 219 females, 169 males; age 24.7 ± 4.7 years) were assessed for anxiety in social situations (Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory) depending on attachment style (Adult Attachment Scale, AAS) and OXTR rs53576 A/G genotype. A less secure attachment style was significantly associated with higher social anxiety. This association was partly modulated by OXTR genotype, with a stronger negative influence of a less secure attachment style on social anxiety in A allele carriers as compared to GG homozygotes. The present pilot data point to a strong association of less secure attachment and social anxiety as well as to a gene-environment interaction effect of OXTR rs53576 genotype and attachment style on social anxiety possibly constituting a targetable combined risk marker of social anxiety disorder.

  19. Seasonal latitudinal and secular variations in temperature trend - evidence for influence of anthropogenic sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, D E; Schwartz, S E; Wagener, R; Benkovitz, C M [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Scripps Institute of Oceanography

    1993-11-19

    Tropospheric aerosols increase the shortwave reflectivity of the Earth-atmosphere system both by scattering light directly, in the absence of clouds, and by enhancing cloud reflectivity. The radiative forcing of climate exerted by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, derived mainly from SO[sub 2] emitted from fossil fuel combustion, is opposite that due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases and is estimated to be of comparable average magnitude in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. However, persuasive evidence of climate response to this forcing has thus far been lacking. Here we examine patterns of seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature anomaly trend for evidence of such a response. Pronounced minima in the rate of temperature increase in summer months in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes are consistent with the latitudinal distribution of anthropogenic sulfate and changes in the rate of SO[sub 2] emissions over the industrial era.

  20. The influence of task variation on manifestation of fatigue is ambiguous : a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luger, T.; Bosch, T.; Veeger, D.; Looze, M. de

    2014-01-01

    Task variation has been proposed to reduce shoulder fatigue resulting from repetitive hand-arm tasks. This review analyses the effect of task variation, both 'temporal (i.e. change of work-rest ratio)' and 'activity (i.e. job rotation)' variation, on physiological responses, endurance time (ET) and

  1. Differences in Muscle Activity During Cable Resistance Training Are Influenced by Variations in Handle Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendos, Nicole K; Heredia Vargas, Héctor M; Alipio, Taislaine C; Regis, Rebeca C; Romero, Matthew A; Signorile, Joseph F

    2016-07-01

    Rendos, NK, Heredia Vargas, HM, Alipio, TC, Regis, RC, Romero, MA, and Signorile, JF. Differences in muscle activity during cable resistance training are influenced by variations in handle types. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2001-2009, 2016-There has been a recent resurgence in the use of cable machines for resistance training allowing movements that more effectively simulate daily activities and sports-specific movements. By necessity, these devices require a machine/human interface through some type of handle. Considerable data from material handling, industrial engineering, and exercise training studies indicate that handle qualities, especially size and shape, can significantly influence force production and muscular activity, particularly of the forearm muscles, which affect the critical link in activities that require object manipulation. The purpose for this study was to examine the influence of three different handle conditions: standard handle (StandH), ball handle with the cable between the index and middle fingers (BallIM), and ball handle with the cable between the middle and ring fingers (BallMR), on activity levels (rmsEMG) of the triceps brachii lateral and long heads (TriHLat, TriHLong), brachioradialis (BR), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi ulnaris, and extensor digitorum (ED) during eight repetitions of standing triceps pushdown performed from 90° to 0° elbow flexion at 1.5 s per contractile stage. Handle order was randomized. No significant differences were seen for triceps or BR rmsEMG across handle conditions; however, relative patterns of activation did vary for the forearm muscles by handle condition, with more coordinated activation levels for the FCR and ED during the ball handle conditions. In addition, the rmsEMG for the ED was significantly higher during the BallIM than any other condition and during the BallMR than the StandH. These results indicate that the use of ball handles with the cable passing between different fingers

  2. Does financial system influence tax revenue? The case of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the influence of financial system activities on tax revenue ... our analysis showed that financial system activities influence tax revenue ... causality test and variance decomposition results corroborate our regression results.

  3. Particle variations and effect on the microstructure and microhardness of Ti6al4V hybrid metal matrix system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akinlabi, ET

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available obtained as follow: 3.0 Ti6Al4 V, B4C and BN, 3.2 Ti6Al4 V, B4C and BN, and 3.4 Ti6Al4 V, B4C and BN systems. Laser coating experiment was done at 1400W. The influence of difference in variation of powder on the microstructure and hardness values...

  4. A Study of Korean EFL Learners' Apology Speech Acts: Strategy and Pragmatic Transfer Influenced by Sociolinguistic Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Kyoung

    2002-01-01

    Examines how apology speech act strategies frequently used in daily life are transferred in the framework of interlanguage pragmatics and sociolinguistics and how they are influenced by sociolinguistic variations such as social status, social distance, severity of offense, and formal or private relationships. (Author/VWL)

  5. Variations in leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis skull morphology and body size: sexual and geographic influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando L. Sicuro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The leopard cat, Prionailurus bengalensis (Kerr, 1792, is one of the most widespread Asian cats, occurring in continental eastern and southeastern Asia. Since 1929, several studies have focused on the morphology, ecology, and taxonomy of leopard cats. Nevertheless, hitherto there has been no agreement on basic aspects of leopard cat biology, such as the presence or absence of sexual dimorphism, morphological skull and body differences between the eleven recognized subspecies, and the biogeography of the different morphotypes. Twenty measurements on 25 adult leopard cat skulls from different Asian localities were analyzed through univariate and multivariate statistical approaches. Skull and external body measurements from studies over the last 77 years were assembled and organized in two categories: full data and summary data. Most of this database comprises small samples, which have never been statistically tested and compared with each other. Full data sets were tested with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses; summary data sets (i.e., means, SDs, and ranges were analyzed through suitable univariate approaches. The independent analyses of the data from these works confirmed our original results and improved the overview of sexual dimorphism and geographical morphological variation among subspecies. Continental leopard cats have larger skulls and body dimensions. Skulls of Indochinese morphotypes have broader and higher features than those of continental morphotypes, while individuals from the Sunda Islands have skulls with comparatively narrow and low profiles. Cranial sexual dimorphism is present in different degrees among subspecies. Most display subtle sex-related variations in a few skull features. However, in some cases, sexual dimorphism in skull morphology is absent, such as in P. b. sumatranus and P. b. borneoensis. External body measurement comparisons also indicate the low degree of sexual dimorphism. Apart from the gonads

  6. Determination of the Level of Influence of Various Factors on the Reliability of Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Popescu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumers supply with qualitative electric power is one of the priority requirements imposed to power systems. Currently, in electricity networks take place a number of planned and unplanned disconnections, which interrupt the power and affect consumers, causing economic damage. To ensure the quality of power supply it is essential to know the factors that influence the reliability of power systems, which have a visible impact on the variation of reliability of equipment installed in power systems. This paper is devoted to problems of calculation and analysis of power systems reliability and estimation of the impact of various factors that influence the supply of consumers.

  7. Seasonal variation in the mating system of a selfing annual with large floral displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ge; Barrett, Spencer C H; Luo, Yi-Bo; Bai, Wei-Ning

    2016-03-01

    Flowering plants display considerable variation in mating system, specifically the relative frequency of cross- and self-fertilization. The majority of estimates of outcrossing rate do not account for temporal variation, particularly during the flowering season. Here, we investigated seasonal variation in mating and fertility in Incarvillea sinensis (Bignoniaceae), an annual with showy, insect-pollinated, 'one-day' flowers capable of delayed selfing. We examined the influence of several biotic and abiotic environmental factors on day-to-day variation in fruit set, seed set and patterns of mating. We recorded daily flower number and pollinator abundance in nine 3 × 3-m patches in a population at Mu Us Sand land, Inner Mongolia, China. From marked flowers we collected data on daily fruit and seed set and estimated outcrossing rate and biparental inbreeding using six microsatellite loci and 172 open-pollinated families throughout the flowering period. Flower density increased significantly over most of the 50-d flowering season, but was associated with a decline in levels of pollinator service by bees, particularly on windy days. Fruit and seed set declined over time, especially during the latter third of the flowering period. Multilocus estimates of outcrossing rate were obtained using two methods (the programs MLTR and BORICE) and both indicated high selfing rates of ∼80 %. There was evidence for a significant increase in levels of selfing as the flowering season progressed and pollinator visitation declined. Biparental inbreeding also declined significantly as the flowering season progressed. Temporal variation in outcrossing rates may be a common feature of the mating biology of annual, insect-pollinated plants of harsh environments but our study is the first to examine seasonal mating-system dynamics in this context. Despite having large flowers and showy floral displays, I. sinensis attracted relatively few pollinators. Delayed selfing by corolla dragging

  8. Identifying the factors influencing practice variation in thrombosis medicine: A qualitative content analysis of published practice-pattern surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeith, Leslie; Gonsalves, Carol

    2017-11-01

    Practice variation, the differences in clinical management between physicians, is one reason why patient outcomes may differ. Identifying factors that contribute to practice variation in areas of clinical uncertainty or equipoise may have implications for understanding and improving patient care. To discern what factors may influence practice variation, we completed a qualitative content analysis of all practice-pattern surveys in thrombosis medicine in the last 10years. Out of 2117 articles screened using a systematic search strategy, 33 practice-pattern surveys met eligibility criteria. Themes were identified using constant comparative analysis of qualitative data. Practice variation was noted in all 33 practice-pattern surveys. Contributing factors to variation included lack of available evidence, lack of clear and specific guideline recommendations, past experience, patient context, institutional culture and the perceived risk and benefit of a particular treatment. Additional themes highlight the value placed on expertise in challenging clinical scenarios, the complexity of practice variation and the value placed on minimizing practice variation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Industrial influences on an accelerator control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westervelt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Industrial applications of a control system package have extended from industrial research to process control. While the requirements of these applications have much in common with accelerator controls, there are always extensions, different emphases, and additional requirements. These often add to the applicability of the software in all fields and certainly keep the development team challenged. This paper discusses some of the influences that industrial applications such as power distribution monitoring, casting and rolling mills, and aircraft engine testing have on software originally designed for scientific research. We also discuss some of the differences in the software development process between development for in-house use and development for sales and industrial use. (Author) ref., fig

  10. Noether's Theorem and its Inverse of Birkhoffian System in Event Space Based on Herglotz Variational Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Herglotz variational principle, in which the functional is defined by a differential equation, generalizes the classical ones defining the functional by an integral. The principle gives a variational principle description of nonconservative systems even when the Lagrangian is independent of time. This paper focuses on studying the Noether's theorem and its inverse of a Birkhoffian system in event space based on the Herglotz variational problem. Firstly, according to the Herglotz variational principle of a Birkhoffian system, the principle of a Birkhoffian system in event space is established. Secondly, its parametric equations and two basic formulae for the variation of Pfaff-Herglotz action of a Birkhoffian system in event space are obtained. Furthermore, the definition and criteria of Noether symmetry of the Birkhoffian system in event space based on the Herglotz variational problem are given. Then, according to the relationship between the Noether symmetry and conserved quantity, the Noether's theorem is derived. Under classical conditions, Noether's theorem of a Birkhoffian system in event space based on the Herglotz variational problem reduces to the classical ones. In addition, Noether's inverse theorem of the Birkhoffian system in event space based on the Herglotz variational problem is also obtained. In the end of the paper, an example is given to illustrate the application of the results.

  11. Performance variations of river water source heat pump system according to heat exchanger capacity variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Ryong; Baik, Young Jin; Lee, Young Soo; Kim, Hee Hwan

    2003-01-01

    The utilization of unused energy is important because it can afford to offer a chance to increase energy efficiency of a heat pump system. One of the promising unused energy sources is river water. It can be used as a heat source in both heating and cooling effectively with its superior features as a secondary working fluids. In this study, the performance of a 5HP heat pump system using river water as a heat source is investigated by both experiment and simulation. According to system simulation results, performance improvement of condenser seems more effective than that of evaporator for better COPH. The serial connection is also preferred among several methods to improve plate type heat exchanger performance. The experimental results show that the hot water of 50∼60 .deg. C can be acquired from water heat source of 5∼9 .deg. C with COPH of 2.7∼3.5

  12. Influence of ecological variation across Pistacia altantica on fruit oil content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi Bayzid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the western and central parts of Iran, there are more than eight million female trees of Pistacia atlantica Desf. with approximately 20,000 tons of fruit oil production ability. In order to evaluate the influence of select ecological characteristics, fruit samples of seven P. atlantica habitats in Kurdistan (Iran were collected in late October over two years (2013-14. Fruit oil was extracted using soxhlet extraction. The results showed a relatively small variation in oil content in fruit across plants of P. atlantica. The fruit oil content ranged from 25.4% to 28.4%, with a mean of 27.3%. Most habitats belonged to temperate and semi-arid regions, with higher longitude and altitude but less latitude and slope, higher soil electrical conductivity, total neutralizing value, organic carbon and clay, medium yearly rainfall, evaporation and sunny hours and also trees with medium ages such as Borban and Kashtar producing higher fruit oil yield than those that belonged to cool and semi-humid regions. Cluster analysis classified habitats into four distinct groups at 50% similarity; four habitats belonging to forest areas were located in the first, Borban and Kashtar in the second and third and Abdolmomen, with the coldest climate and the oldest trees, was in the fourth group. The results of principal component analysis (PCA revealed that habitats with low fruit oil showed extreme values of PC1 and PC2 but ones with high fruit oil were located mainly in the central zones of the bi plot, which suggest that habitats with medium ecological conditions produce higher fruit oil.

  13. Effects of energy variations of ions influencing a target on implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhov, V.P.; Rubtsov, V.A.; Aranovich, R.M.; Pavlov, P.V.

    1981-01-01

    In cases of phosphorus and boron ion implantation into silicon the dependence of electrophysical properties of ion-doped layers and target material near the layer boundaries on energy variation conditions of influencing ions is observed. A physical model explaining the dependence is proposed. It is found that for the target, being at room temperature, after successive annealing the qualitative characteristics of conditions (i.e. energy increase and decrease) on implantation of phosphorus ions into p-silicon and boron ions into n-silicon, as well as the value of energy stages, define rhosub(l) ion-doped layer resistivity and tausub(mc) nonequilibrium minority carrier lifetime in the base of p-n transitions. The essence of the effects observed is that for equal sets of Esub(i) ion energy values and PHIsub(i) corresponding phases at maximum energy used exceeding 30 keV, successive energy increase during implantation, when E 1 2 1 mode), leads to smaller rhosub(e) values and greater tausub(mc) than in case of successive energy decrease, when E 1 >E 2 >...E(E 2 mode) for any fixed annealing temperature. In cases when the maximum energy does not exceed 30 KeV, the E 1 and E 2 modes lead to analogous rhosub(e) and tausub(mc) values. The E 2 mode leads to enrichment of the ion-implanted layer with associations and complexes on the basis of interstitial atoms in comparison with the E 1 mode. The associations and complexes on thermal treatment are reformed into the higher-temperature interstitial complexes increasing rhosub(e) and decreasing tausub(mc). Supposition about the effect of these complexes and processes of structural transformations on annealing, hampering-improvement of structural properties of the ion-implanted layer and a crystal region bordered on it [ru

  14. The Influence of Smoking on the Variations in Carboxyhemoglobin and Methemoglobin During Urologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilovska-Brzanov, Aleksandra; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Mojsova-Mijovska, Maja; Jovanovski-Srceva, Marija; Taleska, Gordana; Brzanov, Nikola; Simeonov, Risto; Miceska, Maja Slaninka

    2017-06-01

    Surgery is supposed to modulate the production of carbon monoxide by the reduction of heme oxygenase activity or transcriptional regulation of inducible heme oxygenase. On the other hand, the inhalation of tobacco smoke can substantially raise the level of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood. Furthermore, methemoglobin is maintained at a constant level. However, excessive production of methemoglobin relative to total methemoglobin reductase activity results in methemoglobin increase. The aim of our study was to investigate the perioperative variations of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin during urologic surgeries, and at the same time to evaluate the changes in methemoglobin as a possible indicator of nitric oxide generation. Our second aim was to evaluate the effect of preoxygenation on the level of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin and the influence of blood transfusion on their changes. The study included 30 patients scheduled for urologic surgery under general endotracheal anesthesia, aged 18-60 years without any history of respiratory disease, divided into two groups. The study group comprised patients who were smoking cigarettes or tobacco pipe, while the control group included non-smokers. In both groups carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were determined preoperatively, after preoxygenation, and postoperatively. COHb levels were decreased postoperatively in both groups. The average values of COHb between the two groups were statistically significantly different (p=0.00). MetHb levels increased postoperatively in the group of smokers and decreased in the group of non-smokers. There were no statistically significant differences in the average postoperative MetHb levels between the two groups. Changes in carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin concentrations in arterial blood occur during urologic surgery, although these amplitudes are small when compared with carbon monoxide intoxication and methemoglobinemia. It is likely that organ

  15. Breeding system variation in 10 evening primroses (Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia; Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Kathryn E; Holsinger, Kent E; Evans, Margaret E K

    2010-06-01

    We examined two accounts of the relationship between breeding system and life history variation in a clade of evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae): (1) selection for reproductive assurance should generate an association between self-compatibility and monocarpy and (2) phylogenetic conservatism leads to retention of breeding system and life history traits among closely related taxa. • We performed over 4000 hand pollinations under greenhouse conditions to determine the compatibility of 10 Oenothera taxa (sections Anogra [17 taxa] and Kleinia [2 taxa)] for which breeding systems had not previously been reported. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the influence of pollination treatment, parents, and population on fruiting success. • Among the taxa tested, six were self-incompatible, two were variable in compatibility, and two were self-compatible. We combined these data with published studies in Anogra and Kleinia and mapped breeding system and life history onto a published phylogeny. • We found no evidence for phylogenetic conservatism, but detected considerable evolutionary lability in both traits. Additionally, we found no evidence for a consistent relationship between breeding system and life history. Only eight of 19 taxa followed the predicted association between self-incompatibility and polycarpy vs. self-compatibility and monocarpy. Instead, many taxa have retained self-incompatibility, regardless of monocarpy or polycarpy.

  16. Amplitude variation in calibrated audiometer systems in Clinical Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Barlow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual pure tone audiometry is considered to be the gold standard for the assessment of hearing thresholds and has been in consistent use for a long period of time. An increased legislative requirement to monitor and screen workers, and an increasing amount of legislation relating to hearing loss is putting greater reliance on this as a tool. There are a number of questions regarding the degree of accuracy of pure tone audiometry when undertaken in field conditions, particularly relating to the difference in conditions between laboratory calibration and clinical or industrial screening use. This study analyzed the output sound pressure level of four different commercial audiometers, all using TDH39 headphones and each of which had recently undergone calibration at an appropriate laboratory. Levels were measured using a Bruël and Kjaer Head and Torso simulator, which accurately replicates the size and shape of a human head, including the ears. A clinical environment was simulated by a trained audiometrist replacing the headphones for each test. Tests were undertaken at three presentation levels, and at the frequencies of 250 Hz, 500 Hz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz, 4 kHz and 6 kHz. The results showed a high level of test-retest variability, both between different audiometers and within the same audiometer. Maximum variation of sound pressure level at the ear for the same tone presentation was 21 decibels, with a particularly high level of variation at 6 kHz for all meters. An audiometer with attenuating cups exhibited significantly higher variation than ones using supral-aural headphones. Overall the variation exhibited suggests that there is a higher degree of potential error with screening pure tone audiometry than is commonly assumed and that results particularly at the 6 kHz frequency need to be assessed carefully alongside other methods such as speech audiometry.

  17. Microscopic description of nuclear few-body systems with the stochastic variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2000-01-01

    A simple gambling procedure called the stochastic variational method can be applied, together with appropriate variational trial functions, to solve a few-body system where the correlation between the constituents plays an important role in determining its structure. The usefulness of the method is tested by comparing to other accurate solutions for Coulombic systems. Examples of application shown here include few-nucleon systems interacting with realistic forces and few-cluster systems with the Pauli principle being taken into account properly. These examples confirm the power of the stochastic variational method. There still remain many problems for extending to a system consisting of more particles. (author)

  18. The influence of weather on the thermal performance of solar heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2003-01-01

    . The investigation is based on calculations with validated models. Solar heating systems with different solar collector types, heat storage volumes and solar fractions are included in the investigation. The yearly solar radiation varies with approximately 20 % in the period from 1990 until 2002. The calculations......The influence of weather on the thermal performance of solar combi systems, solar domestic hot water systems and solar heating plants is investigated. The investigation is based on weather data from the Danish Design Reference Year, DRY and weather data measured for a period from 1990 until 2002...... show that the thermal performance of the investigated systems varies due to the weather variation. The variation of the yearly thermal performance of a solar heating plant is about 40 % while the variation of the yearly thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water system is about 30...

  19. Influence of temporal variation and host condition on helminth abundance in the lizard Tropidurus hispidus from north-eastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, J A Araujo; Brito, S V; Lima, V F; Pereira, A M A; Mesquita, D O; Albuquerque, R L; Almeida, W O

    2017-05-01

    Ecological characteristics and environmental variation influence both host species composition and parasite abundance. Abiotic factors such as rainfall and temperature can improve parasite development and increase its reproduction rate. The comparison of these assemblages between different environments may give us a more refined analysis of how environment affects the variation of helminth parasite abundance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how temporal variation, host size, sex and reproduction affect helminth abundance in the Tropidurus hispidus lizard in Caatinga, Restinga and Atlantic Forest environments. Overall, larger-sized lizards showed higher helminth abundance. We found a monthly variation in the helminth species abundance in all studied areas. In the Caatinga area, monoxenic and heteroxenic parasites were related to the rainy season and to the reproductive period of lizards. In Restinga, monoxenic and heteroxenic helminth species were more abundant during the driest months. In the Atlantic Forest, the rainy and host reproductive season occurred continuously throughout the year, so parasite abundance was relatively constant. Nevertheless, heteroxenic species were more abundant in this area. The present results showed that the temporal variation, body size, sex, reproductive period and habitat type influence the abundance and composition of helminth species in T. hispidus.

  20. Influence of swirl ratio on fuel distribution and cyclic variation under flash boiling conditions in a spark ignition direct injection gasoline engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jie; Xu, Min; Hung, David L.S.; Wu, Qiang; Dong, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of swirl on fuel distribution studied using laser induced fluorescence. • Gradient is sufficient for fuel spatial distribution variation analysis. • Close relation between fuel distribution and flame initiation/development. • Quantitative analysis shows high swirl suppresses variation of fuel distribution. • High order modes capable of identifying the distribution fluctuation patterns. - Abstract: One effective way of suppressing the cycle-to-cycle variation in engine is to design a combustion system that is robust to the root causes of engine variation over the entire engine working process. Flash boiling has been demonstrated as an ideal technique to produce stable fuel spray. But the generation of stable intake flow and fuel mixture remains challenging. In this study, to evaluate the capability of enhanced swirl flow to produce repeatable fuel mixture formation, the fuel distribution inside a single cylinder optical engine under two swirl ratios were measured using laser induced fluorescence technique. The swirl ratio was regulated by a swirl control valve installed in one of the intake ports. A 266 nm wavelength laser sheet from a frequency-quadrupled laser was directed into the optical engine through the quartz liner 15 mm below the tip of the spark plug. The fluorescence signal from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in gasoline was collected by applying a 320–420 nm band pass filter mounted in front of an intensified charge coupled device camera. Test results show that the in-cylinder fuel distribution is strongly influenced by the swirl ratio. Specifically, under high swirl condition, the fuel is mainly concentrated on the left side of the combustion chamber. While under the low swirl flow, fuel is distributed more randomly over the observing plane. This agrees well with the measurements of the stable flame location. Additionally, the cycle-to-cycle variation of the fuel distribution were analyzed. Results show that well

  1. Diurnal variation in the performance of rapid response systems: the role of critical care services-a review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy; Flabouris, Arthas; Thompson, Campbell

    2016-01-01

    The type of medical review before an adverse event influences patient outcome. Delays in the up-transfer of patients requiring intensive care are associated with higher mortality rates. Timely detection and response to a deteriorating patient constitute an important function of the rapid response system (RRS). The activation of the RRS for at-risk patients constitutes the system's afferent limb. Afferent limb failure (ALF), an important performance measure of rapid response systems, constitutes a failure to activate a rapid response team (RRT) despite criteria for calling an RRT. There are diurnal variations in hospital staffing levels, the performance of rapid response systems and patient outcomes. Fewer ward-based nursing staff at night may contribute to ALF. The diurnal variability in RRS activity is greater in unmonitored units than it is in monitored units for events that should result in a call for an RRT. RRT events include a significant abnormality in either the pulse rate, blood pressure, conscious state or respiratory rate. There is also diurnal variation in RRT summoning rates, with most activations occurring during the day. The reasons for this variation are mostly speculative, but the failure of the afferent limb of RRT activation, particularly at night, may be a factor. The term "circadian variation/rhythm" applies to physiological variations over a 24-h cycle. In contrast, diurnal variation applies more accurately to extrinsic systems. Circadian rhythm has been demonstrated in a multitude of bodily functions and disease states. For example, there is an association between disrupted circadian rhythms and abnormal vital parameters such as anomalous blood pressure, irregular pulse rate, aberrant endothelial function, myocardial infarction, stroke, sleep-disordered breathing and its long-term consequences of hypertension, heart failure and cognitive impairment. Therefore, diurnal variation in patient outcomes may be extrinsic, and more easily modifiable

  2. The Influence of Weather Variation, Urban Design and Built Environment on Objectively Measured Sedentary Behaviour in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapally, Tarun Reddy; Rainham, Daniel; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2016-01-01

    With emerging evidence indicating that independent of physical activity, sedentary behaviour (SB) can be detrimental to health, researchers are increasingly aiming to understand the influence of multiple contexts such as urban design and built environment on SB. However, weather variation, a factor that continuously interacts with all other environmental variables, has been consistently underexplored. This study investigated the influence of diverse environmental exposures (including weather variation, urban design and built environment) on SB in children. This cross-sectional observational study is part of an active living research initiative set in the Canadian prairie city of Saskatoon. Saskatoon's neighbourhoods were classified based on urban street design into grid-pattern, fractured grid-pattern and curvilinear types of neighbourhoods. Diverse environmental exposures were measured including, neighbourhood built environment, and neighbourhood and household socioeconomic environment. Actical accelerometers were deployed between April and June 2010 (spring-summer) to derive SB of 331 10-14 year old children in 25 one week cycles. Each cycle of accelerometry was conducted on a different cohort of children within the total sample. Accelerometer data were matched with localized weather patterns derived from Environment Canada weather data. Multilevel modeling using Hierarchical Linear and Non-linear Modeling software was conducted by factoring in weather variation to depict the influence of diverse environmental exposures on SB. Both weather variation and urban design played a significant role in SB. After factoring in weather variation, it was observed that children living in grid-pattern neighbourhoods closer to the city centre (with higher diversity of destinations) were less likely to be sedentary. This study demonstrates a methodology that could be replicated to integrate geography-specific weather patterns with existing cross-sectional accelerometry data to

  3. [Spatial variation in diurnal courses of stem temperature of Betula platyphylla and Fraxinus mandshurica and its influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Ran; Wang, Xing Chang; Wang, Chuan Kuan; Liu, Fan; Zhang, Quan Zhi

    2017-10-01

    Plant temperature is an important parameter for estimating energy balance and vegetation respiration of forest ecosystem. To examine spatial variation in diurnal courses of stem temperatures (T s ) and its influencing factors, we measured the T s with copper constantan thermocouples at different depths, heights and azimuths within the stems of two broadleaved tree species with contrasting bark and wood properties, Betula platyphylla and Fraxinus mandshurica. The results showed that the monthly mean diurnal courses of the T s largely followed that of air temperature with a 'sinusoi dal' pattern, but the T s lagged behind the air temperature by 0 h at the stem surface to 4 h at 6 cm depth. The daily maximal values and ranges of the diurnal course of T s decreased gradually with increasing measuring depth across the stem and decreasing measuring height along the stem. The circumferential variation in T s was marginal, with slightly higher daily maximal values in the south and west directions during the daytime of the dormant season. Differences in thermal properties (i.e. , specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity) of both bark and wood tissue between the two species contributed to the inter specific variations in the radial variation in T s through influencing the heat exchange between the stem surface and ambient air as well as heat diffusion within the stem. The higher reflectance of the bark of B. platyphylla decreased the influence of solar radiation on T s . The stepwise regression showed that the diurnal courses of T s could be well predicted by the environmental factors (R 2 > 0.85) with an order of influence ranking as air temperature > water vapor pressure > net radiation > wind speed. It is necessary to take the radial, vertical and inter specific varia-tions in T s into account when estimating biomass heat storage and stem CO2 efflux.

  4. Long scale astronomical variations in our solar system: consequences for future ice ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvardsson, S.; Karlsson, K.G.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that the Earth has gone through a number of glaciations during the last few million years. It is generally agreed that changes in the Earth's orbital parameters and obliquity play an important role in climate forcing, an idea originally due to Milutin Milankovitch. The climatic history of the Earth shows clear evidence of the precession periods (about 19 000 and 23 000 years) and changes in the obliquity (period about 41 000 years). The main period in glacial data (around 100 000 years) is, however, hard to explain in terms of orbital variations. During the last decade or so a large number of simulations of the planetary system have been reported, many of which have been concerned with the influence of variations in the Earth's orbit on climate. In former studies comparisons have been made between the astronomical parameters and the ice volume of the Earth. Generally speaking, the match between astronomical forcing and ice data has been rather poor. In this study we instead compare the parameters with changes in ice volume, which yields a much better agreement between the astronomical and the geological data. A number of climate models have been constructed to reproduce past climate history, and also to make predictions about the future. These are purely empirical models designed to match certain periods of past climate. Typically they also involve a substantial number of free parameters. (authors)

  5. Convex Minimization with Constraints of Systems of Variational Inequalities, Mixed Equilibrium, Variational Inequality, and Fixed Point Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Chuan Ceng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and analyze one iterative algorithm by hybrid shrinking projection method for finding a solution of the minimization problem for a convex and continuously Fréchet differentiable functional, with constraints of several problems: finitely many generalized mixed equilibrium problems, finitely many variational inequalities, the general system of variational inequalities and the fixed point problem of an asymptotically strict pseudocontractive mapping in the intermediate sense in a real Hilbert space. We prove strong convergence theorem for the iterative algorithm under suitable conditions. On the other hand, we also propose another iterative algorithm by hybrid shrinking projection method for finding a fixed point of infinitely many nonexpansive mappings with the same constraints, and derive its strong convergence under mild assumptions.

  6. Diagnosing Atmospheric Influences on the Interannual 18O/16O Variations in Western U.S. Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yoshimura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many climate proxies in geological archives are dependent on the isotopic content of precipitation (δ18Op, which over sub-annual timescales has been linked to temperature, condensation height, atmospheric circulation, and post-condensation exchanges in the western U.S. However, many proxies do not resolve temporal changes finer than interannual-scales. This study explores causes of the interannual variations in δ18Op within the western U.S. Simulations with the Isotope-incorporated Global Spectral Model (IsoGSM revealed an amplifying influence of post-condensation exchanges (i.e., raindrop evaporation and vapor equilibration on interannual δ18Op variations throughout the western U.S. Mid-latitude and subtropical vapor tagging simulations showed that the influence of moisture advection on δ18Op was relatively strong in the Pacific Northwest, but weak over the rest of the western U.S. The vapor tags correlated well with interannual variations in the 18O/16O composition of vapor, an indication that isotopes in vapor trace atmospheric circulation. However, vertical-tagging simulations revealed a strong influence of condensation height on δ18Op in California. In the interior of the western U.S., a strong temperature effect was found only after annual mean temperatures were weighted by monthly precipitation totals. These multiple influences on δ18Op complicate interpretations of western U.S. climate proxies that are derived from isotopes in precipitation.

  7. Systems genetics analysis of pharmacogenomics variation during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Kogelman, L J A; Kadarmideen, H N

    2016-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely used antidepressants, but the efficacy of the treatment varies significantly among individuals. It is believed that complex genetic mechanisms play a part in this variation. We have used a network based approach to unravel the in...... genes involved in calcium homeostasis. In conclusion, we suggest a difference in genetic interaction networks between initial and subsequent SSRI response.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 18 October 2016; doi:10.1038/tpj.2016.68....

  8. Tidal variations in the Sundarbans estuarine system, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterjee, M.; Shankar, D.; Sen, G.K.; Sanyal, P.; Sundar, D.; Michael, G.S.; Chatterjee, A.; Amol, P.; Mukherjee, D.; Suprit, K.; Mukherjee, A.; Vijith, V.; Chatterjee, S.; Basu, A.; Das, M.; Chakraborti, S.; Kalla, A.; Misra, S.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Mandal, G.; Sarkar, K.

    Situated in the eastern coastal state of West Bengal, the Sundarbans Estuarine System (SES) is India’s largest monsoonal, macro-tidal delta-front estuarine system. It comprises the southernmost part of the Indian portion of the Ganga...

  9. Do the earth tides have an influence on short-term variations in radon concentration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnet, I.; Prochazka, J.; Skalsky, L.

    1997-01-01

    The short term (diurnal) indoor radon variations are often explained as a result of temperature and air pressure changes inside a dwelling (the so-called stack effect). The observations of indoor and soil gas radon variations related to the temperature and pressure variations in a test dwelling at Lipova, Northern Bohemia, have not proved the expected correlation between the radon and climatic parameters. The stack effect was clearly observed at the beginning of the four week cycles, when the indoor temperature growth was obvious. However, the indoor radon variations were of the same range or higher than at the beginning of the cycles during the whole week cycles, even when the temperature changes were of the 1-3 o C range. A theory is therefore presented, supported by the known fluctuations of the groundwater level caused by the Earth tides, and the widely observed free air radon variations. According to this theory, the Earth tides lead to the compression of the aquifers and synchronous rise of the groundwater level, which displaces the soil gas with radon into the atmosphere or dwellings. The Earth tide components were calculated for the studied locality and time intervals. The very good phase fit of the amplitudes of gravity variations, vertical and volume strain and vertical displacement with the indoor radon variations was found. This agreement leads to the conclusion that the Earth tides can be considered as one of the causes of the indoor radon variations. This conclusion is also supported by the observations of the radon variations in the underground unventilated spaces under constant temperature and air pressure conditions. (Author)

  10. Determining the influence of Korean population variation on whole-body average SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Choi, Hyung-Do

    2012-05-07

    Compliance of the ICNIRP reference and IEEE action levels with the basic restrictions on whole-body average (WBA) SAR was investigated based on age, physique, and posture under isolated and grounded conditions. First, Korean male models 1, 3, 5, 7, and 20 years of age with body sizes in the 50th percentile were developed and used as the test subjects: 1y(50th), 3y(50th), 5y(50th), 7y(50th), and 20y(50th). The effects of age-dependent dielectric properties due to the water content of the tissue on WBA SAR were analysed, and showed that the changes in WBA SAR are marginal. At the ages of 1, 5, and 20, thin models 1y(10th), 5y(10th), and 20y(10th) with body sizes in the 10th percentile for the horizontal plane were added in order to determine the influence of physical variations of the population. We considered standing postures with arms up and arms down. The WBA SAR for each human model was calculated when exposed to a vertically polarized plane wave in the frequency range of 10 MHz-3 GHz using the finite-difference time-domain method. The evaluated WBA SAR-based safety factor of each model is discussed for exposure to the ICNIRP reference and IEEE action levels. Finally, the lowest external electric field strength required to produce the basic restrictions on the WBA SAR, 0.08 W kg(-1), was obtained. The results showed that the ICNIRP public reference level is not conservative in the frequency range of 20-200 MHz for an arms-up posture, in the range of 40-200 MHz for an arms-down posture, and above 1 GHz for both postures. The IEEE action level is different from the ICNIRP reference level below 30 MHz, where most cases showed a safety factor of less than 50, which is the minimum value compliant with the basic restrictions for exposure to the general public.

  11. Melanic variation underlies aposematic color variation in two hymenopteran mimicry systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Hines

    Full Text Available The stinging hymenopteran velvet ants (Mutillidae and bumble bees (Apidae: Bombus spp. have both undergone extensive diversification in aposematic color patterns, including yellow-red hues and contrasting dark-light body coloration, as a result of Müllerian mimicry. Understanding the genetic and developmental mechanisms underlying shifts in these mimetic colors requires characterization of their pigmentation. In this study, a combination of solubility, spectrophotometry, and melanin degradation analysis are applied to several color forms and species of these lineages to determine that orange-red colors in both lineages are comprised of primarily dopamine-derived pheomelanins. Until a few recent studies, pheomelanins were thought not to occur in insects. These results support their potential to occur across insects and particularly among the Hymenoptera. Shifts between black and orange-red colors, such as between mimetic color forms of bumble bee Bombus melanopygus, are inferred to involve modification of the ratios of dark eumelanins to red pheomelanins, thus implicating the melanin pathway in mimetic diversification. This discovery highlights the need to focus on how pheomelanins are synthesized in the insect melanin pathway and the potential for new pigments to be found even in some of our most well-known insect systems.

  12. [Track and trigger systems in Denmark - small country, great variations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønnee, Mads; Bukan, Ramin Brandt; Waldau, Tina; Møller, Ann Merete; Bukan, Katrine Brandt

    2018-05-07

    A track and trigger (TAT) system and mobile emergency team (MET) can aid observation and care for admitted patients in the hospital ward. We have examined the literature and find evidence, though not strong, that the introduction of TAT and MET systems reduce hospital mortality. However, in Denmark, many different TAT systems are used, and several hospitals do not have MET. We believe, that a standardised national TAT system could encourage interregional research and the investigation of system compliance, cost-benefit and impact on intensive care unit admissions.

  13. [Study on the dynamic variations and influencing factors of serum lipid levels during pregnancy and postpartum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D; Liang, C; Chen, L; Wu, X D; He, J

    2018-04-25

    Objective: To study the variations and influencing factors of serum triglycerides and cholesterol levels during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods: A retrospective study was performed among 5 020 healthy singleton (95.10%, 4 774/5 020) and twin (4.90%, 246/5 020) women who had delivery in Women's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine from January 2011 to December 2016. Serum triglycerides and cholesterol levels during pregnancy and postpartum of all the cases were collected. Both singleton and twin pregnant women were divided into advanced age and appropriate age groups, and then data of serum sample were assigned to 3 groups according to the gestation weeks, which were second trimester pregnancy (24-28 gestation weeks) , third trimester pregnancy (32-41 gestation weeks) and postpartum (within 72 hours after delivery) . The serum triglycerides and cholesterol levels in each groups were compared. Results: (1) Serum triglycerides and cholesterol levels during the second trimester pregnancy, third trimester pregnancy and postpartum were higher than levels of non-pregnancy in both singleton and twin groups (all Ppregnancy group were higher than those of second trimester pregnancy group in both advanced age and appropriate aged women regardless singleton or twin pregnancy (all Ppregnancy were as follows: in appropriate aged singleton group, the triglycerides levels were 1.07-4.13 and 1.52-7.21 mmol/L, and the cholesterol levels were 2.77-12.11 and 4.44-9.36 mmol/L. In advanced aged singleton group, the triglycerides levels were 1.28-4.61 and 1.70-7.80 mmol/L, and the cholesterol levels were 4.35-8.40 and 4.46-9.35 mmol/L; in appropriate aged twin group, the triglycerides levels were 1.39-7.16 and 1.90-9.29 mmol/L, and the cholesterol levels were 4.99-12.16 and 4.52-10.07 mmol/L; in advanced aged twin group, the triglycerides levels were 1.61-5.32 and 1.94-9.29 mmol/L, and the cholesterol levels were 5.24-8.10 and 4.53-8.86 mmol/L. (3) Serum lipids levels

  14. Monsoonal influence on variation of hydrochemistry and isotopic signatures: Implications for associated arsenic release in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Santanu; Datta, Saugata; Nath, Bibhash; Neidhardt, Harald; Sarkar, Simita; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Berner, Zsolt; Hidalgo, Manuela; Chatterjee, Debankur; Chatterjee, Debashis

    2016-04-01

    The present study examines the groundwater and surface water geochemistry of two different geomorphic domains within the Chakdaha block, West Bengal, in an attempt to decipher potential influences of groundwater abstraction on the hydrochemical evolution of the aquifer, the effect of different water inputs (monsoon rain, irrigation and downward percolation from surface water impoundments) to the groundwater system and concomitant As release. A low-land flood plain and a natural levee have been selected for this purpose. Although the stable isotopic signatures of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δ2H) are largely controlled by local precipitation, the isotopic composition falls sub-parallel to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). The Cl/Br molar ratio indicates vertical recharge into the wells within the flood plain area, especially during the post-monsoon season, while influences of both evaporation and vertical mixing are visible within the natural levee wells. Increase in mean DOC concentrations (from 1.33 to 6.29 mg/L), from pre- to post-monsoon season, indicates possible inflow of organic carbon to the aquifer during the monsoonal recharge. Concomitant increase in AsT, Fe(II) and HCO3- highlights a possible initial episode of reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. The subsequent sharp increase in the mean As(III) proportions (by 223%), particularly in the flood plain samples during the post-monsoon season, which is accompanied by a slight increase in mean AsT (7%) may refer to anaerobic microbial degradation of DOC coupled with the reduction of As(V) to As(III) without triggering additional As release from the aquifer sediments.

  15. TO DETERMINATION OF INFLUENCE FOR VARIATIONS IN LASER TREATMENT MODES ON TRIBOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CUTTING TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to higher durability and reliability of a cutting tool for cutting gastronomic products while using laser processing that leads to resistance increase of material operating surfaces against impact forces. Influence of laser fusion with additional doping on structure, microhardness, wear resistance for adhesive coatings of Fe–B–Cr–Si system has been studied in the paper. In order to solve a problem for selection of optimal qualitative and subsequently quantitative composition of a multi-component coating a mathematical modeling method using Scheffe’s simplex lattices has been used in the paper. Similar tendency for measuring micro-structure of all adhesive coatings fused by laser beams has been established in the paper. Increase in beam speed has caused the following microstructure changes: cast equilibrium, dendrite, supersaturated boride, carbide and boride. Response surface models have been found and they provide the possibility to assess influence quantity of laser processing parameters on microhardness of adhesive coatings obtained by laser doping and intensity of their wear under various conditions for all investigated compositions.It has been ascertained that there is no strict correlation between hardness and intensity of coating wear after laser doping used for adhesive coatings. This testifies to the fact that hardening has taken place not only due to an increase of carbide-boride phase, but also due to matrix hardening.In addition, a regression model for coating composition effect on tribological characteristics of the adhesive coatings has revealed that an optimal composition of a multicomponent coating ensuring maximum wear resistance of coatings constitutes B4C is 2/3 and 1/3 TaB. It has been determined that hardening of the adhesive coating after laser doping while using multicomponent coating occurs not only due to increase of carbide-boridnoy phase, but also due to matrix hardening.

  16. Cultural Variation in Situation Assessment: Influence of Source Credibility and Rank Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heacox, N

    2000-01-01

    .... Although information content, rank status, and source credibility have received much attention by researchers in command and control decision-making, cultural variations in these factors have seldom been studied...

  17. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay characterization of Basal variation and heritability of systemic microfibrillar-associated protein 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sækmose, Susanne Gjørup; Schlosser, Anders; Holst, René

    2013-01-01

    Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is a systemic biomarker that is significantly elevated in samples from patients suffering from hepatic cirrhosis. The protein is generally localized to elastic fibers and other connective tissue fibers in the extracellular matrix (ECM), and variation...... in systemic MFAP4 (sMFAP4) has the potential to reflect diverse diseases with increased ECM turnover. Here, we aimed to validate an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the measurement of sMFAP4 with an emphasis on the robustness of the assay. Moreover, we aimed to determine confounders influencing...

  18. Variation partitioning of diatom species data matrices: Understanding the influence of multiple factors on benthic diatom communities in tropical streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bere, Taurai, E-mail: tbere2015@gmail.com; Mangadze, Tinotenda; Mwedzi, Tongai

    2016-10-01

    Elucidating the confounding influence of multiple environmental factors on benthic diatom communities is important in developing water quality predictive models for better guidance of stream management efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relative impact of metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations in, addition to nutrient enrichment and organic pollution, on diatom taxonomic composition with the view to improve stream diatom-based water quality inference models. Samples were collected twice at 20 sampling stations in the tropical Manyame Catchment, Zimbabwe. Diatom, macroinvertebrate communities and environmental factors were sampled and analysed. The variations in diatom community composition explained by different categories of environmental factors were analysed using canonical correspondence analysis using variance partitioning (partial CCA). The following variations were explained by the different predictor matrices: nutrient levels and organic pollution - 10.4%, metal pollution - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. Thus, factors other than nutrient levels and organic pollution explain additional significant variation in these diatom communities. Development of diatom-based stream water quality inference models that incorporate metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations, where these are key issues, is thus deemed necessary. - Highlights: • Confounding influences of multiple environmental factors on diatom communities are elucidated. • Variation explained: nutrients + organic pollution - 10.4%, metals - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. • Calibration of existing or development of new indices may be necessary.

