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Sample records for systemic lupus erythromatosus

  1. Outcome of pregnancy in patients with inactive systemic lupus erythromatosus and minimal proteinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alshohaib Saad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem disease. This study was under-taken to assess the outcome of pregnancies in patients with inactive SLE. We prospectively studied 20 female patients with diagnosis of stable class IV Lupus nephritis followed up at King Abdul Aziz University Hospital, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 1998 and 2008. Before each pregnancy all the patients had their blood pressure, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, serology for SLE and 24-hour urine protein excretion measured and then repeated at monthly intervals during the pregnancy. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Despite having negative antinuclear antibody (ANA significant complications were observed during pregnancy. The daily proteinuria during 34-36 weeks′ gestation was significantly higher (P< 0.05 than during 32 weeks. Two patients had abortions one stillbirth and 2 required termination of the pregnancy; one due to severe hypertension, and other due to renal impairment. One patient developed HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets syndrome. 14 patients had a successful preg-nancy, including 4 requiring a cesarian section. In conclusion, although no clinical evidence of lupus disease activity was demonstrated pre-conception proteinuria significantly increased during pregnancy along with maternal and fetal complications. Pregnant females with diagnosis of SLE need a multidisciplinary care during the pregnancy and post-partum period.

  2. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also more common among African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Genes play an important role in lupus, but ... is also more common in African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women than in Caucasian women. What are the symptoms? ...

  3. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  4. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Alexandra; Kao, Amy H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is the least understood, yet perhaps the most prevalent manifestation of lupus. The pathogenesis of NPSLE is multifactorial and involves various inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and immune complexes resulting in vasculopathic, cytotoxic and autoantibody-mediated neuronal injury. The management of NPSLE is multimodal and has not been subjected to rigorous study. Different treatment regimens include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. For refractory NPSLE, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, and rituximab have been used. Adjunctive symptomatic treatment complements these therapies by targeting mood disorders, psychosis, cognitive impairment, seizures or headaches. Several new biological agents are being tested including Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets B lymphocyte stimulator. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, treatment, and new potential therapies for neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22379459

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desquamative gingival lesions are non-plaque induced inflammatory gingival lesions. It is a clinical description and not a diagnosis. These desquamative lesions represent oral manifestations of various dermatoses. Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE, one of the rare dermatoses shows desquamative lesions as the oral manifestation. We here with report a case of SLE with oral lesions involving gingiva of a 36 year old female patient. The clinical presentation, histological features, and investigatory findings are discussed.

  6. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  7. Headache in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Urowitz, Murray B; O'Keeffe, Aidan G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).......To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)....

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus serositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, V.H.S.; Robins, P.D.; Sweeney, D.J. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The imaging appearances of a case of systemic lupus erythematosus, which manifested initially as a serositis, is described. Barium small bowel study showed segments of spiculation with tethering, angulation, and obstruction. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen confirmed ascites. It was also useful in demonstrating free fluid, bowel wall oedema, and serosal thickening . Follow up scanning to demonstrate resolution of changes may also be of value. The definitive diagnosis was made on the basis of marked elevation of antinuclear and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  9. 75 FR 35492 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... biological products, and medical devices for the treatment of lupus nephritis (LN) caused by systemic lupus...] Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical... entitled ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for...

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Gitelman, M S; Miller, M L

    1996-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) of childhood is a complex and challenging disease which can occur at any age. Identification of disease early in it's course and aggressive, appropriate management leads to improved outcome for an individual child. The history of SLE indicates how much progress has been made in the last quarter century. A discussion of the etiopathogenesis of SLE demonstrates the complexity of the syndrome. This is followed by a description of clinical manifestations, including diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis and suggested methods for eliciting important symptoms to make the diagnosis. Evaluation of specific organs is next reviewed highlighting critical organ manifestations that are significant for future prognosis. Treatment of SLE includes a variety of medications, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, steroids and immuno-suppressive drugs. Attention to physical activity, stress and nutrition is equally important. Signs and symptoms that indicate disease flare or infection are described. Lastly, related syndromes are reviewed.

  11. Lupus cystitis: An unusual presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mukhopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus cystitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and occurs in association with gastrointestinal symptoms. This rare disorder has been reported mainly from Japan. We report a 20 year old female who diagnosed as having SLE associated with paralytic ileus and chronic interstitial cystitis. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and azathioprine led to amelioration of manifestations. Later she developed lupus nephritis which was treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

  12. Lupus cystitis: An unusual presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Jana, S; Roy, M K; Chatterjee, A; Sarkar, A; Mazumdar, S; Mukherjee, P; Mukhopadhyay, J

    2014-09-01

    Lupus cystitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and occurs in association with gastrointestinal symptoms. This rare disorder has been reported mainly from Japan. We report a 20 year old female who diagnosed as having SLE associated with paralytic ileus and chronic interstitial cystitis. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and azathioprine led to amelioration of manifestations. Later she developed lupus nephritis which was treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

  13. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment... of medical products for the treatment of lupus nephritis. Dated: June 22, 2012. Leslie Kux, Assistant...] Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical...

