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Sample records for systemic radiation doses

  1. Study of national registration systems for health records of radiation workers. National radiation dose registration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Haruo; Kanda, Keiji

    1999-01-01

    A national radiation dose registration system is proposed in this paper. In Japan, only one radiation dose registration system is partly effective. It is applied for workers in nuclear power plants which are under control of regulatory laws for nuclear reactors. The total system was proposed previously by the Committee for Compensation Claims of Nuclear Accidents. The reason for the delay in establishing a registration system for all radiation workers is supposedly a lack of effort to adjust differences among items in radiation protection laws and the promotion of public acceptance to atomic power. Items about dose recordings, record keeping and dose-record reporting in all of the radiation regulatory laws are compared to each other, and items were extracted for revision. (author)

  2. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin-woo; Jeong, Kyu-hwan; Kim, Jong-il; Im, Chae-wan

    2015-01-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  3. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-woo [KAERI - Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup-si (Korea, Republic of); Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyu-hwan [KINS - Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon-Si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-il [Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Im, Chae-wan [REMTECH, Seoul-Si (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  4. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  5. Radiation leakage dose from Elekta electron collimation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Garrett M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L

    2016-09-08

    This study provided baseline data required for a greater project, whose objective was to design a new Elekta electron collimation system having significantly lighter electron applicators with equally low out-of field leakage dose. Specifically, off-axis dose profiles for the electron collimation system of our uniquely configured Elekta Infinity accelerator with the MLCi2 treatment head were measured and calculated for two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate and document the out-of-field leakage dose in the patient plane and 2) to validate the dose distributions calculated using a BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) model for out-of-field dose profiles. Off-axis dose profiles were measured in a water phantom at 100 cm SSD for 1 and 2 cm depths along the in-plane, cross-plane, and both diagonal axes using a cylindrical ionization chamber with the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators and 7, 13, and 20 MeV beams. Dose distributions were calculated using a previously developed BEAMnrc MC model of the Elekta Infinity accelerator for the same beam energies and applicator sizes and compared with measurements. Measured results showed that the in-field beam flatness met our acceptance criteria (± 3% on major and ±4% on diagonal axes) and that out-of-field mean and maximum percent leakage doses in the patient plane met acceptance criteria as specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Cross-plane out-of-field dose profiles showed greater leakage dose than in-plane profiles, attributed to the curved edges of the upper X-ray jaws and multileaf collimator. Mean leakage doses increased with beam energy, being 0.93% and 0.85% of maximum central axis dose for the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators, respectively, at 20 MeV. MC calculations predicted the measured dose to within 0.1% in most profiles outside the radiation field; however, excluding model-ing of nontrimmer applicator components led to calculations exceeding measured data by as much as 0.2% for some regions

  6. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  7. Optimization of paediatric radiation doses with CR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatelli, Giovanna; Mazzocchi, S.; Ciccarone, A.; Fonda, C.; De Otto, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection of paediatric patients is a primary objective in paediatric radiology due the higher life expectance of the little patients undergoing radiology examinations and due to the higher radiosensitivity of tissues. Aim of this work is the study of the optimization process in paediatric doses needed after the recent installation of a new Computed Radiography System in the Radiology of the Meyer paediatric Hospital, in Florence, Italy. This process involves both the use of new dedicated digitizer (Agfa DX-S) and elaboration software (Agfa NX2.0). The choice of the DX-S systems has been performed in consideration of high resolution (Scanhead technology - DirectriX detector), image sharpness and portability of the cassettes that make DX-S ideal in paediatric applications as neonatal intensive care. The NX software for image processing has been installed with the 'Paediatric' licence that optimizes paediatric images especially for exposures of premature newborns. Paediatric NX automatically selects the paediatric age group, depending on the patient's birth date. Each age group contains enhanced algorithms and settings adapted to age group, for optimized visibility of fine details. All the CR system has been accepted by mean of quality control acceptance tool AGFA AutoQC2, and all the automatic exposure control devices installed on radiographic devices were previously calibrated in accordance to literature with signal to noise vs dose considerations [S. Mazzocchi et al. 'AEC set-up optimization with computed radiography imaging' Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 117, 169-173 2005]. Paediatric patients were then divided into age-weight categories and the Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) were calculated by output x-rays measurements. ESD for thorax examinations were correlated to the image evaluations performed by experienced radiologists following European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images in paediatrics (EUR 16261, European

  8. Whole body exposure to low-dose γ-radiation enhances the antioxidant defense system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, C.M.; Avti, P.K.; Khanduja, K.L.; Sharma, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that the extent of cellular damage by low- radiation dose is proportional to the effects observed at high radiation dose as per the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis. However, this notion may not be true at low-dose radiation exposure in the living system. Recent evidence suggest that the living organisms do not respond to ionizing radiations in a linear manner in the low dose range 0.01-0.5Gy and rather restore the homeostasis both in vivo and in vitro by normal physiological mechanisms such as cellular and DNA repair processes, immune reactions, antioxidant defense, adaptive responses, activation of immune functions, stimulation of growth etc. In this study, we have attempted to find the critical radiation dose range and the post irradiation period during which the antioxidant defense systems in the lungs, liver and kidneys remain stimulated in these organs after whole body exposure of the animals to low-dose radiation

  9. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will causes damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 , displacement damage in silicon in terms of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence and fluence of thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper design of the system, results of measurements and comparison of measured integrated doses and fluences with predictions from FLUKA simulation will be shown.

  10. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P S; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will cause damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 and fluences of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutrons and thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper measurements collected during two years of ATLAS data taking are presented and compared to predictions from radiation background simulations.

  11. A system of dose-effects relationships for the Northern wildlife: radiation protection criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    The key issue in the assessment system for radiation protection of wildlife is the establishment of a set of dose-effects relationships for reference representatives of natural biota, based on scientific data from a range of doses and a range of radiation effects. Risks to natural populations in particular habitats can be evaluated from a comparison of estimated doses to biota with the scale of dose-effects relationships for different types of biota. Within the frame of the EC Project EPIC 'Environmental Protection from Ionizing Contaminants' 2000-2003), a database has been created, which include the published and unpublished data relating to dose effects relationships for flora and fauna in the Northern and Arctic areas. The EPIC database contains information based exclusively on Russian/FSU experimental and field studies; chronic/lifetime exposures were the focus of the work, owing to the fact that such exposures are the most typical in radiological assessments for biota. In total, the EPIC database radiation effects on biota contains about 1600 records from 440 publications, including datasets on terrestrial and aquatic animals, plants, soil fauna and microorganisms. The EPIC database information cover a very wide range of radiation dose rates to wild flora and fauna: from below 10 -5 Gy d -1 up to more than 1 Gy d -1 . A great variety of radiation effects are registered in the EPIC database, from stimulation at low doses up to death from acute radiation syndrome at high doses. From data, compiled in the EPIC database, the dose-effects relationships were derived for different types of northern organisms. The system of dose-effects relationships forms the scale of severity of radiation effects at increasing levels of chronic radiation exposure. With its focus on the effects of low-to-moderate chronic exposure, the system of dose effects relationships provides a useful tool for scientists and decision-makers to establish safety standards for protecting the

  12. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  13. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  14. Optimum design for the primary cooling system in BWRs to control shutdown radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Saito, Tatsuya; Uchida, Shunsuke; Izumiya, Masakiyo.

    1982-01-01

    The reduction of radiation dose rate at the time of shutdown is an important task for smoothly performing the regular inspection and maintenance works in nuclear power plants as the number of those plants in operation has increased. Hitachi Ltd. has investigated the industrially applicable measures to reduce dose rate to suppress the exposure dose per year in 1100 MWe class BWR nuclear power plants below 200 Man-Rem. The exposure dose in normal checking works during a regular inspection is regarded to be macroscopically dependent on the dose rate of piping in recirculation system. Thus, it was found that the above target can be achieved by suppressing the dose rate on piping surface to 30 mR/h. For further reduction if iron crud and 60 Co ions contributing to the increase of dose rate, in addition to the oxygen injection into the feed water system and the duplicated condensate purification system, the use of corrosion-resistant steel and low cobalt material has been attempted. However, high temperature water to be filtrated can not be passed through the purification system because it employs ion exchange resin. Therefore, the optimum capacity is selected for the purification system in view of the reduction of dose rate and plant thermal efficiency. Hitachi Ltd. recommends the application of this system, considering the evaluation of contribution by the code predicting dose rate increase and estimating economy. The above measures will achieve the exposure dose target of 200 Man-Rem/year. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  16. The influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiecinska, T.

    1986-11-01

    Recent results concerning possible beneficial effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological systems are summarized. It is also pointed out on the basis of existing evidence that harmful effects on living organisms take place not only in the case of excess but also in the case of deficiency of ionizing radiation. Possibility of using radio-enhanced ultralow luminescence for studying hormesis phenomena is discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  17. Optimum power of radiation dose in X ray television systems of flaw inspection in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denbnovetskii, S.V.; Troitskii, V.A.; Belyi, N.G.; Grom, V.S.; Kuz'micheva, N.V.; Leshchishin, A.V.; Mikhailov, V.N.; Shutenko, O.V.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present the experimental dose characteristics of a x ray television system based on x ray vidicons with the diameter of the working field of 900 mm which operate in the continuous and pulsed conditions with the longer time of cumulation of radiation images on the target of the x ray vidicon. For each type of the inspected material, its thickness, and cumulation time, the dose characteristics were used to determine the optimum power of the exposure dose ensuring the maximum signal/noise ratio and detectability of the defects at the output of the system. (author)

  18. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  19. Code system to compute radiation dose in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Davis, J.L.; Tang, J.S.; Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo photon transport code and a code using Monte Carlo integration of a point kernel have been revised to incorporate human phantom models for an adult female, juveniles of various ages, and a pregnant female at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, in addition to the adult male used earlier. An analysis code has been developed for deriving recommended values of specific absorbed fractions of photon energy. The computer code system and calculational method are described, emphasizing recent improvements in methods

  20. The EOS imaging system: Workflow and radiation dose in scoliosis examinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Bo; Torfing, Trine; Jespersen, Stig

    Introduction The EOS imaging system is a biplane slot beam scanner capable of full body scans at low radiation dose and without geometrical distortion. It was implemented in our department primo 2012 and all scoliosis examinations are now performed in EOS. The system offers improved possibility...... The purpose of the study was to evaluate workflow defined as scheduled time pr. examination and radiation dose in scoliosis examinations in EOS compared to conventional x-ray evaluation. Materials and Methods: The Dose Area Product (DAP) was measured with a dosimeter and a comparison between conventional X......-ray and EOS was made. The Workflow in 2011 was compared to the workflow in 2013 with regards to the total number of examinations and the scheduled examination time for scoliosis examinations. Results: DAP for a scoliosis examination in conventional X-ray was 185 mGy*cm2 and 60.36 mGy*cm2 for EOS...

  1. ASSESSMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE RADIATION DOSES FOR THE TECHA RIVER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Shagina, N. B.

    2009-10-23

    In order to provide more accurate and precise estimates of individual dose (and thus more precise estimates of radiation risk) for the members of the ETRC, a new dosimetric calculation system, the Techa River Dosimetry System-2009 (TRDS-2009) has been prepared. The deterministic version of the improved dosimetry system TRDS-2009D was basically completed in April 2009. Recent developments in evaluation of dose-response models in light of uncertain dose have highlighted the importance of different types of uncertainties in the development of individual dose estimates. These include uncertain parameters that may be either shared or unshared within the dosimetric cohort, and also the nature of the type of uncertainty as aleatory or epistemic and either classical or Berkson. This report identifies the nature of the various input parameters and calculational methods incorporated in the Techa River Dosimetry System (based on the TRDS-2009D implementation), with the intention of preparing a stochastic version to estimate the uncertainties in the dose estimates. This report reviews the equations, databases, and input parameters, and then identifies the author’s interpretations of their general nature. It presents the approach selected so that the stochastic, Monte-Carlo, implementation of the dosimetry System - TRDS-2009MC - will provide useful information regarding the uncertainties of the doses.

  2. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  3. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology systems. A national survey in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando; Martinez, Luis Carlos; Oyarzun, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in all five X-ray fluoroscopy systems used for interventional cardiology procedures existing in Chile have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object (TO) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-16 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low (FL), medium and high) and cine (CI) modes have been archived in DICOM format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM) and high-contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. The ratio between the maximum and the minimum value of ESAK per frame for a given fluoroscopy mode between the five systems ranges from 2 to 5 and from 14 to 38 for CI mode. SNR, FOM and HCSR showed a great variability for the different acquisition modes (AMs) and PMMA thickness. In the near future, it is urgent to upgrade Chilean legislation on radiation protection to incorporate quality assurance programmes that will allow us to evaluate and optimise the X-ray systems used in medical applications. Increments in doses per frame when increasing phantom thickness and when used CI runs instead of FL runs can be considered by the cardiologist in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging AM during clinical procedures.

  4. Image Quality and Radiation Dose Assessment of a Digital Mammography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa, N. M.; Hassan, W. M. S. W.; Abdullah, W. A. K. W.; Othman, F.; Ramli, A. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Image quality and radiation dose of a direct amorphous selenium digital mammography system were considered in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and average glandular dose (AGD). They were measured for various qualities and breast phantom thicknesses with different types of breast tissue composition to determine optimal radiation quality and dose. Three sets of breast tissue equivalent slabs (30%:70%, 50%:50% and 70%:30% glandular-adipose) with thickness of 2 cm to 7 cm and 0.2 mm aluminum foil were used to provide certain CNR. Two different combinations of anode/ilter material and a wide range of tube voltages were employed for each phantom thickness. Phantom images with grid were acquired using automatic exposure control (AEC) mode for each thickness. Phantom images without grid were also obtained in manual exposure mode by selecting the same anode/filter combination and kVp as the image obtained with grid at the same thickness, but varying mAs of 10 to 200 mAs. Optimization indicated that relatively high energy beam qualities should be used with a greater dose to compensate for lower energy x-rays. The results also indicate that current AEC setting for a fixed detector is not optimal.

  5. User requirements on CT-based computed dose planning systems in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, H.

    1983-01-01

    The expanding use of computers in radiation therapy procedures, especially the rapidly increasing use of digital CT-information, necessitates the coordination of the different systems in order to facilitate their developments. In order to define necessary demands for tomorrow a Nordic cooperation was initiated in 1981 by NORDFORSK (Nordic co-operative organisation for applied research), and a group of physicians and physicists having their daily work in this field of medicine and physics was invited to produce a report on 'User requirements on CT-based computed dose planning systems in radiation therapy'. The work has been done within the frame of NORDFORSK's activities and has been independent of the existing commissions and associations in the radiology field, but it has taken into consideration recommendations that have been given by or are being produced by other organizations. (Auth.)

  6. Evaluation of radiation dose during sent-graft treatment using a hybrid operating room system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Kaga, Yuji; Chida, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, aortic aneurysm treatment with stent graft grafting in the X-ray fluoroscopy is increasing. This is an endovascular therapy, because it is a treatment which includes the risk of radiation damage, having to deal with radiation damage, to know in advance is important. In this study, in order to grasp the trend of exposure stent graft implantation in a hybrid operating room (OR) system, focusing on clinical data (entrance skin dose and fluoroscopy time), was to count the total. In TEVAR and EVAR, fluoroscopy time became 13.40 ± 7.27 minutes, 23.67 ± 11.76 minutes, ESD became 0.87 ± 0.41 mGy, 1.11 ± 0.57 mGy. (fluoroscopy time of EVAR was 2.0 times than TEVAR. DAP of EVAR was 1.2 times than TEVAR). When using the device, adapted lesions and usage are different. This means that care changes in exposure-related factors. In this study, exposure trends of the stent graft implantation was able to grasp. It can be a helpful way to reduce/optimize the radiation dose in a hybrid OR system. (author)

  7. [Evaluation of Radiation Dose during Stent-graft Treatment Using a Hybrid Operating Room System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Kouichi; Kaga, Yuji; Saitou, Kazuhisa; Arai, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Iwaya, Yoshimi; Kumasaka, Eriko; Kataoka, Nozomi; Satou, Naoto; Abe, Mitsuya

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, aortic aneurysm treatment with stent graft grafting in the X-ray fluoroscopy is increasing. This is an endovascular therapy, because it is a treatment which includes the risk of radiation damage, having to deal with radiation damage, to know in advance is important. In this study, in order to grasp the trend of exposure stent graft implantation in a hybrid operating room (OR) system, focusing on clinical data (entrance skin dose and fluoroscopy time), was to count the total. In TEVAR and EVAR, fluoroscopy time became 13.40 ± 7.27 minutes, 23.67 ± 11.76 minutes, ESD became 0.87 ± 0.41 mGy, 1.11 ± 0.57 mGy. (fluoroscopy time of EVAR was 2.0 times than TEVAR. DAP of EVAR was 1.2 times than TEVAR.) When using the device, adapted lesions and usage are different. This means that care changes in exposure-related factors. In this study, exposure trends of the stent graft implantation was able to grasp. It can be a helpful way to reduce/optimize the radiation dose in a hybrid OR system.

  8. Patient dose simulation in X-ray CT using a radiation treatment-planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, Yasuo; Oda, Masahiko; Minamoto, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    Medical irradiation dosage has been increasing with the development of new radiological equipment and new techniques like interventional radiology. It is fair to say that patient dose has been increased as a result of the development of multi-slice CT. A number of studies on the irradiation dose of CT have been reported, and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is now used as a general means of determining CT dose. However, patient dose distribution in the body varies with the patient's constitution, bowel gas in the body, and conditions of exposure. In this study, patient dose was analyzed from the viewpoint of dose distribution, using a radiation treatment-planning computer. Percent depth dose (PDD) and the off-center ratio (OCR) of the CT beam are needed to calculate dose distribution by the planning computer. Therefore, X-ray CT data were measured with various apparatuses, and beam data were sent to the planning computer. Measurement and simulation doses in the elliptical phantom (Mix-Dp: water equivalent material) were collated, and the CT irradiation dose was determined for patient dose simulation. The rotational radiation treatment technique was used to obtain the patient dose distribution of CT, and patient dose was evaluated through simulation of the dose distribution. CT images of the thorax were sent to the planning computer and simulated. The result was that the patient dose distribution of the thorax was obtained for CT examination. (author)

  9. New ultrasound stone locking system in extracorporeal lithotripsy: Decreased duration of fluoroscopy and radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, N.; Ravier, E.; Codas, R.; Crouzet, S.; Martin, X.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the most common method of treatment for kidney stones. Both fluoroscopy and ultrasound imaging can be used to locate stones, but fluoroscopy is more frequently employed. Evaluation of a new stereotaxic navigational system: the stone was located using an ultrasound probe, and its 3D location was saved. The table automatically moved to position the stone at the focal point. A real-time follow-up was possible during treatment. Our objective was to demonstrate a decrease in the use of fluoroscopy to locate kidney stones for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy through the use of a 3D ultrasound stone locking system. Prospective analysis of the case records of the 20 patients preceding and the 20 patients succeeding the arrival of the ultrasound stone locking system Visio-Track (EDAP-TMS). We used a Student test to compare age, BMI, kidney stone size, number of shock waves and administered energy. Patient characteristics were comparable. The average age was 55 years old and the average kidney stone size was 10.7 mm. Radiation duration was 174.8 seconds in the group without Visio-Track versus 57.1 seconds in the group with it (P < 0.0001). A similar result was observed for radiation doses: 5197.25 mGy.cm 2 for the group without versus 1987.6 mGy.cm 2 for the group with Visio-Track (P ≡ 0.0033). The stone locking system Visio-Track reduced fluoroscopy in our first group of patients, which decreased the patient's individual absorbed irradiation dose. (authors)

  10. [Influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on tenascin expression in hybridoma cell systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunga, I N

    2003-01-01

    One of the achievements of the modern radiation ecology is the preparation and application of stable eukariotic cell lines to solve various problems occurring under exposure to ionizing radiation, especially to low doses. The detection of onco-fetal protein--tenascin in different embryonic and tumor cells of humans and animals supposes the probability of appropriate gene expression in lymphoid cells, including hybridomal cells. Using the immunochemical method, the study of tenascin expression in two mouse hybridomal lines was carried out. Tenascin was revealed in hybridomal lines MLC-1 and K-48. Further hybridomal cell lines were exposed to X-ray radiation (120 KV) with doses 2.10,15 cGy. The obtained results demonstrated the sensitivity of tenascin expression to low doses of ionizing radiation, that may be used as a convenient model of studying of genotoxic effects of various damaging ionizing agents on a cell level.

  11. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  12. A Remote-operated System to Map Radiation Dose in the Fukushima Daiichi Primary Containment Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancekievill, M.; Jones, A. R.; Joyce, M. J.; Lennox, B.; Watson, S.; Katakura, J.; Okumura, K.; Kamada, S.; Katoh, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a submersible system based on a remote-operated vehicle coupled with radiation detectors to map the interior of the reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. It has the aim oflocating fuel debris. The AVEXIS submersible vehicle used in this study has been designed as a low-cost, potentially disposable, inspection platform that is the smallest of its class and is capable of being deployed through a 150 mm diameter access pipe. To map the gamma-ray environment, a cerium bromide scintillator detector with a small form factor has been incorporated into the AVEXIS to identify radioactive isotopes via gamma-ray spectroscopy. This provides the combined system with the potential to map gamma-ray spectra and particle locations throughout submerged, contaminated facilities, such as Units 1, 2 and 3 of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The hypothesis of this research is to determine the sensitivity of the combined system in a submerged environment that replicates the combination of gamma radiation and water submersion but at lower dose rates.

  13. MO-F-16A-06: Implementation of a Radiation Exposure Monitoring System for Surveillance of Multi-Modality Radiation Dose Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, B; Kanal, K; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We have implemented a commercially available Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) to enhance the processes of radiation dose data collection, analysis and alerting developed over the past decade at our sites of practice. REMS allows for consolidation of multiple radiation dose information sources and quicker alerting than previously developed processes. Methods: Thirty-nine x-ray producing imaging modalities were interfaced with the REMS: thirteen computed tomography scanners, sixteen angiography/interventional systems, nine digital radiography systems and one mammography system. A number of methodologies were used to provide dose data to the REMS: Modality Performed Procedure Step (MPPS) messages, DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR), and DICOM header information. Once interfaced, the dosimetry information from each device underwent validation (first 15–20 exams) before release for viewing by end-users: physicians, medical physicists, technologists and administrators. Results: Before REMS, our diagnostic physics group pulled dosimetry data from seven disparate databases throughout the radiology, radiation oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, anesthesiology/pain management and vascular surgery departments at two major medical centers and four associated outpatient clinics. With the REMS implementation, we now have one authoritative source of dose information for alerting, longitudinal analysis, dashboard/graphics generation and benchmarking. REMS provides immediate automatic dose alerts utilizing thresholds calculated through daily statistical analysis. This has streamlined our Closing the Loop process for estimated skin exposures in excess of our institutional specific substantial radiation dose level which relied on technologist notification of the diagnostic physics group and daily report from the radiology information system (RIS). REMS also automatically calculates the CT size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) as well as provides

  14. Effect of anxiolytic aphobazole on hemopoietic system under exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and emotional stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Deshevoj, Yu.B.; Seredenin, S.B.; Lyrshchikova, A.V.; Lebedev, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of aphobazole in investigated on the course of adaptation reactions and state of compensatory capabilities of hemopoietic system of rats-males under long-term emotional stress developed following the low-dose gamma-radiation. Gamma-quanta from 137 Cs source at 0.9 Gy dose (1.3 Gy/min dose rate) were used for single and uniform irradiation of animals. Two days later rats were exposed to long-term emotional stress. Aphobazole at the dose of 10.0 mg/kg was incorporated into rats once a day. It is shown that aphobazole permits to stop the violations in adaptation reactions and compensatory capabilities of hemopoietic system under conditions of emotional stress development in the early period following the exposure to gamma radiation at 0.9 Gy dose [ru

  15. Longitudinal study of radiation exposure in computed tomography with an in-house developed dose monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2013-03-01

    During the last decades, the reduction of radiation exposure especially in diagnostic computed tomography is one of the most explored topics. In the same time, it seems challenging to quantify the long-term clinical dose reduction with regard to new hardware as well as software solutions. To overcome this challenge, we developed a Dose Monitoring System (DMS), which collects information from PACS, RIS, MPPS and structured reports. The integration of all sources overcomes the weaknesses of single systems. To gather all possible information, we integrated an optical character recognition system to extract, for example, information from the CT-dose-report. All collected data are transferred to a database for further evaluation, e.g., for calculations of effective as well as organ doses. The DMS provides a single database for tracking all essential study and patient specific information across different modality as well as different vendors. As an initial study, we longitudinally investigated the dose reduction in CT examination when employing a noise-suppressing reconstruction algorithm. For this examination type a significant long-term reduction in radiation exposure is reported, when comparing to a CT-system with standard reconstruction. In summary our DMS tool not only enables us to track radiation exposure on daily bases but further enables to analyses the long term effect of new dose saving strategies. In the future the statistical analyses of all retrospective data, which are available in a modern imaging department, will provide a unique overview of advances in reduction of radiation exposure.

  16. Global real-time dose measurements using the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, D.; Smart, D.; Shea, M.; Bailey, J.; Didkovsky, L.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Jones, B.; Hong, S.; Yoon, K.

    2016-11-01

    The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) program has successfully deployed a fleet of six instruments measuring the ambient radiation environment at commercial aircraft altitudes. ARMAS transmits real-time data to the ground and provides quality, tissue-relevant ambient dose equivalent rates with 5 min latency for dose rates on 213 flights up to 17.3 km (56,700 ft). We show five cases from different aircraft; the source particles are dominated by galactic cosmic rays but include particle fluxes for minor radiation periods and geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The measurements from 2013 to 2016 do not cover a period of time to quantify galactic cosmic rays' dependence on solar cycle variation and their effect on aviation radiation. However, we report on small radiation "clouds" in specific magnetic latitude regions and note that active geomagnetic, variable space weather conditions may sufficiently modify the magnetospheric magnetic field that can enhance the radiation environment, particularly at high altitudes and middle to high latitudes. When there is no significant space weather, high-latitude flights produce a dose rate analogous to a chest X-ray every 12.5 h, every 25 h for midlatitudes, and every 100 h for equatorial latitudes at typical commercial flight altitudes of 37,000 ft ( 11 km). The dose rate doubles every 2 km altitude increase, suggesting a radiation event management strategy for pilots or air traffic control; i.e., where event-driven radiation regions can be identified, they can be treated like volcanic ash clouds to achieve radiation safety goals with slightly lower flight altitudes or more equatorial flight paths.

  17. Labour cost of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.; Lockett, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to optimise capital expenditure on measures to protect workers against radiation it would be useful to have a means to measure radiation dose in money terms. Because labour has to be employed to perform radiation work there must be some relationship between the wages paid and the doses received. Where the next increment of radiation dose requires additional labour to be recruited the cost will at least equal the cost of the extra labour employed. This paper examines some of the factors which affect the variability of the labour cost of radiation dose and notes that for 'in-plant' exposures the current cost per rem appears to be significantly higher than values quoted in ICRP Publication 22. An example is given showing how this concept may be used to determine the capital it is worth spending on installed plant to prevent regular increments of radiation dose to workers. (author)

  18. Low dose effects of ionizing radiations in in vitro and in vivo biological systems: a multi-scale approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoccia, A.; Berardinelli, F.; Argazzi, E.; Balata, M.; Bedogni, R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term biological effects of low-dose radiation are little known nowadays and its carcinogenic risk is estimated on the assumption that risk remains linearly proportional to the radiation dose down to low-dose levels. However in the last 20 years this hypothesis has gradually begun to seem in contrast with a huge collection of experimental evidences, which has shown the presence of plethora of non-linear phenomena (including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance, adaptive response, and non-targeted phenomena like bystander effect and genomic instability) occurring after low-dose irradiation. These phenomena might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model currently used for cancer risk assessment through extrapolation from existing high-dose data. Moreover only few information is available regarding the effects induced on cryo preserved cells by multi-year background radiation exposure, which might induce a radiation-damage accumulation, due to the inhibition of cellular repair mechanisms. In this framework, the multi-year Excalibur (Exposure effects at low doses of ionizing radiation in biological culture) experiment, funded by INFN-CNS5, has undertaken a multi-scale approach investigation on the biological effects induced in in vitro and in vivo biological systems, in culture and cryo preserved conditions, as a function of radiation quality (X/γ-rays, protons, He-4 ions of various energies) and dose, with particular emphasis on the low-dose region and non-linear phenomena, in terms of different biological endpoints.

  19. Evaluation of personal dose equivalent 'HP(d)' in a external individual monitoring system for X and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, C.; Antonio Filho, J.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The good of individual monitoring for external radiation is the assessment of occupational exposure from X and γ radiations in order to assure that the radiological conditions of the workplace are acceptable, safe and satisfactory. The evaluation of radiations doses for workers must not exceed dose limits specified for workers, according to national regulatory agencies. Nowadays, there are two external monitoring systems in use, both based on ICRU definitions. In the conventional system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of Hx. The personal dosimeter is worn over chest surface and it is calibrated in function of air kerma. In the new system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of HP(d) and the personal dosimeter is calibrated in function of phantom doses. The aim of this paper is to adapt an external dosimetry laboratory (based on photographic dosimetry) to evaluate the personal dosimeters in terms of HP(d). In this way, a simple methodology, based on linear programming, was utilized. In this adaptation, calibration curves were obtained for radiation qualities (W and N series) described by International Organization for Standardization (ISO 4037-1, 1995). These calibration curves offer a better accuracy on dose determinations and energy below 140 keV, improving the quality of service rendered the society. (author)

  20. A Study on the Establishment of Radiation Dose Estimation Procedure for Accumulated Radioactive Ions for RAON ISOL System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIM Do Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For purposes of various experiments, RAON heavy ion accelerator facility has been designed in Korea. ISOL is one system of RAON accelerators to generate and separate rare isotopes. Radioactive ions generated from target-proton reactions are separated and accumulated at separation devices. The accumulated isotopes release the gamma radiations; therefore, the radiation safety must be clearly estimated. In this study, a process to evaluate radiations from the accumulated ions was proposed by modifying FISPACT code. The proposed process was validated by comparing a solution of single element decay problem. Using the process, a preliminary study for radiation doses were performed in a virtual separation devise.

  1. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  2. The ferrous ammonium sulfate solid system, as dosemeter for processes at low temperatures and high doses of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez C, J.M.; Ramos B, S.; Negron M, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from a study of the radiation induced oxidation of crystalline ferrous ammonium sulfate with gamma rays at 295 K, 263 K and 77 K and dose from 0 to 300 kGy. The radiation induced decomposition of ferrous ammonium sulfate has been studied by the dissolution of the irradiated salt in 0,8 N sulfuric acid. The main product is Fe 3+ and molar concentration of ferric ion was determined spectrophotometrically in the UV region at 304 nm. The optical density values showed a linear dependence with dose, indicating that the data obtained might be used to create a calibrating curve. Color in irradiated salt changes from blue to green, yellow and orange according to the absorbed dose. The accuracy and the reproducibility of the system were tested. In addition, some other characteristics make possible the use of this system as a dosimeter, similar to Fricke chemical dosemeter, at low temperatures and high dose. (Author)

  3. The EOS imaging system: Workflow and radiation dose in scoliosis examinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Bo; Torfing, Trine; Jespersen, Stig

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate workflow defined as scheduled time pr. examination and radiation dose in scoliosis examinations in EOS compared to conventional x-ray evaluation. Materials and Methods: The Dose Area Product (DAP) was measured with a dosimeter and a comparison between conventional X......-ray and EOS was made. The Workflow in 2011 was compared to the workflow in 2013 with regards to the total number of examinations and the scheduled examination time for scoliosis examinations. Results: DAP for a scoliosis examination in conventional X-ray was 185 mGy*cm2 and 60.36 mGy*cm2 for EOS...... to approximately 30 % of the radiation dose in conventional X-ray. The increased number of scoliosis examinations is related to increased referral and not due to optimized workflow....

  4. Are low radiation doses Dangerous?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Lima, O.; Cornejo, N.

    1996-01-01

    In the last few years the answers to this questions has been affirmative as well as negative from a radiation protection point of view low doses of ionizing radiation potentially constitute an agent causing stochasting effects. A lineal relation without threshold is assumed between dose and probability of occurrence of these effects . Arguments against the danger of probability of occurrence of these effects. Arguments again the danger of low dose radiation are reflected in concepts such as Hormesis and adaptive response, which are phenomena that being studied at present

  5. Risks of circulatory diseases among Mayak PA workers with radiation doses estimated using the improved Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseeva, Maria B.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Haylock, Richard [Public Health of England, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The new Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008) was published in 2013 and supersedes the Doses-2005 dosimetry system for Mayak Production Association (PA) workers. It provides revised external and internal dose estimates based on the updated occupational history data. Using MWDS-2008, a cohort of 18,856 workers first employed at one of the main Mayak PA plants during 1948-1972 and followed up to 2005 was identified. Incidence and mortality risks from ischemic heart disease (IHD) (International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes 410-414) and from cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) (ICD-9 codes 430-438) were examined in this cohort and compared with previously published risk estimates in the same cohort based on the Doses-2005 dosimetry system. Significant associations were observed between doses from external gamma-rays and IHD and CVD incidence and also between internal doses from alpha-radiation and IHD mortality and CVD incidence. The estimates of excess relative risk (ERR)/Gy were consistent with those estimates from the previous studies based on Doses-2005 system apart from the relationship between CVD incidence and internal liver dose where the ERR/Gy based on MWDS-2008 was just over three times higher than the corresponding estimate based on Doses-2005 system. Adjustment for smoking status did not show any effect on the estimates of risk from internal alpha-particle exposure. (orig.)

  6. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Di Trano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author) [es

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose and positioning accuracy on X-ray volume imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, C.-H. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, J.-K. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, K.-M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wu, T.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, C.-J.; Chen, C.-L. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2008-05-15

    Linear accelerators equipped with X-ray volumetric cone-beam Imaging (XVI) system enable verification of location of patients and displacement of tumors for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study is to evaluate the positioning accuracy using the XVI system for image-guided patient setup and to establish a lower-dose imaging protocol without sacrificing positioning accuracy for routine treatment courses. Several low-dose imaging protocols are proposed by modifying tube voltage from 120 to 100 kV and lowering tube current from 40 to 10 mA. The positioning accuracy of both bone and gray value registration methods provided by XVI system were also evaluated. Phantom study revealed that the gray value algorithm was more accurate than the bone algorithm in position and registration. However, both translational and rotational accuracies were less than 0.15 mm and 0.8' deg. at all dimensions, which were considered negligible in clinical applications. In addition, the lower-dose protocol (100 kV, 10 mA) produced relative much less radiation dose compared to the default CBCT protocol in the XVI system. In conclusion, our proposed lower-dose protocol results in significant radiation dose reduction without compromising positioning accuracy and may have the potential to be adopted for clinical usage in the future.

  8. Management of pediatric radiation dose using GE's Revolution digital radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabri, K.N.; Uppaluri, R.; Xue Ping

    2004-01-01

    Digital flat-panel X-ray detectors offer excellent image quality and dose efficiency in addition to clinical productivity, connectivity, and adaptability to advanced clinical applications. GE's Revolution systems provide two modes of exposure control for setting the dose operating point, fixed time and automatic exposure control, the latter of which maintains high image signal-to-noise ratio for the given technique settings. In addition to enhancing detail contrast and compressing the dynamic range, postprocessing automatically determines the best window level and width for display, taking into account the dose at which the image was acquired. Several studies have examined the reduction in patient dose achievable with Revolution systems as compared to competing technologies, and results indicate significant dose savings with equivalent or superior image quality. For pediatric exams, pediatric default techniques provide for a lower patient dose as compared to adult techniques. Therefore, GE's Revolution systems can achieve a high image quality-to-dose ratio for pediatric imaging using the combined advantages of dose-efficient detection, advanced postprocessing, and independently adjustable pediatric techniques. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of the use of a Business Intelligence system for management of patient radiation dose undergone to nuclear medicine exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.C.F.S.; Capaverde, A.S.; Moreira, M.N.; Moraes, A.L.; Andrade, J.R.M.; Bacelar, A.

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of using a Business Intelligence (BI) system, IMPAX BI (Agfa), to manage the effective radiation dose of patients undergoing Nuclear Medicine exams was evaluated. The evaluation was divided into four stages, using retrospective data from the activity administered to adult patients in the year 2016. It was possible with the system to create panels to filter the data by date and display them in table and / or graphs, indicating the estimated doses and established limits. The IMPAX BI system proved to be a tool capable of assisting in dose management in Nuclear Medicine since it facilitates the identification of cases in which the patient is submitted to doses higher than those defined in the protocols of exams

  10. A NIRS's product. Japanese internet system for the calculation of aviation route doses 'JISCARD'. The program which informs us of cosmic radiation doses in an aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The radiation dose during one round aviation from Japan to Western countries is about 0.1 mSv. A web tool called JISCARD (Japanese Internet System for the Calculation of Aviation Route Doses) has been developed by National Institute of Radiological Sciences for giving the information on the irradiation of cosmic ray during the aviation. 'Route dose' (the effective dose by cosmic ray irradiation) of going and coming each can be shown for major international airlines from/to Japan. 'JISCARD Mobile' for mobile phones is also available. Global distribution of daily cosmic ray intensity at cruising altitude (11 km) of aircrafts is shown on the page 'Related Information'. Explanation of the terminology is also compiled. (K.Y.)