  19. Influence of seasonal variations in sea level on the salinity regime of a coastal groundwater-fed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Cameron; Harrington, Glenn A

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal variations in sea level are often neglected in studies of coastal aquifers; however, they may have important controls on processes such as submarine groundwater discharge, sea water intrusion, and groundwater discharge to coastal springs and wetlands. We investigated seasonal variations in salinity in a groundwater-fed coastal wetland (the RAMSAR listed Piccaninnie Ponds in South Australia) and found that salinity peaked during winter, coincident with seasonal sea level peaks. Closer examination of salinity variations revealed a relationship between changes in sea level and changes in salinity, indicating that sea level-driven movement of the fresh water-sea water interface influences the salinity of discharging groundwater in the wetland. Moreover, the seasonal control of sea level on wetland salinity seems to override the influence of seasonal recharge. A two-dimensional variable density model helped validate this conceptual model of coastal groundwater discharge by showing that fluctuations in groundwater salinity in a coastal aquifer can be driven by a seasonal coastal boundary condition in spite of seasonal recharge/discharge dynamics. Because seasonal variations in sea level and coastal wetlands are ubiquitous throughout the world, these findings have important implications for monitoring and management of coastal groundwater-dependent ecosystems. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  20. Variation partitioning of diatom species data matrices: Understanding the influence of multiple factors on benthic diatom communities in tropical streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bere, Taurai; Mangadze, Tinotenda; Mwedzi, Tongai

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the confounding influence of multiple environmental factors on benthic diatom communities is important in developing water quality predictive models for better guidance of stream management efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relative impact of metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations in, addition to nutrient enrichment and organic pollution, on diatom taxonomic composition with the view to improve stream diatom-based water quality inference models. Samples were collected twice at 20 sampling stations in the tropical Manyame Catchment, Zimbabwe. Diatom, macroinvertebrate communities and environmental factors were sampled and analysed. The variations in diatom community composition explained by different categories of environmental factors were analysed using canonical correspondence analysis using variance partitioning (partial CCA). The following variations were explained by the different predictor matrices: nutrient levels and organic pollution - 10.4%, metal pollution - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. Thus, factors other than nutrient levels and organic pollution explain additional significant variation in these diatom communities. Development of diatom-based stream water quality inference models that incorporate metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations, where these are key issues, is thus deemed necessary. - Highlights: • Confounding influences of multiple environmental factors on diatom communities are elucidated. • Variation explained: nutrients + organic pollution - 10.4%, metals - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. • Calibration of existing or development of new indices may be necessary.

  1. Environmental calcium and variation in yolk sac size influence swimming performance in larval lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deslauriers, David; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Genz, Janet

    2018-01-01

    , because the yolk sac is likely to affect drag forces during swimming. Testing swimming performance of larval A. fulvescens reared in four different calcium treatments spanning the range of 4-132 mg l-1 [Ca2+], this study found no treatment effects on the sprint swimming speed. A novel test of volitional...... reduced swimming performance and could be more susceptible to predation or premature downstream drift. Our study reveals how environmental factors and phenotypic variation influence locomotor performance in a larval fish....

  2. Both male and female identity influence variation in male signalling effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svensson P Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male sexual displays play an important role in sexual selection by affecting reproductive success. However, for such displays to be useful for female mate choice, courtship should vary more among than within individual males. In this regard, a potentially important source of within male variation is adjustment of male courtship effort in response to female traits. Accordingly, we set out to dissect sources of variation in male courtship effort in a fish, the desert goby (Chlamydogobius eremius. We did so by designing an experiment that allowed simultaneous estimation of within and between male variation in courtship, while also assessing the importance of the males and females as sources of courtship variation. Results Although males adjusted their courtship depending on the identity of the female (a potentially important source of within-male variation, among-male differences were considerably greater. In addition, male courtship effort towards a pair of females was highly repeatable over a short time frame. Conclusion Despite the plasticity in male courtship effort, courtship displays had the potential to reliably convey information about the male to mate-searching females. Our experiment therefore underscores the importance of addressing the different sources contributing to variation in the expression of sexually-selected traits.

  3. Solar activity influence on climatic variations of stratosphere and mesosphere in mid-latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubenheim, J.; Entzian, G.; Voncossart, G.

    1989-01-01

    The direct modulation of temperature of the mid-latitude mesosphere by the solar-cycle EUV variation, which leads to greater heat input at higher solar activity, is well established. Middle atmosphere temperature modulation by the solar cycle is independently confirmed by the variation of reflection heights of low frequency radio waves in the lower ionosphere, which are regularly monitored over about 30 years. As explained elsewhere in detail, these reflection heights depend on the geometric altitude of a certain isobaric surface (near 80 k), and on the solar ionizing Lyman-alpha radiation flux. Knowing the solar cycle variation of Lyman-alpha how much the measured reflection heights would be lowered with the transition from solar minimum to maximum can be calculated, if the vertical baric structure of the neutral atmosphere would remain unchanged. Any discrepancy between expected and observed height change must be explained by an uplifting of the isobaric level from solar minimum to maximum, caused by the temperature rise in the mesosphere. By integrating the solar cycle temperature changes over the height region of the middle atmosphere, and assuming that the lower boundary (tropopause) has no solar cycle variation, the magnitude of this uplifting can be estimated. It is given for the Lidar-derived and for the rocket-measured temperature variations. Comparison suggests that the real amplitude of the solar cycle temperature variation in the mesosphere is underestimated when using the rocket data, but probably overestimated with the Lidar data

  4. Patient, Physician and Organizational Influences on Variation in Antipsychotic Prescribing Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Lave, Judith R; Gellad, Walid F; Huskamp, Haiden A; Donohue, Julie M

    2016-03-01

    Physicians face the choice of multiple ingredients when prescribing drugs in many therapeutic categories. For conditions with considerable patient heterogeneity in treatment response, customizing treatment to individual patient needs and preferences may improve outcomes. To assess variation in the diversity of antipsychotic prescribing for mental health conditions, a necessary although not sufficient condition for personalizing treatment. To identify patient caseload, physician, and organizational factors associated with the diversity of antipsychotic prescribing. Using 2011 data from Pennsylvania's Medicaid program, IMS Health's HCOSTM database, and the AMA Masterfile, we identified 764 psychiatrists who prescribed antipsychotics to 10 patients. We constructed three physician-level measures of diversity/concentration of antipsychotic prescribing: number of ingredients prescribed, share of prescriptions for most preferred ingredient, and Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI). We used multiple membership linear mixed models to examine patient caseload, physician, and healthcare organizational predictors of physician concentration of antipsychotic prescribing. There was substantial variability in antipsychotic prescribing concentration among psychiatrists, with number of ingredients ranging from 2-17, share for most preferred ingredient from 16%-85%, and HHI from 1,088-7,270. On average, psychiatrist prescribing behavior was relatively diversified; however, 11% of psychiatrists wrote an average of 55% of their prescriptions for their most preferred ingredient. Female prescribers and those with smaller shares of disabled or serious mental illness patients had more concentrated prescribing behavior on average. Antipsychotic prescribing by individual psychiatrists in a large state Medicaid program varied substantially across psychiatrists. Our findings illustrate the importance of understanding physicians' prescribing behavior and indicate that even among specialties

  5. A variational integrators approach to second order modeling and identification of linear mechanical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruschetta, M.; Saccon, A.; Picci, G.

    2014-01-01

    The theory of variational integration provides a systematic procedure to discretize the equations of motion of a mechanical system, preserving key properties of the continuous time flow. The discrete-time model obtained by variational integration theory inherits structural conditions which in

  6. The inverse problem of the calculus of variations for discrete systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero-Liñán, María; Farré Puiggalí, Marta; Ferraro, Sebastián; Martín de Diego, David

    2018-05-01

    We develop a geometric version of the inverse problem of the calculus of variations for discrete mechanics and constrained discrete mechanics. The geometric approach consists of using suitable Lagrangian and isotropic submanifolds. We also provide a transition between the discrete and the continuous problems and propose variationality as an interesting geometric property to take into account in the design and computer simulation of numerical integrators for constrained systems. For instance, nonholonomic mechanics is generally non variational but some special cases admit an alternative variational description. We apply some standard nonholonomic integrators to such an example to study which ones conserve this property.

  7. Understanding genetic variation - the value of systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Pharmacology is currently transformed by the vast amounts of genome-associated information available for system-level interpretation. Here I review the potential of systems biology to facilitate this interpretation, thus paving the way for the emerging field of systems pharmacology. In particular, I will show how gene regulatory and metabolic networks can serve as a framework for interpreting high throughput data and as an interface to detailed dynamical models. In addition to the established connectivity analyses of effective networks, I suggest here to also analyze higher order architectural properties of effective networks. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Designing, Modeling and Evaluating Influence Strategiesfor Behavior Change Support Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öörni, Anssi; Kelders, Saskia Marion; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri

    2014-01-01

    Behavior change support systems (BCSS) research is an evolving area. While the systems have been demonstrated to work to the effect, there is still a lot of work to be done to better understand the influence mechanisms of behavior change, and work out their influence on the systems architecture. The

  9. Orbits and variational principles for conservative Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres del Castillo, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that for any Hamiltonian system whose Hamiltonian is time-independent the equations that determine the orbits followed by the system, without making reference to time, have the form of Hamilton's equations in a phase space of dimension two units smaller than that of the original phase space. By considering the cases of classical mechanics and of geometrical optics, it is shown that this result amounts, respectively, to Maupertuis' least action principle and to Fermat's principle. (Author)

  10. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  11. Influence of geometry variations on the gravitational focusing of timelike geodesic congruences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriu, Masafumi

    2015-10-01

    We derive a set of equations describing the linear response of the convergence properties of a geodesic congruence to arbitrary geometry variations. It is a combination of equations describing the deviations from the standard Raychaudhuri-type equations due to the geodesic shifts and an equation describing the geodesic shifts due to the geometry variations. In this framework, the geometry variations, which can be chosen arbitrarily, serve as probes to investigate the gravitational contraction processes from various angles. We apply the obtained framework to the case of conformal geometry variations, characterized by an arbitrary function f (x ), and see that the formulas get simplified to a great extent. We investigate the response of the convergence properties of geodesics in the latest phase of gravitational contractions by restricting the class of conformal geometry variations to the one satisfying the strong energy condition. We then find out that in the final stage, f and D .D f control the overall contraction behavior and that the contraction rate gets larger when f is negative and |f | is so large as to overwhelm |D .D f |. (Here D .D is the Laplacian operator on the spatial hypersurfaces orthogonal to the geodesic congruence in concern.) To get more concrete insights, we also apply the framework to the time-reversed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model as the simplest case of the singularity formations.

  12. Influence of Population Variation of Physiological Parameters in Computational Models of Space Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. G.; Feola, A.; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The earliest manifestations of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome become evident after months of spaceflight and include a variety of ophthalmic changes, including posterior globe flattening and distension of the optic nerve sheath. Prevailing evidence links the occurrence of VIIP to the cephalic fluid shift induced by microgravity and the subsequent pressure changes around the optic nerve and eye. Deducing the etiology of VIIP is challenging due to the wide range of physiological parameters that may be influenced by spaceflight and are required to address a realistic spectrum of physiological responses. Here, we report on the application of an efficient approach to interrogating physiological parameter space through computational modeling. Specifically, we assess the influence of uncertainty in input parameters for two models of VIIP syndrome: a lumped-parameter model (LPM) of the cardiovascular and central nervous systems, and a finite-element model (FEM) of the posterior eye, optic nerve head (ONH) and optic nerve sheath. Methods: To investigate the parameter space in each model, we employed Latin hypercube sampling partial rank correlation coefficient (LHSPRCC) strategies. LHS techniques outperform Monte Carlo approaches by enforcing efficient sampling across the entire range of all parameters. The PRCC method estimates the sensitivity of model outputs to these parameters while adjusting for the linear effects of all other inputs. The LPM analysis addressed uncertainties in 42 physiological parameters, such as initial compartmental volume and nominal compartment percentage of total cardiac output in the supine state, while the FEM evaluated the effects on biomechanical strain from uncertainties in 23 material and pressure parameters for the ocular anatomy. Results and Conclusion: The LPM analysis identified several key factors including high sensitivity to the initial fluid distribution. The FEM study found that intraocular pressure and

  13. The covariance between genetic and environmental influences across ecological gradients: reassessing the evolutionary significance of countergradient and cogradient variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David O; Duffy, Tara A; Hice, Lyndie A

    2009-06-01

    Patterns of phenotypic change across environmental gradients (e.g., latitude, altitude) have long captivated the interest of evolutionary ecologists. The pattern and magnitude of phenotypic change is determined by the covariance between genetic and environmental influences across a gradient. Cogradient variation (CoGV) occurs when covariance is positive: that is, genetic and environmental influences on phenotypic expression are aligned and their joint influence accentuates the change in mean trait value across the gradient. Conversely, countergradient variation (CnGV) occurs when covariance is negative: that is, genetic and environmental influences on phenotypes oppose one another, thereby diminishing the change in mean trait expression across the gradient. CnGV has so far been found in at least 60 species, with most examples coming from fishes, amphibians, and insects across latitudinal or altitudinal gradients. Traits that display CnGV most often involve metabolic compensation, that is, the elevation of various physiological rates processes (development, growth, feeding, metabolism, activity) to counteract the dampening effect of reduced temperature, growing season length, or food supply. Far fewer examples of CoGV have been identified (11 species), and these most often involve morphological characters. Increased knowledge of spatial covariance patterns has furthered our understanding of Bergmann size clines, phenotypic plasticity, species range limits, tradeoffs in juvenile growth rate, and the design of conservation strategies for wild species. Moreover, temporal CnGV explains some cases of an apparent lack of phenotypic response to directional selection and provides a framework for predicting evolutionary responses to climate change.

  14. Temporal and spatial variation in Hg accumulation in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha): possible influences of DOC and diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Lisa D; Evans, Douglas; Dillon, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are filter feeders located near the base of the foodweb and these animals are able to utilize a variety of carbon sources that may also vary seasonally. We conducted both a spatial and a temporal study in order to test the hypotheses: (1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations influence Hg accumulation in zebra mussels sampled from a series of lakes and (2) seasonal variations in diet influence Hg accumulation. In the spatial study, we found a significant negative relationship between Hg concentrations and DOC concentrations, suggesting an influence of DOC on Hg bioaccumulation. In the temporal study, we used stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) as ecological tools to provide a temporally integrated description of the feeding ecology of zebra mussels. Both δ(15)N and δ(13)C varied seasonally in a similar manner: more depleted values occurred in the summer and more enriched values occurred in the fall. Mercury concentrations also varied significantly over the year, with highest concentrations occurring in the summer, followed by a progressive decrease in concentrations into the fall. The C/N ratio of zebra mussels also varied significantly over the year with the lowest values occurring mid-summer and then values increased in the fall and winter, suggesting that there was significant variation in lipid stores. These results indicate that in addition to any effect of seasonal dietary changes, seasonal variation in energy stores also appeared to be related to Hg levels in the zebra mussels. Collectively results from this study suggest that DOC concentrations, seasonal variation in diet and seasonal depletion of energy stores are all important variables to consider when understanding Hg accumulation in zebra mussels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oscillatory variation of anomalous diffusion in pendulum systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    driven and parametrically-driven pendulum systems are presented. When the frequency of the periodic driving force is varied, the exponent μ, which is the rate of divergence of the mean square displacement with time, is found to vary in an ...

  16. Variational Iterative Methods for Nonsymmetric Systems of Linear Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    With a third matrix-vector product, b(i) can be computed as i j ( ATAr i+l’pj)/ApjpApj), and the previous (Apj) need not be saved. Page 8 I OCR I Orthomin... Economics and Mathematical Systems, Volume 134, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1976. [51 Paul Concus, Gene H. Golub, and Dianne P. O’Leary. A generalized

  17. Diatoms of the microphytobenthic community in a tropical intertidal sand flat influenced by monsoons: Spatial and temporal variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.

    to the carbon budgets of such unstable habitats. Introduction Intertidal areas are highly dynamic systems which are constantly influenced by local energy levels and, espe- cially in the case of high energy sand flat areas, exhibit a microstructure governed...

  18. Influence of seasonal variation in mood and behavior on cognitive test performance among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikanto, Ilona; Lahti, Tuuli; Castaneda, Anu E; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Aalto-Setälä, Terhi; Suvisaari, Jaana; Partonen, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Seasonal variations in mood and behavior are common among the general population and may have a deteriorating effect on cognitive functions. In this study the effect of seasonal affective disorder (SAD-like symptoms) on cognitive test performance were evaluated in more detail. The data were derived from the study Mental Health in Early Adulthood in Finland. Participants (n = 481) filled in a modified Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ) and performed cognitive tests in verbal and visual skills, attention and general intelligence. SAD-like symptoms, especially regarding the seasonal variations in weight and appetite, had a significant effect on working memory (Digit Span Backward, P = 0.008) and auditory attention and short-term memory (Digit Span Forward, P = 0.004). The seasonal variations in sleep duration and mood had an effect on auditory attention and short-term memory (Digit Span Forward, P = 0.02 and P = 0.0002, respectively). The seasonal variations in social activity and energy level had no effect. Seasonal changes in mood, appetite and weight have an impairing effect on auditory attention and processing speed. If performance tests are not to repeated in different seasons, attention needs to be given to the most appropriate season in which to test.

  19. Solar variations and their influence on trends in upper stratospheric ozone and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Lean, J.L.

    1990-10-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the magnitude and temporal structure of the variations in the sun's ultraviolet irradiance has increased steadily. A number of theoretical modeling studies have shown that changes in the solar ultraviolet flux during the 11-year solar cycle can have a significant effect on stratospheric ozone concentrations. With the exception of Brasseur et al., who examined a very broad range of solar flux variations, all of these studies assumed much larger changes in the ultraviolet flux than measurements now indicate. These studies either calculated the steady-state effect at solar maximum and solar minimum or assumed sinusoidal variations in the solar flux changes with time. It is now possible to narrow the uncertainty range of the expected effects on upper stratospheric ozone and temperature resulting from the 11-year solar cycle. A more accurate representation of the solar flux changes with time is used in this analysis, as compared to previous published studies. This study also evaluates the relative roles of solar flux variations and increasing concentrations of long-lived trace gases in determining the observed trends in upper stratospheric ozone and temperature. The LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model of the global atmosphere is used to evaluate the combined effects on the stratosphere from changes in solar ultraviolet irradiances and trace gas concentrations over the last several decades. Derived trends in upper stratospheric ozone concentrations and temperature are then compared with available analyses of ground-based and satellite measurements over this time period

  20. The influence of ENSO, PDO and PNA on secular rainfall variations in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abby G. Frazier; Oliver Elison Timm; Thomas W. Giambelluca; Henry F. Diaz

    2017-01-01

    Over the last century, significant declines in rainfall across the state of Hawai‘i have been observed, and it is unknown whether these declines are due to natural variations in climate, or manifestations of human-induced climate change. Here, a statistical analysis of the observed rainfall variability was applied as first step towards better understanding causes for...

  1. Chloroplast DNA variation of oaks in western Central Europe and genetic consequences of human influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    König, A.O.; Ziegenhagen, B.; Dam, van B.C.; Csaikl, U.M.; Coart, E.; Degen, B.; Burg, K.; Vries, de S.M.G.; Petit, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oak chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was studied in a grid-based inventory in western Central Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, the Czech Republic, and the northern parts of Upper and Lower Austria. A total of 2155 trees representing 426 populations of Quercus robur

  2. Seasonal temperature variations influence tapetum mitosis patterns associated with reproductive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Umesh C; Basu, Surochita; Kushwaha, Jyotsana Singh; Lavania, Seshu

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stress in plants impacts many biological processes, including male gametogenesis, and affects several cytological mechanisms that are strongly interrelated. To understand the likely impact of rising temperature on reproductive fitness in the climate change regime, a study of tapetal mitosis and its accompanying meiosis over seasons was made to elucidate the influence of temperature change on the cytological events occurring during microsporogenesis. For this we used two species of an environmentally sensitive plant system, i.e., genus Cymbopogon Sprengel (Poaceae), namely Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle var. confertiflorus (Steud.) Bor (2n = 20) and Cymbopogon jwaruncusha (Jones) Schult. (2n = 20). Both species flower profusely during extreme summer (48 °C) and mild winter (15 °C) but support low and high seed fertility, respectively, in the two seasons. We have shown that tapetal mitotic patterns over seasons entail differential behavior for tapetal mitosis. During the process of tapetum development there are episodes of endomitosis that form either (i) an endopolyploid genomically imbalanced uninucleate and multinucleate tapetum, and (or) (ii) an acytokinetic multinucleate genomically balanced tapetum, with the progression of meiosis in the accompanying sporogenous tissue. The relative frequency of occurrence of the two types of tapetum mitosis patterns is significantly different in the two seasons, and it is found to be correlated with the temperature conditions. Whereas, the former (genomically imbalanced tapetum) are prevalent during the hot summer, the latter (genomically balanced tapetum) are frequent under optimal conditions. Such a differential behaviour in tapetal mitosis vis-à-vis temperature change is also correspondingly accompanied by substantial disturbances or regularity in meiotic anaphase disjunction. Both species show similar patterns. The study underpins that tapetal mitotic behaviour per se could be a reasonable indicator to

  3. Adaptive influence of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on variation of incubation periods among tropical and temperate passerines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E.; Ton, Riccardo; Oteyza, Juan C.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding intrinsic (physiological) and extrinsic (e.g., temperature) causes of variation in embryonic development time (incubation period) is important because they can have different impacts on individual quality. Robert Ricklefs and colleagues have argued that longer incubation periods result primarily from intrinsic physiological programs that increase individual quality and adult survival. They claim that incubation periods are largely invariant and that extrinsic factors like temperature have little impact. We have argued that adult survival may be a cause rather than a consequence of much of the variation in embryonic development time. A reduction in extrinsic sources of annual adult mortality (e.g., migration, predation, nonbreeding-season mortality) favors reduced parental effort during incubation to minimize costs to future reproduction and survival. Reduced parental effort, in turn, manifests as cooler average egg temperatures that yield longer incubation periods. Ricklefs and colleagues mischaracterized our hypothesis and deconstructed their own incorrect version, while also making some incorrect statements. We show that reevaluation of previous evidence provided by this group actually supports a role of egg temperature for the variation in incubation periods. We also summarize other observational and experimental evidence that incubation periods are not invariant and that egg temperature has a strong causal influence on variation within and among species. In fact, egg temperature explains ∼60% of the difference in incubation periods among species. The remaining ∼40% reflects intrinsic physiological programs and other factors, potentially providing intrinsic benefits. Ultimately, annual adult mortality explains substantial variation in parental effort and egg temperature, and the latter strongly explains variation in incubation periods. Both intrinsic programs and extrinsic temperature effects need to be considered in attempts to understand

  4. Transit Duration Variations due to Secular Interactions in Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boley, Aaron; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Granados Contreras, A. Paula

    2018-04-01

    Secular interactions among planets in multi-planet systems will lead to variations in orbital inclinations and to the precession of orbital nodes. Taking known system architectures at face value, we calculate orbital precession rates for planets in tightly-packed systems using classical second-order secular theory, in which the orientation of the orbits can be described as a vector sum of eigenmodes and the eigenstructure is determined only by the masses and semi-major axes of the planets. Using this framework, we identify systems that have fast precession frequencies, and use those systems to explore the range of transit duration variation that could occur using amplitudes that are consistent with tightly-packed planetary systems. We then further assess how transit duration variations could be used in practice.

  5. Asymptotics of decreasing solutions of coupled p-Laplacian systems in the framework of regular variation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehák, Pavel; Matucci, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 3 (2014), s. 837-858 ISSN 0373-3114 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : decreasing solution * quasilinear system * Emden-Fowler system * Lane-Emden system * regular variation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.065, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10231-012-0303-9

  6. Influence of anthropogenic alterations on geomorphic response to climate variations and change in San Francisco Bay-Delta and watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florsheim, J.L.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Global warming and attendant sea-level rise may soon impact geomorphic processes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River and San Francisco Bay Delta systems. During the past two centuries, dramatic anthropogenic changes in sediment supply and pervasive structural controls on rivers and floodplains have altered geomorphic responses to floods throughout a zone that extends upstream from tidally influenced areas to dams that regulate flow. Current geomorphic responses to floods differ from natural responses due to historical actions that concentrated the pre-disturbance multiple-channel and flood-basin system into single channels isolated by levees from increasingly developed floodplains and flood bypass channels, altered flow and sediment regimes, and caused subsidence of leveed Delta Islands. A review of historic and current geomorphic responses to floods illustrates the dominance of structural controls on geomorphic changes in the lowland part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin system. Current climate-change projections for CA suggest that the total volume of snowmelt runoff that may be shifted from spring and added to winter flows is roughly 5 maf/yr, similar to the volume currently available for flood storage in Sierra Nevadan reservoirs. Changes in timing of reservoir releases to accommodate these changes could add to either the magnitude or duration of winter flood peaks, each causing different geomorphic responses. Increased wintertime flows that accompany already large floods could increase overbank flood extent, erosion, and sedimentation, or alternatively increase the depth and strength of confined flows and increase the risk of levee failures. Runoff released from reservoirs as a relatively constant addition to winter baseflow would increase the duration of bankfull or possibly "levee-full" flows. This scenario could lead to bank and levee failure through increased saturation and seepage erosion. Projected sea level rise of 1-2 m would compound vulnerability of

  7. Influence Business Process On The Quality Of Accounting Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Meiryani; Muhammad Syaifullah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of business process to the quality of the accounting information system. This study aims to examine the influence of business process on the quality of the information system of accounting information system. The study was theoritical research which considered the roles of business process on quality of accounting information system which use secondary data collection. The results showed that the business process have a signifi...

  8. Variation of structural damping with response amplitude in piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    From tests conducted over the last several years, it has become apparent that structural damping is not a single number applicable to all piping systems, but is highly dependent on piping system parameters such as supports, response amplitude, and insulation. As a result, there is considerable scatter in the available data. Furthermore, the relationships between the parameters and damping are often highly complex, interrelated, and difficult to predict. From tests of piping supported by various typical methods, two basic types of energy dissipation in the supports can be observed. The first is friction such as between spring hangers and their housings or in the internal mechanisms of constant force hangers. The second is impacting such as occurs in snubbers, rigid struts, and rod hangers. Overall, these effects lead to a wide variety of possibilities that can occur at low vibration levels and can change with only a slight perturbation of vibration amplitude. This can account for much of the scatter in the data at low strain levels. Thus damping is almost impossible to predict at low amplitudes, and extrapolation of this type data to higher amplitudes is cautioned. However, once strain levels rise above 100 to 200 micro in/in, the damping trend becomes easier to characterize. From the 100 to 200 micro in/in to 800 to 1000 micro in/in range the damping is fairly constant and is induced primarily by the supports. At the upper end of this range a threshold is reached in which damping increases with increasing strain amplitude. Data in the high strain (plastic range) is sparse since the test usually renders the pipe unsuitable for further use. 15 refs

  9. Unit Level Variations And Peer Influences In Mental Health Diagnoses In The U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202- 4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget...variations across units without unobserved time-invariant differences such as culture or leadership style , as well as effects of time-variant variables...Nanyang Technological University, 2008 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT from the

  10. Culture’s Influence: Regionally Differing Social Milieus and Variations in Fertility Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Fulda, B.

    2015-01-01

    How can we understand subnational differences in fertility rates? The most common explanations see the key to these differences in the socio-structural composition of a region’s population and its structural conditions. However, such explanations fail to account for fertility rate differences in regions with similar populations and structures. This paper analyzes two social milieus in southern Germany and argues that variations in their fertility rates can only be understood through their cul...

  11. Daily variations in pathogenic bacterial populations in a monsoon influenced tropical environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Naik, S.D.; Gaonkar, C.C.

    and an assessment of the health of such an ecosystem benefits from high resolution observations. Virulent pathogenic Vibrio species are expected more frequently in tropical marine environments, since the virulence gene expression seems to increase at elevated... cells ml−1 (July 2009) to 5.9 x 107 cells ml−1 (February 2011) (Fig. 2b). Inter annual variations point out that the total bacterial abundance increased 5 from 2009 to 2011, while the viable bacterial numbers decreased. Complex physical, chemical...

  12. Seasonal variation of plankton communities influenced by environmental factors in an artificial lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemei; Yu, Yuhe; Zhang, Tanglin; Feng, Weisong; Ao, Hongyi; Yan, Qingyun

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the seasonal variation in plankton community composition in an artificial lake. We conducted microscopic analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes to characterize the plankton community. The clustering of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) was then used to investigate the similarity of these plankton communities. DGGE fingerprinting revealed that samples collected at the different sites within a season shared high similarity and were generally grouped together. In contrast, we did not observe any seasonal variation based on microscopic analysis. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of the plankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in relation to environmental factors revealed that transparency was negatively correlated with the first axis ( R=-0.931), and temperature and total phosphorus (TP) were positively correlated with the first axis ( R=0.736 and R=0.660, respectively). In conclusion, plankton communities in the artificial lake exhibited significant seasonal variation. Transparency, phosphorus and temperature appear to be the major factors driving the differences in plankton composition.

  13. Study of bond-energy variations in molecular systems under irradiation; Etude de la variation de l'energie de liaison dans les systemes moleculaires irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudet, G; Passe, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    On the basis of experimental results selected from publications, the evolution of the bond energy of a molecular system under irradiation - leading to a more or less bound state - is studied. This variation of bond energy is then compared to the total bond energy of the initial system and to the energy absorbed in the system during the irradiation. This is done as a function of the nature of molecular system and the radiation spectrum and intensity. Our working method will first be explained, and the results obtained will then be given. (authors) [French] A l'aide de resultats experimentaux, selectionnes dans les publications, nous etudions l'evolution de l'energie de liaison d'un systeme moleculaire sous irradiation (evolution vers un etat plus ou moins lie), et nous comparons cette variation d'energie de liaison a l'energie totale de liaison du systeme initial et a l'energie absorbee dans le systeme au cours de l'irradiation. Ceci est fait en fonction de la nature du systeme moleculaire ainsi que du spectre et de l'intensite du rayonnement. Nous exposons d'abord notre methode de travail, puis les resultats obtenus. (auteurs)

  14. The influence of weather and lemmings on spatiotemporal variation in the abundance of multiple avian guilds in the arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry G Robinson

    Full Text Available Climate change is occurring more rapidly in the Arctic than other places in the world, which is likely to alter the distribution and abundance of migratory birds breeding there. A warming climate can provide benefits to birds by decreasing spring snow cover, but increases in the frequency of summer rainstorms, another product of climate change, may reduce foraging opportunities for insectivorous birds. Cyclic lemming populations in the Arctic also influence bird abundance because Arctic foxes begin consuming bird eggs when lemmings decline. The complex interaction between summer temperature, precipitation, and the lemming cycle hinder our ability to predict how Arctic-breeding birds will respond to climate change. The main objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between annual variation in weather, spring snow cover, lemming abundance and spatiotemporal variation in the abundance of multiple avian guilds in a tundra ecosystem in central Nunavut, Canada: songbirds, shorebirds, gulls, loons, and geese. We spatially stratified our study area based on vegetation productivity, terrain ruggedness, and freshwater abundance, and conducted distance sampling to estimate strata-specific densities of each guild during the summers of 2010-2012. We also monitored temperature, rainfall, spring snow cover, and lemming abundance each year. Spatial variation in bird abundance matched what was expected based on previous ecological knowledge, but weather and lemming abundance also significantly influenced the abundance of some guilds. In particular, songbirds were less abundant during the cool, wet summer with moderate snow cover, and shorebirds and gulls declined with lemming abundance. The abundance of geese did not vary over time, possibly because benefits created by moderate spring snow cover were offset by increased fox predation when lemmings were scarce. Our study provides an example of a simple way to monitor the correlation between

  15. Influence of the Antenna Impedance Variation and Input Matching Network Q on LNA Key Figures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Gülstorff, Steen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the behaviour of a 2:4 GHz Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) applications facing antennadetuning issue. An amplifier with ultra-low power, low voltage, and with reduced component count is prototyped to validate simulation results......, then the behaviour is analyzed through simulations based on data measured on real users. The analysis shows that the designed LNA is stable to the antenna impedance variation expectable in most cases, while highlights the possible risks associated to a high-Q input matching network when used in a context prone...

  16. Seasonal variations in house dust mite influence the circadian peak expiratory flow amplitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; vanderHeide, S; deReus, DM; Koeter, GH; vanAalderen, WMC; Meijer, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether seasonal differences in house dust mite (HDM) allergen exposure influence the circadian peak expiratory flow (PEF) amplitude in asthmatic children. Asthmatic children (n = 25) with a solitary allergy to HDM were studied in spring and in autumn. All

  17. Influence of time of concentration on variation of runoff from a small urbanized watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra Amatya; Agnieszka Cupak; Andrzej Walega

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to estimate the influence of time of concentration (TC) on maximum flow in an urbanized watershed. The calculations of maximum flow have been carried out using the Rational method, Technical Release 55 (TR55) procedure based on NRCS (National Resources Conservation Services) guidelines, and NRCS-UH rainfall-runoff model. Similarly,...

  18. R-R interval variations influence the degree of mitral regurgitation in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, M. J.; Moller, J. E.; Haggstrom, J.

    2014-01-01

    of congestive heart failure due to MMVD. The severity of MR was evaluated in apical four-chamber view using colour Doppler flow mapping (maximum % of the left atrium area) and colour Doppler M-mode (duration in ms). The influence of the ratio between present and preceding R-R interval on MR severity......Mitral regurgitation (MR) due to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is a frequent finding in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs). Sinus arrhythmia and atrial premature complexes leading to R-R interval variations occur in dogs. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the duration...... of the RR interval immediately influences the degree of MR assessed by echocardiography in dogs. Clinical examination including echocardiography was performed in 103 privately-owned dogs: 16 control Beagles, 70 CKCSs with different degree of MR and 17 dogs of different breeds with clinical signs...

  19. The Influence Of Organizational Culture On Management Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlis Dewi Kuraesin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to know the culture of the organization and management accounting information system based on existing theories. The management information system is a collection of sub-systems which are interconnected with each other to work together in harmony to achieve one goal of process data into information needed by management in decision making. An important factor influencing the use of information systems is Cultural Organization. Management Information system success is influenced by several factors one of which is the organizations culture. Organizational culture has a very strong influence on the overall organizational and individual behavior due to the information system is a major component of the organization are influenced substantially by organizational culture.

  20. The Influence of Variation in Time and HCl Concentration to the Glucose Produced from Kepok Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo M, Rohman; Noviyanto, Denny; RM, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Kepok banana (Musa paradisiaca) is a plant that has many advantagesfrom its fruit, stems, leaves, flowers and cob. However, we just tend to take benefit from the fruit. We grow and harvest the fruit without taking advantages from other parts. So they would be a waste or detrimental to animal nest if not used. The idea to take the benefit from the banana crop yields, especially cob is rarely explored. This study is an introduction to the use of banana weevil especially from the glucose it contains. This study uses current methods of hydrolysis using HCl as a catalyst with the concentration variation of 0.4 N, 0.6 N and 0.8 N and hydrolysis times variation of 20 minutes, 25 minutes and 30 minutes. The stages in the hydrolysis include preparation of materials, the process of hydrolysis and analysis of test results using Fehling and titrate with standard glucose solution. HCl is used as a catalyst because it is cheaper than the enzyme that has the same function. NaOH 60% is used for neutralizing the pH of the filtrate result of hydrolysis. From the results of analysis, known thatthe biggest yield of glucose is at concentration 0.8 N and at 30 minutes reaction, it contains 6.25 gram glucose / 20 gram dry sampel, and the convertion is 27.22% at 20 gram dry sampel.

  1. Genotypic variation influences reproductive success and thermal stress tolerance in the reef building coral, Acropora palmata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, I. B.; Devlin-Durante, M. K.; Polato, N. R.; Xu, D.; Giri, S.; Altman, N. S.; Ruiz, D.; Parkinson, J. E.; Boulay, J. N.

    2013-09-01

    The branching coral Acropora palmata is a foundation species of Caribbean reefs that has been decimated in recent decades by anthropogenic and natural stressors. Declines in population density and genotypic diversity likely reduce successful sexual reproduction in this self-incompatible hermaphrodite and might impede recovery. We investigated variation among genotypes in larval development under thermally stressful conditions. Six two-parent crosses and three four-parent batches were reared under three temperatures and sampled over time. Fertilization rates differed widely with two-parent crosses having lower fertilization rates (5-56 %, mean 22 % ± 22 SD) than batches (from 31 to 87 %, mean 59 % ± 28 SD). Parentage analysis of larvae in batch cultures showed differences in gamete compatibility among parents, coinciding with significant variation in both sperm morphology and egg size. While all larval batches developed more rapidly at increased water temperatures, rate of progression through developmental stages varied among batches, as did swimming speed. Together, these results indicate that loss of genotypic diversity exacerbates already severe limitations in sexual reproductive success of A. palmata. Nevertheless, surviving parental genotypes produce larvae that do vary in their phenotypic response to thermal stress, with implications for adaptation, larval dispersal and population connectivity in the face of warming sea surface temperatures.

  2. Variational and penalization methods for studying connecting orbits of Hamiltonian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Nien Chen

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider a class of second order Hamiltonian systems that possess infinite or finite number of equilibria. Variational arguments will be used to study the existence of connecting orbits joining pairs of equilibria. Applying penalization methods, we obtain various patterns for multibump homoclinics and heteroclinics of Hamiltonian systems.

  3. Population genomic analysis suggests strong influence of river network on spatial distribution of genetic variation in invasive saltcedar across the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Rang; Jo, Yeong-Seok; Park, Chan-Ho; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Olson, Matthew S.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the complex influences of landscape and anthropogenic elements that shape the population genetic structure of invasive species provides insight into patterns of colonization and spread. The application of landscape genomics techniques to these questions may offer detailed, previously undocumented insights into factors influencing species invasions. We investigated the spatial pattern of genetic variation and the influences of landscape factors on population similarity in an invasive riparian shrub, saltcedar (Tamarix L.) by analysing 1,997 genomewide SNP markers for 259 individuals from 25 populations collected throughout the southwestern United States. Our results revealed a broad-scale spatial genetic differentiation of saltcedar populations between the Colorado and Rio Grande river basins and identified potential barriers to population similarity along both river systems. River pathways most strongly contributed to population similarity. In contrast, low temperature and dams likely served as barriers to population similarity. We hypothesize that large-scale geographic patterns in genetic diversity resulted from a combination of early introductions from distinct populations, the subsequent influence of natural selection, dispersal barriers and founder effects during range expansion.

  4. The Influencing Factors, Regional Difference and Temporal Variation of Industrial Technology Innovation: Evidence with the FOA-GRNN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongli Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology innovation is a motivating force for sustainable development. The recognition and measurement of influencing factors are a basic prerequisite of technology innovation research. In response to the gaps and shortages of existing theories and methods, this paper builds the impact indicators of technology innovation, the proposed FOA-GRNN model, and analyzes the influencing factors, regional differences and temporal variations of technology innovation based on industrial above-scale enterprises of 31 provinces in China from 2008 to 2015. The empirical results show that innovation investment is a determinant of technology innovation in China, and is more and more significant; meanwhile a wide gap of innovation resource between Eastern China and Western China exists. In general, the enterprise scale has a negative effect: with enlargement of enterprise in China, the innovation efficiency of enterprise will decline, while the effect has regional disparity, with positive influence in Central and Western China, and negative influence in Eastern China. Government support has negative effects on technology innovation: indirect equity investment contributes more to technology innovation than direct fund support. Innovation environment has positive and weak effects on technology innovation, but it is the biggest obstacle in Western China, and the innovation environment in China has improved continuously. This paper provides new evidence that can shine some light on determining the factors affecting technology innovation, and also presents a novel approach, which comprises characteristics of nonlinear function approximation, high accuracy and a small sample.

  5. On the influence of load variations on lifetime and strength of wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2006-01-01

    To days recommendations for probability and reliability analysis of wood structures do not fully recognize the influence of wood microstructure and creep on the mechanical behavior of wood. As a consequence, certain important features in wood design cannot be considered properly. Ignoring the bas...... history on recycle-strength (residual strength). It is demonstrated in this paper, how the problems just mentioned can be solved from respecting wood as a damaged viscoelastic material, meaning that wood is a cracked (damaged) material with creep....

  6. Genetic Variation Throughout the Folate Metabolic Pathway Influences Negative Symptom Severity in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Roffman, Joshua L.; Brohawn, David G.; Nitenson, Adam Z.; Macklin, Eric A.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Goff, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Low serum folate levels previously have been associated with negative symptom risk in schizophrenia, as has the hypofunctional 677C>T variant of the MTHFR gene. This study examined whether other missense polymorphisms in folate-regulating enzymes, in concert with MTHFR, influence negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and whether total risk allele load interacts with serum folate status to further stratify negative symptom risk. Medicated outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 219), all of European...

  7. Influence of diurnal variations in stream temperature on streamflow loss and groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantz, Jim; Thomas, Carole L.; Zellweger, Gary W.

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate that for losing reaches with significant diurnal variations in stream temperature, the effect of stream temperature on streambed seepage is a major factor contributing to reduced afternoon streamflows. An explanation is based on the effect of stream temperature on the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed, which can be expected to double in the 0° to 25°C temperature range. Results are presented for field experiments in which stream discharge and temperature were continuously measured for several days over losing reaches at St. Kevin Gulch, Colorado, and Tijeras Arroyo, New Mexico. At St. Kevin Gulch in July 1991, the diurnal stream temperature in the 160-m study reach ranged from about 4° to 18°C, discharges ranged from 10 to 18 L/s, and streamflow loss in the study reach ranged from 2.7 to 3.7 L/s. On the basis of measured stream temperature variations, the predicted change in conductivity was about 38%; the measured change in stream loss was about 26%, suggesting that streambed temperature varied less than the stream temperature. At Tijeras Arroyo in May 1992, diurnal stream temperature in the 655-m study reach ranged from about 10° to 25°C and discharge ranged from 25 to 55 L/s. Streamflow loss was converted to infiltration rates by factoring in the changing stream reach surface area and streamflow losses due to evaporation rates as measured in a hemispherical evaporation chamber. Infiltration rates ranged from about 0.7 to 2.0 m/d, depending on time and location. Based on measured stream temperature variations, the predicted change in conductivity was 29%; the measured change in infiltration was also about 27%. This suggests that high infiltration rates cause rapid convection of heat to the streambed. Evapotranspiration losses were estimated for the reach and adjacent flood plain within the arroyo. On the basis of these estimates, only about 5% of flow loss was consumed via stream evaporation and stream-side evapotranspiration

  8. Floral Trait Variations Among Wild Tobacco Populations Influence the Foraging Behavior of Hawkmoth Pollinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Haverkamp

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Most pollinators visit flowers in the search of nectar rewards. However, as the floral nectar can often not be directly detected by pollinators, many flower visitors use secondary metabolites such as odor- or taste-proxies to anticipate nectar quantity and quality. Plants might exploit these sensory inferences of the pollinator to increase their pollination rates without increasing their caloric investment into their floral rewards. Here we investigated the effects of natural variation in certain primary and secondary floral metabolites in three populations of the wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, on the pollination behavior of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. Although offering the same caloric value per flower, the plants of these populations differ in the compositions and concentrations of sugars within the nectar. Moreover, the flowers of these plants emitted highly contrasting levels of attractive floral volatiles (benzyl acetone, but did not differ in the amounts of defensive nectar metabolites (nicotine. In wind tunnel assays with M. sexta moths, plants from those populations that released the largest amount of benzyl acetone as well as those that had a higher ratio of nectar sucrose were more frequently visited and re-visited by the hawkmoth. High emissions of benzyl acetone additionally correlated with a higher time investment of the moths into individual flowers on each visit, leading to the largest foraging success of the moths on those flowers that were most strongly scented. We propose that it is the variation of flower metabolites and their detection by the pollinator rather than the actual caloric value of the nectar, which determines pollinator visitations to a certain flower population. Hence, plants could potentially create a specialist pollinator community by altering their floral signals, either by producing volatiles that pollinators prefer or by providing nectar sugars that pollinators are most sensitive to, while at the same

  9. Influences of the variation in inflow to East Asia on surface ozone over Japan during 1996–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chatani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Air quality simulations in which the global chemical transport model CHASER and the regional chemical transport model WRF/chem are coupled have been developed to consider the dynamic transport of chemical species across the boundaries of the domain of the regional chemical transport model. The simulation captures the overall seasonal variations of surface ozone, but overestimates its concentration over Japanese populated areas by approximately 20 ppb from summer to early winter. It is deduced that ozone formation around Northeast China and Japan in summer is overestimated in the simulation. On the other hand, the simulation well reproduces the interannual variability and the long-term trend of observed surface ozone over Japan. Sensitivity experiments have been performed to investigate the influence of the variation in inflow to East Asia on the interannual variability and the long-term trend of surface ozone over Japan during 1996–2005. The inflow defined in this paper includes the recirculation of species with sources within the East Asian region as well as the transport of species with sources out of the East Asian region. Results of sensitivity experiments suggest that inflow to East Asia accounts for approximately 30 % of the increasing trend of surface ozone, whereas it has much less influence on the interannual variability of observed surface ozone compared to meteorological processes within East Asia.