  14. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Aisha; Petri, Michelle

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a strong female predilection. Pregnancy remains a commonly encountered but high-risk situation in this setting. Both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity are still significantly increased despite improvements in outcomes. Maternal morbidity includes higher risk of disease flares, preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related complications. Fetal issues include higher rates of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and neonatal lupus syndromes. Treatment options during pregnancy are also limited and maternal benefit has to be weighed against fetal risk. A coordinated approach, with close monitoring by a multidisciplinary team, is essential for optimal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-da-Costa, Teresa; Centeno, Mónica; Pinto, Luísa; Marques, Aurora; Mendes-Graça, Luís

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease, resulting from an auto-immune dysfunction. The etiology of this disease is unknown. It frequently occurs in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may be associated with several complications (maternal, obstetrical and fetal). The prognosis for both mother and child is better when systemic lupus erythematosus has been quiescent for at least six months before pregnancy. Thus, preconceptional assessment and management is crucial for helping women to achieve a period of disease remission before pregnancy as well as for allowing an adjustment of therapy. Maternal health and fetal development should be closely monitored during pregnancy. These patients should be surveilled by a multidisciplinary team (obstetrician, rheumatologist or internist, nephrologist if necessary and a pediatrician), in a tertiary care hospital. Antiphospholipid syndrome, positivity for anti-SSA/Ro or anti-SSB/LA antibodies, hypertension or renal involvement are associated with an increase of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this article the authors review the main aspects of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Green, A; Junker, P

    1998-01-01

    A population based cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was recruited from a for epidemiological purposes representative Danish region. Patients were ascertained from 4 different sources with a high degree of completeness as estimated by using capture-recapture analysis...

  17. Lupus cystitis: An unusual presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Jana, S.; Roy, M. K.; Chatterjee, A.; Sarkar, A.; Mazumdar, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Mukhopadhyay, J.

    2014-01-01

    Lupus cystitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and occurs in association with gastrointestinal symptoms. This rare disorder has been reported mainly from Japan. We report a 20 year old female who diagnosed as having SLE associated with paralytic ileus and chronic interstitial cystitis. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and azathioprine led to amelioration of manifestations. Later she develop...

  18. Dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Szodoray, Peter; Kiss, Emese

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Accelerated atherosclerosis is related to traditional (age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, smoking, and positive family history) and non-traditional, disease-related factors. Traditional risk factors are still more prominent in patients with lupus, as both hypertension and hypercholesterinemia were independently associated with premature atherosclerosis in several SLE cohorts. In this work, the authors summarize the epidemiology of dyslipidemia in lupus patients and review the latest results in the pathogenesis of lipid abnormalities. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, with elevations in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), and a reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels are about 30% at the diagnosis of SLE rising to 60% after 3 years. Multiple pathogenetic mechanism is included, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) can suppress HDL and increase TG, auto-antibodies can cause the injury of the endothelium, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity can be reduced by circulating inflammatory mediators and antibodies, and increased oxidative stress may trigger a wide range of pro-atherogenic lipid modifications. As a major risk factor, dyslipidemia should be treated aggressively to minimize the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Randomized controlled trials with statins are controversial in the detention of atherosclerosis progression, but can be favorable by inhibiting immune activation that is the arterial wall and by decreasing lupus activity.

  19. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new...

  20. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that peri...

  1. Genetics and pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandra; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder that has a broad spectrum of effects on the majority of organs, including the kidneys. Approximately 40-70% of patients with SLE will develop lupus nephritis. Renal assault during SLE is initiated by genes that breach immune tolerance and promote autoantibody production. These genes might act in concert with other genetic factors that augment innate immune signalling and IFN-I production, which in turn can generate an influx of effector leucocytes, inflammatory mediators and autoantibodies into end organs, such as the kidneys. The presence of cognate antigens in the glomerular matrix, together with intrinsic molecular abnormalities in resident renal cells, might further accentuate disease progression. This Review discusses the genetic insights and molecular mechanisms for key pathogenic contributors in SLE and lupus nephritis. We have categorized the genes identified in human studies of SLE into one of four pathogenic events that lead to lupus nephritis. We selected these categories on the basis of the cell types in which these genes are expressed, and the emerging paradigms of SLE pathogenesis arising from murine models. Deciphering the molecular basis of SLE and/or lupus nephritis in each patient will help physicians to tailor specific therapies.

  2. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the

  3. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  4. Mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Que, Tak Lun; Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong; Lam, Wing Yin

    2003-10-01

    To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. A Medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "Mucorales," "Rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 +/- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 +/- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, Rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. Mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin B and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your condition. Some of these are: ANA panel Complement components (C3 and C4) Coombs test -- direct Cryoglobulins ... which dampen or suppress the immune system). These medicines are used if you do not get better ...