  11. Risk after low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    1989-01-01

    The high-level data measured in radiation doses need to be extrapolated to lower dose ranges in order to be able to state the risk of leukaemia and cancer in low radiation doses. The assumption is that there is no threshold dose although there has been no scientific verification for this yet. Conceptual considerations concerning the radiation action mechanisms suggest that a threshold dose does not exist. The assumption is that leukaemia and cancer are induced by the fact that individual transformed and malignant cells possess a certain though low potential to cause a malignant disease (leukaemia or cancer). It is assumed that radiation exposure produces damage to the genetic material of the cell which results in a malignant transformation. The number of these events is greatly reduced by a highly effective repair mechanism. However, these repair processes at the DNA are not complete or may even result in a misrepair; even low radiation doses (less than 10 mSv, 1 rem) apparently may trigger such cellular effects (transformation). (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  13. Spiral CT and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Czerny, C.; Hojreh, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Kudler, H.; Noebauer, I.; Nowotny, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies in the USA and Europe state that computed tomography (CT) scans compromise only 3-5% of all radiological exams, but they contribute 35-45% of total radiation dose to the patient population. These studies lead to concern by several public authorities. Basis of CT-dose measurements is the computed tomography dose index (CTDI), which was established 1981. Nowadays there are several modifications of the CTDI values, which may lead to confusion. It is suggested to use the standardized CTDI-100 w. value together with the dose length product in all CT-examinations. These values should be printed on all CT-images and allows an evaluation of the individualized patient dose. Nowadays, radiologist's aim must be to work at the lowest maximal diagnostic acceptable signal to noise ratio. To decrease radiation dose radiologist should use low kV and mA, but high pitches. Newly developed CT-dose-reduction soft-wares and filters should be installed in all CT-machines. We should critically compare the average dose used for a specific examination with the reference dose used in this country and/or Europe. Greater differences should caution the radiologist. Finally, we as radiologists must check very carefully all indications and recommend alternative imaging methods. But we have also to teach our customers--patients and medical doctors who are non-radiologists--that a 'good' image is not that which show all possible information, but that which visualize 'only' the diagnostic necessary information

  14. Effects of different 137Cs γ radiation dose on mouse hematopoietic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yueying; Wu Hongying; Li Deguan; Wang Xiaochun; Song Naling; Lu Lu; Zhang Junling; Meng Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effects of different dose of radiation on the mouse's hematopoietic system. Methods: Mice of 615 strain, ICR strain and IRM-2 strain were given a one-time 4.0 Gy total body irradiation,and then the changes of peripheral white blood cells and bone marrow nuclear cells (BMNC) among those mice were observed at different time points. Mice of IRM-2 and C57BL/6 were given a one-time 6.0 Gy total body irradiation and the changes of peripheral hematological between the two strains were observed forty-five days after irradiation. Results: Two days after irradiation,white blood cell and BMNC counts decreased to the lowest level in all the mice of 615 strain, ICR strain and IRM-2 strain. During the following days,white blood cell and BMNC counts raised again. Nine days after irradiation, BMNC count in IRM-2 mice was significantly higher than that in 615 and ICR mice (t=3.725, P<0.01; t=8.487, P<0.001). Twelve days after irradiation,white blood cell count in IRM-2 mice was significantly higher than that in the 615 and ICR mice (t=4.811 and 4.302, both P <0.001). Twenty-one days after irradiation,compared to the control group,white blood cell count was recovered to 52.0%, 60.7% and 50.8% of the normal range in IRM-2, ICR and 615 mice separately and BMNC count was recovered to 90.8%, 82.1%, 75.4% of the normal range in IRM-2, ICR and 615 mice separately. Forty-five days after 6.0 Gy irradiation,white blood cell, BMNC, hemoglobin and hematocrit counts in IRM-2 mice were significantly higher than those indexes in C57BL/6 strain (t=5.629, 7.788, 4.9289, 6.064, all P<0.001). Compared to the control group, white blood cells, red blood cells,hemoglobin and hematocrit were recovered to 75.0%, 98.9%, 98.7%, and 97.5% of the normal range separately in IRM-2 mice. And white blood cells, red blood cells,hemoglobin and hematocrit were recovered to 40.6%, 93.8%, 93.3%, and 93.8% of the normal range separately in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion: There are similar

  15. Measurement of radiocesium concentration in trees using cumulative gamma radiation dose rate detection systems - A simple presumption for radiocesium concentration in living woods using glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, T.; Hashida, S.N. [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Kawachi, N.; Suzui, N.; Yin, Y.G.; Fujimaki, S. [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagao, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium from the severe accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on 11 March 2011 contaminates large areas. After this, a doubt for forest products, especially of mushroom, is indelible at the areas. Pruned woody parts and litters are containing a considerable amount of radiocesium, and generates a problem at incineration and composting. These mean that more attentive survey for each subject is expected; however, the present survey system is highly laborious/expensive and/or non-effective for this purpose. On the other hand, we can see a glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system. This system always utilized to detect a personal cumulative radiation dose, and thus, it is not suitable to separate a radiation from a specific object. However, if we can separate a radiation from a specific object and relate it with the own radiocesium concentration, it would enable us to presume the specific concentration with just an easy monitoring but without a destruction of the target nature and a complicated process including sampling, pre-treatment, and detection. Here, we present the concept of the measurement and results of the trials. First, we set glass-badges (type FS, Chiyoda Technol Corp., Japan) on a part of bough (approximately 10 cm in diameter) of Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) with four different settings: A, a direct setting without any shield; B, a setting with an aluminum shield between bough and the glass-badge; C, a setting with a lead shield between bough and the glass-badge; D, a setting with a lead shield covering the glass-badge to shut the radiation from the surrounding but from bough. The deduction between the amount of each setting should separate a specific radiation of the bough from unlimited radiation from the surrounding. Even if the hourly dose rate is not enough to count the difference, a moderate cumulative dose would clear the difference. In fact, results demonstrated a

  16. Combined high-dose radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy improves survival in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W K; Pan, Jianji; Han, Lu; Chen, Qisong; Lu, Jiade J

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy of high-dose radiation therapy (RT) to the primary and regional disease in combination with systemic chemotherapy and local treatment to metastatic foci in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). One hundred and five consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed NPC with distant metastasis at diagnosis seen between 1995 and 2002 were reviewed. All were offered cisplatin-based chemotherapy, high-dose RT (>30 Gy) to the head and neck region, and active treatment to the metastatic foci. Patients' median age was 46 years, and all had a Karnofsky Performance Score of ≥70. Eighty-nine patients (85%) had metastases confined to 1 organ. Ninety-six patients (91%) received at least 1 cycle of chemotherapy and 71 (68%) received greater than 65 Gy of radiation to the head and neck region. With a median follow-up time of 22 months (range: 2 to 142 mo), 90 patients had deceased, and the median survival time of the entire group was 25 months. The 2 and 5-year estimated overall survival rates were 50% and 17%, respectively. Radiation dose of greater than 65 Gy to the primary region (P = 0.05) and number of organs with metastases (single vs. multiple) (P = 0.002) were independent predictive factors for overall survival on log-rank tests. Only moderately severe acute toxicities, such as Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3 mucositis, skin desquamation, and leukocytopenia were observed. No patient experienced grade 4 acute toxicities. High-dose RT is indicated for local disease control in patients with metastatic NPC, and may improve survival when actively used with systemic chemotherapy and local treatment for metastatic foci. Patients with single-organ metastases have a better prognosis as compared with those with more widespread metastases.

  17. Reduction of radiation dose by using digital luminescence radiography compared to conventional screen film system with grid cassette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyne, J.P.; Merbold, H.; Neumann, R.; Freesmeyer, M.; Jonetz-Mentzel, L.; Kaiser, W.A.; Sehner, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: How much can the radiation dose be reduced for skull radiography by using digital luminescence radiography (DLR) compared to a conventional screen film system with a grid cassette? Methods and Materials: A skull phantom (3M) was X-rayed in anterior-posterior orientation using both a conventional screen film system with grid cassette and DLR (ADC-70, Agfa). The tube current time product (mAs) was diminished gradually while keeping the voltage constant. The surface entrance dose was measured by a sensor of Dosimax (Wellhoefer). Five investigators evaluated the images by characteristic and critical features, spatial resolution and contrast. Results: The surface entrance dose at 73 kV/22 mAs was 0,432 mGy in conventional screen film system and 0,435 mGy in DLR. The images could be evaluated very well down to an average dose of 71% (0,308 mGy; SD 0,050); sufficient images were obtained down to an average dose of 31% (0,136 mGy; SD 0,065). The resolution of the line pairs were reduced down to a 2 levels depending on the investigator. Contrast was assessed as being very good to sufficient. The acceptance of the postprocessed images (MUSICA-software) was individually different and resultde in an improvement of the assessment of bone structures an contrast in higher dose ranges only. Conclusion: For the sufficient assessment of a possible fracture/of paranasal sinuses/of measurement the skull the dose can be reduced to at least 56% (31%; SD 14,9%)/40% (27%; SD 9,3%)/18% (14%; SD 4,4%). Digital radiography allows question-referred exposure parameters with clearly reduced dose, so e.g. for fracture exclusion 73 kV/12,5 mAs and to skull measurement 73 kV/4 mAs. (orig.) [de

  18. Dose limits for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, D.

    1989-01-01

    Dose limits for exposure to ionising radiation are assessed to see if they give sufficient protection both for the occupationally exposed and for the general public. It is concluded that current limits give a level of safety that satisfies the necessary criteria in the light of present knowledge and further reductions would be unlikely to improve standards of safety. (author)

  19. Animal Studies of Residual Hematopoietic and Immune System Injury from Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Radiation and Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    fission products were released, workers involved in reactor or weapons construction, and perhaps astronauts/cosmonauts exposed to space irradiation. It is...dose rates [5,6]. long-term animal experiments. Such data could be extrap - The long-term consequences of low dose irradiation may olated to human

  20. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J. T.

    2014-10-01

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H E and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  1. RADIATION DOSE IN PAEDIATRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This CT facility at the time of writing also did not use a documented guideline and protocol for imaging children. RADIATION DOSE. The amount of radiation energy deposited in a medium is called the radiation dose. Different x-ray modalities address radiation dose in different ways. For example, in chest radiography it is the ...

  2. Natural radiation dose to Gammarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Eisenbud, M.

    1975-01-01

    The natural radiation dose rate to whole body and components of the Gammarus species (i.e., G. Tigrinus, G. Fasciatus and G. Daiberi) that occurs in the Hudson River is evaluated and the results compared with the upper limits of dose rates from man made sources to the whole body of the organisms. Methods were developed to study the distribution of alpha emitters from 226 Ra plus daughter products in Gammarus using autoradiographic techniques, taking into account the amount of radon that escapes from the organisms. This methodology may be adapted to study the distribution of alpha emitters in contaminated tissues of plants and animals

  3. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  4. Computed Tomography Angiography with a 192-slice Dual-source Computed Tomography System: Improvements in Image Quality and Radiation Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsen, Philip V M; Coenen, Adriaan; Lubbers, Marisa M; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L; Ouhlous, Mohamed; Nieman, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare image quality, radiation dose, and the influence of the heart rate on image quality of high-pitch spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) using 128-slice (second generation) dual-source CT (DSCT) and a 192-slice DSCT (third generation) scanner. Two consecutive cohorts of fifty patients underwent CCTA by high-pitch spiral scan mode using 128 or 192-slice DSCT. The 192-slice DSCT system has a more powerful roentgen tube (2 × 120 kW) that allows CCTA acquisition at lower tube voltages, wider longitudinal coverage for faster table speed (732 m/s), and the use of iterative reconstruction. Objective image quality was measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subjective image quality was evaluated using a Likert scale. While the effective dose was lower with 192-slice DSCT (1.2 ± 0.5 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv; P quality was scored higher (4.2 ± 0.8 vs. 3.0 ± 0.7; P quality, despite a higher average heart rate, at lower radiation doses compared to 128-slice DSCT.

  5. The hypophyseothyroid system in patients with nonspecific diseases of the lungs exposed to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorozhnaya, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    The study aimed at detection of hypophyseothyroid correlations in subjects with chronic nonspecific pulmonary diseases who formerly participated in the liquidation of Chernobyl accident consequences. Relationship between hypophyseal and thyroid hormones with estimation of correlation coefficient and specific coefficients for TTH, STH, and PRL were investigated in 23 men hospitalized in 1988-1989. A group of 22 male patients with chronic nonspecific diseases of the lungs without a history of radiation exposure were controls. A stronger correlation between the most active physiologically labile forms of thyroid hormones in the presence of hypothyrosis and a weaker regulating TTH-T 3 relationship were revealed in exposed subjects. A closer relationship with the thyroid system was revealed for PRL, as well as a more active part in the realization of the TTH-STH relationship. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  6. High dose dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Radiation processing today offers various advantages in the field of sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products, food preservation, treatment of chemical materials and a variety of other products widely used in modern society, all of which are of direct relevance to health and welfare. The safety and economic importance of radiation processing is clearly recognized. It is understood that reliable dosimetry is a key parameter for quality assurance of radiation processing and irradiated products. Furthermore, the standardization of dosimetry can provide a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and form the basis of international clearance for free trade. After the initiation of the Agency's high dose standardization programme (1977), the first IAEA Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry was organized in 1984. As a result, concern as to the necessity of reliable dosimetry has greatly escalated not only in the scientific community but also in the radiation processing industry. The second International Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing was held in Vienna from 5 to 9 November, 1990, with a view to providing an international forum for the exchange of technical information on up to date developments in this particular field. The scientific programme held promises for an authoritative account of the status of high dose dosimetry throughout the world in 1990. Forty-one papers presented at the meeting discussed the development of new techniques, the improvement of reference and routine dosimetry systems, and the quality control and assurance of dosimetry. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. 4D dose-position verification in radiation therapy using the RADPOS system in a deformable lung phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherpak, Amanda; Serban, Monica; Seuntjens, Jan; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A novel 4D in vivo dosimetry system (RADPOS), in conjunction with a deformable lung phantom, has been evaluated as a potential quality assurance tool for 4D radiotherapy. Methods: RADPOS detectors, which consist of a MOSFET dosimeter combined with an electromagnetic positioning probe, were placed inside the deformable lung phantom. One detector was positioned directly inside a tumor embedded in the lung phantom and another was positioned inside the lung portion of the phantom, outside the tumor. CT scans were taken with the phantom at three breathing phases, and for each phase, the detector position inside the phantom was read with the RADPOS software and compared to the position as determined from the CT data. These values were also compared to RADPOS measurements taken with the phantom on the couch of a Varian Clinac 6EX linac. The deformable phantom and the RADPOS system were also used in two radiation delivery scenarios: (1) A simulation of a free-breathing delivery and (2) a simulation of an adaptive treatment. Results: Compared to CT imaging, the RADPOS positional accuracy was found to be better than 2.5 mm. The radial displacement measurements taken in the CT and linac rooms agreed to within an average of (0.7±0.3) mm. Hence, the system can provide relative displacement measurements in the treatment room, consistent with measurements made in the CT room. For the free-breathing delivery, the total dose reported by RADPOS agreed to within 4% and 5% of the treatment planning doses in the tumor and the lung portion of the phantom, respectively. The RADPOS-measured dose values for the adaptive delivery were within 1.5% of the treatment plan values, which was well within the estimated experimental uncertainties. Conclusions: This work has shown that the deformable lung phantom-RADPOS system can be an efficient quality assurance tool for 4D radiation therapy.

  8. Dose discrepancy between planning system estimation and measurement in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Vial Philip; Berry Megan; Ochoa, Cesar; Beeksma, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat spinal metastases has shown excellent clinical outcomes for local control. High dose gradients wrapping around spinal cord make this treatment technically challenging. In this work, we present a spine SBRT case where a dosimetric error was identified during pre-treatment dosimetric quality assurance (QA). A patient with metastasis in T7 vertebral body consented to undergo SBRT. A dual arc volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) with a 6 MV Elekta machine using gantry control point spacing of 4°. Standard pre-treatment QA measurements were performed, including ArcCHECK, ion chamber in CTV and spinal cord (SC) region and film measurements in multiple planes. While the dose measured at CTV region showed good agreement with TPS, the dose measured to the SC was significantly higher than reported by TPS in the original and repeat plans. Acceptable agreement was only achieved when the gantry control point spacing was reduced to 3°. A potentially harmful dose error was identified by pre-treatment QA. TPS parameter settings used safely in conventional treatments should be re-assessed for complex treatments.

  9. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  10. The development of wireless radiation dose monitoring using smart phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Jeong, Gyo Seong; Lee, Yun Jong; Kim, Chong Yeal; Lim, Chai Wan

    2016-01-01

    Radiation workers at a nuclear facility or radiation working area should hold personal dosimeters. some types of dosimeters have functions to generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions to communicate with other equipment or the responsible personnel. our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system that can be utilized to monitor the radiation dose for radiation workers and to notify the radiation protection manager of the dose information in real time. We use a commercial survey meter for personal radiation measurement and a smart phone for a mobile wireless communication tool and a Beacon for position detection of radiation workers using Blue tooth communication. In this report, the developed wireless dose monitoring of cellular phone is introduced

  11. Dose effect relationships in cervical and thoracic radiation myelopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdorff, B.

    1980-01-01

    The course and prognosis of radiation myelopathies are determined by 3 factors: the segmental (vertical) location of the lesion, the extent of the transverse syndrome (complete or incomplete) and the radiation dose. The median spinal dose in cervical radiation myelopathies with fatal outcome was higher than in survivals with an incomplete transverse syndrome. In thoracic radiation myelopathies a dose difference between complete and incomplete transverse syndromes could be found as well. Incomplete transverse syndromes as submaximum radiation injuries are more suitable for the determination of the spinal tolerance dose than complete transverse syndromes. The lowest threshold could be stated for cases following high-volume irradiation of the lymphatic system. (Auth.)

  12. Patient radiation dose during mammography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Swsan Awd Elkriem

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the patient dose in term of mean glandular dose and assist in optimization of radiation protection in mammographic procedures in Sudan. A total number of 107 patients were included. Four mammographic units were participated. Only one center was using automatic exposure control (AEC). The mean doses in (mGy) for the CC projection were 3.13, 1.24, 2.45 and 0.98 and for the MLO projection was 2.13, 1.26, 1.99 and 1.02 for centers A, B, C, and D, respectively. The total mean dose per breast from both projections was 5.26, 2.50, 4.44 and 1.99 mGy for centers A, B, C and D, respectively. The minimum mean glandular dose was found between the digital system which was operated under AEC and one of the manual selected exposure factors systems, this highlight possible optimization of radiation protection in the other manual selected systems. The kilo volt and the tube current time products should be selected correctly according to the breast thickness in both centers A and C. (author)

  13. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  14. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milkovic, D. [Srebrnjak, Specialized Hospital for Respiratory System Diseases in Children and Youth, Zagreb (Croatia); Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  15. RTP Radiation Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfred, S.L.; Mohd Fairus Abdul Farid; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Nurhayati Ramli

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Monitoring System aiming to limiting dose exposed to personnel to the lowest level referring to the concept of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). Atomic Energy Licensing (Basic Safety Radiation Protection) Regulation 2010 (Act 304) is a baseline to control employee and public radiation protection program and guideline, as well as to meet the requirement of the Occupational Safety and Health 1994 (Act 514). (author)

  16. A radiation protection training program designed to reduce occupational radiation dose to individuals using pneumatic-transfer systems at the Oregon State TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.; Pratt, D.; Dodd, B.; Carpenter, W.T.

    1984-01-01

    In order to keeping personnel doses as low as reasonably achievable, and also to help satisfy requirements of NRC regulations contained in 10 CFR 19, a training program was established to qualify all individuals prior to their use of the OSTR PT systems. Program objectives are directed mainly towards minimizing the spread of radioactive contamination and reducing the potential for unnecessary and inappropriate personnel radiation exposure; however, other operational and emergency procedures are also covered. The PT systems training program described in this report was established approximately 8 to 10 years ago but recently there was an increased interest to use it. Whether or not a PT system training program should be implemented at a specific TRIGA operation (assuming the facility is equipped with a PT system) will undoubtedly be influenced heavily by the nature and frequency of the PT system's use, by who uses the system, and by whether the system is one of the automatic loading and unloading types, or one of the more' commonly encountered manually operated systems. However, from our experience we feel that training commensurate with the type of PT system operation being conducted is a wise investment, and should be a requirement for all system operators

  17. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from the source. The study included the interventional radiolo- gists, radiographers and nurses ...

  18. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, John; Day, Philip

    2008-01-01

    , the same is not true of the ICRP protection quantities equivalent and effective dose (i.e. those measured in sieverts). The ICRP quantities are intended for practical application in radiological protection and the choice of radiation and tissue weighting factors used in their calculation involves simplifying assumptions regarded as acceptable for this purpose. Best estimates of doses and risks to individuals and specific population groups may be calculated using ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric approaches, but would require the use of best available information on RBE and age-, sex- and population-specific risk factors. Consideration of uncertainties is important in applications such as the assessment of the probability of cancer causation for an individual and in estimating doses in epidemiological studies. While the ICRP system of protection does not take explicit account of uncertainties, an understanding of the various contributions to uncertainty can be seen to be of value when making judgments on the optimisation of protection. (review)

  19. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  20. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  1. MONTEC, an interactive fortran program to simulate radiation dose and dose-rate responses of populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.A.; Szekely, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    The computer program MONTEC was written to simulate the distribution of responses in a population whose members are exposed to multiple radiation doses at variable dose rates. These doses and dose rates are randomly selected from lognormal distributions. The individual radiation responses are calculated from three equations, which include dose and dose-rate terms. Other response-dose/rate relationships or distributions can be incorporated by the user as the need arises. The purpose of this documentation is to provide a complete operating manual for the program. This version is written in FORTRAN-10 for the DEC system PDP-10

  2. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  3. Fiber optics in high dose radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partin, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the behavior of state-of-the-art optical fiber waveguides in high dose (greater than or equal to 10 5 rad), steady state radiation fields is presented. The influence on radiation-induced transmission loss due to experimental parameters such as dose rate, total dose, irradiation history, temperature, wavelength, and light intensity, for future work in high dose environments are given

  4. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR. All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM observation, forced swim test (FST, the open field test (OFT, the chromosome aberration (CA, the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA, the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR.

  5. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  6. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a 'Th2 polarized' immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in

  7. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  8. Optimization of brain tumor dose using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbakery, Andaria Elhanfi Elmaki

    2016-04-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) become an essential technique that achieves the goal of radiation therapy, maximum target dose and minimum dose for healthy tissues. Dose optimization was applied for brain tumor through as set of constrains given to the software. Fifteen patients were selected for IMRT planning and delineation was done using special software (fical). All data was tranferred to the treatment planning system. Kon Rad planning system was used in this work. The planning was evaluated with homogeneity index and dose volume histogram ( DVH). The 0ptimization was achieved from converge of target volume with 5% as maxim dose and 95% as the minimum dose. The homogeneity index that calculated for most of patients was approcimately equal to 1. It means that converge was good and the optimization fulfilled. For organs at risk (OAR) the dose was below the tolerances and the mean dose and maxim dose were calculated. (Author)

  9. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site

  10. ENSURING OF RADIATION PROTECTION DURING WORKS ON TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBJECT SHELTER INTO ECOLOGICALLY SAFE SYSTEM. BIOPHYSICAL MONITORING OF THE PERSONNEL INTERNAL EXPOSURE DOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Nechaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Given paper, states the ensuring of the interpretation of the basic radiation protection principles, relative to the works at the Object Shelter (OS. Analysis of the factors of radiation situation at the OS is figured out. Functioning at the present time individual dose monitoring (IDM system at the OS is describe. The system is based on the methods of biophysical monitoring. A series of the results, obtained during internal exposure individual dose monitoring of the personnel is presented. It is mentioned, that implementation of the internal exposure dose biophysical monitoring system (during the works on transformation of the OS into ecologically safe system allows:  provide adequate level of the IDM of the internal exposure dose (the level is corresponds to the present day requirements of the radiation protection; develop the recommendations on selection of individual means of protection of respiratory tract; ensure determination of the parameters of radioactive air contamination in the work areas; and, provide the optimal planning of dose load to the personnel.

  11. Charpak, Garwin, propose unit for radiation dose

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Becquerels, curries, grays, rads, rems, roentgens, sieverts - even for specialists the units of radiation can get confusing. That's why two eminent physicists, Georges Charpak of France, and Richard Garwin, are proposing the DARI as a unit of radiation dose they hope will help the public evaluate the risks associated with low-level radiation exposure (1 page)

  12. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine

    1989-03-15

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  13. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  14. Radiation and PD-(L)1 treatment combinations: immune response and dose optimization via a predictive systems model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinsky, Yuri; Dovedi, Simon J; Peskov, Kirill; Voronova, Veronika; Chu, Lulu; Tomkinson, Helen; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Stanski, Donald R; Helmlinger, Gabriel

    2018-02-27

    Numerous oncology combination therapies involving modulators of the cancer immune cycle are being developed, yet quantitative simulation models predictive of outcome are lacking. We here present a model-based analysis of tumor size dynamics and immune markers, which integrates experimental data from multiple studies and provides a validated simulation framework predictive of biomarkers and anti-tumor response rates, for untested dosing sequences and schedules of combined radiation (RT) and anti PD-(L)1 therapies. A quantitative systems pharmacology model, which includes key elements of the cancer immunity cycle and the tumor microenvironment, tumor growth, as well as dose-exposure-target modulation features, was developed to reproduce experimental data of CT26 tumor size dynamics upon administration of RT and/or a pharmacological IO treatment such as an anti-PD-L1 agent. Variability in individual tumor size dynamics was taken into account using a mixed-effects model at the level of tumor-infiltrating T cell influx. The model allowed for a detailed quantitative understanding of the synergistic kinetic effects underlying immune cell interactions as linked to tumor size modulation, under these treatments. The model showed that the ability of T cells to infiltrate tumor tissue is a primary determinant of variability in individual tumor size dynamics and tumor response. The model was further used as an in silico evaluation tool to quantitatively predict, prospectively, untested treatment combination schedules and sequences. We demonstrate that anti-PD-L1 administration prior to, or concurrently with RT reveal further synergistic effects, which, according to the model, may materialize due to more favorable dynamics between RT-induced immuno-modulation and reduced immuno-suppression of T cells through anti-PD-L1. This study provides quantitative mechanistic explanations of the links between RT and anti-tumor immune responses, and describes how optimized combinations and

  15. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  16. Wound Trauma Alters Ionizing Radiation Dose Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    reconstructing radiation dose and calculating risk assessment after a nuclear accident . Results Wounding Enhanced Radiation-Induced Mortality, body weight...approaches usually apply for assessment of whole-body irradiation alone. However, frequently, individuals involved in radiation accidents and cancer...concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid associated with thoracic radiotherapy . Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2004, 58:758–67. 34. Peterson VM

  17. Dose Assurance in Radiation Processing Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Chadwick, K.H.; Nam, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed...... at the radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing....

  18. Reducing the radiation dose in fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thijssen, M.A.O.; Rosenbusch, G.; Gerlach, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    Hitherto, there was only one standard reference curve available for fluoroscopic examination. The novel POLYMATIC system now offers the possibility of randomly choosing kV/mA combinations. Measurements of dose rate, contrast, and resolving power made with phantoms and the results of patient examinations with subsequent comparison of the images obtained using two different standard reference curves have shown that with the curve through 100 kV, image quality is equal to or only slightly less than that obtained following the usual standard curve, but the radiation dose is lower. Hence the application of the new standard reference curve can be recommended for examinations of the digestive tract or of other organs. (orig./GDG).

  19. Analysis of CT radiation dose based on radiation-dose-structured reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weipeng; Zhang Yi; Zhang Menglong; Zhang Dapeng; Song Shaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the CT radiation dose statistically using the standardized radiation-dose-structured report (RDSR) of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). Methods: Using the self-designed software, 1230 RDSR files about CT examination were obtained searching on the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The patient dose database was established by combination of the extracted relevant information with the scanned sites. The patients were divided into adult group (over 10 years) and child groups (0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years) according to the age. The average volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) of all scans were recorded respectively, and then the effective dose (E) was estimated. The DLP value at 75% quantile was calculated and compared with the diagnostic reference level (DRL). Results: In adult group, CTDI vol and DLP values were moderately and positively correlated (r = 0.41), the highest E was observed in upper abdominal enhanced scan, and the DLP value at 75% quantile was 60% higher than DRL. In child group, their CTDI vol in group of 5-10 years was greater than that in groups of 0-1 and 1-5 years (t = 2.42, 2.04, P < 0.05); the DLP value was slightly and positively correlated with the age (r = 0.16), while E was moderately and negatively correlated with the age (r = -0.48). Conclusions: It is a simple and efficient method to use RDSR to obtain the radiation doses of patients. With the popularization of the new equipment and the application of regionalized medical platform, RDSR would become the main tool for the dosimetric level surveying and individual dose recording. (authors)

  20. Dose linearity and uniformity of a linear accelerator designed for implementation of multileaf collimation system-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Li Sicong; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Yoe-Sein, Maung; Pillai, Susha; Enke, Charles A.; Celi, Juan C.

    2003-01-01

    The dose linearity and uniformity of a linear accelerator designed for multileaf collimation system- (MLC) based IMRT was studied as a part of commissioning and also in response to recently published data. The linear accelerator is equipped with a PRIMEVIEW, a graphical interface and a SIMTEC IM-MAXX, which is an enhanced autofield sequencer. The SIMTEC IM-MAXX sequencer permits the radiation beam to be 'ON' continuously while delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy subfields at a defined gantry angle. The dose delivery is inhibited when the electron beam in the linear accelerator is forced out of phase with the microwave power while the MLC configures the field shape of a subfield. This beam switching mechanism reduces the overhead time and hence shortens the patient treatment time. The dose linearity, reproducibility, and uniformity were assessed for this type of dose delivery mechanism. The subfields with monitor units ranged from 1 MU to 100 MU were delivered using 6 MV and 23 MV photon beams. The doses were computed and converted to dose per monitor unit. The dose linearity was found to vary within 2% for both 6 MV and 23 MV photon beam using high dose rate setting (300 MU/min) except below 2 MU. The dose uniformity was assessed by delivering 4 subfields to a Kodak X-OMAT TL film using identical low monitor units. The optical density was converted to dose and found to show small variation within 3%. Our results indicate that this linear accelerator with SIMTEC IM-MAXX sequencer has better dose linearity, reproducibility, and uniformity than had been reported

  1. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron......Thin radiochromic dye films are useful for measuring large radiation absorbed doses (105–108 rads) and for high-resolution imaging of dose patterns produced by penetrating radiation beams passing through non-homogeneous media. Certain types of amino-substituted triarylmethane cyanides dissolved...... in polymeric solutions can be cast into flexible free-standing thin films of uniform thickness and reproducible response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. The increase in optical density versus energy deposited by radiation is linear over a wide range of doses and is for practical purposes independent...

  2. Radiation dose optimization in thoracic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, D

    2010-01-01

    Guidelines for reduction of CT radiation dose were introduced in 1997 and are now more than 12 years old. The process initiated by the European Regulatory authorities to reduce the excess of radiation from CT has however not produced the expected results. Reference diagnostic levels (DRL) from surveys are still twice as high as needed in most European countries and were not significantly reduced as compared to the initial European ones. Many factors may at least explain partially the lack of dose reduction. One of them is the complexity of the dose optimization process while maintaining image quality at a diagnostically acceptable level. Chest is an anatomical region where radiation dose could be substantially reduced because of high natural contrasts between structures, such as air in the lungs and fat in the mediastinum. In this article, the concept of CT radiation dose optimization and the factors that contribute to maintain global excess in radiation dose are reviewed and a brief summary of results from research in the field of chest CT radiation dose is given.

  3. ''Low dose'' and/or ''high dose'' in radiation protection: A need to setting criteria for dose classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The ''low dose'' and/or ''high dose'' of ionizing radiation are common terms widely used in radiation applications, radiation protection and radiobiology, and natural radiation environment. Reading the title, the papers of this interesting and highly important conference and the related literature, one can simply raise the question; ''What are the levels and/or criteria for defining a low dose or a high dose of ionizing radiation?''. This is due to the fact that the criteria for these terms and for dose levels between these two extreme quantities have not yet been set, so that the terms relatively lower doses or higher doses are usually applied. Therefore, setting criteria for classification of radiation doses in the above mentioned areas seems a vital need. The author while realizing the existing problems to achieve this important task, has made efforts in this paper to justify this need and has proposed some criteria, in particular for the classification of natural radiation areas, based on a system of dose limitation. (author)

  4. GENII-LIN-2.1: an open source software system for calculating radiation dose and risk from radionuclides released to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodori, Francesco; Sumini, Marco

    2008-12-01

    GENII-LIN is an open source radiation protection environmental software system running on the Linux operating system. It has capabilities for calculating radiation dose and risk to individuals or populations from radionuclides released to the environment and from pre-existing environmental contamination. It can handle exposure pathways that include ingestion, inhalation and direct exposure to air, water and soil. The package is available for free and is completely open source, i.e., transparent to the users, who have full access to the source code of the software.

  5. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  6. Radiation Dose Measurement Using Chemical Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Han, Bum Soo

    2010-01-01

    The radiation dose can be estimated in various ways. Dose estimates can be obtained by either experiment or theoretical analysis. In experiments, radiation impact is assessed by measuring any change caused by energy deposition to the exposed matter, in terms of energy state (physical change), chemical production (chemical change) or biological abnormality (biological change). The chemical dosimetry is based on the implication that the energy deposited to the matter can be inferred from the consequential change in chemical production. The chemical dosimetry usually works on the sample that is an aqueous solution, a biological matter, or an organic substance. In this study, we estimated absorbed doses by quantitating chemical changes in matter caused by radiation exposure. Two different chemical dosimeters, Fricke and ECB (Ethanol-Chlorobenzene) dosimeter, were compared in several features including efficacy as dose indicator and effective dose range

  7. Plastic for indicating a radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.; Ohmori, S.

    1975-01-01

    A plastic film suitable for indicating radiation dose contains a chlorine polymer, at least one acid sensitive coloring agent and a plasticizer. The film undergoes a distinct change of color in response to a given radiation dose, the degree of change proportional to the total change. These films may be stored for a long period without loss of sensitivity, and have good color stability after irradiation. (auth)

  8. Evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.A.; Grove, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive new drugs are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. Before a new drug can be marketed it must have an approved New Drug Application (NDA). Clinical investigations of a radioactive new drug are carried out under a Notice of Claimed Investigational Exemption for a New Drug (IND), submitted to the FDA. In the review of the IND, radiation doses are projected on the basis of experimental data from animal models and from calculations based upon radiation characteristics, predicted biodistribution of the drug in humans, and activity to be administered. FDA physicians review anticipated doses and prevent clinical investigations in humans when the potential risk of the use of a radioactive substance outweighs the prospect of achieving beneficial results from the administration of the drug. In the evaluation of an NDA, FDA staff attempt to assure that the intended diagnostic or therapeutic effect is achievable with the lowest practicable radiation dose. Radiation doses from radioactive new drugs are evaluated by physicians within the FDA. Important radioactive new drugs are also evaluated by the Radiopharmaceuticals Advisory Committee. FDA also supports the Center for Internal Radiation Dosimetry at Oak Ridge, to provide information regarding in vivo distribution and dosimetry to critical organs and the whole body from radioactive new drugs. The process for evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive new drugs for protection against use of unnecessary radiation exposure by patients in nuclear medicine procedures, a

  9. Radiation doses - maps and magnitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' Series presents information on the numerous sources and magnitude of exposure of man to radiation. These include the medical use of radiation, radioactive discharges to the environment, cosmic rays, gamma rays from the ground and buildings, radon gas and food and drink. A Pie chart represents the percentage contribution of each of those sources. Finally, the terms becquerel, microsievert and millisievert are explained. (U.K.)

  10. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  11. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  12. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... York Northern California Northern Ohio Rio Grande Savannah River State of Texas Southern California Susquehanna Valley Virginia ... patient's metabolism), and other issues. Typical Doses from Diagnostic Radiology Exams As noted above, the tables below ...

  13. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222 Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings

  14. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  15. Evaluation of dose uncertainty in radiation processing using EPR spectroscopy and butylated hydroxytoluene rods as dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhorayef, M.; Mansour, A.; Sulieman, A.; Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M.; Babikir, E.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) rods represent a potential dosimeter in radiation processing, with readout via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Among the possible sources of uncertainty are those associated with the performance of the dosimetric medium and the conditions under which measurements are made, including sampling and environmental conditions. Present study makes estimate of the uncertainties, investigating physical response in different resonance regions. BHT, a white crystalline solid with a melting point of between 70-73 °C, was investigated using 60Co gamma irradiation over the dose range 0.1-100 kGy. The intensity of the EPR signal increases linearly in the range 0.1-35 kGy, the uncertainty budget for high doses being 3.3% at the 2σ confidence level. The rod form represents an excellent alternative dosimeter for high level dosimetry, of small uncertainty compared to powder form.

  16. Work on optimum medical radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2010-01-01

    Every day the medical world makes use of X-rays and radioisotopes. Radiology allows organs to be visualised, nuclear medicine diagnoses and treats cancer by injecting radioisotopes, and radiotherapy uses ionising radiation for cancer therapy. The medical world is increasingly mindful of the risks of ionising radiation that patients are exposed to during these examinations and treatments. In 2009 SCK-CEN completed two research projects that should help optimise the radiation doses of patients.

  17. Analysis of T101 outage radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Collective radiation dose during outage is about 80% of annual collective radiation dose at nuclear power plants (NPPs). T 101 Outage is the first four-year outage of Unit 1 at Tianwan Nuclear Power Station (TNPS) and thorough overhaul was undergone for the 105-day's duration. Therefore, T 101 Outage has significant reference meaning to reducing collective radiation dose at TNPS. This paper collects the radiation dose statistics during T 101 Outage and analyses the radiation dose distribution according to tasks, work kinds and varying trend of the collective radiation dose etc., comparing with other similar PWRs in the world. Based on the analysis this paper attempts to find out the major factors in collective radiation dose during T 101 Outage. The major positive factor is low radiation level at workplace, which profits from low content of Co in reactor construction materials, optimised high-temperature p H value of the primary circuit coolant within the tight range and reactor operation without trips within the first fuel cycle. One of the most negative factors is long outage duration and many person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone, caused by too many tasks and inefficient work. So besides keeping good performance of reducing radioactive sources, it should be focused on how to improve implementation of work management including work selection, planning and scheduling, work preparation, work implementation, work assessment and feedback, which can lead to reduced numbers of workers needed to perform a task, of person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone. Moreover, this leads to reduce occupational exposures in an ALARA fashion. (author)

  18. Development of radiation monitoring and visualization systems for Fukushima. GPS monitoring system, Dose3DMap system, and LED-coupled scintillating fiber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Noriaki; Kosako, Kazuaki; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Kawaguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Lands that were contaminated with radioactive elements following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 have been decontaminated, and the construction of an interim storage facility for radioactive waste is planned. A GPS monitoring system was developed to concomitantly determine a location and measure the radiation level at the location. Moreover, a mapping system that produces radiation maps at the measurement locations and also predicts post-decontamination radiation maps using the compiled Monte Carlo simulation program was constructed. These systems were used for decontamination planning and estimation of the decontamination effect. An LED-coupled scintillating fiber detector was developed for visually monitoring radiation in real time at the interim storage facility. The LEDs display different colors corresponding to different radiation levels at the measurement locations along the fiber detector, the maximum length of which is 50 m. Thus, the radiation levels at all positions along the length of the detector can be visually monitored in real time. Moreover, it is useful for radiation safety and for risk communication with radiation workers and residents close to the site. (author)

  19. Dose mapping for documentation of radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation sterilization standards EN 552 and ISO 11137 require that dose mapping in real or simulated product be carried in connection with the process qualification. This paper reviews the recommendations given in the standards and discusses the difficulties and limitations of practical dose...... mapping. The paper further gives recommendations for effective dose mapping including traceable dosimetry, documented procedures for placement of dosimeters, and evaluation of measurement uncertainties. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Iodine 131 therapy patients: radiation dose to staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.; Beh, R.A.; Veilleux, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    Metastasis to the skeletal system from follicular thyroid carcinoma may be treated with an oral dose of 131 I-NaI. Radiation exposures to hospital personnel attending these patients were calculated as a function of administered dose, distance from the patient and time after administration. Routine or emergency patient handling tasks would not exceed occupational radiation protection guidelines for up to 30 min immediately after administration. The emergency handling of several patients presents the potential for exceeding these guidelines. (author)

  1. Radiation Doses Received by the Irish Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P.A.; Organo, C.; Hone, C.; Fenton, D.

    2008-05-01

    Some chemical elements present in the environment since the Earth was formed are naturally radioactive and exposure to these sources of radiation cannot be avoided. There have also been additions to this natural inventory from artificial sources of radiation that did not exist before the 1940s. Other sources of radiation exposure include cosmic radiation from outer space and the use of radiation in medical diagnosis and treatment. There can be large variability in the dose received by invividual members of the population from any given source. Some sources of radiation expose every member of the population while, in other cases, only selected individuals may be exposed. For example, natural radioactivity is found in all soils and therefore everybody receives some radiation dose from this activity. On the other hand, in the case of medical exposures, only those who undergo a medical procedure using radiation will receive a radiation dose. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has undertaken a comprehensive review of the relevant data on radiation exposure in Ireland. Where no national data have been identified, the RPII has either undertaken its own research or has referred to the international literature to provide a best estimate of what the exposure in Ireland might be. This has allowed the relative contribution of each source to be quantified. This new evaluation is the most up-to-date assessment of radiation exposure and updates the assessment previously reported in 2004. The dose quoted for each source is the annual 'per caput' dose calculated on the basis of the most recently available data. This is an average value calculated by adding the doses received by each individual exposed to a given radiation source and dividing the total by the current population of 4.24 million. All figures have been rounded, consistent with the accuracy of the data. In line with accepted international practice, where exposure takes place both indoors and

  2. Radiation Dose from Reentrant Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Cleghorn, T. E.; Watts, J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating the crew exposures during an EVA, the contribution of reentrant electrons has always been neglected. Although the flux of these electrons is small compared to the flux of trapped electrons, their energy spectrum extends to several GeV compared to about 7 MeV for trapped electrons. This is also true of splash electrons. Using the measured reentrant electron energy spectra, it is shown that the dose contribution of these electrons to the blood forming organs (BFO) is more than 10 times greater than that from the trapped electrons. The calculations also show that the dose-depth response is a very slowly changing function of depth, and thus adding reasonable amounts of additional shielding would not significantly lower the dose to BFO.