  10. New Silica Magnetite Sorbent: The Influence of Variations of Sodium Silicate Concentrations on Silica Magnetite Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmiyawati, C.; Pratiwi, P. I.; Darmawan, A.

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption capacity of an adsorbent is determined by the adsorbent and the adsorbate properties. The character of the adsorbent will play a major role in its ability to adsorb the corresponding adsorbate. Therefore, in this study we looked at the effects of variations of sodium silicate concentrations on the resulting magnetite silica adsorbent properties. The application of silica coating on the magnetite was carried out through a sol-gel process with sodium silicate and HCl precursors. Based on the characterization data obtained, it was found that the silica coating on magnetite can increase the resistance to acid leaching, increase the particle size, but decrease the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Based on Gas Sorption Analyzer (GSA) and X-ray Difraction (XRD) data it can successively be determined that increase in concentration of sodium silicate will increase the surface area and amorphous structure of the Silica Magnetie.

  11. The influence of coastal access on isotope variation in Icelandic arctic foxes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Dalerum

    Full Text Available To quantify the ecological effects of predator populations, it is important to evaluate how population-level specializations are dictated by intra- versus inter-individual dietary variation. Coastal habitats contain prey from the terrestrial biome, the marine biome and prey confined to the coastal region. Such habitats have therefore been suggested to better support predator populations compared to habitats without coastal access. We used stable isotope data on a small generalist predator, the arctic fox, to infer dietary strategies between adult and juvenile individuals with and without coastal access on Iceland. Our results suggest that foxes in coastal habitats exhibited a broader isotope niche breadth compared to foxes in inland habitats. This broader niche was related to a greater diversity of individual strategies rather than to a uniform increase in individual niche breadth or by individuals retaining their specialization but increasing their niche differentiation. Juveniles in coastal habitats exhibited a narrower isotope niche breadth compared to both adults and juveniles in inland habitats, and juveniles in inland habitats inhabited a lower proportion of their total isotope niche compared to adults and juveniles from coastal habitats. Juveniles in both habitats exhibited lower intra-individual variation compared to adults. Based on these results, we suggest that foxes in both habitats were highly selective with respect to the resources they used to feed offspring, but that foxes in coastal habitats preferentially utilized marine resources for this purpose. We stress that coastal habitats should be regarded as high priority areas for conservation of generalist predators as they appear to offer a wide variety of dietary options that allow for greater flexibility in dietary strategies.

  12. Geographic variation in avian incubation periods and parental influences on embryonic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E; Auer, Sonya K; Bassar, Ronald D; Niklison, Alina M; Lloyd, Penn

    2007-11-01

    Theory predicts shorter embryonic periods in species with greater embryo mortality risk and smaller body size. Field studies of 80 passerine species on three continents yielded data that largely conflicted with theory; incubation (embryonic) periods were longer rather than shorter in smaller species, and egg (embryo) mortality risk explained some variation within regions, but did not explain larger differences in incubation periods among geographic regions. Incubation behavior of parents seems to explain these discrepancies. Bird embryos are effectively ectothermic and depend on warmth provided by parents sitting on the eggs to attain proper temperatures for development. Parents of smaller species, plus tropical and southern hemisphere species, commonly exhibited lower nest attentiveness (percent of time spent on the nest incubating) than larger and northern hemisphere species. Lower nest attentiveness produced cooler minimum and average embryonic temperatures that were correlated with longer incubation periods independent of nest predation risk or body size. We experimentally tested this correlation by swapping eggs of species with cool incubation temperatures with eggs of species with warm incubation temperatures and similar egg mass. Incubation periods changed (shortened or lengthened) as expected and verified the importance of egg temperature on development rate. Slower development resulting from cooler temperatures may simply be a cost imposed on embryos by parents and may not enhance offspring quality. At the same time, incubation periods of transferred eggs did not match host species and reflect intrinsic differences among species that may result from nest predation and other selection pressures. Thus, geographic variation in embryonic development may reflect more complex interactions than previously recognized.

  13. Geographic variation in avian incubation periods and parental influences on embryonic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.; Auer, S.K.; Bassar, R.D.; Niklison, Alina M.; Lloyd, P.

    2007-01-01

    Theory predicts shorter embryonic periods in species with greater embryo mortality risk and smaller body size. Field studies of 80 passerine species on three continents yielded data that largely conflicted with theory; incubation (embryonic) periods were longer rather than shorter in smaller species, and egg (embryo) mortality risk explained some variation within regions, but did not explain larger differences in incubation periods among geographic regions. Incubation behavior of parents seems to explain these discrepancies. Bird embryos are effectively ectothermic and depend on warmth provided by parents sitting on the eggs to attain proper temperatures for development. Parents of smaller species, plus tropical and southern hemisphere species, commonly exhibited lower nest attentiveness (percent of time spent on the nest incubating) than larger and northern hemisphere species. Lower nest attentiveness produced cooler minimum and average embryonic temperatures that were correlated with longer incubation periods independent of nest predation risk or body size. We experimentally tested this correlation by swapping eggs of species with cool incubation temperatures with eggs of species with warm incubation temperatures and similar egg mass. Incubation periods changed (shortened or lengthened) as expected and verified the importance of egg temperature on development rate. Slower development resulting from cooler temperatures may simply be a cost imposed on embryos by parents and may not enhance offspring quality. At the same time, incubation periods of transferred eggs did not match host species and reflect intrinsic differences among species that may result from nest predation and other selection pressures. Thus, geographic variation in embryonic development may reflect more complex interactions than previously recognized. ?? 2007 The Author(s).

  14. Natural Variation in Synthesis and Catabolism Genes Influences Dhurrin Content in Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M. Hayes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyanogenic glucosides are natural compounds found in more than 1000 species of angiosperms that produce HCN and are deemed undesirable for agricultural use. However, these compounds are important components of the primary defensive mechanisms of many plant species. One of the best-studied cyanogenic glucosides is dhurrin [(--hydroxymandelonitrile-β--glucopyranoside], which is produced primarily in sorghum [ (L. Moench]. The biochemical basis for dhurrin metabolism is well established; however, little information is available on its genetic control. Here, we dissect the genetic control of leaf dhurrin content through a genome-wide association study (GWAS using a panel of 700 diverse converted sorghum lines (conversion panel previously subjected to pre-breeding and selected for short stature (∼1 m in height and photoperiod insensitivity. The conversion panel was grown for 2 yr in three environments. Wide variation for leaf dhurrin content was found in the sorghum conversion panel, with the Caudatum group exhibiting the highest dhurrin content and the Guinea group showing the lowest dhurrin content. A GWAS using a mixed linear model revealed significant associations (a false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.05 close to both UGT 185B1 in the canonical biosynthetic gene cluster on chromosome 1 and close to the catabolic dhurrinase loci on chromosome 8. Dhurrin content was associated consistently with biosynthetic genes in the two N-fertilized environments, while dhurrin content was associated with catabolic loci in the environment without supplemental N. These results suggest that genes for both biosynthesis and catabolism are important in determining natural variation for leaf dhurrin in sorghum in different environments.

  15. Hedgehog signaling mediates adaptive variation in a dynamic functional system in the cichlid feeding apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinan; Albertson, R Craig

    2014-06-10

    Adaptive variation in the craniofacial skeleton is a key component of resource specialization and habitat divergence in vertebrates, but the proximate genetic mechanisms that underlie complex patterns of craniofacial variation are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates widespread variation across a complex functional system that affects the kinematics of lower jaw depression--the opercular four-bar linkage apparatus--among Lake Malawi cichlids. By using a combined quantitative trait locus mapping and population genetics approach, we show that allelic variation in the Hh receptor, ptch1, affects the development of distinct bony elements in the head that represent two of three movable links in this functional system. The evolutionarily derived allele is found in species that feed from the water column, and is associated with shifts in anatomy that translate to a four-bar system capable of faster jaw rotation. Alternatively, the ancestral allele is found in species that feed on attached algae, and is associated with the development of a four-bar system that predicts slower jaw movement. Experimental manipulation of the Hh pathway during cichlid development recapitulates functionally salient natural variation in craniofacial geometry. In all, these results significantly extend our understanding of the mechanisms that fine-tune the craniofacial skeletal complex during adaptation to new foraging niches.

  16. Interdecadal variations of East Asian summer monsoon northward propagation and influences on summer precipitation over East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Yang, S.; He, J.; Li, J.; Liang, J.

    2008-08-01

    The interdecadal variation of northward propagation of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) and summer precipitation in East China have been investigated using daily surface rainfall from a dense rain gauge network in China for 1957 2001, National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis, European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis, and Global Mean Sea Level Pressure Dataset (GMSLP2) from Climatic Research Unit (CRU). Results in general show a consistent agreement on the interdecadal variability of EASM northward propagations. However, it appears that the interdecadal variation is stronger in NCEP than in ECMWF and CRU datasets. A newly defined normalized precipitation index (NPI), a 5-day running mean rainfall normalized with its standard deviation, clearly depicts the characteristics of summer rainbelt activities in East China in terms of jumps and durations during its northward propagations. The EASM northward propagation shows a prominent interdecadal variation. EASM before late 1970s had a rapid northward advance and a northern edge beyond its normal position. As a result, more summer rainfall occurred for the North China rainy season, Huaihe-River Mei-Yu, and South China Mei-Yu. In contrast, EASM after late 1970s had a slow northward movement and a northern edge located south of its normal position. Less summer precipitation occurred in East China except in Yangtze River basin. The EASM northernmost position (ENP), northernmost intensity (ENI), and EASM have a complex and good relationship at interdecadal timescales. They have significant influences on interdecadal variation of the large-scale precipitation anomalies in East China.

  17. The day-night variation of cosmic rays intensity at sea level under the influence of meteorological fronts and troughs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, H.M.; Cheng, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    The day-night variation of cosmic rays (CR) intensity at sea level has been observed by a simple G-M counter telescope. We perform two 5 hours counting during the day and the night and find that the pattern of variation is closely related to the atmospheric disturbance. The normal pattern shows that the day counts is a few percents lower than that of the night counts. This can be simply explained by the temperature effect. But when our observation station is being affected by a meteorological front or trough, a reversal occurs. At times the reversal pattern occurs even up to a few days ahead the formation of the troughs at a few hundred kilometers away. Such a reversal may lasts for a few days until the influence of the front or trough has significantly weakened. This effect also overrides the barometric effect, except when there is a sharp change of air pressure, such as during the approach of a tropical cyclone. Our further investigation shows that the pattern of variation may be negatively correlated to the altitude of the 0degC level in the atmosphere. A 150 m upward shift of the 0degC level reduces the CR intensity by about 3-4%. Our postulation is that this variation of CR intensity is related to the relativistic effect of the muon decay, and is an indication of the height of the mid-level pressure distribution. The phenomenon should be further investigated for possible application in weather forecasting and better understanding of the phenomenon could be of use in differentiating the atmospheric effect and the solar effects in CR data. (author)

  18. Amygdala Volume in Offspring from Multiplex for Alcohol Dependence Families: The Moderating Influence of Childhood Environment and 5-HTTLPR Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shirley Y; Wang, Shuhui; Carter, Howard; McDermott, Michael D; Zezza, Nicholas; Stiffler, Scott

    2013-12-12

    The increased susceptibility for developing alcohol dependence seen in offspring from families with alcohol dependence may be related to structural and functional differences in brain circuits that influence emotional processing. Early childhood environment, genetic variation in the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the SLCA4 gene and allelic variation in the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene have each been reported to be related to volumetric differences in the temporal lobe especially the amygdala. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to obtain amygdala volumes for 129 adolescent/young adult individuals who were either High-Risk (HR) offspring from families with multiple cases of alcohol dependence (N=71) or Low-Risk (LR) controls (N=58). Childhood family environment was measured prospectively using age-appropriate versions of the Family Environment Scale during a longitudinal follow-up study. The subjects were genotyped for Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met and the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Two family environment scale scores (Cohesion and Conflict), genotypic variation, and their interaction were tested for their association with amygdala volumes. Personal and prenatal exposure to alcohol and drugs were considered in statistical analyses in order to more accurately determine the effects of familial risk group differences. Amygdala volume was reduced in offspring from families with multiple alcohol dependent members in comparison to offspring from control families. High-Risk offspring who were carriers of the S variant of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism had reduced amygdala volume in comparison to those with an LL genotype. Larger amygdala volume was associated with greater family cohesion but only in Low-Risk control offspring. Familial risk for alcohol dependence is an important predictor of amygdala volume even when removing cases with significant personal exposure and covarying for

  19. The influence of climatically-driven surface loading variations on continental strain and seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Tim; Calais, Eric; Fleitout, Luce; Bollinger, Laurent; Scotti, Oona

    2016-04-01

    In slowly deforming regions of plate interiors, secondary sources of stress and strain can result in transient deformation rates comparable to, or greater than, the background tectonic rates. Highly variable in space and time, these transients have the potential to influence the spatio-temporal distribution of seismicity, interfering with any background tectonic effects to either promote or inhibit the failure of pre-existing faults, and potentially leading to a clustered, or 'pulse-like', seismic history. Here, we investigate the ways in which the large-scale deformation field resulting from climatically-controlled changes in surface ice mass over the Pleistocene and Holocene may have influenced not only the seismicity of glaciated regions, but also the wider seismicity around the ice periphery. We first use a set of geodynamic models to demonstrate that a major pulse of seismic activity occurring in Fennoscandia, coincident with the time of end-glaciation, occurred in a setting where the contemporaneous horizontal strain-rate resulting from the changing ice mass, was extensional - opposite to the reverse sense of coseismic displacement accommodated on these faults. Therefore, faulting did not release extensional elastic strain that was building up at the time of failure, but compressional elastic strain that had accumulated in the lithosphere on timescales longer than the glacial cycle, illustrating the potential for a non-tectonic trigger to tap in to the background tectonic stress-state. We then move on to investigate the more distal influence that changing ice (and ocean) volumes may have had on the evolving strain field across intraplate Europe, how this is reflected in the seismicity across intraplate Europe, and what impact this might have on the paleoseismic record.

  20. Genetic and environmental factors influencing the Placental Growth Factor (PGF variation in two populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Sorice

    Full Text Available Placental Growth Factor (PGF is a key molecule in angiogenesis. Several studies have revealed an important role of PGF primarily in pathological conditions (e.g.: ischaemia, tumour formation, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory processes suggesting its use as a potential therapeutic agent. However, to date, no information is available regarding the genetics of PGF variability. Furthermore, even though the effect of environmental factors (e.g.: cigarette smoking on angiogenesis has been explored, no data on the influence of these factors on PGF levels have been reported so far. Here we have first investigated PGF variability in two cohorts focusing on non-genetic risk factors: a study sample from two isolated villages in the Cilento region, South Italy (N=871 and a replication sample from the general Danish population (N=1,812. A significant difference in PGF mean levels was found between the two cohorts. However, in both samples, we observed a strong correlation of PGF levels with ageing and sex, men displaying PGF levels significantly higher than women. Interestingly, smoking was also found to influence the trait in the two populations, although differently. We have then focused on genetic risk factors. The association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located in the PGF gene and the plasma levels of the protein was investigated. Two polymorphisms (rs11850328 and rs2268614 were associated with the PGF plasma levels in the Cilento sample and these associations were strongly replicated in the Danish sample. These results, for the first time, support the hypothesis of the presence of genetic and environmental factors influencing PGF plasma variability.

  1. Influence Business Process On The Quality Of Accounting Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiryani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of business process to the quality of the accounting information system. This study aims to examine the influence of business process on the quality of the information system of accounting information system. The study was theoritical research which considered the roles of business process on quality of accounting information system which use secondary data collection. The results showed that the business process have a significant effect on the quality of accounting information systems.

  2. Genetic and environmental factors influencing the Placental Growth Factor (PGF) variation in two populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorice, Rossella; Ruggiero, Daniela; Nutile, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    between the two cohorts. However, in both samples, we observed a strong correlation of PGF levels with ageing and sex, men displaying PGF levels significantly higher than women. Interestingly, smoking was also found to influence the trait in the two populations, although differently. We have then focused...... on genetic risk factors. The association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the PGF gene and the plasma levels of the protein was investigated. Two polymorphisms (rs11850328 and rs2268614) were associated with the PGF plasma levels in the Cilento sample and these associations were...

  3. Genetic and environmental factors influencing the Placental Growth Factor (PGF) variation in two populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorice, Rossella; Ruggiero, Daniela; Nutile, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    . However, to date, no information is available regarding the genetics of PGF variability. Furthermore, even though the effect of environmental factors (e.g.: cigarette smoking) on angiogenesis has been explored, no data on the influence of these factors on PGF levels have been reported so far. Here we have......Placental Growth Factor (PGF) is a key molecule in angiogenesis. Several studies have revealed an important role of PGF primarily in pathological conditions (e.g.: ischaemia, tumour formation, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory processes) suggesting its use as a potential therapeutic agent...

  4. The influences of fluorine and process variations on polysilicon film stress and MOSFET hot carrier effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Lynn E.; Macwilliams, Kenneth P.; Isaac, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The use of fluorinated gate oxides may provide an improvement in nMOSFET reliability by enhancing hot carrier resistance. In order to clarify the mechanisms by which polysilicon processing and fluorination influence the oxide behavior, a matrix of nMOSFET structures was prepared using various processing, doping, and implantation strategies. These structures were evaluated for crystalline morphology and chemical element distribution. Mechanical stress measurements were taken on the polysilicon films from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. These examinations showed that fluorination of a structure with randomly oriented polysilicon can reduce residual mechanical stress and improve hot carrier resistance at room temperature.

  5. Orbital Period Variations in the NY Vir System, Revisited in the Light of New Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baştürk Özgür

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available NY Virginis is an eclipsing binary system with a subdwarf B primary and an M type dwarf secondary. Recent studies (Qian et al. 2012; Lee et al. 2014 suggested the presence of two circumbinary planets with a few Jovian masses within the system. Lee et al. (2014 examined the orbital stabilities of the suggested planets, using the best-fit parameters derived from their eclipse timing variation analysis. They found that the outer companion should be ejected from the system in about 800 000 years. An observational report from Pulley et al. (2016 pointed out that the recent mideclipse times of the binary deviate significantly from the models suggested by Lee et al. (2014. In fact, variations in the orbital period of the system had already been recognized by many authors, but the parameters of these variations vary significantly as new data accumulate. Here, we analyze the eclipse timing variations of the NY Vir system, using new mid-eclipse times that we have obtained together with earlier published measurements in order to understand the nature of the system and constrain its parameters.

  6. Dynamics of insect pollinators as influenced by cocoa production systems in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon, Ian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa is strictly entomophilous but studies on the influence of the ecosystem on insect pollinators in cocoa production systems are limited. The abundance of cocoa pollinators and pod-set of cocoa as influenced by a gradient of farm distances from natural forest and proportion of plantain/banana clusters in or adjacent to cocoa farms were therefore investigated. Cocoa pollinators trapped were predominantly ceratopogonid midges hence, analyses were based on their population. Variation in farm distance to forest did neither influence ceratopogonid midge abundance nor cocoa pod-set. However, we found a positive relationship between pollinator abundance and fruit set and the proportion of plantain/banana intercropped with cocoa. The results suggest appropriate cocoa intercrop can enhance cocoa pollination, and the current farming system in Ghana can conveniently accommodate such interventions without significant changes in farm practices.

  7. Variations of fracture toughness and stress-strain curve of cold worked stainless steel and their influence on failure strength of cracked pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess failure probability of cracked components, it is important to know the variations of the material properties and their influence on the failure load assessment. In this study, variations of the fracture toughness and stress-strain curve were investigated for cold worked stainless steel. The variations of the 0.2% proof and ultimate strengths obtained using 8 specimens of 20% cold worked stainless steel (CW20) were 77 MPa and 81 MPa, respectively. The respective variations were decreased to 13 and 21 MPa for 40% cold worked material (CW40). Namely, the variation in the tensile strength was decreased by hardening. The COVs (coefficients of variation) of fracture toughness were 7.3% and 16.7% for CW20 and CW40, respectively. Namely, the variation in the fracture toughness was increased by hardening. Then, in order to investigate the influence of the variations in the material properties on failure load of a cracked pipe, flaw assessments were performed for a cracked pipe subjected to a global bending load. Using the obtained material properties led to variation in the failure load. The variation in the failure load of the cracked pipe caused by the variation in the stress-strain curve was less than 1.5% for the COV. The variation in the failure load caused by fracture toughness variation was relatively large for CW40, although it was less than 2.0% for the maximum case. It was concluded that the hardening induced by cold working does not cause significant variation in the failure load of cracked stainless steel pipe. (author)

  8. VARIATION AND EVOLUTION OF BREEDING SYSTEMS IN THE TURNERA ULMIFOLIA L. COMPLEX (TURNERACEAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Spencer C H; Shore, Joel S

    1987-03-01

    The evolutionary and functional relationships among breeding systems and floral morphology were investigated in the Turnera ulmifolia complex. Predictions of a model of breeding system evolution among distylous and homostylous varieties were tested. Chromosome counts of 73 accessions revealed an association between breeding system and chromosome number. Diploid and tetraploid populations of five taxonomic varieties are distylous and self-incompatible, whereas hexaploid populations of three varieties are homostylous and self-compatible. The latter occur at different margins of the geographical range of the complex. Crossing studies and analyses of pollen and ovule fertility in F 1 's revealed that the three homostylous varieties are intersterile. To test the prediction that, homostylous varieties are long homostyles that have originated by crossing over within the distyly supergene, a crossing program was undertaken among distylous and homostylous plants. Residual incompatibility was observed in styles and pollen of each homostylous variety with patterns consistent with predictions of the cross-over model. The intersterility of hexaploid varieties suggests that long homostyly has arisen on at least three occasions in the complex by recombination within the supergene controlling distyly. Deviation from expected compatibility behavior occurs in populations of var. angustifolia that have the longest styles. These phenotypes displayed the greatest separation between anthers and stigmas (herkogamy) and set little seed in crosses with long- or short-styled plants. This suggests that they are derived from long homostyles with shorter length styles. It is proposed that selection for increased outcrossing has favored the evolution of herkogamy in long homostyles. Estimates of outcrossing rate in a distylous population using allozyme markers confirmed that dimorphic incompatibility enforces complete outcrossing. Significant genetic variation for floral traits likely to

  9. The Semianalytical Solutions for Stiff Systems of Ordinary Differential Equations by Using Variational Iteration Method and Modified Variational Iteration Method with Comparison to Exact Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Tarik Atay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Variational Iteration Method (VIM and Modified Variational Iteration Method (MVIM are used to find solutions of systems of stiff ordinary differential equations for both linear and nonlinear problems. Some examples are given to illustrate the accuracy and effectiveness of these methods. We compare our results with exact results. In some studies related to stiff ordinary differential equations, problems were solved by Adomian Decomposition Method and VIM and Homotopy Perturbation Method. Comparisons with exact solutions reveal that the Variational Iteration Method (VIM and the Modified Variational Iteration Method (MVIM are easier to implement. In fact, these methods are promising methods for various systems of linear and nonlinear stiff ordinary differential equations. Furthermore, VIM, or in some cases MVIM, is giving exact solutions in linear cases and very satisfactory solutions when compared to exact solutions for nonlinear cases depending on the stiffness ratio of the stiff system to be solved.

  10. Influence of core flows on the decade variations of the polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulot, G.; Le Huy, M.; Le Mouël, J.-L.

    We address the possibility for the core flows that generate the geomagnetic field to contribute significantly to the decade variations of the mean pole position (generally called the Markowitz wobble). This assumption is made plausible by the observation that the flow at the surface of the core-estimated from the geomagnetic secular variation models-experiences important changes on this time scale. We discard the viscous and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and consider only the pressure torque pf resulting from the fluid flow overpressure acting on the non-spherical core-mantle boundary (CMB) at the bottom of the mantle, and the gravity torque gf due to the density heterogeneity driving the core flow. We show that forces within the core balance each other on the time scale considered and, using global integrals over the core, the mantle and the whole Earth, we write Euler's equation for the mantle in terms of two more useful torques Pgeo and . The "geostrophic torque", γ Pgeo incorporates γpf and part of γgf, while γ is another fraction of γgf. We recall how the geostrophic pressure pgeo, and thus γPgeo for a given topography, can be derived from the flow at the CMB and compute the motion of the mean pole from 1900 to 1990, assuming in a first approach that the unknown γ can be neglected. The amplitude of the computed pole motion is three to ten times less than the observed one and out of the phase with it. In order to estimate the possible contribution of γ we then use a second approach and consider the case in which the reference state for the Earth is assumed to be the classical axisymmetric ellipsoidal figure with an almost constant ellipticity within the core. We show that (γPgeo + γ) is then equal to a pseudo-electromagnetic torque γL3, the torque exerted on the core by the component of the Lorentz force along the axis of rotation (this torque exists even though the mantle is assumed insulating). This proves that, at least in this case and

  11. Variation of densitometry on computed tomography in COPD--influence of different software tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O Wielpütz

    Full Text Available Quantitative multidetector computed tomography (MDCT as a potential biomarker is increasingly used for severity assessment of emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Aim of this study was to evaluate the user-independent measurement variability between five different fully-automatic densitometry software tools.MDCT and full-body plethysmography incl. forced expiratory volume in 1s and total lung capacity were available for 49 patients with advanced COPD (age = 64±9 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 31±6% predicted. Measurement variation regarding lung volume, emphysema volume, emphysema index, and mean lung density was evaluated for two scientific and three commercially available lung densitometry software tools designed to analyze MDCT from different scanner types.One scientific tool and one commercial tool failed to process most or all datasets, respectively, and were excluded. One scientific and another commercial tool analyzed 49, the remaining commercial tool 30 datasets. Lung volume, emphysema volume, emphysema index and mean lung density were significantly different amongst these three tools (p<0.001. Limits of agreement for lung volume were [-0.195, -0.052 l], [-0.305, -0.131 l], and [-0.123, -0.052 l] with correlation coefficients of r = 1.00 each. Limits of agreement for emphysema index were [-6.2, 2.9%], [-27.0, 16.9%], and [-25.5, 18.8%], with r = 0.79 to 0.98. Correlation of lung volume with total lung capacity was good to excellent (r = 0.77 to 0.91, p<0.001, but segmented lung volume (6.7±1.3-6.8±1.3 l were significantly lower than total lung capacity (7.7±1.7 l, p<0.001.Technical incompatibilities hindered evaluation of two of five tools. The remaining three showed significant measurement variation for emphysema, hampering quantitative MDCT as a biomarker in COPD. Follow-up studies should currently use identical software, and standardization efforts should encompass software as

  12. Image Size Variation Influence on Corrupted and Non-viewable BMP Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Tengku Norsuhaila T.; Azma Abdullah, Nurul; Rahman, Nurul Hidayah Ab; Hamid, Isredza Rahmi A.; Chai Wen, Chuah

    2017-08-01

    Image is one of the evidence component seek in digital forensics. Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format is most popular used in the Internet because JPEG files are very lossy and easy to compress that can speed up Internet transmitting processes. However, corrupted JPEG images are hard to recover due to the complexities of determining corruption point. Nowadays Bitmap (BMP) images are preferred in image processing compared to another formats because BMP image contain all the image information in a simple format. Therefore, in order to investigate the corruption point in JPEG, the file is required to be converted into BMP format. Nevertheless, there are many things that can influence the corrupting of BMP image such as the changes of image size that make the file non-viewable. In this paper, the experiment indicates that the size of BMP file influences the changes in the image itself through three conditions, deleting, replacing and insertion. From the experiment, we learnt by correcting the file size, it can able to produce a viewable file though partially. Then, it can be investigated further to identify the corruption point.

  13. Variation of biometric parameters in corn cobs under the influence of nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigel, Prisecaru; Florin, Sala

    2017-07-01

    Biometric parameters as elements of productivity on corn cobs, along with plant density per unit area (ha) are essential in achieving production. The influence of differentiated fertilization with nitrogen was evaluated at the level of productivity elements on corn cobs, Andreea hybrid. Biometric parameters of the corn cobs (total length - L; usable length - l; uncoated length with corn kernels - lu; diameter at the base - Db, middle - Dm, and top of the corn cobs - Dt; corn cob weight - Cw, grain weight - Gw) were directly influenced by the doses of nitrogen. Regression analysis has facilitated the prediction of grain weight as the main element of productivity under different statistical certainty based on nitrogen doses (R2 = 0.962, p<0.01), on the total length of corn cobs (R2 = 0.985, p<0.01), on the usable length of corn cobs (R2 = 0.996, p<<0.001), on the diameter at the base of corn cobs (R2 = 0.824, p<0.01), on the diameter at the middle of corn cobs (R2 = 0.807, p<0.01), on uncoated length with corn kernels (R2 = 0.624, p<0.01) and on the diameter at the top of the corn cobs (R2 = 0.384, p=0.015).

  14. PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION OF VIBRATION INFLUENCE ON SENSITIVE SYSTEM ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lobaty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem pertaining to an estimation of vibration influence on sensitive system elements. Dependences of intensity and probability of a process exit characterizing a condition of a system element for the preset range that allow to estimate serviceability and no-failure operation of the system have been obtained analytically in the paper

  15. Regional Variations of Public Perception on Contaminated Industrial Sites in China and Its Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonuo; Jiao, Wentao; Xiao, Rongbo; Chen, Weiping; Bai, Yanying

    2016-04-08

    Public involvement is critical in sustainable contaminated site management. It is important for China to improve public knowledge and participation, foster dialogue between urban managers and laypeople, and accelerate the remediation and redevelopment processes in contaminated site management. In this study, we collected 1812 questionnaires from nine cities around China through face-to-face interviews and statistically analyzed the perception of residents concerning contaminated sites. The results show that respondents' concern about soil pollution was lower than for other environmental issues and their knowledge of soil contamination was limited. The risks posed by contaminated industrial sites were well recognized by respondents, but they were unsatisfied with the performance of local agencies regarding information disclosure, publicity and education and public participation. Respondents believed that local governments and polluters should take the primary responsibility for contaminated site remediation. Most of them were unwilling to pay for contaminated site remediation and preferred recreational or public service redevelopment. Moreover, our research indicated that public perception varied among different cities. This variation was mainly determined by implementations of policy instruments and additionally affected by remediation technology, pollutant type, regional policy response and living distance.

  16. Characterization of black carbon in the ambient air of Agra, India: Seasonal variation and meteorological influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Singh, Shalendra Pratap; Jangid, Ashok; Kumar, Ranjit

    2017-09-01

    This study characterizes the black carbon in Agra, India home to the Taj Mahal—and situated in the Indo-Gangetic basin. The mean black carbon concentration is 9.5 μg m-3 and, owing to excessive biomass/fossil fuel combustion and automobile emissions, the concentration varies considerably. Seasonally, the black carbon mass concentration is highest in winter, probably due to the increased fossil fuel consumption for heating and cooking, apart from a low boundary layer. The nocturnal peak rises prominently in winter, when the use of domestic heating is excessive. Meanwhile, the concentration is lowest during the monsoon season because of the turbulent atmospheric conditions and the process of washout by precipitation. The ratio of black carbon to brown carbon is less than unity during the entire study period, except in winter (December). This may be because that biomass combustion and diesel exhaust are major black carbon contributors in this region, while a higher ratio in winter may be due to the increased consumption of fossil fuel and wood for heating purposes. ANOVA reveals significant monthly variation in the concentration of black carbon; plus, it is negatively correlated with wind speed and temperature. A high black carbon mass concentration is observed at moderate (1-2 m s-1) wind speed, as compared to calm or turbulent atmospheric conditions.

  17. The Influence of Second Harmonic Phase and Amplitude Variation in Cyclically Pitching Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Ethan; Farnsworth, John

    2017-11-01

    From wind tunnel testing of a cyber-physical wing model, it has been found that the pitch trajectory for stall flutter is described by an array of higher harmonic frequencies with decaying energy content. These frequencies distort the stall flutter motion from that of a pure sinusoidal oscillation in pitch and can have a significant effect on the resulting force production. In order to understand how these higher harmonic frequencies contribute to the overall pitching moment characteristics of a wing in stall flutter, a rigid finite span wing model, with aspect ratio four, was pitched in the wind tunnel. The prescribed motion of the pitch cycle was varied by changing the amplitude ratio and phase of the second harmonic of the oscillation frequency. The second harmonic represents the second highest energy mode in the pitching cycle spectra. Pitching moment and planar particle image velocimetry data was collected. From these pitching trajectories, a significant dependence of pitching moment on both the phase and amplitude of the prescribed waveforms was found. Specifically, for the same amplitude ratio, variations in the phase produced changes of approximately 30 percent in the phase averaged pitching moment.

  18. Influence of spatial variation on countermeasures with special regards to animal food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.; Kiefer, P.

    2000-07-01

    In the context of SAVE, soil and animal based countermeasures have been considered as well as human based ones: In this technical deliverable we have considered the following countermeasures: - Soil-plant transfer: The effectiveness of Ca, K, fertilisers and substances with a high cation exchange capacity on the transfer of radiocaesium from soil to plant for different soil types within Europe have been considered. In addition, the fertility status of soils will give an indication of the potential effectiveness of fertilisation. In this report the effect of K application in a specified area and a given contamination scenario is evaluated and demonstrated. - Plant-animal transfer: A wide range of countermeasures is available to directly reduce transfer of radionuclides to animals, and thereby animal products. The preferred option will always be the most cost effective and practically acceptable one, for both producers and consumers. In this report collection of animal based countermeasures for Cs, Sr and I with special respect to their acceptability, effectiveness and spatial variation is presented. The contribution and importance of countries in import and export of feedstuff used for animals is estimated based on trading information. (orig.)

  19. Influence of isentropic transport on seasonal ozone variations in the lower stratosphere and subtropical upper troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, P.; Cunnold, D. M.; Yang, E.-S.; Wang, H.-J.

    2005-01-01

    The isentropic cross-tropopause ozone transport has been estimated in both hemispheres in 1999 based on the potential vorticity mapping of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 11 ozone measurements and contour advection calculations using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Global and Modeling Assimilation Office analysis. The estimated net isentropic stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux is approx.118 +/- 61 x 10(exp9)kg/yr globally within the layer between 330 and 370 K in 1999; 60% of it is found in the Northern Hemisphere, and 40% is found in the Southern Hemisphere. The monthly average ozone fluxes are strongest in summer and weakest in winter in both hemispheres. The seasonal variations of ozone in the lower stratosphere (LS) and upper troposphere (UT) have been analyzed using ozonesonde observations from ozonesonde stations in the extratropics and subtropics, respectively. It is shown that observed ozone levels increase in the UT over subtropical ozonesonde stations and decrease in the LS over extratropical stations in late spring/early summer and that the ozone increases in the summertime subtropical UT are unlikely to be explained by photochemical ozone production and diabatic transport alone. We conclude that isentropic transport is a significant contributor to ozone levels in the subtropical upper troposphere, especially in summer.

  20. Wind-Driven Sea-Level Variation Influences Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Daehyun; Cairns, David; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Long-term variation of mean sea level has been considered the primary exogenous factor of vegetation dynamics in salt marshes. In this study, we address the importance of short-term, wind-induced rise of the sea surface in such biogeographic changes. There was an unusual opportunity for examining......, waterlogging of marsh soils, which has retarded ecological succession. To conclude, we stress the need for a multitemporal perspective that recognizes the significance of short-term sea-level fluctuations nested within long-term trends......) continuous sedimentation with spatial variability (2.0–4.0 mm yr-1), (3) increased frequency of over-marsh flooding events, and (4) contemporary dominance of Halimione portulacoides, indicating little progressive succession toward a later phase. Conventionally, recent eustatic sea-level rise was believed...... to drive the increased frequency of flooding and such retarded succession. Skallingen, however, has showed more or less equilibrated yearly rates between sea-level rise and surface accretion. This implies that the long-term, gradual sea-level rise alone might not be enough to explain the increased...

  1. Influence of thyroid in nervous system growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, G C; Mussa, F; Bretto, R; Zambelli, M C; Silvestro, L

    2001-08-01

    Nervous system growth and differentiation are closely correlated with the presence of iodine and thyroid hormones in initial development stages. In the human species, encephalon maturation during the first quarter of pregnancy is affected according to recent studies by the transplacenta passage of maternal thyroid hormones while it depends on initial iodiothyronin secretion by the foetal gland after the 12th week of pregnancy. Thyroid hormone deficiency during nervous system development causes altered noble nervous cells, such as the pyramidal cortical and Purkinje cells, during glial cell proliferation and differentiation alike. Neurons present cell hypoplasia with reduced axon count, dendritic branching, synaptic spikes and interneuron connections. Oligodendrocytes decrease in number and average myelin content consequently drops. Biochemical studies on hypothyroid rats have demonstrated alterations to neuron intraplasmatic microtubule content and organisation, changed mitochondria number and arrangement and anomalies in T3 nuclear and citoplasmatic receptor maturation. Alterations to microtubules are probably responsible for involvement of the axon-dendrite system, and are the consequence of deficient thyroid hormone action on the mitochondria, the mitochondria enzymes and proteins associated with microtubules. Nuclear and citoplasmatic receptors have been identified and gene clonation studies have shown two families of nuclear receptors that include several sub-groups in their turn. A complex scheme of temporal and spatial expression of these receptors exists, so they probably contribute with one complementary function, although their physiological role differs. The action of thyroid hormones occurs by changing cell protein levels because of their regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Genes submitted to thyroid hormone control are either expressed by oligodendrytes, which are myelin protein coders or glial differentiation mediators, or

  2. Sources of variation influencing concordance between functional MRI and direct cortical stimulation in brain tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A Morrison

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS. There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14 who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12. The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP, true negative (TN, false positive (FP and false negative (FN occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance more in-depth. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor versus language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced

  3. The influence of pregnancy on systemic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Michael; Sperling, Rhoda S; Moran, Thomas M; Kraus, Thomas A

    2012-12-01

    Adaptations in maternal systemic immunity are presumed to be responsible for observed alterations in disease susceptibility and severity as pregnancy progresses. Epidemiological evidence as well as animal studies have shown that influenza infections are more severe during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, resulting in greater morbidity and mortality, although the reason for this is still unclear. Our laboratory has taken advantage of 20 years of experience studying the murine immune response to respiratory viruses to address questions of altered immunity during pregnancy. With clinical studies and unique animal model systems, we are working to define the mechanisms responsible for altered immune responses to influenza infection during pregnancy and what roles hormones such as estrogen or progesterone play in these alterations.

  4. Intrinsic Factors Influencing Decision making of Arbitrators in Dispute Resolution of variation Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, K. C.; Chaphalkar, N. B.; Patil, Smita K.

    2018-06-01

    Occurrence of disputes is a common feature in construction contracts. Adjudication of disputes through the arbitration process involves detailed and through analysis of facts and evidences related to the case before arriving at the final decision. These facts and evidences have been explored by researchers to develop dispute resolution mechanisms. As a part of the research, the present work identifies the factors which influence the decision making of arbitrators in resolving disputes through a case study of 72 arbitration awards and settled court cases related to Indian construction contracts. This work further seeks consensus for the identified factors from experts and also ranks the factors based on their importance with the help of the responses obtained through a questionnaire survey and statistical tests.

  5. Electromyographic analysis of knee push up plus variations: what is the influence of the kinetic chain on scapular muscle activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhout, A; Van Praet, K; Pizzi, L; Van Herzeele, M; Cools, A

    2010-11-01

    First, to look for appropriate closed kinetic chain exercises to restore intramuscular imbalance between upper trapezius (UT) and serratus anterior (SA) in overhead athletes. Second, to determine the influence of using diagonal pattern muscle recruitment during knee push up plus (KPP) exercises on scapular electromyographic activity. Single group repeated-measures design. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-two physically active individuals in good general health who did not have a history of neck and/or shoulder injury or surgery nor participated in high-level overhead sports or performed upper limb strength training for more than 5 h/week. Interventions Subjects performed the standard KPP and six variations. Electromyographic activity of the three trapezius parts and the SA. Four exercises with a low UT/SA can be selected for rehabilitation of intramuscular balance: standard KPP, KPP with homolateral leg extension, KPP with a wobble board and homolateral leg extension and one-handed KPP. The use of a wobble board during KPP exercises and performance on one hand has no influence on SA electromyographic activity. Heterolateral leg extension during KPP stimulates lower trapezius activity, whereas homolateral leg extension stimulates SA activity. In case of intramuscular scapular imbalance, some exercises are preferable over others because of their low UT/SA ratio. The use of a kinetic chain approach during KPP exercises influences scapular muscle activity.

  6. Influence of Different Patellofemoral Design Variations Based on Genesis II Total Knee Endoprosthesis on Patellofemoral Pressure and Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtle, Ulf G; Lange, Barbara; Herzog, Yvonne; Schnauffer, Peter; Leichtle, Carmen I; Wülker, Nikolaus; Lorenz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patellofemoral groove design varies greatly and likely has a distinct influence on patellofemoral biomechanics. To analyse the selective influence, five patellofemoral design variations were developed based on Genesis II total knee endoprosthesis (original design, being completely flat, being laterally elevated, being medially elevated, and both sides elevated) and made from polyamide using rapid prototyping. Muscle-loaded knee flexion was simulated on 10 human knee specimens using a custom-made knee simulator, measuring the patellofemoral pressure distribution and tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. The measurements were carried out in the native knee as well as after TKA with the 5 design prototypes. The overall influence of the different designs on the patellofemoral kinematics was small, but we found detectable effects for mediolateral tilt ( p patellofemoral pressures, major interindividual differences were seen between the designs, which, on average, largely cancelled each other out. These results suggest that the elevation of the lateral margin of the patellofemoral groove is essential for providing mediolateral guidance, but smooth contouring as with original Genesis II design seems to be sufficient. The pronounced interindividual differences identify a need for more patellofemoral design options in TKA.

  7. The influence of fine-scale habitat features on regional variation in population performance of alpine White-tailed Ptarmigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedy, B.; Martin, K.

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed (explicitly or implicitly) that animals select habitat features to maximize fitness. However, there is often a mismatch between preferred habitats and indices of individual and population measures of performance. We examined the influence of fine-scale habitat selection on the overall population performance of the White-tailed Ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura), an alpine specialist, in two subdivided populations whose habitat patches are configured differently. The central region of Vancouver Island, Canada, has more continuous and larger habitat patches than the southern region. In 2003 and 2004, using paired logistic regression between used (n = 176) and available (n = 324) sites, we identified food availability, distance to standing water, and predator cover as preferred habitat components . We then quantified variation in population performance in the two regions in terms of sex ratio, age structure (n = 182 adults and yearlings), and reproductive success (n = 98 females) on the basis of 8 years of data (1995-1999, 2002-2004). Region strongly influenced females' breeding success, which, unsuccessful hens included, was consistently higher in the central region (n = 77 females) of the island than in the south (n = 21 females, P = 0.01). The central region also had a much higher proportion of successful hens (87%) than did the south (55%, P < 0.001). In light of our findings, we suggest that population performance is influenced by a combination of fine-scale habitat features and coarse-scale habitat configuration. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  8. Variations in infant and childhood vitamin D supplementation programmes across Europe and factors influencing adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Uday

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutritional rickets is a growing global public health concern despite existing prevention programmes and health policies. We aimed to compare infant and childhood vitamin D supplementation policies, implementation strategies and practices across Europe and explore factors influencing adherence. Methods: European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Bone and Growth Plate Working Group members and other specialists completed a questionnaire on country-specific vitamin D supplementation policy and child health care programmes, socioeconomic factors, policy implementation strategies and adherence. Factors influencing adherence were assessed using Kendall’s tau-b correlation coefficient. Results: Responses were received from 29 of 30 European countries (97%. Ninety-six per cent had national policies for infant vitamin D supplementation. Supplements are commenced on day 1–5 in 48% (14/29 of countries, day 6–21 in 48% (14/29; only the UK (1/29 starts supplements at 6 months. Duration of supplementation varied widely (6 months to lifelong in at-risk populations. Good (≥80% of infants, moderate (50–79% and low adherence (<50% to supplements was reported by 59% (17/29, 31% (9/29 and 10% (3/29 of countries, respectively. UK reported lowest adherence (5–20%. Factors significantly associated with good adherence were universal supplementation independent of feeding mode (P = 0.007, providing information at neonatal unit (NNU discharge (P = 0.02, financial family support (P = 0.005; monitoring adherence at surveillance visits (P = 0.001 and the total number of factors adopted (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Good adherence to supplementation is a multi-task operation that works best when parents are informed at birth, all babies are supplemented, and adherence monitoring is incorporated into child health surveillance visits. Implementation strategies matter for delivering efficient prevention policies.