  6. [Pulmonary manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, Krisztina; Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is the most common connective tissue disease that is associated with pulmonary manifestations. Although lupus has the potential to affect any organ, lung involvement is observed during the course of the disease in most cases and it is prognostic for outcome. Pulmonary manifestations in lupus can be classified into five groups based on the anatomical involvement: pleura, lung parenchyma, bronchi and bronchioli, lung vasculature and respiratory muscles can be involved. The most common respiratory manifestations attributable to lupus are pleuritis with or without pleural effusion, pulmonary vascular disease, upper and lower airway dysfunction, parenchymal disease, and diaphragmatic dysfunction (shrinking lung syndrome). In this article the authors summarize lung involvement of lupus, its diagnosis, therapy and prognosis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1154-1160.

  7. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  8. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Lymphoma risk in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joseph, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    to cyclophosphamide and to higher cumulative steroids in lymphoma cases than the cancer-free controls. CONCLUSIONS: In this large SLE sample, there was a suggestion of higher lymphoma risk with exposure to cyclophosphamide and high cumulative steroids. Disease activity itself was not clearly associated with lymphoma......OBJECTIVE: To examine disease activity versus treatment as lymphoma risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: We performed case-cohort analyses within a multisite SLE cohort. Cancers were ascertained by regional registry linkages. Adjusted HRs for lymphoma were generated...... (SLEDAI-2K) over time, and drugs were treated both categorically (ever/never) and as estimated cumulative doses. RESULTS: We studied 75 patients with lymphoma (72 non-Hodgkin, three Hodgkin) and 4961 cancer-free controls. Most lymphomas were of B-cell origin. As is seen in the general population, lymphoma...

  10. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  11. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  12. OSTEOPOROSIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE form a high risk group osteoporosis (OP. Its main causes are autoimmune inflammation, concomitant pathology, and their treatment. When OP occurs in SLE, bone mass loss is shown to occur early and is associated with the use of glucocorticosteroids (GC. To prevent OP, all patients with SLE should modify their lifestyle. To verify bone changes, densitometry is performed in patients who have risk factors of OP and/or a menopause. Calcium preparations and vitamin D are used to prevent OP; bisphosphonates that significantly reduce the risk of fractures of the vertebral column and femoral neck are employed for therapy of OP. A SLE patient with gluco-corticoid-induced OP and a good effect of bisphophonate treatment is described.

  13. Humor in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Cristiano S; Li, Rui; Lawrie, Sarah; Bar-Or, Amit; Clarke, Ann E; Da Costa, Deborah; Banerjee, Devi; Bernatsky, Sasha; Lee, Jennifer L; Pineau, Christian A

    2015-03-01

    Humor has neurophysiological effects influencing the release of cortisol, which may have a direct impact on the immune system. Laughter is associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines both in the general population and in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the effects of humor on serum cytokines [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and cortisol levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), after a standard intervention (120 min of visual comedy). We enrolled 58 females with SLE from consecutive patients assessed in the Montreal General Hospital lupus clinic. The subjects who consented to participate were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (watching 120 min of comedy) or control group (watching a 120 min documentary). Measurements of cytokine and serum cortisol levels as well as 24-h urine cortisol were taken before, during, and after the interventions. We compared serum cytokine levels and serum and 24-h urine cortisol levels in the humor and control groups and performed regression analyses of these outcomes, adjusting for demographics and the current use of prednisone. There were no significant differences between the control and humor groups in demographics or clinical variables. Baseline serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and B-cell activating factor were also similar in both groups. There was no evidence of a humor effect in terms of decreasing cytokine levels, although there was some suggestion of lowered cortisol secretion in the humor group based the 24-h urinary cortisol levels in a subgroup. In contrast to what has been published for RA, we saw no clear effects of humor in altering cytokine levels in SLE, although interesting trends were seen for lower cortisol levels after humor intervention compared with the control group.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimovski, Flavia Emilie; Simioni, Juliana A; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to belong to different serological and clinical subgroups of the disease. Genetic background can cause the appearance of these subgroups. To determine whether Brazilian patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon differ from those who do not. Retrospective analysis of 373 medical records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients studied for demographic, clinical and serological data. A comparative analysis was performed of individuals with and without RP. There was a positive association between Raynaud's phenomenon and age at diagnosis (p=0.02), presence of anti-Sm (p=0.01) antibodies and anti-RNP (pRaynaud's phenomenon and hemolysis (p=0.01), serositis (p=0.01), glomerulonephritis (p=0.0004) and IgM aCL (p=0.004) antibodies. Raynaud's phenomenon patients appear to belong to a systemic lupus erythematosus subset with a spectrum of clinical manifestations located in a more benign pole of the disease.