  3. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Parnell-Parmley, June E.; Charkot, Ellen; BenDavid, Guila; Krajewski, Connie [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Haidar, Salwa [Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Department of Radiology, Salmiya (Kuwait); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Parnell-Parmley, June E.; Charkot, Ellen; BenDavid, Guila; Krajewski, Connie; Haidar, Salwa; Moineddin, Rahim

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  5. Radiation control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Mitsuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly and suitably performing planning and designation by radiation-working control systems in the radiation controlled area of nuclear power plant. Method: Various informations regarding radiation exposure are arranged and actual exposure data are statistically stored, to thereby perform forecasting calculation for the radiation exposure upon workings in the plurality of working regions in the radiation controlled area. Based on the forecast values and the registered workers' exposure dose in the past workings are alocated successively such that the total exposure does upon conducting the workings is less than the limited value, to prepare working plans in the areas. Further, procedures for preparing a series of documents regarding the workings in the radiation area are automated to rapidly and properly provide the informations serving to the planning and designation for the radiation workings. As a result, the radiation managers' burnden can be mitigated and an efficient working management system can be provided, in view of the exposure management and personal management. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Risk of radiation at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1996-01-01

    Risk and risk sources have been increasingly studied in recent years. The essentials of risk consist of a combination of the idea of loss with that of chance or probability. The idea of chance is crucial: the inevitable can be utterly unpleasant but, lacking the element of chance, is not a risk. Even without analyzing the different components of the concept of 'loss', it should be recognized that to be exposed to risk is not necessarily bad. The achievements of modern life imply the exposure to several sources of risk, and past evolution would have been impossible without the risk incurred by our ancestors. A special type of risk, pertinent to our discussion, is exemplified by the health threats due to low levels of natural or man-made chemicals and low radiation levels. It constitutes a risk very difficult to analyze, not because the effects are unknown but because they are already very familiar, and exposed groups only manifest a slightly increased frequency of such effects. The linear non-threshold relationship, is at present the best tool to predict the risk probability of radiation at low doses. It fulfills all the requirements to be considered 'realistically representative', using modeling terminology. Practical decisions can be made under this relationship, and the radiation protection system, recommended by the ICRP provides a method for such decisions. (author)

  7. Assay of new systems in vivo mutagenesis for determining the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauluz, C.; Sierra, I.; Martin, L.; Real, A.; Vidania, R. de

    1997-01-01

    Ionizing radiation reacts directly and indirectly with the genetic material in living cells and produces DNA damage. Processing of this damage by correcting enzymes may result in appearing of mutations which, in turn, may lead to carcinogenesis. We have focused on the determination of in vivo mutagenesis induced after exposure to X-rays, aiming at establishing methods to evaluate the effect of low doses of radiation. In vivo mutagenesis has been addressed in the Muta Mouse model that carries a lacZ marker gene and provides a relatively simple assay of appearance of mutations. Mutation frequencies were determined in the lacZ gene copies recovered from mice irradiated with 1Gy or 4Gy of X-rays, acute or fractionated. Liver, spleen and bone marrow DNA samples were isolated at different times after irradiation, ranging from 1 day to 2 months, and evolution of mutations was studied. Results showed different responses depending on the organ and especially on the time of analysis, suggesting that the mutagenic process in vivo is much more complex than previously deduced from in vitro experiments. Therefore, determination of the relationship between dose and mutagenic effect in vivo will require additional studies. (author)

  8. Emissions and doses from sources of ionising radiation in the Netherlands: radiation policy monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleveld, H.; Pruppers, M.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997 the Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment requested RIVM to develop an information system for policy monitoring. One of the motives was that the European Union requires that the competent authorities of each member state ensure that dose estimates due to practices involving exposure to ionising radiation are made as realistic as possible for the population as a whole and for reference groups in all places where such groups may occur. Emissions of radionuclides and radiation to the environment can be classified as follows: (1) emissions to the atmosphere, (2) emissions to the aquatic system and (3) emission of external radiation from radioactive materials and equipment that produces ionising radiation. Released radioactivity is dispersed via exposure pathways, such as the atmosphere, deposition on the ground and farmland products, drinking water, fish products, etc. This leads to radiation doses due to inhalation, ingestion and exposure to external radiation. To assess the possible radiation doses different kinds of models are applied, varying from simple multiplications with dispersion coefficients, transfer coefficients and dose conversion coefficients to complex dispersion models. In this paper an overview is given of the human-induced radiation doses in the Netherlands. Also, trends in and the effect of policy on the radiation dose of members of the public are investigated. This paper is based on an RIVM report published recently. A geographical distribution of radiation risks due to routine releases for a typical year in the Netherlands was published earlier

  9. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients. Low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, T. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Baldauf, A.Q. [Theresienkrankenhaus Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie; Ludwig, K. [Klinikum Herford (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. Results: The mean dose area product was 16.8 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for antero-posterior images and 26.6 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). Conclusion: When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. (orig.)

  10. Reducing Radiation Dose in Pediatric Diagnostic Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodadra, Anish; Bartoletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To assess radiation dose in common pediatric diagnostic fluoroscopy procedures and determine the efficacy of dose tracking and dose reduction training to reduce radiation use. Fluoroscopy time and radiation dose area product (DAP) were recorded for upper GIs (UGI), voiding cystourethrograms (VCUGs), and barium enemas (BEs) during a six-month period. The results were presented to radiologists followed by a 1-hour training session on radiation dose reduction methods. Data were recorded for an additional six months. DAP was normalized to fluoroscopy time, and Wilcoxon testing was used to assess for differences between groups. Data from 1,479 cases (945 pretraining and 530 post-training) from 9 radiologists were collected. No statistically significant difference was found in patient age, proportion of examination types, or fluoroscopy time between the pre- and post-training groups (P ≥ .1), with the exception of a small decrease in median fluoroscopy time for VCUGs (1.0 vs 0.9 minutes, P = .04). For all examination types, a statistically significant decrease was found in the median normalized DAP (P < .05) between pre- and post-training groups. The median (quartiles) for pretraining and post-training normalized DAPs (μGy·m(2) per minute) were 14.36 (5.00, 38.95) and 6.67 (2.67, 17.09) for UGIs; 13.00 (5.34, 32.71) and 7.16 (2.73, 19.85) for VCUGs; and 33.14 (9.80, 85.26) and 17.55 (7.96, 46.31) for BEs. Radiation dose tracking with feedback, paired with dose reduction training, can reduce radiation dose during diagnostic pediatric fluoroscopic procedures by nearly 50%. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  12. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  13. Radiation dose measurement of paediatric patients in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepler, K. [Training Centre of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tartu (Estonia); Lintrop, M. [Department of Radiology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu (Estonia); Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Eek, V.; Filippova, I. [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2003-06-01

    According to the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/Euratom) the radiation doses to patients should be measured in every hospital and doses should be compared to the reference doses established by the competent authorities. Special attention should be paid to the paediatric x-ray examinations, because the paediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adult patients. The requirement of measurements of radiation dose to patients is not yet included in the Estonian radiation act, but the purpose to join the European Communities makes the quality control in radiology very actual in Estonia. The necessity exists to introduce suitable measurement methods in the Xray departments of Estonian hospitals for establishing feedback system for radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists in optimising the radiation burden of patients and image quality. (orig.)

  14. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  15. Low radiation doses and antinuclear lobby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobnik, J.

    1987-01-01

    The probability of mutations or diseases resulting from other than radiation causes is negatively dependent on radiation. Thus, for instance, the incidence of cancer, is demonstrably lower in areas with a higher radiation background. The hypothesis is expressed that there exist repair mechanisms for DNA damage which will repair the damage, and will give priority to those genes which are currently active. Survival and stochastic processes are not dependent on the overall repair of DNA but on the repair of critical function genes. New discoveries shed a different light on views of the linear dependence of radiation damage on the low level doses. (M.D.)

  16. Dose non-linearity of the dosimetry system and possible monitor unit errors on medical linear accelerators used in conventional and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wazir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study dose non-linearity in medical linear accelerators used in conventional radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Open fields, as well as the enhanced dynamic wedge ones, were used to collect data for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams obtained from the VARIAN linear accelerator. Beam stability was checked and confirmed for different dose rates, energies, and application of enhanced dynamic wedge by calculating the charge per monitor unit. Monitor unit error was calculated by the two-exposure method for open and enhanced dynamic wedge beams of 6 MV and 15 MV photons. A significant monitor unit error with maximum values of ±2.05931 monitor unit and ±2.44787 monitor unit for open and enhanced dynamic wedge beams, respectively, both energy and dose rate dependent, was observed both in the open photon beam and enhanced dynamic wedge fields. However, it exhibited certain irregular patterns at enhanced dynamic wedge angles. Dose monitor unit error exists only because of the overshoot phenomena and electronic delay in dose coincident and integrated circuits with a dependency on the dose rate and photon energy. Monitor unit errors are independent of the application of enhanced dynamic wedge. The existence of monitor unit error demands that the dose non-linearity of the linear accelerator dosimetry system be periodically tested, so as to avoid significant dosimetric errors.

  17. A conceptual framework for managing radiation dose to patients in diagnostic radiology using reference dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. (authors)

  18. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Radiation Doses Received by the Irish Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P.A.; Organo, C.; Hone, C.; Fenton, D.

    2008-05-01

    Some chemical elements present in the environment since the Earth was formed are naturally radioactive and exposure to these sources of radiation cannot be avoided. There have also been additions to this natural inventory from artificial sources of radiation that did not exist before the 1940s. Other sources of radiation exposure include cosmic radiation from outer space and the use of radiation in medical diagnosis and treatment. There can be large variability in the dose received by individual members of the population from any given source. Some sources of radiation expose every member of the population while, in other cases, only selected individuals may be exposed. For example, natural radioactivity is found in all soils and therefore everybody receives some radiation dose from this radioactivity. On the other hand, in the case of medical exposures, only those who undergo a medical procedure using radiation will receive a radiation dose. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has undertaken a comprehensive review of the relevant data on radiation exposure in Ireland. Where no national data have been identified, the RPII has either undertaken its own research or has referred to the international literature to provide a best estimate of what the exposure in Ireland might be. This has allowed the relative contribution of each source to be quantified. This new evaluation is the most up-to-date assessment of radiation exposure and updates the assessment previously reported in 2004. The dose quoted for each source is the annual 'per caput' dose calculated on the basis of the most recently available data. This is an average value calculated by adding the doses received by each individual exposed to a given radiation source and dividing the total by the current population of 4.24 million. All figures have been rounded, consistent with the accuracy of the data. In line with accepted international practice, where exposure takes place both indoors and

  20. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric cranial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Choyin; Wong Yiuchung; Chau Luenfai; Yu Siuki; Lau Pochung

    1999-01-01

    Background. There is no consensus about the optimal milliamperage-second (mAs) settings for computed tomography (CT). Most operators follow the recommended settings of the manufacturers, but these may not be the most appropriate settings. Objective. To determine whether a lower radiation dose technique could be used in CT of the paediatric brain without jeopardising the diagnostic accuracy of the images. Materials and methods. A randomised prospective trial. A group of 53 children underwent CT using manufacturer's default levels of 200 or 250 mAs; 47 underwent scanning at 125 or 150 mAs. Anatomical details and the confidence level in reaching a diagnosis were evaluated by two radiologists in a double-blinded manner using a 4-point scoring system. Results. For both readers there was no statistically significant difference in the confidence level for reaching a diagnosis between the two groups. The 95 % confidence intervals and P values were -0.9-1.1 and 0.13 (reader 1) and -1.29-1.37 and 0.70 (reader 2), respectively. Reliability tests showed the results were consistent. Conclusions. The recommended level may not be the optimum setting. Dose reduction of 40 % is possible on our system in paediatric brain CT without affecting the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  1. A new imaging 2D and 3D for musculo-skeletal physiology and pathology with low radiation dose and standing position: the EOS system; Une nouvelle imagerie osteo-articulaire basse dose en position debout: le systeme EOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubousset, J. [Academie Nationale de Medecine, et Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, Service de Chirurgie Orthopedique, 75 - Paris (France); Charpak, G.; Dorion, I. [Biospace, Instruments, 75 - Paris (France); Skalli, W.; Lavaste, F. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts et Metiers, 75 - Paris (France); Deguise, J. [Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie Orthopedique, Montreal (Canada); Kalifa, G.; Ferey, S. [Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-06-01

    Very precise combined work between multidisciplinary partners (radiation engineers in physics, engineers in bio-mechanics, medical radiologists and orthopedic pediatric surgeons) lead to the concept and development of a new low dose radiation device named EOS. This device allows 3 main advantages: (1) thanks to the invention of Georges Charpak (Nobel Price 1992) who designed gaseous detectors for X-rays, the reduction of dose necessary to obtain a good image of skeletal system was 8 to 10 times less for 2D imaging, compared to the dose necessary to obtain a 3D reconstruction from CT scan cuts the reduction factor was 800 to 1000. (2) The accuracy of 3D reconstruction obtained is as good as a 3D reconstruction from CT scan cuts. (3) The patient in addition get its imaging in standing functional position thank to the X-rays obtained from head to feet simultaneously AP and lateral. This is a big advantage compared to CT scan used only in lying position. From this simultaneous AP and lateral X-rays of the whole body thanks to the 3D bone external envelop technique, the engineers in bio-mechanics allowed to obtain 3D reconstruction of every level of osteo-articular system in standing position with an acceptable period of time (15 to 30 minutes). This (in spite of the evolution of standing MRI) allows more precise bone reconstruction in orthopedics especially at the level of spine, lower limbs, etc. In addition the fact to study the entire skeleton in standing functional position instead of small segmented studies given by CT scan in lying position produce a real improvement as well for physiology as for pathology of bone and joints disorders and especially for spinal pathology. (author)

  2. Environmental radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tsutomu; Shioiri, Masatoshi; Sakamaki, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring systems are used to measure and monitoring gamma-rays at the observation boundaries of nuclear facilities and in the surrounding areas. In recent years, however, few new nuclear facilities have been constructed and the monitoring systems shift to renewal of existing systems. In addition, in order to increase public acceptance, the facilities are being equipped with communication lines to provide data to prefectural environmental centers. In this text, we introduce the latest technology incorporated in replacement of environmental radiation monitoring systems. We also introduce a replacement method that can shorten the duration during which environmental dose rate measurement is interrupted by enabling both the replacement system and the system being replaced to perform measurements in parallel immediately before and after the replacement. (author)

  3. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Analysis of a system containing a monitored retrievable storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Daling, P.M.; Faletti, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    This addendum report extends the original study of the estimated radiation doses to the public and to workers resulting from transporting spent nuclear fuel from commercial nuclear power reactor stations through the federal waste management system (FWMS), to a system that contains a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The system concepts and designs utilized herein are consistent with those used in the original study (circa 1985--1987). Because the FWMS design is still evolving, the results of these analyses may no longer apply to the design for casks and cask handling systems that are currently being considered. Four system scenarios are examined and compared with the reference No-MRS scenario (all spent fuel transported directly from the reactors to the western repository in standard-capacity truck and rail casks). In Scenarios 1 and 2, an MRS facility is located in eastern United States and ships either intact fuel assemblies or consolidated fuel rods and compacted assembly hardware in canisters. In Scenarios 3 and 4, an MRS facility is located in the western United States and ship either intact fuel assemblies or consolidated fuel rods and compacted assembly hardware in canisters

  4. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  5. Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, D.S.; Davis, K.R.; Breazeal, N.L.; Watson, R.A.; Ford, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb's ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood

  6. Brain radiation doses to patients in an interventional neuroradiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, R M; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Moreu, M; Lopez-Ibor, L

    2014-07-01

    In 2011, the International Commission on Radiologic Protection established an absorbed-dose threshold to the brain of 0.5 Gy as likely to produce cerebrovascular disease. In this paper, the authors investigated the brain doses delivered to patients during clinical neuroradiology procedures in a university hospital. The radiation dose delivered to the brain was investigated in 99 diagnostic and therapeutic interventional neuroradiology procedures. Brain doses were calculated in a mathematic model of an adult standard anthropomorphic phantom by using the technical and radiation dose data of an x-ray biplane system submitted to regular quality controls and calibration programs. For cerebral embolizations, brain doses resulted in a maximum value of 1.7 Gy, with an average value of 500 mGy. Median and third quartile resulted in 400 and 856 mGy, respectively. For cerebral angiography, the average dose in the brain was 100 mGy. This work supports the International Commission on Radiologic Protection recommendation on enhancing optimization when doses to the brain could be higher than 0.5 Gy. Radiation doses should be recorded for all patients and kept as low as reasonably achievable. For pediatric patients and young adults, an individual evaluation of brain doses could be appropriate. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. Radiation dose optimization in thoracic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tack, D

    2010-01-01

    Guidelines for reduction of CT radiation dose were introduced in 1997 and are now more than 12 years old. The process initiated by the European Regulatory authorities to reduce the excess of radiation from CT has however not produced the expected results. Reference diagnostic levels (DRL) from surveys are still twice as high as needed in most European countries and were not significantly reduced as compared to the initial European ones. Many factors may at least explain partially the lack of ...

  8. Radiation dose reduction in the invasive cardiovascular laboratory: implementing a culture and philosophy of radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A; Mathew, Verghese; Lennon, Ryan; Bell, Malcolm R; Holmes, David R; Rihal, Charanjit S

    2012-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sustained practice and x-ray system technical changes on the radiation dose administered to adult patients during invasive cardiovascular procedures. It is desirable to reduce radiation dose associated with medical imaging to minimize the risk of adverse radiation effects to both patients and staff. Several clinical practice and technical changes to elevate radiation awareness and reduce patient radiation dose were implemented under the guidance of a cardiovascular invasive labs radiation safety committee. Practice changes included: intraprocedure radiation dose announcements; reporting of procedures for which the air-kerma exceeded 6,000 mGy, including procedure air-kerma in the clinical report; and establishing compulsory radiation safety training for fellows. Technical changes included establishing standard x-ray imaging protocols, increased use of x-ray beam spectral filters, reducing the detector target dose for fluoroscopy and acquisition imaging, and reducing the fluoroscopy frame rate to 7.5 s(-1). Patient- and procedure-specific cumulative skin dose was calculated from air-kerma values and evaluated retrospectively over a period of 3 years. Data were categorized to include all procedures, percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary angiography, noncardiac vascular angiography and interventions, and interventions to treat structural heart disease. Statistical analysis was based on a comparison of the cumulative skin dose for procedures performed during the first and last quarters of the 3-year study period. A total of 18,115 procedures were performed by 27 staff cardiologists and 65 fellows-in-training. Considering all procedures, the mean cumulative skin dose decreased from 969 to 568 mGy (40% reduction) over 3 years. This work demonstrates that a philosophy of radiation safety, implemented through a collection of sustained practice and x-ray system changes, can result in a significant decrease in the radiation dose

  9. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  10. Radiation dose-response of human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunieff, P.; Morgan, D.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Suit, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The dose of radiation that locally controls human tumors treated electively or for gross disease is rarely well defined. These doses can be useful in understanding the dose requirements of novel therapies featuring inhomogeneous dosimetry and in an adjuvant setting. The goal of this study was to compute the dose of radiation that locally controls 50% (TCD 50 ) of tumors in human subjects. Logit regression was used with data collected from single institutions or from combinations of local control data accumulated from several institutions treating the same disease. 90 dose response curves were calculated: 62 of macroscopic tumor therapy, 28 of elective therapy with surgery for primary control. The mean and median TCD 50 for gross disease were 50.0 and 51.9 Gy, respectively. The mean and median TCD 50 for microscopic disease control were 39.3 and 37.9 Gy, respectively. At the TCD 50 , an additional dose of 1 Gy controlled an additional 2.5% (median) additional patients with macroscopic disease and 4.2% (median) additional patients with microscopic disease. For both macro- and microscopic disease, an increase of 1% of dose at the TCD 50 increased control rates ∼ 1% (median) or 2-3% (mean). A predominance of dose response curves had shallow slopes accounting for the discrepancy between mean and median values. Doses to control microscopic disease are approximately 12 Gy less than that required to control macroscopic disease and about 79% of the dose required to control macroscopic disease. The percentage increase in cures expected for a 1% increase in dose is similar for macroscopic and microscopic disease, with a median value of ∼ 1%/% and a mean of ∼ 2.7%/%. 94 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Plants as warning signal for exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli Ibrahim; Norhafiz Talib

    2012-01-01

    The stamen-hair system of Tradescantia for flower colour has proven to be one of the most suitable materials to study the frequency of mutations induced by low doses of various ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens. The system has also been used successfully for detecting mutagenic synergisms among chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations as well as for studying the variations of spontaneous mutation frequency. In this study of radiobiology, the main objective is to observe somatic mutation (occurrence of pink cells from blue cells) induced on stamen hairs of five Tradescantia sp. available in Malaysia after exposure to low doses of chronic gamma irradiation using Gamma Green House. Pink cells appeared only on Tradescantia Pallida Purpurea stamen hairs after 13 days of exposure to irradiation with different doses of gamma rays. The highest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded from flowers irradiated with the highest dose of 6.37 Gy with 0.07 Gy/ h of dose rate. The lowest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded with an average of 0.57, irradiated with the lowest dose of 0.91 Gy with 0.01 Gy/ h of dose rate. There were no pink cells observed on Tradescantia Spathaceae Discolor after exposure to different doses of gamma rays. Similar negative results were observed for the control experiments. The principal cells in this assay are the mitotic stamen hair cells developing in the young flower buds. After exposure to radiation, the heterozygous dominant blue character of the stamen hair cell is prevented, resulting in the appearance of the recessive pink color. Furthermore, no pink cell appears on all species of Tradescantia spathaceae after irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. The sensitivity of the Tradescantia has been used widely and has demonstrated the relation between radiation dose and frequency of mutation observed at low doses which can contribute to the effects of low doses and their consequences for human health. This system

  12. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chena; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Woo Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Symkhampha, Khanthaly [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic); Lee, Woo Jin [Dept. of Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Sciences Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Heon Young [School of Computer Science Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose.

  13. A study on the radiation and environmental safety -Development of a real-time radiological dose assessment system-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Heui; Lee, Yung Bok; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The real-time dose assessment system under development has been updated and the technology for tracer experiment has been established. The calculation of external gamma dose is the most difficult and time-consuming part of the dose calculations. The characteristics of external gamma exposure have been investigated and the method for reducing the calculation time has been devised. The internal exposure via the ingestion of the contaminated foodstuffs is one of the important pathways to the total radiological exposure. In the emergency, it is necessary to take an action such like food ban to protect the internal exposure. An algorithm for the interface between the real-time system and the food chain model has been provided. The second field tracer experiment over flat terrain has been carried out on a plain in Iksan city in Junrabook-Do. Sequential tracer sampler which can be sampled the tracer gas over arbitrary 12 time interval has been designed and manufactured. SF{sub 6} has been used as the tracer gas and the sampled gas has been analysed by gas-chromatographer. 55 figs, 32 tabs, 65 refs. (Author).

  14. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  15. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  16. Review of European research trends of low dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Large research projects on low dose radiation effects in Europe and US over the past decade have provided limited scientific knowledge which could underpin the validation of radiation protection systems. Recently in Europe, there have been repeated discussions and dialogues to improve the situation, and as the consequence, the circumstances surrounding low dose radiation risks are changing. In 2009, Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) was established as a trans-national organization capable of ensuring appropriate governance of research in the pursuit of a long term shared vision, and Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi) network was launched in 2010 to achieve fairly short term results in order to prove the validity of the MELODI approach. It is expected to be very effective and powerful activities to facilitate the reduction of uncertainties in the understanding of low dose risks, but the regulatory requests rushing the reinforcement of radiological protection regulations based on the precautional principles are more increasing. To develop reasonable radiological protection systems based on scientific evidences, we need to accelerate to collect scientific evidences which could directly underpin more appropriate radiation protection systems even in Japan. For the purpose, we Japan need to develop from an independent standpoint and share as a multidisciplinary vision a long term and holistic research strategy which enables to enhance Japanese advantages such as low dose rate facilities and animal facilities, as soon as possible. (author)

  17. Comparison and analysis of BNCT radiation dose between gold wire and JCDS measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Mizobuchi, Y.; Nagahiro, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    We compared and evaluated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) radiation dose between gold wire measurement and JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS). Gold wire analysis demonstrates the actual BNCT dose though it dose not reflect the real the maximum and minimum dose in tumor tissue. We can conclude that JCDS is precise and high-reliable dose planning system for BNCT. (author)

  18. Assessment of patient radiation doses during routine diagnostic radiography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Asim Karam Aldden Adam

    2015-11-01

    Medical applications of radiation represent the largest source of exposure to general population. Accounting for 3.0 mSv against an estimated 2.4 mSv from a natural back ground in United States. The association of ionizing radiation an cancer risk is assumed to be continuos and graded over the entire range of exposure, The objective of this study is to evaluate the patient radiation doses in radiology departments in Khartoum state. A total of 840 patients ? during two in the following hospitals Khartoum Teaching Hospital (260 patients), Fedail specialized hospital ( 261 patients). National Ribat University hospital ( 189 patients) and Engaz hospital (130 patients). Patient doses were measured for 9 procedures. The Entrance surface Air Kerma (ESAK) was quantified using x-ray unit output by Unifiers xi dose rate meter( Un fore inc. Billdal. Sweden) and patient exposure parameters. The mean patient age. Weight and Body Mass index (BMI) were 42.6 year 58/4 kg and 212 kg/m respectively. The mean patient doses, kv and MAS and E.q was 0.35 mGy per procedures 59.9 volt 19.8 Ampere per second 0.32 Sv . Patient doses were comparable with previous studies. Patient radiation doses showed considerable difference between hospitals due to x- ray systems exposure settings and patient weight. Patient are exposed to unnecessary radiation.(Author)

  19. Influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on Escherichia coli DH5α population based on plasma theory and system dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yi; Hu, Dawei; Li, Liang; Jing, Zheng; Wei, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Lantao; Fu, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    It remains a mystery why the growth rate of bacteria is higher in low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment than that in normal environment. In this study, a hypothesis composed of environmental selection and competitive exclusion was firstly proposed from observed phenomena, experimental data and microbial ecology. Then a LDIR environment simulator (LDIRES) was built to cultivate a model organism of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, the accurate response of bacterial population to ionizing radiation intensity variation was measured experimentally, and then the precise relative dosage of ionizing radiation E. coli DH5α population received was calculated by finite element analysis based on drift-diffusion equations of plasma. Finally, a highly valid mathematical model expressing the relationship between E. coli DH5α population and LDIR intensity was developed by system dynamics based on hypotheses, experimental data and microbial ecology. Both experiment and simulation results clearly showed that the E. coli DH5α individuals with greater specific growth rate and lower substrate consumption coefficient would adapt and survive in LDIR environment and those without such adaptability were finally eliminated under the combined effects of ionizing radiation selection and competitive exclusion. - Highlights: • Establishment of a low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment simulator. • Escherichiacoli DH5α was selected as a bacterial representative for investigation. • Precise LDIR intensity for E. coli DH5α was calculated by FEA and plasma theory. • Development of system dynamics model of LDIR influence on E. coli DH5α population. • Mechanism of bacterial boom in LDIR environment was elucidated by computer simulation.

  20. Bio-indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1990-12-01

    In nuclear facilities, such as Chalk River Laboratories, dose to the atomic radiation workers (ARWs) is assessed routinely by using physical dosimeters and bioassay procedures in accordance with regulatory recommendations. However, these procedures may be insufficient in some circumstances, e.g., in cases where the reading of the physical dosimeters is questioned, in cases of radiation accidents where the person(s) in question was not wearing a dosimeter, or in the event of a radiation emergency when an exposure above the dose limits is possible. The desirability of being able to assess radiation dose on the basis of radio-biological effects has prompted the Dosimetric Research Branch to investigate the suitability of biological devices and techniques that could be used for this purpose. Current biological dosimetry concepts suggest that there does not appear to be any bio-indicator that could reliably measure the very low doses that are routinely measured by the physical devices presently in use. Nonetheless, bio-indicators may be useful in providing valuable supplementary information in cases of unusual radiation exposures, such as when the estimated body doses are doubtful because of lack of proper physical measurements, or in cases where available results need to be confirmed for medical treatment plannings. This report evaluates the present state of biological dosimetry and, in particular, assesses the efficiency and limits of individual indicators. This has led to the recommendation of a few promising research areas that may result in the development of appropriate biological dosimeters for operational and emergency needs at Chalk River

  1. A validation of carbon fiber imaging couch top modeling in two radiation therapy treatment planning systems: Philips Pinnacle3 and BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njeh Christopher F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon fiber (CF is now the material of choice for radiation therapy couch tops. Initial designs included side metal bars for rigidity; however, with the advent of IGRT, involving on board imaging, new thicker CF couch tops without metal bars have been developed. The new design allows for excellent imaging at the expense of potentially unacceptable dose attenuation and perturbation. Objectives We set out to model the BrainLAB imaging couch top (ICT in Philips Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS, to validate the already modeled ICT in BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose treatment planning system and to compute the magnitude of the loss in skin sparing. Results Using CF density of 0.55 g/cm3 and foam density of 0.03 g/cm3, we demonstrated an excellent agreement between measured dose and Pinnacle3 TPS computed dose using 6 MV beam. The agreement was within 1% for all gantry angle measured except for 120o, which was 1.8%. The measured and iPlan RT Dose TPS computed dose agreed to within 1% for all gantry angles and field sizes measured except for 100o where the agreement was 1.4% for 10 cm × 10 cm field size. Predicted attenuation through the couch by iPlan RT Dose TPS (3.4% - 9.5% and Pinnacle3 TPS (2% - 6.6% were within the same magnitude and similar to previously reported in the literature. Pinnacle3 TPS estimated an 8% to 20% increase in skin dose with increase in field size. With the introduction of the CF couch top, it estimated an increase in skin dose by approximately 46 - 90%. The clinical impact of omitting the couch in treatment planning will be dependent on the beam arrangement, the percentage of the beams intersecting the couch and their angles of incidence. Conclusion We have successfully modeled the ICT in Pinnacle3 TPS and validated the modeled ICT in iPlan RT Dose. It is recommended that the ICT be included in treatment planning for all treatments that involve posteriors beams. There is a significant

  2. A validation of carbon fiber imaging couch top modeling in two radiation therapy treatment planning systems: Philips Pinnacle3 and BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njeh, Christopher F; Parker, Jason; Spurgin, Joseph; Rhoe, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) is now the material of choice for radiation therapy couch tops. Initial designs included side metal bars for rigidity; however, with the advent of IGRT, involving on board imaging, new thicker CF couch tops without metal bars have been developed. The new design allows for excellent imaging at the expense of potentially unacceptable dose attenuation and perturbation. We set out to model the BrainLAB imaging couch top (ICT) in Philips Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system (TPS), to validate the already modeled ICT in BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose treatment planning system and to compute the magnitude of the loss in skin sparing. Using CF density of 0.55 g/cm 3 and foam density of 0.03 g/cm 3 , we demonstrated an excellent agreement between measured dose and Pinnacle 3 TPS computed dose using 6 MV beam. The agreement was within 1% for all gantry angle measured except for 120 o , which was 1.8%. The measured and iPlan RT Dose TPS computed dose agreed to within 1% for all gantry angles and field sizes measured except for 100 o where the agreement was 1.4% for 10 cm × 10 cm field size. Predicted attenuation through the couch by iPlan RT Dose TPS (3.4% - 9.5%) and Pinnacle 3 TPS (2% - 6.6%) were within the same magnitude and similar to previously reported in the literature. Pinnacle 3 TPS estimated an 8% to 20% increase in skin dose with increase in field size. With the introduction of the CF couch top, it estimated an increase in skin dose by approximately 46 - 90%. The clinical impact of omitting the couch in treatment planning will be dependent on the beam arrangement, the percentage of the beams intersecting the couch and their angles of incidence. We have successfully modeled the ICT in Pinnacle 3 TPS and validated the modeled ICT in iPlan RT Dose. It is recommended that the ICT be included in treatment planning for all treatments that involve posteriors beams. There is a significant increase in skin dose that is dependent on the percentage of the beam

  3. Radiation doses from radioactivity in incandescent mantles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Thorium nitrate is used in the production of incandescent mantles for gas lanterns. In this report dose estimates are given for internal and external exposure that result from the use of the incandescent mantles for gas lanterns. The collective, effective dose equivalent for all users of gas mantles is estimated to be about 100 Sv per annum in the Netherlands. For the population involved (ca. 700,000 persons) this is roughly equivalent to 5% to 10% of the collective dose equivalent associated with exposure to radiation from natural sources. The major contribution to dose estimates comes from inhalation of radium during burning of the mantles. A pessimistic approach results in individual dose estimates for inhalation of up to 0.2 mSv. Consideration of dose consequences in case of a fire in a storage department learns that it is necessary for emergency personnel to wear respirators. It is concluded that the uncontrolled removal of used gas mantles to the environment (soil) does not result in a significant contribution to environmental radiation exposure. (Auth.)

  4. The health detriment associated with low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the problems and uncertainties in using available data to derive risk estimates are discussed in relation to low dose irradiation. Topics considered are:- dose and dose response relationships for stochastic effects following low doses of low LET radiation, estimates of probability of human radiation-induced cancer at low doses, proposed estimates of probability of fatal cancer for low dose, low dose rate, low-LET radiation, natural incidence of severe hereditary diseases, estimates of probability of radiation-induced severe hereditary diseases at low doses, deterministic effects resulting from low dose prenatal exposure, cancer induction including leukemia following human in utero irradiation, mental retardation, and total health detriment. (UK)

  5. Dose-effect relationships for fife shortening, tumorigenesis, and systemic injuries in mice irradiated with fission neutron or 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.J.; Fry, R.J.M.; Williamson, F.S.; Brennan, P.C.; Stearner, S.P.; Yang, V.V.; Crouse, D.A.; Rust, J.H.; Borak, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide additional data on life shortening, neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases, and other systematic injuries necessary for the determination of dose-response relationships. The data are used to test existing predictive models and formulate new models which may assist with radiation risk assessment. Late somatic effects of fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor or from cobalt-60 gamma radiation are evaluated in young adult B6CF 1 mice that receive either a range of single doses or protracted doses at low dose rates; the protracted irradiation is administered over a 6-month period. After single doses of gamma radiation the relationship between radiation dose and percent life shortening appears linear whereas after single doses of fission spectrum neutrons a non-linear dose response is observed. These results suggest that estimates of radiation risk for fission spectrum neutrons should take into account the following: the curvilinearity of the neutron dose-response curve for life shortening, and the increased life shortening produced by neutron dose fractionation

  6. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  7. Automated extraction of radiation dose information for CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to radiation as a result of medical imaging is currently in the spotlight, receiving attention from Congress as well as the lay press. Although scanner manufacturers are moving toward including effective dose information in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine headers of imaging studies, there is a vast repository of retrospective CT data at every imaging center that stores dose information in an image-based dose sheet. As such, it is difficult for imaging centers to participate in the ACR's Dose Index Registry. The authors have designed an automated extraction system to query their PACS archive and parse CT examinations to extract the dose information stored in each dose sheet. First, an open-source optical character recognition program processes each dose sheet and converts the information to American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text. Each text file is parsed, and radiation dose information is extracted and stored in a database which can be queried using an existing pathology and radiology enterprise search tool. Using this automated extraction pipeline, it is possible to perform dose analysis on the >800,000 CT examinations in the PACS archive and generate dose reports for all of these patients. It is also possible to more effectively educate technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians about exposure to radiation from CT by generating report cards for interpreted and performed studies. The automated extraction pipeline enables compliance with the ACR's reporting guidelines and greater awareness of radiation dose to patients, thus resulting in improved patient care and management. Copyright © 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Capture and analysis of radiation dose reports for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, S M

    2014-12-01

    Radiographic imaging systems can produce records of exposure and dose parameters for each patient. A variety of file formats are in use including plain text, bit map images showing pictures of written text and radiation dose structured reports as text or extended markup language files. Whilst some of this information is available with image data on the hospital picture archive and communication system, access is restricted to individual patient records, thereby making it difficult to locate multiple records for the same scan protocol. This study considers the exposure records and dose reports from four modalities. Exposure records for mammography and general radiography are utilized for repeat analysis. Dose reports for fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) are utilized to study the distribution of patient doses for each protocol. Results for dosimetric quantities measured by General Radiography, Fluoroscopy and CT equipment are summarised and presented in the Appendix. Projection imaging uses the dose (in air) area product and derived quantities including the dose to the reference point as a measure of the air kerma reaching the skin, ignoring movement of the beam for fluoroscopy. CT uses the dose indices CTDIvol and dose length product as a measure of the dose per axial slice, and to the scanned volume. Suitable conversion factors are identified and used to estimate the effective dose to an average size patient (for CT and fluoroscopy) and the entrance skin dose for fluoroscopy.

  9. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  10. Radiation effects on and dose enhancement of electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srour, J.R.; Long, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes radiation effects on and dose enhancement factors for electronic materials. Alteration of the electrical properties of solid-state devices and integrated circuits by impinging radiation is well-known. Such changes may cause an electronic subsystem to fail, thus there is currently great interest in devising methods for avoiding radiation-induced degradation. The development of radiation-hardened devices and circuits is an exciting approach to solving this problem for many applications, since it could minimize the need for shielding or other system hardening techniques. Part 1 describes the basic mechanisms of radiation effects on electronic materials, devices, and integrated circuits. Radiation effects in bulk silicon and in silicon devices are treated. Ionizing radiation effects in silicon dioxide films and silicon MOS devices are discussed. Single event phenomena are considered. Key literature references and a bibliography are provided. Part II provides tabulations of dose enhancement factors for electronic devices in x-ray and gamma-ray environments. The data are applicable to a wide range of semiconductor devices and selected types of capacitors. Radiation environments discussed find application in system design and in radiation test facilities

  11. Pediatric radiation dose management in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neitzel, U.

    2004-01-01

    Direct digital radiography (DR) systems based on flat-panel detectors offer improved dose management in pediatric radiography. Integration of X-ray generation and detection in one computer-controlled system provides better control and monitoring

  12. Radiation-induced cancer from low doses of ionizing radiation: risk analysis using the cell dose concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.

    1990-01-01

    High doses of ionizing radiations are known to bear the risk of cancer to the exposed individual. In order to appreciate potential carcinogenesis from low doses also, the action of ionizing radiation in the human body has to be considered in holistic approach: energy depositions to individual cells trigger effects within a hierachical structure of interacting levels of biological systems, consisting consecutively of atoms, molecules, cells and organ tissue. The present paper describes the cell dose concept which is an essential factor in assessing the risk due to the ionizing radiation to the cells and tissues. Low dose of ionizing radiation induces adaptive response in individual cells which could be linked to the action of molecular radicals. Enzyme activities in bone marrow cells and bilayer lipid membranes and radicals are directly related to radiation effects. Temporary improvements of the detoxification of molecular radicals also improve the cellular defence. The risk analysis calls for more attention as it is important for radiation protection and other beneficial effects due to low doses of irradiation. (author). 18 refs

  13. Comparison of radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort and financial break-even of standard digital radiography and a novel biplanar low-dose X-ray system for upright full-length lower limb and whole spine radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Schwab, Alexander; Pankalla, Katja; Buck, Florian M

    2013-07-01

    To compare the radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort, and financial break-even of a standard digital radiography and a biplanar low-dose X-ray system. A standard digital radiography system (Ysio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was compared with a biplanar X-ray unit (EOS, EOS imaging, Paris, France) consisting of two X-ray tubes and slot-scanning detectors, arranged at an angle of 90° allowing simultaneous vertical biplanar linear scanning in the upright patient position. We compared data of standing full-length lower limb radiographs and whole spine radiographs of both X-ray systems. Dose-area product was significantly lower for radiographs of the biplanar X-ray system than for the standard digital radiography system (e.g. whole spine radiographs; standard digital radiography system: 392.2 ± 231.7 cGy*cm(2) versus biplanar X-ray system: 158.4 ± 103.8 cGy*cm(2)). The mean examination time was significantly shorter for biplanar radiographs compared with standard digital radiographs (e.g. whole spine radiographs: 449 s vs 248 s). Patients' comfort regarding noise was significantly higher for the standard digital radiography system. The financial break-even point was 2,602 radiographs/year for the standard digital radiography system compared with 4,077 radiographs/year for the biplanar X-ray unit. The biplanar X-ray unit reduces radiation exposure and increases subjective noise exposure to patients. The biplanar X-ray unit demands a higher number of examinations per year for the financial break-even point, despite the lower labour cost per examination due to the shorter examination time.

  14. Comparison of radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort and financial break-even of standard digital radiography and a novel biplanar low-dose X-ray system for upright full-length lower limb and whole spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Tobias J.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Pankalla, Katja; Buck, Florian M. [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Schwab, Alexander [University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Finances, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    To compare the radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort, and financial break-even of a standard digital radiography and a biplanar low-dose X-ray system. A standard digital radiography system (Ysio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was compared with a biplanar X-ray unit (EOS, EOS imaging, Paris, France) consisting of two X-ray tubes and slot-scanning detectors, arranged at an angle of 90 allowing simultaneous vertical biplanar linear scanning in the upright patient position. We compared data of standing full-length lower limb radiographs and whole spine radiographs of both X-ray systems. Dose-area product was significantly lower for radiographs of the biplanar X-ray system than for the standard digital radiography system (e.g. whole spine radiographs; standard digital radiography system: 392.2 {+-} 231.7 cGy*cm{sup 2} versus biplanar X-ray system: 158.4 {+-} 103.8 cGy*cm{sup 2}). The mean examination time was significantly shorter for biplanar radiographs compared with standard digital radiographs (e.g. whole spine radiographs: 449 s vs 248 s). Patients' comfort regarding noise was significantly higher for the standard digital radiography system. The financial break-even point was 2,602 radiographs/year for the standard digital radiography system compared with 4,077 radiographs/year for the biplanar X-ray unit. The biplanar X-ray unit reduces radiation exposure and increases subjective noise exposure to patients. The biplanar X-ray unit demands a higher number of examinations per year for the financial break-even point, despite the lower labour cost per examination due to the shorter examination time. (orig.)

  15. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    radiation, a time after radiation, individual and situational conditions of the irradiated object and the environment. A group of essential radiation toxins with antigenic properties expressed significantly and specifically for different forms of the radiation disease represents the group of compounds: glycoproteins and lipoproteins that accumulate in the lymphatic system of mammals at once in the first hours after radiation. The molecular weight of radiation toxins of S.D.R. group constitutes 200-250 k DA. The essential radiation toxins, preparations of S.D.R. (Specific Radiation Determinant), were isolated from the lymphatic system of laboratory and agricultural animals that were irradiated by doses capable to induce development of cerebral (S.D.R. - 1), toxic (S.D.R.-2), gastrointestinal (S.D.R.-3) and typical (S.D.R.-4) forms of the acute radiation disease. Biological properties and reproduction effects of preparations of essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group depended on a magnitude of radiation doses that animal-donors absorbed being irradiated. The essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group isolated from the lymphatic system of irradiated animals and injected by the different doses to intact animals can provide the effects which induce development of different forms of the acute radiation disease. Different doses of active biological substance of S.D.R. can provide different effects:1. Optimal doses are necessary for an active immune response and radioprotection effects 2. Toxic doses can induce and stimulate the radiation disease. Optimal doses of S.D.R. preparations applied for active immunization are determined very individually and depend on species of laboratory animals, their weight and gender. Toxic doses of S.D.R. preparations can cause, stimulate and imitate the development of different forms of the acute radiation syndromes and any consequences of the acute radiation disorder. Previously researchers allow making assumption what toxic doses of biological

  16. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D.; Jones, J.; Gonda, S.; Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G.; Kirchin, V.; Rachael, C.