  9. Variation in broccoli cultivar phytochemical content under organic and conventional management systems: implications in breeding for nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Erica N C; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T; Myers, James R; Paulo, Maria João; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (δ-, γ-, α-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For δ- and γ-tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41-13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between

  10. Variation in Broccoli Cultivar Phytochemical Content under Organic and Conventional Management Systems: Implications in Breeding for Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Erica N. C.; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T.; Myers, James R.; Paulo, Maria João; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (δ-, γ-, α-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For δ- and γ- tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41–13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between

  11. Influence of LOCA simulating conditions on the variation of electrical characteristics of insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Sohei; Yoshikawa, Masato; Ito, Masayuki; Kusama, Yasuo; Yagi, Toshiaki

    1982-01-01

    The authors have examined the variation of insulation resistance when the sheets of insulating materials and cables were exposed to various LOCA simulating environment. This report describes the summarized results obtained so far for ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) which is important as an insulating material of cables. The samples used were an EPR sheet of standard compound ratio, 2 kinds of EPR sheets of practical compound ratio, 6 types of PH cables (fire-retardant, EPR insulated, chlorosulphonated polyethylene sheathed cable) produced for trial as reactor use, and 6 kinds of EPR sheets of the same composition as the cable core. To discuss the difference of insulation resistance change, the logarithmic mean of the ratio of 1 min values to initial insulation resistance rho/rhosub(o) was used. PWR LOCA-simulating environment was used, while the thermal aging in the air at 121 deg C for 7 days and 50 Mrad irradiation in the air at room temperature were given as the predeterioration. The effect of LOCA-simulation period in the simultaneous method without air, in which steam and radiation were given in parallel, the difference in the experimental results of cables and sheets, the effect of air, the comparison of the simultaneous method with the sequential method in which LOCA-simulating steam was applied after the irradiation in the air and the reverse sequential method (dielectric property measurements) are described. Under the existence of air, the sequential method seems to be a good simulation condition for the simultaneous method, though many experiments are required further. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. Influence of LOCA simulating conditions on the variation of electrical characteristics of insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Sohei; Yoshikawa, Masato; Ito, Masayuki; Kusama, Yasuo; Yagi, Toshiaki

    1982-12-01

    The authors have examined the variation of insulation resistance when the sheets of insulating materials and cables were exposed to various LOCA simulating environment. This report describes the summarized results obtained so far for ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) which is important as an insulating material of cables. The samples used were an EPR sheet of standard compound ratio, 2 kinds of EPR sheets of practical compound ratio, 6 types of PH cables (fire-retardant, EPR insulated, chlorosulphonated polyethylene sheathed cable) produced for trial as reactor use, and 6 kinds of EPR sheets of the same composition as the cable core. To discuss the difference of insulation resistance change, the logarithmic mean of the ratio of 1 min values to initial insulation resistance rho/rhosub(o) was used. PWR LOCA-simulating environment was used, while the thermal aging in the air at 121 deg C for 7 days and 50 Mrad irradiation in the air at room temperature were given as the predeterioration. The effect of LOCA-simulation period in the simultaneous method without air, in which steam and radiation were given in parallel, the difference in the experimental results of cables and sheets, the effect of air, the comparison of the simultaneous method with the sequential method in which LOCA-simulating steam was applied after the irradiation in the air and the reverse sequential method (dielectric property measurements) are described. Under the existence of air, the sequential method seems to be a good simulation condition for the simultaneous method, though many experiments are required further.

  13. Solar influence on meteor rates and atmospheric density variations at meteor heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellyett, C.

    1977-01-01

    A full analysis of radar-determined meteor rates from New Zealand, involving 3,085,574 meteors recorded over a total of 3 1/2 years, and 12,391,976 meteors recorded by the National Research Council of Canada in 8 1/2 years confirms an inverse relationship between meteor rates and solar activity as measured by sunspot numbers. The relationship, significant at the 1% level, appears in the Canadian annual average when the abnormal 1963 increase is removed, in monthly and 1/3-monthly results for the total Canadian period, and in monthly intervals for 1 year of the New Zealand data. This proven relationship of meteor rates with the solar cycle calls for a significant density gradient change over the solar cycle in the 70- to-120-km height range. Although some definite negative results have been reported, no unambiguous positive results are yet available supporting such a density gradient change. It is possible that density variations due to annual, semiannual, diurnal, and latitudinal changes obscure any 11-year density gradient change occurring at these heights. It is uncertain whether the 1963 increase represents density gradient changes in the meteor ablation region regularly brought about 1-2 years before each sunspot minimum or is a special event due to volcanic dust. The following additional facts have emerged from the present analysis. (1) Within a 1-year period the seasonal rate change of astronomical origin overrides any density gradient change in controlling the meteor rates in one of the two hemispheres. (2) The earth's daily rotation alters rates in phase with probable diurnal density gradient changes. (3) An effect due to D region absorption has been observed in the Canadian data

  14. Influence of CYP3A5 genetic variation on everolimus maintenance dosing after cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesche, Dorothea; Sigurdardottir, Vilborg; Setoud, Raschid; Englberger, Lars; Fiedler, Georg M; Largiadèr, Carlo R; Mohacsi, Paul; Sistonen, Johanna

    2015-12-01

    Everolimus (ERL) has become an alternative to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) due to its renal-sparing properties, especially in heart transplant (HTx) recipients with kidney dysfunction. However, ERL dosing is challenging due to its narrow therapeutic window combined with high interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of clinical and genetic factors on ERL dosing in a pilot cohort of 37 HTx recipients. Variants in CYP3A5, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, POR, NR1I2, and ABCB1 were genotyped, and clinical data were retrieved from patient charts. While ERL trough concentration (C0 ) was within the targeted range for most patients, over 30-fold variability in the dose-adjusted ERL C0 was observed. Regression analysis revealed a significant effect of the non-functional CYP3A5*3 variant on the dose-adjusted ERL C0 (p = 0.031). ERL dose requirement was 0.02 mg/kg/d higher in patients with CYP3A5*1/*3 genotype compared to patients with CYP3A5*3/*3 to reach the targeted C0 (p = 0.041). ERL therapy substantially improved estimated glomerular filtration rate (28.6 ± 6.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) in patients with baseline kidney dysfunction. Everolimus pharmacokinetics in HTx recipients is highly variable. Our preliminary data on patients on a CNI-free therapy regimen suggest that CYP3A5 genetic variation may contribute to this variability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Influence of source type and air exchange on variations of indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Winqvist, K.

    1986-04-01

    The model relates radon concentration to source strength and its variations, air exchange rate and meteorological factors. Two types of sources have been studied. The pressure difference dependent source is made up of radon transported with soil pore air and driven by pressure difference due to the stack effect. The constant source is made up of radon transported by diffusion from building materials or from soil. The air exchange rate depends exponentially on indoor-outdoor temperature difference and linearly on wind speed. These two inputs have been summed in quadrature. In a house with a constant source radon concentration decreases when the air exchange rate increases due to the increasing temperature difference, whereas the pressure difference dependent source causes an increasing concentration. This is due to the fact that the effect of the source strength increase is stronger than the decreasing effect of air exchange on concentration. The winter-summer concentration ratio depends on the combination of the two types of source. A pure pressure dependent source leads to the winter-summer ratio of 2-3.5 (winter -5 deg C, summer +15 deg C, wind speed 3 m/s). A strong contribution of a constant source is needed to cause a summer concentration higher than the winter concentration. The model is in agreement with the winter-summer concentration ratios measured. This ratio increases with the increasing winter concentration. The measured ratio was near 1.0 for houses with winter concentration of 200 Bq m''3 or less and near 2.0 with concentration of 1000 Bq m''3. In a house with a constant source, the diurnal maximum occurs in the afternoon, while in houses with a pressure difference dependent source the time of maximum is early in the morning

  16. Combined influence of LDLR and HMGCR sequence variation on lipid-lowering response to simvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangravite, Lara M.; Medina, Marisa Wong; Cui, Jinrui; Pressman, Sheila; Smith, Joshua D.; Rieder, Mark J.; Guo, Xiuqing; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Although statins are efficacious for lowering LDL-cholesterol (LDLC), there is wide inter-individual variation in response. We tested the extent to which combined effects of common alleles of LDLR and HMGCR can contribute to this variability. Methods and Results Haplotypes in the LDLR 3′-untranslated region (3UTR) were tested for association with lipid-lowering response to simvastatin treatment in the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics (CAP) trial (335 African-Americans and 609European-Americans). LDLR haplotype 5 (L5)was associated with smaller simvastatin-induced reductions in LDLC, total cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B (P=0.0002–0.03)in African-Americans, but not European-Americans. The combined presence of L5 and previously described HMGCR haplotypes in African-Americans was associated with significantly attenuated apoB reduction(−22.4±1.5% N=89) both compared to noncarriers (−30.6±1.5% N=78, P=0.0001) and to carriers of either individual haplotype (−28.2±1.1% N=158, P=0.001). We observed similar differences when measuring simvastatin-mediated induction of LDLR surface expression using lymphoblast cell lines (P=0.03). Conclusions We have identified a common LDLR 3UTR haplotype that is associated with attenuated lipid-lowering response to simvastatin treatment. Response was further reduced in individuals with both LDLR and previously described HMGCR haplotypes. Previously identified racial differences in statin efficacy were partially explained by increased prevalence of these combined haplotypes in African-Americans. PMID:20413733

  17. AMOC variations in 1979-2008 simulated by NCEP operational ocean data assimilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Boyin [Climate Prediction Center, NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States); National Climate Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States); Xue, Yan; Kumar, Arun [Climate Prediction Center, NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Behringer, David W. [Environmental Modeling Center, NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) between 1979 and 2008 are documented using the operational ocean analysis, the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS), at the National Centers for Climate Prediction (NCEP). The maximum AMOC at 40 N is about 16 Sv in average with peak-to-peak variability of 3-4 Sv. The AMOC variations are dominated by an upward trend from 1980 to 1995, and a downward trend from 1995 to 2008. The maximum AMOC at 26.5 N is slightly weaker than hydrographic estimates and observations from mooring array. The dominant variability of the AMOC in 20 -65 N (the first EOF, 51% variance) is highly correlated with that in the subsurface temperature (the first EOF, 33% variance), and therefore, with density (the first EOF, 25% variance) in the North Atlantic, and is consistent with the observational estimates based on the World Ocean Database 2005. The dominant variabilities of AMOC and subsurface temperature are also analyzed in the context of possible links with the net surface heat flux, deep convection, western boundary current, and subpolar gyre. Variation in the net surface heat flux is further linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index which is found to lead AMOC variations by about 5 years. Our results indicate that AMOC variations can be documented based on an ocean analysis system such as GODAS. (orig.)

  18. A neural network method for solving a system of linear variational inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Hengyou; Cui Yishun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we transmute the solution for a new system of linear variational inequalities to an equilibrium point of neural networks, and by using analytic technique, some sufficient conditions are presented. Further, the estimation of the exponential convergence rates of the neural networks is investigated. The new and useful results obtained in this paper generalize and improve the corresponding results of recent works.

  19. A miniature ultrasonic actuator-control system for plant stem diameter micro-variation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of micro-variations in plant stem diameter are potentially useful to optimize irrigation decision support systems that are based on plant physiological responses. However, for this technology to be suitable for field applications, problems associated with stem softness and micro variati...

  20. Low complexity variational bayes iterative reviver for MIMO-OFDM systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Chunlin; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    A low complexity iterative receiver is proposed in this paper for MIMO-OFDM systems in time-varying multi-path channel based on the variational Bayes (VB) method. According to the VB method, the estimation algorithms of the signal distribution and the channel distribution are derived for the rece...

  1. Solving Ratio-Dependent Predatorprey System with Constant Effort Harvesting Using Variational Iteration Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghotbi, Abdoul R; Barari, Amin

    2009-01-01

    Due to wide range of interest in use of bio-economic models to gain insight in to the scientific management of renewable resources like fisheries and forestry, variational iteration method (VIM) is employed to approximate the solution of the ratio-dependent predator-prey system with constant effort...

  2. Repeatability of fractional flow reserve despite variations in systemic and coronary hemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, N.P.; Johnson, D.T.; Kirkeeide, R.L.; Berry, C.; de Bruyne, B.; Fearon, W.F.; Oldroyd, K.G.; Pijls, N.H.J.; Gould, K. Lance

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study classified and quantified the variation in fractional flow reserve (FFR) due to fluctuations in systemic and coronary hemodynamics during intravenous adenosine infusion. Background Although FFR has become a key invasive tool to guide treatment, questions remain regarding its

  3. Correlation of maturity groups with seed composition in soybeans, as influenced by genotypic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maestri, Damián M.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of 19 soybean cultivars (Glycine max (L. Merrill with maturity groups V, VI or VII were analyzed for proximate composition, fatty acids and sterols. Protein, oil, carbohydrate and ash contents varied between 344-463 g kg-1, 178-233 g kg-1, 234-338 g kg-1, and 40.0-49.3 g kg-1 of dry matter, respectively. Fatty acid profiles revealed that the major acids were palmitic (9.2-12.5%, oleic (17.7-22.1% and linoleic (53.6-56.9%. Linolenic acid ranged from 8.6 to 10.4%. Sitosterol (48.1-56.8% was the main component of the sterol fraction, followed by campesterol (18.4-21.7% and stigmasterol (13.4-18.0%. Statistically significant differences between genotypes were found for the majority of parameters evaluated, but there are not significant variations among maturity groups.

    Se analizaron la humedad, contenido en proteínas, carbohidratos, grasas y cenizas, y las composiciones en ácidos grasos y esteróles de las semillas de 19 cultivares de soja (Glycine max (L. Merrill con grupos de madurez V, VI o VIl. Los contenidos de proteínas, aceites, carbohidratos y cenizas variaron entre 344-463 g kg-1, 178-233 g kg-1, 234-338 g kg-1 y 40.0-49.3 g kg-1 de materia seca, respectivamente. Los ácidos grasos mayoritarios fueron palmítico (9.2-12.5%, oleico (17.7-22.1% y linoleico (53.6-56.9%. El porcentaje de ácido linolénico varió desde 8.6 hasta 10.4%. El principal componente de la fracción de esteroles del aceite fue el sitosterol (48.1-56.8%, seguido por el campesterol (18.4-21.7% y el estigmasterol (13.4-18.0%. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los genotipos para la mayoría de los parámetros evaluados, pero no hubo variaciones significativas entre grupos de madurez.

  4. Environmental variation and macrofauna response in a coastal area influenced by land runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoumianaki, Ioanna; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar.; Nicolaidou, Artemis

    2013-11-01

    Macrofauna community interactions with environmental variables in the water column (salinity, temperature, turbidity, transparency, suspended particulate matter, particulate organic matter, choloroplastic pigments) and in the sediment (granulometric variables, organic carbon and pigments) were investigated in a coastal area with high land runoff due to riverine and temporary stream discharges (Greece, Aegean Sea, Maliakos Gulf). Samples were taken along a distance-depositional gradient from the river mouth to the open sea at eight stations, at times of different precipitation regime from August 2000 to May 2001. The physical variables, such as transparency and median grain size, generally increased seawards, and parallelled the depositional gradient as opposed to measures of food inputs and hydrodynamic regime. High environmental heterogeneity was observed during peak precipitation. The total number of species increased seawards and from August (122 species) to May (170 species). Maximum abundance also increased from August (4953 m-2) to May (10,220 individuals m-2), irrespective of distance from river mouth. Species belonging to different functional groups, as to recolonization, feeding, motility and substrate preferences, coexisted at all times indicating high functional diversity. Non-parametric multivariate regression showed that at times of low, rising and falling precipitation 78-81% of community variation was explained by environmental variables, indicating that macrofauna distribution and species composition respond to food inputs and sediment characteristics. During peak land runoff the community-environment relationship weakened (57% of the variability explained). The diversity of functional traits of the most abundant species indicates that the macrofauna community can absorb the impact of increased turbidity, sedimentation and current-driven dispersion. The study offers baseline information for the integrated coastal zone management in microtidal areas

  5. Polymorphisms at Amino Acid Residues 141 and 154 Influence Conformational Variation in Ovine PrP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sujeong; Thackray, Alana M.; Hopkins, Lee; Monie, Tom P.; Burke, David F.; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms in ovine PrP at amino acid residues 141 and 154 are associated with susceptibility to ovine prion disease: Leu141Arg154 with classical scrapie and Phe141Arg154 and Leu141His154 with atypical scrapie. Classical scrapie is naturally transmissible between sheep, whereas this may not be the case with atypical scrapie. Critical amino acid residues will determine the range or stability of structural changes within the ovine prion protein or its functional interaction with potential cofactors, during conversion of PrPC to PrPSc in these different forms of scrapie disease. Here we computationally identified that regions of ovine PrP, including those near amino acid residues 141 and 154, displayed more conservation than expected based on local structural environment. Molecular dynamics simulations showed these conserved regions of ovine PrP displayed genotypic differences in conformational repertoire and amino acid side-chain interactions. Significantly, Leu141Arg154 PrP adopted an extended beta sheet arrangement in the N-terminal palindromic region more frequently than the Phe141Arg154 and Leu141His154 variants. We supported these computational observations experimentally using circular dichroism spectroscopy and immunobiochemical studies on ovine recombinant PrP. Collectively, our observations show amino acid residues 141 and 154 influence secondary structure and conformational change in ovine PrP that may correlate with different forms of scrapie. PMID:25126555

  6. Influence of structural variations in push-pull zinc porphyrins on photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chenyi; Giordano, Fabrizio; Cevey-Ha, Ngoc-Le; Tsao, Hoi Nok; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-04-01

    We designed and synthesized two new zinc porphyrin dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Subtle molecular structural variation in the dyes significantly influenced the performance of the DSC devices. By utilizing these dyes in combination with a cobalt-based redox electrolyte using a photoanode made of mesoporous TiO2 , we achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of up to 12.0 % under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) simulated solar light. Moreover, we obtained a high PCE of 6.4 % for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by using 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene as a hole-transporting material. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The influence of river water temperature annual variation to the moderator heat exchangers heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nita, I. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Main Moderator heat exchangers are the most important consumers supplied by Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) System. In order to determine an appropriate operating configuration of the RCW system it is needed to determine the flowrate required by the Main Moderator consumers, in real time. From operating experience, the required RCW flowrate necessary to be supplied to the main moderator heat exchangers is much lower than design flowrate. In installation, there are no flow elements that could measure especially that flow. However, there are two control valves which regulate the flow to the main moderator heaters; they control the outlet temperature of the moderator to 69"oC. That leads to the requirement of calculating the flowrate function of the outside temperature for all possible temperatures during a calendar year. One considered all possible temperatures during an operating year, and more, going beyond design point, up to 36"oC, temperature that can occur during quick transients after forth RCW pump starting. The calculation was made to verify the capacity of heat exchanger to remove the designed 100 MW(t) in the new condition of reducing moderator temperature outlet from 77 to 69°C. The obtained model was validated using field temperatures and flow measurements and the conclusion was the model can accurately predict how the RCW system operates in all year operation conditions. (authors)

  8. Influences of climate change on area variation of Qinghai Lake on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau since 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lingyi; Duan, Xiaofang; Kong, Fanjin; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Yangfan; Li, Zhen; Mei, Yi; Zhao, Yanwen; Hu, Shuijin

    2018-05-09

    Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is the most sensitive region to global warming on Earth. Qinghai Lake, the largest lake on the plateau, has experienced evident area variation during the past several decades. To quantify the area changes of Qinghai Lake, a satellite-based survey based on Landsat images from the 1980s to 2010s has been performed. In addition, meteorological data from all the seven available stations on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau has been analyzed. Area of Qinghai Lake shrank ~2% during 1987-2005, and then increased ~3% from 2005-2016. Meanwhile, the average annual temperature increased 0.319 °C/10 y in the past 50 years, where the value is 0.415 °C/10 y from 2005-2016. The structural equation modeling (SEM) shows that precipitation is the primary factor influencing the area of Qinghai Lake. Moreover, temperature might be tightly correlated with precipitation, snow line, and evaporation, thereby indirectly causes alternations of the lake area. This study elucidated the significant area variation of water body on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau under global warming since 1980s.

  9. Influence of ASIR (Adaptative Statistical Iterative Reconstruction) variation in the image noise of computerized tomography for high voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, L.M.M.; Pereira, W.B.R.; Vieira, J.G.; Lamounier, C.S.; Gonçalves, D.A.; Carvalho, G.N.P.; Santana, P.C.; Oliveira, P.M.C.; Reis, L.P.

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography had great advances in the equipment used in the diagnostic practice, directly influencing the levels of radiation for the patient. It is essential to optimize techniques that must be employed to comply with the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle of radioprotection. The relationship of ASIR (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction) with image noise was studied. Central images of a homogeneous water simulator were obtained in a 20 mm scan using a 64-channel Lightspeed VCT tomograph of General Electric in helical acquisitions with a rotation time of 0.5 seconds, Pitch 0.984: 1, and thickness of cut 0.625 mm. All these constant parameters varying the voltage in two distinct values: 120 and 140 kV with use of the automatic current by the CAE (Automatic Exposure Control), ranging from 50 to 675 mA (120 kV) and from 50 to 610 mA (140kV), minimum and maximum values, respectively allowed for each voltage. Image noise was determined through ImageJ free software. The analysis of the obtained data compared the percentage variation of the noise in the image based on the ASIR value of 10%, concluding that there is a variation of approximately 50% when compared to the values of ASIR (100%) in both tensions. Dose evaluation is required in future studies to better utilize the relationship between dose and image quality

  10. Influence of seasonal variation and anthropogenic activity on phosphorus cycling and retention in mangrove sediments: A case study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Lu, Haoliang; Liu, Jingchun; Lin, Yushan; Dai, Minyue; Yan, Chongling

    2018-03-01

    Mangroves are known for sequestering and storing large quantities of phosphorus (P) within their sediments. In the present study, the sediment P cycle (including phosphatase activity intensity, total sedimentary P, P fractions distinguished by a sequential extraction method, as well as diffusion-adsorption processes) in a mangrove swamp in a subtropical estuary in China was studied. In the spring, the acid phosphatase activity varied between 1.3 and 1.9 units in the four sites in the estuary. The activity of alkaline phosphatase varied from 0.8 to 1.4 units. The total sedimentary P ranged from 821 to 1689 mg kg-1 with a dominance of redox-sensitive (Fe/Al bound) P. In the autumn, activities of both phosphatases and the total sediment P amount increased, probably due to enhanced inputs of organic matter and Fe oxides. In addition to seasonal variation, P in the mangrove sediment was influenced by anthropogenic activities. In particular, redox-sensitive P decreased significantly while phosphatase activity increased in the site that was flushed with aquaculture pond effluents. In contrast, sediment P enrichment was observed in the site that received domestic sewage. Both sources of anthropogenic P increased the eutrophication risk of the mangrove sediment because of a decrease in the amount of P adsorption and an enhancement of P release via diffusion. Diesel contamination due to the presence of a dock depressed phosphatase activity in the surficial sediment. The overlap between seasonal rhythm and human influences may introduce significant variations in P cycling, which warrants further attention from coastal management.

  11. Variations in the stimulus salience of cocaine reward influences drug-associated contextual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddie, Shervin; Itzhak, Yossef

    2016-03-01

    Drugs of abuse act as reinforcers because they influence learning and memory processes resulting in long-term memory of drug reward. We have previously shown that mice conditioned by fixed daily dose of cocaine (Fix-C) or daily escalating doses of cocaine (Esc-C) resulted in short- and long-term persistence of drug memory, respectively, suggesting different mechanisms in acquisition of cocaine memory. The present study was undertaken to investigate the differential contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits in the formation of Fix-C and Esc-C memory in C57BL/6J mice. Training by Esc-C resulted in marked elevation in hippocampal expression of Grin2b mRNA and NR2B protein levels compared with training by Fix-C. The NR2B-containing NMDAR antagonist ifenprodil had similar attenuating effects on acquisition and reconsolidation of Fix-C and Esc-C memory. However, the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 had differential effects: (1) higher doses of MK-801 were required for post-retrieval disruption of reconsolidation of Esc-C memory than Fix-C memory; and (2) pre-retrieval MK-801 inhibited extinction of Fix-C memory but it had no effect on Esc-C memory. In addition, blockade of NMDAR downstream signaling pathways also showed differential regulation of Fix-C and Esc-C memory. Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase attenuated acquisition and disrupted reconsolidation of Fix-C but not Esc-C memory. In contrast, the mitogen-activating extracellular kinase inhibitor SL327 attenuated reconsolidation of Esc-C but not Fix-C memory. These results suggest that NMDAR downstream signaling molecules associated with consolidation and reconsolidation of cocaine-associated memory may vary upon changes in the salience of cocaine reward during conditioning. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Genetic variation throughout the folate metabolic pathway influences negative symptom severity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Joshua L; Brohawn, David G; Nitenson, Adam Z; Macklin, Eric A; Smoller, Jordan W; Goff, Donald C

    2013-03-01

    Low serum folate levels previously have been associated with negative symptom risk in schizophrenia, as has the hypofunctional 677C>T variant of the MTHFR gene. This study examined whether other missense polymorphisms in folate-regulating enzymes, in concert with MTHFR, influence negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and whether total risk allele load interacts with serum folate status to further stratify negative symptom risk. Medicated outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 219), all of European origin and some included in a previous report, were rated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. A subset of 82 patients also underwent nonfasting serum folate testing. Patients were genotyped for the MTHFR 677C>T (rs1801133), MTHFR 1298A>C (rs1801131), MTR 2756A>G (rs1805087), MTRR 203A>G (rs1801394), FOLH1 484T>C (rs202676), RFC 80A>G (rs1051266), and COMT 675G>A (rs4680) polymorphisms. All genotypes were entered into a linear regression model to determine significant predictors of negative symptoms, and risk scores were calculated based on total risk allele dose. Four variants, MTHFR 677T, MTR 2756A, FOLH1 484C, and COMT 675A, emerged as significant independent predictors of negative symptom severity, accounting for significantly greater variance in negative symptoms than MTHFR 677C>T alone. Total allele dose across the 4 variants predicted negative symptom severity only among patients with low folate levels. These findings indicate that multiple genetic variants within the folate metabolic pathway contribute to negative symptoms of schizophrenia. A relationship between folate level and negative symptom severity among patients with greater genetic vulnerability is biologically plausible and suggests the utility of folate supplementation in these patients.

  13. Variation in absorption and half-life of hydrocortisone influence plasma cortisol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Peter C; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocortisone therapy should be individualized in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients to avoid over and under replacement. We have assessed how differences in absorption and half-life of cortisol influence glucocorticoid exposure. Forty-eight patients (21 M) aged between 6·1 and 20·3 years with CAH due to CYP21A2 deficiency were studied. Each patient underwent a 24-h plasma cortisol profile with the morning dose used to calculate absorption parameters along with an intravenous (IV) hydrocortisone (15 mg/m(2) body surface area) bolus assessment of half-life. Parameters derived were maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ), time of maximum plasma concentration (tmax ), time to attaining plasma cortisol concentration cortisol. Mean half-life was 76·5 ± 5·2 (range 40-225·3) min, Cmax 780·7 ± 61·6 nmol/l and tmax 66·7 (range 20-118) min. Time taken to a plasma cortisol concentration less than 100 nmol/l was 289 (range 140-540) min. Those with a fast half-life and slow tmax took longest to reach a plasma cortisol concentration less than 100 nmol/l (380 ± 34·6 min), compared to those with a slow half-life and fast tmax (298 ± 34·8 min) and those with a fast half-life and fast tmax (249·5 ± 14·4 min) (One-way anovaF = 4·52; P = 0·009). Both rate of absorption and half-life of cortisol in the circulation play important roles in determining overall exposure to oral glucocorticoid. Dose regimens need to incorporate estimates of these parameters into determining the optimum dosing schedule for individuals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. INFLUENCE OF DOPAMINERGIC SYSTEM ON INTERNET ADDICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jović

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Internet addiction is a clinical anomaly with strong negative consequences on social, work-related, family, financial, and economic function of a person. It is regarded as a serious public health issue. The basic idea of this paper is to, based on the currently available body of research work on this topic, point out to neurobiological pathos of Internet addiction, and its connection to the dopaminergic system. Dopamine contains all physiological functions of neurotransmitters and it is a part of chatecholamine family. Five dopaminergic receptors (D1 - D5 belong to the super family of receptors related to G-protein. Through these receptors, dopamine achieves its roles: regulation of voluntary movement, regulation of center of pleasure, hormonal regulation, and regulation of hypertension. In order to recognize an Internet user as an addict, he or she needs to comply with the criteria suggested by the American Psychiatric Association (APA. Phenomenological, neurobiological, and pharmacological data indicates similarities in pathopsychology of substance addiction and pathological gambling, which are indirectly related to the similarity with the Internet addiction. Responding to stimuli from the game, addicts have shown more brain activity in the nape region, left dorsolateral, prefrontal cortex, and left parachipocampal gyrus than in the control group. After the six-week bupropion therapy, desire to play Internet and video games, the total duration of playing, and induced brain activity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are lowered with the addicts.

  15. Application of the variational iteration method for system of initial value problems delay differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Hamood. M.; Ismail, A. I. B. MD.

    2017-08-01

    Many attempts have been presented to solve the system of Delay Differential Equations (DDE) with Initial Value Problem. As a result, it has shown difficulties when getting the solution or cannot be solved. In this paper, a Variational Iteration Method is employed to find out an approximate solution for the system of DDE with initial value problems. The example illustrates convenient and an efficiency comparison with the exact solution.

  16. Influence of hydrography of Central Mexican Pacific in the spatial variation of inorganic nutrients during 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivos-Ortiz, A.; Gaviño-Rodríguez, J. H.; Quijano-Scheggia, S.; Pelayo-Martinez, G.; Torres-Orozco, E.; Calva-Chavez, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexican Central Pacific (MCP) is considered an oligotrophic area that holds important populations of different species with ecological and economic importance like marine mammals, billfish and tunas. Hydrographic mechanisms are responsible to interplay with the biogeochemical cycles of nutrients to support primary productivity for these food webs. It is argued that seasonal upwelling of bottom waters rich in nutrients generates distributed in patches of high-productivity, which are also linked to topographic continental forcing. The goal of this study is determine the presence of water masses, depth of the mixed layer, temperature, salinity, patterns of geostrophic currents and their influence on the spatiotemporal variability of inorganic nutrients. For that pupose, three oceanographic cruises were conducted in January, May-June, and October of 2010 off the coast of the MCP. Each campaign consisted of 15 stations in five perpendicular transects with stations at 2, 50 and 100 nm offshore. At each station samples were taken to determine the concentration of NO3-+ NO2-, NH4+, PO43- and SiO2 at 0, 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 150 and 200 m depth. CTD casts were made up to 500m to obtain profiles of salinity, temperature, water masses, and identify geostrophic currents (direction and intensity). Identified water masses were: Pacific Tropical Surface Water (PTSW), Pacific Equatorial Surface Water (PESW), Equatorial Pacific Water (EPW), California Current Water (CCW), Subtropical Subsurface Water (STSsW), and Pacific Intermediate Water (PIT); these water masses were present in all three seasons being more clear the presence of CCW during autumn and PTSW in winter. The interaction between coastal topography, geostrophic circulation, and the depth of the mixed layer (55m oceanic part in January and 10m coastal area in October) were the factors that determined the location of areas of high concentration of nutrients. The distribution of nutrients was heterogeneous

  17. ``Use of perturbative methods to break down the variation of reactivity between two systems``; ``Decomposition par methodes perturbatives de la variation de reactivite de deux systemes``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perruchot-Triboulet, S.; Sanchez, R.

    1997-12-01

    The modification of the isotopic composition, the temperature or even accounting for across section uncertainties in one part of a nuclear reactor core, affects the value of the effective multiplication factor. A new tool allows the analysis of the reactivity effect generated by the modification of the system. With the help of the direct and adjoint fluxes, a detailed balance of reactivity, between the compared systems, is done for each isotopic cross section. After the presentation of the direct and adjoint transport equations in the context of the multigroup code transport APOLLO2, this note describes the method, based on perturbation theory, for the analysis of the reactivity variation. An example application is also given. (author).

  18. Analysis of influence on back-EMF based sensorless control of PMSM due to parameter variations and measurement errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Z.; Lu, K.; Ye, Y.

    2011-01-01

    To achieve better performance of sensorless control of PMSM, a precise and stable estimation of rotor position and speed is required. Several parameter uncertainties and variable measurement errors may lead to estimation error, such as resistance and inductance variations due to temperature...... and flux saturation, current and voltage errors due to measurement uncertainties, and signal delay caused by hardwares. This paper reveals some inherent principles for the performance of the back-EMF based sensorless algorithm embedded in a surface mounted PMSM system adapting vector control strategy...

  19. No evidence that genetic variation in the myeloid-derived suppressor cell pathway influences ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Cannioto, Rikki; Clay, Alyssa I

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism by which the immune system is adversely affected in cancer patients remains poorly understood, but the accumulation of immune suppressive/pro-tumorigenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is thought to be one prominent mechanism contributing to immunologic...... tolerance of malignant cells in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To this end, we hypothesized genetic variation in MDSC pathway genes would be associated with survival after EOC diagnoses. METHODS: We measured the hazard of death due to EOC within 10 years of diagnosis, overall and by invasive subtype...

  20. Maturity of hospital information systems: Most important influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Carvalho, João; Rocha, Álvaro; Abreu, António

    2017-07-01

    Maturity models facilitate organizational management, including information systems management, with hospital organizations no exception. This article puts forth a study carried out with a group of experts in the field of hospital information systems management with a view to identifying the main influencing factors to be included in an encompassing maturity model for hospital information systems management. This study is based on the results of a literature review, which identified maturity models in the health field and relevant influencing factors. The development of this model is justified to the extent that the available maturity models for the hospital information systems management field reveal multiple limitations, including lack of detail, absence of tools to determine their maturity and lack of characterization for stages of maturity structured by different influencing factors.

  1. Factors that influence the relative use of multiple memory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Mark G; Goodman, Jarid

    2013-11-01

    Neurobehavioral evidence supports the existence of at least two anatomically distinct "memory systems" in the mammalian brain that mediate dissociable types of learning and memory; a "cognitive" memory system dependent upon the hippocampus and a "stimulus-response/habit" memory system dependent upon the dorsolateral striatum. Several findings indicate that despite their anatomical and functional distinctiveness, hippocampal- and dorsolateral striatal-dependent memory systems may potentially interact and that, depending on the learning situation, this interaction may be cooperative or competitive. One approach to examining the neural mechanisms underlying these interactions is to consider how various factors influence the relative use of multiple memory systems. The present review examines several such factors, including information compatibility, temporal sequence of training, the visual sensory environment, reinforcement parameters, emotional arousal, and memory modulatory systems. Altering these parameters can lead to selective enhancements of either hippocampal-dependent or dorsolateral striatal-dependent memory, and bias animals toward the use of either cognitive or habit memory in dual-solution tasks that may be solved adequately with either memory system. In many learning situations, the influence of such experimental factors on the relative use of memory systems likely reflects a competitive interaction between the systems. Research examining how various factors influence the relative use of multiple memory systems may be a useful method for investigating how these systems interact with one another. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Variations of surface ozone at Ieodo Ocean Research Station in the East China Sea and the influence of Asian outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Shin, B.; Lee, M.; Hwang, G.; Kim, J.; Shim, J.; Lee, G.; Shim, C.

    2015-11-01

    Ieodo Ocean Research Station (IORS), a research tower (~ 40 m a.s.l.) for atmospheric and oceanographic observations, is located in the East China Sea (32.07° N, 125.10° E). The IORS is almost equidistant from South Korea, China, and Japan and, therefore, it is an ideal place to observe Asian outflows without local emission effects. The seasonal variation of ozone was distinct, with a minimum in August (37 ppbv) and two peaks in April and October (62 ppbv), and was largely affected by the seasonal wind pattern over east Asia. At IORS, six types of air masses were distinguished with different levels of O3 concentrations by the cluster analysis of backward trajectories. Marine air masses from the Pacific Ocean represent a relatively clean background air with a lowest ozone level of 32 ppbv, which was most frequently observed in summer (July-August). In spring (March-April) and winter (December-February), the influence of Chinese outflows was dominant with higher ozone concentrations of 62 and 49 ppbv, respectively. This study confirms that the influence of Chinese outflows was the main factor determining O3 levels at IORS and its extent was dependent on meteorological state, particularly at a long-term scale.

  3. The Influence of runner system on production of injection molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janostik Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study describes the influence of runner system on rheological properties during the injection molding process. Economic effects on the amount of production are discussed as well. Autodesk Moldflow Synergy 2016 (Moldflow was used for the study of the injection process. Three suggestions of the runner system, cold runner system, hot runner system and the combination of cold–hot runner system have been promoted. These three variants underwent the rheological and economic analysis. As a result, recommendations for the application of the runner system for the required amount of production have been suggested

  4. Concepts, Operations, and Feasibility of a Projection-Based Variation Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Berger, Thorsten; Walkingshaw, Eric

    2016-01-01

    on a subset of all variants could ease the engineering of highly configurable software. We investigate the potential of one kind of such tools: projection-based variation control systems. For such systems we aim to understand: (i) what end-user operations they need to support, and (ii) whether they can...... realize the actual evolution of real-world, highly configurable software. We conduct an experiment that investigates variability-related evolution patterns and that evaluates the feasibility of a projection-based variation control system by replaying parts of the history of a highly configurable real......Highly configurable software often uses preproces- sor annotations to handle variability. However, understanding, maintaining, and evolving code with such annotations is difficult, mainly because a developer has to work with all variants at a time. Dedicated methods and tools that allow working...

  5. Intrinsic light variation in very close eclipsing binary systems with distorted components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnendijk, L.

    1974-01-01

    Using the theory of distorted components in very close binaries, the semiaxes are computed for several possible models. The coefficients of limb darkening and the gravity effect are found as weighted mean values of the results of several theoretical investigations. A simple linear relation is found between the coefficient of limb darkening and the logarithm of the effective temperature in the spectral interval A0 to K0. The Fourier series for the intrinsic light variation of such distorted components is given for any polytropic index. The influence of the tidal bulge is described in detail. (IAA)

  6. Cytokine variations and mood disorders: influence of social stressors and social support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude eAudet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressful events have been implicated in the evolution of mood disorders. In addition to brain neurotransmitters and growth factors, the view has been offered that these disorders might be provoked by the activation of the inflammatory immune system as well as by de novo changes of inflammatory cytokines within the brain. The present review describes the impact of social stressors in animals and in humans on behavioral changes reminiscent of depressive states as well as on cytokine functioning. Social stressors increase pro-inflammatory cytokines in circulation as well as in brain regions that have been associated with depression, varying with the animal’s social status and/or behavioral methods used to contend with social challenges. Likewise, in humans, social stressors that favor the development of depression are accompanied by elevated circulating cytokine levels and conversely, conditions that limit the cytokine elevations correlated with symptoms attenuation or reversal. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the potentially powerful effects of social support, social identity, and connectedness in maintaining well-being and in diminishing symptoms of depression.

  7. Y-chromosome variation in Altaian Kazakhs reveals a common paternal gene pool for Kazakhs and the influence of Mongolian expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulik, Matthew C; Osipova, Ludmila P; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-03-11

    Kazakh populations have traditionally lived as nomadic pastoralists that seasonally migrate across the steppe and surrounding mountain ranges in Kazakhstan and southern Siberia. To clarify their population history from a paternal perspective, we analyzed the non-recombining portion of the Y-chromosome from Kazakh populations living in southern Altai Republic, Russia, using a high-resolution analysis of 60 biallelic markers and 17 STRs. We noted distinct differences in the patterns of genetic variation between maternal and paternal genetic systems in the Altaian Kazakhs. While they possess a variety of East and West Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups, only three East Eurasian paternal haplogroups appear at significant frequencies (C3*, C3c and O3a3c*). In addition, the Y-STR data revealed low genetic diversity within these lineages. Analysis of the combined biallelic and STR data also demonstrated genetic differences among Kazakh populations from across Central Asia. The observed differences between Altaian Kazakhs and indigenous Kazakhs were not the result of admixture between Altaian Kazakhs and indigenous Altaians. Overall, the shared paternal ancestry of Kazakhs differentiates them from other Central Asian populations. In addition, all of them showed evidence of genetic influence by the 13(th) century CE Mongol Empire. Ultimately, the social and cultural traditions of the Kazakhs shaped their current pattern of genetic variation.

  8. Y-chromosome variation in Altaian Kazakhs reveals a common paternal gene pool for Kazakhs and the influence of Mongolian expansions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Dulik

    Full Text Available Kazakh populations have traditionally lived as nomadic pastoralists that seasonally migrate across the steppe and surrounding mountain ranges in Kazakhstan and southern Siberia. To clarify their population history from a paternal perspective, we analyzed the non-recombining portion of the Y-chromosome from Kazakh populations living in southern Altai Republic, Russia, using a high-resolution analysis of 60 biallelic markers and 17 STRs. We noted distinct differences in the patterns of genetic variation between maternal and paternal genetic systems in the Altaian Kazakhs. While they possess a variety of East and West Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups, only three East Eurasian paternal haplogroups appear at significant frequencies (C3*, C3c and O3a3c*. In addition, the Y-STR data revealed low genetic diversity within these lineages. Analysis of the combined biallelic and STR data also demonstrated genetic differences among Kazakh populations from across Central Asia. The observed differences between Altaian Kazakhs and indigenous Kazakhs were not the result of admixture between Altaian Kazakhs and indigenous Altaians. Overall, the shared paternal ancestry of Kazakhs differentiates them from other Central Asian populations. In addition, all of them showed evidence of genetic influence by the 13(th century CE Mongol Empire. Ultimately, the social and cultural traditions of the Kazakhs shaped their current pattern of genetic variation.

  9. Influence of the temporal and spatial variation of nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase and soil composition in the N species content in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Edgar; Fidalgo, Fernanda; Teixeira, Jorge; Aguiar, Ana A; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2014-04-01

    The variation of nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and N content in lettuce was evaluated at 5 stages of lettuce growth. Soil physicochemical properties and its N content were also assessed to elucidate the soil-to-plant transfer of inorganic N and potential leaching to groundwater. A decrease of NR activity and an increase of NO3(-) and N-Kjeldahl content in lettuces were observed during plant growth, whereas GS activity and NH4(+) increased during the first few weeks of lettuce growth and then decreased. Although the temporal variation was similar in lettuces grown in different soils, quantitative differences were observed, indicating that high NO3(-) content in soil caused a higher NO3(-) accumulation in lettuce despite the higher NR activity during the initial stage of plant growth. Higher levels of NO3(-) and NH4(+) were correlated with higher levels of N-Kjeldahl in lettuce suggesting a positive effect of these N species in the biosynthesis of organic forms of N. Soil physicochemical properties influenced the mobility of inorganic N within the groundwater-soil-plant system. Sandy soils with low OM content allowed NO3(-) leaching, which was confirmed by higher NO3(-) levels in groundwater. Therefore, lettuces grown in those soils presented lower N content and the inputs of N to the environment were higher. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence Business Strategy On The Quality Of Accounting Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Meiryani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Todaythe survival ofthe companyis largely determinedbythe ability ofcompaniesto competeinthe market so improvement on the quality of accounting information system is needed. Companies use accounting information system as a tool to generate information that managers can make decisions. To be able to take the right decisions necessary quality of accounting information systems. In view of the above this paper considers the Influence Of Business Strategy On The Quality Of Accounting Info...

  11. Effect of mass variation on dynamics of tethered system in orbital maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Zhao, Guowei; Huang, Hai

    2018-05-01

    In orbital maneuvering, the mass variation due to fuel consumption has an obvious impact on the dynamics of tethered system, which cannot be neglected. The contributions of the work are mainly shown in two aspects: 1) the improvement of the model; 2) the analysis of dynamics characteristics. As the mass is variable, and the derivative of the mass is directly considered in the traditional Lagrange equation, the expression of generalized force is complicated. To solve this problem, the coagulated derivative is adopted in the paper; besides, the attitude dynamics equations derived in this paper take into account the effect of mass variation and the drift of orbital trajectory at the same time. The bifurcation phenomenon, the pendular motion angular frequency, and amplitudes of tether vibration revealed in this paper can provide a reference for the parameters and controller design in practical engineering. In the article, a dumbbell model is adopted to analyze the dynamics of tethered system, in which the mass variation of base satellite is fully considered. Considering the practical application, the case of orbital transfer under a transversal thrust is mainly studied. Besides, compared with the analytical solutions of librational angles, the effects of mass variation on stability and librational characteristic are studied. Finally, in order to make an analysis of the effect on vibrational characteristic, a lumped model is introduced, which reveals a strong coupling of librational and vibrational characteristics.