  15. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute Adrenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    hereby report such a case of SLE presenting as acute adrenal insufficiency. ... Kidney function tests, Liver function tests, serum calcium, and ... renal involvement. Patient was successfully managed with steroids and improved clinically. Keywords: Addison's disease, Autoimmune diseases, Systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Radiological changes in systemic lupus erythematosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, R.; Freyschmidt, J.; Suedhof-Mueller, G.; Menninger, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1981-01-01

    In a study of 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosis, radiologically demonstrable lung changes and pleural effusions were found in 50%. Changes in the peripheral skeleton, such as osteoporosis, erosions or mutilations, were seen in only two patients. Our radiological analysis has shown that systemic lupus erythematosis does not produce changes in the joints, but is responsible for abnormalities in the lungs, as well as for pericardial and pleural effusions. (orig.) [de

  17. Onset of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jie Yang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available When systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is first suspected during pregnancy, though rare, the diagnostic criteria are not different from those for nonpregnant women. The pregnancy outcome is good if treatment with adequate immunosuppressive agents starts as soon as the diagnosis is made. There are 4 cases in this report who had SLE onset during pregnancy. Although 2 of them suffered from preeclampsia, all 4 pregnancies resulted in favorable outcomes after the lupus was controlled by medical treatment.

  18. 75 FR 35493 - Guidance for Industry on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing Medical Products for Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... ``Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment... entitled ``Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment.'' This guidance... medical devices for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This guidance finalizes the draft...

  19. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Rubim Camara Sete

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice-versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions’ pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding.

  20. Belimumab: in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burness, Celeste B; McCormack, Paul L

    2011-12-24

    Belimumab is a fully human recombinant IgG1λ monoclonal antibody that inhibits the binding of soluble B lymphocyte stimulator to B cells and hence prevents the survival and differentiation of selected B-cell subsets. It is available in the US, the EU and Canada for the treatment of adult patients with active, autoantibody-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with a high degree of disease activity despite receiving standard therapy. At 52 weeks, a significantly greater proportion of belimumab 10 mg/kg than placebo recipients experienced a response as assessed by the SLE Responder Index (primary endpoint) in the randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase III BLISS-52 and BLISS-76 trials in patients with active seropositive SLE receiving standard therapy. A significantly greater proportion of belimumab than placebo recipients achieved a ≥4 point reduction in the SELENA-SLEDAI score at week 52 in both BLISS trials. However, the SLE Responder Index response rate was not significantly different between belimumab and placebo at 76 weeks in BLISS-76. Belimumab was generally well tolerated in the BLISS trials. During the double-blind periods of these trials and the phase II trial, twice as many deaths were reported with belimumab than placebo (six vs three). There were no meaningful differences between the incidence of serious infections and malignancies with belimumab or placebo.

  1. A 12-year retrospective review of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprapaph, K; Sawatwarakul, S; Vachiramon, V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features, laboratory findings, systemic manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary care center in Thailand. Methods We performed a retrospective review from 2002 to 2014 of all patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for bullous systemic lupus erythematosus to evaluate for the clinical characteristics, extracutaneous involvement, histopathologic features, immunofluorescence pattern, serological abnormalities, internal organ involvement, treatments and outcome. Results Among 5149 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and/or systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 developed vesiculobullous lesions. Ten patients had validation of the diagnosis of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus, accounting for 0.19%. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus occurred after the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in six patients with a median onset of 2.5 months (0-89). Four out of 10 patients developed bullous systemic lupus erythematosus simultaneously with systemic lupus erythematosus. Hematologic abnormalities and renal involvement were found in 100% and 90%, respectively. Polyarthritis (40%) and serositis (40%) were less frequently seen. Systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, antimalarials and dapsone offered resolution of cutaneous lesions. Conclusion Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is an uncommon presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blistering can occur following or simultaneously with established systemic lupus erythematosus. We propose that clinicians should carefully search for systemic involvement, especially hematologic and renal impairment, in patients presenting with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

  2. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  3. Rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Hannah; Lightstone, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) have high associated morbidity and mortality. Side effects, particularly from long-term corticosteroid usage, limit patient adherence, with subsequent impacts on treatment efficacy. In addition, a subset of patients with SLE/LN fails to respond to current standard immunotherapy. There is an urgent need to develop steroid-sparing treatment regimens as well as novel therapies for the management of refractory disease. Rituximab is a chimeric mouse/human monoclonal antibody directed against the B cell CD20 receptor. It has been used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for over 30 years and has an excellent safety profile. Recent work has demonstrated a role for B cell depletion therapy in the management of autoimmune disease, and the efficacy of rituximab in many observational studies in SLE and LN has been noted. Unfortunately, two large randomised controlled trials evaluating rituximab for the treatment of renal and non-renal lupus failed to meet their primary endpoints. Reasons for this have been discussed extensively within the medical community with a general consensus that trial design (steroid use, trial size and endpoints used) was the principal reason for the failures. Despite the lack of trial evidence, clinical experience means many physicians firmly believe in the value of rituximab in SLE/LN treatment and have continued to use it in their clinical practice. Recent work has demonstrated the efficacy of rituximab as a steroid-sparing agent and as an alternative therapeutic option for refractory SLE/LN. There are two further rituximab randomised controlled trials planned/started in LN – one using a steroid-minimising regimen with rituximab for induction and one evaluating rituximab for LN refractory to 6 months standard of care treatment. Rituximab remains a problematic drug in lupus and LN – it is a biologically plausible agent with a huge amount of supportive