    2006-01-01

    radiation, a time after radiation, individual and situational conditions of the irradiated object and the environment. A group of essential radiation toxins with antigenic properties expressed significantly and specifically for different forms of the radiation disease represents the group of compounds: glycoproteins and lipoproteins that accumulate in the lymphatic system of mammals at once in the first hours after radiation. The molecular weight of radiation toxins of S.D.R. group constitutes 200-250 k DA. The essential radiation toxins, preparations of S.D.R. (Specific Radiation Determinant), were isolated from the lymphatic system of laboratory and agricultural animals that were irradiated by doses capable to induce development of cerebral (S.D.R. - 1), toxic (S.D.R.-2), gastrointestinal (S.D.R.-3) and typical (S.D.R.-4) forms of the acute radiation disease. Biological properties and reproduction effects of preparations of essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group depended on a magnitude of radiation doses that animal-donors absorbed being irradiated. The essential radiation toxins of S.D.R. group isolated from the lymphatic system of irradiated animals and injected by the different doses to intact animals can provide the effects which induce development of different forms of the acute radiation disease. Different doses of active biological substance of S.D.R. can provide different effects:1. Optimal doses are necessary for an active immune response and radioprotection effects 2. Toxic doses can induce and stimulate the radiation disease. Optimal doses of S.D.R. preparations applied for active immunization are determined very individually and depend on species of laboratory animals, their weight and gender. Toxic doses of S.D.R. preparations can cause, stimulate and imitate the development of different forms of the acute radiation syndromes and any consequences of the acute radiation disorder. Previously researchers allow making assumption what toxic doses of biological

  17. Radiation dose measurements in intravenous pyelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeblad, M.; Gottlieb, E.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) and micturition cystourethrography (MCU) are the standard procedures in the radiological examination of children with urinary tract infections and in the control of these children. Gonad protection against radiation is not possible in MCU, but concerning the girls partly possible in IVP. It is of major importance to know the radiation dose in these procedures, especially since the examination is often repeated in the same patients. All IVP were done by means of the usual technique including possible gonad protection. The thermoluminescence dosimeter was placed rectally in the girls and fixed on the scrota in the boys. A total of 50 children was studied. Gonad dose ranged from 140 to 200mR in the girls and from 20 to 70mR in the boys (mean values). The radiation dose in IVP is very low compared to that of MCU, and from this point of view IVP is a dose saving examination in the control of children with urinary tract infections [fr

  18. The development of a decision support system with an interactive clinical user interface for estimating treatment parameters in radiation therapy in order to reduce radiation dose in head and neck patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sneha; Liu, Joseph; Deshpande, Ruchi; DeMarco, John; Liu, Brent J.

    2017-03-01

    The primary goal in radiation therapy is to target the tumor with the maximum possible radiation dose while limiting the radiation exposure of the surrounding healthy tissues. However, in order to achieve an optimized treatment plan, many constraints, such as gender, age, tumor type, location, etc. need to be considered. The location of the malignant tumor with respect to the vital organs is another possible important factor for treatment planning process which can be quantified as a feature making it easier to analyze its effects. Incorporation of such features into the patient's medical history could provide additional knowledge that could lead to better treatment outcomes. To show the value of features such as relative locations of tumors and surrounding organs, the data is first processed in order to calculate the features and formulate a feature matrix. Then these feature are matched with retrospective cases with similar features to provide the clinician with insight on delivered dose in similar cases from past. This process provides a range of doses that can be delivered to the patient while limiting the radiation exposure of surrounding organs based on similar retrospective cases. As the number of patients increase, there will be an increase in computations needed for feature extraction as well as an increase in the workload for the physician to find the perfect dose amount. In order to show how such algorithms can be integrated we designed and developed a system with a streamlined workflow and interface as prototype for the clinician to test and explore. Integration of the tumor location feature with the clinician's experience and training could play a vital role in designing new treatment algorithms and better outcomes. Last year, we presented how multi-institutional data into a decision support system is incorporated. This year the presentation is focused on the interface and demonstration of the working prototype of informatics system.

  19. High-dose mode of mortality in Tribolium: A model system for study of radiation injury and repair in non-proliferative tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chihing Christina.

    1989-01-01

    With appropriate doses of ionizing radiation, both the acute, or lethal-midlethal, dose-independent pattern of mortality, and the hyperacute, dose-dependent pattern, were demonstrated within a single insect genus (Tribolium). This demonstration provides resolution of apparently contradictory reports of insect radiation responses in terms of doses required to cause lethality and those based on survival time as a function of dose. A dose-dependent mortality pattern was elicited in adult Tribolium receiving high doses, viz., 300 Gy or greater; its time course was complete in 10 days, before the dose-independent pattern of mortality began. Visual observations of heavily-irradiated Tribolium suggested neural and/or neuromuscular damage, as had been previously proposed by others for lethally-irradiated wasps, flies, and mosquitoes. Results of experiments using fractionated high doses supported the suggestion that the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death is the result of damage to nonproliferative tissues. Relative resistance of a strain to the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death was not correlated with resistance to the midlethal mode, which is believed to be the result of damage to the proliferative cells of the midgut. Using the high-dose mode of death as a model of radiation damage to nonproliferative tissues, the effects of age, and of a moderate priming dose were assessed. Beetles showed age-related increase in sensitivity to the high-dose mode of death, suggesting a decline in capacity to repair radiation damage to postmitotic tissue. This correlated with a decrease (50%) in the amount of repair reflected in the sparing effect of dose-fractionation (SDF) between the age of 1 to 3 months. The age related increase in radiosensitivity was reduced by a moderate priming dose (40 or 65 Gy) given at a young age

  20. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaetzing, R.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment. (orig.)

  1. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaetzing, R. [Agfa Corp., Greenville, SC (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment. (orig.)

  2. Reduction of the dose of ionizing radiation: progressions in TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlacchio, A.; Costanzo, E.; Chegai, F.; Simonetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of the dose of ionizing radiation in CT, it is a very important matter that can be reach avoiding unnecessary examinations, using un appropriate report KV / mAs reducing the rotation time, determining the field of study, using a high pitch using equipment that provide systems with dose reduction, through proper education of the staff that interacts with machinery and using radioprotective compounds.

  3. Radiation dose to the nuclear medicine nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari, A.; Dadashzadeh, S.; Nasirgholi, G.; Firoozabadi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: people who have been administrated radiopharmaceuticals could be a source of radiation to their relatives, medical nurses, and people who are in contact with them. The aim of this work was to estimate radiation dose received by nuclear medicine nurses. Materials and methods: in this study, the dose rates at various distances of 5-100 cm from 70 patients, who were administrated diagnostic of 201 T1-Chloride and 99m Tc-MIBI , were measured using an ionization chamber. For determination of external radiation dose to the nurses, three different time intervals were used for measurements. Results: The maximum values of external dose rates of 201 T1 and 99m Tc-MIBI were 11.2 μ Sv/h ±2.3 and 43.1μSv/h ±11.9 respectively, at 5cm from the patients. Significant exposure from patients after injection of 99m Tc-MIBI was limited to the day of administration. Departure dose rate of 201 T1 fell gradually; so, it became significant by 3 days after administration. Maximum and average absorbed dose of nuclear medicine staff from 201 T1, was 4.6 and 2.7μSv/h, and for 9 '9 m Tc-MIBI was 18.1 and 9.8 μSv/h in each scan. Conclusion: significant exposure from the patients is limited to the few hours after administration, therefore patients should be recommended to urinate frequently before leaving the nuclear medicine department

  4. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs

  5. Assessment of Organ Radiation Dose Associated with Uterine Artery Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glomset, O.; Hellesnes, J.; Heimland, N.; Hafsahl, G.; Smith, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation dose to the skin, uterus, and ovaries during uterine artery embolization. Material and Methods: Guided uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata and two types of X-ray equipment with different dose levels were utilized during fluoroscopy in 20 women (ages ranging from 32 to 52 years, body weights from 55 to 68 kg). The first 13 women were treated using a non-pulsed system A, with 3.3 mm Al filtering and, for simplicity, a fixed peak voltage 80 kV. During treatment of the other 7 women, a pulsed system B with 5.4 mm Al filtering and an identical fixed voltage was used. The dose area product (DAP) was recorded. The vaginal dose of the first 13 patients and the peak skin dose of all patients were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). TLDs were placed in the posterior vaginal fornix and on the skin at the beam entrance site. The uterine and ovarian doses were estimated based on the measured skin doses, normalized depth dose, and organ depth values. The effective dose (D eff ) was estimated based on the observed DAP values. The measured vaginal doses and the corresponding estimated uterine doses were compared statistically, as were the DAP values from systems A and B. Results: For system A, the mean fluoroscopic time was 20.9 min (range 12.7-31.1), and for system B 35.9 min (range 16.4-55.4). The mean numbers of angiographic exposures for systems A and B were 82 (range 30-164) and 37 (range 20-72), respectively. The mean peak skin dose for system A was 601.5 mGy (range 279-1030) and for system B 453 mGy (range 257-875). The mean DAP for system A was 88.6 Gy cm 2 (range 41.4-161.0) and for system B 52.5 Gy cm 2 (range 20.1-107.9). Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the DAP values, the DAP for system B being the lower one. The mean estimated effective doses from systems A and B were 32 mSv (range 15.1-58.4) and 22 mSv (range 9-46), respectively. The mean estimated maximum uterine and ovarian doses

  6. Assessment of Organ Radiation Dose Associated with Uterine Artery Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glomset, O.; Hellesnes, J.; Heimland, N.; Hafsahl, G.; Smith, H.J. [Rikshospitalet Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiology and the Interventional Centre

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation dose to the skin, uterus, and ovaries during uterine artery embolization. Material and Methods: Guided uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata and two types of X-ray equipment with different dose levels were utilized during fluoroscopy in 20 women (ages ranging from 32 to 52 years, body weights from 55 to 68 kg). The first 13 women were treated using a non-pulsed system A, with 3.3 mm Al filtering and, for simplicity, a fixed peak voltage 80 kV. During treatment of the other 7 women, a pulsed system B with 5.4 mm Al filtering and an identical fixed voltage was used. The dose area product (DAP) was recorded. The vaginal dose of the first 13 patients and the peak skin dose of all patients were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). TLDs were placed in the posterior vaginal fornix and on the skin at the beam entrance site. The uterine and ovarian doses were estimated based on the measured skin doses, normalized depth dose, and organ depth values. The effective dose (D eff ) was estimated based on the observed DAP values. The measured vaginal doses and the corresponding estimated uterine doses were compared statistically, as were the DAP values from systems A and B. Results: For system A, the mean fluoroscopic time was 20.9 min (range 12.7-31.1), and for system B 35.9 min (range 16.4-55.4). The mean numbers of angiographic exposures for systems A and B were 82 (range 30-164) and 37 (range 20-72), respectively. The mean peak skin dose for system A was 601.5 mGy (range 279-1030) and for system B 453 mGy (range 257-875). The mean DAP for system A was 88.6 Gy cm{sup 2} (range 41.4-161.0) and for system B 52.5 Gy cm{sup 2} (range 20.1-107.9). Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the DAP values, the DAP for system B being the lower one. The mean estimated effective doses from systems A and B were 32 mSv (range 15.1-58.4) and 22 mSv (range 9-46), respectively. The mean estimated maximum uterine and

  7. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiang Juliann G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wounding following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co γ-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in γ-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in γ-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI included continuously decreased γ-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined

  8. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alatas, Zubaidah

    2003-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  9. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations

  10. Influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on Escherichia coli DH5α population based on plasma theory and system dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Hu, Dawei; Li, Liang; Jing, Zheng; Wei, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Lantao; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It remains a mystery why the growth rate of bacteria is higher in low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment than that in normal environment. In this study, a hypothesis composed of environmental selection and competitive exclusion was firstly proposed from observed phenomena, experimental data and microbial ecology. Then a LDIR environment simulator (LDIRES) was built to cultivate a model organism of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, the accurate response of bacterial population to ionizing radiation intensity variation was measured experimentally, and then the precise relative dosage of ionizing radiation E. coli DH5α population received was calculated by finite element analysis based on drift-diffusion equations of plasma. Finally, a highly valid mathematical model expressing the relationship between E. coli DH5α population and LDIR intensity was developed by system dynamics based on hypotheses, experimental data and microbial ecology. Both experiment and simulation results clearly showed that the E. coli DH5α individuals with greater specific growth rate and lower substrate consumption coefficient would adapt and survive in LDIR environment and those without such adaptability were finally eliminated under the combined effects of ionizing radiation selection and competitive exclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analgesia induced by repeated exposure to low dose X-rays in mice, and involvement of the accessory olfactory system in modulation of the radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyachi, Yukihisa; Yamada, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low-dose X-rays on mouse nociceptive behavior were examined using a formalin injected test which rated the amount of time the animals spent licking the injected hind-paw. Male ICR White Swiss mice showed a marked suppression of licking behavior after repeated low-dose X-irradiation (5 cGy/day, 6 consecutive days). The most profound effect was observed on the day 30 after irradiation. The decline of licking behavior, however, was not observed at all following olfactory bulbectomy or vomeronasal tract cut. The analgesic effects could be observed in writhing animals administered acetic-acid intraperitoneally. Moreover, analgesia was totally blocked by the administration of N-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to accessory olfactory bulbs prior to the exposure. The present results indicate that the olfactory system plays an important role in modulation of radiation-induced analgesia, and a possible involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of recognition memory subjected to repeated X-rays. Relatively higher doses (5 cGy x 9 days, 5 cGy x 12 days), however, did not induce such effects, namely, the decline of nociceptive response was limited to the animals irradiated with the smaller dose. (author)

  12. Radiation dose and risk assessment in hysterosalpingography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plećaš Darko V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hysterosalpingography is an important diagnostic method for the evaluation of the female reproductive tract involving the exposure of patients to ionizing radiation. The irradiation of ovaries is unavoidable and radiation exposure of the patient and the associated radiological risk for the foetus and born child during the period of growth should be considered, as well. The purpose of this work is to evaluate organ and patient doses and radiation risks during hysterosalpingography procedures performed in a dedicated gynecological hospital. The entrance surface air kerma was measured for a total of 31 patients during hysterosalpingography. Based on the results obtained, the radiogenic risk for hereditary effects and cancer induction was estimated. The patient dose levels are in the range of 3-15 mGy, with a median value of 10 mGy, in terms of entrance surface air kerma. Estimated median ovarian and uterus doses are 1.7 and 2.3 mGy, respectively. The risk for fatal cancer and hereditary effects is estimated to be 5.5×10-5 and 3.4 ×10-6, respectively. Although low compared to the natural incidence of genetic effects and cancer, it can be elevated in cases of prolonged or repeated procedures or procedures where the non-optimized protocol is used.

  13. New technologies to reduce pediatric radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, Philipp; Lendl, Markus; Deinzer, Frank

    2006-01-01

    X-ray dose reduction in pediatrics is particularly important because babies and children are very sensitive to radiation exposure. We present new developments to further decrease pediatric patient dose. With the help of an advanced exposure control, a constant image quality can be maintained for all patient sizes, leading to dose savings for babies and children of up to 30%. Because objects of interest are quite small and the speed of motion is high in pediatric patients, short pulse widths down to 4 ms are important to reduce motion blurring artifacts. Further, a new noise-reduction algorithm is presented that detects and processes signal and noise in different frequency bands, generating smooth images without contrast loss. Finally, we introduce a super-resolution technique: two or more medical images, which are shifted against each other in a subpixel region, are combined to resolve structures smaller than the size of a single pixel. Advanced exposure control, short exposure times, noise reduction and super-resolution provide improved image quality, which can also be invested to save radiation exposure. All in all, the tools presented here offer a large potential to minimize the deterministic and stochastic risks of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  14. Radiation Dose to Post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation dose calculation for post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers in Ukraine - both external radiation exposure due to fallout and internal doses due to inhalation (I131 intake) or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs.

  15. Low radiation doses - Book of presentations (slides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the conference on low radiation doses organised by the 'research and health' department of the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Ten presentations are available and deal with he following topics: 1 - Cyto-toxicity, geno-toxicity: comparative approach between ionizing radiations and other geno-toxic agents (F. Nesslany, Institut Pasteur, Lille); Succession of events occurring after a radio-induced DNA damage (D. Averbeck, IRSN/CEA); Importance of stem cells in the response to ionizing radiations (J. Lebeau, CEA); Relation between energy deposition at the sub-cell scale and early biological effects (C. Villagrasa, IRSN); Natural history of breast cancer: predisposition, susceptibility with respect to irradiation (S. Rivera, IGR); Pediatrics scanner study and the EPI-CT project (M.O Bernier, IRSN); What future for an irradiated cell: survival or apoptosis? (E. Sage, Institut Curie); Differential effect of a 137 Cs chronic contamination on the different steps of the atheromatous pathology (T. Ebrahimian, IRSN); Variability of the individual radiosensitivity (S. Chevillard, CEA); What definitions for individual sensitivity? (A. Schmidt, CEA); Low doses: some philosophical remarks (A. Grinbaum, CEA)

  16. Radiation dose measurement and alarm equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girle, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    This portable radiation personal dosemeter contains only commercially available electronic components and is light, easy to operate, stable and requires practically no maintenance. The radiation which is present produces electrical impulses in a detector in the well known way, whose frequency is propertional to the intensity of radiation. The added number of pulses is therefore a measure of the incoming radiation dose. After passing through a pulse forming circuit the pulses are stored in a digital counter, i.e. they are added. An AND circuit connected to the counter output produces the excitation of the sound generator through a subsequent bistable circuit, if a number of pulses preset in the counter is reached. The sound generator feeds a warning signal to a loudspeaker. A second output after the digital counter converts the added number of pulses to an instrument reading in a digital - analogue converter. This makes it possible to read the instantaneous value of dose while the digital value is not indicated but only used for setting off the alarm. (HP) [de

  17. Epistemological problems in assessing cancer risks at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walinder, G.

    1987-01-01

    Historically, biology has not been subjected to any epistemological analysis as has been the case with mathematics and physics. Our knowledge of the effects in biological systems of various stimuli proves to be dualistic in a complementary (although not mutually exclusive) way, which bears resemblance to the knowledge of phenomena in quantum physics. The dualistic limbs of biological knowledge are the action of stimuli and the response of the exposed, biological system. With regard to radiogenic cancer, this corresponds to the action of the ionizations and the response of the exposed mammal to that action, respectively. The following conclusions can be drawn from the present analysis: Predictions as to radiogenic cancer seem often if not always to have neglected the response variability (variations in radiosensitivity) in individuals or among individuals in populations, i.e. the predictions have been based exclusively on radiation doses and exposure conditions. The exposed individual or population, however, must be considered an open statistical system, i.e. a system in which predictions as to the effect of an agent are only conditionally possible. The knowledge is inverse to the size of the dose or concentration of the active agent. On epistemological grounds, we can not gain knowledge about the carcinogenic capacity of very low (non-dominant) radiation doses. Based on the same principle, we can not predict cancer risks at very low (non-dominant) radiation doses merely on the basis of models, or otherwise interpolated or extrapolated high-dose effects, observed under special exposure conditions

  18. Natural radiation dose estimates from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, M.A.G.R.; Moreira, H.; Medina, N.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil has been studied. Soil samples from Interlagos, Sao Paulo; parks and Billings dam, in Sao Bernardo do Campo city; Santos, Sao Vicente and Sao Sebastiao beaches, Sao Paulo and sands from Ilha Grande beaches, Rio de Janeiro, were analyzed. The results show that the main contribution to the effective dose is due to elements of the 232 Th decay chain, with a smaller contribution from the radionuclide 40 K and the elements of the series of 238 U. The obtained values found in the studied regions, are around the average international dose due to external exposure to gamma rays (0.48 mSv/yr), except in Praia Preta, Ilha Grande, where the effective dose exceeds the average value. (author)

  19. National Survey of Radiation Doses of Pediatric Chest Radiography in Korea: Analysis of the Factors Affecting Radiation Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Hyun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Oh, Sang Young [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong Ju; Lee, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jung Eun [National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Radiation Safety Division, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate radiation doses in pediatric chest radiography in a national survey and to analyze the factors that affect radiation doses. The study was based on the results of 149 chest radiography machines in 135 hospitals nationwide. For each machine, a chest radiograph was obtained by using a phantom representing a 5-year-old child (ATOM dosimetry phantom, model 705-D, CIRS, Norfolk, VA, USA) with each hospital's own protocol. Five glass dosimeters (M-GD352M, Asahi Techno Glass Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan) were horizontally installed at the center of the phantom to measure the dose. Other factors including machine's radiography system, presence of dedicated pediatric radiography machine, presence of an attending pediatric radiologist, and the use of automatic exposure control (AEC) were also evaluated. The average protocol for pediatric chest radiography examination in Korea was 94.9 peak kilovoltage and 4.30 milliampere second. The mean entrance surface dose (ESD) during a single examination was 140.4 microgray ({mu}Gy). The third quartile, median, minimum and maximum value of ESD were 160.8 {mu}Gy, 93.4 {mu}Gy, 18.8 {mu}Gy, and 2334.6 {mu}Gy, respectively. There was no significant dose difference between digital and non-digital radiography systems. The use of AEC significantly reduced radiation doses of pediatric chest radiographs (p < 0.001). Our nationwide survey shows that the third quartile, median, and mean ESD for pediatric chest radiograph is 160.8 {mu}Gy, 93.4 {mu}Gy, and 140.4 {mu}Gy, respectively. No significant dose difference is noticed between digital and non-digital radiography systems, and the use of AEC helps significantly reduce radiation doses.

  20. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  1. Direct determination of internal radiation dose in human blood

    OpenAIRE

    Tanır, Ayse Güneş; Güleç, Özge

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the internal radiation dose using a human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of the internal radiation dose received by a person. The luminescence counts from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose and the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes were both measured. The decay and dose-response curves were plotted for the different doses...

  2. Patient radiation exposure and dose tracking: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, Madan M

    2017-07-01

    Much of the emphasis on radiation protection about 2 decades ago accrued from the need for protection of radiation workers and collective doses to populations from medical exposures. With the realization that individual patient doses were rising and becoming an issue, the author had propagated the concept of a smart card for radiation exposure history of individual patients. During the last 7 years, much has happened wherein radiation exposure and the dose history of individual patients has become a reality in many countries. In addition to dealing with overarching questions, such as "Why track, what to track, and how to track?," this review elaborates on a number of points such as attitudes toward tracking, review of practices in large parts of the world, description of various elements for exposure and dose tracking, how to use the information available from tracking, achievements and stumbling blocks in implementation to date, templates for implementation of tracking at different levels of health care, the role of picture archiving and communication systems and eHealth, the role of tracking in justification and optimization of protection, comments on cumulative dose, how referrers can use this information, current provisions in international standards, and future actions.

  3. BCC and Childhood Low Dose Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Beiraghi Toosi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is a late complication of ionizing radiation. Two skin neoplasms prominent Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC and Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC are the most famous complications of radiotherapy. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC is the most common human malignant neoplasm. Many genetic and environmental factors are involved in its onset. BCC is observed in sun-exposed areas of skin. Some patients with scalp BCC have had a history of scalp radiation for the treatment of tinea capitis in childhood. Evidence that ionizing radiation is carcinogenic first came from past reports of nonmelanoma skin cancers on the hands of workers using radiation devices. The total dose of radiation and irradiated site exposed to sunlight can lead to a short incubation period. It is not clear whether BCC in these cases has a more aggressive nature and requires a more aggressive resection of the lesion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the differences between BCC specification and treatment results between irradiated and nonirradiated patients.

  4. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  5. Status of calcium regulating hormonal systems in delayed period in persons exposed to occupational exposure of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dospolova, Zh.G.; Abylaev, Zh.A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of study is consideration of endocrine system participation in development of calcium exchange disorders in persons exposed to action of low dose radiation . By radio- immune method in blood serum of 150 liquidators of Chernobyl accident consequences the concentration the following hormones were determined: parathormone, T 3 , T 4 , TSH, cortisol, ACTH, testosteron, insulin. Content of these hormones have been studied in according to following radiation factors: value of absorbed doses of external irradiation, degree of radioactive contamination of zone and exposition duration. It was determined, that basically dishormone disorders development have been concerned with parathormone, cortisol, hormones of thyroid axis, and in some cases to ACTH and insulin. Liquidators' frequencies of normal and changed concentration of calcium regulating hormones are sited in tabular form. It was established, that examined persons in result hormone disorders have of decrease functions of pituitary glands (76.78 %), pancreas (55 %), thyroid gland (24.31 %) and sex glands (19.23 %) and simultaneously cases of increase functions of parathyroid gland (58.2 %), adrenal glands (52.32 %) and adeno-pituitary glands (17.39). It is concluded, that inter hormonal correlation disorders are accompanying with morphologic and functional futures of secretory activity changes

  6. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  7. Radiation sensitive medium for recording an absorbed dose distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a radiation sensitive medium for recording an absorbed dose distribution from an external radiation source such as e.g. a linear particle accelerator used for e.g. cancer treatment or radiation processing. The invention further relates to a method for measuring the absorbed...... doses distribution in a radiation sensitive medium....

  8. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  9. Radiation dose to the eye lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; D. Nielsen, Kamilla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Dose to the Eye Lens: Does Positioning Really Matter? C. Baun1, K. Falch1, K.D. Nielsen2, S. Shanmuganathan1, O. Gerke1, P.F. Høilund-Carlsen1 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. 2University College Lillebaelt, Odense, Denmark. Aim: The scan...... field in oncology patients undergoing eyes-to-thighs PET/CT must always include the base of the scull according to department guidelines. The eye lens is sensitive to radiation exposure and if possible it should be avoided to scan the eye. If the patient’s head is kipped backwards during the scan one...... might avoid including the eye in the CT scan without losing sufficient visualization of the scull base. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose to the eye lens, simply by changing the head position, when doing the PET/CT scan from the base of the scull...

  10. Radiation dose distribution to CEGB workers in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.J.; Wheatley, B.M.

    1980-04-01

    The ICRP system of dose limitation requires that few if any workers are exposed at the dose limit of 5 rem per year. The dose limit was fixed on the assumption that risks would be acceptable if doses were distributed among classified workers in a manner comparable with a reference log-normal distribution published by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Although it is well-known from earlier publications that the doses to classified workers at CEGB nuclear sites are low, a further analysis shows that they are distributed according to a log-normal function with parameters showing a distribution of risks considerably better than those considered acceptable by ICRP. In 1978 the collective dose to 6,856 classified workers on CEGB nuclear sites was 1,635 man-rem. The mean individual dose was 0.24 rem, corresponding to 0.41 man-rem per MW. The log normal distribution of individual doses shows a median dose of 0.15 rem, compared with a median dose of 0.5 rem in the UNSCEAR reference distribution. (author)

  11. Adaptive responses of living cells towards low-doses of radiation. Induction of endogenous antioxidant system and its applicable possibility for treatment of diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shuji; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    1999-01-01

    Bacteria and mammalian cells show an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with small amounts of oxidant induces resistance to the subsequent, otherwise lethal, doses of oxidant. Previous studies have shown that this adaptive response involves the induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), metallothionein, heat shock proteins, and other factors. The toxicity of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, to living cells, is thought to be due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Thus, adaptive responses to low doses of ionizing radiation and to oxidants are likely to be similar. In this paper, the induction of endogenous glutathione (GSH) together with antioxidant enzymes induced by low-dose radiation was reviewed. Furthermore, the applicable possibility of this efficacy for the prevention of and/or therapy of various reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related diseases including Parkinson's diseases, aging, and diabetes, was discussed. (author)

  12. [The effect of natural polyphenol complex of red grape wine on L-arginine/NO system in peripheral blood of rats under low doses of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadashka, M V; Hnatush, A R; Datsiuk, L O; Staranko, U V; Fedorovych, A M; Herzhikova, V H; Zotov, A M; Slast'ia, É A; Sybirna, N O

    2014-01-01

    The total activity of NO-synthase and content of stable metabolitic products of nitric oxide in the peripheral blood of rats under low doses of ionizing radiation and administration of natural polyphenol complex of grape was investigated. It was found that natural polyphenol compounds of grapes have the ability to correct radioinduced changes in L-arginine/NO system. It was noted that the action of X-radiation increased activity of NO-synthase in the peripheral blood of rats. However, the consumption of natural polyphenol complex of grape led to a decrease of this index to control values. An increase in NOS activity under irradiation leads to the increase of NO stable metabolites content, which is reflected in the accumulation of nitrite- and nitrate-anions in the peripheral blood of rats. The consumption of preparation of polyphenol complex this index decreased in the early period of the experiment, and on the third day after exposure, the total content of NO stable metabolites is slightly higher compared to the indices of control animals. Thus, the ability of natural polyphenol complex to cause attenuation of oxidative-nitrative stress caused by ionizing radiation was investigated experimentally.

  13. The effect of natural polyphenol complex of red grape wine ON L-arginine/NO system in peripheral blood of rats under low doses of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Sabadashka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The total activity of NO-synthase and content of stable metabolitic products of nitric oxide in the peripheral blood of rats under low doses of ionizing radiation and administration of natural polyphenol complex of grape was investigated. It was found that natural polyphenol compounds of grapes have the ability to correct radioinduced changes in L-arginine/NO system. It was noted that the action of X-radiation increased activity of NO-synthase in the peripheral blood of rats. However, the consumption of natural polyphenol complex of grape led to a decrease of this index to control values. An increase in NOS activity under irradiation leads to the increase of NO stable metabolites content, which is reflected in the accumulation of nitrite- and nitrate-anions in the peripheral blood of rats. The consumption of preparation of polyphenol complex this index decreased in the early period of the experiment, and on the third day after exposure, the total content of NO stable metabolites is slightly higher compared to the indices of control animals. Thus, the ability of natural polyphenol complex to cause attenuation of oxidative-nitrative stress caused by ionizing radiation was investigated experimentally.

  14. Radiation risk factors and dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The contents of the ICRP publications 9 (1965) and 26 (1977) are outlined and the research conducted during these years considered. Expressions are derived for the frequency for induction of cancer from the most common irradiations - X rays, gamma rays and electrons. The dose limits advised by the ICRP are discussed and the first two fundamental principles are presented - that no one should be subjected to radiation without useful cause and that in those cases where irradiation is thought necessary, the medical, scientific, social and economic advantages need to be carefully considered with respect to the possible disadvantages. (C.F.)

  15. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.; Dellagrammaticas, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered. (author)

  16. Radiation doses from mammography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Young, B.F.; Young, J.G.; Tingey, D.R.C.

    1991-05-01

    During 1989-90 the Australian Radiation Laboratory conducted a postal survey of at least 90% of the mammographic facilities in Australia. The primary aim of the survey was to measure the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the X-ray beam half value layer (HVL) for a typical mammograph. The MGD and HVL were measured with a specially designed tissue equivalent monitor. In all, 258 mammographic centres were surveyed. It was found that for centres using film-screen imaging, the average mean glandular dose was 1.83 mGy for centres using grids and 0.84 mGy for centres not using grids. In addition to the MGD and HVL, comprehensive statistical information was collected and data is presented on the types of equipment and techniques used, the number and age of patients and demographic distribution of centres. Results indicate that the use of a grid is the major factor determining dose and several other factors appear to have minor effects. In view of the distribution of MGD, it is recommended that the mean glandular dose per image, for a 5 cm compressed breast thickness, should not exceed 2.0 mGy when a grid is used and 1.0 mGy without a grid. 63 refs., 11 tabs., 15 figs

  17. Validating the pivotal role of the immune system in low-dose radiation-induced tumor inhibition in Lewis lung cancer-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoying; Li, Hui; Niu, Chao; Yu, Dehai; Yang, Guozi; Liang, Xinyue; Wen, Xue; Li, Min; Cui, Jiuwei

    2018-04-01

    Although low-dose radiation (LDR) possesses the two distinct functions of inducing hormesis and adaptive responses, which result in immune enhancement and tumor inhibition, its clinical applications have not yet been elucidated. The major obstacle that hinders the application of LDR in the clinical setting is that the mechanisms underlying induction of tumor inhibition are unclear, and the risks associated with LDR are still unknown. Thus, to overcome this obstacle and elucidate the mechanisms mediating the antitumor effects of LDR, in this study, we established an in vivo lung cancer model to investigate the participation of the immune system in LDR-induced tumor inhibition and validated the pivotal role of the immune system by impairing immunity with high-dose radiation (HDR) of 1 Gy. Additionally, the LDR-induced adaptive response of the immune system was also observed by sequential HDR treatment in this mouse model. We found that LDR-activated T cells and natural killer cells and increased the cytotoxicity of splenocytes and the infiltration of T cells in the tumor tissues. In contrast, when immune function was impaired by HDR pretreatment, LDR could not induce tumor inhibition. However, when LDR was administered before HDR, the immunity could be protected from impairment, and tumor growth could be inhibited to some extent, indicating the induction of the immune adaptive response by LDR. Therefore, we demonstrated that immune enhancement played a key role in LDR-induced tumor inhibition. These findings emphasized the importance of the immune response in tumor radiotherapy and may help promote the application of LDR as a novel approach in clinical practice. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Transatlantic Comparison of CT Radiation Doses in the Era of Radiation Dose-Tracking Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Anushri; Euler, Andre; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare diagnostic reference levels from a local European CT dose registry, using radiation-tracking software from a large patient sample, with preexisting European and North American diagnostic reference levels. Data (n = 43,761 CT scans obtained over the course of 2 years) for the European local CT dose registry were obtained from eight CT scanners at six institutions. Means, medians, and interquartile ranges of volumetric CT dose index (CTDI vol ), dose-length product (DLP), size-specific dose estimate, and effective dose values for CT examinations of the head, paranasal sinuses, thorax, pulmonary angiogram, abdomen-pelvis, renal-colic, thorax-abdomen-pelvis, and thoracoabdominal angiogram were obtained using radiation-tracking software. Metrics from this registry were compared with diagnostic reference levels from Canada and California (published in 2015), the American College of Radiology (ACR) dose index registry (2015), and national diagnostic reference levels from local CT dose registries in Switzerland (2010), the United Kingdom (2011), and Portugal (2015). Our local registry had a lower 75th percentile CTDI vol for all protocols than did the individual internationally sourced data. Compared with our study, the ACR dose index registry had higher 75th percentile CTDI vol values by 55% for head, 240% for thorax, 28% for abdomen-pelvis, 42% for thorax-abdomen-pelvis, 128% for pulmonary angiogram, 138% for renal-colic, and 58% for paranasal sinus studies. Our local registry had lower diagnostic reference level values than did existing European and North American diagnostic reference levels. Automated radiation-tracking software could be used to establish and update existing diagnostic reference levels because they are capable of analyzing large datasets meaningfully.

  19. Radiation doses and radiation risk in foreign nuclear objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvehlov, Yu.

    2001-01-01

    Data on levels of irradiation on NPP operating in different regions of the world obtained from the data of the International Information System ISOE created by IAEA in association with the Nuclear Energetic Agency OECD are performed. Effect of commissioning new NPP, sacrifice of radiation situation at the Ignalina NPP in 1996, importance of the development and introduction of programs on perfecting of radiation protection and culture of safety are noted [ru

  20. A unique radiation area monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.C.; Allen, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Remote Area Monitoring Systems (RAMS) monitors four radiation areas with two independent systems in each area. Each system consists of power supplies, four ionization chambers, and four analog and digital circuits. The first system controls the warning beacons, horns, annunciation panel and interlocks. The second system presents a quantitative dose rate indication at the console and in the radiation area

  1. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  2. Determination of the radiation dose to the body due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1985-01-01

    Section 63 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance defines the basic requirement, determination of radiation dose to the body. The determination of dose equivalents for the body is the basic step in practical monitoring of dose equivalents or dose limits with regard to individuals or population groups, both for constant or varying conditions of exposure. The main field of monitoring activities is the protection of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Conversion factors between body doses and radiation quantities are explained. (DG) [de

  3. Radiation Doses in Patient Eye Lenses during Interventional Neuroradiology Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R M; Vañó, E; Fernández, J M; Rosati, S; López-Ibor, L

    2016-03-01

    Eye lenses are among the most sensitive organs to x-ray radiation and may be considered at risk during neurointerventional radiology procedures. The threshold dose to produce eye lens opacities has been recently reduced to 500 mGy by the International Commission on Radiologic Protection. In this article, the authors investigated the radiation doses delivered to patients' eyes during interventional neuroradiology procedures at a university hospital. Small optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were located over patients' eyes during 5 diagnostic and 31 therapeutic procedures performed in a biplane x-ray system. Phantom measurements were also made to determine the level of radiation to the eye during imaging runs with conebeam CT. The left eye (located toward the lateral C-arm x-ray source) received a 4.5 times greater dose than the right one. The average dose during embolization in the left eye was 300 mGy, with a maximum of 2000 mGy in a single procedure. The patient who received this maximum eye dose needed 6 embolization procedures to treat his high-volume AVM. If one took into account those 6 embolizations, the eye dose could be 2-fold. Sixteen percent of the embolizations resulted in eye doses of >500 mGy. A relevant fraction of patients received eye doses exceeding the threshold of 500 mGy. A careful optimization of the procedures and follow-up of these patients to evaluate potential lens opacities should be considered. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  5. Dose calculation system for remotely supporting radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kunieda, E.; Narita, Y.; Kimura, H.; Hirai, M.; Deloar, H. M.; Kaneko, K.; Ozaki, M.; Fujisaki, T.; Myojoyama, A.; Saitoh, H.

    2005-01-01

    The dose calculation system IMAGINE is being developed keeping in mind remotely supporting external radiation therapy using photon beams. The system is expected to provide an accurate picture of the dose distribution in a patient body, using a Monte Carlo calculation that employs precise models of the patient body and irradiation head. The dose calculation will be performed utilising super-parallel computing at the dose calculation centre, which is equipped with the ITBL computer, and the calculated results will be transferred through a network. The system is intended to support the quality assurance of current, widely carried out radiotherapy and, further, to promote the prevalence of advanced radiotherapy. Prototypes of the modules constituting the system have already been constructed and used to obtain basic data that are necessary in order to decide on the concrete design of the system. The final system will be completed in 2007. (authors)

  6. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Hwang, T.; Hsieh, C.; Thames, H.

    1985-01-01

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  7. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  8. Dose non-linearity of the dosimetry system and possible monitor unit errors on medical linear accelerators used in conventional and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Wazir; Hoon Lee Sang; Alam Khan; Maqbool Muhammad; Khan Gulzar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study dose non-linearity in medical linear accelerators used in conventional radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Open fields, as well as the enhanced dynamic wedge ones, were used to collect data for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams obtained from the VARIAN linear accelerator. Beam stability was checked and confirmed for different dose rates, energies, and application of enhanced dynamic wedge by calculating the charge per monitor unit. Moni...

  9. Versatile radiation gaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    The attributes of computerized versatile radiation gaging systems are described. The gages are used to measure plating thicknesses and material characteristics that can be determined from radiation attenuation and/or x-ray fluorescence measurements

  10. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  11. Attributability of health effects at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel

    2008-01-01

    assumption that the relationship between the number of people being exposed and their doses is robust enough to make epidemiological attestability feasible (Strictly, the population would also need to be identical to those populations studied epidemiologically). - Conversely, at the individual level, stochastic health effects at low doses are, at this time of biological understanding, unfeasible to be credited, assigned and imputed and consequently ascribed to a specific exposure situation; - However, if attributability is taken to be a stochastic notion, then a conditional probability of causation can be theoretically assigned (following Bayes' theorem and using available scientific information). This stochastic attributability, nevertheless, will not be attestable. - Therefore, while individual health effects can under certain theoretical assumptions be stochastically attributable, they can not be subjected to an attestable attributability. - As a result, presently individual health effects can not be deterministically attributable to radiation exposure situations delivering low radiation doses and, thus, they may not be deemed attributable in codified legal systems. (author)

  12. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices. A comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anissi, H.D.; Geibel, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. Materials and Methods: 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). Results: 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Conclusion: Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. (orig.)