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay characterization of basal variation and heritability of systemic microfibrillar-associated protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Gjørup Sækmose

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4 is a systemic biomarker that is significantly elevated in samples from patients suffering from hepatic cirrhosis. The protein is generally localized to elastic fibers and other connective tissue fibers in the extracellular matrix (ECM, and variation in systemic MFAP4 (sMFAP4 has the potential to reflect diverse diseases with increased ECM turnover. Here, we aimed to validate an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the measurement of sMFAP4 with an emphasis on the robustness of the assay. Moreover, we aimed to determine confounders influencing the basal sMFAP4 variability and the genetic contribution to the basal variation. METHODS: The sandwich ELISA was based on two monoclonal anti-MFAP4 antibodies and was optimized and calibrated with a standard of recombinant MFAP4. The importance of pre-analytical sample handling was evaluated regarding sample tube type, time, and temperature conditions. The mean value structure and variance structure was determined in a twin cohort including 1,417 Danish twins (age 18-67 years by mixed-effect linear regression modeling. RESULTS: The practical working range of the sandwich ELISA was estimated to be 4-75 U/ml. The maximum intra- and inter-assay variation was estimated to be 8.7% and 6.6%, respectively. Sample handling and processing appeared to influence MFAP4 measurements only marginally. The average concentration of sMFAP4 in the serum was 18.9 ± 8.4 (SD U/ml in the twin cohort (95% CI: 18.5-19.4, median sMFAP4 17.3 U/ml. The mean structure model was demonstrated to include waist-hip ratio, age, and cigarette smoking status in interactions with gender. A relatively low heritability of h(2 = 0.24 was found after applying a model including additive genetic factors and shared and non-shared environmental factors. CONCLUSIONS: The described ELISA provides robust measures of the liver fibrosis marker sMFAP4. The low heritability and the relatively

  13. Geometrical treatment of non-potential interactions: the exterior variational calculus, dynamical systems, physical 1-forms and variational selfadjointness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trostel, R.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical objective of this paper is to provide geometrical formulation of the integrability conditions for the existence of an action functional, that is, to provide a geometrical counterpart (similar to that by Abraham, Marsden, and Hughes) of the variational and functional approach to self-adjointness. This objective is achieved via the exterior variational calculus, an exterior differential calculus on the vector space of functions depending on time or space time, using from the outset extensively the concept of functional differentiation as its foundation. Variational self-adjointness equals the variational closure of the physical 1-form, the vanishing of a generalized curl-operation applied to the equations of motion. The convenience of this more formal approach is demonstrated, not only when deriving the conditions of variational self-adjointness for materials of differential type of arbitrary order (particles or fields), using roughly no more than Dirac's delta-distributions, but also when treating materials of a broader class (including causal and acausal constitutive functionals, materials of rate type, integral type, etc.). A physical objective of this paper is achieved by pointing out that, as physics is primarily concerned with the solutions of the evolution equations, i.e., with the set of the zero points of the physical 1-form, an equivalence relation among the physical 1-forms on the infinite dimensional vector space of functions is constructed by leaving the set of their zero points unchanged. Using this result, a direct Lagrangian universality is indicated and an almost one presented. Moreover, all physical 1-forms connected by invertible supermatrices (thus mixing the evolution law of different times or space-time) are equivalent. Choosing these supermatrices to be diagonal in time or space-time yields the indirect analytical representation factors

  14. Is variation management included in regional healthcare governance systems? Some proposals from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Sabina; Seghieri, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The Italian National Health System, which follows a Beveridge model, provides universal healthcare coverage through general taxation. Universal coverage provides uniform healthcare access to citizens and is the characteristic usually considered the added value of a welfare system financed by tax revenues. Nonetheless, wide differences in practice patterns, health outcomes and regional usages of resources that cannot be justified by differences in patient needs have been demonstrated to exist. Beginning with the experience of the health care system of the Tuscany region (Italy), this study describes the first steps of a long-term approach to proactively address the issue of geographic variation in healthcare. In particular, the study highlights how the unwarranted variation management has been addressed in a region with a high degree of managerial control over the delivery of health care and a consolidated performance evaluation system, by first, considering it a high priority objective and then by actively integrating it into the regional planning and control mechanism. The implications of this study can be useful to policy makers, professionals and managers, and will contribute to the understanding of how the management of variation can be implemented with performance measurements and financial incentives. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Seasonal variation of early diagenesis and greenhouse gas production in coastal sediments of Cadiz Bay: Influence of anthropogenic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Macarena; Ortega, Teodora; Bohórquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Rabouille, Christophe; Forja, Jesús M.

    2018-01-01

    Greenhouse gas production in coastal sediments is closely associated with the early diagenesis processes of organic matter and nutrients. Discharges from anthropogenic activities, particularly agriculture, fish farming and waste-water treatment plants supply large amounts of organic matter and inorganic nutrients that affect mineralization processes. Three coastal systems of Cadiz Bay (SW Spain) (Guadalete River, Rio San Pedro Creek and Sancti Petri Channel) were chosen to determine the seasonal variation of organic matter mineralization. Two sampling stations were selected in each system; one in the outer part, close to the bay, and another more inland, close to a discharge point of effluent related to anthropogenic activities. Seasonal variation revealed that metabolic reactions were driven by the annual change of temperature in the outer station of the systems. In contrast, these reactions depended on the amount of organic matter reaching the sediments in the outermost part of the systems, which was higher during winter. Oxygen is consumed in the first 0.5 cm indicating that suboxic and anoxic processes, such as denitrification, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are important in these sediments. Sulfate reduction seems to account for most of the mineralization of organic matter at the marine stations, while methanogenesis is the main pathway at the sole freshwater station of this study, located inside the estuary of the Guadalete River, because of the lack of sulfate as electron acceptor. Results point to denitrification being the principal process of N2O formation. Diffusive fluxes varied between 2.6 and 160 mmol m-2 d-1 for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC); 0.9 and 164.3 mmol m-2 d-1 for TA; 0.8 and 17.4 μmol m-2 d-1 for N2O; and 0.1 μmol and 13.1 mmol m-2 d-1 for CH4, indicating that these sediments act as a source of greenhouse gases to the water column.

  16. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  17. Geographical variation and factors influencing modern contraceptive use among married women in Ethiopia: evidence from a national population based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, Yihunie; Reda, Ayalu A; Tamene, Habtamu; Benedict, Susan; Deribe, Kebede

    2013-09-26

    Modern contraceptive use persists to be low in most African countries where fertility, population growth, and unmet need for family planning are high. Though there is an evidence of increased overall contraceptive prevalence, a substantial effort remains behind in Ethiopia. This study aimed to identify factors associated with modern contraceptive use and to examine its geographical variations among 15-49 married women in Ethiopia. We conducted secondary analysis of 10,204 reproductive age women included in the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS). The survey sample was designed to provide national, urban/rural, and regional representative estimates for key health and demographic indicators. The sample was selected using a two-stage stratified sampling process. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were applied to determine the prevalence of modern contraceptive use and associated factors in Ethiopia. Being wealthy, more educated, being employed, higher number of living children, being in a monogamous relationship, attending community conversation, being visited by health worker at home strongly predicted use of modern contraception. While living in rural areas, older age, being in polygamous relationship, and witnessing one's own child's death were found negatively influence modern contraceptive use. The spatial analysis of contraceptive use revealed that the central and southwestern parts of the country had higher prevalence of modern contraceptive use than that of the eastern and western parts. The findings indicate significant socio-economic, urban-rural and regional variation in modern contraceptive use among reproductive age women in Ethiopia. Strengthening community conversation programs and female education should be given top priority.

  18. Variationally optimal selection of slow coordinates and reaction coordinates in macromolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Frank

    To efficiently simulate and generate understanding from simulations of complex macromolecular systems, the concept of slow collective coordinates or reaction coordinates is of fundamental importance. Here we will introduce variational approaches to approximate the slow coordinates and the reaction coordinates between selected end-states given MD simulations of the macromolecular system and a (possibly large) basis set of candidate coordinates. We will then discuss how to select physically intuitive order paremeters that are good surrogates of this variationally optimal result. These result can be used in order to construct Markov state models or other models of the stationary and kinetics properties, in order to parametrize low-dimensional / coarse-grained model of the dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, European Research Council.

  19. Systems of general nonlinear set-valued mixed variational inequalities problems in Hilbert spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the existing theorems and methods for finding solutions of systems of general nonlinear set-valued mixed variational inequalities problems in Hilbert spaces are studied. To overcome the difficulties, due to the presence of a proper convex lower semi-continuous function, φ and a mapping g, which appeared in the considered problem, we have used some applications of the resolvent operator technique. We would like to point out that although many authors have proved results for finding solutions of the systems of nonlinear set-valued (mixed variational inequalities problems, it is clear that it cannot be directly applied to the problems that we have considered in this paper because of φ and g. 2000 AMS Subject Classification: 47H05; 47H09; 47J25; 65J15.

  20. Influence of IL15 gene variations on the clinical features, treatment response and risk of developing childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Latvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Dmitrijs; Kreile, Madara; Nikulshin, Sergejs; Kovalova, Zhanna; Gailite, Linda

    2018-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Modern treatment protocols allow achievement of long-term event-free survival rates in up to 85% of cases, although the treatment response varies among different patient groups. It is hypothesized that treatment response is influenced by the IL15 gene variations, although research results are conflicting. To analyze IL15 gene variations influence treatment response, clinical course and the risk of developing ALL we performed a case-control and family-based study. The study included 81 patients with childhood ALL. DNA samples of both or one biological parent were available for 62 of ALL patients and 130 age and gender adjusted healthy samples were used as a control group. Analyzed IL15 gene variations: rs10519612, rs10519613 and rs17007695 were genotyped using PCR-RFLP assay. Our results shows that IL15 gene variations haplotypes are associated with the risk of developing childhood ALL (p variations separately. The variations rs10519612 and rs1059613 in a recessive pattern of inheritance were associated with hyperdiploidy (p = 0.048). Analyzed genetic variations had no impact on other clinical features and treatment response (assessed by the minimal residual disease) in our study.

  1. Anatomic variations in vascular and collecting systems of kidneys from deceased donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, H C; Moreira, R J; Fukunaga, P; Fernandes, R C; Boni, R C; Matos, A C

    2011-01-01

    Nephroureterectomy for transplantation has increased owing to the greater number of deceased donors. Anatomic variations may complicate the procedure or, if unrecognized, compromise the viability of kidneys for transplantation. We reviewed 254 surgical descriptions of nephroureterectomy specimens from January 2008 to December 2009. All organs collected according by standard techniques were evaluated for age, cause of death, renal function, frequency of injury during the procedure, as well as variations in the vascular and collecting systems. The mean donor age was 42 years (range, 2-74). The mean serum creatinine was 1.2 mg/dL (range, 1.0-7.0). The causes of death were cerebrovascular cause (stroke; n = 130), traumatic brain injury (n = 81) or other cause (n = 43). Among the anatomic variations: 8.6% (n = 22) were right arterial anatomical variations: 19 cases with 2 arteries and 3 cases with 3 arteries. In 25 cases (9.8%) the identified variation was the left artery: 2 arteries (n = 23), 3 arteries (n = 1) and 4 arteries (n = 1). We observed 9.8% on right side and 1.5% on left side venous anatomic variations, including 24 cases with 2 veins on the right side and 4 cases with 2 veins on the left side. Three cases of a retroaortic left renal vein and 1 case of a retro necklace vein (anterior and posterior to the aorta). Two cases of ureteral duplication were noted on the left and 1 on the right kidney. There were 3 horseshoe and 1 pelvic kidney. In 7.5% of cases, an injury to the graft included ureteral (n = 3), arterial (n = 10), or venous (n = 6). The most common anatomic variation was arterial (17.8%). Duplication of the renal vein was more frequent on the right. The high incidences of anatomic variations require more attention in the dissection of the renal hilum to avoid an injury that may compromise the graft. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The benefit of accounting for DQE variations in simulated dose reduction of digital radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalkvist, A.; Baath, M.

    2010-01-01

    Adding noise to clinical radiographs to simulate dose reduction can be used to investigate the relationship between dose level and clinical image quality without exposing patients to additional radiation. The purpose of the present paper was to examine the benefits of using a method that accounts for detective quantum efficiency (DQE) variations that may occur in different dose ranges in the simulated dose reduction process. A method initially intended for simulated dose reduction in tomo-synthesis was applied to extremely low-dose posterio-anterior radiographs of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, selected from a group of projection images included in a tomo-synthesis examination and compared with a previous method that do not account for DQE variations. A comparison of images simulated to be collected at a lower dose level (73% of the original dose level) and images actually collected at this lower dose level revealed that the error in the integrated normalised noise power spectrum was smaller than 4% for the method that accounts for DQE variations in the simulated dose reduction, whereas the error was larger than 20% for the previous method. This indicates that an increased validity in dose reduction simulation of digital radiographic systems is obtained with a method accounting for DQE variations. (authors)

  3. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A qualitative study of systemic influences on paramedic decision making: care transitions and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Hirst, Enid; Storey, Matthew; Mason, Suzanne; Quinn, Tom; Shewan, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Paramedics routinely make critical decisions about the most appropriate care to deliver in a complex system characterized by significant variation in patient case-mix, care pathways and linked service providers. There has been little research carried out in the ambulance service to identify areas of risk associated with decisions about patient care. The aim of this study was to explore systemic influences on decision making by paramedics relating to care transitions to identify potential risk factors. An exploratory multi-method qualitative study was conducted in three English National Health Service (NHS) Ambulance Service Trusts, focusing on decision making by paramedic and specialist paramedic staff. Researchers observed 57 staff across 34 shifts. Ten staff completed digital diaries and three focus groups were conducted with 21 staff. Nine types of decision were identified, ranging from emergency department conveyance and specialist emergency pathways to non-conveyance. Seven overarching systemic influences and risk factors potentially influencing decision making were identified: demand; performance priorities; access to care options; risk tolerance; training and development; communication and feedback and resources. Use of multiple methods provided a consistent picture of key systemic influences and potential risk factors. The study highlighted the increased complexity of paramedic decisions and multi-level system influences that may exacerbate risk. The findings have implications at the level of individual NHS Ambulance Service Trusts (e.g. ensuring an appropriately skilled workforce to manage diverse patient needs and reduce emergency department conveyance) and at the wider prehospital emergency care system level (e.g. ensuring access to appropriate patient care options as alternatives to the emergency department). © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. ON THE INFLUENCE OF COLD WORK ON RESISTIVITY VARIATIONS WITH THERMAL EXPOSURE IN IN-718 NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhi, Elhoucine; Nagy, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    In nickel-base superalloys, irreversible electrical conductivity changes occur above a transition temperature where thermally-activated microstructural evolution initiates. The electrical conductivity first decreases above about 450 deg. C then increases above 600 deg. C. However, the presence of plastic deformation results in accelerated microstructure evolution at an earlier transition temperature. It was recently suggested that this well-known phenomenon might explain the notable conductivity difference between the peened near-surface part and the intact part at sufficiently large depth in surface-treated specimens. The influence of cold work on the electrical conductivity change with thermal exposure offers a probable answer to one of the main remaining questions in eddy current residual stress assessment, namely unusually fast and occasionally even non-monotonic decay of the apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC) change that was observed at temperatures as low as 400 deg. C. To validate this explanation, the present study investigates the influence of cold work on low-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) resistivity variations with thermal exposure. In-situ resistivity monitoring was conducted throughout various heating cycles using the ACPD technique. IN-718 nickel-base superalloy specimens with different levels of cold work were exposed to gradually increasing peak temperatures from 400 deg. C to 800 deg. C. The results indicate that the initial irreversible rise in resistivity is approximately one order of magnitude higher and occurs at about 50 deg. C lower temperature in cold-worked samples of 30% plastic strain than in the intact material.

  6. Influences of braking system faults on the vehicle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straky, H.; Kochem, M.; Schmitt, J.; Hild, R.; Isermann, R. [Technische Univ., Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. of Automatic Control

    2001-07-01

    From a safety point of view the braking system is, besides the driver, one of the key subsystems in a car. The driver, as an adaptive control system, might not notice small faults in the hydraulic part of the braking system and sooner or later critical braking situations, e.g. due to a brake-circuit failure, may occur. Most of the drivers are not capable to deal with such critical situations. Therefore this paper investigates the influence of faults in the braking system on the dynamic vehicle behavior and the steering inputs of the driver to keep the vehicle on the desired course. (orig.)

  7. Meteorological Research Institute multivariate ocean variational estimation (MOVE) system: Some early results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Norihisa; Ishizaki, Shiro; Fujii, Yosuke; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Tamaki; Kamachi, Masafumi

    The Meteorological Research Institute multivariate ocean variational estimation (MOVE) System has been developed as the next-generation ocean data assimilation system in Japan Meteorological Agency. A multivariate three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme with vertical coupled temperature salinity empirical orthogonal function modes is adopted. The MOVE system has two varieties, the global (MOVE-G) and North Pacific (MOVE-NP) systems. The equatorial Pacific and western North Pacific are analyzed with assimilation experiments using MOVE-G and -NP, respectively. In each system, the salinity and velocity fields are well reproduced, even in cases without salinity data. Changes in surface and subsurface zonal currents during the 1997/98 El Niño event are captured well, and their transports are reasonably consistent with in situ observations. For example, the eastward transport in the upper layer around the equator has 70 Sv in spring 1997 and weakens in spring 1998. With MOVE-NP, the Kuroshio transport has 25 Sv in the East China Sea, and 40 Sv crossing the ASUKA (Affiliated Surveys of the Kuroshio off Cape Ashizuri) line south of Japan. The variations in the Kuroshio transports crossing the ASUKA line agree well with observations. The Ryukyu Current System has a transport ranging from 6 Sv east of Taiwan to 17 Sv east of Amami. The Oyashio transport crossing the OICE (Oyashio Intensive observation line off Cape Erimo) line south of Hokkaido has 14 Sv southwestward (near shore) and 11 Sv northeastward (offshore). In the Kuroshio Oyashio transition area east of Japan, the eastward transport has 41 Sv (32 36°N) and 12 Sv (36 39°N) crossing the 145°E line.

  8. Influence of Special Weather on Output of PV System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zele

    2018-01-01

    The output of PV system is affected by different environmental factors, therefore, it is important to study the output of PV system under different environmental conditions. Through collecting data on the spot, collecting the output of photovoltaic panels under special weather conditions, and comparing the collected data, the output characteristics of the photovoltaic panels under different weather conditions are obtained. The influence of weather factors such as temperature, humidity and irradiance on the output of photovoltaic panels was investigated.

  9. System factors influencing utilisation of Research4Life databases by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a comprehensive investigation of the influence of system factors on utilisation of Research4Life databases. It is part of a doctoral dissertation. Research4Life databases are new innovative technologies being investigated in a new context – utilisation by NARIs scientists for research. The study adopted the descriptive ...

  10. Influence of big power motors for irrigation of electric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, M.; Gialuca, V.; Trombetta, O.R.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of rural electrification in CPFL - Companhia Paulista de Forca e Luz, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, and the influence of big power motors installation for irrigation in electric system are shown. Considerations about rural market, energy consumption, planning of distribution and transmission line and some calculations are also presented. (author)

  11. Decentralised water systems: emotional influences on resource decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankad, Aditi

    2012-09-01

    The study of emotion has gathered momentum in the field of environmental science, specifically in the context of community resource decision-making. Of particular interest in this review is the potential influence of emotion, risk and threat perception on individuals' decisions to acceptance and adopt decentralised water systems, such as rainwater tanks and greywater systems. The role of message framing is also considered in detail, as well as the influences that different types of framing can have on decision making. These factors are considered as possible predictors for analysing community acceptance of decentralised water in urban environments. Concepts believed to be influenced by emotion, such as trust and framing, are also discussed as potentially meaningful contributors to an overall model of community acceptance of decentralised water. Recommendations are made for how emotion-based concepts, such as risk and threat, can be targeted to facilitate widespread adoption of decentralised systems and how researchers can explore different types of emotions that influence decision making in distinct ways. This review is an important theoretical step in advancing the psycho-social understanding of acceptance and adoption of on-site water sources. Avenues for future research are recommended, including the need for greater theoretical development to encourage future social science research on decentralised systems. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating User Participation and User Influence in an Enterprise System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Does user influence have an impact on the data quality of an information systems development project? What decision making should users have? How can users effectively be engaged in the process? What is success? User participation is considered to be a critical success factor for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects, yet there is little…

  13. A Simply Constrained Optimization Reformulation of KKT Systems Arising from Variational Inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchinei, F.; Fischer, A.; Kanzow, C.; Peng, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions can be regarded as optimality conditions for both variational inequalities and constrained optimization problems. In order to overcome some drawbacks of recently proposed reformulations of KKT systems, we propose casting KKT systems as a minimization problem with nonnegativity constraints on some of the variables. We prove that, under fairly mild assumptions, every stationary point of this constrained minimization problem is a solution of the KKT conditions. Based on this reformulation, a new algorithm for the solution of the KKT conditions is suggested and shown to have some strong global and local convergence properties

  14. Variations of Hodge Structure Considered as an Exterior Differential System: Old and New Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Carlson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a survey of the subject of variations of Hodge structure (VHS considered as exterior differential systems (EDS. We review developments over the last twenty-six years, with an emphasis on some key examples. In the penultimate section we present some new results on the characteristic cohomology of a homogeneous Pfaffian system. In the last section we discuss how the integrability conditions of an EDS affect the expected dimension of an integral submanifold. The paper ends with some speculation on EDS and Hodge conjecture for Calabi-Yau manifolds.

  15. Hybrid three-dimensional variation and particle filtering for nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Hong-Ze; Song Jun-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of estimating the states of nonlinear dynamic systems with sparse observations. We present a hybrid three-dimensional variation (3DVar) and particle piltering (PF) method, which combines the advantages of 3DVar and particle-based filters. By minimizing the cost function, this approach will produce a better proposal distribution of the state. Afterwards the stochastic resampling step in standard PF can be avoided through a deterministic scheme. The simulation results show that the performance of the new method is superior to the traditional ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF) and the standard PF, especially in highly nonlinear systems

  16. Reconstructing Holocene hematite and goethite variations in the Indus Canyon to trace changes in the Asian monsoon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Cornelia; Clift, Peter; Pressling, Nicola; Limmer, David; Giosan, Liviu; Tabrez, Ali

    2010-05-01

    In order to study Holocene Asian monsoon variations, we reconstructed changes in chemical weathering by examining sediments from the Indus Canyon. During the late Holocene, the Asian monsoon system had periods of high and low intensities that influenced the civilisations living in its realm. For example, the demise of the Harappan civilisation has been linked to a weakened monsoon system around 4 ka. The sediments in the Indus Canyon, which originate from the River Indus and its Himalayan tributaries, provide an ideal, natural environmental archive of the South Asian monsoon system. In order to investigate the alternation between arid and humid monsoonal climatic conditions, variations are traced using the magnetic minerals hematite and goethite, which form under distinct environmental conditions: goethite is stable under humid conditions, whereas hematite forms from the dehydration of goethite under arid conditions. The two minerals are characterised and quantified using environmental magnetic measurements, as well as diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Combining both approaches will enable us to reconstruct variations in chemical weathering over time. Furthermore, because this is governed by temperature and the availability of moisture, our weathering record will allow us to understand monsoon variability during the Holocene and test whether summer rain intensity has been decreasing in SW Asia since 8 ka. In addition, the multi-component analysis of colour reflectance spectra identifies different mineral components including hematite/goethite, clay mineral mixtures, calcite and organics. We will present our results from the multi-sensor core logger equipped with a Minolta spectrometer, measuring both magnetic susceptibility and the optical properties of the split sediment cores. Initial results indicate the presence of hematite and goethite in the sediment. There is an increasing hematite content up the cores, indicating an aridification trend during the Holocene

  17. Influence of ozone precursors and particulate matter on the variation of surface ozone at an urban site of Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashima Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of surface O3 and its precursors (NO, NO2, CO, CH4 and NMHCs at an urban site of Delhi, India during January 2012 to December 2013 are presented. In the present study, the annual average mixing ratios of surface O3, NO, NO2, CO, CH4 and NMHC were 30 ± 6 ppb, 24 ± 6 ppb, 15 ± 4 ppb, 1.5 ± 0.4 ppm, 2.4 ± 0.4 ppm and 0.4 ± 0.1 ppm, respectively. The maximum average mixing ratios of surface O3, NO and NO2 were observed during the summer, whereas, the minimum average mixing ratios of ambient NO and NO2 were during monsoon seasons. The surface O3, NO and NO2 have shown the prominent diurnal variations during all the seasons at the observational site of Delhi. The result reveals that the surface O3 was negatively correlated with NOx and CO during the study. The linear scatter plot analysis shows that the PM2.5 and PM10 present in the ambient air of Delhi influence the production of surface O3 at observational site.

  18. Influence of Harvest Season and Cultivar on the Variation of Phenolic Compounds Composition and Antioxidant Properties in Vaccinium ashei Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verciane Schneider Cezarotto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of variation of harvest season and cultivar on the total phenolic content (TPC, total flavonoid content (TFC, HPLC-UV/DAD profile and antioxidant properties in Vaccinium ashei (Rabbiteye blueberry leaves grown in Brazil was evaluated. The cultivars collected in December and March were Aliceblue, Powderblue, Climax, Bluegem and FloridaM. It was observed that leaves from March had the highest TPC values (222 ± 1 mg gallic acid equivalents/g to Aliceblue cultivar and highest TFC values (49.8 ± 0.8 and 48.7 ± 0.7 µg rutin/g to Clímax and Powderblue cultivars, respectively. The chromatographic profile was quantitatively similar, however, the proportions of each compound were influenced by cultivar and harvest season. Chlorogenic acid and rutin were the main identified phenolic compounds, but chlorogenic acid was the most abundant in both harvest seasons. Antioxidant capacities values ranged from 5.80 ± 0.04 to 105 ± 2 µg/mL (DPPH and 178 ± 5 to 431 ± 8 mmol Trolox/100 g (ORAC. The cultivar Bluegem by March had the highest values in both assays. The results indicate that the blueberry leaves from different cultivars and harvest seasons have different phenolic compounds content and different antioxidant capacities. In addition, the antioxidant properties demonstrated a high correlation with rutin content.

  19. Preliminary evidence that allelic variation in the LMX1A gene influences training-related working memory improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellander, Martin; Brehmer, Yvonne; Westerberg, Helena; Karlsson, Sari; Fürth, Daniel; Bergman, Olle; Eriksson, Elias; Bäckman, Lars

    2011-06-01

    LMX1A is a transcription factor involved in the development of dopamine (DA)-producing neurons in midbrain. Previous research has shown that allelic variations in three LMX1A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that these SNPs may influence the number of mesencephalic DA neurons. Prompted by the established link between striatal DA functions and working memory (WM) performance, we examined two of these SNPs in relation to the ability to benefit from 4 weeks of WM training. One SNP (rs4657412) was strongly associated with the magnitude of training-related gains in verbal WM. The allele linked to larger gains has previously been suggested to be associated with higher dopaminergic nerve cell density. No differential gains of either SNP were observed for spatial WM, and the genotype groups were also indistinguishable in tests of attention, interference control, episodic memory, perceptual speed, and reasoning for both SNPs. This pattern of data is in agreement with previous findings from our group, suggesting that cognitive effects of DA-related genes may be more easily detected in a training context than for single-assessment performance scores. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of the seasonal variation of environmental conditions on biogas upgrading in an outdoors pilot scale high rate algal pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, David; Posadas, Esther; Cano, Patricia; Pérez, Víctor; Lebrero, Raquel; Muñoz, Raúl

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the daily and seasonal variations of environmental conditions on the quality of the upgraded biogas was evaluated in an outdoors pilot scale high rate algal pond (HRAP) interconnected to an external absorption column (AC) via a conical settler. The high alkalinity in the cultivation broth resulted in a constant biomethane composition during the day regardless of the monitored month, while the high algal-bacterial activity during spring and summer boosted a superior biomethane quality. CO 2 concentrations in the upgraded biogas ranged from 0.1% in May to 11.6% in December, while a complete H 2 S removal was always achieved regardless of the month. A limited N 2 and O 2 stripping from the scrubbing cultivation broth was recorded in the upgraded biogas at a recycling liquid/biogas ratio in the AC of 1. Finally, CH 4 concentration in the upgraded biogas ranged from 85.6% in December to 99.6% in August. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of carbon and lipid sources on variation of mercury and other trace elements in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routti, Heli; Letcher, Robert J; Born, Erik W; Branigan, Marsha; Dietz, Rune; Evans, Thomas J; McKinney, Melissa A; Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonne, Christian

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the influence of carbon and lipid sources on regional differences in liver trace element (As, Cd, Cu, total Hg, Mn, Pb, Rb, Se, and Zn) concentrations measured in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) (n = 121) from 10 Alaskan, Canadian Arctic, and East Greenland subpopulations. Carbon and lipid sources were assessed using δ(13) C in muscle tissue and fatty acid (FA) profiles in subcutaneous adipose tissue as chemical tracers. A negative relationship between total Hg and δ(13) C suggested that polar bears feeding in areas with higher riverine inputs of terrestrial carbon accumulate more Hg than bears feeding in areas with lower freshwater input. Mercury concentrations were also positively related to the FA 20:1n-9, which is biosynthesized in large amounts in Calanus copepods. This result raises the hypothesis that Calanus glacialis are an important link in the uptake of Hg in the marine food web and ultimately in polar bears. Unadjusted total Hg, Se, and As concentrations showed greater geographical variation among polar bear subpopulations compared with concentrations adjusted for carbon and lipid sources. The Hg concentrations adjusted for carbon and lipid sources in Bering-Chukchi Sea polar bear liver tissue remained the lowest among subpopulations. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that carbon and lipid sources for polar bears should be taken into account when one is assessing spatial and temporal trends of long-range transported trace elements. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  2. Quantitative EDXS: Influence of geometry on a four detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraxner, Johanna; Schäfer, Margit; Röschel, Otto; Kothleitner, Gerald; Haberfehlner, Georg; Paller, Manuel; Grogger, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the geometry on quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS) analysis is determined for a ChemiSTEM system (Super-X) in combination with a low-background double-tilt specimen holder. For the first time a combination of experimental measurements with simulations is used to determine the positions of the individual detectors of a Super-X system. These positions allow us to calculate the detector's solid angles and estimate the amount of detector shadowing and its influence on quantitative EDXS analysis, including absorption correction using the ζ-factor method. Both shadowing by the brass portions and the beryllium specimen carrier of the holder severely affect the quantification of low to medium atomic number elements. A multi-detector system is discussed in terms of practical consequences of the described effects, and a quantitative evaluation of a Fayalit sample is demonstrated. Corrections and suggestions for minimizing systematic errors are discussed to improve quantitative methods for a multi-detector system. - Highlights: • Geometrical issues for EDXS quantification on a Super-X system. • Realistic model of a specimen holder using X-ray computed tomography. • Determination of the exact detector positions of a Super-X system. • Influence of detector shadowing and Be specimen carrier on quantitative EDXS.

  3. Anatomical variations of hepatic arterial system, coeliac trunk and renal arteries: an analysis with multidetector CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurel, M S; Battal, B; Bozlar, U; Nural, M S; Tasar, M; Ors, F; Saglam, M; Karademir, I

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine the anatomical variations in the coeliac trunk-hepatic arterial system and the renal arteries in patients who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography of the abdominal aorta for various reasons. A total of 100 patients were analysed retrospectively. The coeliac trunk, hepatic arterial system and renal arteries were analysed individually and anatomical variations were recorded. Statistical analysis of the relationship between hepatocoeliac variations and renal artery variations was performed using a chi(2) test. There was a coeliac trunk trifurcation in 89% and bifurcation in 8% of the cases. Coeliac trunk was absent in 1%, a hepatosplenomesenteric trunk was seen in 1% and a splenomesenteric trunk was present in 1%. Hepatic artery variation was present in 48% of patients. Coeliac trunk and/or hepatic arterial variation was present in 23 (39.7%) of the 58 patients with normal renal arteries, and in 27 (64.3%) of the 42 patients with accessory renal arteries. There was a statistically significant correlation between renal artery variations and coeliac trunk-hepatic arterial system variations (p = 0.015). MDCT angiography permits a correct and detailed evaluation of hepatic and renal vascular anatomy. The prevalence of variations in the coeliac trunk and/or hepatic arteries is increased in people with accessory renal arteries. For that reason, when undertaking angiographic examinations directed towards any single organ, the possibility of variations in the vascular structure of other organs should be kept in mind.

  4. Practice variation of vaginal birth after cesarean and the influence of risk factors at patient level: a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, E.; Schoorel, E.N.; Kuijk, S.M. van; Mol, B.J.; Nijhuis, J.G.; Aardenburg, R.; Alink, M.; Boer, K. de; Delemarre, F.M.; Dirksen, C.D.; Dooren, I.M. van; Franssen, M.T.; Kaplan, M.; Kleiverda, G.; Kuppens, S.M.; Kwee, A.; Langenveld, J.; Lim, F.T.; Melman, S.; Sikkema, M.J.; Smits, L.J; Visser, H.; Woiski, M.D.; Scheepers, H.C.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Large practice variation exists in mode of delivery after cesarean section, suggesting variation in implementation of contemporary guidelines. We aim to evaluate this practice variation and to what extent this can be explained by risk factors at patient level. MATERIAL AND METHODS:

  5. Practice variation of vaginal birth after cesarean and the influence of risk factors at patient level : A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, Emy; Schoorel, Ellen N. C.; van Kuijk, Sander M. J.; Mol, Ben-Willem J.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Aardenburg, Robert; Alink, Marleen; de Boer, Karin; Delemarre, Friso M. C.; Dirksen, Carmen D.; Van Dooren, Ivo M. A.; Franssen, Maureen T. M.; Kaplan, Mesrure; Kleiverda, Gunilla; Kuppens, Simone M. I.; Kwee, Anneke; Langenveld, Josje; Lim, Frans T. H.; Melman, Sonja; Sikkema, Marko J.; Smits, Luc J.; Visser, Harry; Woiski, Mallory; Scheepers, Hubertina C.; Hermens, Rosella P. M. G.

    IntroductionLarge practice variation exists in mode of delivery after cesarean section, suggesting variation in implementation of contemporary guidelines. We aim to evaluate this practice variation and to what extent this can be explained by risk factors at patient level. Material and methodsThis

  6. Patient Awareness of Local Drug Price Variation and the Factors That Influence Pharmacy Choice: A Cross-sectional Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Spencer D; Awosika, Olabola D; Eleryan, Misty G; Rengifo-Pardo, Monica; Kuang, Xiangyu; Amdur, Richard L; Ehrlich, Alison

    2017-12-01

    BACKGROUND: High out-of-pocket drug expenditures are increasingly common in dermatology. Patients may not be aware that prices vary among pharmacies and consequently may not shop for the lowest cost. OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors influence pharmacy choice and the effect of providing local prescription prices on pharmacy selection. We hypothesized that patients do not "shop around" due to lack of knowledge of price variation and would choose a pharmacy based on costs if educated on price disparity. METHODS: Between July and August 2016, we administered a cross-sectional anonymous survey to adults visiting four outpatient clinics at an academic tertiary care center in Washington, D.C. Participants answered questions before and after viewing a list of prescription drug prices from local pharmacies. RESULTS: 287 surveys were administered to a convenience sample of adults (age ≥ 18 and literate in English). Of the 287 participants, 218 fully completed the survey; 55.1% were women and 40.5% were over age 40. When considering a cost savings of $10-25, 65% would switch pharmacies if the distance were the same, and 21.3% would switch if the distance were 45-minutes further. After price education, fewer participants felt that drug price knowledge would ultimately influence pharmacy choice (P less than 0.0001). However, respondents' intended frequency of researching price online, calling a pharmacy to ask about price, and comparing price between pharmacies before filling a prescription all increased, compared to prior self-reported frequencies (P less than 0.001). Specifically, participants with $75,000-$99,999 income were more likely to compare prices than those with income below $45,000 (odds ratio [OR], 4.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-17.28). CONCLUSION: In this study, pharmacy choice was more influenced by convenience than cost prior to drug price education. However, price education ultimately impacted intent to research prescription drug prices before

  7. Measuring user’s influence in the Yelp recommender system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Bejarano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Recommender systems collect information about users and businesses and how they are related. Such relation is given in terms of reviews and votes on reviews. User reviews gather opinions, rating scores and review influence. The latter component is crucial for determining which users are more relevant in a recommender system, that is, the users whose reviews are more popular than the average user’s reviews. Design/methodology/approach – A model of measure of user influence is proposed based on review and social attributes of the user. User influence is also used for determining how influenced has been a business being based on popular reviews. Findings – Results indicate there is a connection between social attributes and user influence. Such results are relevant for marketing, credibility estimation and Sybil detections, among others. Originality/value – The proposed model allows search parameterization based on the social attribute weights of users, reviews and businesses. Such weights defines the relevance on each attribute, which can be adjusted according to the search needs. Popularity results are then a function of weight preferences on user, reviews and businesses data join.

  8. Spontaneous emergence of social influence in online systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2010-10-26

    Social influence drives both offline and online human behavior. It pervades cultural markets, and manifests itself in the adoption of scientific and technical innovations as well as the spread of social practices. Prior empirical work on the diffusion of innovations in spatial regions or social networks has largely focused on the spread of one particular technology among a subset of all potential adopters. Here we choose an online context that allows us to study social influence processes by tracking the popularity of a complete set of applications installed by the user population of a social networking site, thus capturing the behavior of all individuals who can influence each other in this context. By extending standard fluctuation scaling methods, we analyze the collective behavior induced by 100 million application installations, and show that two distinct regimes of behavior emerge in the system. Once applications cross a particular threshold of popularity, social influence processes induce highly correlated adoption behavior among the users, which propels some of the applications to extraordinary levels of popularity. Below this threshold, the collective effect of social influence appears to vanish almost entirely, in a manner that has not been observed in the offline world. Our results demonstrate that even when external signals are absent, social influence can spontaneously assume an on-off nature in a digital environment. It remains to be seen whether a similar outcome could be observed in the offline world if equivalent experimental conditions could be replicated.

  9. Path-space variational inference for non-equilibrium coarse-grained systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmandaris, Vagelis; Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Katsoulakis, Markos; Plecháč, Petr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss information-theoretic tools for obtaining optimized coarse-grained molecular models for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular simulations. The latter are ubiquitous in physicochemical and biological applications, where they are typically associated with coupling mechanisms, multi-physics and/or boundary conditions. In general the non-equilibrium steady states are not known explicitly as they do not necessarily have a Gibbs structure. The presented approach can compare microscopic behavior of molecular systems to parametric and non-parametric coarse-grained models using the relative entropy between distributions on the path space and setting up a corresponding path-space variational inference problem. The methods can become entirely data-driven when the microscopic dynamics are replaced with corresponding correlated data in the form of time series. Furthermore, we present connections and generalizations of force matching methods in coarse-graining with path-space information methods. We demonstrate the enhanced transferability of information-based parameterizations to different observables, at a specific thermodynamic point, due to information inequalities. We discuss methodological connections between information-based coarse-graining of molecular systems and variational inference methods primarily developed in the machine learning community. However, we note that the work presented here addresses variational inference for correlated time series due to the focus on dynamics. The applicability of the proposed methods is demonstrated on high-dimensional stochastic processes given by overdamped and driven Langevin dynamics of interacting particles.

  10. Path-space variational inference for non-equilibrium coarse-grained systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmandaris, Vagelis, E-mail: harman@uoc.gr [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics (IACM), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), IACM/FORTH, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Kalligiannaki, Evangelia, E-mail: ekalligian@tem.uoc.gr [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Crete (Greece); Katsoulakis, Markos, E-mail: markos@math.umass.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts at Amherst (United States); Plecháč, Petr, E-mail: plechac@math.udel.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we discuss information-theoretic tools for obtaining optimized coarse-grained molecular models for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular simulations. The latter are ubiquitous in physicochemical and biological applications, where they are typically associated with coupling mechanisms, multi-physics and/or boundary conditions. In general the non-equilibrium steady states are not known explicitly as they do not necessarily have a Gibbs structure. The presented approach can compare microscopic behavior of molecular systems to parametric and non-parametric coarse-grained models using the relative entropy between distributions on the path space and setting up a corresponding path-space variational inference problem. The methods can become entirely data-driven when the microscopic dynamics are replaced with corresponding correlated data in the form of time series. Furthermore, we present connections and generalizations of force matching methods in coarse-graining with path-space information methods. We demonstrate the enhanced transferability of information-based parameterizations to different observables, at a specific thermodynamic point, due to information inequalities. We discuss methodological connections between information-based coarse-graining of molecular systems and variational inference methods primarily developed in the machine learning community. However, we note that the work presented here addresses variational inference for correlated time series due to the focus on dynamics. The applicability of the proposed methods is demonstrated on high-dimensional stochastic processes given by overdamped and driven Langevin dynamics of interacting particles.

  11. Variations Method to Solve Terminal Problems for the Second Order Systems of Canonical Form with State Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Kasatkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminal control problem with fixed finite time for the second order affine systems with state constraints is considered. A solution of such terminal problem is suggested for the systems with scalar control of regular canonical form.In this article it is shown that the initial terminal problem is equivalent to the problem of auxiliary function search. This function should satisfy some conditions. Such function design consists of two stages. The first stage includes search of function which corresponds the solution of the terminal control problem without state constraints. This function is designed as polynom of the fifth power which depends on time variable. Coefficients of the polynom are defined by boundary conditions. The second stage includes modification of designed function if corresponding to that function trajectory is not satisfied constraints. Modification process is realized by adding to the current function supplementary polynom. Influence of that polynom handles by variation of a parameter value. Modification process can include a few iterations. After process termination continuous control is found. This control is the solution of the initial terminal prUsing presented scheme the terminal control problem for system, which describes oscillations of the mathematical pendulum, is solved. This approach can be used for the solution of terminal control problems with state constraints for affine systems with multi-dimensional control.

  12. Influence of Load Modes on Voltage Stability of Receiving Network at DC/AC System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Chizu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses influence of load modes on DC/AC system. Because of widespread use of HVDC, DC/AC system become more complex than before and the present modes used in dispatch and planning departments are not fit in simulation anymore. So it is necessary to find load modes accurately reflecting characteristics of the system. For the sake of the voltage stability, commutation failure, etc. the practical example of the receiving network in a large DC/AC system in China is simulated with BPA, and the influence of Classical Load Mode (CLM and Synthesis load model (SLM on simulation results is studies. Furthermore, some important parameters of SLM are varied respectively among an interval to analyse how they affect the system. According to this practical examples, the result is closely related to load modes and their parameters, and SLM is more conservative but more reasonable than the present modes. The consequences indicate that at critical states, micro variation in parameters may give rise to change in simulation results radically. Thus, correct mode and parameters are important to enhance simulation accuracy of DC/AC system and researches on how they affect the system make senses.

  13. Variation of the solvation number of Eu(III) in mixed system of methanol and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganuma, H.; Arisaka, M.; Omori, T.; Satoh, I.; Choppin, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants (β 1 ) of the monofluoride complex of Eu(III) have been determined in mixed solvents of methanol and water at a 0.10 M ionic strength using a solvent extraction technique. The values of ln β 1 increase as the mole fraction of methanol in the mixed solvent system increases. The variation in the stability constants can be correlated with both the large effect due to the solvation of F and the small effect due to both (1) the solvation of cations in connection with complexation and (2) the electrostatic attraction between Eu 3+ and F - . Based on the variation in the sum of (1) and (2) in water and the mixed solvent solutions, it was determined that the coordination number (CN) of Eu(III) varied from a mixture of CN = 9 and 8 to CN = 8 at about a 0.03 mole fraction of methanol in the mixed solvent. (orig.)

  14. Structure analyses of swollen rubber-carbon black systems by contrast variation SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Mikihito; Nishitsuji, Shotaro; Fujii, Sumiaki; Amino, Naoya; Ishikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    The polymer layers adsorbed on carbon black (CB) aggregates in rubber/CB systems have been investigated with contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) method. Specimens were swollen by toluene/deuterated toluene solvents having various scattering length densities and their scattering intensities were measured with SANS. The contrast variation SANS for the specimens yielded partial scattering functions: the scattering function for polymer-polymer correlation S pp (q), the scattering function for CB- CB correlation S cc (q), and the scattering function for polymer- CB correlation S pc (q). The analyses of the partial scattering functions explored the existence of dense polymer layers around CB aggregates. Several characteristic parameters are estimated from the analyses, such as the size of aggregates, the thickness of layers, and the volume fractions of polymer of layers and matrix. (author)

  15. Enterprise Systems Implementations: Organizational Influence Processes for Corporate User Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Axel; Nordheim, Stig

    2008-01-01

    -depth, interpretive study from the oil industry, where we analyze a case of innovative integration of an ECM system with collaboration technologies. The data collection has been longitudinal. The data analysis has been performed through the perspective of organizational influence processes. The main finding concerns...... an organizational role as corporate user representative to deal with the scale and complexities of implementation. A single person was particularly influential in the role. At the outset a user representative had to perform upward influence processes from a lower formal position. This is impeding...