  4. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise From; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE with concomitant or subsequent lupus nephritis (LN) in Denmark during 1995.2011, using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR).  Methods. To assess the incidence of SLE, we identified all persons aged...... with or after first SLE registration.  Results. The overall annual incidence rate per 100,000 for SLE was 2.35 (95% CI 2.24.2.49); 0.69 (95% CI 0.60.0.78) for men and 3.96 (95% CI 3.75.4.17) for women. For LN, the mean annual incidence rate per 100,000 was estimated to be 0.45 (95% CI 0.38.0.53); 0.20 (95% CI 0...... (December 31, 2011) per 100,000 was 45.2 (95% CI 43.3.47.4) and 6.4 (95% CI 5.7.7.2) for SLE and LN, respectively.  Conclusion. Our Danish population-based data showed a stable incidence of SLE and LN. As expected, we found higher incidence rates among women than among men, particularly in younger persons....

  5. Lupus nephritis susceptibility loci in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sharon A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Williams, Adrienne H; Ramos, Paula S; Berthier, Celine C; Bhangale, Tushar; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Behrens, Timothy W; Criswell, Lindsey A; Graham, Deborah Cunninghame; Demirci, F Yesim; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Gaffney, Patrick M; Harley, John B; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Kelly, Jennifer A; Manzi, Susan; Moser-Sivils, Kathy L; Russell, Laurie P; Petri, Michelle; Tsao, Betty P; Vyse, Tim J; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Kretzler, Matthias; Kimberly, Robert P; Freedman, Barry I; Graham, Robert R; Langefeld, Carl D

    2014-12-01

    Lupus nephritis is a manifestation of SLE resulting from glomerular immune complex deposition and inflammation. Lupus nephritis demonstrates familial aggregation and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. We completed a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies of SLE to identify lupus nephritis-predisposing loci. Through genotyping and imputation, >1.6 million markers were assessed in 2000 unrelated women of European descent with SLE (588 patients with lupus nephritis and 1412 patients with lupus without nephritis). Tests of association were computed using logistic regression adjusting for population substructure. The strongest evidence for association was observed outside the MHC and included markers localized to 4q11-q13 (PDGFRA, GSX2; P=4.5×10(-7)), 16p12 (SLC5A11; P=5.1×10(-7)), 6p22 (ID4; P=7.4×10(-7)), and 8q24.12 (HAS2, SNTB1; P=1.1×10(-6)). Both HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3, two well established lupus susceptibility loci, showed evidence of association with lupus nephritis (P=0.06 and P=3.7×10(-5), respectively). Within the class I region, rs9263871 (C6orf15-HCG22) had the strongest evidence of association with lupus nephritis independent of HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3 (P=8.5×10(-6)). Consistent with a functional role in lupus nephritis, intra-renal mRNA levels of PDGFRA and associated pathway members showed significant enrichment in patients with lupus nephritis (n=32) compared with controls (n=15). Results from this large-scale genome-wide investigation of lupus nephritis provide evidence of multiple biologically relevant lupus nephritis susceptibility loci. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Validation of the Lupus Nephritis Clinical Indices in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Rina; Abulaban, Khalid; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S; Eberhard, Barbara A; Ardoin, Stacy P; Singer, Nora; Onel, Karen; Tucker, Lori; O'neil, Kathleen; Wright, Tracey; Brooks, Elizabeth; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Jung, Lawrence; Imundo, Lisa; Rovin, Brad; Witte, David; Ying, Jun; Brunner, Hermine I

    2016-02-01

    To validate clinical indices of lupus nephritis activity and damage when used in children against the criterion standard of kidney biopsy findings. In 83 children requiring kidney biopsy, the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index renal domain (SLEDAI-R), British Isles Lupus Assessment Group index renal domain (BILAG-R), Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) renal activity score (SLICC-RAS), and SLICC Damage Index renal domain (SDI-R) were measured. Fixed effects and logistic models were calculated to predict International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) class; low-to-moderate versus high lupus nephritis activity (National Institutes of Health [NIH] activity index [AI]) score: ≤10 versus >10; tubulointerstitial activity index (TIAI) score: ≤5 versus >5; or the absence versus presence of lupus nephritis chronicity (NIH chronicity index) score: 0 versus ≥1. There were 10, 50, and 23 patients with ISN/RPS class I/II, III/IV, and V, respectively. Scores of the clinical indices did not differentiate among patients by ISN/RPS class. The SLEDAI-R and SLICC-RAS but not the BILAG-R differed with lupus nephritis activity status defined by NIH-AI scores, while only the SLEDAI-R scores differed between lupus nephritis activity status based on TIAI scores. The sensitivity and specificity of the SDI-R to capture lupus nephritis chronicity was 23.5% and 91.7%, respectively. Despite being designed to measure lupus nephritis activity, SLICC-RAS and SLEDAI-R scores significantly differed with lupus nephritis chronicity status. Current clinical indices of lupus nephritis fail to discriminate ISN/RPS class in children. Despite its shortcomings, the SLEDAI-R appears best for measuring lupus nephritis activity in a clinical setting. The SDI-R is a poor correlate of lupus nephritis chronicity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus in a male patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibarani, H.; Zubir, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Female to male ratio is approximately 9:1.A 20 years old male was admitted to HAM Hospital 3 months ago with chief complaint pain in both knees joint. After anamneses, physical examination and laboratory test the patient was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient tested positive for ANA and anti-ds-DNA antibody test. The patient was with giving non-biologic DMARDS @myfortic 360mg, methylprednisolone, chloroquine and other symptomatic drugs.