  13. Efeitos de baixas doses de radiação-X no desenvolvimento do sistema nervoso central: estudo experimental em ratos Effects of low X-radiation doses on the central nervous system development: an experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Lins

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho analisa as conseqüências da irradiação-X no desenvolvimento do sistema nervoso de fetos de ratos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O trabalho foi constituído de 10 Rattus norvegicus albinos, Wistar, fêmeas, grávidas, com idade de oito semanas. Cinco ratas fêmeas constituíram o grupo controle e outras cinco tiveram suas regiões abdominais expostas por 30 segundos a uma dose de 0,3 Gy proveniente de um aparelho odontológico Gnatus de 70 kV e 10 mA. No 17º dia gestacional, ambos os grupos foram submetidos a histerectomia. As seções selecionadas foram examinadas para análise cerebral comparativa entre os grupos. RESULTADOS: O exame clínico revelou não haver diferenças morfológicas entre os grupos controle e experimental e nenhum dos animais apresentou anormalidades grosseiras. Vinte e sete por cento dos animais do grupo experimental apresentaram hemorragia cerebral moderada e 73% apresentaram hemorragia severa e danos no tecido nervoso. Nenhum animal do grupo controle apresentou hemorragia cerebral ou danificações de tecido nervoso. CONCLUSÃO: Estas evidências demonstram que pequenas doses de radiação-X podem causar hemorragias cerebrais e, conseqüentemente, lesão tecidual nervosa.OBJECTIVE: The present study analyzes the consequences of X-irradiation for the development of the nervous system of rat fetuses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample included ten eight-week-old, pregnant Rattus norvegicus albinus, Wistar. Five female rats constituted the control group and other five had their abdominal region exposed for 30 seconds to a single 0.3 Gy radiation dose from a 70 kV, 10 mA Gnatus odontological apparatus. At the 17th gestational day both groups were submitted to hysterectomy. Selected sections were examined for comparative brain analysis of both groups. RESULTS: The clinical evaluation demonstrated no morphological difference between the control and the experimental groups. Twenty-seven percent of the

  14. Measurement of radiation dose in multi-slice computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Surendra Maharjan; Sudil Prajapati; Om Biju Panta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) examinations of the head, chest and abdomen in adult patients in Nepal in comparison to international standard. Dose length products (DLP) and effective doses for standard patient sizes were calculated from the reported volume CT dose index (CTDIVol). Details were obtained from approximately 90 CT examinations carried out in 128 slice CT scan. Effective dose was calculated for each examination using CT dose ...

  15. Personal monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1981-12-01

    The Personal Radiation Monitoring Service operated by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is outlined and the types of monitors used for assessment of doses received by radiation workers are described. The distribution of doses received by radiation workers in different occupational categories is determined. From these distributions, the average doses received have been assessed and the maximum likely additional increase in cancer deaths in Australia as a result of occupational exposure estimated. This increase is shown to be very small. There is, however, a considerable spread of doses received by individuals within occupational groups

  16. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The guide presents the definitions of equivalent dose and effective dose, the principles for calculating these doses, and instructions for applying their maximum values. The limits (Annual Limit on Intake and Derived Air Concentration) derived from dose limits are also presented for the purpose of monitoring exposure to internal radiation. The calculation of radiation doses caused to a patient from medical research and treatment involving exposure to ionizing radiation is beyond the scope of this ST Guide

  17. Study of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation. The contribution of biphasic regulation of the antioxidative system in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Large, Martin; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Reichert, Sebastian; Roedel, Claus; Roedel, Franz [Goethe University Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gaipl, Udo S. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Fournier, Claudia [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Weiss, Christian [Goethe University Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Klinikum Darmstadt, Institute for Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We examined (a) the expression of the antioxidative factor glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) following low-dose X-irradiation in endothelial cells (ECs) and (b) the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nrf2 on functional properties of ECs to gain further knowledge about the anti-inflammatory mode of action of low doses of ionizing radiation. EA.hy926 ECs and primary human dermal microvascular ECs (HMVEC) were stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 20 ng/ml) 4 h before irradiation with single doses ranging from 0.3 to 3 Gy. The expression and activity of GPx and Nrf2 were analyzed by flow cytometry, colorimetric assays, and real-time PCR. The impact of ROS and Nrf2 on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) adhesion was assayed in the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and Nrf2 activator AI-1. Following a low-dose exposure, we observed in EA.hy926 EC and HMVECs a discontinuous expression and enzymatic activity of GPx concomitant with a lowered expression and DNA binding activity of Nrf2 that was most pronounced at a dose of 0.5 Gy. Scavenging of ROS by NAC and activation of Nrf2 by AI-1 significantly diminished a lowered adhesion of PBMC to EC at a dose of 0.5 Gy. Low-dose irradiation resulted in a nonlinear expression and activity of major compounds of the antioxidative system that might contribute to anti-inflammatory effects in stimulated ECs. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war die Untersuchung der Expression des antioxidativen Enzyms Glutathionperoxidase (GPx) und des Transkriptionsfaktors ''nuclear factor E2-related factor 2'' (Nrf2) in Endothelzellen nach niedrigdosierter Roentgenbestrahlung. Des Weiteren wurde der Einfluss von reaktiven Sauerstoffmetaboliten (ROS) und von Nrf2 auf funktionelle Eigenschaften von Endothelzellen analysiert, um weitere Erkenntnisse ueber die antientzuendliche Wirkung von niedrigdosierten Roentgenstrahlen

  18. Cosmic radiation doses at flight level altitudes of airliners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, E.; Petr, I.

    1985-01-01

    Changes are discussed in flux density of cosmic radiation particles with time as are the origin of cosmic radiation, the level of cosmic radiation near the Earth's surface, and the determination of cosmic radiation doses in airliners. Doses and dose rates are given measured on different flight routes. In spite of the fact that the flight duration at an altitude of about 10 km makes for about 80% of the total flight time, the overall radiation burden of the crews at 1000 flight hours a year is roughly double that of the rest of the population. (J.C.)

  19. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Habeeballa, B.; Osman, H.; Abdelaziz, I.; Sassi, S.A.; Sam, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) and (ii) Dynamic Cannula Screw (DCS) and to evaluate entrance surface Air kerma (ESAK) dose and organ doses and effective doses. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used. The mean patients’ doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 mGy for DHS and DCS procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean organ and effective dose for patients and staff were higher in DHS compared to DCS. Orthopedic surgeons were exposed to unnecessary radiation doses due to the lack of protection measures. The radiation dose per hip procedure is within the safety limit and less than the previous studies

  1. MO-G-18A-01: Radiation Dose Reducing Strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesh, M; Gingold, E; Jones, A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in medical x-ray imaging have provided significant benefits to patient care. According to NCRP 160, there are more than 400 million x-ray procedures performed annually in the United States alone that contributes to nearly half of all the radiation exposure to the US population. Similar growth trends in medical x-ray imaging are observed worldwide. Apparent increase in number of medical x-ray imaging procedures, new protocols and the associated radiation dose and risk has drawn considerable attention. This has led to a number of technological innovations such as tube current modulation, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dose alerts, dose displays, flat panel digital detectors, high efficient digital detectors, storage phosphor radiography, variable filters, etc. that are enabling users to acquire medical x-ray images at a much lower radiation dose. Along with these, there are number of radiation dose optimization strategies that users can adapt to effectively lower radiation dose in medical x-ray procedures. The main objectives of this SAM course are to provide information and how to implement the various radiation dose optimization strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography. Learning Objectives: To update impact of technological advances on dose optimization in medical imaging. To identify radiation optimization strategies in computed tomography. To describe strategies for configuring fluoroscopic equipment that yields optimal images at reasonable radiation dose. To assess ways to configure digital radiography systems and recommend ways to improve image quality at optimal dose

  2. Radiation exposure information record system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.W.; Fix, J.J.; Murphy, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The proposed alternative information system to provide DOE with a radiation exposure data base that could be used to assess the impacts of proposed changes in radiation protection practices and regulations. Although the data base would contain dose information on all DOE employees who are monitored for compliance, no personal identifiers would be maintained with this information. The proposed system includes a DOE employee locator file and a badged visitor file. The primary purpose of the locator file is to provide an up-to-date list of all current employees at DOE and DOE contractor sites

  3. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Alexandre R.; Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F.; Silva, Francisco C.A. Da

    2015-01-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  4. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre R., E-mail: alexandre.lima@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F., E-mail: samuelfisica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gabriel.alo@aceletron.com.br [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Aceletrica Comercio e Representacoes Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Francisco C.A. Da, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  5. Dose planning and dose delivery in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoeoes, T.

    1991-01-01

    A method has been developed for calibration of CT-numbers to volumetric electron density distributions using tissue substitutes of known elemental composition and experimentally determined electron density. This information have been used in a dose calculation method based on photon and electron interaction processes. The method utilizes a convolution integral between the photon fluence matrix and dose distribution kernels. Inhomogeneous media are accounted for using the theorems of Fano and O'Connor for scaling dose distribution kernels in proportion to electron density. For clinical application of a calculated dose plan, a method for prediction of accelerator output have been developed. The methods gives the number of monitor units that has to be given to obtain a certain absorbed dose to a point inside an irregular, inhomogeneous object. The method for verification of dose distributions outlined in this study makes it possible to exclude the treatment related variance contributions, making an objective evaluation of dose calculations with experiments feasible. The methods for electron density determination, dose calculation and prediction of accelerator output discussed in this study will all contribute to an increased accuracy in the mean absorbed dose to the target volume. However, a substantial gain in the accuracy for the spatial absorbed dose distribution will also follow, especially using CT for mapping of electron density together with the dose calculation algorithm. (au)

  6. Radiation dose to the patient in radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    In medical radionuclide studies, the radiation risk has to be considered in addition to the general risk of administering a pharmaceutical. As radiation exposure is an essential factor in radiation risk estimation, some aspects of internal dose calculation, including radiation risk assessments, are treated. The formalism of current internal dose calculation is presented. The input data, especially the residence time and the absorbed dose per transformation, their origin and accuracy are discussed. Results of internal dose calculations for the ten most frequently used radionuclide studies are presented as somatically effective dose equivalents. The accuracy of internal dose calculation is treated in detail by considering the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical, the phantoms used for dose calculations, the absorbed dose per transformation, the administered activity, and the transfer of the dose, calculated for a phantom, to the patient. The internal dose calculated for a reference phantom may be assumed to be in accordance with the actual patient dose within a range described by a factor of about two to three. Finally, risk estimates for nuclear medicine procedures are quantified, being generally of sixth order. The radiation risk from the radioiodine test is comparably higher, but probably lower than calculated according to the UNSCEAR risk coefficients. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results and to improve the quantification of the radiation risk from the medical use of radionuclides. (author)

  7. Integrated nuclear and radiation protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, I.; Oprea, M.; Stoica, V.; Cerga, V.; Pirvu, V.; Badea, E.

    1993-01-01

    A multifunctional radiation monitoring equipment, flexible and capable to meet virtually environmental radiation monitoring, activity measurement and computational requirements, for nuclear laboratories has been designed. It can be used as a radiation protection system, for radionuclide measurement in isotope laboratories, nuclear technology, health physics and nuclear medicine, nuclear power stations and nuclear industry. The equipment is able to measure, transmit and record gamma dose rate and isotope activities. Other parameters and functions are optionally available, such as: self-contained alarm level, system self-test, dose integrator, syringe volume calculation for a given dose corrected for decay, calibration factor, 99 Mo assays performing and background subtraction

  8. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses; Energies, sante, medecine. Les faibles doses de rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  9. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  10. Multi-detector computed tomography radiation doses in the follow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The primary objectives were to determine the radiation dose exposure in paediatric patients subjected to MDCT imaging following neurosurgery and to compare these values with references in current literature. Our secondary objective was to assess the relationship between radiation dose and clinical scenario.

  11. Influence of the SURLAS applicator on radiation dose distributions during simultaneous thermoradiotherapy with helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Petr; PenagarIcano, Jose A; Nahirnyak, Volodymyr; Corry, Peter; Moros, Eduardo G

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous thermoradiotherapy has been shown to maximize the effect of hyperthermia as a radiation sensitizer in cancer treatment. Here we follow our previous work on feasibility of thermoradiotherapy with the scanning ultrasound reflector linear array system (SURLAS) and TomoTherapy (registered) Hi.Art (registered) treatment system, and investigate the influence of the SURLAS hyperthermia applicator on delivered radiation dose with the TomoTherapy. A radiation treatment plan was calculated and the treatment was delivered to a phantom with SURLAS on top simulating the likely clinical setup. Proper positioning of the SURLAS was assisted with a magnetic position-and-orientation tracking device (POTD) and was verified with megavoltage-computed tomography. The delivered dose was measured with an ionization chamber (point measurement) and a radiographic film (2D dose distributions). The planned and delivered point dose data agreed within 0.61% ± 0.63%. Planar dose data agreed within a dose difference of ≤3% of the maximum dose, and a distance-to-dose-agreement of ≤1 mm. The susceptibility of the delivered radiation dose on correct SURLAS positioning was studied as well. The largest dose discrepancy was measured for a position for which a maximum number of radiation beams intersected the incorrectly positioned SURLAS within one TomoTherapy gantry rotation. The point dose disagreed by 6.14% ± 0.52%, and 2.25% of pixels of the 2D dose distribution did not pass the 3% dose difference/1 mm distance-to-dose-agreement criteria. Our study showed that correct positioning of the SURLAS applicator had an influence on the delivered radiation dose. Delivered and planned dose distributions were in an excellent agreement when SURLAS was positioned according to the treatment plan. Moving the applicator from its planned position was found to cause a modification of delivered dose distributions. A precise and reproducible positioning of the applicator was assured with a POTD

  12. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  13. Solar radiation alert system : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The Solar Radiation Alert (SRA) system continuously evaluates measurements of high-energy protons made by instruments on GOES satellites. If the measurements indicate a substantial elevation of effective dose rates at aircraft flight altitudes, the C...

  14. A Paradigm Shift in Low Dose Radiation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alatas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When ionizing radiation traverses biological material, some energy depositions occur and ionize directly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA molecules, the critical target. A classical paradigm in radiobiology is that the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA are responsible for the detrimental biological effects of radiation. It is presumed that no radiation effect would be expected in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure through nucleus. The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation. However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose radiation than they do to high dose radiation. Moreover, recent experimental evidences from many laboratories reveal the fact that radiation effects also occur in cells that were not exposed to radiation and in the progeny of irradiated cells at delayed times after radiation exposure where cells do not encounter direct DNA damage. Recently, the classical paradigm in radiobiology has been shifted from the nucleus, specifically the DNA, as the principal target for the biological effects of radiation to cells. The universality of target theory has been challenged by phenomena of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response. The new radiation biology paradigm would cover both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying these responses involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. These results brought in understanding that the biological response to low dose radiation at tissue or organism level is a complex process of integrated response of cellular targets as well as extra-cellular factors. Biological understanding of

  15. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  16. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated

  17. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  19. Comparison of computational models for estimation of whole body and organ radiation dose in rainbow trout from uptake of iodine-131 - Comparison of rainbow trout phantoms for estimation of whole body and organ radiation dose rates from uptake of iodine-131 in freshwater systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Nicole E. [Department of Environmental and Engineering Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, 29634 (United States); Johnson, Thomas E.; Ruedig, Elizabeth; Pinder, John E. III [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 1681 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80523 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Internal radiation dose rates to biota are typically calculated utilizing dose conversion factors (DCF), which are values for absorbed dose rate per activity concentration (i.e. mGy d{sup -1} per Bq g{sup -1}). The current methodology employed by both the ICRP and within the ERICA Integrated Approach for calculating dose conversion coefficients is to use Monte Carlo modeling of a homogeneously distributed radionuclide within an ellipsoidal phantom chosen to represent a particular organism. It has been shown that for whole-body DCF, homogenous distribution is a reasonable assumption for electrons, and is associated with an uncertainty of less than 30% for photons. However, if a radionuclide has a specific tissue tropism (e.g. iodine-131 in thyroid) a much higher dose will be received by the organ or tissue than by the whole body. Internal organs are modeled generically as spheres within the ellipsoid phantom, due to the complex and variable nature of organ structure and arrangement within different types of organisms. Ratios of whole-body to organ mass offer conservative conversions of whole-body to organ specific DCF (Gomez-Ros et al 2008), but may considerably overestimate the organ dose; more accurate estimates can be made based on specific absorbed fractions and activity concentrations. Establishment of appropriate screening levels in the regulatory paradigm requires incorporation of sufficient knowledge of dose effects; the ICRP currently lists no derived consideration reference levels for organs, meaning that specific risks associated with organ dose rates are unavailable (ICRP 108). Model comparison and refinement is important in the process of determining both dose rates and dose effects, and here we develop and compare three models for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): the simple geometry described above, a more specific geometry employing anatomically relevant organ size and location, and voxel reconstruction of internal anatomy obtained from CT imaging

  20. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Orthopedic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H; Elzaki, A.; Sam, A.K.; Sulieman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of orthopedic procedures requiring the use of the fluoroscopic guidance has increased over the recent years. Consequently the patient exposed to un avoidable radiation doses. The aim of the current study was to evaluate patient radiation dose during these procedures.37 patients under went dynamic hip screw (DHS) and dynamic cannulated screw (DCS) were evaluated using calibrated Thermolumincent Dosimeters (TLDs), under carm fluoroscopic machines ,in three centers in Khartoum-Sudan. The mean Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was 7.9 m Gy per procedure. The bone marrow and gonad organ exposed to significant doses. No correlation was found between ESD and Body Mass Index (BMI), or patient weight. Well correlation was found between kilo voltage applied and ESD. Orthopedic surgeries delivered lower radiation dose to patients than cardiac catheterization or hysterosalpingraphy (HSG) procedures. More study should be implemented to follow radiation dose before surgery and after surgery

  1. Personnel external dose monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hengyuan

    1989-01-01

    The status and trend of personnel external dose monitoring system are introduced briefly. Their characteristics, functions and TLD bedges of some commercially available automatic TLD system, including UD-710A (Matsushita, Japan), Harshaw-2271, 2276 (Harshaw, USA), Harshaw-8000 (Harshaw/Filtrol), Studsvik-1313 (Sweden) and Pitman-800 (UK) were depicted in detail. Finally, personnel dose management and record keeping system were presented and two examples were given

  2. Perspectives on radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewe, W.E.

    1986-12-01

    Four decades after the actual events, quantitative characterization of the radiation fields at Hiroshima and Nagasaki continues to be sought, with high accuracy a goal justified by the unique contribution to radiation protection standards that is represented by the medical records of exposed survivors. The most recent effort is distinguished by its reliance on computer modeling and concomitant detail, and by its decentralized direction, both internationally and internally to the US and Japan, with resultant ongoing peer review and wide scope of inquiry. A new system for individual dose estimation has been agreed upon, and its scientific basis has been elaborated in the literature as well as in a comprehensive treatise to be published in the Spring of 1987. In perspective, this new system appears to be an unusually successful achievement that offers the expectation of reliable estimates with the desired accuracy. Some aspects leading to this expectation, along with a caveat, are discussed here. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Perspectives on radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewe, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    For decades after the actual events, quantitative characterization of the radiation fields at Hiroshima and Nagasaki continues to be sought, with high accuracy a goal justified by the unique contribution to radiation protection standards that is represented by the medical records of exposed survivors. The most recent effort is distinguished by its reliance on computer modelling and concomitant detail, and by its decentralized direction, both internationally and internally to the U.S. and Japan, with resultant ongoing peer review and wide scope of inquiry. A new system for individual dose estimation has been agreed upon, and its scientific basis has been elaborated in the literature as well as in a comprehensive treatise to be published in the Spring of 1987. In perspective, this new system appears to be an unusually successful achievement that offers the expectation of reliable estimates with the desired accuracy. Some aspects leading to this expectation, along with a caveat, are discussed here

  4. Perspectives on radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    1986-12-01

    Four decades after the actual events, quantitative characterization of the radiation fields at Hiroshima and Nagasaki continues to be sought, with high accuracy a goal justified by the unique contribution to radiation protection standards that is represented by the medical records of exposed survivors. The most recent effort is distinguished by its reliance on computer modeling and concomitant detail, and by its decentralized direction, both internationally and internally to the US and Japan, with resultant ongoing peer review and wide scope of inquiry. A new system for individual dose estimation has been agreed upon, and its scientific basis has been elaborated in the literature as well as in a comprehensive treatise to be published in the Spring of 1987. In perspective, this new system appears to be an unusually successful achievement that offers the expectation of reliable estimates with the desired accuracy. Some aspects leading to this expectation, along with a caveat, are discussed here. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  6. Radiation risk evaluation and reference doses in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Vano, E.; Padovani, R.; Zoetelief, J.

    2001-01-01

    In interventional radiology, there are two potential hazards to the patient. These are somatic risks and, for certain procedures, deterministic injuries. The task of radiation protection in interventional radiology is to minimise somatic risks and avoid deterministic injuries. Radiation protection tools and protocols must be developed to achieve these two objectives. Reference doses have been proposed as a method of identifying high dose centres and equipment. The role of reference doses in interventional radiology will be discussed. There are two approaches to reference doses in interventional radiology. These are the measurement of patient entrance skin dose or skin dose rate, or image intensifier input dose rate. Alternatively, dose area product or effective dose to the patient may be monitored. These two main approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  7. Assessment of dose level of ionizing radiation in army scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Hamid, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy radiation. Ionizing radiation is widely used in industry and medicine. Any human activity of nuclear technologies should be linked to the foundation of scientific methodology and baseline radiation culture to avoid risk of radiation and should be working with radioactive materials and expertise to understand, control practices in order to avoid risks that could cause harm to human and environment. The study was conducted in warehouses and building of Sudan air force Khartoum basic air force during September 2010. The goal of this study to estimate the radiation dose and measurement of radioactive contamination of aircraft scrap equipment and increase the culture of radiological safety as well as the concept of radiation protection. The results showed that there is no pollution observed in the contents of the aircraft and the spire part stores outside, levels of radiation dose for the all contents of the aircraft and spire part within the excitable level, except temperature sensors estimated radiation dose about 43 μSv/h outside of the shielding and 12 μSv/h inside the shielding that exceeded the internationally recommended dose level. One of the most important of the identification of eighteen (18) radiation sources used in temperature and fuel level sensors. These are separated from the scrap, collected and stored in safe place. (Author)

  8. Patient radiation dose in conventional and xerographic cephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copley, R.L.; Glaze, S.A.; Bushong, S.C.; West, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of the radiation doses for xeroradiographic and conventional film screen cephalography was made. Alderson tissue-equivalent phantoms were used for patient simulation. An optimum technique in terms of patient dose and image quality indicated that the dose for the Xerox process ranged from five to eleven times greater than that for the conventional process for entrance and exit exposures, respectively. This dose, however, falls within an acceptable range for other dental and medical radiation doses. It is recommended that conventional cephalography be used for routine purposes and that xeroradiography be reserved for situations requiring the increased image quality that the process affords

  9. Radiation doses and possible radiation effects of low-level, chronic radiation in vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, W.A.; Franks, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of radiation doses in soil and vegetation in Pu-contaminated areas at the Nevada Test Site with the objective of investigating low-level, low-energy gamma radiation (with some beta radiation) effects at the cytological or morphological level in native shrubs. In this preliminary investigation, the exposure doses to shrubs at the approximate height of stem apical meristems were estimated from 35 to 140 R for a ten-year period. The gamma exposure dose estimated for the same period was 20.7 percent +- 6.4 percent of that recorded by the dosimeters used in several kinds of field instrument surveys. Hence, a survey instrument reading made at about 25 cm in the tops of shrubs should indicate about 1 / 5 the dosimeter-measured exposures. No cytology has yet been undertaken because of the drought since last winter. (auth)

  10. 10 CFR 20.1004 - Units of radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... beta radiation 1 1 Alpha particles, multiple-charged particles, fission fragments and heavy particles... convenient to measure the neutron fluence rate than to determine the neutron dose equivalent rate in rems per... measured tissue dose in rads to dose equivalent in rems. Table 1004(b).2—Mean Quality Factors, Q, and...

  11. Clinical practitioners' knowledge of ionizing radiation doses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Observation has shown a preponderance of irrelevant, unjustified and perhaps unnecessary radiological requests in the study area. The consequences of this on the patients' doses and population collective dose may be dire. Objective: To assess Clinicians/Referrers' knowledge of radiation doses of patients ...

  12. The determination of the penetrating radiation dose at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, L.A.

    1989-09-01

    Most of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and other devices that have been used to measure environmental radiation on the Hanford Site have measured natural background levels of radiation. Measurements of offsite environmental radiation near the boundary of the Hanford Site have often indicated higher doses than onsite measurements have. However, the converse has been found when radiation measurements from the cities and communities of southeastern Washington were compared with onsite measurements. The historical trends described for environmental TLD data have been better defined in this study by compiling the TLD data for selected locations over a 6-year period (1983 to 1988). The ongoing Hanford Environmental Surveillance Program also provides radionuclide concentrations in soil based on samples collected by technicians at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sent to a commercial laboratory for analyses. As part of the study described in this report, a portable gamma spectroscopy system was used in the field to identify concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the soil at various locations on the Hanford Site and in the surrounding area. This work began in 1986. Supplemental radiation measurements were made with a microprocessor-based survey meter and large NaI detector. 20 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. “Denervation” of autonomous nervous system in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension by low-dose radiation: a case report with an unexpected outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohenforst-Schmidt W

    2014-03-01

    in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. A 58-year-old woman presented with dyspnea and mild edema of the lower extremities. A bronchoscopy was performed without any suspicious findings suggesting a central tumor or other infiltrative disease. Endobronchial ultrasound revealed enlarged pulmonary arteries containing thrombi, a few enlarged lymph nodes, and enlarged mediastinal tissue anatomy with suspicion for mediastinal infiltration of a malignant process. We estimated that less than 10% of the peripheral vascular bed of the lung was involved in direct consolidated fibrosis as demonstrated in the left upper lobe apex. Further, direct involvement of fibrosis around the main stems of the pulmonary arteries was assumed to be low from positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Assuming a positive influence of low-dose radiation, it was not expected that this could have reduced pulmonary vascular resistance by over two thirds of the initial result. However; it was noted that this patient had idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension mixed with “acute” (mediastinal fibrosis which could have contributed to the unexpected success of reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, probably as a result of low-dose radiation to the pulmonary arterial main stems. The patient continues to have no specific complaints concerning her idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.Keywords: radiation, pulmonary hypertension, denervatio

  14. Semiconductor radiation detection systems

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Covers research in semiconductor detector and integrated circuit design in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explores other applications of semiconductor radiation detection systems in security applications such as luggage scanning, dirty bomb detection and border control.

  15. Digital radiation monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Jinhu; Zhai Yongchun; Guan Junfeng; Ren Dangpei; Ma Zhiyuan

    2003-01-01

    The article introduced digital radiation monitor system. The contents include: how to use advanced computer net technology to establish equipment net for nuclear facility, how to control and manage measuring instruments on field equipment net by local area net, how to manage and issue radiation monitoring data by internet

  16. Total dose and dose rate radiation characterization of EPI-CMOS radiation hardened memory and microprocessor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, B.L.; Hermsen, J.M.; Lee, J.C.; Schroeder, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The process, circuit discription, and total dose radiation characteristics are presented for two second generation hardened 4K EPI-CMOS RAMs and a first generation 80C85 microprocessor. Total dose radiation performance is presented to 10M rad-Si and effects of biasing and operating conditions are discussed. The dose rate sensitivity of the 4K RAMs is also presented along with single event upset (SEU) test data

  17. Trends in doses to some UK radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.J.; Kendall, G.M.; Pook, E.A.; Saunders, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The NRPB runs a Personal Monitoring Service which issues dosemeters and keeps radiation dose records for over 10 000 workers. This database is a valuable source of information on occupational exposure to radiation though it is likely that in future the Central Index of Dose Information (CIDI) will provide more comprehensive statistics, albeit restricted to radiation workers in the sense of Ionising Radiation Regulations. This note describes doses incurred to the end of 1987 with some preliminary figures for 1988. It does not cover the same ground as earlier reports but gives more details of the structure of the monitored population by age and sex and examines evidence that mean radiation doses are decreasing with time. (author)

  18. Audit of radiation dose during balloon mitral valvuloplasty procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Chandy, Sunil; Peace, B S Timothy; George, Paul; John, Bobby; Pati, Purendra

    2006-01-01

    Radiation doses to patients during cardiological procedures are of concern in the present day scenario. This study was intended to audit the radiation dose imparted to patients during the balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV) procedure. Thirty seven patients who underwent the BMV procedure performed using two dedicated cardiovascular machines were included in the study. The radiation doses imparted to patients were measured using a dose area product (DAP) meter. The mean DAP value for patients who underwent the BMV procedure from one machine was 19.16 Gy cm 2 and from the other was 21.19 Gy cm 2 . Optimisation of exposure parameters and radiation doses was possible for one machine with the use of appropriate copper filters and optimised exposure parameters, and the mean DAP value after optimisation was 9.36 Gy cm 2

  19. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. Occupational Radiation Dose for Medical Workers at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Nassef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational radiation doses for medical workers from the departments of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy at the university hospital of King Abdul-Aziz University (KAU were measured and analysed. A total of 100 medical radiation workers were monitored to determine the status of their average annual effective dose. The analysis and the calibration procedures of this study were carried out at the Center for Radiation Protection and Training-KAU. The monitored workers were classified into subgroups, namely, medical staff/supervisors, technicians, and nurses, according to their responsibilities and specialties. The doses were measured using thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti placed over the lead apron at the chest level in all types of workers except for those in the cath lab, for whom the TLD was placed at the thyroid protective collar. For nuclear medicine, a hand dosimeter was used to measure the hand dose distribution. The annual average effective doses for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy workers were found to be 0.66, 1.56, and 0.28 mSv, respectively. The results of the measured annual dose were well below the international recommended dose limit of 20 mSv. Keywords: Occupational radiation dose, radiation workers, TLD, radiation protection

  1. Mean annual and collective radiation doses of Perm' province personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, K.K.; Rotenberg, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    The average annual and collective doses of radiation received by personnel of radiologic facilities and by the population of the region under study as a whole are estimated. Tabular data on radiation loads are presented according to the age and sex of personnel and to the type of radiation sources used. The procedure employed in this study allows one to evaluate objectively the conditions of work with sources of ionizing radiation

  2. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  3. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek

    2007-07-01

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources

  4. Staff radiation doses from patients undergoing Indium-111 investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvain, I.; Rabenandrasana, H.; Bruno, I.; Amaral, A.; Bonnin, F.; Bok, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to estimate the whole-body radiation doses to NM technical (radiation exposed personals) and to the nursing staff of the gastroenterology (GE) department (non radiation workers by radiation protection regulations) deriving from in patients undergoing 111 In octreotide ( 111 In-OCT) scintigraphy. Material and Methods: Doses were measured using electronic personal dosimeters from 6 patients who had received an intravenous injection of 160 ± 15 MBq 111 In-OCT. Real time measurements were separately performed for each task of NM personals during their contact with the radiopharmaceutical and/or the patient; and for the GE staff up to 24 h after administration of 111 In-OCT. Results: Individual radiation doses among the GE staff varied from 0.01 to 1.03 μSv (for 3 to 25 min close to the patient) during a working day for just one totally autonomous adult patient. The average dose rate was then 4.0 μSv/h. Radiation exposure of the NM technologists is presented. Conclusion: The injection is the more exposed task for NM personals. Extrapolating our results, the maximum radiation exposure to both the NM and GE staff remains far below the respective annual dose limits for radiation exposed and non exposed persons. The high sensitivity and real time responses of electronic dosimeters may help optimising practical radiation protection

  5. Effective dose equivalents from external radiation due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkin, V.G.; Debedev, O.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Parkhomenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized data on measurements of individual dose of external γ-sources in 1987-1990 of population of western areas of Bryansk region were presented. Type of distribution of effective dose equivalent, its significance for various professional and social groups of population depending on the type of the house was discussed. Dependences connecting surface soil activity in the populated locality with average dose of external radiation sources were presented. Tendency of dose variation in 1987-1990 was shown

  6. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. - Highlights: • This study aims to calculate the dose rate profiles after cobalt device ejection from open-pool-type reactor core. • MicroShield code was used to evaluate the dose rates inside the reactor control room. • McSKY code was used to evaluate the dose rates outside the reactor building. • The calculated dose rates for workers are higher than the permissible limits after 18 s from device ejection.

  7. Multilevel mechanisms of stimulatory effect of low dose radiation on immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu-Zeng Liu

    1992-01-01

    Attention is paid to the effects of low level ionizing radiation on humans. The conference is devoted to low dose radiation and defense mechanisms of the body. Due to the importance of the immune system in body resistance, special attention has been given to host defense mechanisms following exposure to different doses of ionizing radiation. The immune system has long been known to be highly sensitive to moderate to high doses of ionizing radiation with immuno-depression as one of the most important causes of death in acute radiation syndrome. However, the dose-effect relationship of immune functions has been found to be quite different in the low dose range, especially with doses within 0.1 Gy. With doses above 0.5 Gy most immunologic parameters show a dose dependent depression. With doses between 0.1-0.5 Gy there may be no definite changes in immune functions. Doses within 0.1 Gy, given in single or chronic exposures, have been found to stimulate many immune responses. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Measurement of gamma radiation doses in nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochvar, I.A.; Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Sergeeva, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the problems of measuring gamma radiation dose values and the dose distribution in the nuclear power plant area with the aim of estimating the extent of their effect on the population. Presented are the dosimeters applied, their distribution throughout the controlled area, time of measurement. The distribution of gamma radiation doses over the controlled area and the dose alteration with the increase of the distance from the release source are shown. The results of measurements are investigated. The conclusion is made that operating nuclear power plants do not cause any increase in the gamma radiation dose over the area. Recommendations for clarifying the techniques for using dose-meters and decreasing measurement errors are given [ru

  9. Health Benefits of Exposure to Low-dose Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy

    2016-03-01

    Although there is no doubt that exposure to high doses of radiation (delivered at a high dose-rate) induces harmful effects, the health risks and benefits of exposure to low levels (delivered at a low dose-rate) of toxic agents is still a challenging public health issue. There has been a considerable amount of published data against the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for assessing risk of cancers induced by radiation. The LNT model for risk assessment creates "radiophobia," which is a serious public health issue. It is now time to move forward to a paradigm shift in health risk assessment of low-dose exposure by taking the differences between responses to low and high doses into consideration. Moreover, future research directed toward the identification of mechanisms associated with responses to low-dose radiation is critically needed to fully understand their beneficial effects.

  10. Commentary 2 to Cox and Little: radiation-induced oncogenic transformation: the interplay between dose, dose protraction, and radiation quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence for end points such as oncogenic transformation in vitro, and carcinogenesis and life shortening in vivo, suggesting that dose protraction leads to an increase in effectiveness relative to a single, acute exposure--at least for radiations of medium linear energy transfer (LET) such as neutrons. Table I contains a summary of the pertinent data from studies in which the effect is seen. [table: see text] This phenomenon has come to be known as the "inverse dose rate effect," because it is in marked contrast to the situation at low LET, where protraction in delivery of a dose of radiation, either by fractionation or low dose rate, results in a decreased biological effect; additionally, at medium and high LET, for radiobiological end points such as clonogenic survival, the biological effectiveness is independent of protraction. The quantity and quality of the published reports on the "inverse dose rate effect" leaves little doubt that the effect is real, but the available evidence indicates that the magnitude of the effect is due to a complex interplay between dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Here, we first summarize the available data on the inverse dose rate effect and suggest that it follows a consistent pattern in regard to dose, dose rate, and radiation quality; second, we describe a model that predicts these features; and, finally, we describe the significance of the effect for radiation protection.

  11. Biological indicators for radiation absorbed dose: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.F.D.; Venkatachalam, P.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Biological dosimetry has an important role to play in assessing the cumulative radiation exposure of persons working with radiation and also in estimating the true dose received during accidents involving external and internal exposure. Various biodosimetric methods have been tried to estimate radiation dose for the above purposes. Biodosimetric methods include cytogenetic, immunological and mutational assays. Each technique has certain advantages and disadvantages. We present here a review of each technique, the actual method used for detection of dose, the sensitivity of detection and its use in long term studies. (author)

  12. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  13. The impact of enteroclysis on patient's radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.; Prikaska, M.

    2002-01-01

    EU Directive 97/43 requires from Member States to ensure that appropriate quality assurance programmes are included together with quality control measures in the national legislation. On the basis of this Directive, as well as of the Basic Safety Standards although the New Act of Slovak National Council No.470/2000 Coll. improved the national system of acceptability of radiological examinations by implementation of Guidance Levels, system of education and necessity of introduction of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) programmes in radiology departments. The knowledge of doses under practical conditions used for variety of diagnostic examinations, serves not only for verification of compliance with recommended guidance levels but also for stimulation of the awareness of medical staff to aspects of radiation protection of the patient, i.e. of variations in doses delivered to patients due to variations in technical conditions of the equipment used and the diagnostic procedures applied. About 14% off all radiological investigations undertaken in SR involve fluoroscopy. Because of the exposure parameters used in these examinations, particularly the screening time, they contribute a substantial proportion of the overall population dose from medical examinations. The objective of our study was to collect data on patient doses obtained during the conventional and digital fluoroscopy examinations of small intestine. In both cases the examinations were performed by the same radiologist, for excluding the individual variations in the used diagnostic methods. Two techniques for small intestine examinations were examined: the barium follow-through and enteroclysis. Our preliminary results are based on the dose-area product measurements and take into account all significant parameters influencing the irradiation dose observed during the two techniques used for diagnostic examinations

  14. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    the shoulder or thyroid guard, and on the hand.7. Radiologists receive larger radia- tion doses during abdominal studies than during cerebral studies, even though the .... body reading. The sitting position and the radiographer's physical build would also influence the reading. An ineffective thyroid guard, openings on.

  15. Radiation doses in buildings containing coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somlai, J.; Kanyar, B.; Nenyei, A.; Nemeth, Z.; Nemeth, Cs.

    2001-01-01

    Using coal-slag with high concentration of 226 Ra as building material could result excess dose of people living in these dwellings. The gamma dose rate, the radon concentration and the radionuclide concentration of built-in slags were measured in kindergartens, schools and homes of three towns (Ajka, Tatabanya, Varpalota). The absorbed dose rates exceeded significantly the world average (80 nGy/h) and the annual dose reached 3-4 mSv in some cases. The dose coming from radon is significant in the case of slags, which did not originate from power plants but from smaller stoves and furnaces because in these cases the burning temperature is lower, so the radon emanation is higher. The dose in the latter cases could reach 10-20 mSv/year. (author)

  16. The effects of weak-dose nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errera, M.

    1987-01-01

    The potential risk of increasing radiation on human health and biological effects of low dose radiation were discussed. The effects of ionizing radiation on DNA and on hypersensitivity, and how low doses are related to genetic disorders and to cancers were explained. The role of radiation on the abnormal morphogenesis of human embryo during in utero life and on mental retardation was studied. Some of the problems encountered in the use of nuclear power for peaceful and military purposes, and the painful consequences of radioactive pollution on the welfare of a human being were pointed out

  17. Natural background radiation and population dose in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangzhi, C. (Ministry of Public Health, Beijing, BJ (China)); Ziqiang, P.; Zhenyum, H.; Yin, Y.; Mingqiang, G.

    On the basis of analyzing the data for the natural background radiation level in China, the typical values for indoor and outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation and effective dose equivalents from radon and thoron daughters are recommended. The annual effective dose equivalent from natural radiation to the inhabitant is estimated to be 2.3 mSv, in which 0.54 mSv is from terrestrial gamma radiation and about 0,8 mSv is from radon and its short-lived daughters. 55 Refs.

  18. Dose- and Ion-Dependent Effects in the Oxidative Stress Response to Space-Like Radiation Exposure in the Skeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwood, Joshua S.; Tran, Luan H.; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Kumar, Akhilesh; Hilton, Diane; Tahimic, Candice G. T.; Globus, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to space radiation may pose a risk to skeletal health during subsequent aging. Irradiation acutely stimulates bone remodeling in mice, although the long-term influence of space radiation on bone-forming potential (osteoblastogenesis) and possible adaptive mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized exposure to ionizing radiation impairs osteoblastogenesis in an ion-type specific manner, with low doses capable of modulating expression of redox-related genes. 16-week old, male, C57BL6/J mice were exposed to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) protons (150 mega electron volts per nucleon) or high-LET (sup 56) Fe ions (600 mega electron volts per nucleon) using either low (5 or 10 centigrays) or high (50 or 200 centigrays) doses at NASAs Space Radiation Lab at Brookhaven National Lab (NSRL/BNL). Tissues were harvested 5 weeks or 1 year after irradiation and bones were analyzed by microcomputed tomography for cancellous microarchitecture and cortical geometry. Marrow-derived, adherent cells were grown under osteoblastogenic culture conditions. Cell lysates were analyzed for select groups by RT-PCR (Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction) during the proliferative phase or the mineralizing phase, and differentiation was analyzed by imaging mineralized nodules (percentage surface area). Representative genes were selected for expression analyses, including cell proliferation (PCNA, Cdk2, p21, p53), differentiation (Runx2, Alpl, Bglap), oxidative metabolism (Catalase, GPX, MnSOD, CuZnSOD, iNos, Foxo1), DNA-damage repair (Gadd45), or apoptosis (Caspase 3). As expected, a high dose (200 centigrays), but not low doses, of either (sup 56) Fe or protons caused a loss of cancellous bone volume per total volume. Marrow cells produced mineralized nodules ex vivo regardless of radiation type or dose; (sup 56) Fe (200 centigrays) inhibited median nodule area by more than 90 percent at 5 weeks and 1 year post-irradiation, compared to controls. At 5 weeks post

  19. SSDL quality assurance for environmental dose/dose rate monitoring of photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Member states of IAEA have recently approved an expanded Nuclear Safety Programme and two International Conventions have been signed. One concerns early notification of a nuclear accident, and the other concerns assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. In the course of the implementation of these conventions an international system will be established by the Agency for the reception and dissemination of data following a nuclear accident. Such data should include the results of radiation measurements obtained by radiation monitoring. These data must be reliable, and comparable. This assures that numerical values of measured quantities obtained at different times, sites and countries, and with different instruments, can be compared in order that the competent authorities may draw conclusions. Such measurements may also have legal consequences. This implies that the instruments used for the measurement should comply with the relevant international specifications, and that the readings of these instruments be traceable to the international measurement system. At a meeting of an expert working group on International Cooperation in Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection held in November 1986, a proposal to produce a technical document on ''The role of SSDLs in the quality assurance programme relating to the use of dose and dose rate meters for personal and environmental measurements'' received high priority, and at a subsequent meeting of the Board of Governors the proposal was approved. Prior to these proposals the SSDL Scientific Committee at its annual meeting in May 1986 also advised the IAEA to promote measures to ensure world wide reliability and traceability of dose measurements in the field of radiation protection. On 26-30 January 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting on ''The role of SSDLs in the dosimetry of unintentional radiation exposures'' was organized by the IAEA. This Advisory Group assisted the Agency in the formulation of a

  20. Radiation Doses Received by the Irish Population 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, C.; Currivan, L.; Cunningham, N.; Kelleher, K.; Lewis, M.; Long, S.; McGinnity, P.; Smith, V.; McMahon, C.