  16. Influencing Swedish homeowners to adopt district heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Krushna; Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Akademigatan 1, 831 25 Oestersund (Sweden)

    2009-02-15

    Improved energy efficiency and greenhouse gas mitigation could be achieved by replacing resistance heaters with district heating system. In 2005, only about 8% of the Swedish detached houses had district heating system. The expansion of such systems largely depends on homeowners' adoption decisions. And, to motivate homeowners to adopt district heating, it is essential to understand their decision-making process. In this context, in June 2005 we carried out a questionnaire survey of about 700 homeowners who lived in the city of Oestersund in houses with resistance heaters (baseline survey). About 84% of the respondents did not intend to install a new heating system. Since then these homeowners were influenced by (a) an investment subsidy by the Swedish government to replace resistance heaters with district heating, a brine/water-based heat pump, or a biomass-based heating system and (b) a marketing campaign by the municipality-owned district heating company. This paper analyses how these two measures influenced about 78% of the homeowners to adopt the district heating system. For this purpose we carried out a follow-up survey of the same homeowners in December 2006 (resurvey). Results showed that the investment subsidy and the marketing campaign created a need among the homeowners to adopt a new heating system. The marketing campaign was successful in motivating them to adopt the district heating system. The marketing strategy by the district heating company corresponds to the results obtained in the baseline survey. (author)

  17. Influencing Swedish homeowners to adopt district heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Krushna; Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Akademigatan 1, 831 25 Oestersund (Sweden)

    2009-02-15

    Improved energy efficiency and greenhouse gas mitigation could be achieved by replacing resistance heaters with district heating system. In 2005, only about 8% of the Swedish detached houses had district heating system. The expansion of such systems largely depends on homeowners' adoption decisions. And, to motivate homeowners to adopt district heating, it is essential to understand their decision-making process. In this context, in June 2005 we carried out a questionnaire survey of about 700 homeowners who lived in the city of Oestersund in houses with resistance heaters (baseline survey). About 84% of the respondents did not intend to install a new heating system. Since then these homeowners were influenced by (a) an investment subsidy by the Swedish government to replace resistance heaters with district heating, a brine/water-based heat pump, or a biomass-based heating system and (b) a marketing campaign by the municipality-owned district heating company. This paper analyses how these two measures influenced about 78% of the homeowners to adopt the district heating system. For this purpose we carried out a follow-up survey of the same homeowners in December 2006 (resurvey). Results showed that the investment subsidy and the marketing campaign created a need among the homeowners to adopt a new heating system. The marketing campaign was successful in motivating them to adopt the district heating system. The marketing strategy by the district heating company corresponds to the results obtained in the baseline survey. (author)

  18. Influencing Swedish homeowners to adopt district heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, Krushna; Gustavsson, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Improved energy efficiency and greenhouse gas mitigation could be achieved by replacing resistance heaters with district heating system. In 2005, only about 8% of the Swedish detached houses had district heating system. The expansion of such systems largely depends on homeowners' adoption decisions. And, to motivate homeowners to adopt district heating, it is essential to understand their decision-making process. In this context, in June 2005 we carried out a questionnaire survey of about 700 homeowners who lived in the city of Ostersund in houses with resistance heaters (baseline survey). About 84% of the respondents did not intend to install a new heating system. Since then these homeowners were influenced by (a) an investment subsidy by the Swedish government to replace resistance heaters with district heating, a brine/water-based heat pump, or a biomass-based heating system and (b) a marketing campaign by the municipality-owned district heating company. This paper analyses how these two measures influenced about 78% of the homeowners to adopt the district heating system. For this purpose we carried out a follow-up survey of the same homeowners in December 2006 (resurvey). Results showed that the investment subsidy and the marketing campaign created a need among the homeowners to adopt a new heating system. The marketing campaign was successful in motivating them to adopt the district heating system. The marketing strategy by the district heating company corresponds to the results obtained in the baseline survey

  19. Managed care: employers' influence on the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, K T; Phoon, J; Barter, M

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform is a complex issue involving many key sectors including providers, consumers, insurers, employers, and the government. System changes must involve all sectors for reform to be effective. Each sector has a responsibility to understand not only its own role in the health care system, but the roles of others as well. The role of business employers is often not apparent to health care providers, especially nurses. Understanding the influence employers have on the health care system is vital if providers want to be proactive change agents ensuring quality care.

  20. Environmental stressors influencing hormones and systems physiology in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stressors undoubtedly influence organismal biology, specifically the endocrine system that, in turn, impact cattle at the systems physiology level. Despite the significant advances in understanding the genetic determinants of the ideal dairy or beef cow, there is a grave lack of understanding of the systems physiology and effects of the environmental stressors that interfere with the endocrine system. This is a major problem because the lack of such knowledge is preventing advances in understanding gene-environment interactions and developing science-based solutions to these challenges. In this review, we synthesize the current knowledge on the nature of the major environmental stressors, such as climate (heat, cold, wind, and humidity), nutrition (feeds, feeding systems, and endocrine disruptors) and management (housing density and conditions, transportation, weaning practices). We summarize the impact of each one of these factors on cattle at the systems level, and provide solutions for the challenges. PMID:24996419

  1. Factors influencing the profitability of optimizing control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broussaud, A.; Guyot, O.

    1999-01-01

    Optimizing control systems supplement conventional Distributed Control Systems and Programmable Logic Controllers. They continuously implement set points, which aim at maximizing the profitability of plant operation. They are becoming an integral part of modern mineral processing plants. This trend is justified by economic considerations, optimizing control being among the most cost-effective methods of improving metallurgical plant performance. The paper successively analyzes three sets of factors, which influence the profitability of optimizing control systems, and provides guidelines for analyzing the potential value of an optimizing control system at a given operation: external factors, such as economic factors and factors related to plant feed; features of the optimizing control system; and subsequent maintenance of the optimizing control system. It is shown that pay back times for optimization control projects are typically measured in days. The OCS software used by the authors for their applications is described briefly. (author)

  2. Genetic variations in key inflammatory cytokines exacerbates the risk of diabetic nephropathy by influencing the gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Iqra; Masoodi, Shariq R; Malik, Perveez A; Mir, Shahnaz A; Ghazanfar, Khalid; Ganai, Bashir A

    2018-06-30

    Diabetic nephropathy is the single strongest predictor of mortality in patients with diabetes. The development of overt nephropathy involves important inter-individual variations, even after adjusting for potential confounding influences of modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Genome-wide transcriptome studies have reported the activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and there is mounting indication of the role of genetic factors. We screened nine genetic variations in three cytokine genes (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-β) in 1326 unrelated subjects comprising of healthy controls (n = 464), type 2 diabetics with nephropathy (DN, n = 448) and type 2 diabetes without nephropathy (T2D, n = 414) by sequence-specific amplification. Functional implication of SNPs was elucidated by correlation studies and relative gene expression using Realtime-Quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Individual SNP analysis showed highest association of IL-1β rs16944-TT genotype (OR = 3.51, 95%CI = 2.36-5.21, P = 0.001) and TNF-α rs1800629-AA genotype (OR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.64-4.59, P = 0.001) with T2D and DN respectively. The haplotype frequency showed significant risk of seven combinations among T2D and four combinations among DN subjects. The highest risk of T2D and DN was associated with GGTGAGTTT (OR = 4.25, 95%CI = 3.3-14.20, P = 0.0016) and GACGACCTT (OR = 21.3, 95%CI = 15.1-28.33, P = 0.026) haplotypes respectively. Relative expression by RT-qPCR showed increased cytokine expression in cases as compared to controls. TNF-α expression was increased by more than four-folds (n-fold = 4.43 ± 1.11) in DN. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β transcript levels were significantly modulated by promoter region SNPs. The present study implicates a strong association between cytokine TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β gene promoter polymorphisms and modulation of transcript levels with susceptibility to nephropathy in diabetes subjects. Copyright

  3. Vibration control of an MR vehicle suspension system considering both hysteretic behavior and parameter variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Seong, Min-Sang; Ha, Sung-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents vibration control responses of a controllable magnetorheological (MR) suspension system considering the two most important characteristics of the system; the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper and the parameter variation of the suspension. In order to achieve this goal, a cylindrical MR damper which is applicable to a middle-sized passenger car is designed and manufactured. After verifying the damping force controllability, the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper is identified using the Preisach hysteresis model. The full-vehicle suspension model is then derived by considering vertical, pitch and roll motions. An H ∞ controller is designed by treating the sprung mass of the vehicle as a parameter variation and integrating it with the hysteretic compensator which produces additional control input. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control system, the hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) methodology is adopted by integrating the suspension model with the proposed MR damper. Vibration control responses of the vehicle suspension system such as vertical acceleration are evaluated under both bump and random road conditions

  4. Genetic variations in the serotoninergic system contribute to body-mass index in Chinese adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity has become a worldwide health problem in the past decades. Human and animal studies have implicated serotonin in appetite regulation, and behavior genetic studies have shown that body mass index (BMI has a strong genetic component. However, the roles of genes related to the serotoninergic (5-hydroxytryptamine,5-HT system in obesity/BMI are not well understood, especially in Chinese subjects. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: With a sample of 478 healthy Chinese volunteers, this study investigated the relation between BMI and genetic variations of the serotoninergic system as characterized by 136 representative polymorphisms. We used a system-level approach to identify SNPs associated with BMI, then estimated their overall contribution to BMI by multiple regression and verified it by permutation. RESULTS: We identified 12 SNPs that made statistically significant contributions to BMI. After controlling for gender and age, four of these SNPs accounted for 7.7% additional variance of BMI. Permutation analysis showed that the probability of obtaining these findings by chance was low (p = 0.015, permuted for 1000 times. CONCLUSION: These results showed that genetic variations in the serotoninergic system made a moderate contribution to individual differences in BMI among a healthy Chinese sample, suggesting that a similar approach can be used to study obesity.

  5. Influence of AC system design on the realisation of tractive efforts by high adhesion locomotives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Wolfs, Peter; Cole, Colin; Stichel, Sebastian; Berg, Mats; Manfred, Plöchl

    2017-08-01

    The main task for heavy haul railway operators is to reduce the cost of exported minerals and enhance the long-term viability of rail transport operations through increasing productivity by running longer and heavier trains. The common opinion is that this is achievable by means of implementation of high adhesion locomotives with advanced AC traction technologies. Modern AC high adhesion locomotives are very complex mechatronic systems and can be designed with two alternative traction topologies of either bogie or individual axle controls. This paper describes a modelling approach for these two types of AC traction systems with the application of an advanced co-simulation methodology, where an electrical system and a traction algorithm are modelled in Matlab/Simulink, and a mechanical system is modelled in a multibody software package. Although the paper concentrates on the analysis of the functioning for these two types of traction control systems, the choice of reference slip values also has an influence on the performance of both systems. All these design variations and issues have been simulated for various adhesion conditions at the wheel-rail interface and their influence on the high traction performance of a locomotive equipped with two three-axle bogies has been discussed.

  6. Evidence for an age-dependent influence of environmental variations on a long-lived seabird's life-history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Deborah; Barbraud, Christophe; Authier, Matthieu; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical studies have highlighted the effects of age on several life-history traits in wild populations. There is also increasing evidence for environmental effects on their demographic traits. However, quantifying how individuals differentially respond to environmental variations according to their age remains a challenge in ecology. In a population of Black-browed Albatrosses monitored during 43 years, we analyzed how life-history traits varied according to age, and whether individuals of different ages responded in different ways to environmental conditions. To do so, we: (1) examined how age affected seven life-history traits, (2) investigated differences in temporal variance of demographic traits between age classes, and (3) tested for age-dependent effects of climate and fisheries covariates on demographic traits. Overall, there was a tendency for traits to improve during the first years of life (5-10 years), to peak and remain stable at middle age (10-30 years), and decline at old ages. At young ages, survival and reproductive parameters increased, except offspring body condition at fledging, suggesting that younger parents had already acquired good foraging capacities. However, they suffered from inexperience in breeding as suggested by their higher breeding failures during incubation. There was evidence for reproductive and actuarial senescence. In particular, breeding success and offspring body condition declined abruptly, suggesting altered foraging capacities of old individuals. Middle-aged individuals had the lowest temporal variance of demographic traits. Although this is predicted by the theory of environmental canalization, it could also results from a higher susceptibility of young and old birds due to their respective inexperience and senescence. The highest temporal variances were found in old individuals. Survival was significantly influenced by sea surface temperatures in the foraging zone of this albatross population during

  7. LRP5 coding polymorphisms influence the variation of peak bone mass in a normal population of French-Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Sylvie; Elfassihi, Latifa; Cardinal, Guy; Laflamme, Nathalie; Rousseau, François

    2007-05-01

    Bone mineral density has a strong genetic component but it is also influenced by environmental factors making it a complex trait to study. LRP5 gene was previously shown to be involved in rare diseases affecting bone mass. Mutations associated with gain-of-function were described as well as loss-of-function mutations. Following this discovery, many frequent LRP5 polymorphisms were tested against the variation of BMD in the normal population. Heel bone parameters (SOS, BUA) were measured by right calcaneal QUS in 5021 healthy French-Canadian women and for 2104 women, BMD evaluated by DXA at two sites was available (femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS)). Among women with QUS measures and those with DXA measures, 26.5% and 32.8% respectively were premenopausal, 9.2% and 10.7% were perimenopausal and 64.2% and 56.5% were postmenopausal. About a third of the peri- and postmenopausal women never received hormone therapy. Two single nucleotide coding polymorphisms (Val667Met and Ala1330Val) in LRP5 gene were genotyped by allele-specific PCR. All bone measures were tested individually for associations with each polymorphism by analysis of covariance with adjustment for non genetic risk factors. Furthermore, haplotype analysis was performed to take into account the strong linkage disequilibrium between the two polymorphisms. The two LRP5 polymorphisms were found to be associated with all five bone measures (L2L4 and femoral neck DXA as well as heel SOS, BUA and stiffness index) in the whole sample. Premenopausal women drove the association as expected from the proposed role of LRP5 in peak bone mass. Our results suggest that the Val667Met polymorphism is the causative variant but this remains to be functionally proven.

  8. The influence of flow discharge variations on the morphodynamics of a diffluence-confluence unit on the Mekong River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Christopher; Darby, Stephen; Parsons, Daniel; Leyland, Julian; Aalto, Rolf; Nicholas, Andrew; Best, Jim

    2017-04-01

    Bifurcations represent key morphological nodes within the channel networks of anabranching and braided fluvial channels, playing an important role in controlling local bed morphology, the routing of sediment and water, and defining the stability of the downstream reaches. Herein, we detail field observations of the three-dimensional flow structure, bed morphological changes and partitioning of both flow discharge and suspended sediment through a large diffluence-confluence unit on the Mekong River, Cambodia, across a range of flow stages (from 13,500 m3 s-1 to 27,000 m3 s-1) over the monsoonal flood-pulse cycle. We show that the discharge asymmetry (a measure of the disparity between discharges distributed down the left and right branches of the bifurcation) varies with flow discharge and that the influence of upstream curvature-induced cross-stream water surface slope and bed morphological changes are first-order controls in modulating the asymmetry in bifurcation discharge. Flow discharge is shown to play a key role in defining the morphodynamics of the diffluence-confluence unit downstream of the bifurcation. Our data show that during high flows (Q 27,000 m3 s-1), the downstream island complex acts as a net sink of suspended sediment (with 2600 kg s-1 being deposited between the diffluence and confluence), whereas during lower flows, on both the rising and falling limbs of the flood wave, the sediment balance is in quasi-equilibrium. We propose, therefore, that the long term stability of the bifurcation, as well as the larger channel planform and morphology of the diffluence-confluence unit, is therefore controlled by annual monsoonal flood pulses and the associated variations in discharge.

  9. Factors influencing development of management strategies for the Abou Ali River in Lebanon I: spatial variation and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, May A; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Scrimshaw, Mark D; Lester, John N

    2006-06-01

    Surface water bodies are progressively subject to increasing stress as a result of environmentally degrading processes primarily related to anthropogenic activities. This study assesses and examines the impact of land use and land-based activities on the spatial variation in water quality of the Abou Ali River in North Lebanon. It is the first detailed study of its kind in Lebanon and adds to the existing knowledge by shedding light on a relatively small Mediterranean river in a developing country where there is a paucity of such studies. The assessment was conducted at the end of the dry season in 2002 and 2003 and the end of the wet season in 2003 and 2004. The study has demonstrated the importance of anthropogenic influences on the water quality of the Abou Ali River Basin, as concentrations of most contaminants were higher at locations with greatest human activity. The most adversely affected area was the section of the river that flows through an entirely urbanized and highly populated region, the Tripoli conurbation. Upstream rural sites were enriched by contaminants primarily from non-point sources such as agricultural runoff and poultry litter whereas contaminant concentrations at the urban sites were enriched by a combination of sewage discharge and flow of contaminants from upstream. If the Abou Ali River is to be utilized as a managed water resource and its water quality sustained, point source discharges will require treatment and land use management must be planned to minimize the impact of diffuse source pollution on the river. A high priority should be given to the implementation and enforcement of the precautionary and polluter pays principles. Moreover, an effective legal, economic and institutional framework is required to encourage investment in waste reduction and control and to introduce environmentally sound practices.

  10. Influence of landscape features on variation of δ2H and δ18O in seasonal mountain snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnis, E. L.; Chapple, W.; Frank, J. M.; Traver, E.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Streamflow contributions from snowpack remain difficult to predict in snow dominated headwater catchments in the Rocky Mountains. There remains considerable uncertainty in how environmental change in mountain watersheds alter seasonal snowpack accumulation and development and how these relationships translate from gaged to ungaged catchments. Stable isotope analysis is a valuable tool for determining the contribution and changes of different source inputs to catchment water budgets. Stable isotope values in snowpack integrate source inputs and processes such as water vapor exchange, selective redistribution, and melt. For better understanding of how these physical processes vary at local and catchment scales, snowpack density, depth, snow water equivalence (SWE), δ2H and δ18O were examined at peak snowpack in spring 2013 and 2014 and at monthly time steps throughout the winter of 2013-2014. Distributed data and sample collection occurred between 2400 and 3300 m elevation across two pine beetle and spruce beetle impacted forest stands with variable canopy cover in the Libby Creek and Nash Fork Little Laramie River basins, Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming. Peak snowpack within these watersheds was 10% below historic average in 2013 and 50% above average in 2014 (NRCS Snotel data). Even with these contrasting peak snowpack patterns, elevation described less than 40% of the spatial variation of snow water equivalents (SWE) across the watersheds for both seasons. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratio values of snowpack sampled monthly in 2014 revealed early season separation from the local meteoric water line, suggesting some kinetic isotope effects. However, isotope ratio values at peak snowpack in 2013 reflected no such signal at any sampling location. The influence of landscape position and canopy cover will be modeled to detect and scale spatial and temporal changes in SWE and stable isotope composition of snowpack. Such an approach will provide increased understanding of

  11. Boundary Equations and Regularity Theory for Geometric Variational Systems with Neumann Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikorra, Armin

    2018-02-01

    We study boundary regularity of maps from two-dimensional domains into manifolds which are critical with respect to a generic conformally invariant variational functional and which, at the boundary, intersect perpendicularly with a support manifold. For example, harmonic maps, or H-surfaces, with a partially free boundary condition. In the interior it is known, by the celebrated work of Rivière, that these maps satisfy a system with an antisymmetric potential, from which one can derive the interior regularity of the solution. Avoiding a reflection argument, we show that these maps satisfy along the boundary a system of equations which also exhibits a (nonlocal) antisymmetric potential that combines information from the interior potential and the geometric Neumann boundary condition. We then proceed to show boundary regularity for solutions to such systems.

  12. Null alleles and sequence variations at primer binding sites of STR loci within multiplex typing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yining; Yang, Qinrui; Shao, Chengchen; Liu, Baonian; Zhou, Yuxiang; Xu, Hongmei; Zhou, Yueqin; Tang, Qiqun; Xie, Jianhui

    2018-01-01

    Rare variants are widely observed in human genome and sequence variations at primer binding sites might impair the process of PCR amplification resulting in dropouts of alleles, named as null alleles. In this study, 5 cases from routine paternity testing using PowerPlex ® 21 System for STR genotyping were considered to harbor null alleles at TH01, FGA, D5S818, D8S1179, and D16S539, respectively. The dropout of alleles was confirmed by using alternative commercial kits AGCU Expressmarker 22 PCR amplification kit and AmpFℓSTR ® . Identifiler ® Plus Kit, and sequencing results revealed a single base variation at the primer binding site of each STR locus. Results from the collection of previous reports show that null alleles at D5S818 were frequently observed in population detected by two PowerPlex ® typing systems and null alleles at D19S433 were mostly observed in Japanese population detected by two AmpFℓSTR™ typing systems. Furthermore, the most popular mutation type appeared the transition from C to T with G to A, which might have a potential relationship with DNA methylation. Altogether, these results can provide helpful information in forensic practice to the elimination of genotyping discrepancy and the development of primer sets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. Hence, by the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays need not reflect the true variation of the mass supply rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale t_{{visc}} also to spread around a mean value. In high mass X-ray binaries, which are thought to be primarily wind-fed, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller and thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the low mass X-ray binaries which are primarily fed by Roche lobe overflow. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a detailed knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales, such as when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term All Sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift satellites by different methods to look for such smearing effects and to infer what these results can tell us about the viscous processes inside the respective disks. We employ three different methods to seek imprints of periodicity on the X-ray variation and found that in all the cases, the location of the peak in the power density spectra is consistent with the orbital frequencies. Interestingly, in high mass X-ray binaries the peaks are sharp with high rms values, consistent with a small Keplerian disk in a wind fed system. However, in low mass X-ray binaries with larger Keplerian disk component, the peaks are spreaded out with much lower rms values. X-ray reflections, or superhump phenomena which may also cause such X-ray modulations would not be affected by the size of

  14. Influences of crustal thickening in the Tibetan Plateau on loading modeling and inversion associated with water storage variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansheng Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use the average crustal structure of the CRUST1.0 model for the Tibetan Plateau to establish a realistic earth model termed as TC1P, and data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS hydrology model and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE data, to generate the hydrology signals assumed in this study. Modeling of surface radial displacements and gravity variation is performed using both TC1P and the global Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM. Furthermore, inversions of the hydrology signals based on simulated Global Positioning System (GPS and GRACE data are performed using PREM. Results show that crust in TC1P is harder and softer than that in PREM above and below a depth of 15 km, respectively, causing larger differences in the computed load Love numbers and loading Green's functions. When annual hydrology signals are assumed, the differences of the radial displacements are found to be as large as approximately 0.6 mm for the truncated degree of 180; while for hydrology-trend signals the differences are very small. When annual hydrology signals and the trends are assumed, the differences in the surface gravity variation are very small. It is considered that TC1P can be used to efficiently remove the hydrological effects on the monitoring of crustal movement. It was also found that when PREM is used inappropriately, the inversion of the hydrology signals from simulated annual GPS signals can only recover approximately 88.0% of the annual hydrology signals for the truncated degree of 180, and the inversion of hydrology signals from the simulated trend GPS signals can recover approximately 92.5% for the truncated degree of 90. However, when using the simulated GRACE data, it is possible to recover almost 100%. Therefore, in future, the TC1P model can be used in the inversions of hydrology signals based on GPS network data. PREM is also valid for use with inversions of hydrology signals from GRACE data at resolutions

  15. The influence of solar system oscillation on the variability of the total solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yndestad, Harald; Solheim, Jan-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Total solar irradiance (TSI) is the primary quantity of energy that is provided to the Earth. The properties of the TSI variability are critical for understanding the cause of the irradiation variability and its expected influence on climate variations. A deterministic property of TSI variability can provide information about future irradiation variability and expected long-term climate variation, whereas a non-deterministic variability can only explain the past. This study of solar variability is based on an analysis of two TSI data series, one since 1700 A.D. and one since 1000 A.D.; a sunspot data series since 1610 A.D.; and a solar orbit data series from 1000 A.D. The study is based on a wavelet spectrum analysis. First, the TSI data series are transformed into a wavelet spectrum. Then, the wavelet spectrum is transformed into an autocorrelation spectrum to identify stationary, subharmonic and coincidence periods in the TSI variability. The results indicate that the TSI and sunspot data series have periodic cycles that are correlated with the oscillations of the solar position relative to the barycenter of the solar system, which is controlled by gravity force variations from the large planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. A possible explanation for solar activity variations is forced oscillations between the large planets and the solar dynamo. We find that a stationary component of the solar variability is controlled by the 12-year Jupiter period and the 84-year Uranus period with subharmonics. For TSI and sunspot variations, we find stationary periods related to the 84-year Uranus period. Deterministic models based on the stationary periods confirm the results through a close relation to known long solar minima since 1000 A.D. and suggest a modern maximum period from 1940 to 2015. The model computes a new Dalton-type sunspot minimum from approximately 2025 to 2050 and a new Dalton-type period TSI minimum from approximately 2040 to 2065.

  16. Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service) very close to the users ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. systematic review. We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet. Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results. Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor. Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans. Analog hearing aids are more susceptible to the electromagnetic interference caused by digital mobile phones. there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.

  17. Human- Versus System-Level Factors and Their Effect on Electronic Work List Variation: Challenging Radiology's Fundamental Attribution Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Matthew S; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; Platt, Joel F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze sources of variation influencing the unread volume on an electronic abdominopelvic CT work list and to compare those results with blinded radiologist perception. The requirement for institutional review board approval was waived for this HIPAA-compliant quality improvement effort. Data pertaining to an electronic abdominopelvic CT work list were analyzed retrospectively from July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014, and modeled with respect to the unread case total at 6 pm (Monday through Friday, excluding holidays). Eighteen system-level factors outside individual control (eg, number of workers, workload) and 7 human-level factors within individual control (eg, individual productivity) were studied. Attending radiologist perception was assessed with a blinded anonymous survey (n = 12 of 15 surveys completed). The mean daily unread total was 24 (range, 3-72). The upper control limit (48 CT studies [3 SDs above the mean]) was exceeded 10 times. Multivariate analysis revealed that the rate of unread CT studies was affected principally by system-level factors, including the number of experienced trainees on service (postgraduate year 5 residents [odds ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.92; P = .0008] and fellows [odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.95; P = .005]) and the daily workload (P = .02 to P level factors best predict the variation in unread CT examinations, but blinded faculty radiologists believe that it relates most strongly to variable individual effort. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of defects on the vibrations of rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, A.

    2008-01-01

    For high rotation speeds, the imperfections (cracks, anisotropy...) of rotating machinery of the energy sector lead to a specific vibratory behavior which can damage the machine. The simulation of rotating machinery are usually realized for systems without defect. The aim of this thesis is to understand the influence of defects and to propose an algorithm to predict the dynamical behavior. In a first part the author studies the simplified rotating oscillators to propose a numerical method in order to taking into account the dynamic of these systems. This method is then applied to real rotating machinery with the Cast3m software. The numerical results are validated with experiments. (A.L.B.)

  19. Variational study of fermionic and bosonic systems with non-Gaussian states: Theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tao; Demler, Eugene; Ignacio Cirac, J.

    2018-03-01

    We present a new variational method for investigating the ground state and out of equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body bosonic and fermionic systems. Our approach is based on constructing variational wavefunctions which extend Gaussian states by including generalized canonical transformations between the fields. The key advantage of such states compared to simple Gaussian states is presence of non-factorizable correlations and the possibility of describing states with strong entanglement between particles. In contrast to the commonly used canonical transformations, such as the polaron or Lang-Firsov transformations, we allow parameters of the transformations to be time dependent, which extends their regions of applicability. We derive equations of motion for the parameters characterizing the states both in real and imaginary time using the differential structure of the variational manifold. The ground state can be found by following the imaginary time evolution until it converges to a steady state. Collective excitations in the system can be obtained by linearizing the real-time equations of motion in the vicinity of the imaginary time steady-state solution. Our formalism allows us not only to determine the energy spectrum of quasiparticles and their lifetime, but to obtain the complete spectral functions and to explore far out of equilibrium dynamics such as coherent evolution following a quantum quench. We illustrate and benchmark this framework with several examples: a single polaron in the Holstein and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models, non-equilibrium dynamics in the spin-boson and Kondo models, the superconducting to charge density wave phase transitions in the Holstein model.

  20. Multi-Scale Three-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation System for Coastal Ocean Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijin; Chao, Yi; Li, P. Peggy

    2012-01-01

    A multi-scale three-dimensional variational data assimilation system (MS-3DVAR) has been formulated and the associated software system has been developed for improving high-resolution coastal ocean prediction. This system helps improve coastal ocean prediction skill, and has been used in support of operational coastal ocean forecasting systems and field experiments. The system has been developed to improve the capability of data assimilation for assimilating, simultaneously and effectively, sparse vertical profiles and high-resolution remote sensing surface measurements into coastal ocean models, as well as constraining model biases. In this system, the cost function is decomposed into two separate units for the large- and small-scale components, respectively. As such, data assimilation is implemented sequentially from large to small scales, the background error covariance is constructed to be scale-dependent, and a scale-dependent dynamic balance is incorporated. This scheme then allows effective constraining large scales and model bias through assimilating sparse vertical profiles, and small scales through assimilating high-resolution surface measurements. This MS-3DVAR enhances the capability of the traditional 3DVAR for assimilating highly heterogeneously distributed observations, such as along-track satellite altimetry data, and particularly maximizing the extraction of information from limited numbers of vertical profile observations.

  1. General variational many-body theory with complete self-consistency for trapped bosonic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streltsov, Alexej I.; Alon, Ofir E.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we develop a complete variational many-body theory for a system of N trapped bosons interacting via a general two-body potential. The many-body solution of this system is expanded over orthogonal many-body basis functions (configurations). In this theory both the many-body basis functions and the respective expansion coefficients are treated as variational parameters. The optimal variational parameters are obtained self-consistently by solving a coupled system of noneigenvalue--generally integro-differential--equations to get the one-particle functions and by diagonalizing the secular matrix problem to find the expansion coefficients. We call this theory multiconfigurational Hartree theory for bosons or MCHB(M), where M specifies explicitly the number of one-particle functions used to construct the configurations. General rules for evaluating the matrix elements of one- and two-particle operators are derived and applied to construct the secular Hamiltonian matrix. We discuss properties of the derived equations. We show that in the limiting cases of one configuration the theory boils down to the well-known Gross-Pitaevskii and the recently developed multi-orbital mean fields. The invariance of the complete solution with respect to unitary transformations of the one-particle functions is utilized to find the solution with the minimal number of contributing configurations. In the second part of our work we implement and apply the developed theory. It is demonstrated that for any practical computation where the configurational space is restricted, the description of trapped bosonic systems strongly depends on the choice of the many-body basis set used, i.e., self-consistency is of great relevance. As illustrative examples we consider bosonic systems trapped in one- and two-dimensional symmetric and asymmetric double well potentials. We demonstrate that self-consistency has great impact on the predicted physical properties of the ground and excited states

  2. Application of Method of Variation to Analyze and Predict Human Induced Modifications of Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessu, S. B.; Melesse, A. M.; Mahadev, B.; McClain, M.

    2010-12-01

    Water resource systems have often used gravitational surface and subsurface flows because of their practicality in hydrological modeling and prediction. Activities such as inter/intra-basin water transfer, the use of small pumps and the construction of micro-ponds challenge the tradition of natural rivers as water resource management unit. On the contrary, precipitation is barely affected by topography and plot harvesting in wet regions can be more manageable than diverting from rivers. Therefore, it is indicative to attend to systems where precipitation drives the dynamics while the internal mechanics constitutes spectrum of human activity and decision in a network of plots. The trade-in volume and path of harvested precipitation depends on water balance, energy balance and the kinematics of supply and demand. Method of variation can be used to understand and predict the implication of local excess precipitation harvest and exchange on the natural water system. A system model was developed using the variational form of Euler-Bernoulli’s equation for the Kenyan Mara River basin. Satellite derived digital elevation models, precipitation estimates, and surface properties such as fractional impervious surface area, are used to estimate the available water resource. Four management conditions are imposed in the model: gravitational flow, open water extraction and high water use investment at upstream and downstream respectively. According to the model, the first management maintains the basin status quo while the open source management could induce externality. The high water market at the upstream in the third management offers more than 50% of the basin-wide total revenue to the upper third section of the basin thus may promote more harvesting. The open source and upstream exploitation suggest potential drop of water availability to downstream. The model exposed the latent potential of economic gradient to reconfigure the flow network along the direction where the

  3. ''Use of perturbative methods to break down the variation of reactivity between two systems''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perruchot-Triboulet, S.; Sanchez, R.

    1997-01-01

    The modification of the isotopic composition, the temperature or even accounting for across section uncertainties in one part of a nuclear reactor core, affects the value of the effective multiplication factor. A new tool allows the analysis of the reactivity effect generated by the modification of the system. With the help of the direct and adjoint fluxes, a detailed balance of reactivity, between the compared systems, is done for each isotopic cross section. After the presentation of the direct and adjoint transport equations in the context of the multigroup code transport APOLLO2, this note describes the method, based on perturbation theory, for the analysis of the reactivity variation. An example application is also given. (author)

  4. FUSION DECISION FOR A BIMODAL BIOMETRIC VERIFICATION SYSTEM USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND ITS VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teoh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paw presents fusion detection technique comparisons based on support vector machine and its variations for a bimodal biometric verification system that makes use of face images and speech utterances. The system is essentially constructed by a face expert, a speech expert and a fusion decision module. Each individual expert has been optimized to operate in automatic mode and designed for security access application. Fusion decision schemes considered are linear, weighted Support Vector Machine (SVM and linear SVM with quadratic transformation. The conditions tested include the balanced and unbalanced conditions between the two experts in order to obtain the optimum fusion module from  these techniques best suited to the target application.

  5. EFFECTS OF PARAMETRIC VARIATIONS ON SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR NON-CLASSICALLY DAMPED COUPLED SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, J.; DEGRASSI, G.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive benchmark program was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform an evaluation of state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for performing seismic analyses of coupled systems with non-classical damping. The program, which was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was designed to address various aspects of application and limitations of these state-of-the-art analysis methods to typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) structures with non-classical damping, and was carried out through analyses of a set of representative benchmark problems. One objective was to examine the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled systems. The examination was performed using parametric variations for three simple benchmark models. This paper presents the comparisons and evaluation of the program participants' results to the BNL exact solutions for the applicable ranges of modeling dynamic characteristic parameters

  6. Nonterminals, homomorphisms and codings in different variations of OL-systems. I. Deterministic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Rozenberg, Grzegorz; Salomaa, Arto

    1974-01-01

    The use of nonterminals versus the use of homomorphisms of different kinds in the basic types of deterministic OL-systems is studied. A rather surprising result is that in some cases the use of nonterminals produces a comparatively low generative capacity, whereas in some other cases the use of n...

  7. Influence of defects on the vibrations of rotating systems; Influence de defauts sur le comportement vibratoire des systemes tournants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For high rotation speeds, the imperfections (cracks, anisotropy...) of rotating machinery of the energy sector lead to a specific vibratory behavior which can damage the machine. The simulation of rotating machinery are usually realized for systems without defect. The aim of this thesis is to understand the influence of defects and to propose an algorithm to predict the dynamical behavior. In a first part the author studies the simplified rotating oscillators to propose a numerical method in order to taking into account the dynamic of these systems. This method is then applied to real rotating machinery with the Cast3m software. The numerical results are validated with experiments. (A.L.B.)

  8. Variations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy course in a multi-ethnic UK population: potential influence of socio-economic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufton, Margaret; Roper, Helen

    2017-08-01

    To explore variation in clinical course and steroid treatment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by ethnic origin and socio-economic status. In this longitudinal cohort study, clinical outcome was defined as age at loss of ambulation (LOA). Ages are presented as months for accurate calculation. Steroid use was reviewed against national guidelines. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to determine probabilities over time of LOA. Log-rank test was used to evaluate comparisons between ethnic and socio-economic groups. From 2005 to 2014, 71 children were newly diagnosed with DMD. Complete data were available on 69, including 33 of white British heritage and 23 of South Asian heritage. Mean age at diagnosis (without known family history) was 45.7 months; white British ethnicity 42.1 months (range 14-86mo), South Asian ethnicity 50.2 months (range 5-98mo). Twenty-four males lost ambulation. Those of South Asian heritage lost ambulation earlier (mean LOA 105.8mo [8y 10mo]) than those of white British heritage (mean LOA 117.8mo [9y 10mo]): log-rank test score 0.012 (p<0.05). Those most deprived did worse: mean age at LOA 130.0 months (10y 10mo) for the top 20 per cent and 102.5 months (8y 6mo) in the lower 20 per cent: log-rank test score 0.035 (p<0.05). The most socially deprived were diagnosed earlier and started steroids earlier. Of those of South Asian heritage, 18 per cent declined steroids, compared with 9 per cent of white British heritage. Also, 44 per cent of those of South Asian heritage stopped steroids compared with 17 per cent of those of white British heritage. Patients from South Asian and deprived backgrounds had earlier LOA. Genetic disease modifiers are likely to be implicated, but social and cultural factors influence access to treatment. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Influence of temporal variations in water chemistry on the Pb isotopic composition of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Jerry R.; Anderson, Jamie B.; Lechler, Paul J.; Kondrad, Shannon L.; Galbreath, Peter F.; Salter, Emory B.

    2005-01-01

    Field and laboratory investigations were undertaken to determine (1) the relations between discharge, Pb concentration, and the Pb isotopic composition of the dissolved load in Richland Creek, western North Carolina, and (2) the potential influence of varying Pb water chemistry on the Pb isotopic abundances in liver and bone tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Stream waters were characterized by relatively low Pb concentrations during periods of base flow exceeding 10 days in length. Moreover, greater than 65% of the Pb was derived from orchard soils located upstream of the monitoring site which are contaminated by lead arsenate. During small to moderate floods, the dissolved load exhibited Pb concentrations more than twice as high as those measured during base flow, but the contribution of Pb from lead arsenate was relatively low and varied directly with discharge. In contrast to smaller events, Pb from lead arsenate in an 8- to 10-year (overbank) event in May 2003 was minimal during peak flow conditions, suggesting that discharge-source relations are dependent on flood magnitude. The hydrologic and geochemical data demonstrate that aquatic biota in Richland Creek are subjected to short-term variations in Pb concentrations and Pb isotopic abundances within the dissolved load ranging from a few hours to few a weeks. Laboratory studies demonstrated that when rainbow trout were exposed to elevated Pb concentrations with a distinct isotopic fingerprint, the bone and liver rapidly acquire isotopic ratios similar to that of the water. Following exposure, bone retains Pb from the contaminant source for a period of months, while the liver excreted approximately 50% of the accumulated Pb within a few days and nearly all of the Pb within a few weeks. Differences in the rates of excretion resulted in contrasting isotopic ratios between the tissues. It seems plausible, then, that previously observed differences between the isotopic composition of bone and liver in

  10. The influence of risk awareness on attitudes towards energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.; Sachs, S.

    1984-01-01

    The implementation of energy systems needs acceptance by people. Acceptance is influenced by various factors, one of which is the attitude towards energy questions. Attitudes and behavioural intentions can be understood from inference and evaluation processes. Ajzen and Fishbein described this by a model which combines in an additive manner attitudes towards acts and norms to predict behavioural intentions and behaviour. The Fishbein model was used as a base for the simulation model REASON which simulates behavioural intentions. The model needs as input knowledge about the part of the world to be evaluated and values and criteria used to judge the conclusions of the inference process. The program provides as output the scores of the various criteria and accumulated evaluations of the options. In addition, if desired, a protocol of the inference process is available. REASON was applied to various energy-related questions. A detailed concept was developed for the selection of a heating system for a new home. The concept was used to simulate the behavioural intentions of home owners towards the installation of a heating system. Competing heating systems were evaluated by cost, safety, comfort, and environmental criteria as well as expectations of other persons or groups. The results of the simulations were partly compared with empirical data. Sensitivity studies were performed which show the influence of risk criteria (for instance safety of supply, influences on the environment, exploitation of resources, time perspective) combined with other criteria. Time dependent studies show the changing of intentions as a result of changing evaluation criteria and changes in knowledge about the environment. (author)

  11. Factors that Influence RF Breakdown in Antenna Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Baity, F. W.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Aghazarian, M.; Castano Giraldo, C. H.; Ruzic, David

    2007-11-01

    One of the main power-limiting factors in antenna systems is the maximum voltage that the antenna or vacuum transmission line can sustain before breaking down. The factors that influence RF breakdown are being studied in a resonant 1/4-wavelength section of vacuum transmission line terminated with an open circuit electrode structure. Breakdown can be initiated via electron emission by high electric fields and by plasma formation in the structure, depending on the gas pressure. Recent experiments have shown that a 1 kG magnetic field can influence plasma formation at pressures as low as 8x10-5 Torr at moderate voltage levels (LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Work supported by USDOE with grant DE-FG02-04ER54765

  12. Influence of changes in an eye's optical system on refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, Janina

    1998-10-01

    The optical system of eye is composed of cornea, lens, anterior chamber, and vitreous body. In the standard schematic eye there are 6 refracting surfaces. The changes of the curvature radii, of the distances between them, of the refractive indices influence the ametropia, refractive power of the eye and retinal image size. The influence of these changes can be appreciated by ray tracing or by an analytical method. There are presented simplified formulae for the differentials of ametropia and refractive power of the eye with respect to the surfaces curvatures, refracting power of cornea and lens, refractive indices. The relations are valid too for bigger changes if ametropia is measured in the cornea vertex. The formulae for the differentials with respect to distances, lens translation, eye axis length are valid if ametropia is measured in the object focus of the eye.

  13. Solar Storage Tank Insulation Influence on the Solar Systems Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negoitescu Arina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For the storage tank of a solar system for domestic hot water production was analyzed the insulation thickness and material influence. To this end, it was considered a private house, occupied by 3 persons, located in zone I of thermal radiation, for which has been simulated the domestic hot water production process. The tank outlet hot water temperature was considered of 45°C. For simulation purposes, as insulation materials for the storage tank were taking into account glass wool and polyurethane with various thicknesses. Finally, was carried out the comparative analysis of two types of tanks, in terms of the insulation thickness influence on the solar fraction, annual solar contribution and solar annual productivity. It resulted that polyurethane is the most advantageous from all points of view.

  14. Variation of the count-dependent Metz filter with imaging system modulation transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Penney, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic investigation was conducted of how a number of parameters which alter the system modulation transfer function (MTF) influence the count-dependent Metz filter. Since restoration filters are most effective at those frequencies where the object power spectrum dominates that of the noise, it was observed that parameters which significantly degrade the MTF at low spatial frequencies strongly influence the formation of the Metz filter. Thus the radionuclide imaged and the depth of the source in a scattering medium had the most influence. This is because they alter the relative amount of scattered radiation being imaged. For low-energy photon emitters, the collimator employed and the distance from the collimator were found to have less of an influence but still to be significant. These cause alterations in the MTF which are more gradual, and hence are most pronounced at mid to high spatial frequencies. As long as adequate spatial sampling is employed, the Metz filter was determined to be independent of the exact size of the sampling bin width, to a first approximation. For planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging, it is shown that two-dimensional filtering with the Metz filter optimized for the imaging conditions is able to deconvolve scatter and other causes of spatial resolution loss while diminishing noise, all in a balanced manner

  15. Physical activity influences the immune system of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that physical activity in breast cancer patients can not only improve quality of life. Influences on physical and psychological levels have been evaluated, but effects on the immune system of breast cancer patients are hardly known. A PubMed search identified relevant trials and meta-analyses from 1970 to 2013. This review summarizes the results of international studies and the current discussion of effects of physical activity on the immune system of breast cancer patients. Highlighted are effects of physical activity on the immune system. Seven original articles and 14 reviews included in this review. Two original and the review articles includes other tumor entities besides breast cancer.Evaluated methods such as dose-response relationships for exercise in oncology, hardly exist. Increased immunological anti-cancer activity due to physical activity is probably mediated via an increase in number and cytotoxicity of monocytes and natural killer cells and cytokines.