  9. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    disorders (4 types, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and 18 other neuropsychiatric events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College...... was associated with Asian race/ethnicity (P = 0.01) and treatment with immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.003). Mood disorders were associated with lower mental health and mental component summary scores but not with the SLEDAI-2K, SDI, or lupus autoantibodies. Among the 232 patients with depression, 168 (72......OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency, characteristics, and outcome of mood disorders, as well as clinical and autoantibody associations, in a multiethnic/racial, prospective inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Patients were assessed annually for mood...

  10. Systemic lupus erythematous revealed by cytomegalovirus infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have been described as exacerbing systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). The role of CMV in starting off SLE remains object of debate. We report a severe presentation of SLE revealed by CMV infection with hemophogocytic syndrome. A 22 old women without a history of systemic disease ...

  11. ENDOCARDITIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMEL Harzallah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is one of the most prevalent forms of cardiac involvement in patients with lupus, as it is considered as one a life-threatening complication. Libman-Sacks endocarditis is common. Infective endocarditis can also cause complications within immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study is to determine particularities of endocarditis in patients with lupus and to look for distinguishing features between infectious or immunological origin. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with lupus presenting endocarditis. Lupus was diagnosed according to the American college of rheumatology criteria. The diagnosis of endocarditis was made based on the modified Duke criteria. The present case report studies seven cases of endocarditis. Six of these patients are women and the other one is a man. They are aged meanly of 29.4 years (extremes: 20-36. Fever was present in all the cases with a new cardiac murmur in six cases and a modification of its intensity in one case. Biologic inflammatory syndrome was present in six cases. Cardiac ultrasound performed in six cases made the diagnosis of endocarditis which involved the left heart valves in five cases and the right heart valves in one case. Valvular insufficiency was identified in six patients. The valve involvement was mitral in two cases, mitro-aortic in two others, aortic in the fifth one and tricuspid in the sixth one. Endocarditis was infectious in 4 cases, thanks to positive blood culture. The germs identified were gram negative bacilli in two cases, anaerobic organism in one case and gram positive cocci in one case. Candida albicans was isolated in one case. Libman-Sacks endocarditis was objectified in three cases. A combination of Libman-Sacks endocarditis with infectious endocarditis was diagnosed in one case. The treatment consisted of antibiotics in four cases with surgery in two cases. The outcome was favorable in five cases and fatal in the two others. Endocarditis in lupus

  12. Pericarditis as initial clinical manifestation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antiphospholipid syndrome. Rheumatology 2002;41:924-929. 19. Ruiz-Irastorza G, Egurbide MV, Pijoan JI, et al. Effect of antimalarials on thrombosis and survival in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus. 2006;15:577-583. Lupus pericarditis rarely occurs without the other well-known diagnostic features of SLE.

  13. Lupus vulgaris in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and persistent IgG deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, N; Duman, M; Sonel, B; Peksari, Y; Erdem, C; Tokgöz, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed a persistent, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia with IgG deficiency. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was probably a complication of high dose corticosteroid treatment. The serum IgG level remained subnormal despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Lupus vulgaris, which developed on the nasal cartilage in this patient with SLE, is not an expected finding. This patient is probably the first reported case of SLE associated with lupus vulgaris.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimovski, Flavia Emilie; Simioni, Juliana A.; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to belong to different serological and clinical subgroups of the disease. Genetic background can cause the appearance of these subgroups. OBJECTIVE To determine whether Brazilian patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon differ from those who do not. METHODS Retrospective analysis of 373 medical records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients studied for demographic, clinical and serological data. A comparative analysis was performed of individuals with and without RP. RESULTS There was a positive association between Raynaud's phenomenon and age at diagnosis (p=0.02), presence of anti-Sm (p=0.01) antibodies and anti-RNP (pRaynaud's phenomenon and hemolysis (p=0.01), serositis (p=0.01), glomerulonephritis (p=0.0004) and IgM aCL (p=0.004) antibodies. CONCLUSION Raynaud's phenomenon patients appear to belong to a systemic lupus erythematosus subset with a spectrum of clinical manifestations located in a more benign pole of the disease. PMID:26734864

  15. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus : a behavioural medicine perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daleboudt, Gabriëlle Mathilde Nicoline

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its immunosuppressive treatment have a great impact on the patient’s life. Previous studies on SLE have focused on the optimisation of diagnosis and treatment. Less attention has been given to the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients’ well-being.