    2014-06-01

    People are constantly exposed to a variety of sources of both natural and artificial radioactivity. The radiation dose received by the population from such sources is periodically estimated by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland RPII. This report is an update of a population dose assessment undertaken in 2008 and includes the most recent data available on the principal radiation exposure pathways. Wherever possible the collective dose and the resulting average annual dose to an individual living in Ireland, based on the most recently published figure for the population of Ireland, have been calculated for each of the pathways of exposure

  1. Ionizing radiation population doses at Sao Paulo city, Brazil: open-pit gamma dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Raimundo Enoch Rodrigues

    2001-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation to the human beings are well known for high and intermediate doses. As far as low level) radiation doses are concerned, there is no consensus. In order to get a better understanding of such effects it is necessary to assess the low doses with better accuracy. In this work, it was made an estimate of the annual ambient dose equivalent (H * (10)) to which the people are exposed in the city of Sao Paulo. Until now there are no data about it available in the literature. For the purpose of this evaluation, a map with various routes covering the largest and more representative area of the city was designed. The choice of points for data collection was made taking into account mainly the occupancy of the region. A portable gamma spectrometry system was used. It furnishes the rate of H * (10) and the measured gamma spectrum (in the range from 50 to 1670 keV) in the place of interest. The measurements were performed in a short time interval, since the gamma radiation arrives from a great extent of soil. Each measurement was done 1 m above the soil during 300 s. The rates of H * (10) varied from 33.1 to 152.3 nSv.h -1 , net values, obtained after subtraction of the cosmic rays contribution. The standard deviation was 22 n Sv.h -1 for an average for the city of Sao Paulo of 96.1(24) nSv.h -1 . In addition, average values of H * (10) rates for the city Health Divisions were calculated. Those values are not statistically equivalent and the whole set of data could not be treated as one, as the statistical Student test indicated a non homogeneity of the group of data. Hence it is necessary the accomplishment of a more detailed survey in order to verify the origin of the discrepancy. The mean value of H * (10) rate obtained for the city of Sao Paulo as converted to effective dose. in order to be compared with other places results It could be noticed that the annual average of effective dose for the city of Sao Paulo, 0.522(13) mSv, is superior to

  2. A system for protecting the environment from ionising radiation. Selecting reference fauna and flora, and the possible dose models and environmental geometries that could be applied to them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.; Woodhead, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    In order to demonstrate, explicitly, that the environment can be protected with respect to controlled sources of ionising radiation, it is essential to have a systematic framework within which dosimetry models for fauna and flora can be used. And because of the practical limitations on what could reasonably be modelled and the amount of information that could reasonably be obtained, it is also necessary to limit the application of such models to a 'set' of fauna and flora within a 'reference' context. This paper, therefore, outlines the factors that will need to be considered to select such 'reference' fauna and flora, and describes some of the factors and constraints necessary to develop the associated dosimetry models. It also describes some of the most basic environmental geometries within which the dose models could be set in order to make comparisons amongst different radiation sources

  3. Controlled platform for the radiation dose data measured in Radiation controlled area of KOMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Kyun; Min, Yi Sub; Park, Jeong Min; Cho, Yong Sub

    2016-01-01

    Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC), the branch institute of Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI), is a multi-user facility to provide a high-intensity proton beam with the energy from 20 MeV to the 100 MeV. This proton beam is accelerated via the proton linear accelerator that is comprised of a 50-keV injector, 3-MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and 100-MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The KOMAC site is classified into General public area and Radiation controlled area, according to the dose rate of 0.25 μSv/h. The system for the data made in Radiation controlled area should have the database to save and the data in the database could be expressed on the monitor in the any form which user wants. The control platform to satisfy these conditions will be made on the basis of the Qt program and MYSQL program. The place with the maximum average values about the alpha and beta detected is the entrance of Radiation controlled area. However, their values are very small in comparison to the criteria to decide the contamination area in KOMAC. That is, KOMAC is safe from the radioactive contamination. The reason why the radiation dose value is twice the background value in Klystron gallery is the klystron to generate the radiation. However, actually the klystron gallery is controlled by the control room when the proton beam is accelerated

  4. Controlled platform for the radiation dose data measured in Radiation controlled area of KOMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Kyun; Min, Yi Sub; Park, Jeong Min; Cho, Yong Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC), the branch institute of Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI), is a multi-user facility to provide a high-intensity proton beam with the energy from 20 MeV to the 100 MeV. This proton beam is accelerated via the proton linear accelerator that is comprised of a 50-keV injector, 3-MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and 100-MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The KOMAC site is classified into General public area and Radiation controlled area, according to the dose rate of 0.25 μSv/h. The system for the data made in Radiation controlled area should have the database to save and the data in the database could be expressed on the monitor in the any form which user wants. The control platform to satisfy these conditions will be made on the basis of the Qt program and MYSQL program. The place with the maximum average values about the alpha and beta detected is the entrance of Radiation controlled area. However, their values are very small in comparison to the criteria to decide the contamination area in KOMAC. That is, KOMAC is safe from the radioactive contamination. The reason why the radiation dose value is twice the background value in Klystron gallery is the klystron to generate the radiation. However, actually the klystron gallery is controlled by the control room when the proton beam is accelerated.

  5. Sixty women a day examined with world-unique mammography system from Sectra. Breast disease centre in Sweden offers lowest radiation dose in the world

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Sectra's digital mammography system, Sectra MicroDose Mammography(TM), has been used to examine more than 1,500 women in the Helsingborg Hospital mammography screening program. This was accomplished in the record time of two months in clinical operation. The system is now being used to examine more than sixty women every day" (1 page).

  6. Radiation therapy system and its accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuzuru

    1990-01-01

    Three prerequisites for increasing accuracy of radiation therapy are considered. Firstly, every irradiation must be performed without errors according to irradiation conditions. Secondly, accurate quality assurance of equipments for radiation, diagnosis, radiation planning, and dosimetry must be maintained. Thirdly, new radiation planning system and treatment equipments with the introduction of computers are required. The purpose of this report is to discuss accuracy of radiation therapy, focusing on (I) the current status of radiation therapy system developed at the National Institute of Radiation Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and on (II) basic items and quality assurance for increasing accuracy of radiation therapy. Fast neutron therapy has been started with the NIRS cyclotron collimator in November 1975. The advent of X-ray CT has contributed to radiation therapy planning, in that it visualizes the inside structure of the patient stereoscopically. An optical positioning apparatus with CT scanner and a dedicated CT simulator have been developed, allowing the realization of more accurate conformation radiotherapy. Error or uncertainty poses a problem in radiation therapy and treatment system. The ICRU Report 24 describes that standard errors for biological changes in tolerance radiation doses should be within ±5%. The AAPM Report 13 describes that uncertainty for dosimetry with phantoms or dose distribution computation must be less than 2.5% and 4.2%, respectively. It is recommended that quality assurance program be introduced to decrease errors in radiation therapy. (N.K.)

  7. Absorbed radiation dose on LHC interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the results of our FLUKA simulations devoted to the evaluation of the peak dose absorbed by the busbar insulator in the LHC Interaction Region 7 interconnects. The peak dose absorbed by the cold magnet coils are also presented.

  8. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?AbstractHigh doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  9. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B.; Catalan-Acosta, A.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Perez-Martin, C.; Armas-Trujillo, D. de

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  10. The Spanish National Dose Registry and Spanish radiation passbooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A.; Martin, A.; Villanueva, I.; Amor, I.; Butragueno, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Spanish National Dose Registry (BDN) is the Nuclear Safety Council's (CSN) national database of occupational exposure to radiation. Each month BDN receives records of individual external doses from approved dosimetry services. The dose records include information regarding the occupational activities of exposed workers. The dose information and the statistical analysis prepared by the BDN are a useful tool for effective operational protection of occupationally exposed workers and a support for the CSN in the development and application of the ALARA principle. The Spanish radiation passbook was introduced in 1990 and since then CSN, as regulatory authority, has required that all outside workers entering controlled areas should have radiation passbooks. Nowadays, CSN has implemented improvements in the Spanish radiation Passbooks, taking into account previous experience and Directive 96/29/EURATOM. (author)

  11. Technical note: Reduction of radiation dose using ultrasound guidance during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan S Livingstone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS procedure for decompression of the portal venous system generally performed under fluoroscopic guidance has undergone continuous technical modifications recently. Due to the length of the procedure, the fluoroscopy times are reasonably high, thus increasing the risk from ionizing radiation. Radiation doses were measured for 19 patients using dose area product (DAP meter. The average DAP value for the TIPS procedure was 63.86 Gy cm 2 (21.12-117.07. Radiation doses to patients can be reduced with the use of USG guidance and intermittent fluoroscopy screening.

  12. Painting Dose: The ART of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Hannah J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of X rays in 1895 captivated society like no other scientific advance. Radiation instantly became the subject not only of numerous scientific papers but also of circus bazaars, poetry, fiction, costume design, comics, and marketing for household items. Its spread was “viral.” What is not well known, however, is its incorporation into visual art, despite the long tradition of medicine and surgery as a subject in art. Using several contemporary search methods, we identified 5 examples of paintings or sculpture that thematically feature radiation therapy. All were by artists with exhibited careers in art: Georges Chicotot, Marcel Duchamp, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Robert Pope, and Cookie Kerxton. Each artist portrays radiation differently, ranging from traditional healer, to mysterious danger, to futuristic propaganda, to the emotional challenges of undergoing cancer therapy. This range captures the complex role of radiation as both a therapy and a hazard. Whereas some of these artists are now world famous, none of these artworks are as well known as their surgical counterparts. The penetration of radiation into popular culture was rapid and pervasive; yet, its role as a thematic subject in art never fully caught on, perhaps because of a lack of understanding of the technology, radiation's intangibility, or even a suppressive effect of society's ambivalent relationship with it. These 5 artists have established a rich foundation upon which pop culture and art can further develop with time to reflect the extraordinary progress of modern radiation therapy.

  13. Painting Dose: The ART of Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Hannah J; Zietman, Anthony L; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2016-11-15

    The discovery of X rays in 1895 captivated society like no other scientific advance. Radiation instantly became the subject not only of numerous scientific papers but also of circus bazaars, poetry, fiction, costume design, comics, and marketing for household items. Its spread was "viral." What is not well known, however, is its incorporation into visual art, despite the long tradition of medicine and surgery as a subject in art. Using several contemporary search methods, we identified 5 examples of paintings or sculpture that thematically feature radiation therapy. All were by artists with exhibited careers in art: Georges Chicotot, Marcel Duchamp, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Robert Pope, and Cookie Kerxton. Each artist portrays radiation differently, ranging from traditional healer, to mysterious danger, to futuristic propaganda, to the emotional challenges of undergoing cancer therapy. This range captures the complex role of radiation as both a therapy and a hazard. Whereas some of these artists are now world famous, none of these artworks are as well known as their surgical counterparts. The penetration of radiation into popular culture was rapid and pervasive; yet, its role as a thematic subject in art never fully caught on, perhaps because of a lack of understanding of the technology, radiation's intangibility, or even a suppressive effect of society's ambivalent relationship with it. These 5 artists have established a rich foundation upon which pop culture and art can further develop with time to reflect the extraordinary progress of modern radiation therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Painting Dose: The ART of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Hannah J. [College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The discovery of X rays in 1895 captivated society like no other scientific advance. Radiation instantly became the subject not only of numerous scientific papers but also of circus bazaars, poetry, fiction, costume design, comics, and marketing for household items. Its spread was “viral.” What is not well known, however, is its incorporation into visual art, despite the long tradition of medicine and surgery as a subject in art. Using several contemporary search methods, we identified 5 examples of paintings or sculpture that thematically feature radiation therapy. All were by artists with exhibited careers in art: Georges Chicotot, Marcel Duchamp, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Robert Pope, and Cookie Kerxton. Each artist portrays radiation differently, ranging from traditional healer, to mysterious danger, to futuristic propaganda, to the emotional challenges of undergoing cancer therapy. This range captures the complex role of radiation as both a therapy and a hazard. Whereas some of these artists are now world famous, none of these artworks are as well known as their surgical counterparts. The penetration of radiation into popular culture was rapid and pervasive; yet, its role as a thematic subject in art never fully caught on, perhaps because of a lack of understanding of the technology, radiation's intangibility, or even a suppressive effect of society's ambivalent relationship with it. These 5 artists have established a rich foundation upon which pop culture and art can further develop with time to reflect the extraordinary progress of modern radiation therapy.

  15. An international intercomparison of absorbed dose measurements for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiman Kadni; Noriah Mod Ali

    2002-01-01

    Dose intercomparison on an international basis has become an important component of quality assurance measurement i.e. to check the performance of absorbed dose measurements in radiation therapy. The absorbed dose to water measurements for radiation therapy at the SSDL, MINT have been regularly compared through international intercomparison programmes organised by the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory, Seibersdorf, Austria such as IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose quality audits and the Intercomparison of therapy level ionisation chamber calibration factors in terms of air kerma and absorbed dose to water calibration factors. The results of these intercomparison in terms of percentage deviations for Cobalt 60 gamma radiation and megavoltage x-ray from medical linear accelerators participated by the SSDL-MINT during the year 1985-2001 are within the acceptance limit. (Author)

  16. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.).

  17. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.)

  18. Radiation dose received by TAMVEC neutron therapy staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smathers, J.B.; Graves, R.G.; Sandel, P.S.; Almond, P.R.; Otte, V.A.; Grant, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Based on over 5 years of experience in fast neutron radiotherapy, the activation radiation source origins and magnitudes are discussed and the staff radiation exposures reviewed. Source magnitudes were determined using ionization chamber survey instruments and staff doses by commercial TLD and film badge service reports. It is concluded that while staff doses exceed those obtained in conventional therapy, the levels received are well within published guidelines for occupational exposure. (author)

  19. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  20. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I.; Alzimami, K.; Osman, H.; Omer, H.; Sassi, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  1. Radiation Dose to Patients and Medical Staff in Different Procedures of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide information on developing technologies and clinical techniques for Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging using ionizing radiation and their associated radiation dose to patients and medical staff. A thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) was used in this study to analyze the historic records of the external radiation doses to staff members working in our nuclear medicine department in 7 procedures, including elution of 99mTc from 99m Mo/ 99m Tc generators, syringe preparation, radiopharmacy kit preparation, injection, accompanying patients, SPECT/CT scan, oral 131 I preparation. These dosimeters was worn by the staff members at the level of the chest on the front part of the body. A retrospective review of 110 clinical studies of various nuclear medicine procedures ( 99m Tc–MIBI–Tetrofosmin, 99m Tc–MDP bone scan, 99m Tc–Tektrotyd, 99m Tc–Thyroid imaging, 99m Tc–Nanocoll, 131 I–Nal (diagnostic application 185 MBq) obtained on hybrid SPECT/CT systems was performed to calculate the effective radiation dose to patients. The results from this study showed that annual effective radiation doses to nuclear medicine department staff members were within permissible levels. The contribution of total effective radiation dose from SPECT component were calculated using the activity of the injected radiopharmaceutical and dose tables published by the conversion factors listed in ICRP 53 and ICRP 80. The radiation dose for CT was calculated by Dose Length Product method. According to the results of this study the dose in each procedure depends on different factors such as the education and experience of the staff members, usage of shielding and taking the radiation protection requirements into consideration. When SPECT–CT is being performed, all measures should be taken to reduce both the radiopharmaceutical dose and the CT effective dose following the ALARA principle. (author)

  2. Total Risk Management for Low Dose Radiation Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Mikulicic, V.; Sterc, D.

    2012-01-01

    health. This view is supported with numerous evidences, and explained with beneficial effects from the increased activity of immune system activated with small radiation exposures. Finally, theory in between is that small doses are less than linearly proportionally harmful and that they are presenting a much smaller risks than according to the LNT. This view is derived from the use of different evidences. Difficulties to find one single theory about effects of small radiation doses are related to existence of huge variability and uncertainty in the evidence data. This is very hard experimental and theoretical problem. It will require lots of additional research to reduce these uncertainties and find final theory. This might be too late for the number of people affected in different ways with current single most conservative LNT approach. The problem with the conservative LNT regulatory approach is resulting in enormous additional costs of nuclear energy and medical applications. Which is reasonable and acceptable during the regular operation when source is high and concentrated. But, this becomes unreasonable huge economic burden after accidents and for cleanups with nuclear facilities. Similar problem arises with restriction of medical examinations and treatments based on over conservative risk estimate. Special circumstances are with evacuated people from contaminated areas where they are on the one side saved from small radiation exposures, and on the other side exposed to years of life away from their home and with numerous direct and indirect additional risks (i.e., stress, social problems, etc.). It seems reasonable that some alternative (total) risk management approach might be much more suitable for this situation. Evacuation of people from contaminated area with small doses sources should not be done when that induces larger risks from even what is expected from radiation based on LNT. Similar total risk management could be also applied for with medical

  3. Estimation of radiation dose received by the radiation workers during radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, N. A. H. O.

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted primarily to evaluate occupational radiation dose in industrial radiography during radiographic testing at Balil-Hadida, with the aim of building up baseline data on radiation exposure in the industrial radiography practice in Sudan. Dose measurements during radiographic testing were performed and compared with IAEA reference dose. In this research the doses measured by using hand held radiation survey meter and personal monitoring dosimeter. The results showed that radiation doses ranged between minimum (0.448 mSv/ 3 month) , and maximum (1.838 mSv / 3 month), with an average value (0.778 mSv/ 3 month), and the standard deviation 0.292 for the workers used gamma mat camera. The analysis of data showed that the radiation dose for all radiation worker are receives less than annual limit for exposed workers 20 mSv/ year and compare with other study found that the dose received while body doses ranging from 0.1 to 9.4 mSv/ year, work area design in all the radiography site followed the three standard rules namely putting radiation signs, reducing access to control area and making of boundaries. Thus the accidents arising from design faults not likely to occur at these site. Results suggest that adequate fundamental training of radiation workers in general radiography prior to industrial radiography work will further improve the standard of personnel radiation protection. (Author)

  4. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Cienfuegos (Cuba))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Hernandez, C.M.; Sanchez-Llull, M.; Cartas-Aguila, H.; Diaz-Asencio, M.; Munoz-Caravaca, A.; Morera-Gomez, Y.; Acosta-Melian, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the level of background radiation for Cienfuegos Province, Cuba. Measurements of outdoor gamma radiation (of terrestrial and cosmic origin) in air were performed at 198 locations using a GPS navigator and a dose meter (SRP-68-01, 30 x 25 mm NaI detector). The average absorbed dose was found to be 73.9 nGy h -1 (17.2-293.9 nGy h -1 ), corresponding to an annual effective dose of 74.7 μSv (21-324 μSv). When compared with the data available for other places, the absorbed gamma doses obtained in this study indicate a background radiation level that falls within natural limits for the Damuji, Salado and Caonao watersheds; however, the Arimao and Gavilanes watersheds present levels of the absorbed dose and annual effective dose comparable with high background radiation areas. An isodose map of the terrestrial gamma dose rate in Cienfuegos was drawn using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This study provides important baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. (authors)

  5. Internal dose assessment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohey, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Although numerous models have been developed for occupational and medical internal dosimetry, they may not be applicable to an accident situation. Published dose coefficients relate effective dose to intake, but if acute deterministic effects are possible, effective dose is not a useful parameter. Consequently, dose rates to the organs of interest need to be computed from first principles. Standard bioassay methods may be used to assess body contents, but, again, the standard models for bioassay interpretation may not be applicable because of the circumstances of the accident and the prompt initiation of decorporation therapy. Examples of modifications to the standard methodologies include adjustment of biological half-times under therapy, such as in the Goiania accident, and the same effect, complicated by continued input from contaminated wounds, in the Hanford 241 Am accident. (author)

  6. Technical problems of high dose rate intracavitary radiation therapy using remote afterloader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kozo

    1980-01-01

    The important factors to use remote afterloading system (RALS) are to calculate the correct radiation dose distribution, to deliver the exact dose to point A, to minimize the radiation injury, and to operate the cycling source with safety and accuracy. Therefore, we need to have excellent method for radiotherapy and perfect system for the safety. The next steps are as follows, (1) Equipment and staff (Radiotherapist, Radiophysicist, Radiotechnologist). (2) Safety care and exposure dose. (3) Training program and educational system from the international point of view. (author)

  7. Individual radiation doses. Annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.

    1995-05-01

    During the year we measured whole body doses on 10226 bearers, distributed as follows: 0-0,5 mSv on 8816 persons, 0,6-1,0 mSv on 693 persons, 1,1-5,0 on 678 persons, >5 mSv on 39 persons. At higher dose than 4 mSv/4 weeks, the reason to the irradiation will be investigated. 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT--review of available options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography currently accounts for the majority of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Although technological improvement of CT scanners has reduced the radiation dose of individual examinations, the benefit was overshadowed by the rapid increase in the number of CT examinations. Radiation exposure from CT examination should be kept as low as reasonably possible for patient safety. Measures to avoid inappropriate CT examinations are needed. Principles and information on radiation dose reduction in chest CT are reviewed in this article. The reduction of tube current and tube potential are the mainstays of dose reduction methods. Study results indicate that routine protocols with reduced tube current are feasible with diagnostic results comparable to conventional standard dose protocols. Tube current adjustment is facilitated by the advent of automatic tube current modulation systems by setting the appropriate image quality level for the purpose of the examination. Tube potential reduction is an effective method for CT pulmonary angiography. Tube potential reduction often requires higher tube current for satisfactory image quality, but may still contribute to significant radiation dose reduction. Use of lower tube potential also has considerable advantage for smaller patients. Improvement in image production, especially the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods, is expected to lower radiation dose significantly. Radiation dose reduction in CT is a multifaceted issue. Understanding these aspects leads to an optimal solution for various indications of chest CT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation dose assessment for occupationally exposed workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-01-31

    Jan 31, 2017 ... This situation therefore brings uncertainty on workers' safety and potential occupational exposure to ionising radiation such as X-rays. This study was hence conducted with the aim of finding out the radiation dose levels currently being received by occupationally exposed workers in radiology departments.

  10. Assessment of pediatrics radiation dose from routine x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Given the fact that children are more sensitive to ionizing radiation than adults,with an increased risk of developing radiation-induced cancer,special care should be taken when they undergo X-ray examinations. The main aim of the current study was to determine Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) to pediatric ...

  11. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-03-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented.

  13. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented

  14. Epidemiology and effects on health of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Artalejo, F.; Andres Manzano, B. de; Rel Calero, J. del

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the concept and aims of epidemiology, its methods and contribution to the knowledge of the effects of low ionizing radiation doses on health. The advantages of epidemiological studies for knowing the consequences of living near nuclear facilities and the effects of occupational exposure to radiations are also described. (Author) 43 refs

  15. The choice of food consumption rates for radiation dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The practical problem in estimating radiation doses due to radioactive contamination of food is the choice of the appropriate food intakes. To ensure compliance or to compare with dose equivalent limits, higher than average intake rates appropriate to critical groups should be used. However for realistic estimates of health detriment in the whole exposed population, average intake rates are more appropriate. (U.K.)

  16. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, M.K.A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D.A; Bakar, K.A.; Haron, M.R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDI w , DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts. - Highlights: • We investigate radiation doses received by patients from CT scan examinations. • We compare data with current national diagnostic reference levels and other references. • Radiation doses from CT were influenced by CT parameter, scanning techniques and patient characteristics.

  17. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    ABSTRACT. The absorbed dose rate in air in the vicinity of the proposed Manyoni uranium mining project located in Singida region, Tanzania, was determined so as to establish the baseline data for background radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven villages ...

  18. Mutation process at low or high radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.; Wisconsin Univ., Madison

    1976-01-01

    A concise review is given of the status of research on the genetic effects of low-level radiation in general. The term ''low dose'' is defined and current theories on low dose are set out. Problems and their solutions are discussed. (author)

  19. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  20. The Effect of NPP's Stack Height to Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandi, Liliana Yetta; Rohman, Budi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of dose calculation for accidents is to analyze the capability of NPP to maintain the safety of public and workers in case an accident occurs on the Plant in a site. This paper calculates the Loss of Coolant Accident in PWR plant. The calculation results shows that no risks of serious radiation exposure are given to the neighboring public even if such a large accident occurred, and the effect of stack height can be predicted by analysis of the calculation results. The whole dose is calculated for some location (100 m, 300 m, 500 m, 700 m, 900 m, 1500 m, and 2000 m) with three difference stack height i.e. 0 m, 40 m and 100 m. The result of the whole dose calculation is under permitted criteria for whole dose : 0.25 Sv and thyroid dose : 3.0 Sv. The calculation of radiation dose in this paper use EEDCDQ code

  1. Population Dose From Medical Radiation Applications in The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Bijwaard, Harmen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: All the European member states have to collect data on patient dose from medical diagnostic imaging. This information contributes to making conscious choices in medical practice, taking into account the risks and benefits of the use of radiation. The Netherlands collects this information on a yearly base to show the development in medical radiation exposure. Materials & Methods: This study was held among all the Dutch hospitals and institutions that use medical radiation applications...

  2. Low-dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantak, S.S.; Onoda, J.M.; Diglio, C.A.; Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI

    1993-01-01

    The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema. (author)

  3. Radiation doses to patients from nuclear medicine examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, K.; Boehmova, I.

    2014-01-01

    Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic, Bratislava The exposure of the population to ionizing radiation is rising rapidly, nearly exclusively due to increasing medical use of radiation, including diagnostic methods of nuclear medicine. In 2012 Public health authority of the Slovak republic (PHA SR) performed a survey about the population exposure from nuclear medicine procedures. The primary objectives of this survey were to assess the frequency of different nuclear medicine procedures, determine the average activities administered by nuclear medicine procedures and compare them with the national diagnostic reference levels and determine the annual collective effective dose to the Slovak population from nuclear medicine. The effective dose calculation was based on the methodology of the ICRP32, ICRP80 and ICRP106. In Slovak republic are 11 nuclear medicine departments. The collected data of activities administered by different procedures correspond to 100 % of nuclear medicine departments. The total number of procedures included in the study was 36 250. The most commonly performed procedure was bone scintigraphy (35.9%), followed by lung perfusion and ventilation scintigraphy (17.0%), static and dynamic renal scintigraphy (13.0%), whole-body positron emission tomography of tumors with PET radiopharmaceuticals (11.6%), myocardial perfusion (8.8%), thyroid scintigraphy (6.2%), parathyroid scintigraphy (2.1%), scintigraphy of tumors (2.1%), scintigraphy of the liver and spleen (0.8%), brain perfusion (0.7%) and examination of the gastrointestinal system (0.3%). (authors)

  4. Flight attendant radiation dose from solar particle events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeri L; Mertens, Christopher J; Grajewski, Barbara; Luo, Lian; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Cassinelli, Rick T

    2014-08-01

    Research has suggested that work as a flight attendant may be related to increased risk for reproductive health effects. Air cabin exposures that may influence reproductive health include radiation dose from galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events. This paper describes the assessment of radiation dose accrued during solar particle events as part of a reproductive health study of flight attendants. Solar storm data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Weather Prediction Center list of solar proton events affecting the Earth environment to ascertain storms relevant to the two study periods (1992-1996 and 1999-2001). Radiation dose from exposure to solar energetic particles was estimated using the NAIRAS model in conjunction with galactic cosmic radiation dose calculated using the CARI-6P computer program. Seven solar particle events were determined to have potential for significant radiation exposure, two in the first study period and five in the second study period, and over-lapped with 24,807 flight segments. Absorbed (and effective) flight segment doses averaged 6.5 μGy (18 μSv) and 3.1 μGy (8.3 μSv) for the first and second study periods, respectively. Maximum doses were as high as 440 μGy (1.2 mSv) and 20 flight segments had doses greater than 190 μGy (0.5 mSv). During solar particle events, a pregnant flight attendant could potentially exceed the equivalent dose limit to the conceptus of 0.5 mSv in a month recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  5. Occupational dose assessment and national dose registry system in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari-Zadeh, M.; Nazeri, F.; Hosseini-Pooya, S. M.; Taheri, M.; Gheshlaghi, F.; Kardan, M. R.; Babakhani, A.; Rastkhah, N.; Yousefi-Nejad, F.; Darabi, M.; Oruji, T.; Gholamali-Zadeh, Z.; Karimi-Diba, J.; Kazemi-Movahed, A. A.; Dashti-Pour, M. R.; Enferadi, A.; Jahanbakhshian, M. H.; Sadegh-Khani, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents status of external and internal dose assessment of workers and introducing the structure of National Dose Registry System of Iran (NDRSI). As well as types of individual dosemeters in use, techniques for internal dose assessment are presented. Results obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison programme on measurement of personal dose equivalent H p (10) and consistency of the measured doses with the delivered doses are shown. Also, implementation of dosimetry standards, establishment of quality management system, authorisation and approval procedure of dosimetry service providers are discussed. (authors)

  6. Radiation dose to the lens and cataract formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Warrington, A.P.; Bessell, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the radiation tolerance of the lens of the eye and the incidence of radiation-induced lens changes in patients treated by fractionated supervoltage radiation therapy for orbital tumors. Forty patients treated for orbital lymphoma and pseudotumor with tumor doses of 20--40 Gy were studied. The lens was partly shielded using lead cylinders in most cases. The dose to the germinative zone of the lens was estimated by measurements in a tissue equivalent phantom using both film densitometry and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Opthalmological examination was performed at 6 monthly intervals after treatment. The lead shield was found to reduce the dose to the germinative zone of the lens to between 36--50% of the tumor dose for Cobalt beam therapy, and to between 11--18% for 5 MeV x-rays. Consequently, the lens doses were in the range 4.5--30 Gy in 10--20 fractions. Lens opacities first appeared from between 3 and 9 years after irradiation. Impairment of visual acuity ensued in 74% of the patients who developed lens opacities. The incidence of lens changes was strongly dose-related. None was seen after doses of 5 Gy or lower, whereas doses of 16.5 Gy or higher were all followed by lens opacities which impaired visual acuity. The largest number of patients received a maximum lens dose of 15 Gy; in this group the actuarial incidence of lens opacities at 8 years was 57% with visual impairment in 38%. The adult lens can tolerate a total dose of 5 Gy during a fractionated course of supervoltage radiation therapy without showing any changes. Doses of 16.5 Gy or higher will almost invariably lead to visual impairment. The dose which causes a 50% probability of visual impairment is approximately 15 Gy. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  8. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of

  9. Radiation monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Farias, Marcos S. de; Lacerda, Fabio de; Heimlich, Adino [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Design of a portable low-power multichannel analyzer with wireless connectivity for remote radiation monitoring, powered from a solar panel with a internal battery to be operated in field. The multichannel analyzer is based on a single microcontroller which performs the digital functions and an analog signal processing board for implementing a Gaussian shaper preamplifier, a Gaussian stretcher, sample and hold, pile-up rejector and a 10 bit ADC. Now this design is to be used with a NaI(Ti) scintillator detector. This multichannel analyzer is designed to be a part of radiation monitoring network. All of them are connected, by radio in a radius of 10 kilometers, to a supervisor computer that collects data from the network of multichannel analyzers and numerically display the latest radiation measurements or graphically display measurements over time for all multichannel analyzers. Like: dose rate, spectra and operational status. Software also supports remotely configuring operating parameters (such as radiation alarm level) for each monitor independently. (author)

  10. [Remote radiation planning support system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shinoto, Makoto; Asai, Kaori; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We constructed a remote radiation planning support system between Kyushu University Hospital (KUH) in Fukuoka and Kyushu University Beppu Hospital (KBH) in Oita. Between two institutions, radiology information system for radiotherapy division (RT-RIS) and radiation planning system (RTPS) were connected by virtual private network (VPN). This system enables the radiation oncologists at KUH to perform radiotherapy planning for the patients at KBH. The detail of the remote radiation planning support system in our institutions is as follows: The radiation oncologist at KBH performs radiotherapy planning and the data of the patients are sent anonymously to the radiation oncologists at KUH. The radiation oncologists at KUH receive the patient's data, access to RTPS at KBH, verify or change the radiation planning at KBH: Radiation therapy is performed at KBH according to the confirmed plan by the radiation oncologists at KUH. Our remote radiation planning system is useful for providing radiation therapy with safety and accuracy.

  11. Radiation dose to patients and staff from Storz Modulith SL20 lithotripter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, C; Greener, A G; Batchelor, S

    1992-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) uses either X-ray fluoroscopy or ultrasound to localize and determine the end point of treatment. We report radiation doses to patients and personnel from the Storz Modulith lithotripter system recently installed in the Lithotripter Centre, St. Thomas' Hospital, London. The mean annual radiation dose to patients and staff was calculated at 0.73 mSv and 4.8 mSv, respectively.

  12. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Section 32 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91) defines the requirements to be applied to the monitoring of the radiation exposure and working conditions in Finland. The concepts relevant to the monitoring and guidelines for determining the necessity of the monitoring as well as its organizing are given in the guide. Instructions for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are given, also procedures for situations leading to exceptional exposures are described. (9 refs.)

  13. Dosimetry for quantitative analysis of low dose ionizing radiation effects on humans in radiation therapy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J; Stern, R L; Daly, T P; Schwieter, C W; Jones, G E; Arnold, M L; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Goldberg, Z

    2004-04-20

    We have successfully developed a practical approach to predicting the location of skin surface dose at potential biopsy sites that receive 1 cGy and 10 cGy, respectively, in support of in vivo biologic dosimetry in humans. This represents a significant technical challenge as the sites lie on the patient surface out side the radiation fields. The PEREGRINE Monte Carlo simulation system was used to model radiation dose delivery and TLDs were used for validation on a phantom and confirmation during patient treatment. In the developmental studies the Monte Carlo simulations consistently underestimated the dose at the biopsy site by approximately 15% for a realistic treatment configuration, most likely due to lack of detail in the simulation of the linear accelerator outside the main beam line. Using a single, thickness-independent correction factor for the clinical calculations, the average of 36 measurements for the predicted 1 cGy point was 0.985 cGy (standard deviation: 0.110 cGy) despite patient breathing motion and other real world challenges. Since the 10 cGy point is situated in the region of high dose gradient at the edge of the field, patient motion had a greater effect and the six measured points averaged 5.90 cGy (standard deviation: 1.01 cGy), a difference that is equivalent to approximately a 6 mm shift on the patient's surface.

  14. Radiation management computer system for Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Kei; Yasutomo, Katsumi; Sudou, Takayuki; Yamashita, Masahiro; Hayata, Kenichi; Ueda, Hajime; Hosokawa, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    Radiation management of nuclear power research institutes, nuclear power stations and other such facilities are strictly managed under Japanese laws and management policies. Recently, the momentous issues of more accurate radiation dose management and increased work efficiency has been discussed. Up to now, Fuji Electric Company has supplied a large number of Radiation Management Systems to nuclear power stations and related nuclear facilities. We introduce the new radiation management computer system with adopted WWW technique for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, MONJU Fast Breeder Reactor (MONJU). (author)

  15. Radiation Doses to Skin from Dermal Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    face; spray-wash 1-7 / 5.00 1.6 0.032 19 CFM; forearms; spray-wash plus rubbing 10-6 / 7.00 1.1 0.16 135 CFM; forearms and hands, spray-wash 1-7...skinskin DRFtCtD   where ) = dose rate to skin at time t (rem h–1); ( tD  Cskin(t) = activity concentration of radionuclides on skin at time t...and dose-rate factor are specific to deposition on clothing: (5-1)     clothingclothing DRFtCtD   where )( tD  = dose rate to skin at

  16. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  17. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N.D.

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs.

  18. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs

  19. CONDOS-II, Radiation Dose from Consumer Product Distribution Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: This code was developed under sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to serve as a tool for assessing radiation doses that may be associated with consumer products that contain radionuclides. The code calculates radiation dose equivalents resulting from user-supplied scenarios of exposures to radionuclides contained in or released from sources that contain radionuclides. Dose equivalents may be calculated to total body, skin surface, skeletal bone, testes, ovaries, liver, kidneys, lungs, and maximally exposed segments of the gastrointestinal tract from exposures via (1) direct, external irradiation by photons (including Bremsstrahlung) emitted from the source, (2) external irradiation by photons during immersion in air containing photon-emitting radionuclides that have escaped from the source, (3) internal exposures by all radiations emitted by inhaled radionuclides that have escaped from the source, and (4) internal exposures by all radiations emitted by ingested radionuclides that have escaped from the source. 2 - Method of solution: Organ dose equivalents are approximated in two ways, depending on the exposure type. For external exposures, energy specific organ-to-skin-surface dose conversion ratios are used to approximate dose equivalents to specific organs from doses calculated to a point on the skin surface. The organ-to-skin ratios are incorporated in organ- and nuclide-specific dose rate factors, which are used to approximate doses during immersion in contaminated air. For internal exposures, 50 year dose equivalents are calculated using organ- and nuclide-specific, 50 year dose conversion factors. Doses from direct, external exposures are calculated using the energy-specific dose conversion ratios, user supplied exposure conditions, and photon flux approximations for eleven source geometries. Available source geometries include: point, shielded and unshielded; line, shielded and unshielded; disk, shielded

  20. Radiation doses of commonly used dental radiographic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J P; Brand, J W

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the radiation dose associated with commonly used dental radiographic surveys including the following: (1) 20 film full-mouth survey, (2) bite-wing radiographs, (3) panoramic survey supplemented with bite-wing radiographs and (4) a common orthodontic radiographic survey (a lateral cephlometric radiograph supplemented with a panoramic radiograph). The effects of collimation and faster radiographic film speeds on dose were also investigated. The effective doses to selected anatomic sites were calculated from measured absorbed doses with the use of an improved, tissue-equivalent phantom fitted with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters. It was demonstrated that converting from round to rectangular collimation reduced the radiation exposure by a factor of four. A panoramic survey supplemented with bite-wing radiographs uses approximately one third of the radiation exposure needed to expose a full-mouth survey made with E-speed film and rectangular collimation.

  1. Uncertainty of dose measurement in radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    to the running debate and presents the author's view, which is based upon experience in radiation processing dosimetry. The origin of all uncertainty components must be identified and can be classified according to Type A and Type B, but it is equally important to separate the uncertainty components into those...

  2. The role of biogenic amines in effects of low-dose ionizing radiation and their correction with activation of positive support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobjova, T.M.; Tyitkova, A.M.; Pavichenko, Yu.V.; Derben'ova, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-six mongrel male rats were exposed to single total x-ray irradiation at a dose of 50 cGy. Single x-ray exposure to a dose of 50 cGy causes long-term phase changes of catecholamines and serotonin in the structures of the brain and blood of the rats. The changes in the structures of the neocortex and limbic system show opposite tendencies. activation of the positive support increases catecholamine-ergic energizing influence in the subcortical structures of the brain, that performed after the exposure normalizes the amount of biogenic monoamines in the central nervous system and reduces the strain of the function of sympathoadrenal system

  3. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  4. Technology Development for Radiation Dose Measurement and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Hwan; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, T. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The correction factors essential for the operation of In-Vivo counting system were produced and implemented into a field operation for the improvement of accuracy in measurement of the radioactivity inside a human body. The BiDAS2007 code which calculate an internal dose was developed by upgrading the former code prepared in the previous stage of this project. The method of using the multibioassy data, the maximum likelihood function and the Bayesian statistics were established to an internal dose based on the measurement data of radioactivity, intakes and retention of radioactivity in a human body and it can improve the accuracy in estimation of the intakes of radioactivity and the committed effective dose equivalent. In order to solve the problem of low detection efficiency of the conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) to a high energy neutron, the extended BS's were manufactured and the technique for neutron field spectrometry was established. The fast neutron and gamma spectrometry system with a BC501A scintillation detector was also prepared. Several neutron fluence spectra at several nuclear facilities were measured and collected by using the extended BS. The spectrum weighted responses of some neutron monitoring instruments were also derived by using these spectra and the detector response functions. A high efficient TL material for the neutron personal dosimeter was developed. It solved the main problem of low thermal stability and high residual dose of the commercial TLDs and has the sensitivity to neutron and to gamma radiation with 40 and 10 times higher respectively than them.