  16. General principles of institutional risks influence on pension systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepp, A. N.; Shilkov, A. A.; Sheveleva, A. Y.; Mamedbakov, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the tools used to study the influence of institutional factors on investment returns. The research object are the tools used in the evaluation of institutional risks in the pension system, in particular, the correlation model of factors impacting on the `anti-director' index, econometric estimates combining the different determinants of savings, the model of endogenous institutional change, etc. Research work focusing on issues of institutional factors affecting pension systems (authored by La Porta, Guiso, Gianetti, El-Mekkaouide Freitas, Neyapti B., and others) is reviewed. The model is examined in terms of the impact of institutional risks on pension systems, especially with regard to the funded part. The study identified the following factors that affect financial institutions, including pension institutions: management quality, regulation quality, rule of law, political stability, and corruption control.

  17. Groundwater hydrochemistry,Variation of Arsenic and Monsoonal influence : An explanation regarding release mechanism assisted by isotopic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashis

    2017-04-01

    The investigation examines the groundwater and surface water geochemistry of two different geomorphics in West Bengal. During investigation, several key factors are taken into account e.g. potential influences of groundwater abstraction on the hydrochemical evolution of the aquifer, the effect of different water inputs (monsoon rain, irrigation and downward percolation from surface water impoundments) to the groundwater system and accompanying As release. A natural levee and low-land flood plain have been chosen for said investigation. The results reveal that the stable isotopic signatures of oxygen (d18O) and hydrogen (d2H) are governed by local precipitation, the isotopic composition falls sub-parallel to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). The Cl/Br molar ratio indicates vertical recharge into the wells within the flood plain area, notably during the post-monsoon season, while influences of both evaporation and vertical mixing are visible within the natural levee wells. The important finding is the increasing mean DOC concentrations (from 1.33 to 6.29 mg/L), from pre- to post-monsoon season, which is indicative of possible inflow of organic carbon to the aquifer during the monsoonal recharge. This suggests the subsequent increase in AsT, Fe(II) and HCO3 highlighting a possible initial episode of reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. The abrupt increase in the mean As(III) proportions (by 223%), notably in the flood plain samples during the post-monsoon season. This is attended by a slight increase in mean AsT (7%). This may refer to anaerobic microbial degradation of DOC coupled with the reduction of As(V) to As(III) without resulting in additional As release from the aquifer sediments.

  18. Space Transportation System Availability Requirements and Its Influencing Attributes Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Russell E.; Adams, Timothy C.; McCleskey, Carey M.

    2008-01-01

    It is important that engineering and management accept the need for an availability requirement that is derived with its influencing attributes. It is the intent of this paper to provide the visibility of relationships of these major attribute drivers (variables) to each other and the resultant system inherent availability. Also important to provide bounds of the variables providing engineering the insight required to control the system's engineering solution, e.g., these influencing attributes become design requirements also. These variables will drive the need to provide integration of similar discipline functions or technology selection to allow control of the total parts count. The relationship of selecting a reliability requirement will place a constraint on parts count to achieve a given availability requirement or if allowed to increase the parts count will drive the system reliability requirement higher. They also provide the understanding for the relationship of mean repair time (or mean down time) to maintainability, e.g., accessibility for repair, and both the mean time between failure, e.g., reliability of hardware and availability. The concerns and importance of achieving a strong availability requirement is driven by the need for affordability, the choice of using the two launch solution for the single space application, or the need to control the spare parts count needed to support the long stay in either orbit or on the surface of the moon. Understanding the requirements before starting the architectural design concept will avoid considerable time and money required to iterate the design to meet the redesign and assessment process required to achieve the results required of the customer's space transportation system. In fact the impact to the schedule to being able to deliver the system that meets the customer's needs, goals, and objectives may cause the customer to compromise his desired operational goal and objectives resulting in considerable

  19. Space Transportation System Availability Requirement and Its Influencing Attributes Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Russel E.; Adams, Timothy C.; McCleskey, Carey M.

    2008-01-01

    It is important that engineering and management accept the need for an availability requirement that is derived with its influencing attributes. It is the intent of this paper to provide the visibility of relationships of these major attribute drivers (variables) to each other and the resultant system inherent availability. Also important to provide bounds of the variables providing engineering the insight required to control the system's engineering solution, e.g., these influencing attributes become design requirements also. These variables will drive the need to provide integration of similar discipline functions or technology selection to allow control of the total parts count. The relationship of selecting a reliability requirement will place a constraint on parts count to achieve a given availability requirement or if allowed to increase the parts count will drive the system reliability requirement higher. They also provide the understanding for the relationship of mean repair time (or mean down time) to maintainability, e.g., accessibility for repair, and both the mean time between failure, e.g., reliability of hardware and availability. The concerns and importance of achieving a strong availability requirement is driven by the need for affordability, the choice of using the two launch solution for the single space application, or the need to control the spare parts count needed to support the long stay in either orbit or on the surface of the moon. Understanding the requirements before starting the architectural design concept will avoid considerable time and money required to iterate the design to meet the redesign and assessment process required to achieve the results required of the customer's space transportation system. In fact the impact to the schedule to being able to deliver the system that meets the customer's needs, goals, and objectives may cause the customer to compromise his desired operational goal and objectives resulting in considerable

  20. Genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system and response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for child anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Roberts, Susanna; Keers, Robert; Breen, Gerome; Bögels, Susan; Creswell, Cathy; Hudson, Jennifer L.; McKinnon, Anna; Nauta, Maaike; Rapee, Ronald M.; Schneider, Silvia; Silverman, Wendy K.; Thastum, Mikael; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne H.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2016-01-01

    Extinction learning is an important mechanism in the successful psychological treatment of anxiety. Individual differences in response and relapse following Cognitive Behavior Therapy may in part be explained by variability in the ease with which fears are extinguished or the vulnerability of these fears to re‐emerge. Given the role of the endocannabinoid system in fear extinction, this study investigates whether genetic variation in the endocannabinoid system explains individual differences in response to CBT. Children (N = 1,309) with a primary anxiety disorder diagnosis were recruited. We investigated the relationship between variation in the CNR1, CNR2, and FAAH genes and change in primary anxiety disorder severity between pre‐ and post‐treatment and during the follow‐up period in the full sample and a subset with fear‐based anxiety disorder diagnoses. Change in symptom severity during active treatment was nominally associated (P < 0.05) with two SNPs. During the follow‐up period, five SNPs were nominally associated with a poorer treatment response (rs806365 [CNR1]; rs2501431 [CNR2]; rs2070956 [CNR2]; rs7769940 [CNR1]; rs2209172 [FAAH]) and one with a more favorable response (rs6928813 [CNR1]). Within the fear‐based subset, the effect of rs806365 survived multiple testing corrections (P < 0.0016). We found very limited evidence for an association between variants in endocannabinoid system genes and treatment response once multiple testing corrections were applied. Larger, more homogenous cohorts are needed to allow the identification of variants of small but statistically significant effect and to estimate effect sizes for these variants with greater precision in order to determine their potential clinical utility. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27346075

  1. Spatial-Temporal Variations of Chlorophyll-a in the Adjacent Sea Area of the Yangtze River Estuary Influenced by Yangtze River Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Jiang, Hong; Jin, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiuying; Lu, Xuehe; Wang, Yueqi

    2015-01-01

    Carrying abundant nutrition, terrigenous freshwater has a great impact on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of phytoplankton in coastal waters. The present study analyzed the spatial-temporal variations of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration under the influence of discharge from the Yangtze River, based on remotely sensed Chl-a concentrations. The study area was initially zoned to quantitatively investigate the spatial variation patterns of Chl-a. Then, the temporal variation of Chl-a in each zone was simulated by a sinusoidal curve model. The results showed that in the inshore waters, the terrigenous discharge was the predominant driving force determining the pattern of Chl-a, which brings the risk of red tide disasters; while in the open sea areas, Chl-a was mainly affected by meteorological factors. Furthermore, a diversity of spatial and temporal variations of Chl-a existed based on the degree of influences from discharge. The diluted water extended from inshore to the east of Jeju Island. This process affected the Chl-a concentration flowing through the area, and had a potential impact on the marine environment. The Chl-a from September to November showed an obvious response to the discharge from July to September with a lag of 1 to 2 months. PMID:26006121

  2. Geographic variations in avoidable hospitalizations in the elderly, in a health system with universal coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberquilla Angel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSH has been proposed as an indirect measure of access to and receipt of care by older persons at the entryway to the Spanish public health system. The aim of this work is to identify the rates of ACSH in persons 65 years or older living in different small-areas of the Community of Madrid (CM and to detect possible differences in ACSH. Methods Cross-sectional, ecologic study, which covered all 34 health districts of the CM. The study population consisted of all individuals aged 65 years or older residing in the CM between 2001 and 2003, inclusive. Using hospital discharge data, avoidable ACSH were selected from the list of conditions validated for Spain. Age- and sex-adjusted ACSH rates were calculated for the population of each health district and the statistics describing the data variability. Point graphs and maps were designed to represent the ACSH rates in the different health districts. Results Of all the hospitalizations, 16.5% (64,409 were ACSH. Globally, the rate was higher among men: 33.15 per 1,000 populations vs. 22.10 in women and these differences were statistically significant (p Conclusion A significant variation is demonstrated in "preventable" hospitalizations between the different districts. In all the districts the men present rates significantly higher than women. Important variations in the access are observed the Primary Attention in spite of existing a universal sanitary cover.

  3. Finite-Temperature Variational Monte Carlo Method for Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Kensaku; Ido, Kota; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    A new computational method for finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated electrons is proposed by extending the variational Monte Carlo method originally developed for the ground state. The method is based on the path integral in the imaginary-time formulation, starting from the infinite-temperature state that is well approximated by a small number of certain random initial states. Lower temperatures are progressively reached by the imaginary-time evolution. The algorithm follows the framework of the quantum transfer matrix and finite-temperature Lanczos methods, but we extend them to treat much larger system sizes without the negative sign problem by optimizing the truncated Hilbert space on the basis of the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). This optimization algorithm is equivalent to the stochastic reconfiguration (SR) method that has been frequently used for the ground state to optimally truncate the Hilbert space. The obtained finite-temperature states allow an interpretation based on the thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state instead of the conventional canonical-ensemble average. Our method is tested for the one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models and its accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated.

  4. Milk Production in the Sylvopastoral Zone of Senegal: Variation Factors and Local Populations’ Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Diop

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Sahelian region of Senegal, milk production in pastoral systems is subjected to inter- and intra-annual variations because the animal feed is almost exclusively based on natural resources. Studies conducted from a monitoring set-up in pastoralist settlements and in station, and data from Nestle Company have shown that milk production was highly related to the milk collection date, but with a low correlation with the total amount of rainfall. The relationship between total milk production and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI was polynomial. The production peak was reached when the water content in forage was 70%. Surveys on pastoralists (men and women belonging to different ethnic groups and living in different production subsystems (Walo, Djoloff and Ferlo showed that the duration of lactation, number of cows and animal species were the main factors of variation of milk production. The actors in charge of milk production management differed depending on the ethnic group. Milk curdling and butter making were the two preserving methods used, and five types of gourds were used in the process. Dairy products still held a major place in farmers’ incomes and skim milk curd was the most marketed product.

  5. Factors that influencing the usage of global distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiasa, I. M.; Suparta, I. K.; Nadra, N. M.

    2018-01-01

    The advancement of Tourism is supported by Information and Communication Technology (ICT) innovation and changes. The use of GDS (Global Distribution System) i.e. Amadeus, Galileo, Sabre, and Worldspan in the tourism industry can increase the availability, frequency and speed of communication among the companies in providing services to potential tourists. This research is to investigate the factors that influence the actual use of GDS in the tourism industry especially travel agents, airlines and hotels in Bali. This research employed a mixed method of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Field surveys were conducted and 80 valid questionnaires were received and analyzed by using SPSS 17.0; descriptive, correlation, factor analysis and regression tests were conducted. The variables used are Perceived Ease of Use and Perceived Usefulness (Technology Acceptance Model); Awareness, Perceived Risk and Communication Channels are examined. This research revealed that Perceived Ease of Use, Perceived Usefulness, Awareness, and Communication Channels influence the Behavioural intention to use GDS, whereas Perceived Risk were found not significant influence the use of GDS. These findings enable travel agent, airline and hotel companies to make provision decision with respect to the actual use of GDS.

  6. Tidal variability of nutrients in a coastal coral reef system influenced by groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhi; Wang, Shuling; Wang, Zhangyong; Jing, Wenping; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Zhouling; Tan, Ehui; Dai, Minhan

    2018-02-01

    To investigate variation in nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate in a spring-neap tide in a coral reef system influenced by groundwater discharge, we carried out a time-series observation of these nutrients and 228Ra, a tracer of groundwater discharge, in the Luhuitou fringing reef at Sanya Bay in the South China Sea. The maximum 228Ra, 45.3 dpm 100 L-1, appeared at low tide and the minimum, 14.0 dpm 100 L-1, appeared during a flood tide in the spring tide. The activity of 228Ra was significantly correlated with water depth and salinity in the spring-neap tide, reflecting the tidal-pumping feature of groundwater discharge. Concentrations of all nutrients exhibited strong diurnal variation, with a maximum in the amplitude of the diel change for nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate in the spring tide of 0.46, 1.54, 0.12, and 2.68 µM, respectively. Nitrate and phosphate were negatively correlated with water depth during the spring tide but showed no correlation during the neap tide. Nitrite was positively correlated with water depth in the spring and neap tide due to mixing of nitrite-depleted groundwater and nitrite-rich offshore seawater. They were also significantly correlated with salinity (R2 ≥ 0.9 and P reef system was closely related with biological processes during both tidal periods, but the biological influence appeared to be less dominant, as inferred from the less significant correlations (R2 = 0.16) during the spring tide when groundwater discharge was more prominent. Thus, the variability of nutrients in the coral reef system was regulated mainly by biological uptake and release in a spring-neap tide and impacted by mixing of tidally driven groundwater and offshore seawater during spring tide.

  7. Genetic Variation in the Natriuretic Peptide System, Circulating Natriuretic Peptide Levels, and Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Nielsen, Søren J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    -h ambulatory BP measurements (ABPMs) will influence the effect of NP gene variations on BP levels.MethodsWe used rs632793 at the NPPB (NP precursor B) locus to investigate the relationship between genetically determined serum N-terminal pro-brain NP (NT-proBNP) concentrations and BP levels...... determined by both 24-h ABPMs and OBPMs in a population consisting of 1,397 generally healthy individuals taking no BP-lowering drugs.Resultsrs632793 was significantly correlated with serum Nt-proBNP levels (r = 0.10, P = 0.0003), and participants with the A:A genotype had lower serum Nt-proBNP levels than......). Office BP decreased across the genotypes from A:A to G:G, but the differences did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.12).ConclusionsThis study suggests that 24-h ABPMs is a better method than OBPMs to detect significant differences in BP levels related to genetic variance and provides further...

  8. Pharmacomicrobiomics: the impact of human microbiome variations on systems pharmacology and personalized therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElRakaiby, Marwa; Dutilh, Bas E; Rizkallah, Mariam R; Boleij, Annemarie; Cole, Jason N; Aziz, Ramy K

    2014-07-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is a global initiative undertaken to identify and characterize the collection of human-associated microorganisms at multiple anatomic sites (skin, mouth, nose, colon, vagina), and to determine how intra-individual and inter-individual alterations in the microbiome influence human health, immunity, and different disease states. In this review article, we summarize the key findings and applications of the HMP that may impact pharmacology and personalized therapeutics. We propose a microbiome cloud model, reflecting the temporal and spatial uncertainty of defining an individual's microbiome composition, with examples of how intra-individual variations (such as age and mode of delivery) shape the microbiome structure. Additionally, we discuss how this microbiome cloud concept explains the difficulty to define a core human microbiome and to classify individuals according to their biome types. Detailed examples are presented on microbiome changes related to colorectal cancer, antibiotic administration, and pharmacomicrobiomics, or drug-microbiome interactions, highlighting how an improved understanding of the human microbiome, and alterations thereof, may lead to the development of novel therapeutic agents, the modification of antibiotic policies and implementation, and improved health outcomes. Finally, the prospects of a collaborative computational microbiome research initiative in Africa are discussed.

  9. First-order system least squares and the energetic variational approach for two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, J. H.; Brannick, J.; Liu, C.; Manteuffel, T.; Zikatanov, L.

    2011-07-01

    This paper develops a first-order system least-squares (FOSLS) formulation for equations of two-phase flow. The main goal is to show that this discretization, along with numerical techniques such as nested iteration, algebraic multigrid, and adaptive local refinement, can be used to solve these types of complex fluid flow problems. In addition, from an energetic variational approach, it can be shown that an important quantity to preserve in a given simulation is the energy law. We discuss the energy law and inherent structure for two-phase flow using the Allen-Cahn interface model and indicate how it is related to other complex fluid models, such as magnetohydrodynamics. Finally, we show that, using the FOSLS framework, one can still satisfy the appropriate energy law globally while using well-known numerical techniques.

  10. Lowest-order constrained variational method for simple many-fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, I.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Wong, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    The authors study the potential energy of many-fermion systems calculated by the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV) method of Pandharipande. Two simple two-body interactions are used. For a simple hard-core potential in a dilute Fermi gas, they find that the Huang-Yang exclusion correction can be used to determine a healing distance. The result is close to the older Pandharipande prescription for the healing distance. For a hard core plus attractive exponential potential, the LOCV result agrees closely with the lowest-order separation method of Moszkowski and Scott. They find that the LOCV result has a shallow minimum as a function of the healing distance at the Moszkowski-Scott separation distance. The significance of the absence of a Brueckner dispersion correction in the LOCV result is discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Variational data assimilation system with nesting model for high resolution ocean circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Yoichi; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Yuji; Wakamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Awaji, Toshiyuki [Center for Earth Information Science and Technology, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-Ku, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); In, Teiji [Japan Marine Science Foundation, 4-24, Minato-cho, Mutsu, Aomori, 035-0064 (Japan); Nakada, Satoshi [Graduate School of Maritime Science, Kobe University, 5-1-1, Fukae-minamimachi, Higashinada-Ku, Kobe, 658-0022 (Japan); Nishina, Kei, E-mail: ishikaway@jamstec.go.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawaoiwake-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    To obtain the high-resolution analysis fields for ocean circulation, a new incremental approach is developed using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation system with nesting models. The results show that there are substantial biases when using a classical method combined with data assimilation and downscaling, caused by different dynamics resulting from the different resolutions of the models used within the nesting models. However, a remarkable reduction in biases of the low-resolution model relative to the high-resolution model was observed using our new approach in narrow strait regions, such as the Tsushima and Tsugaru straits, where the difference in the dynamics represented by the high- and low-resolution models is substantial. In addition, error reductions are demonstrated in the downstream region of these narrow channels associated with the propagation of information through the model dynamics. (paper)

  12. The effects of parameter variation on MSET models of the Crystal River-3 feedwater flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miron, A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we develop further the results reported in Reference 1 to include a systematic study of the effects of varying MSET models and model parameters for the Crystal River-3 (CR) feedwater flow system The study used archived CR process computer files from November 1-December 15, 1993 that were provided by Florida Power Corporation engineers Fairman Bockhorst and Brook Julias. The results support the conclusion that an optimal MSET model, properly trained and deriving its inputs in real-time from no more than 25 of the sensor signals normally provided to a PWR plant process computer, should be able to reliably detect anomalous variations in the feedwater flow venturis of less than 0.1% and in the absence of a venturi sensor signal should be able to generate a virtual signal that will be within 0.1% of the correct value of the missing signal

  13. Anatomic variation of the deep venous system and its relationship with deep vein thrombosis found on the lower extremity venograms that were obtained after artificial joint replacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jee Eun; Hwang, Ji Young; Shim, Sung Shine; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Suh, Jeong Soo; Park, Jae Young

    2006-01-01

    artificial joint replacements. The total number of asymptomatic DVT cases was 43 (23.1%) and DVT was found in the calf in 39 of these cases. Post-operative venograms of the lower extremity showed 7 types of anatomic variation in the deep venous system. The incidence of silent post-operative DVT was not influenced by anatomic variations of the deep vein system, whether there were a small or large number of valves and the operation sites for artificial joint replacement. The most frequent site of DVT after artificial joint replacement was the calf

  14. Prezygotic barriers to hybridization in marine broadcast spawners: reproductive timing and mating system variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A Monteiro

    Full Text Available Sympatric assemblages of congeners with incomplete reproductive barriers offer the opportunity to study the roles that ecological and non-ecological factors play in reproductive isolation. While interspecific asynchrony in gamete release and gametic incompatibility are known prezygotic barriers to hybridization, the role of mating system variation has been emphasized in plants. Reproductive isolation between the sibling brown algal species Fucus spiralis, Fucus guiryi (selfing hermaphrodite and Fucus vesiculosus (dioecious was studied because they form hybrids in parapatry in the rocky intertidal zone, maintain species integrity over a broad geographic range, and have contrasting mating systems. We compared reproductive synchrony (spawning overlap between the three species at several temporal scales (yearly/seasonal, semilunar/tidal, and hourly during single tides. Interspecific patterns of egg release were coincident at seasonal (single peak in spring to early summer to semilunar timescales. Synthesis of available data indicated that spawning is controlled by semidiurnal tidal and daily light-dark cues, and not directly by semilunar cycles. Importantly, interspecific shifts in timing detected at the hourly scale during single tides were consistent with a partial ecological prezygotic hybridization barrier. The species displayed patterns of gamete release consistent with a power law distribution, indicating a high degree of reproductive synchrony, while the hypothesis of weaker selective constraints for synchrony in selfing versus outcrossing species was supported by observed spawning in hermaphrodites over a broader range of tidal phase than in outcrossers. Synchronous gamete release is critical to the success of external fertilization, while high-energy intertidal environments may offer only limited windows of reproductive opportunity. Within these windows, however, subtle variations in reproductive timing have evolved with the potential to

  15. Carbonate system and nutrients in the Pearl River estuary, China: Seasonal and inter-annual variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.

    2017-12-01

    Located in southern China and surrounded by several metropolis, the Pearl River estuary is a large subtropical estuary under significant human perturbation. We examined the impact of sewage treatment rate on the water environmental factors. Carbonate system parameters (Dissolved inorganic carbon or DIC, Total alkalinity or TA, and pH), and nutrients were surveyed in the Pearl River estuary from 2000 to 2015. Spatially, concentrations of nutrients were high at low salinity and decreased with salinity in both wet and dry seasons although seasonal variation occurred. However, distribution patterns of DIC and TA differed in wet and dry seasons. In wet season, both DIC and TA were low at low salinity (600-1500 umol kg-1) and increased with salinity, but in dry season they were high at low salinity (3000-3500 umol kg-1) and decreased with salinity. Compared with the years before 2010, both values and distribution patterns of DIC, TA and pH were similar among the years in wet season, but they were conspicuously different in the upper estuary in dry season. Both DIC and TA were more than 1000 umol kg-1 lower than those in the years before 2010. For nutrients at low salinity, the ammonia concentration was much lower in the years after 2010 (200 vs. 400 umol kg-1 in wet season and 400 vs. 800 umol kg-1 in dry season), but nitrate concentration was slightly higher (180 vs 120 mmol kg-1 in wet season and 200 vs 180 mmol kg-1 in dry season). As a reference, carbonate system parameters and nutrients were stable among the 16 years in the adjacent northern South China Sea. The variations in biogeochemical processes induced by nutrients concentration and structure as a result of sewage discharge will be discussed in detail. The decrease in DIC, TA and nutrients in the upper Pearl River estuary after 2010 was due mainly to the improvement of sewage treatment rate and capacity.

  16. The influence of a scaled boundary response on integral system transient behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimenna, R.A.; Kullberg, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling relationships associated with the thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-loop system are applied to a calculational assessment of a feed-and-bleed recovery in a nuclear reactor integral effects test. The analysis demonstrates both the influence of scale on the system response and the ability of the thermal-hydraulics code to represent those effects. The qualitative response of the fluid is shown to be coupled to the behavior of the bounding walls through the energy equation. The results of the analysis described in this paper influence the determination of computer code applicability. The sensitivity of the code response to scaling variations introduced in the analysis is found to be appropriate with respect to scaling criteria determined from the scaling literature. Differences in the system response associated with different scaling criteria are found to be plausible and easily explained using well-known principles of heat transfer. Therefore, it is concluded that RELAP5/MOD2 can adequately represent the scaled effects of heat transfer boundary conditions of the thermal-hydraulic calculations through the mechanism of communicating walls. The results of the analysis also serve to clarify certain aspects of experiment and facility design

  17. Analysis of enriched HF-UF6 systems. Influence by impurity and density upon the value of the multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, N.B.; Canavese, S.I.; Lopez, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is analyzing the influence of impurity in hydrogen fluoride and in density variation (UF 6 -HF) upon the value of the effective multiplication factor (Kef) in enriched uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen fluoride systems. The identification of the values of such multiplication factors were performed by means of the Monte-Carlo (MONK V.II) code, which is specific for criticality problems. Diverse systems were considered by keeping the same geometry and varying the density value and the impurity percentages, while the assumptions made for each model were described on a case-by-case basis. Also, systems with and without water infinite reflector were evaluated. Finally, an analysis is made of the influence of each parameter upon the effective multiplication factor, in the postulated enriched UF 6 -HF systems. (Author) [es

  18. Variation in chromosome number and breeding systems: implications for diversification in Pachycereus pringlei (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Gutiérrez-Flores

    2018-02-01

    the diploid populations as a new taxonomic entity. We suggest that chromosome doubling in conjunction with allopatric distribution, differences in neutral genetic variation, floral traits, and breeding systems has driven the reproductive isolation, evolution, and diversification of this columnar cactus.

  19. Variation in chromosome number and breeding systems: implications for diversification in Pachycereus pringlei (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Flores, Carina; la Luz, José L León-de; León, Francisco J García-De; Cota-Sánchez, J Hugo

    2018-01-01

    populations as a new taxonomic entity. We suggest that chromosome doubling in conjunction with allopatric distribution, differences in neutral genetic variation, floral traits, and breeding systems has driven the reproductive isolation, evolution, and diversification of this columnar cactus.

  20. Research on the Strength Variation of Root-Clay Systems under Freeze-Thaw Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the influence of an effective root system of rhizome plants on the reinforcement of slope soil under freeze-thaw conditions. This study focused on the mechanical properties between roots and clay in the root system of four plant species from different regions of China (northeast, northern, central, and southern areas: Setaria viridis, Eleusine indica, Zoysia japonica, and Carex leucochlora. Based on the interfacial friction effects between the plant roots and the soil, pull-out tests and unconfined compressive strength tests were conducted on the reinforced soil system for varying numbers of freeze-thaw cycles. Several stages of the pull-out process of the root system in clay are explicitly proposed based on the interfacial friction test results. The results showed that the friction effect between Zoysia japonica roots and the soil was the most significant and that these roots had the best reinforcement effect. In contrast, the friction and reinforcement effects between Setaria viridis roots and the soil were the worst, and the resulting unconfined compressive strength was the smallest. However, the freeze-thaw resistance ability of the Setaria viridis and soil system was stronger than that of the Zoysia japonica system.

  1. The influence of topographic variation on forest structure in two woody plant communities: A remote sensing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ediriweera, S.; Danaher, T.; Pathirana, S.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: The study aimed to characterise variation in structural attributes of vegetation in relation to variations in topographic position using LIDAR data over landscapes. Area of study: The study was conducted in open canopy eucalypt-dominated forest (Richmond Range National Park-RRNP) and closed canopy subtropical rainforest (Border Ranges National Park-BRNP) in north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. Material and Methods: one metre resolution digital canopy height model (CHM) was extracted from the LIDAR data and used to estimate maximum overstorey height and crown area. LIDAR fractional cover representing the photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic component of canopy was calculated using LIDAR points aggregated into 50 m spatial bins. Potential solar insolation, Topographic Wetness Index (TWI), slope and the elevation were processed using LIDAR derived digital elevation models. Main results: No relationship was found between maximum overstorey height and insolation gradient in the BRNP. Maximum overstorey height decreased with increasing insolation in the RRNP (R2 0.45). Maximum overstorey height increased with increasing TWI in the RRNP. Average crown area decreased with increasing insolation in both study areas. LIDAR fractional cover decreased with increasing insolation (R2 0.54), and increased with increasing TWI (R2 0.57) in the RRNP. Research highlights: The characterization of structural parameters of vegetation in relation to the variation of the topography was possible in eucalyptus dominated open canopy forest. No reportable difference in variation of structural elements of vegetation was detected with topographic variation of subtropical rainforest. (Author)

  2. Role of sulfiredoxin in systemic diseases influenced by oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfiredoxin is a recently discovered member of the oxidoreductases family which plays a crucial role in thiol homoeostasis when under oxidative stress. A myriad of systemic disorders have oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species as the key components in their etiopathogenesis. Recent studies have evaluated the role of this enzyme in oxidative stress mediated diseases such as atherosclerosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a wide array of carcinomas. Its action is responsible for the normal functioning of cells under oxidative stress and the promotion of cell survival in cancerous cells. This review will highlight the cumulative effects of sulfiredoxin in various systemic disorders with a strong emphasis on its target activity and the factors influencing its expression in such conditions.

  3. Inverse Problem and Variation Method to Optimize Cascade Heat Exchange Network in Central Heating System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yin; WEI Zhiyuan; ZHANG Yinping; WANG Xin

    2017-01-01

    Urban heating in northern China accounts for 40% of total building energy usage.In central heating systems,heat is often transfened from heat source to users by the heat network where several heat exchangers arc installed at heat source,substations and terminals respectively.For given overall heating capacity and heat source temperarure,increasing the terminal fluid temperature is an effective way to improve the thermal performance of such cascade heat exchange network for energy saving.In this paper,the mathematical optimization model of the cascade heat exchange network with three-stage heat exchangers in series is established.Aim at maximizing the cold fluid temperature for given hot fluid temperature and overall heating capacity,the optimal heat exchange area distribution and the medium fluids' flow rates are determined through inverse problem and variation method.The preliminary results show that the heat exchange areas should be distributed equally for each heat exchanger.It also indicates that in order to improve the thernmal performance of the whole system,more heat exchange areas should be allocated to the heat exchanger where flow rate difference between two fluids is relatively small.This work is important for guiding the optimization design of practical cascade heating systems.

  4. Morphology and biomass variations in root system of young tomato plants (Solanum sp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez Gil, Marta A.; Fernández, Ana Fita; Ruiz Sánchez, María del C.; Bolarín Jiménez, María del C.

    2016-01-01

    The scarce exploitation of genotypic variability present in plant roots is an attractive breeding choice with regard to abiotic stresses and supports the objective of this work, which is to identify genotypic variation in root system traits of tomato genotypes (Solanum sp.). Thus, five tomato genotypes were studied: the commercial hybrid cultivar Jaguar (S. lycopersicum), Pera, Volgogradiskij and PE-47 entry (S. pennellii), which were collected in Peru, and the interspecific hybrid PeraxPE-47. Plants were grown in hydroponics for 26 days since germination; their roots were extracted and images were digitalized on scanner to evaluate total length, average diameter, the projected area and root length, following the categories per diameter of the whole root system through software Win Rhizo Pro 2003. The dry mass of roots and aerial parts was also recorded. Results indicated that genotypes differed in morphology, length according to diameter, root system spatial configuration and biomass, mainly with respect to the wild salinity resistant species PE-47. The interspecific hybrid PxPE-47 could be used as a rootstock to increase salt tolerance of susceptible cultivars. (author)

  5. Efficacy of variational iteration method for chaotic Genesio system - Classical and multistage approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, S.M.; Noorani, M.S.M.; Hashim, I.

    2009-01-01

    This is a case study of solving the Genesio system by using the classical variational iteration method (VIM) and a newly modified version called the multistage VIM (MVIM). VIM is an analytical technique that grants us a continuous representation of the approximate solution, which allows better information of the solution over the time interval. Unlike its counterpart, numerical techniques, such as the Runge-Kutta method, provide solutions only at two ends of the time interval (with condition that the selected time interval is adequately small for convergence). Furthermore, it offers approximate solutions in a discretized form, making it complicated in achieving a continuous representation. The explicit solutions through VIM and MVIM are compared with the numerical analysis of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method (RK4). VIM had been successfully applied to linear and nonlinear systems of non-chaotic in nature and this had been testified by numerous scientists lately. Our intention is to determine whether VIM is also a feasible method in solving a chaotic system like Genesio. At the same time, MVIM will be applied to gauge its accuracy compared to VIM and RK4. Since, for most situations, the validity domain of the solutions is often an issue, we will consider a reasonably large time frame in our work.

  6. Improved interobserver variation after training of doctors in the Neer system. A randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, S; Bagger, J; Sylvest, A

    2002-01-01

    We investigated whether training doctors to classify proximal fractures of the humerus according to the Neer system could improve interobserver agreement. Fourteen doctors were randomised to two training sessions, or to no training, and asked to categorise 42 unselected pairs of plain radiographs...... of fractures of the proximal humerus according to the Neer system. The mean kappa difference between the training and control groups was 0.30 (95% CI 0.10 to 0.50, p = 0.006). In the training group the mean kappa value for interobserver variation improved from 0.27 (95% CI 0.24 to 0.31) to 0.62 (95% CI 0.......57 to 0.67). The improvement was particularly notable for specialists in whom kappa increased from 0.30 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.37) to 0.79 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.88). These results suggest that formal training in the Neer system is a prerequisite for its use in clinical practice and research....

  7. Does the hybrid light source (LED/laser) influence temperature variation on the enamel surface during 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Menezes, Andressa Nery; da Mota, Ana Carolina Costa; Simões, Alyne; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Lago, Andrea Dias Neves; Ferreira, Leila Soares; Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne Monteiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated how a hybrid light source (LED/laser) influences temperature variation on the enamel surfaces during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching. Effects on the whitening effectiveness and tooth sensitivity were analyzed. Twenty-two volunteers were randomly assigned to two different treatments in a split-mouth experimental model: group 1 (control), 35% HP; group 2 (experimental), 35% HP + LED/laser. Color evaluation was performed before treatment, and 7 and 14 days after completion of bleaching, using a color shade scale. Tooth sensitivity was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS; before, immediately, and 24 hours after bleaching). During the bleaching treatment, thermocouple channels positioned on the tooth surfaces recorded the temperature. Data on color and temperature changes were subjected to statistical analysis (α = 5%). Tooth sensitivity data were evaluated descriptively. Groups 1 and 2 showed mean temperatures (± standard deviation) of 30.7 ± 1.2 °C and 34.1 ± 1.3 °C, respectively. It was found that there were statistically significant differences between the groups, with group 2 showing higher mean variation (P enamel surface. The color change results showed no differences in bleaching between the two treatment groups (P = .177). The variation of the average temperature during the treatments was not statistically associated with color variation (P = .079). Immediately after bleaching, it was found that 36.4% of the subjects in group 2 had mild to moderate sensitivity. In group 1, 45.5% showed moderate sensitivity. In both groups, the sensitivity ceased within 24 hours. Hybrid light source (LED/ laser) influences temperature variation on the enamel surface during 35% HP bleaching and is not related to greater tooth sensitivity.

  8. The messenger matters: Pollinator functional group influences mating system dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer J

    2017-08-01

    The incredible diversity of plant mating systems has fuelled research in evolutionary biology for over a century. Currently, there is broad concern about the impact of rapidly changing pollinator communities on plant populations. Very few studies, however, examine patterns and mechanisms associated with multiple paternity from cross-pollen loads. Often, foraging pollinators collect a mixed pollen load that may result in the deposition of pollen from different sires to receptive stigmas. Coincident deposition of self- and cross-pollen leads to interesting mating system dynamics and has been investigated in numerous species. But, mixed pollen loads often consist of a diversity of cross-pollen and result in multiple sires of seeds within a fruit. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Rhodes, Fant, and Skogen () examine how pollinator identity and spatial isolation influence multiple paternity within fruits of a self-incompatible evening primrose. The authors demonstrate that pollen pool diversity varies between two pollinator types, hawkmoths and diurnal solitary bees. Further, progeny from more isolated plants were less likely to have multiple sires regardless of the pollinator type. Moving forward, studies of mating system dynamics should consider the implications of multiple paternity and move beyond the self- and cross-pollination paradigm. Rhodes et al. () demonstrate the importance of understanding the roles that functionally diverse pollinators play in mating system dynamics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Canister positioning. Influence of fracture system on deposition hole stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, Harald

    2003-11-01

    The study concerns the mechanical behaviour of rock surrounding tunnels and deposition holes in a nuclear waste repository. The mechanical effects of tunnel excavation and deposition hole excavation are investigated by use of a tunnel scale numerical model representing a part of a KBS-3 type repository. The excavation geometry, the initial pre-mining state of stress, and the geometrical features of the fracture system are defined according to conditions that prevail in the TBM tunnel rock mass in Aespoe HRL. Comparisons are made between results obtained without consideration of fractures and results obtained with inclusion of the fracture system. The focus is on the region around the intersection of a tunnel and a deposition hole. A general conclusion is that a fracture system of the type found in the TBM rock mass does not have a decisive influence on the stability of the deposition holes. To estimate the expected extent of spalling, information about other conditions, e.g. the orientation of the initial stresses and the strength properties of the intact rock, is more important than detailed information about the fracture system

  10. The variation of molybdenum isotopes within the weathering system of the black shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianming, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Jian-Ming Zhu 1,2, De-Can Tan 2, Liang Liang 2, Wang Jing21 State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100083, China 2 State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, 550002, China Molybdenum (Mo) stable isotopes have been developed as a tracer to indicate the evolution of the atmospheric and oceanic oxygenation related with continent weathering, and to reveal the extent of ancient oceanic euxinia. Molybdenum isotopic variation within the weathering system of basalts has been studied, and was presented the whole trend with heavier isotopes preferentially removed during weathering processes. However, there are few researches to study the variation of Mo isotopes during black shale weathering, especiall on the behavoir of Mo isotopes within the perfect shales' profiles. Here, the weathering profiles of Mo and selenium(Se)-rich carbonaceous rocks in Enshi southwest Hubei Province were selected. The Mo isotopes was measured on Nu Plasma II's MC-ICP-MS using 97Mo-100Mo double spike, and δ98/95Mo was reported relative to NIST 3134. A comprehensive set of Mo isotopic composition and concentration data from the unweathered, weakly and intensely weathered rocks were collected. The δ98/95Mo in fresh shales (220±248 mg/kg Mo, 1SD, n=41) from Shadi and Yutangba drill cores varies from 0.41‰ to 0.99‰ with an average of 0.67±0.16‰, while the strongly weathered shales (19.9±5.8 mg/kg Mo, 1SD, n=5) from Shadi profiles are isotopically heavier with average δ98/95Mo values of 1.03±0.10‰ (1SD, n=5). The Locally altered shales exposed in a quarry at Yutangba are highly enriched in Mo, varing from 31 to 2377 mg/kg with an average of 428 ±605mg/kg (1SD, n=24), approximately 2 times greater than that in fresh shales samples. These rocks are presented a significant variation in δ98/95Mo values varing from -0.24 ‰ to -3.99 ‰ with

  11. CpDNA haplotype variation reveals strong human influence on oak stands of the Veluwe forest in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiteveld, J.; Koelewijn, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    We examined chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation in 78 oak stands of an important forest complex (the Veluwe) in The Netherlands. Based on historical maps and information oak stands were classified as planted or autochthonous. A genetic study by means of cpDNA haplotype characterisation was carried out

  12. Regulation of the Th1 immune response : the role of IL-23 and the influence of genetic variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetering, Diederik van de

    2010-01-01

    Part 1: The role of IL-23 in inducing IFN-g production and in the initiation of a Th1 response. Part 2: Genetic variations in the type-1 cytokine pathway. Part 3: Treatment options for a genetic deficiency in the type-1 cytokine pathway

  13. The influence of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, G.J.; Sielwa, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    The study is presented of the effects of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube. One model for the turbulent Eddy viscosity and termal Eddy diffusivity developed by CEBECI; NA and HABIB was utilized. The theoretical results agree well with experimental results [pt

  14. Why Does Working Memory Capacity Predict Variation in Reading Comprehension? On the Influence of Mind Wandering and Executive Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Some people are better readers than others, and this variation in comprehension ability is predicted by measures of working memory capacity (WMC). The primary goal of this study was to investigate the mediating role of mind-wandering experiences in the association between WMC and normal individual differences in reading comprehension, as predicted…

  15. Chemical variation in hydrothermal minerals of the Los Humeros geothermal system, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Serrano, R.G. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Insituto de Geofisica

    2002-10-01

    The Los Humeros geothermal system is composed of more than 2200 m of Quaternary altered volcanic rocks and an underlying Cretaceous sedimentary sequence. The low salinity of the fluids discharged at present (Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} concentrations <500 ppm), and the excess steam, indicate that the reservoir contains a mixture of steam and dilute groundwater. Water-rock equilibrium is not attained. Hydrothermal minerals are present in veinlets, vugs, and replacing primary minerals. Three mineral zones are recognized: 1) a shallow argillic zone (<400 m depth), 2) a propylitic zone (ranging between 500 and 1800 m) and 3) a skarn zone (>1800 m). Petrographic examination of cuttings from five wells and temperature data indicate at least two stages of hydrothermal activity. Temperature is the main factor that affects the chemical composition of chlorite, epidote and biotite. Fe{sup 2+} and Al{sup IV} increase in chlorite with temperature [from 1.4 formula position unit (fpu) to 2.8, and from 0.7 to 2.4 fpu, respectively]. The pistacite content of epidote varies from 18 to 33 mol% in high-temperature regions (>270 {sup o}C) and from 13 to 26 mol% in low-temperature regions (<250 {sup 0}C). Biotite displays a slight increase in Al{sup IV} contents (1.55-2.8) and octahedral occupancy (5.93-6.0 fpu) with temperature. Whole rock composition and variations in oxygen fugacity condition are factors that also affect the concentrations of Fe, Al and Mg in the octahedral sites of chlorite, epidote, biotite and amphiboles. Chemical variations observed in alteration minerals at different depths in the Colapso Central-Xalapazco region could be used as indicator of relict physico-chemical conditions in the reservoir, before the present economic exploitation. (author)

  16. Endocranial anatomy of the charadriiformes: sensory system variation and the evolution of wing-propelled diving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Adam Smith

    Full Text Available Just as skeletal characteristics provide clues regarding behavior of extinct vertebrates, phylogenetically-informed evaluation of endocranial morphology facilitates comparisons among extinct taxa and extant taxa with known behavioral characteristics. Previous research has established that endocranial morphology varies across Aves; however, variation of those systems among closely related species remains largely unexplored. The Charadriiformes (shorebirds and allies are an ecologically diverse clade with a comparatively rich fossil record, and therefore, are well suited for investigating interspecies variation, and potential links between endocranial morphology, phylogeny, ecology and other life history attributes. Endocranial endocasts were rendered from high resolution X-ray computed tomography data for 17 charadriiforms (15 extant and two flightless extinct species. Evaluation of endocranial character state changes on a phylogeny for Charadriiformes resulted in identification of characters that vary in taxa with distinct feeding and locomotor ecologies. In comparison with all other charadriiforms, stem and crown clade wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae displayed compressed semicircular canals, and indistinct occipital sinuses and cerebellar fissures. Flightless wing-propelled divers have relatively smaller brains for their body mass and smaller optic lobes than volant pan-alcids. Observed differences between volant and flightless wing-propelled sister taxa are striking given that flightless pan-alcids continue to rely on the flight stroke for underwater propulsion. Additionally, the brain of the Black Skimmer Rynchops niger, a taxon with a unique feeding ecology that involves continuous forward aerial motion and touch-based prey detection used both at day and night, is discovered to be unlike that of any other sampled charadriiform in having an extremely large wulst as well as a small optic lobe and distinct occipital sinus. Notably, the

  17. Radiolarian Indices of Paleoproductivity Variation in the late Pleistocene Benguela Upwelling System, ODP Site 1084

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittniok, B. B.; Lazarus, D. B.; Diester-Haass, L.; Billups, K.; Meyers, P.

    2006-12-01

    Changes in export productivity play a significant role in ocean carbon budgets and global climate change. Proxies for export productivity can be difficult to interpret: benthic foraminifera accumulation rates (BFAR) can be affected by carbonate dissolution in organic-carbon rich sediments; bulk opal can be affected by silica limitation of source waters. Recent work (Lazarus et al. 2006; Mar. Micropal.) has shown that a new index based on radiolarian faunal changes (WADE ratio) correlates well to total organic carbon (TOC) values from the same samples over the long term (latest Miocene-Recent) history of productivity in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). We present new data on variation in export productivity proxies (WADE, TOC, carbonate, radiolarian opal, BFAR) for the last glacial-interglacial cycle from ODP Site 1084, located just offshore from the main coastal upwelling cells of the BUS. Our age model, from mean Quaternary sedimentation rates (Leg 175 Scientific Results), is in accordance with cyclic variation in other climate sensitive parameters (carbonate and color reflectance). Although opal content and radiolarian preservation is only moderate in our samples, WADE values vary significantly and suggest higher productivity during the last glacial, in accordance with current interpretations of BUS history. Radiolarian opal accumulation is also higher during the last glacial, suggesting that silica limitation (opal paradox) conditions did not dominate over this time period. Similar results for bulk opal have been reported from late Quaternary piston cores from the more northerly Congo upwelling region (Schneider et al, 1997; Paleoc.). We conclude that WADE ratios are a useful proxy for late Pleistocene productivity in the BUS at glacial- interglacial time scales.