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus. Unusual cutaneous manifestations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockinger, T.; Richter, L.; Kanzler, M.; Melichart-Kotik, M.; Pas, H.; Derfler, K.; Schmidt, E.; Rappersberger, K.

    2016-01-01

    Various different mucocutaneous symptoms may affect up to 80 % of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To investigate, various unspecific, but otherwise typical clinical symptoms of skin and mucous membranes that arise in SLE patients other than those defined as SLE criteria such as

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Systemic Lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a wide spectrum of manifestations, shows considerable variation across the globe, although there is data from Africa is limited. Quantifying the burden of SLE across Africa can help raise awareness and knowledge about the ...

  20. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed...

  1. Pregnancy complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  2. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment and follow-up are needed, especially in the presence of

  3. Ocular findings in systemic lupus erythemato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir S. Shoughy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease. Ocular complications occur in up to one-third of patients with SLE. The ocular findings may represent the initial manifestation of the disease and may lead to severe ocular morbidity and loss of vision. Early diagnosis and prompt management of patients with SLE are mandatory and require collaboration between the ophthalmologist and the rheumatologist.

  4. Ocular findings in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease. Ocular complications occur in up to one-third of patients with SLE. The ocular findings may represent the initial manifestation of the disease and may lead to severe ocular morbidity and loss of vision. Early diagnosis and prompt management of patients with SLE are mandatory and require collaboration between the ophthalmologist and the rheumatologist.

  5. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these...

  6. Sweet syndrome revealing systemic lupus erythematosus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, N

    2015-02-01

    Sweet Syndrome is an acute inflammatory skin eruption which is rare in children. We report a case of childhood Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) that presented with Sweet syndrome. This case is a unique presentation of a common disorder which provides a new facet for the differential diagnosis of SLE in children. It is also the first paediatric case to be reported in a Caucasian child.

  7. Dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talib SH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available SH Talib, SR Bhattu, R Bhattu, SG Deshpande, DB Dahiphale Department of Medicine and Nephrology, MGM Medical College and Hospital, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India Abstract: We report a rare case of dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. The patient presented herself during a large outbreak of dengue fever in December 2012 in Maharashtra, India. The diagnosis of dengue fever was confirmed by the presence of NS-1 antigen during the first few days of febrile illness. Eight weeks later, kidney tissue biopsy studies revealed evidence of lupus nephritis on microscopic examination and immunofluorescence. The report interpreted it as focal proliferative glomerulonephritis and segmental sclerosis (Stage IIIC. The case was also found positive for perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay. An active and effective management of a case essentially calls for clear perception of differentiating dengue-induced lupus flare, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related nephropathy, and/or dengue-induced de-novo lupus disease. Dengue viremia may be the trigger for immune complex formation in patients who are predisposed to developing autoimmune diseases. The present case explains the importance of considering the diagnosis of dengue-related lupus nephritis as an atypical occurrence in appropriate situations, as in this case. It would not be improper to regard this escalating disease as an expanded feature of dengue. Keywords: kidney biopsy, glomerulonephritis, segmental sclerosis, lupus flare, dengue viremia, autoimmune, de-novo lupus nephritis

  8. Hydroxychloroquine and pregnancy on lupus flares in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Ko, H S; Kwok, S-K; Ju, J H; Park, S-H

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnancies with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and identified lupus flare predictors during pregnancy. Additionally, we examined lupus activity and pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients who continued, discontinued or underwent no hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) treatment during pregnancy. We retrospectively analyzed 179 pregnancies in 128 SLE patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Korea, between 1998 and 2012 and then assessed the clinical profiles and maternal and fetal outcomes. Overall, 90.5% of pregnancies resulted in a successful delivery and were divided into two groups: those who experienced lupus flares (80 pregnancies, 44.7%) and those who did not (99 pregnancies, 55.3%). Increased preeclampsia, preterm births, low birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and low 1-minute Apgar scores occurred in pregnancies with lupus flares compared to pregnancies in quiescent disease. Lupus flares were predicted by HCQ discontinuation, a history of lupus nephritis, high pre-pregnancy serum uric acid and low C4 levels. Our study indicates that achieving pre-pregnancy remission and continuing HCQ treatment during pregnancy are important for preventing lupus flares. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Predicting eventual development of lupus nephritis at the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Chan; Lee, Jung Sun; Ghang, Byeongzu; Kim, Yong-Gil; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin; Hong, Seokchan