  5. The ferrous ammonium sulfate solid system, as dosemeter for processes at low temperatures and high doses of gamma radiation; El sistema sulfato ferroso amoniacal solido, como dosimetro para procesos a bajas temperaturas y altas dosis de radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez C, J.M.; Ramos B, S.; Negron M, A. [ICN-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from a study of the radiation induced oxidation of crystalline ferrous ammonium sulfate with gamma rays at 295 K, 263 K and 77 K and dose from 0 to 300 kGy. The radiation induced decomposition of ferrous ammonium sulfate has been studied by the dissolution of the irradiated salt in 0,8 N sulfuric acid. The main product is Fe{sup 3+} and molar concentration of ferric ion was determined spectrophotometrically in the UV region at 304 nm. The optical density values showed a linear dependence with dose, indicating that the data obtained might be used to create a calibrating curve. Color in irradiated salt changes from blue to green, yellow and orange according to the absorbed dose. The accuracy and the reproducibility of the system were tested. In addition, some other characteristics make possible the use of this system as a dosimeter, similar to Fricke chemical dosemeter, at low temperatures and high dose. (Author)

  6. Radiation doses to children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmedal, Lise J. [Helse Fonna, Department of Radiology, Stord Hospital, Stord (Norway); Friberg, Eva G.; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde [The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Laegreid, Liv [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Bergen (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology Section, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus are still followed routinely with frequent head CT scans. To estimate the effective dose, brain and lens doses from these examinations during childhood, and to assess dose variation per examination. All children born between 1983 and 1995 and treated for hydrocephalus between 1983 and 2002 were included. We retrospectively registered the number of examinations and the applied scan parameters. The effective dose was calculated using mean conversion factors from the CT dose index measured free in air, while doses to the lens and brain were estimated using tabulated CT dose index values measured in a head phantom. A total of 687 CT examinations were performed in 67 children. The mean effective dose, lens dose and brain dose to children over 6 months of age were 1.2 mSv, 52 mGy and 33 mGy, respectively, and the corresponding doses to younger children were 3.2 mSv, 60 mGy and 48 mGy. The effective dose per CT examination varied by a factor of 64. None of the children was exposed to doses known to cause deterministic effects. However, since the threshold for radiation-induced damage is not known with certainty, alternative modalities such as US and MRI should be used whenever possible. (orig.)

  7. Use of an automatic recording system for CT doses: evaluation of the impact of iterative reconstruction on radiation exposure in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, L-A; Defez, D; Chaillot, P F; Douek, P; Boussel, L

    2015-03-01

    Despite the obligatory recording of doses administered to patients during CT scans, this data is not easily accessible. The objective of this study was to implement and validate a computerised automated dose-recording system for CT scans, for a single radiology department. Every patient undergoing a CT scan in our department over a one-year period was included in the study. The CT scanner was upgraded after eight months (installation of iterative reconstruction and choice of an additional voltage of 100 kV). The system recorded, from DICOM image headers, the patient data and technical acquisition parameters. The statistical analysis compared the dose length products (DLP) before and after the upgrade, and compared them with the diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Four thousand seven hundred and ninety-five CT scans were included (2141 before the upgrade and 2654 after). For all of the acquisition protocols tested, there was a reduction in DLP after the upgrade. The mean reduction was 30%, with a range of 17% to 44% depending on the protocol. After the upgrade, all of the mean DLPs were under the DRL thresholds (PCT scans. It confirmed the significant reduction in the dose resulting from the implementation of iterative reconstruction, and enabled an exhaustive and rapid control of the respect of DRLs. Copyright © 2014 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Chronic low dose radiation exposure and oxidative stress in radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.S.; Bhatt, M.B.; Kulkarni, MM.; Rajan, R.; Singh, B.B.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. In this study free radical stress due to low dose chronic radiation exposures of radiation workers was examined as a possible atherogenic risk factor. Data on lipid profiles, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione content in blood indicated an absence of correlation with radiation doses up to 125 mSv. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  9. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  10. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  11. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1980-10-01

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  12. Radiation dose assessments for materials with elevated natural radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markkanen, M.

    1995-11-01

    The report provides practical information needed for evaluating the radiation dose to the general public and workers caused by materials containing elevated levels of natural radionuclides. The report presents criteria, exposure scenarios and calculations used to assess dose with respect to the safety requirements set for construction materials in accordance with the Finnish Radiation Act. A method for calculating external gamma exposure from building materials is presented in detail. The results for most typical cases are given as specific dose rates in table form to enable doses to be assessed without computer calculation. A number of such dose assessments is presented, as is the corresponding computer code. Practical investigation levels for the radioactivity of materials are defined. (23 refs.).

  13. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komochkov, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  14. CT colonography at different radiation dose levels: Feasibility of dose reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, Rogier E.; Venema, Henk W.; Serlie, Iwo W. O.; Nio, C. Yung; Determann, Rogier M.; Tipker, Corinne A.; Vos, Frans M.; Glas, Afina S.; Bartelsman, Joep F. W.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Laméris, Johan S.; Stoker, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the sensitivity and specificity of polyp detection and the image quality of computed tomographic (CT) colonography at different radiation dose levels and to study effective doses reported in literature on CT colonography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT colonography and colonoscopy

  15. Occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and female breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelina, P.; Bliznakov, V.; Bairacova, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed and registered breast cancer [probability of causation - PC] among Bulgarian women who have used different ionizing radiation sources during their working experience. The National Institute of Health (NIH) in US has developed a method for estimating the probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed cancer. We have used this method. A group of 27 women with diagnosed breast cancer has been studied. 11 of them are former workers in NPP - 'Kozloduy', and 16 are from other sites using different sources of ionizing radiation. Analysis was performed for 14 women, for whom full personal data were available. The individual radiation dose for each of them is below 1/10 of the annual dose limit, and the highest cumulative dose for a period of 14 years of occupational exposure is 50,21 mSv. The probability of causation (PC) values in all analyzed cases are below 1%, which confirms the extremely low probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and occurring cases of breast cancer. (orig.)

  16. Radiation-dose consequences of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.; Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially Ra and Cs, are among these materials. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will cause increases in mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Several simulation models were tested with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modelled a typical, acid rain sensitive soil using meterological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. Based on the literature available, a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor or 2 or more. This will lead to increases in plant uptake and ultimate dose to man of about the same extent

  17. Radiation doses to the staff of a nuclear cardiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Koutelou, M.; Theodorakos, A.; Kouzoumi, A.; Kitziri, S.; Tsiblouli, S.; Vardalaki, E.; Kyrozi, E.; Kouttou, S.

    2002-01-01

    The last years, new radiopharmaceuticals are used in a Nuclear Medicine (NM) Department. Nowadays, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a method of routine imaging, a fact that has required increased levels of radioactivity in certain patient examinations. The staff that is more likely to receive the greatest radiation dose in a NM Department is the technologist who deals with performance of patient examination and injection of radioactive material and the nurse who is caring for the patients visiting the Department some of which being totally helpless. The fact that each NM Dept possesses equipment with certain specifications, deals with various kind of patients, has specific design and radiation protection measures which can differ from other NM Depts and uses various examination protocols, makes essential the need to investigate the radiation doses received by each member of the staff, so as to continuously monitor doses and take protective measures if required, control less experienced staff and ensure that radiation dose levels are kept as low as possible at all times. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate radiation dose to the nuclear cardiology department staff by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) placed on the the skin at thyroid and abdominal region as well as evaluating protection measures taken currently in the Dept

  18. AUTOMATIC ACQUISITION OF CT RADIATION DOSE DATA: USING THE DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVEL FOR RADIATION DOSE OPTIMIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Yasuo; Tsuge, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Jyunichi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Tsujimoto, Takeshi; Nishiki, Shigeo; Satoh, Toshimitsu; Aoyama, Nobukazu; Morimoto, Kyohei; Aita, Masamichi; Yamashita, Yusuke; Yoshitake, Takayasu; Mukai, Masami; Yokooka, Yuki; Yokohama, Noriya; Akahane, Keiichi

    2018-02-07

    The present work describes that we try to construct a system that collects dose information that performed CT examination from multiple facilities and unified management. The results of analysis are compared with other National diagnostic reference level (DRL), and the results are fed back to each facility and the cause of the abnormal value is investigated for dose optimization. Medical information collected 139 144 tests from 33 CT devices in 13 facilities. Although the DRL of this study is lower than that of Japan DRL, it was higher than the DRL of each country. When collecting all the examination, it is thought that the variation of the dose due to the error other than the intended imaging site is large. In future, we should continue to collect information in order to DRL renewal and we also think that it is desirable to collect information on physique and detailed scan region as well. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. System and method for administering radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, T.M.

    1975-01-01

    A system and method for metering the quantity of radiation administered a subject by a source of radiation movable along a path relative to the subject is described. The system cumulatively counts the amount of radiation directed toward the subject during each of a succession of increments of motion of the source. When a predetermined amount of radiation is delivered during an increment, the source is disabled until the source passes into the next increment of displacement. The count of radiation is restarted at the instant the source is disabled, to accumulate accurately any added spurious radiation dosage which may occur and to include that dosage in the count of the permitted amount for the next succeeding increment of motion. Several interlocks for disabling the system in response to various malfunctions are included. Means for controlling the speed of movement of the source and/or the dose rate of the source are also included. (auth)

  20. Impact of radiation technique, radiation fraction dose, and total cisplatin dose on hearing. Retrospective analysis of 29 medulloblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scobioala, Sergiu; Kittel, Christopher; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Wolters, Heidi; Eich, Hans Theodor; Parfitt, Ross; Matulat, Peter; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the incidence and degree of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) resulting from different radiation techniques, fractionation dose, mean cochlear radiation dose (D mean ), and total cisplatin dose. In all, 29 children with medulloblastoma (58 ears) with subclinical pretreatment hearing thresholds participated. Radiotherapy (RT) and cisplatin had been applied sequentially according to the HIT MED Guidance. Audiological outcomes up to the latest follow-up (median 2.6 years) were compared. Bilateral high-frequency SNHL was observed in 26 patients (90%). No significant differences were found in mean hearing threshold between left and right ears at any frequency. A significantly better audiological outcome (p < 0.05) was found after tomotherapy at the 6 kHz bone-conduction threshold (BCT) and left-sided 8 kHz air-conduction threshold (ACT) than after a combined radiotherapy technique (CT). Fraction dose was not found to have any impact on the incidence, degree, and time-to-onset of SNHL. Patients treated with CT had a greater risk of SNHL at high frequencies than tomotherapy patients even though D mean was similar. Increase in severity of SNHL was seen when the total cisplatin dose reached above 210 mg/m 2 , with the highest abnormal level found 8-12 months after RT regardless of radiation technique or fraction dose. The cochlear radiation dose should be kept as low as possible in patients who receive simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The risk of clinically relevant HL was shown when D mean exceeds 45 Gy independent of radiation technique or radiation regime. Cisplatin ototoxicity was shown to have a dose-dependent effect on bilateral SNHL, which was more pronounced in higher frequencies. (orig.) [de

  1. Full-field digital mammography versus computed radiology mammography: comparison in image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongxia; Song Shaojuan; Liu Chuanya; Qi Hengtao; Qin Weichang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences in image quality and radiation dose between full- field digital mammography (FFDM) system and compute radiology mammography (CRM) system. Methods: The ALVIM mammographic phantom was exposed by FFDM system with automatic exposure control (AEC) and then exposed by CRM system with the unique imaging plank on the same condition. The FFDM system applied the same kV value and the different mAs values (14, 16, 18, 22 and 24 mAs), and the emission skin dose (ESD) and the average gland dose (AGD) were recorded for the above-mentioned exposure factors. All images were read by five experienced radiologists under the same condition and judged based on 5-point scales. And then receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn and the probability (P det ) values were calculated. The data were statistically processed with ANOVA. Results: The P det values of calcifications and lesion lump were higher with FFDM system than with CRM system at the same dose (1.36 mGy). Especially, for microcalcifications and lesion lump, the largest difference of the P det value was 0.215, and that of lesion lump was 0.245. In comparison with CRM system, the radiation dose of FFDM system could be reduced at the same P det value. The ESD value was reduced by 26%, and the ACD value was reduced by 41%. When the mAs value exceed AEC value, the P det value almost had no change, though the radiation dose was increased. Conclusions: The detection rates of microcalcifications and lesion lump with FFDM system are proven to be superior to CRM system at the same dose. The radiation dose of FFDM system was less than CRM system for the same image quality. (authors)

  2. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields; Revision didactica del sistema de magnitudes operativas ICRU para la evaluacion de la dosis equivalente en campos externos de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H{sub E} and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  3. Radiation dose in neuroangiography using image noise reduction technology: a population study based on 614 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital - Solna, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute and Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mauti, Maria; Boon, Sjirk; Hoornaert, Bart [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Omar, Artur; Marteinsdottir, Maria [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Section of Imaging Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the reduction in patient radiation dose by X-ray imaging technology using image noise reduction and system settings for neuroangiography and to assess its impact on the working habits of the physician. Radiation dose data from 190 neuroangiographies and 112 interventional neuroprocedures performed with state-of-the-art image processing and reference system settings were collected for the period January-June 2010. The system was then configured with extra image noise reduction algorithms and system settings, which enabled radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Radiation dose data from 174 neuroangiographies and 138 interventional neuroprocedures were collected for the period January-June 2012. Procedures were classified as diagnostic or interventional. Patient radiation exposure was quantified using cumulative dose area product and cumulative air kerma. Impact on working habits of the physician was quantified using fluoroscopy time and number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. The optimized system settings provided significant reduction in dose indicators versus reference system settings (p<0.001): from 124 to 47 Gy cm{sup 2} and from 0.78 to 0.27 Gy for neuroangiography, and from 328 to 109 Gy cm{sup 2} and from 2.71 to 0.89 Gy for interventional neuroradiology. Differences were not significant between the two systems with regard to fluoroscopy time or number of DSA images. X-ray imaging technology using an image noise reduction algorithm and system settings provided approximately 60% radiation dose reduction in neuroangiography and interventional neuroradiology, without affecting the working habits of the physician. (orig.)

  4. Coronary computed tomography angiography using ultra-low-dose contrast media: radiation dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Sei; Kamata, Teruaki; Imai, Atsuko; Ohara, Tomoki; Takewa, Mitsuhiko; Ohe, Ryoko; Miyaji, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Junichi; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2013-08-01

    To analyze the invasiveness and image quality of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with 80 kV. We enrolled 181 patients with low body weight and low calcium level. Of these, 154 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 280 HU/80 kV (n = 51); 350 HU/80 kV (n = 51); or 350 HU/120 kV (n = 52). The amount of contrast media (CM) was decided with a CT number-controlling system. Twenty-seven patients were excluded because of an invalid time density curve by timing bolus. The predicted amount of CM, volume CT dose index, dose-length product, effective dose, image noise, and 5-point image quality were measured. The amounts of CM for the 80 kV/280 HU, 80 kV/350 HU, and 120 kV/350 HU groups were 10 ± 4 mL, 15 ± 7 mL, and 30 ± 6 mL, respectively. Although image noise was greater at 80 than 120 kV, there was no significant difference in image quality between 80 kV/350 HU and 120 kV/350 HU (p = 0.390). There was no significant difference in image quality between 80 kV/280 HU and 80 kV/350 HU (4.4 ± 0.7 vs. 4.7 ± 0.4, p = 0.056). The amount of CM and effective dose was lower for 80 kV CCTA than for 120 kV CCTA. CCTA at 80 kV/280 HU may decrease the amount of CM and radiation dose necessary while maintaining image quality.

  5. Estimation of Fetal Dose during Radiation Therapy of Pregnant Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chi Hoon; Kim, Chan Yong; Kim, Bo Gyum; Seo, Suk Jin; Yoo, Sook Hyun; Park, Heung Deuk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a simple and practical shielding device to reduce the fetal dose for a pregnant patient undergoing radiation therapy of brain metastasis. The dose to the fetus was evaluated by simulating the treatments using the anthropomorphic phantom. The prescription dose at mid-brain is 300 cGy x 10 fractions with 6 MV photon with 18 x 22 cm{sup 2} field size. The additional shielding devices to reduce the fetal dose are a shielding wall, cerrobend plates and lead (Pb) sheets over acrylic bridge. Various points of measurement with off-field distance were detected by using ion-chamber (30, 40, 50, and 60 cm) with and without the shielding devices and TLD (30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 cm) only with the shielding devices. The doses to the fetus without shielding were 3.20, 3.21, 1.44, 0.90 cGy at the distances of 30, 40, 50, and 60 cm from the treatment field edge. With shielding, the doses were reduced to 0.88, 0.60, 0.35, 0.25 cGy, and the ratio of the shielding effect varied from 70% to 80%. TLD results were 1.8, 1.2, 0.8, 1.2, and 0.8 cGy (70 cm). The total dose to the fetus was expected to be under 1 cGy during the entire treatment. The essential point during radiation therapy of pregnant patient would be minimizing the fetal dose. 10 cGy to 20 cGy is the threshold dose for fetal radiation effects. Our newly developed device reduced the fetal dose far below the safe level. Therefore, our additional shielding devices are useful and effective to reduce the fetal dose.

  6. Techniques and radiation dose in CT examinations of adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elameen, S. E. A.

    2010-06-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation dose to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lake of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose. The aim of this study was to measure radiation doses in CT examination of the adults in three Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 160 CT examination carried out in 3 hospitals (3 CT scanners). Effective dose was calculated for each examination using CT dose indices. exposure related parameters and CT D1- to- effective dose conversion factors. CT air kerma index (CT D1) and dose length products (DLP) determined were below the established international reference dose levels. The mean effective doses in this study for the head, chest, and abdomen are 0.82, 3.7 and 5.4 mGy respectively. These values were observed that the effective dose per examination was lower in Sudan than in other countries. The report of a CT survey done in these centers indicates that the mean DLP values for adult patients were ranged from 272-460 mGy cm (head) 195-995 mGy cm (chest), 270-459 mGy cm (abdomen). There are a number of observed parameters that greatly need optimization, such as minimize the scan length, without missing any vital anatomical regions, modulation of exposure parameters (kV, mA, exposure time, and slice thickness) based on patient size and age. Another possible method is through use of contrast media only to optimize diagnostic yield. The last possible method is the use of radio protective materials for protection however, in order to achieve the above optimization strategies: there is great demand to educate CT personnel on the effects of scan parameter settings on radiation dose to patients and image quality required for accurate diagnosis. (Author)

  7. Real-Time Patient and Staff Radiation Dose Monitoring in IR Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: karmanna@stanford.edu; Paulis, Leonie, E-mail: leonie.paulis@mumc.nl; Vergoossen, Laura; Kovac, Axel O., E-mail: axel.kovac@mumc.nl; Wijnhoven, Geert, E-mail: g.wijnhoven@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl; Mees, Barend, E-mail: barend.mees@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Vascular Surgery (Netherlands); Das, Marco, E-mail: m.das@mumc.nl; Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    PurposeKnowledge of medical radiation exposure permits application of radiation protection principles. In our center, the first dedicated real-time, automated patient and staff dose monitoring system (DoseWise Portal, Philips Healthcare) was installed. Aim of this study was to obtain insight in the procedural and occupational doses.Materials and MethodsAll interventional radiologists, vascular surgeons, and technicians wore personal dose meters (PDMs, DoseAware, Philips Healthcare). The dose monitoring system simultaneously registered for each procedure dose-related data as the dose area product (DAP) and effective staff dose (E) from PDMs. Use and type of shielding were recorded separately. All procedures were analyzed according to procedure type; these included among others cerebral interventions (n = 112), iliac and/or caval venous recanalization procedures (n = 68), endovascular aortic repair procedures (n = 63), biliary duct interventions (n = 58), and percutaneous gastrostomy procedure (n = 28).ResultsMedian (±IQR) DAP doses ranged from 2.0 (0.8–3.1) (percutaneous gastrostomy) to 84 (53–147) Gy cm{sup 2} (aortic repair procedures). Median (±IQR) first operator doses ranged from 1.6 (1.1–5.0) μSv to 33.4 (12.1–125.0) for these procedures, respectively. The relative exposure, determined as first operator dose normalized to procedural DAP, ranged from 1.9 in biliary interventions to 0.1 μSv/Gy cm{sup 2} in cerebral interventions, indicating large variation in staff dose per unit DAP among the procedure types.ConclusionReal-time dose monitoring was able to identify the types of interventions with either an absolute or relatively high staff dose, and may allow for specific optimization of radiation protection.

  8. Correlation between scatter radiation dose at the height of the operators eye and dose to patient for different angiographies projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyton, F.; Nogueira, M. S.; Da Silva, T. A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Post-graduation in Sciences and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos No. 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gubolino, L.; Pivetta, M. R. [Hospital dos Fornecedores de Cana de Piracicaba, Av. Barao de Valenca 616, 13405-233 Piracicaba (Brazil); Ubeda, C., E-mail: leyton.fernando@gmail.com [Tarapaca University, Health Sciences Faculty, Radiological Sciences Center, Av. Gral. Velasquez 1775, 1000007 Arica, Arica and Parinacota (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    Cases of radiation induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies. In view of evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. The aim of this works was to report scattered radiation doses at the height of the operators eye in an interventional cardiology facility from procedures performed without use of radiation protection devices, correlated with different angiographic projections and operational modes. Measurements were made in a cardiac laboratory with an angiography X-ray system GE equipped with flat-panel detector. PMMA plates of 30 x 30 x 5 cm were used to simulate a patient with a thickness of 20 cm. Two fluoroscopy modes (low and normal, 15 frame/s), cine mode 15 frame/s. Four angiographic projections anterior posterior (Ap), lateral (Lat), left anterior oblique caudal (spider) and left anterior oblique cranial (Lao-45/cra-30) and a cardiac protocol for patient between 70 to 90 kg was used. Measurements of phantom entrance doses rate and scatter doses rate were performed with two Unfors Xi plus. The detector measuring scatter radiation was positioned at the usual distance of the cardiologists eyes during working conditions (1 m from the isocenter and 1.7 m from the floor). There is a good linear correlation between the kerma-area product and scatter dose at the lens. An experimental correlation factor of 2.3; 12.0; 12.2 and 17.6 μSv/Gy cm{sup 2} were found for the Ap, Lao/cra, spider and Lat projections, respectively. The entrance dose of PMMA for fluoroscopy low, medium and cine was 13, 39 and 282 mGy/min, respectively to Ap. (Author)

  9. Correlation between scatter radiation dose at the height of the operators eye and dose to patient for different angiographies projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyton, F.; Nogueira, M. S.; Da Silva, T. A.; Gubolino, L.; Pivetta, M. R.; Ubeda, C.

    2015-10-01

    Cases of radiation induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies. In view of evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. The aim of this works was to report scattered radiation doses at the height of the operators eye in an interventional cardiology facility from procedures performed without use of radiation protection devices, correlated with different angiographic projections and operational modes. Measurements were made in a cardiac laboratory with an angiography X-ray system GE equipped with flat-panel detector. PMMA plates of 30 x 30 x 5 cm were used to simulate a patient with a thickness of 20 cm. Two fluoroscopy modes (low and normal, 15 frame/s), cine mode 15 frame/s. Four angiographic projections anterior posterior (Ap), lateral (Lat), left anterior oblique caudal (spider) and left anterior oblique cranial (Lao-45/cra-30) and a cardiac protocol for patient between 70 to 90 kg was used. Measurements of phantom entrance doses rate and scatter doses rate were performed with two Unfors Xi plus. The detector measuring scatter radiation was positioned at the usual distance of the cardiologists eyes during working conditions (1 m from the isocenter and 1.7 m from the floor). There is a good linear correlation between the kerma-area product and scatter dose at the lens. An experimental correlation factor of 2.3; 12.0; 12.2 and 17.6 μSv/Gy cm 2 were found for the Ap, Lao/cra, spider and Lat projections, respectively. The entrance dose of PMMA for fluoroscopy low, medium and cine was 13, 39 and 282 mGy/min, respectively to Ap. (Author)

  10. Biochemical and immunological responses to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.; Sayed, Z.S.; Mahdy, E.M.; El-Gawish, M.A.; Shosha, W.

    2006-01-01

    Malondialdehyde, lactate dehydrogenase, iron concentration, IL-6 and IL-1b concentration, hemoglobin content, red cells, white cells and platelet counts were determined in seventy-two male albino rats divided into two main groups. The first one was subdivided into 7 subgroups; control and 6 irradiated subgroups with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 Gy single dose of gamma radiation. The other was subdivided into 4 subgroups irradiated with fractionated doses of gamma radiation; three groups were irradiated with 0.3, 0.7 and 1 Gy (0.1 Gy/day) and the last subgroup with 1 Gy (0.2 Gy/day). All animals were sacrificed after three days of the last irradiation dose. The results revealed that all biochemical parameters were increased in rats exposed to fractionated doses more than the single doses. Hematological parameters were decreased in rats exposed to single doses more than the fractionated ones. In conclusion, the data of this study highlights the stimulatory effect of low ionizing radiation doses (= 1 Gy), whether single or fractionated, on some biochemical and immunological parameters

  11. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes paints'' to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with [sup 144]Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to [sup 60]Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  12. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes ``paints`` to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with {sup 144}Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to {sup 60}Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  13. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes ''paints'' to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with 144 Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to 60 Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness

  14. Radiation oncology: what can we achieve by optimized dose delivery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, T.

    2003-01-01

    Spectacular technical advances have marked the last twenty years in radiation oncology. This revolution began with CT-based planning which was followed by 3D conformal therapy. The latter approach produced two important capabilities. The most obvious was that tumors could be viewed in their true location with respect to normal tissues and treated with beams that were not in the axial plane. A second equally important advance was the development of 3D planning tools such as dose volume histograms. These tools permitted quantitative comparison of treatment plans and have supported the development of models relating normal tissue irradiation to the risk of complication. The '3D hypothesis' - that 3D treatment planning would permit higher doses of radiation to be safely delivered-has been proven. Dose escalation studies have been successfully conducted in the lung (= 100 Gy), liver (= 90 Gy), brain (= 90 Gy), and prostate (= 78 Gy). Prospective phase II and phase III trials suggest improved outcome using these higher doses for tumors in the liver and prostate compared to doses considered acceptable in the 2D era. The next technical revolution is underway, with advances in '4D' radiotherapy (accounting fully for organ motion) and in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to further improve the conformality and accuracy of treatment. Proton therapy will improve dose distributions still further. These improved dose distributions can be combined with more accurate tumor delineation provided by functional imaging to offer the potential for additional dose escalation without toxicity and for improved tumor control. These developments permit us to ask if we are approaching the limits of dose optimization and how (if?) research in radiation delivery should proceed

  15. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Richard P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  16. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain

  17. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  18. The principles of dose limitation in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of radiation protection is to protect individuals, their offspring and the population as a whole against harmful effects from ionizing radiation and radioactive substances. Harmful effects may be either somatic, i.e. occurring in the exposed person himself/herself, or hereditary, i.e. occurring in the exposed person's offspring. Successful radiation protection involves (a) protective measures based on the results of research into the biological and biophysical effects of radiation and (b) ensuring that activities necessitating exposure are justified and that the degree of exposure is minimal. This benefit/risk principle ceases to apply if a radiation source is out of control, since the main aim is then to introduce risk limitation measures, provided that these are of positive net benefit to the individual and the population as a whole. This paper discusses the principles of dose limitation as a function of exposure conditions, i.e. controlled or uncontrolled exposure to a source of radiation

  19. Reconstitution of ionizing radiation doses received during pediatrics medical examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baysson, Helene

    2013-01-01

    The issue of cancer risk associated with exposure to medical diagnostic during childhood is particularly relevant in the context of an increasing use of radiological examinations, including CT scans, in pediatrics. Recently, the results of an epidemiological study carried out in UK (7) showed a significant excess risk of leukemia and brain tumors after repeated examinations by CT scans during childhood. However, this study did not include individual exposure data. The article by Thierry-Chef et al. presents an innovative work, within the European project EPI-CT, to estimate individual organ doses due to pediatrics CT scans. The article of Yakoumakis et al. shows doses values received by children exposed to ionizing radiation during cardiac catheterization and an estimate of radiation-induced risk. In both articles, organ doses are estimated on an individual basis in order to improve the evaluation of the risk of radiation-induced cancer in the long term. (author)

  20. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  1. An online radiation monitoring system for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Camanzi, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The Large proton-proton cross-section at 14 TeV and the high luminosity of the LHC will expose CMS to a very complex radiation environment which consists of many different particles. Some electronic components and materials will be exposed to doses of radiation never faced before. CMS must operate reliably for many years in this high-intensity, mixed radiation field. Early warning of problems caused by these high doses is provided by regular and quantitative monitoring of the radiation absorbed at key points by a carefully designed array of remote-reading dosimeters, centred largely on CMS subdetectors. In this note the suitable, existing dosimetric technologies are evaluated. To be suitable the system must perform online monitoring of the radiation environment and have an extremely high dynamic range. The testing of three dosimetric principles is described.

  2. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  3. Reduction of radiation dose by using digital luminescence radiography compared to conventional screen film system with grid cassette; Reduktion der Strahlendosis mittels Speicherfolienradiographie im Vergleich zum konventionellen Film-Folien-System mit Rasterkassette am Schaedelphantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyne, J.P.; Merbold, H.; Neumann, R.; Freesmeyer, M.; Jonetz-Mentzel, L.; Kaiser, W.A. [Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena, Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie (Germany); Sehner, J. [AGFA-Deutschland, Vertriebsgesellschaft (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Purpose: How much can the radiation dose be reduced for skull radiography by using digital luminescence radiography (DLR) compared to a conventional screen film system with a grid cassette? Methods and Materials: A skull phantom (3M) was X-rayed in anterior-posterior orientation using both a conventional screen film system with grid cassette and DLR (ADC-70, Agfa). The tube current time product (mAs) was diminished gradually while keeping the voltage constant. The surface entrance dose was measured by a sensor of Dosimax (Wellhoefer). Five investigators evaluated the images by characteristic and critical features, spatial resolution and contrast. Results: The surface entrance dose at 73 kV/22 mAs was 0,432 mGy in conventional screen film system and 0,435 mGy in DLR. The images could be evaluated very well down to an average dose of 71% (0,308 mGy; SD 0,050); sufficient images were obtained down to an average dose of 31% (0,136 mGy; SD 0,065). The resolution of the line pairs were reduced down to a 2 levels depending on the investigator. Contrast was assessed as being very good to sufficient. The acceptance of the postprocessed images (MUSICA-software) was individually different and resultde in an improvement of the assessment of bone structures an contrast in higher dose ranges only. Conclusion: For the sufficient assessment of a possible fracture/of paranasal sinuses/of measurement the skull the dose can be reduced to at least 56% (31%; SD 14,9%)/40% (27%; SD 9,3%)/18% (14%; SD 4,4%). Digital radiography allows question-referred exposure parameters with clearly reduced dose, so e.g. for fracture exclusion 73 kV/12,5 mAs and to skull measurement 73 kV/4 mAs. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Wie weit kann unter Einsatz der rasterlosen Speicherfolienradiographie bei einer Schaedelaufnahme die Strahlendosis im Vergleich zum Film-Folien-System (FFS) mit Rasterkassette (RK) fragestellungsbezogen gesenkt werden? Material und Methode: Ein Schaedelphantom (3M) wurde konventionell

  4. Radiation oncology systems integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    ROLE7 is intended as a complementary addition to the HL7 Standard and not as an alternative standard. Attempt should be made to mould data elements which are specific to radiation therapy with existing HL7 elements. This can be accomplished by introducing additional values to some element's table-of-options. Those elements which might be specific to radiation therapy could from new segments to be added to the Ancillary Data Reporting set. In order to accomplish ROLE7, consensus groups need be formed to identify the various functions related to radiation oncology that might motivate information exchange. For each of these functions, the specific data elements and their format must be identified. HL7 is organized with a number of applications which communicate asynchronously. Implementation of ROLE7 would allow uniform access to information across vendors and functions. It would provide improved flexibility in system selection. It would allow a more flexible and affordable upgrade path as systems in radiation oncology improve. (author). 5 refs

  5. Comparison of Radiation Dose Rates with the Flux to Dose Conversion Factors Recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Kil, A Reum; Lee, Jo Eun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation shielding has been performed for the design and maintenance of various facilities using radioactive sources such as nuclear fuel, accelerator, and radionuclide. The conversion of flux to dose mainly used in nuclear and radiation fields has been generally made with the dose coefficients presented in ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP- 74), which are produced based on ICRP Publication 60. On the other hand, ICRP Publication 116 (ICRP-116), which adopts the protection system of ICRP Publication 103, has recently been published and provides the dose conversion coefficients calculated with a variety of Monte Carlo codes. The coefficients have more than an update of those in ICRP-74, including new particle types and a greatly expanded energy range. In this study, a shielding evaluation of a specific container for neutron and gamma sources was performed with the MCNP6 code. The dose rates from neutron and gamma-ray sources were calculated using the MCNP6 codes, and these results were based on the flux to dose conversion factors recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116. As a result, the dose rates evaluated with ICRP-74 were generally shown higher than those with ICRP-116. For neutrons, the difference is mainly occurred by the decrease of radiation weighting factors in a part of energy ranges in the ICRP-116 recommendations. For gamma-rays, the ICRP-74 recommendation applied with the kerma approximation leads to overestimated results than the other assessment

  6. Radiation dose reduction in parasinus CT by spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Brand, Michael; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin; Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Spectral shaping aims to narrow the X-ray spectrum of clinical CT. The aim of this study was to determine the image quality and the extent of radiation dose reduction that can be achieved by tin prefiltration for parasinus CT. All scans were performed with a third generation dual-source CT scanner. A study protocol was designed using 100 kV tube voltage with tin prefiltration (200 mAs) that provides image noise levels comparable to a low-dose reference protocol using 100 kV without spectral shaping (25 mAs). One hundred consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly assigned to the study or control group. All patients signed written informed consent. The study protocol was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and applies to the HIPAA. Subjective and objective image quality (attenuation values, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) were assessed. Radiation exposure was assessed as volumetric CT dose index, and effective dose was estimated. Mann-Whitney U test was performed for radiation exposure and for image noise comparison. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Image noise in air, in the retrobulbar fat, and in the eye globe was comparable between both groups (all p > 0.05). CNR{sub eye} {sub globe/air} did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.7). Radiation exposure (1.7 vs. 2.1 mGy, p < 0.01) and effective dose (0.055 vs. 0.066 mSv, p < 0.01) were significantly reduced in the study group. Radiation dose can be further reduced by 17% for low-dose parasinus CT by tin prefiltration maintaining diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  7. Clinical usefulness of the management and delivery of radiation dose-distribution images using the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Onogi, Yuzou; Aoki, Yukimasa; Kozuka, Takuyo; Ohtomo, Kuni

    1998-01-01

    Dose distribution images in radiation therapy play important roles in the management of cancer patients. To date, hard copies of these images have been stored for referral by radiation oncologists as needed. In most cases, these images are not available to medical personnel outside the radiation oncology department. We have developed a means to access these dose distribution images from the hospital via the World-Wide Web (WWW). A screen snapshot of a dose distribution image on the CRT of a treatment planning unit is copied to the WWW server and converted to a GIF (graphic interchange format) image. Similarly, we can register dose volume histograms and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) on the WWW. Medical personnel can view these images through the WWW browser from anywhere in the hospital. As a result, radiation oncologists are given detailed information on target definition in treatment planning by expert physicians. The system also helps co-medical personnel in understanding dose distribution and predicting radiation injury. At the same time, it actualizes an electronic archive of dose distribution images, which is a database for quick and reliable review, evaluation, and comparison of treatment plans. This technique also fosters closer relationships among radiation oncologists, physicians, and co-medical personnel. (author)

  8. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  9. Evaluation of occupational radiation dose of extremities on hysterosalpingography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipov, D.; Kotowski, S.T.A.

    2017-01-01

    In the Hysterosalpingography (HSG) exam there is always a professional present with their hands very close to the radiation field. Based on CNEN, individuals occupationally exposed to radiation have equivalent dose limit values for the extremities (500 mSv / year). The objective of the study was to verify the equivalent dose in the hand region of an IOE (Occupationally Exposed Individual) that performs the HSG test and to compare it with the CNEN limit and with similar studies. A humanoid phantom was used to simulate the patient and an ionization chamber, which was placed in the place commonly occupied by the professional. The equivalent hand dose result (∼ 30 mSv / year) equals 6% of the CNEN annual dose limit, but is close to most studies using fluoroscopes. Therefore, the optimization of radiological protection is necessary to reduce these results

  10. Calibration of high-dose radiation facilities (Handbook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, B.L.; Bhat, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    In India at present several high intensity radiation sources are used. There are 135 teletheraphy machines and 65 high intensity cobalt-60 sources in the form of gamma chambers (2.5 Ci) and PANBIT (50 Ci). Several food irradiation facilities and a medical sterilization plant ISOMED are also in operation. The application of these high intensity sources involve a wide variation of dose from 10 Gy to 100 kGy. Accurate and reproducible radiation dosimetry is essential in the use of these sources. This handbook is especially compiled for calibration of high-dose radiation facilities. The first few chapters discuss such topics as interaction of radiation with matter, radiation chemistry, radiation processing, commonly used high intensity radiation sources and their special features, radiation units and dosimetry principles. In the chapters which follow, chemical dosimeters are discussed in detail. This discussion covers Fricke dosimeter, FBX dosimeter, ceric sulphate dosimeter, free radical dosimetry, coloured indicators for irrdiation verification. A final chapter is devoted to practical hints to be followed in calibration work. (author)

  11. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The report contains information on the natural (background) radiation exposure (chapter II), the natural radiation exposure as influenced by anthropogenic effects (chapter III), the anthropogenic radiation exposure (chapter IV), and the radiation doses to the environment and the population emanating from the Chernobyl fallout (chapter V). The natural radiation exposure is specified referring to the contributions from cosmic and terrestrial background radiation and intake of natural radioactive substances. Changes of the natural environment resulting from anthropogenic effects (technology applications) inducing an increase in concentration of natural radioactive substances accordingly increase the anthropogenic radiation exposure. Indoor air radon concentration in buildings for instance is one typical example of anthropogenic increase of concentration of natural radioactivity, primarily caused by the mining industry or by various materials processing activities, which may cause an increase in the average radiation dose to the population. Measurements so far show that indoor air concentration of radon exceeds a level of 200 Bq/m 3 in less than 2% of the residential buildings; the EUropean Commission therefore recommends to use this concentration value as a maximum value for new residential buildings. Higher concentrations are primarily measured in areas with relevant geological conditions and abundance of radon, or eg. in mining areas. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Hybrid dose calculation: a dose calculation algorithm for microbeam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Mattia; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Oelfke, Uwe; Wilkens, Jan J.; Bartzsch, Stefan

    2018-02-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is still a preclinical approach in radiation oncology that uses planar micrometre wide beamlets with extremely high peak doses, separated by a few hundred micrometre wide low dose regions. Abundant preclinical evidence demonstrates that MRT spares normal tissue more effectively than conventional radiation therapy, at equivalent tumour control. In order to launch first clinical trials, accurate and efficient dose calculation methods are an inevitable prerequisite. In this work a hybrid dose calculation approach is presented that is based on a combination of Monte Carlo and kernel based dose calculation. In various examples the performance of the algorithm is compared to purely Monte Carlo and purely kernel based dose calculations. The accuracy of the developed algorithm is comparable to conventional pure Monte Carlo calculations. In particular for inhomogeneous materials the hybrid dose calculation algorithm out-performs purely convolution based dose calculation approaches. It is demonstrated that the hybrid algorithm can efficiently calculate even complicated pencil beam and cross firing beam geometries. The required calculation times are substantially lower than for pure Monte Carlo calculations.

  13. Radiographic fallopian tube recanalization: Absorbed ovarian radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgpeth, P.L.; Thurmond, A.S.; Fry, R.; Schmidgall, J.R.; Roesch, J.