  18. Secondary elements of blood pH variation can influence the effort effectiveness based on adaptive changes within a group of elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ştefan Adrian; Tomescu, Valeriu; Voidăzan, Septimiu

    2016-01-01

    pH is the direct indicator of the body reaction following the activities performed. Establishing precise correlations between pH and blood biochemical parameters might support the balancing of values during periods of marked physical activity. We conducted a case study in a group of elite rowers. Twelve athletes were included in the study. Monitoring was carried out by collecting biological samples several times a day: in the morning, 80 minutes pre-workout, 12 hours after the last physical effort performed, at two different times, 10 days apart. Determinations were aimed at adapting the reported biochemical parameters depending on the effort performed. The following parameters were monitored: pH, HCO3, pCO2, pO2, BE, SBE, SBC, Ca++, Mg++, LDH, GPT, T-Pro, and Alb. The mean value of pH found in athletes was 7.41±0.024. The value obtained was significantly correlated to biochemical parameters such as BE (2.32±1.79), SBC (1.67±1.45), SBE (2.70±1.75). However, bicarbonate (HCO3) was statistically significantly related with SBE, SBC, SBE, and pO2, but did not present a strong association with the pH value (p=0.094). However, values such as Alb, Ca++, LDH, BE, SBC are related to pH value as a result of variations in the data submitted. The processed data evidence the fact that blood pH, in this case, is significantly influenced by a number of indices that correlate energy system activity, individual adaptation to effort, and the recovery process. The parameters under investigation (SBE, SBC, SBE, CPK, LDH) are associated with pH changes that could confirm the recovery efficiency of the athlete, along with a possible metabolic acidosis/alkalosis.

  19. A variational Bayesian multiple particle filtering scheme for large-dimensional systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-El-Fquih, Boujemaa

    2016-06-14

    This paper considers the Bayesian filtering problem in high-dimensional nonlinear state-space systems. In such systems, classical particle filters (PFs) are impractical due to the prohibitive number of required particles to obtain reasonable performances. One approach that has been introduced to overcome this problem is the concept of multiple PFs (MPFs), where the state-space is split into low-dimensional subspaces and then a separate PF is applied to each subspace. Remarkable performances of MPF-like filters motivated our investigation here into a new strategy that combines the variational Bayesian approach to split the state-space with random sampling techniques, to derive a new computationally efficient MPF. The propagation of each particle in the prediction step of the resulting filter requires generating only a single particle in contrast with standard MPFs, for which a set of (children) particles is required. We present simulation results to evaluate the behavior of the proposed filter and compare its performances against standard PF and a MPF.

  20. A variational Bayesian multiple particle filtering scheme for large-dimensional systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-El-Fquih, Boujemaa; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the Bayesian filtering problem in high-dimensional nonlinear state-space systems. In such systems, classical particle filters (PFs) are impractical due to the prohibitive number of required particles to obtain reasonable performances. One approach that has been introduced to overcome this problem is the concept of multiple PFs (MPFs), where the state-space is split into low-dimensional subspaces and then a separate PF is applied to each subspace. Remarkable performances of MPF-like filters motivated our investigation here into a new strategy that combines the variational Bayesian approach to split the state-space with random sampling techniques, to derive a new computationally efficient MPF. The propagation of each particle in the prediction step of the resulting filter requires generating only a single particle in contrast with standard MPFs, for which a set of (children) particles is required. We present simulation results to evaluate the behavior of the proposed filter and compare its performances against standard PF and a MPF.

  1. Measuring Chemotherapy Appointment Duration and Variation Using Real-Time Location Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barysauskas, Constance M; Hudgins, Gina; Gill, Katie Kupferberg; Camuso, Kristen M; Bagley, Janet; Rozanski, Sheila; Kadish, Sarah

    Clinical schedules drive resource utilization, cost, and patient wait time. Accurate appointment duration allocation ensures appropriate staffing ratios to daily caseloads and maximizes scarce resources. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) infusion appointment duration is adjusted by regimen using a consensus method of experts including pharmacists, nurses, and administrators. Using real-time location system (RTLS), we examined the accuracy of observed appointment duration compared with the scheduled duration. Appointment duration was calculated using RTLS at DFCI between August 1, 2013, and September 30, 2013. Duration was defined as the total time a patient occupied an infusion chair. The top 10 administered infusion regimens were investigated (n = 805). Median observed appointment durations were statistically different than the scheduled durations. Appointment durations were shorter than scheduled 98% (C), 95% (I), and 75% (F) of the time and longer than scheduled 77% (A) and 76% (G) of the time. Fifty-six percent of the longer than scheduled (A) appointments were at least 30 minute longer. RTLS provides reliable and unbiased data to improve schedule accuracy. Replacing consensus with system-based data may improve clinic flow, relieve staff stress, and increase patient satisfaction. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate factors that impact variation in appointment duration.

  2. Variation in soil fertility influences cycle dynamics and crop diversity in shifting cultivation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braga Junqueira, A.; Stomph, T.J.; Clement, C.R.; Struik, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming in Amazonia is practised mostly through shifting cultivation, which under low population pressure is well adapted to the low-fertility soils that predominate in uplands and to the lack of external inputs. In this paper we investigate the effects of soil heterogeneity (in terms of

  3. Influences of multiple memory systems on auditory mental image acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Cebrian, Ana; Janata, Petr

    2010-05-01

    The influence of different memory systems and associated attentional processes on the acuity of auditory images, formed for the purpose of making intonation judgments, was examined across three experiments using three different task types (cued-attention, imagery, and two-tone discrimination). In experiment 1 the influence of implicit long-term memory for musical scale structure was manipulated by varying the scale degree (leading tone versus tonic) of the probe note about which a judgment had to be made. In experiments 2 and 3 the ability of short-term absolute pitch knowledge to develop was manipulated by presenting blocks of trials in the same key or in seven different keys. The acuity of auditory images depended on all of these manipulations. Within individual listeners, thresholds in the two-tone discrimination and cued-attention conditions were closely related. In many listeners, cued-attention thresholds were similar to thresholds in the imagery condition, and depended on the amount of training individual listeners had in playing a musical instrument. The results indicate that mental images formed at a sensory/cognitive interface for the purpose of making perceptual decisions are highly malleable.

  4. Testing a key assumption in animal communication: between-individual variation in female visual systems alters perception of male signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Ronald

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Variation in male signal production has been extensively studied because of its relevance to animal communication and sexual selection. Although we now know much about the mechanisms that can lead to variation between males in the properties of their signals, there is still a general assumption that there is little variation in terms of how females process these male signals. Variation between females in signal processing may lead to variation between females in how they rank individual males, meaning that one single signal may not be universally attractive to all females. We tested this assumption in a group of female wild-caught brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater, a species that uses a male visual signal (e.g. a wingspread display to make its mate-choice decisions. We found that females varied in two key parameters of their visual sensory systems related to chromatic and achromatic vision: cone densities (both total and proportions and cone oil droplet absorbance. Using visual chromatic and achromatic contrast modeling, we then found that this between-individual variation in visual physiology leads to significant between-individual differences in how females perceive chromatic and achromatic male signals. These differences may lead to variation in female preferences for male visual signals, which would provide a potential mechanism for explaining individual differences in mate-choice behavior.

  5. Testing a key assumption in animal communication: between-individual variation in female visual systems alters perception of male signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, Kelly L; Ensminger, Amanda L; Shawkey, Matthew D; Lucas, Jeffrey R; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2017-12-15

    Variation in male signal production has been extensively studied because of its relevance to animal communication and sexual selection. Although we now know much about the mechanisms that can lead to variation between males in the properties of their signals, there is still a general assumption that there is little variation in terms of how females process these male signals. Variation between females in signal processing may lead to variation between females in how they rank individual males, meaning that one single signal may not be universally attractive to all females. We tested this assumption in a group of female wild-caught brown-headed cowbirds ( Molothrus ater ), a species that uses a male visual signal (e.g. a wingspread display) to make its mate-choice decisions. We found that females varied in two key parameters of their visual sensory systems related to chromatic and achromatic vision: cone densities (both total and proportions) and cone oil droplet absorbance. Using visual chromatic and achromatic contrast modeling, we then found that this between-individual variation in visual physiology leads to significant between-individual differences in how females perceive chromatic and achromatic male signals. These differences may lead to variation in female preferences for male visual signals, which would provide a potential mechanism for explaining individual differences in mate-choice behavior. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Within-individual variation in bullfrog vocalizations: implications for a vocally mediated social recognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Mark A

    2004-12-01

    Acoustic signals provide a basis for social recognition in a wide range of animals. Few studies, however, have attempted to relate the patterns of individual variation in signals to behavioral discrimination thresholds used by receivers to discriminate among individuals. North American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) discriminate among familiar and unfamiliar individuals based on individual variation in advertisement calls. The sources, patterns, and magnitudes of variation in eight acoustic properties of multiple-note advertisement calls were examined to understand how patterns of within-individual variation might either constrain, or provide additional cues for, vocal recognition. Six of eight acoustic properties exhibited significant note-to-note variation within multiple-note calls. Despite this source of within-individual variation, all call properties varied significantly among individuals, and multivariate analyses indicated that call notes were individually distinct. Fine-temporal and spectral call properties exhibited less within-individual variation compared to gross-temporal properties and contributed most toward statistically distinguishing among individuals. Among-individual differences in the patterns of within-individual variation in some properties suggest that within-individual variation could also function as a recognition cue. The distributions of among-individual and within-individual differences were used to generate hypotheses about the expected behavioral discrimination thresholds of receivers.

  7. Spatial Structure and Temporal Variation of Fish Communities in the Upper Mississippi River System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chick, John H; Ickes, Brian S; Pegg, Mark A; Barko, Valerie A; Hrabik, Robert A; Herzog, David P

    2005-01-01

    Variation in community composition (presence/absence data) and structure (relative abundance) of Upper Mississippi River fishes was assessed using data from the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program...

  8. The influence of industrial applications on a control system toolbox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.

    1992-01-01

    Vsystem is as an open, advanced software application toolbox for rapidly creating fast, efficient and cost-effective control and data-acquisition systems. Vsystem's modular architecture is designed for single computers, networked computers and workstations running under VAX/VMS or VAX/ELN. At the heart of Vsystem lies Vaccess, a user extendible real-time database and library of access routines. The application database provides the link to the hardware of the application and can be organized as one database or separate database installed in different computers on the network. Vsystem has found application in charged-particle accelerator control, tokamak control, and industrial research, as well as its more recent industrial applications. This paper describes the broad feature of Vsystem and the influence that recent industrial applications have had on the software. (author)

  9. The GMAO Hybrid Ensemble-Variational Atmospheric Data Assimilation System: Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todling, Ricardo; El Akkraoui, Amal

    2018-01-01

    This document describes the implementation and usage of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Hybrid Ensemble-Variational Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (Hybrid EVADAS). Its aim is to provide comprehensive guidance to users of GEOS ADAS interested in experimenting with its hybrid functionalities. The document is also aimed at providing a short summary of the state-of-science in this release of the hybrid system. As explained here, the ensemble data assimilation system (EnADAS) mechanism added to GEOS ADAS to enable hybrid data assimilation applications has been introduced to the pre-existing machinery of GEOS in the most non-intrusive possible way. Only very minor changes have been made to the original scripts controlling GEOS ADAS with the objective of facilitating its usage by both researchers and the GMAO's near-real-time Forward Processing applications. In a hybrid scenario two data assimilation systems run concurrently in a two-way feedback mode such that: the ensemble provides background ensemble perturbations required by the ADAS deterministic (typically high resolution) hybrid analysis; and the deterministic ADAS provides analysis information for recentering of the EnADAS analyses and information necessary to ensure that observation bias correction procedures are consistent between both the deterministic ADAS and the EnADAS. The nonintrusive approach to introducing hybrid capability to GEOS ADAS means, in particular, that previously existing features continue to be available. Thus, not only is this upgraded version of GEOS ADAS capable of supporting new applications such as Hybrid 3D-Var, 3D-EnVar, 4D-EnVar and Hybrid 4D-EnVar, it remains possible to use GEOS ADAS in its traditional 3D-Var mode which has been used in both MERRA and MERRA-2. Furthermore, as described in this document, GEOS ADAS also supports a configuration for exercising a purely ensemble-based assimilation strategy which can be fully decoupled from its variational component. We

  10. Genetic variation of the ghrelin signaling system in females with severe alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Sara; Jerlhag, Elisabet; Hallman, Jarmila; Oreland, Lars; Lissner, Lauren; Strandhagen, Elisabeth; Thelle, Dag S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Engel, Jörgen A

    2010-09-01

    Central ghrelin signaling is required for the rewarding effects of alcohol in mice. Because ghrelin is implied in other addictive behaviors such as eating disorders and smoking, and because there is co-morbidity between these disorders and alcohol dependence, the ghrelin signaling system could be involved in mediating reward in general. Furthermore, in humans, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the pro-ghrelin gene (GHRL) and the ghrelin receptor gene (GHSR) have previously been associated with increased alcohol consumption and increased body weight. Known gender differences in plasma ghrelin levels prompted us to investigate genetic variation of the ghrelin signaling system in females with severe alcohol dependence (n = 113) and in a selected control sample of female low-consumers of alcohol from a large cohort study in southwest Sweden (n = 212). Six tag SNPs in the GHRL (rs696217, rs3491141, rs4684677, rs35680, rs42451, and rs26802) and four tag SNPs in the GHSR (rs495225, rs2232165, rs572169, and rs2948694) were genotyped in all individuals. We found that one GHRL haplotype was associated with reports of paternal alcohol dependence as well as with reports of withdrawal symptoms in the female alcohol-dependent group. Associations with 2 GHSR haplotypes and smoking were also shown. One of these haplotypes was also negatively associated with BMI in controls, while another haplotype was associated with having the early-onset, more heredity-driven, type 2 form of alcohol dependence in the patient group. Taken together, the genes encoding the ghrelin signaling system cannot be regarded as major susceptibility genes for female alcohol dependence, but is, however, involved in paternal heritability and may affect other reward- and energy-related factors such as smoking and BMI.

  11. Variation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supply

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Trevor; Plett, Darren; Conn, Vanessa; Conn, Simon; Rabie, Huwaida; Rafalski, J. Antoni; Dhugga, Kanwarpal; Tester, Mark A.; Kaiser, Brent N.

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the adaptations made by plants in their nitrogen (N) uptake systems in response to reduced N supply is important to the development of cereals with enhanced N uptake efficiency (NUpE). Twenty seven diverse genotypes of maize (Zea mays, L.) were grown in hydroponics for 3 weeks with limiting or adequate N supply. Genotypic response to N was assessed on the basis of biomass characteristics and the activities of the nitrate (NO−3) and ammonium (NH+4) high-affinity transport systems. Genotypes differed greatly for the ability to maintain biomass with reduced N. Although, the N response in underlying biomass and N transport related characteristics was less than that for biomass, there were clear relationships, most importantly, lines that maintained biomass at reduced N maintained net N uptake with no change in size of the root relative to the shoot. The root uptake capacity for both NO−3 and NH+4 increased with reduced N. Transcript levels of putative NO−3 and NH+4 transporter genes in the root tissue of a subset of the genotypes revealed that predominately ZmNRT2 transcript levels responded to N treatments. The correlation between the ratio of transcripts of ZmNRT2.2 between the two N levels and a genotype's ability to maintain biomass with reduced N suggests a role for these transporters in enhancing NUpE. The observed variation in the ability to capture N at low N provides scope for both improving NUpE in maize and also to better understand the N uptake system in cereals.

  12. Variation for N Uptake System in Maize: Genotypic Response to N Supply

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Trevor

    2015-11-09

    An understanding of the adaptations made by plants in their nitrogen (N) uptake systems in response to reduced N supply is important to the development of cereals with enhanced N uptake efficiency (NUpE). Twenty seven diverse genotypes of maize (Zea mays, L.) were grown in hydroponics for 3 weeks with limiting or adequate N supply. Genotypic response to N was assessed on the basis of biomass characteristics and the activities of the nitrate (NO−3) and ammonium (NH+4) high-affinity transport systems. Genotypes differed greatly for the ability to maintain biomass with reduced N. Although, the N response in underlying biomass and N transport related characteristics was less than that for biomass, there were clear relationships, most importantly, lines that maintained biomass at reduced N maintained net N uptake with no change in size of the root relative to the shoot. The root uptake capacity for both NO−3 and NH+4 increased with reduced N. Transcript levels of putative NO−3 and NH+4 transporter genes in the root tissue of a subset of the genotypes revealed that predominately ZmNRT2 transcript levels responded to N treatments. The correlation between the ratio of transcripts of ZmNRT2.2 between the two N levels and a genotype\\'s ability to maintain biomass with reduced N suggests a role for these transporters in enhancing NUpE. The observed variation in the ability to capture N at low N provides scope for both improving NUpE in maize and also to better understand the N uptake system in cereals.

  13. Genetic variation at CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 interacts with smoking status to influence body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freathy, Rachel M; Kazeem, Gbenga R; Morris, Richard W

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with lower body mass index (BMI), and a commonly cited reason for unwillingness to quit smoking is a concern about weight gain. Common variation in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene region (chromosome 15q25) is robustly associated with smoking quantity in smokers, but ......, but its association with BMI is unknown. We hypothesized that genotype would accurately reflect smoking exposure and that, if smoking were causally related to weight, it would be associated with BMI in smokers, but not in never smokers.......Cigarette smoking is associated with lower body mass index (BMI), and a commonly cited reason for unwillingness to quit smoking is a concern about weight gain. Common variation in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene region (chromosome 15q25) is robustly associated with smoking quantity in smokers...

  14. The activity of glutathione S-transferase in hepatopancreas of Procambarus clarkii: seasonal variations and the influence of environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, E; Almar, M M; Hermenegildo, C; Monsalve, E; Romero, F J

    1991-01-01

    1. The glutathione S-transferase activity in hepatopancreas of the American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii after 15 days' acclimatization in tap water aquaria was measured in specimens collected monthly for a whole year, and shows seasonal variation. 2. Previous data on the environmental pollution of Lake Albufera suggest a possible correlation with the activity tested in the different seasons of the year considering the results of non-acclimatized animals.

  15. Factors influencing development of management strategies for the Abou Ali River in Lebanon. I: Spatial variation and land use

    OpenAIRE

    Massoud, MA; El-Fadel, M; Scrimshaw, MDirector; Lester, JN

    2006-01-01

    Surface water bodies are progressively subject to increasing stress as a result of environmentally degrading processes primarily related to anthropogenic activities. This study assesses and examines the impact of land use and anthropogenic activities on the spatial variation in water quality of the Abou Ali River in North Lebanon. It is the first detailed study of its kind in Lebanon and adds to the existing Knowledge by shedding light on a relatively small Mediterranean river in a developing...

  16. Influence of allelic variations in relation to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors on psychopathic traits: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Durand

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Past findings support a relationship between abnormalities in the amygdala and the presence of psychopathic traits. Among other genes and biomarkers relevant to the amygdala, norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors might both play a role in psychopathy due to their association with traits peripheral to psychopathy. The purpose is to examine if allelic variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms related to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors play a role in the display of psychopathic traits and executive functions. Methods Fifty-seven healthy participants from the community provided a saliva sample for SNP sampling of rs5522 and rs5569. Participants then completed the Psychopathic Personality Inventory–Short Form (PPI-SF and the Tower of Hanoi. Results Allelic variations of both rs5522 and rs5569 were significant when compared to PPI-SF total score and the fearless dominance component of the PPI-SF. A significant result was also obtained between rs5522 and the number of moves needed to complete the 5-disk Tower of Hanoi. Conclusion This pilot study offers preliminary results regarding the effect of allelic variations in SNPs related to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors on the presence of psychopathic traits. Suggestions are provided to enhance the reliability and validity of a larger-scale study.

  17. The influence of thermal inertia on Mars' seasonal pressure variation and the effect of the weather component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. E.; Paige, D. A.

    Using a Leighton-Murray type diurnal and seasonal Mars thermal model, we found that it is possible to reproduce the seasonal variation in daily-averaged pressures (approximately 680-890 Pa) measured by Viking Lander 1 (VL1), during years without global dust storms, with a standard deviation of less than 5 Pa. In this simple model, surface CO2, frost condensation, and sublimation rates at each latitude are determined by the net effects of radiation, latent heat, and heat conduction in subsurface soil layers. An inherent assumption of our model is that the seasonal pressure variation is due entirely to the exchange of mass between the atmosphere and polar caps. However, the results of recent Mars GCM modeling have made it clear that there is a significant dynamical contribution to the seasonal pressure variation. This 'weather' component is primarily due to large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation, and its magnitude depends somewhat on the dust content of the atmosphere. The overall form of the theoretical weather component at the location of VL1, as calculated by the AMES GCM, remains the same over the typical range of Mars dust opacities.

  18. Does intraspecific behavioural variation of pollinator species influence pollination? A quantitative study with hummingbirds and a Neotropical shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, P K; Justino, D G; Oliveira, P E

    2016-11-01

    Floral visitors differ in their efficacy as pollinators, and the impact of different pollinator species on pollen flow and plant reproduction has been frequently evaluated. In contrast, the impact of intraspecific behavioural changes on their efficacy as pollinators has seldom been quantified. We studied a self-incompatible shrub Palicourea rigida (Rubiaceae) and its hummingbird pollinators, which adjust their behaviour according to floral resource availability. Fluorescence microscopy was used to access pollen tube growth and incompatibility reaction in pistils after a single visit of territorial or intruder hummingbirds in two populations. To characterise the plant populations and possible differences in resource availability between areas we used a three-term quadrat variance method to detect clusters of floral resources. Within-species variation in foraging behaviour, but not species identity, affected pollinator efficacy. Effectively, hummingbirds intruding into territories deposited more compatible pollen grains on P. rigida stigmas than territory holders in both study areas. Additionally, territory holders deposited more incompatible than compatible pollen grains. Our results imply that intraspecific foraging behaviour variation has consequences for pollination success. Quantifying such variation and addressing the implications of intraspecific variability contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics and consequences of plant-pollinator interactions. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Framework Design and Influencing Factor Analysis of a Water Environmental Functional Zone-Based Effluent Trading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Zhaoxing; Li, Shuang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional effluent trading systems is questionable due to their neglect of seasonal hydrological variation and the creation of upstream hot spots within a watershed. Besides, few studies have been conducted to distinguish the impacts of each influencing factor on effluent trading systems outputs. In this study, a water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems framework was configured and a comprehensive analysis of its influencing factors was conducted. This proposed water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems was then applied for the control of chemical oxygen demand in the Beiyun River watershed, Beijing, China. Optimal trading results highlighted the integration of water quality constraints and different hydrological seasons, especially for downstream dischargers. The optimal trading of each discharger, in terms of pollutant reduction load and abatement cost, is greatly influenced by environmental and political factors such as background water quality, the location of river assessment points, and tradable discharge permits. In addition, the initial permit allowance has little influence on the market as a whole but does impact the individual discharger. These results provide information that is critical to understanding the impact of policy design on the functionality of an effluent trading systems.

  20. Framework Design and Influencing Factor Analysis of a Water Environmental Functional Zone-Based Effluent Trading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Zhaoxing; Li, Shuang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional effluent trading systems is questionable due to their neglect of seasonal hydrological variation and the creation of upstream hot spots within a watershed. Besides, few studies have been conducted to distinguish the impacts of each influencing factor on effluent trading systems outputs. In this study, a water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems framework was configured and a comprehensive analysis of its influencing factors was conducted. This proposed water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems was then applied for the control of chemical oxygen demand in the Beiyun River watershed, Beijing, China. Optimal trading results highlighted the integration of water quality constraints and different hydrological seasons, especially for downstream dischargers. The optimal trading of each discharger, in terms of pollutant reduction load and abatement cost, is greatly influenced by environmental and political factors such as background water quality, the location of river assessment points, and tradable discharge permits. In addition, the initial permit allowance has little influence on the market as a whole but does impact the individual discharger. These results provide information that is critical to understanding the impact of policy design on the functionality of an effluent trading systems.

  1. Emergent nested systems a theory of understanding and influencing complex systems as well as case studies in urban systems

    CERN Document Server

    Walloth, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a theory as well as methods to understand and to purposively influence complex systems. It suggests a theory of complex systems as nested systems, i. e. systems that enclose other systems and that are simultaneously enclosed by even other systems. According to the theory presented, each enclosing system emerges through time from the generative activities of the systems they enclose. Systems are nested and often emerge unplanned, and every system of high dynamics is enclosed by a system of slower dynamics. An understanding of systems with faster dynamics, which are always guided by systems of slower dynamics, opens up not only new ways to understanding systems, but also to effectively influence them. The aim and subject of this book is to lay out these thoughts and explain their relevance to the purposive development of complex systems, which are exemplified in case studies from an urban system. The interested reader, who is not required to be familiar with system-theoretical concepts or wit...

  2. Spatio-temporal variation of fish taxonomic composition in a South-East Asian flood-pulse system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Heng; Chevalier, Mathieu; Laffaille, Pascal; Lek, Sovan

    2017-01-01

    The Tonle Sap Lake (TSL) is a flood-pulse system. It is the largest natural lake in South-East Asia and constitutes one of the largest fisheries over the world, supporting the livelihood of million peoples. Nonetheless, the Mekong River Basin is changing rapidly due to accelerating water infrastructure development (hydropower, irrigation, flood control, and water supply) and climate change, bringing considerable modifications to the annual flood-pulse of the TSL. Such modifications are expected to have strong impacts on fish biodiversity and abundance. This paper aims to characterize the spatio-temporal variations of fish taxonomic composition and to highlights the underlying determinants of these variations. For this purpose, we used data collected from a community catch monitoring program conducted at six sites during 141 weeks, covering two full hydrological cycles. For each week, we estimated beta diversity as the total variance of the site-by-species community matrix and partitioned it into Local Contribution to Beta Diversity (LCBD) and Species Contribution to Beta Diversity (SCBD). We then performed multiple linear regressions to determine whether species richness, species abundances and water level explained the temporal variation in the contribution of site and species to beta diversity. Our results indicate strong temporal variation of beta diversity due to differential contributions of sites and species to the spatial variation of fish taxonomic composition. We further found that the direction, the shape and the relative effect of species richness, abundances and water level on temporal variation in LCBD and SCBD values greatly varied among sites, thus suggesting spatial variation in the processes leading to temporal variation in community composition. Overall, our results suggest that fish taxonomic composition is not homogeneously distributed over space and time and is likely to be impacted in the future if the flood-pulse dynamic of the system is

  3. Influence of genetic variation on plasma protein levels in older adults using a multi-analyte panel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungeun Kim

    Full Text Available Proteins, widely studied as potential biomarkers, play important roles in numerous physiological functions and diseases. Genetic variation may modulate corresponding protein levels and point to the role of these variants in disease pathophysiology. Effects of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within a gene were analyzed for corresponding plasma protein levels using genome-wide association study (GWAS genotype data and proteomic panel data with 132 quality-controlled analytes from 521 Caucasian participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort. Linear regression analysis detected 112 significant (Bonferroni threshold p=2.44×10(-5 associations between 27 analytes and 112 SNPs. 107 out of these 112 associations were tested in the Indiana Memory and Aging Study (IMAS cohort for replication and 50 associations were replicated at uncorrected p<0.05 in the same direction of effect as those in the ADNI. We identified multiple novel associations including the association of rs7517126 with plasma complement factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1 level at p<1.46×10(-60, accounting for 40 percent of total variation of the protein level. We serendipitously found the association of rs6677604 with the same protein at p<9.29×10(-112. Although these two SNPs were not in the strong linkage disequilibrium, 61 percent of total variation of CFHR1 was accounted for by rs6677604 without additional variation by rs7517126 when both SNPs were tested together. 78 other SNP-protein associations in the ADNI sample exceeded genome-wide significance (5×10(-8. Our results confirmed previously identified gene-protein associations for interleukin-6 receptor, chemokine CC-4, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and angiotensinogen, although the direction of effect was reversed in some cases. This study is among the first analyses of gene-protein product relationships integrating multiplex-panel proteomics and targeted genes extracted from a GWAS

  4. Modeling of a solar photovoltaic water pumping system under the influence of panel cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinathambi Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of a solar photovoltaic water pumping system was improved by maintaining the cell temperature in the range between 30°C and 40°C. Experiments have been conducted on a laboratory experimental set-up installed with 6.4 m2 solar panel (by providing air cooling either on the top surface or over the beneath surface of the panel to operate a centrifugal pump with a rated capacity of 0.5 HP. The performance characteristics of the photovoltaic panel (such as, cell temperature, photovoltaic panel output, and photovoltaic efficiency, pump performance characteristics (such as pump efficiency and discharge, and system performance characteristics are observed with reference to solar irradiation, ambient temperature and wind velocity. A thermal model has been developed to predict the variations of photovoltaic cell temperature based on the measured glass and tedlar temperatures. The influences of cell temperature and solar irradiation on the performance of the system are described. The results concluded that cooling of photovoltaic panel on beneath surface has maintained the cell temperature in the range between 30°C and 40°C and improved the overall efficiency by about 1.8% when compared to the system without panel cooling.

  5. The Effect of Intertalker Variations on Acoustic-Perceptual Mapping in Cantonese and Mandarin Tone Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Zhang, Caicai; Zheng, Hong-Ying; Minett, James W.; Wang, William S.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the impact of intertalker variations on the process of mapping acoustic variations on tone categories in two different tone languages. Method: Pitch stimuli manipulated from four voice ranges were presented in isolation through a blocked-talker design. Listeners were instructed to identify the stimuli that they…

  6. Spatial variation of electrode position in bioelectrochemical treatment system: Design consideration for azo dye remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruva, Dileep Kumar; Shanthi Sravan, J; Butti, Sai Kishore; Annie Modestra, J; Venkata Mohan, S

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, three bio-electrochemical treatment systems (BET) were designed with variations in cathode electrode placement [air exposed (BET1), partially submerged (BET2) and fully submerged (BET3)] to evaluate azo-dye based wastewater treatment at three dye loading concentrations (50, 250 and 500 mg L -1 ). Highest dye decolorization (94.5 ± 0.4%) and COD removal (62.2 ± 0.8%) efficiencies were observed in BET3 (fully submerged electrodes) followed by BET1 and BET2, while bioelectrogenic activity was highest in BET1 followed by BET2 and BET3. It was observed that competition among electron acceptors (electrode, dye molecules and intermediates) critically regulated the fate of bio-electrogenesis to be higher in BET1 and dye removal higher in BET3. Maximum half-cell potentials in BET3 depict higher electron acceptance by electrodes utilized for dye degradation. Study infers that spatial positioning of electrodes in BET3 is more suitable towards dye remediation, which can be considered for scaling-up/designing a treatment plant for large-scale industrial applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermodynamics of Micro- and Nano-Systems Driven by Periodic Temperature Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Brandner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a general framework for analyzing the thermodynamics of small systems that are driven by both a periodic temperature variation and some external parameter modulating their energy. This setup covers, in particular, periodic micro- and nano-heat engines. In a first step, we show how to express total entropy production by properly identified time-independent affinities and currents without making a linear response assumption. In linear response, kinetic coefficients akin to Onsager coefficients can be identified. Specializing to a Fokker-Planck-type dynamics, we show that these coefficients can be expressed as a sum of an adiabatic contribution and one reminiscent of a Green-Kubo expression that contains deviations from adiabaticity. Furthermore, we show that the generalized kinetic coefficients fulfill an Onsager-Casimir-type symmetry tracing back to microscopic reversibility. This symmetry allows for nonidentical off-diagonal coefficients if the driving protocols are not symmetric under time reversal. We then derive a novel constraint on the kinetic coefficients that is sharper than the second law and provides an efficiency-dependent bound on power. As one consequence, we can prove that the power vanishes at least linearly when approaching Carnot efficiency. We illustrate our general framework by explicitly working out the paradigmatic case of a Brownian heat engine realized by a colloidal particle in a time-dependent harmonic trap subject to a periodic temperature profile. This case study reveals inter alia that our new general bound on power is asymptotically tight.

  8. Contribution of benthic microalgae to the temporal variation in phytoplankton assemblages in a macrotidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Fariñas, Tania; Ribeiro, Lourenço; Soudant, Dominique; Belin, Catherine; Bacher, Cédric; Lampert, Luis; Barillé, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Suspended marine benthic microalgae in the water column reflect the close relationship between the benthic and pelagic components of coastal ecosystems. In this study, a 12-year phytoplankton time-series was used to investigate the contribution of benthic microalgae to the pelagic system at a site along the French-Atlantic coast. Furthermore, all taxa identified were allocated into different growth forms in order to study their seasonal patterns. The highest contribution of benthic microalgae was observed during the winter period, reaching up to 60% of the carbon biomass in the water column. The haptobenthic growth form showed the highest contribution in terms of biomass, dominant in the fall-winter period when the turbidity and the river flow were high. The epipelic growth form did not follow any seasonal pattern. The epiphytic diatom Licmophora was most commonly found during summer. As benthic microalgae were found in the water column throughout the year, the temporal variation detected in the structure of pelagic assemblages in a macrotidal ecosystem was partly derived from the differentiated contribution of several benthic growth forms. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  9. Phase diagram of a symmetric electron–hole bilayer system: a variational Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajesh O.; Saini, L. K.; Prasad Bahuguna, Bhagwati

    2018-05-01

    We study the phase diagram of a symmetric electron–hole bilayer system at absolute zero temperature and in zero magnetic field within the quantum Monte Carlo approach. In particular, we conduct variational Monte Carlo simulations for various phases, i.e. the paramagnetic fluid phase, the ferromagnetic fluid phase, the anti-ferromagnetic Wigner crystal phase, the ferromagnetic Wigner crystal phase and the excitonic phase, to estimate the ground-state energy at different values of in-layer density and inter-layer spacing. Slater–Jastrow style trial wave functions, with single-particle orbitals appropriate for different phases, are used to construct the phase diagram in the (r s , d) plane by finding the relative stability of trial wave functions. At very small layer separations, we find that the fluid phases are stable, with the paramagnetic fluid phase being particularly stable at and the ferromagnetic fluid phase being particularly stable at . As the layer spacing increases, we first find that there is a phase transition from the ferromagnetic fluid phase to the ferromagnetic Wigner crystal phase when d reaches 0.4 a.u. at r s   =  20, and before there is a return to the ferromagnetic fluid phase when d approaches 1 a.u. However, for r s   Wigner crystal is stable over the considered range of r s and d. We also find that as r s increases, the critical layer separations for Wigner crystallization increase.

  10. Perspective: Maximum caliber is a general variational principle for dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Purushottam D; Wagoner, Jason; Weistuch, Corey; Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Dill, Ken A

    2018-01-07

    We review here Maximum Caliber (Max Cal), a general variational principle for inferring distributions of paths in dynamical processes and networks. Max Cal is to dynamical trajectories what the principle of maximum entropy is to equilibrium states or stationary populations. In Max Cal, you maximize a path entropy over all possible pathways, subject to dynamical constraints, in order to predict relative path weights. Many well-known relationships of non-equilibrium statistical physics-such as the Green-Kubo fluctuation-dissipation relations, Onsager's reciprocal relations, and Prigogine's minimum entropy production-are limited to near-equilibrium processes. Max Cal is more general. While it can readily derive these results under those limits, Max Cal is also applicable far from equilibrium. We give examples of Max Cal as a method of inference about trajectory distributions from limited data, finding reaction coordinates in bio-molecular simulations, and modeling the complex dynamics of non-thermal systems such as gene regulatory networks or the collective firing of neurons. We also survey its basis in principle and some limitations.

  11. Perspective: Maximum caliber is a general variational principle for dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Purushottam D.; Wagoner, Jason; Weistuch, Corey; Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Dill, Ken A.

    2018-01-01

    We review here Maximum Caliber (Max Cal), a general variational principle for inferring distributions of paths in dynamical processes and networks. Max Cal is to dynamical trajectories what the principle of maximum entropy is to equilibrium states or stationary populations. In Max Cal, you maximize a path entropy over all possible pathways, subject to dynamical constraints, in order to predict relative path weights. Many well-known relationships of non-equilibrium statistical physics—such as the Green-Kubo fluctuation-dissipation relations, Onsager's reciprocal relations, and Prigogine's minimum entropy production—are limited to near-equilibrium processes. Max Cal is more general. While it can readily derive these results under those limits, Max Cal is also applicable far from equilibrium. We give examples of Max Cal as a method of inference about trajectory distributions from limited data, finding reaction coordinates in bio-molecular simulations, and modeling the complex dynamics of non-thermal systems such as gene regulatory networks or the collective firing of neurons. We also survey its basis in principle and some limitations.

  12. Competition and equilibria in electricity markets based on two-settlement system: A conjectural variation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, David

    This dissertation studies electricity markets based on two-settlement systems and applies the concept of conjectural variation (CV) as a tool for representing different levels of competitiveness in the market. Some recent theoretical works are addressed to support the use of CV as a solution concept. A notion of consistency is introduced to make the level of competitiveness of the market endogenous, and allows finding consistent CV equilibria and the corresponding conditions for existence of equilibria. First, a case is studied in which firms hold exogenous levels of forward commitments. Then, backward induction and sub-game perfection are used to solve sequentially for the spot and forward market equilibrium. This allows analyzing how firms take positions in the forward market, based on considering their later impact on the spot market. It is concluded that positions taken in the forward market depend largely on firms expectations about the competitiveness of both the spot and the forward market. Forward markets are welfare enhancing even if they are not as competitive as the associated spot market as long as they are not too oligopolistie. The above formulation is used to model a dynamic scenario to analyze market stability, linking this research to Dr. Alvarado's earlier research on market stability. This brings about interesting trade offs between market power and market stability.

  13. Influence of Different Ceramic Systems on Marginal Misfit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, S P; Neves, A C C; Vitti, R; Amaral, M; Henrique, M N; Silva-Concílio, L R

    2017-09-01

    the aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal misfit at the interface between a ceramic coping and its abutment. Twenty-four specimens were made with solid abutments. The specimens were divided into 3 groups according to the ceramic system (n = 8): Lava (zirconia), IPS e.max Press (lithium disilicate), and IPS Empress Esthetic (leucite). All copings were cemented with resin luting agent (RelyX U200) and the marginal misfit were evaluated at 3 different times: initial, after cementation, and after mechanical cycling using a linear measuring microscope (Measuring Microscope STM-Olympus) at a magnification of 40x. All specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (1 million cycles) by an universal testing machine (Instron 8800). The results were statistically analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Student's t-test (α = 0.05). all groups showed an increase in the marginal misfit after cementation. The lithium disilicate group demonstrated the lowest interacial gap values at each evaluation (p = 0.001). The zirconia and leucite groups showed similar interfacial gap values (initial, p = 0.244; and post cementation, p = 0.751). the cementation increase the marginal misfit, but the mechanical cycling did not influence the marginal misfit of the ceramics systems evaluated. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  14. Filter aids influence on pressure drop across a filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, S.; Rashid, M.; Nurnadia, A.; Ammar, M. R.; Hasfalina, C. M.

    2017-06-01

    Filter aids is commonly used to reduce pressure drop across air filtration system as it helps to increase the efficiency of filtration of accumulated filter cake. Filtration velocity is one of the main parameters that affect the performance of filter aids material. In this study, a formulated filter aids consisting of PreKot™ and activated carbon mixture (designated as PrekotAC) was tested on PTFE filter media under various filtration velocities of 5, 6, and 8 m/min at a constant material loading of 0.2 mg/mm2. Results showed that pressure drop is highly influenced by filtration velocity where higher filtration velocity leads to a higher pressure drop across the filter cake. It was found that PrekotAC performed better in terms of reducing the pressure drop across the filter cake even at the highest filtration velocity. The diversity in different particle size distribution of non-uniform particle size in the formulated PrekotAC mixture presents a higher permeability causes a lower pressure drop across the accumulated filter cake. The finding suggests that PrekotAC is a promising filter aids material that helps reducing the pressure drop across fabric filtration system.

  15. Quantitative analysis of structural variations in corpus callosum in adults with multiple system atrophy (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debanjali; Sinha, Neelam; Saini, Jitender

    2017-03-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare, non-curable, progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects nervous system and movement, poses a considerable diagnostic challenge to medical researchers. Corpus callosum (CC) being the largest white matter structure in brain, enabling inter-hemispheric communication, quantification of callosal atrophy may provide vital information at the earliest possible stages. The main objective is to identify the differences in CC structure for this disease, based on quantitative analysis on the pattern of callosal atrophy. We report results of quantification of structural changes in regional anatomical thickness, area and length of CC between patient-groups with MSA with respect to healthy controls. The method utilizes isolating and parcellating the mid-sagittal CC into 100 segments along the length - measuring the width of each segment. It also measures areas within geometrically defined five callosal compartments of the well-known Witelson, and Hofer-Frahma schemes. For quantification, statistical tests are performed on these different callosal measurements. From the statistical analysis, it is concluded that compared to healthy controls, width is reduced drastically throughout CC for MSA group and as well as changes in area and length are also significant for MSA. The study is further extended to check if any significant difference in thickness is found between the two variations of MSA, Parkinsonian MSA and Cerebellar MSA group, using the same methodology. However area and length of this two sub-MSA group, no substantial difference is obtained. The study is performed on twenty subjects for each control and MSA group, who had T1-weighted MRI.

  16. Space Transportation System Availability Requirements and Its Influencing Attributes Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Russel E.; Adams, TImothy C.

    2008-01-01

    It is essential that management and engineering understand the need for an availability requirement for the customer's space transportation system as it enables the meeting of his needs, goal, and objectives. There are three types of availability, e.g., operational availability, achieved availability, or inherent availability. The basic definition of availability is equal to the mean uptime divided by the sum of the mean uptime plus the mean downtime. The major difference is the inclusiveness of the functions within the mean downtime and the mean uptime. This paper will address tIe inherent availability which only addresses the mean downtime as that mean time to repair or the time to determine the failed article, remove it, install a replacement article and verify the functionality of the repaired system. The definitions of operational availability include the replacement hardware supply or maintenance delays and other non-design factors in the mean downtime. Also with inherent availability the mean uptime will only consider the mean time between failures (other availability definitions consider this as mean time between maintenance - preventive and corrective maintenance) that requires the repair of the system to be functional. It is also essential that management and engineering understand all influencing attributes relationships to each other and to the resultant inherent availability requirement. This visibility will provide the decision makers with the understanding necessary to place constraints on the design definition for the major drivers that will determine the inherent availability, safety, reliability, maintainability, and the life cycle cost of the fielded system provided the customer. This inherent availability requirement may be driven by the need to use a multiple launch approach to placing humans on the moon or the desire to control the number of spare parts required to support long stays in either orbit or on the surface of the moon or mars. It is

  17. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D.

    2011-01-01

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in 1 H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  18. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D., E-mail: bernard.lemire@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, School of Molecular and Systems Medicine (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  19. Development of a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system for the Seto Island Sea, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, K.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2016-12-01

    By optimally combined ocean models with observation data, numerical oceanic reanalysis and forecast systems allow us to predict the ocean more precisely. In general, data assimilation is exploited to prepare the initial condition for the forecast. This technique has widely been employed in atmospheric prediction, whereas oceanic prediction lags behind weather forecast. Accurate oceanic prediction systems have been demanded for operational purposes such as for fisheries, vessel navigation, marine construction, offshore platform management, marine monitoring, etc. In particular, in crowded harbors and estuaries including the Seto Inland Sea (SIS), Japan, data assimilation has seldom been adapted because data from satellites and Argo floats essential to successful oceanic predictions is desperately limited. In addition, although static data assimilation, typically three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR), is computationally cheap and statistically optimal, but is not physically balanced. For instance, 3DVAR is known to modify velocity and density fields merely mathematically, yet it does not adequately consider quasi-geostrophic balance, which is generally true in most cases. In the present study, we develop a 3DVAR system for Regional Oceanic Modeling Systems (ROMS) and apply to the high-resolution SIS model in a double nested configuration (Kosako et al., 2015). The SIS is the largest estuary in Japan with a number of autonomous in-situ monitoring of vertical profiles of temperature and salinity, tens of tidal gages, along with continuous surface current measurement using HF radars. We first present a theoretical framework of the 3DVAR algorithm by considering geostrophic and thermal-wind balance to find plausible relationships among physical variables to avoid undesirable modifications. Subsequently, the developed 3DVAR is coupled with the SIS ROMS model to compare the model outcomes against some observation data. The 3DVAR ROMS model for the SIS

  20. Influence of inter-annual