    1991-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose to the ovaries during radiographic fallopian tube recanalization was estimated in 29 patients with use of thermoluminescent dosimeters placed in the vaginal fornix. With an average fluoroscopic time of 8.5 minutes ± 5.5 and an average of 14 ± 5 105-mm spot radiographs obtained, the average absorbed dose to the ovaries was 8.5 mGy ± 5.6 (0.85 rad ± 0.56). Technical guidelines for keeping patient radiation exposure to a minimum during this new interventional procedure are suggested

  14. Radiographic fallopian tube recanalization: Absorbed ovarian radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedgpeth, P.L.; Thurmond, A.S.; Fry, R.; Schmidgall, J.R.; Roesch, J. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland (USA))

    1991-07-01

    Absorbed radiation dose to the ovaries during radiographic fallopian tube recanalization was estimated in 29 patients with use of thermoluminescent dosimeters placed in the vaginal fornix. With an average fluoroscopic time of 8.5 minutes {plus minus} 5.5 and an average of 14 {plus minus} 5 105-mm spot radiographs obtained, the average absorbed dose to the ovaries was 8.5 mGy {plus minus} 5.6 (0.85 rad {plus minus} 0.56). Technical guidelines for keeping patient radiation exposure to a minimum during this new interventional procedure are suggested.

  15. Randomized comparison of operator radiation exposure comparing transradial and transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: rationale and design of the minimizing adverse haemorrhagic events by TRansradial access site and systemic implementation of angioX – RAdiation Dose study (RAD-MATRIX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Calabrò, Paolo; Sarandrea, Alessandro; Rigattieri, Stefano; Tomassini, Francesco; Sardella, Gennaro; Zavalloni, Dennis; Cortese, Bernardo; Limbruno, Ugo; Tebaldi, Matteo; Gagnor, Andrea; Rubartelli, Paolo; Zingarelli, Antonio; Valgimigli, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radiation absorbed by interventional cardiologists is a frequently under-evaluated important issue. Aim is to compare radiation dose absorbed by interventional cardiologists during percutaneous coronary procedures for acute coronary syndromes comparing transradial and transfemoral access. Methods: The randomized multicentre MATRIX (Minimizing Adverse Haemorrhagic Events by TRansradial Access Site and Systemic Implementation of angioX) trial has been designed to compare the clinical outcome of patients with acute coronary syndromes treated invasively according to the access site (transfemoral vs. transradial) and to the anticoagulant therapy (bivalirudin vs. heparin). Selected experienced interventional cardiologists involved in this study have been equipped with dedicated thermoluminescent dosimeters to evaluate the radiation dose absorbed during transfemoral or right transradial or left transradial access. For each access we evaluate the radiation dose absorbed at wrist, at thorax and at eye level. Consequently the operator is equipped with three sets (transfemoral, right transradial or left transradial access) of three different dosimeters (wrist, thorax and eye dosimeter). Primary end-point of the study is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators at thorax. An important secondary end-point is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators comparing the right or left radial approach. Patient randomization is performed according to the MATRIX protocol for the femoral or radial approach. A further randomization for the radial approach is performed to compare right and left transradial access. Conclusions: The RAD-MATRIX study will probably consent to clarify the radiation issue for interventional cardiologist comparing transradial and transfemoral access in the setting of acute coronary syndromes

  16. Randomized comparison of operator radiation exposure comparing transradial and transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: rationale and design of the minimizing adverse haemorrhagic events by TRansradial access site and systemic implementation of angioX – RAdiation Dose study (RAD-MATRIX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciahbasi, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.sciahbasi@fastwebnet.it [Interventional Cardiology, Sandro Pertini Hospital – ASL RMB, Rome (Italy); Calabrò, Paolo [Division of Cardiology - Department of Cardio-Thoracic Sciences - Second University of Naples (Italy); Sarandrea, Alessandro [HSE Management, Rome (Italy); Rigattieri, Stefano [Interventional Cardiology, Sandro Pertini Hospital – ASL RMB, Rome (Italy); Tomassini, Francesco [Department of Cardiology, Infermi Hospital, Rivoli (Italy); Sardella, Gennaro [La Sapienza University, Rome (Italy); Zavalloni, Dennis [UO Emodinamica e Cardiologia Invasiva, IRCCS, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy); Cortese, Bernardo [Interventional Cardiology, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Milan (Italy); Limbruno, Ugo [Cardiology Unit, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto (Italy); Tebaldi, Matteo [Cardiology Department, University of Ferrara, Department of Cardiology (Italy); Gagnor, Andrea [Department of Cardiology, Infermi Hospital, Rivoli (Italy); Rubartelli, Paolo [Villa Scassi Hospital, Genova (Italy); Zingarelli, Antonio [San Martino Hospital, Genova (Italy); Valgimigli, Marco [Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Radiation absorbed by interventional cardiologists is a frequently under-evaluated important issue. Aim is to compare radiation dose absorbed by interventional cardiologists during percutaneous coronary procedures for acute coronary syndromes comparing transradial and transfemoral access. Methods: The randomized multicentre MATRIX (Minimizing Adverse Haemorrhagic Events by TRansradial Access Site and Systemic Implementation of angioX) trial has been designed to compare the clinical outcome of patients with acute coronary syndromes treated invasively according to the access site (transfemoral vs. transradial) and to the anticoagulant therapy (bivalirudin vs. heparin). Selected experienced interventional cardiologists involved in this study have been equipped with dedicated thermoluminescent dosimeters to evaluate the radiation dose absorbed during transfemoral or right transradial or left transradial access. For each access we evaluate the radiation dose absorbed at wrist, at thorax and at eye level. Consequently the operator is equipped with three sets (transfemoral, right transradial or left transradial access) of three different dosimeters (wrist, thorax and eye dosimeter). Primary end-point of the study is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators at thorax. An important secondary end-point is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators comparing the right or left radial approach. Patient randomization is performed according to the MATRIX protocol for the femoral or radial approach. A further randomization for the radial approach is performed to compare right and left transradial access. Conclusions: The RAD-MATRIX study will probably consent to clarify the radiation issue for interventional cardiologist comparing transradial and transfemoral access in the setting of acute coronary syndromes.

  17. Medical effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggle, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ionising radiation is genotoxic and causes biological effects via a chain of events involving DNA strand breaks and 'multiply damaged sites' as critical lesions that lead to cell death. The acute health effects of radiation after doses of a few gray, are due to such cell death and consequent disturbance of cell population kinetics. Because of cellular repair and repopulation there is generally a threshold dose of about 1-2 Gy below which such severe effects are not inducible. However, more subtle, sub-lethal mutational DNA damage in somatic cells of the body and the germ cells of the ovary and testis cause the two major low dose health risks -cancer induction and genetic (heritable) effects. This paper discusses some of the epidemiological and experimental evidence regarding radiation genetic effects, carcinogenesis and CNS teratogenesis. It concludes that current risk estimates imply that about 3% of all cancers; 1% of genetic disorders and between 0% and 0.3% of severe mental subnormality in the UK is attributable to the ubiquitous background radiation. The health risks associated with the medical uses of radiation are smaller, whilst the nuclear industry causes perhaps 1% of the health detriment attributable to background doses. (author)

  18. Radiation dose from Chernobyl forests: assessment using the 'forestpath' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Linkov, I.; Belinkaia, E.; Rimkevich, V.; Zmushko, Yu.; Lutsko, A.; Fifield, F.W.; Flowers, A.G.; Wells, G.

    1996-01-01

    Contaminated forests can contribute significantly to human radiation dose for a few decades after initial contamination. Exposure occurs through harvesting the trees, manufacture and use of forest products for construction materials and paper production, and the consumption of food harvested from forests. Certain groups of the population, such as wild animal hunters and harvesters of berries, herbs and mushrooms, can have particularly large intakes of radionuclides from natural food products. Forestry workers have been found to receive radiation doses several times higher than other groups in the same area. The generic radionuclide cycling model 'forestpath' is being applied to evaluate the human radiation dose and risks to population groups resulting from living and working near the contaminated forests. The model enables calculations to be made to predict the internal and external radiation doses at specific times following the accident. The model can be easily adjusted for dose calculations from other contamination scenarios (such as radionuclide deposition at a low and constant rate as well as complex deposition patterns). Experimental data collected in the forests of Southern Belarus are presented. These data, together with the results of epidemiological studies, are used for model calibration and validation

  19. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  20. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  1. Radiation dose for patients in conventional radiological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly, J.; Ghilardi Netto, T.

    1998-01-01

    This work shows results obtained from evaluating radiation doses administered to patients undergoing common X-rays tests. Data were gathered in ten wards from three institutions at Curritiba Paran Data embraced grown-up patients weighting 70 +- 10 Kg undergoing PA and LAT thorax and AP abdomen tests. Calibration of instruments and thermoluminescent dosimeters was made in fields employed in radiodiagnosis to determine adequate correction factors. TLD were calibrated to decrease input dose at the surface

  2. A method for radiobiological investigations in radiation fields with different LET and high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundler, W.

    1976-01-01

    For investigations: 1. Performed in the field of radiobiology with different LET-radiation and a relatively high background dose rate of one component (e.g. investigations with fast and intermediate reactor neutrons) 2. Concerning radiation risk studies within a wide range 3. Of irradiations, covering a long time period (up to 100 days) a test system is necessary which on the one hand makes it possible to analyze the influence of different LET radiation and secondly shows a relative radiation resistant behaviour and allows a simple cell cycle regulation. A survey is given upon the installed device of a simple cell observation method, the biological test system used and the analysis of effects caused by dose, repair and LET. It is possible to analyze the behaviour of the nonsurvival cells and to demonstrate different reactions of the test parameters to the radiation of different LET. (author)

  3. Radiation Dose from Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG) Examination in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwiladluk, T.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to determine entrance skin dose (ESD) from fluoroscopy and radiography procedures in voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) studies of pediatric patients by dose-area product (DAP) recording. Methods: Radiation doses received by 70 patients underwent VCUG procedures were determined by the DAP Meter, Wellh?fer Dosimetrie GmbH, Germany) directly coupled to the x-ray tube window (Philips Omni Diagnost Eleva) and an electrometer connected to a computer for data collection. The study revealed the radiation dose for VCUG and the baseline data on the entrance skin dose, ESD, dose area-product (DAP) and the effective dose, E, to establish local reference dose levels for VCUG in pediatric patients. Results: The mean(minimum-maximum) ESD, DAP and the effective dose of pediatric patients in 4 age ranges were 3.41(1-9) mGy, 46.58 (21.90-158.90) cGycm 2 and 0.10(0.05-0.33) mSv for 0- 1 years, 6.80(2-16) mGy, 115.55 (20.70-258.70)cGycm 2 and 0.24(0.04-0.54) mSv for >1-5 years, 11.76 (3-23) mGy, 292.28 (88.90-593.50)cGycm 2 and 0.61(0.19-1.25) mSv for >5-10 years, and 20.50(10-42) mGy, 575.98(255.60-1247.80) cGycm 2 and 1.12(0.54-2.62) mSv for >10-15 years respectively. Discussion: The dose levels for VCUG as recommended by the national reference doses (NRDs) of UK are classified at patient age of 0-1 years, 90 cGy.cm 2 , >1-5 years, 110 cGy.cm 2 , >5-10 years, 210 cGy.cm 2 and >10-15 years, 470 cGy.cm 2 respectively. Conclusions: The mean DAP of pediatric patients were higher than the dose level as recommended by NRD at the age range >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 years. The limitation in this study was the non uniform in the number of patients at the higher age. Attempts could be made to lower the radiation dose to avoid the higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer in children. (author)

  4. Radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuszer, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    A circuit is disclosed that detects radiation transients and provides a clamping signal in response to each transient. The clamping signal is present from the time the transient rises above a given threshold level and for a known duration thereafter. The system includes radiation sensors, a blocking oscillator that generates a pulse in response to each sensor signal, and an output pulse duration control circuit. The oscillator pulses are fed simultaneously to the output pulse duration control circuit and to an OR gate, the output of which comprises the system output. The output pulse duration is controlled by the time required to magnetize a magnetic core to saturation in first one direction and then the other

  5. Radiation detecting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    In spectrophotometry systems, a usual arrangement for modulating the radiation is a rotating disc having one or more sectors removed. A beam of radiation may be blocked by the disc except when a cut-away sector is in the path of the beam. With a double-beam system, a cut-away sector of 180 0 may be used so that when the first path is blocked, the second is allowed through, and vice versa. One or both sides of the disc may be formed as mirrors to facilitate beam switching and to allow use of more than two beams for background compensation purposes or for analysis of more than one substance within a sample. (G.T.H.)

  6. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure.

  7. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong

    2013-01-01

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure

  8. Measurement of radiation dose in paediatric micturating cystourethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N. E. A.

    2013-06-01

    Paediatrics and children have been recognized that they have a higher risk of developing cancer from the radiation than adults. Therefor, increased attention has been directed towards the dose to the patients. Micturating Cystourethrography (MCU) is a commonly use ed fluoroscopic procedure in children and commonly used to detect the vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and show urethral and bladder and abnormalities. This study aims to measure the pediatric patients undergoing MCU. The study was carried out in two hospitals in Khartoum. The entrance surface dose (ESD) was determined determined by indirect method for 45 children. Furthermore, the mean ESD, sd and range resulting from MCU procedures has been estimated to be 0.7±.5 (0.2-2.5) mGy for the total patient population. The radiation dose to the patients is well within established safety limits, in the light of the current practice. The radiation dose results of this study are appropriate for adoption as the local initial dose reference level (DRL) value for this technique. The data presented in this study showed our doses to be approximately 50% lower than the lower mean values presented in the literature.(Author)

  9. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay [Institute of Radiological science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tzung-Chi, E-mail: tzungchi.huang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, No.91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Background: Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications. Materials: Image quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan. Results: Radiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2{+-}4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95{+-}0.82 and 4.13{+-}0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53{+-}0.5 to 0.16{+-}0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols. Conclusion: The proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  10. The analysis of annual dose distributions for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    The system of dose limitation recommended by the ICRP includes the requirement that no worker shall exceed the current dose limit of 50mSv/a. Continuous exposure at this limit corresponds to an annual death rate comparable with 'high risk' industries if all workers are continuously exposed at the dose limit. In practice, there is a distribution of doses with an arithmetic mean lower than the dose limit. In its 1977 report UNSCEAR defined a reference dose distribution for the purposes of comparison. However, this two parameter distribution does not show the departure from log-normality normally observed for actual distributions at doses which are a significant proportion of the annual limit. In this report an alternative model is suggested, based on a three parameter log-normal distribution. The third parameter is an ''effective dose limit'' and such a model fits very well the departure from log-normality observed in actual dose distributions. (author)

  11. Integrative radiation systems biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Maximisation of the ratio of normal tissue preservation and tumour cell reduction is the main concept of radiotherapy alone or combined with chemo-, immuno- or biologically targeted therapy. The foremost parameter influencing this ratio is radiation sensitivity and its modulation towards a more efficient killing of tumour cells and a better preservation of normal tissue at the same time is the overall aim of modern therapy schemas. Nevertheless, this requires a deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in order to identify its key players as potential therapeutic targets. Moreover, the success of conventional approaches that tried to statistically associate altered radiation sensitivity with any molecular phenotype such as gene expression proofed to be somewhat limited since the number of clinically used targets is rather sparse. However, currently a paradigm shift is taking place from pure frequentistic association analysis to the rather holistic systems biology approach that seeks to mathematically model the system to be investigated and to allow the prediction of an altered phenotype as the function of one single or a signature of biomarkers. Integrative systems biology also considers the data from different molecular levels such as the genome, transcriptome or proteome in order to partially or fully comprehend the causal chain of molecular mechanisms. An example for the application of this concept currently carried out at the Clinical Cooperation Group “Personalized Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer” of the Helmholtz-Zentrum München and the LMU Munich is described. This review article strives for providing a compact overview on the state of the art of systems biology, its actual challenges, potential applications, chances and limitations in radiation oncology research working towards improved personalised therapy concepts using this relatively new methodology

  12. The effect of well-characterized, very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Katelyn; Bradley, Suzanne; Baginski, Bryana; Wilson, Joseph R; Medlin, Donald; Zheng, Leon; Wilson, R Kevin; Rusin, Matthew; Takacs, Endre; Dean, Delphine

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on fibroblast cells irradiated by spectrally and dosimetrically well-characterized soft x-rays. To achieve this, a new cell culture x-ray irradiation system was designed. This system generates characteristic fluorescent x-rays to irradiate the cell culture with x-rays of well-defined energies and doses. 3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in cups with Mylar® surfaces and were irradiated for one hour with characteristic iron (Fe) K x-ray radiation at a dose rate of approximately 550 μGy/hr. Cell proliferation, total protein analysis, flow cytometry, and cell staining were performed on fibroblast cells to determine the various effects caused by the radiation. Irradiated cells demonstrated increased proliferation and protein production compared to control samples. Flow cytometry revealed that a higher percentage of irradiated cells were in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle compared to control counterparts, which is consistent with other low-dose studies. Cell staining results suggest that irradiated cells maintained normal cell functions after radiation exposure, as there were no qualitative differences between the images of the control and irradiated samples. The result of this study suggest that low-dose soft x-ray radiation might cause an initial pause, followed by a significant increase, in proliferation. An initial "pause" in cell proliferation could be a protective mechanism of the cells to minimize DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. The new cell irradiation system developed here allows for unprecedented control over the properties of the x-rays given to the cell cultures. This will allow for further studies on various cell types with known spectral distribution and carefully measured doses of radiation, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms behind varied cell responses to low-dose x-rays reported in the literature.

  13. The effect of well-characterized, very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Katelyn; Bradley, Suzanne; Baginski, Bryana; Wilson, Joseph R.; Medlin, Donald; Zheng, Leon; Wilson, R. Kevin; Rusin, Matthew; Takacs, Endre

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on fibroblast cells irradiated by spectrally and dosimetrically well-characterized soft x-rays. To achieve this, a new cell culture x-ray irradiation system was designed. This system generates characteristic fluorescent x-rays to irradiate the cell culture with x-rays of well-defined energies and doses. 3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in cups with Mylar® surfaces and were irradiated for one hour with characteristic iron (Fe) K x-ray radiation at a dose rate of approximately 550 μGy/hr. Cell proliferation, total protein analysis, flow cytometry, and cell staining were performed on fibroblast cells to determine the various effects caused by the radiation. Irradiated cells demonstrated increased proliferation and protein production compared to control samples. Flow cytometry revealed that a higher percentage of irradiated cells were in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle compared to control counterparts, which is consistent with other low-dose studies. Cell staining results suggest that irradiated cells maintained normal cell functions after radiation exposure, as there were no qualitative differences between the images of the control and irradiated samples. The result of this study suggest that low-dose soft x-ray radiation might cause an initial pause, followed by a significant increase, in proliferation. An initial “pause” in cell proliferation could be a protective mechanism of the cells to minimize DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. The new cell irradiation system developed here allows for unprecedented control over the properties of the x-rays given to the cell cultures. This will allow for further studies on various cell types with known spectral distribution and carefully measured doses of radiation, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms behind varied cell responses to low-dose x-rays reported in the literature. PMID:29300773

  14. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, Azadeh; Weber, Michael; Homolka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice

  15. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  16. Radiation dose associated with CT-guided drain placement for pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Cody J.; Isaacson, Ari J.; Fordham, Lynn Ansley; Ivanovic, Marija; Dixon, Robert G. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, UNC Health Care, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Taylor, J.B. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Environment, Health and Safety, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To date, there are limited radiation dose data on CT-guided procedures in pediatric patients. Our goal was to quantify the radiation dose associated with pediatric CT-guided drain placement and follow-up drain evaluations in order to estimate effective dose. We searched the electronic medical record and picture archiving and communication system (PACS) to identify all pediatric (<18 years old) CT-guided drain placements performed between January 2008 and December 2013 at our institution. We compiled patient data and radiation dose information from CT-guided drain placements as well as pre-procedural diagnostic CTs and post-procedural follow-up fluoroscopic abscess catheter injections (sinograms). Then we converted dose-length product, fluoroscopy time and number of acquisitions to effective doses using Monte Carlo simulations and age-appropriate conversion factors based on annual quality-control testing. Fifty-two drainages were identified with mean patient age of 11.0 years (5 weeks to 17 years). Most children had diagnoses of appendicitis (n=23) or inflammatory bowel disease (n=11). Forty-seven patients had diagnostic CTs, with a mean effective dose of 7.3 mSv (range 1.1-25.5 mSv). Drains remained in place for an average of 16.9 days (range 0-75 days), with an average of 0.9 (0-5) sinograms per patient in follow-up. The mean effective dose for all drainages and follow-up exams was 5.3 mSv (0.7-17.1) and 62% (32/52) of the children had effective doses less than 5 mSv. The majority of pediatric patients who have undergone CT-guided drain placements at our institution have received total radiation doses on par with diagnostic ranges. This information could be useful when describing the dose of radiation to parents and providers when CT-guided drain placement is necessary. (orig.)

  17. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance

  18. Problems of dose rate in radiation protection regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Some modern problems of Radiation Safety Standards are discussed. It is known that Standards are based on the Linear-Non-Threshold Concept (LNTC) of radiation risk, which is now called by many experts as conservative. It is thought it is necessary to include in the Standards such factor as dose rate or duration of irradiation. Some model of effects of radiation exposure with taking into account the reparation of cell damage is presented. The practical method for assessment of effects of duration of irradiation on detriments is proposed.(author)

  19. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  20. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  1. Radiation doses and cancer risks from breast imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2010-10-01

    To compare radiation doses and lifetime attributable risks (LARs) of radiation-induced cancer incidence and mortality from breast imaging studies involving the use of ionizing radiation. Recent literature on radiation doses from radiologic procedures and organ doses from nuclear medicine procedures, along with Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII age-dependent risk data, is used to estimate LARs of radiation-induced cancer incidence and mortality from breast imaging studies involving ionizing radiation, including screen-film mammography, digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, dedicated breast computed tomography, breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), and positron emission mammography (PEM). Two-view digital mammography and screen-film mammography involve average mean glandular radiation doses of 3.7 and 4.7 mGy, respectively. According to BEIR VII data, these studies are associated, respectively, with LARs of fatal breast cancer of 1.3 and 1.7 cases per 100,000 women aged 40 years at exposure and less than one case per one million women aged 80 years at exposure. Annual screening digital or screen-film mammography performed in women aged 40-80 years is associated with an LAR of fatal breast cancer of 20-25 cases in 100,000. A single BSGI study involving a label-recommended dose of 740-1100 MBq (20-30 mCi) of technetium 99m-sestamibi is estimated to involve an LAR of fatal cancer that is 20-30 times that of digital mammography in women aged 40 years. A single PEM study involving a labeled dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose is estimated to involve an LAR of fatal cancer that is 23 times higher than that of digital mammography in women aged 40 years. A single BSGI or PEM study is associated with a fatal radiation-induced cancer risk higher than or comparable to that of annual screening mammography in women aged 40-80 years.

  2. The assessment of personal dose due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Young, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental basis of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is discussed and a number of considerations in the measurement of thermoluminescence described, with particular reference to CaSO 4 :Dy. The steps taken to convert a thermoluminescence measurement to an exposure and then an absorbed dose are outlined. The calculation of effective dose equivalents due to external exposure to γ-radiation in a number of situations commonly encountered in a uranium mine is discussed. Factors which may affect the accuracy of external dose assessments are described

  3. System responses to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green, and red light in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Collier Valle

    Full Text Available Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions.

  4. System responses to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green, and red light in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions.

  5. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation; Praenatale Strahlenexposition. Dosisermittlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Roeser, A. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology

    2015-05-15

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  6. Problems in radiation absorbed dose estimation from positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, G.F.; Harper, P.V.; Reft, C.S.; Chen, C.T.; Lathrop, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The positron emitters commonly used in clinical imaging studies for the most part are short-lived, so that when they are distributed in the body the radiation absorbed dose is low even though most of the energy absorbed is from the positrons themselves rather than the annihilation radiation. These considerations do not apply to the administration pathway for a radiopharmaceutical where the activity may be highly concentrated for a brief period rather than distributed in the body. Thus, high local radiation absorbed doses to the vein for an intravenous administration and to the upper airways during administration by inhalation can be expected. For these geometries, beta point source functions (FPS's) have been employed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose in the present study. Physiologic measurements were done to determine other exposure parameters for intravenous administration of O-15 and Rb-82 and for administration of O-15-CO 2 by continuous breathing. Using FPS's to calculate dose rates to the vein wall from O-15 and Rb-82 injected into a vein having an internal radius of 1.5 mm yielded dose rates of 0.51 and 0.46 (rad x g/μCi x h), respectively. The dose gradient in the vein wall and surrounding tissues was also determined using FPS's. Administration of O-15-CO 2 by continuous breathing was also investigated. Using ultra-thin thermoluninescent dosimeters (TLD's) having the effective thickness of normal tracheal mucosa, experiments were performed in which 6 dosimeters were exposed to known concentrations of O-15 positrons in a hemicylindrical tracheal phantom having an internal radius of 0.96 cm and an effective length of 14 cm. The dose rate for these conditions was 3.4 (rads/h)/(μCi/cm 3 ). 15 references, 7 figures, 6 tables

  7. Radiation Doses and Associated Risk From the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    The magnitude of dose due to the Fukushima Daiichi Accident was estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2013 report published in April 2014. Following this, the UNSCEAR white paper, which comprises a digest of new information for the 2013 Fukushima report, was published in October 2015. Another comprehensive report on radiation dose due to the accident is the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report on the Fukushima Daiichi Accident published in August 2015. Although the UNSCEAR and IAEA publications well summarize doses received by residents, they review only literature published before the end of December 2014 and the end of March 2015, respectively. However, some studies on dose estimation have been published since then. In addition, the UNSCEAR 2013 report states it was likely that some overestimation had been introduced generally by the methodology used by the Committee. For example, effects of decontamination were not considered in the lifetime external dose estimated. Decontamination is in progress for most living areas in Fukushima Prefecture, which could reduce long-term external dose to residents. This article mainly reviews recent English language articles that may add new information to the UNSCEAR and IAEA publications. Generally, recent articles suggest lower doses than those presented by the UNSCEAR 2013 report.

  8. Radiation dose associated with common computed tomography examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Mokhtar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To survey computed tomography (CT radiation dose associated with non-contrast spiral Multislice CT examination in our institute. Methods: Detailed parameters for 362 consecutive examinations, including the patient weight, height, volume CT dose index (CTDIvol, scan length, and dose length product (DLP were recorded from the dose report. Effective dose (E was estimated for each patient. The differences between E doses were statistically analyzed using SSPS. Results: Patients body mass index (BMI was 13.4 to 51.42 (average BMI 29.5 kg/m. Patients dose data (1 scan phase for each patient from dose information: the median value of DLP was 586.45 mGy cm (83.30–1179.70 mGy cm, median value of CTDIvol was 12.07 (2.20–23.9 mGy, median value of mAs used was 186.50 (34–334 mAs. Effective dose range was (1.1–16.5 mSv according to international commission of radiological protection (ICRP 103 and according to ICRP60 the range was (1.3–18.93 mSv. Median value of frequent CT examinations for the same patient was 2 (min 1 scan/year & max 11 scan/year. CT dose variation was highly significant (p value <0.01 depending on high variation on mAs with (r = 0.98. CT dose was moderate depending on BMI (r = 0.55. Conclusion: There was statistically highly significant variation in effective radiation doses associated with non-contrast CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. The reason for this variation must be avoided. Keywords: Computed tomography (CT, CT dose, volume CT dose index, dose length product (DLP, Effective dose (E, International commission of radiological protection (ICRP 103

  9. The role of radiation types and dose in induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim Munira, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Genomic Instability (GI) is defined as long-term alterations induced by low-dose exposure to a variety of genotoxic agents in mammalian cells that act to increase the 'apparent' spontaneous mutation frequency.GI is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression and is observed in the progeny of irradiated and bystander cells as the delayed and stochastic appearance of de novo chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and delayed lethal mutations both in vitro and in vivo. It occurs at a frequency several orders of magnitude greater than would be expected for mutation in a single gene, implying that GI is a multigenic phenomenon. The expression of GI can be influenced by genotype, cell type and radiation quality; however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. While several studies have demonstrated GI induction by high and low LET radiation, our work on human and mouse primary cell systems has shown significant differences in the capacity to induce GI and the spectrum of alterations depending on LET. These differences might be attributed to differences in radiation track structure, radiation dose and radiation exposure regime (distribution of hit and un hit cells). In this presentation I shall review the role of radiation quality; describe the possible mechanisms underlining the observed differences between radiation type and present results of experiments demonstrating that the dose of low LET radiation might be the most significant factor in determining the role of radiation type in the induction of GI.

  10. Ionizing radiation measurements and assay of corresponding dose

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    Measurements of ionizing radiation and corresponding dose rate around bottling and pharma- ceutical facilities in Ilorin, Nigeria, have been ... hanced naturally occurring radioactive materi- als are produced as a result of industrial activi- ... that the quality of our environment be main- tained in a good state, to ensure a high ...

  11. Population doses from naturally occurring radiation in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranden, E.

    The main purpose of this work was to study the radiological consequences of the introduction of building materials with high concentrations of radioactivity and to analyse the impact of a reduction of the ventilation rates in houses on the population dose from inhalation of natural airborne radioactivity. The general problems of radioactivity in building materials are discussed. Measurements of radioactivity in building materials from different parts of the country are reported, together with theoretical calculations of the gamma doses in houses. These calculations are compared with experimental results and earlier measurements of the indoor gamma radiation in Norway. Measurements of the outdoor gamma radiation in different parts of Norway are presented. These results are used together with earlier measurements of the gamma radiation inside houses to calculate the average, and variations of population dose from this radiation. An experimental study on the radon concentrations inside different types of dwellings, and a discussion of the respiratory dose received by the inhalation of radon daughters is presented. Some factors that may have influence upon the radon concentrations are also discussed. A method for measurement of radon and thoron daughters in air is discussed. The possible radiological effects of an increased radon concentration in houses are discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Dose rate effectiveness in radiation-induced teratogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Norimura, T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of p53 gene in tissue repair of teratogenic injury, we compared incidence of radiation-induced malformations in homozygous p53(-/-) mice, heterozygous p53(+/-) mice and wild-type p53(+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy at high dose rate on 9.5 days of gestation, p53(-/-) mice showed higher incidences of anomalies and higher resistance to prenatal deaths than p53(+/+) mice. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and deaths supports the notion that embryos or fetuses have a p53-dependent 'guardian' that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. In fact, after X-irradiation, the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in p53(+/+) fetuses but not in p53(-/-) fetuses. The same dose of γ-ray exposure at low dose rate on 9.5-10.5 day of gestation produced significant reduction of radiation-induced malformation in p53(+/+) and p53(+/-) mice, remained teratogenic for p53(-/-) mice. These results suggest that complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires the concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and the p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. When concerted DNA repair and apoptosis functions efficiently, there is a threshold dose-rate for radiation-induced malformations. (author)

  13. Population Dose From Medical Radiation Applications in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmen Bijwaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: All the European member states have to collect data on patient dose from medical diagnostic imaging. This information contributes to making conscious choices in medical practice, taking into account the risks and benefits of the use of radiation. The Netherlands collects this information

  14. Radiation scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In the radiation scanning system the radiation emitted from an image field is scanned by a field of radiosensitive detector elements, and the signals transmitted are used to control the video input of a scanning-pattern image display unit. By the variations of the transmitting properties of the detector elements and the electronic equipment spurious patterns are produced on the projected picture. In order to prevent this there is provided for a compensating circuit and a comparator by means of which the variations of the transmitting properties are compensated. It works synchronous by together with a multipler device and carries out a measurement of the statistic moment of the voltage of each channel. The compensating device may be designed as an open or closed control loop. (orig.) [de

  15. Imaging doses in radiation therapy from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Daniel Ellis

    Advances in radiation treatment delivery, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), have made it possible to deliver large doses of radiation with a high degree of conformity. While highly conformal treatments offers the advantage of sparing surrounding normal tissue, this benefit can only be realized if the patient is accurately positioned during each treatment fraction. The need to accurately position the patient has led to the development and use of gantry mounted kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) systems. These systems are used to acquire high resolution volumetric images of the patient which are then digitally registered with the planning CT dataset to confirm alignment of the patient on the treatment table. While kV-CBCT is a very useful tool for aligning the patient prior to treatment, daily use in a high fraction therapy regimen results in a substantial radiation dose. In order to quantify the radiation dose associated with CBCT imaging, an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 50th percentile adult male and a fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimetry system were both constructed as part of this dissertation. These tools were then used to directly measure organ doses incurred during clinical protocols for the head, chest, and pelvis. For completeness, the dose delivered from both the X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) and the On-Board Imager (OBI, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were investigated. While this study provided a direct measure of organ doses for estimating risk to the patient, a practical method for estimating organ doses that could be performed with phantoms and dosimeters currently available at most clinics was also desired. To accomplish this goal, a 100 mm pencil ion chamber was used to measure the "cone beam dose index" (CBDI) inside standard CT dose index (CTDI) acrylic phantoms. A weighted CBDI (CBDIw), similar to the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), was then calculated to

  16. Radiation interactions with biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muhammad Torequl

    2017-05-01

    The use of radiation, especially ionizing radiation (IR), is currently attracting great attention in the field of medical sciences. However, it should be mentioned that IR has both beneficial and harmful effects in biological systems. This review aims to focus on IR-mediated physiological events in a mechanistic way. Evidence from the databases, mainly from PUBMED and SCIENCE DIRECT were considered. IR directly and/or with their lyses products (indirect) causes oxidative stresses to biological systems. These activities may be localized and systematic. Otherwise, IR-induced non-/multi-targeted effects are also evident. IR in diagnosis and cancer radiotherapy is well-known. Reactive species produced by IR are not only beneficial, but also can exert harmful effects in a biological system such as aging, genetic instability and mutagenicity, membrane lysis and cell death, alteration of enzymatic activity and metabolic events, mitochondrial dysfunction, and even cancer. Additionally, DNA adducts formation, after IR-induced DNA breakage, is a cause of blockage of DNA repair capability with an increase in cellular radiosensitivity. These may allow cellular ruin even at low IR levels. Dependent on the dose, duration of action and quality, IR plays diverse roles in biological systems.

  17. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: tiuchi@chiba-cc.jp [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Bay Advanced Imaging and Radiation Oncology Clinic, Makuhari, Chiba (Japan); Uchino, Yoshio [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Chiba Ryogo Center, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Makiko [Division of Surgical Pathology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  18. Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Ola, O. O.; Achuka, J. A.; Babarimisa, I. O.; Ayara, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ measurement of background radiation dose from selected dumpsites in Ota and its environs was done using Radialert Nuclear Radiation Monitor (Digilert 200). Ten measurements were taken from each dumpsite. The measured background radiation range between 0.015 mRhr-1 for AOD and 0.028 mRhr-1 for SUS dumpsites. The calculated annual equivalent doses vary between 1.31 mSvyr-1 for AOD and 2.28 mSv/yr for SUS dumpsites. The air absorbed dose calculated ranged from 150 nGyhr-1 to 280 nGy/hr for AOD and SUS dumpsites respectively with an average value of 217 nGyhr-1 for all the locations. All the estimated parameters were higher than permissible limit set for background radiation for the general public. Conclusively, the associated challenge and radiation burden posed by the wastes on the studied locations and scavengers is high. Therefore, there is need by the regulatory authorities to look into the way and how waste can be properly managed so as to alleviate the effects on the populace leaving and working in the dumpsites vicinity.

  19. Quantifying the Combined Effect of Radiation Therapy and Hyperthermia in Terms of Equivalent Dose Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Barendsen, Gerrit W.; Bel, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the therapeutic effect of radiosensitization by hyperthermia; to this end, a numerical method was proposed to convert radiation therapy dose distributions with hyperthermia to equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia. Methods and Materials: Clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created for 15 prostate cancer cases. To simulate a clinically relevant heterogeneous temperature distribution, hyperthermia treatment planning was performed for heating with the AMC-8 system. The temperature-dependent parameters α (Gy −1 ) and β (Gy −2 ) of the linear–quadratic model for prostate cancer were estimated from the literature. No thermal enhancement was assumed for normal tissue. The intensity modulated radiation therapy plans and temperature distributions were exported to our in-house-developed radiation therapy treatment planning system, APlan, and equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia were calculated voxel by voxel using the linear–quadratic model. Results: The planned average tumor temperatures T90, T50, and T10 in the planning target volume were 40.5°C, 41.6°C, and 42.4°C, respectively. The planned minimum, mean, and maximum radiation therapy doses were 62.9 Gy, 76.0 Gy, and 81.0 Gy, respectively. Adding hyperthermia yielded an equivalent dose distribution with an extended 95% isodose level. The equivalent minimum, mean, and maximum doses reflecting the radiosensitization by hyperthermia were 70.3 Gy, 86.3 Gy, and 93.6 Gy, respectively, for a linear increase of α with temperature. This can be considered similar to a dose escalation with a substantial increase in tumor control probability for high-risk prostate carcinoma. Conclusion: A model to quantify the effect of combined radiation therapy and hyperthermia in terms of equivalent dose distributions was presented. This model is particularly instructive to estimate the potential effects of interaction from different treatment

  20. Improving radiation sterilization dose of bone tissue in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodowoz, O.; Rodriguez, G.; Vicentino, W.; Saldias, M.; Perez Campos, H.; Silva, W.; Machin, D.; Sanchez, G.; Acosta, M.; Alvarez, I.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Since 2002 our tissue banks policy is to deliver radiosterilized bones in order to deliver safety and reliable tissues for clinical uses.The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that sterile or most clean environment for bone tissue retrieval, the INDT maintains the low bioburden and it could decrease the radiation sterilization dose of processed bone tissue following Good Processing Practices. Bones were retrieved from cadaveric and brain death multiorganic donors with informed consent, according to 14.005 and 17.668 Transplant Laws and 160/06 Decret. Between 2005 and 2007, 157 long bones (mostly femur and tibia) were retrieved. 101 structural bones were used for patients with tumors, total hip revision replacement and trauma surgery, and 10 kg. were used in spine, benign tumors and bucomaxillary surgery. All batches were radiosterilized in a Gamma cell unit. Radiation dose was determined according tissue bioburden. The bioburden were analyzed during 1 year simultaneously in (Ezeiza CNEA and INDT microbiological Lab), and then by our microbiological Lab. after quality certification. The proceeding of Radiation as well as the radiation dose determination were monitorized by AIEA/URU/7/005 Project. Bioburden was studied using AIEA Code of Practice approved technique. The Co-60 source used were the Energy Committee - Ezeiza Plant in Bs. As. And since June 2007 Uruguay got a Radiation Unit (Gamma cell 220 Excel) through AIEA URU 2005/003 RQ-URU/7/005 Project. In 2002 bioburden was between 0.1 and 0.3 CFU/cc for frozen bones and freeze dried bones, showing a radiation dose lower than 25 kGy. During the period 2005 - 2007 the bioburden rate was about 0.1 CFU/cc and the radiation dose between 15.2- 25 kGy. We point out that we keep bioburden and radiation sterilization dose in the same rate and the Good Processing Practices are the key to warranty microbiologically safety tissues. (Author)

  1. Radiation doses to neonates and issues of radiation protection in a special care baby unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C.I.; Fife, I.A.J.; Croasdale, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiographs are most commonly taken in the neonatal period to assist in the diagnosis and management of respiratory difficulties. Frequent accurate radiographic assessment is required and a knowledge of the radiation dose is necessary to make the justification of such exposures. A survey of radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic X-ray examinations (chest and abdomen) has been carried out in the special care baby unit (SCBU) of the Royal Free Hospital. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was calculated from Quality Control measurements on the X-ray set itself. Direct measurement of radiation doses was also performed using highly sensitive thermoluminescence dosimeters (LiF:Mg,Cu,P), calibrated and tested for consistency in sensitivity. The mean ESD per radiograph was calculated to be 36μGy (with a standard deviation of 6μGy), averaged over 95 X-ray examinations. The ESD's as derived from the TLD crystals, ranged from 18μGy to 60μGy. The mean energy imparted (EI) and the mean whole body dose per radiograph were estimated to be 14μJ and 10μGy respectively. Assuming that neonates and foetuses are equally susceptible to carcinogenic effects of radiation (it involves an overestimation of risk), the radiation risk of childhood cancer from a single radiograph was estimated to be of the order (0.3-1.3)x10 -6 . Radiation doses compared favourably with the reference value of 80μGy ESD published by CEC in 1996. (author)

  2. Multicentre dose audit for clinical trials of radiation therapy in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Fukumura, Akifumi; Nakamura, Yuzuru-Kutsutani; Jianping, Cao; Cho, Chul-Koo; Supriana, Nana; Dung, To Anh; Calaguas, Miriam Joy; Devi, C R Beena; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Banu, Parvin Akhter; Riaz, Masooma; Esentayeva, Surya; Kato, Shingo; Karasawa, Kumiko; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2017-05-01

    A dose audit of 16 facilities in 11 countries has been performed within the framework of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA) quality assurance program. The quality of radiation dosimetry varies because of the large variation in radiation therapy among the participating countries. One of the most important aspects of international multicentre clinical trials is uniformity of absolute dose between centres. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan has conducted a dose audit of participating countries since 2006 by using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters (RGDs). RGDs have been successfully applied to a domestic postal dose audit in Japan. The authors used the same audit system to perform a dose audit of the FNCA countries. The average and standard deviation of the relative deviation between the measured and intended dose among 46 beams was 0.4% and 1.5% (k = 1), respectively. This is an excellent level of uniformity for the multicountry data. However