    2018-02-23

    To investigate factors predictive of future lupus nephritis development when systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is diagnosed. Patients with newly diagnosed SLE without renal manifestations were followed for development of lupus nephritis, comparing findings at baseline between those who did or did not develop nephritis. Albumin-to-globulin ratio (AGR) was calculated as albumin/(total protein-albumin). Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify predictors of lupus nephritis. Of 278 patients, 241 did not and 37 did develop lupus nephritis during follow-up. On univariate analysis, young age, low C3, low C4, high anti-dsDNA titre, anti-Sm antibody, anti-RNP antibody and low AGR were associated with a higher risk of lupus nephritis. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of nephritis were age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.928, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.895-0.961, p lupus nephritis development. Young age, low C3, high anti-dsDNA titre and presence of anti-Sm antibody at diagnosis of SLE were associated with a risk of future lupus nephritis, but the hazard was greatest with a low AGR value, suggesting that a greater proportion of immunoglobulin relative to total protein is associated with the development of nephritis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gestational outcomes in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, G R; Rodrigues, B C; Lacerda, M I; Dos Santos, F C; de Jesus, N R; Klumb, E M; Levy, R A

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzed maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a reference unit. This retrospective cohort study included 26 pregnancies of patients seen between 2011 and 2015 included with history and/or active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus among 135 pregnancies. Three patients had active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus at conception, but only one remained with neurological activity during gestation, characteristically related to the inadvertent suspension of medications. Twenty six percent of the newborns were small for gestational age and 40% of live births were premature, with no neonatal death or early complications of prematurity. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in nine pregnancies, with two cases of early severe form that resulted in intrauterine fetal death. Patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus had more prematurity and preeclampsia compared to patients without neuropsychiatric disease. However, when concomitant lupus nephritis was excluded, the gestational results of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients were more favorable.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  12. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  13. [Respiratory involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmier, D; Marchand-Adam, S; Diot, P; Diot, E

    2008-12-01

    Respiratory involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is not as well known as the cutaneous, rheumatological and renal manifestations. It occurs frequently but the diagnosis may be difficult because of the heterogeneity of the anatomical and clinical presentations. A precise diagnosis is crucial as new immunosuppressive drugs have considerably improved the prognosis. The pathology involves genetic, endocrine, environmental, pharmacological and immunological factors with a cytotoxic reaction of auto antibodies against complement, a circulating immune complex reaction and a hyperactivity of B lymphocytes. Respiratory involvement in SLE can be classified in 5 groups based on the anatomy: pleural involvement, infiltrating pneumonia (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia and acute lupus pneumonitis), airways involvement (upper airways, bronchi), vascular involvement (pulmonary hypertension, acute reversible hypoxaemia, alveolar haemorrhage, and antiphospholipid syndrome), muscular and diaphragmatic involvement (shrinking lung syndrome). Treatment is based, depending upon the type of involvement and its severity, on steroids which may be combined with immunosuppressants and plasmapheresis.

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Uva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient.

  15. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient.

  16. Acquired enophthalmos with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K R; Seo, M R; Ryu, H J; Chi, M J; Baek, H J; Choi, H J

    2016-01-01

    Ocular involvement sometimes occurs with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but enophthalmos with SLE is rare. We report a case of enophthalmos with SLE. A 25-year-old male was admitted for two weeks of fever, sore throat, arthralgia, chest pain and right arm weakness with pain. We diagnosed him with SLE with malar rash, arthritis, pleural effusion, proteinuria, leukopenia, positive antinuclear antibody, anti-dsDNA, and lupus anticoagulant. The patient was prescribed high-dose prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine 400 mg. One week after discharge, he complained about a sensation of a sunken right eye. CT showed right enophthalmos, a post-inflammatory change and chronic inflammation. Proteinuria increased to 3.8 g/day after the patient stopped taking prednisolone. Cyclophosphamide therapy was administered for three months without improvement. We decided to restart prednisolone and change cyclophosphamide to mycophenolate mofetil. Proteinuria decreased but enophthalmos remains as of this reporting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. [Unmet needs in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

      Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease involving multiple lesions that cause inflammation and the production of autoantibodies. Lupus nephritis (LN) and neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) are common organ-threatening manifestations of SLE and result in significant morbidity and mortality. In the last 30 years, steroids and immunosuppressive drugs have improved the prognosis of patients with SLE, and today the 5-year survival rate exceeds 90%. However, the treatment of SLE still largely depends on these medications and sometimes results in death due to complications. In recent years, biologic agents and low-molecular-weight compounds have emerged that are expected to be effective against refractory LN and NPSLE. For the diagnosis of SLE, the classification revised in 1997 proposed by the American College of Rheumatology and the classification standards of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics 2012 classification criteria have been used, but they are not necessarily useful for early diagnosis. New biomarkers are needed for the early diagnosis of SLE. In this article, we summarize the unmet needs of diagnosis and treatment with SLE, especially those with LN and NPSLE, with data from our own experiences.

  18. The Ro/SSA Complex in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Do Nascimento, Noelle Mariane

    2017-01-01

    In this work the involved mechanisms between Ro/SSA complex, composed also by the tripartite motif 21 (TRIM21alpha) and trove domain 2 (TROVE2) proteins, with respect to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) autoantibodies is studied. The work is divided in three chapters: I- In vitro and in silico analysis of the molecular recognition between lupus autoantibodies and TRIM21alpha Fc Receptor ; II- In vitro evidence of bipolar-bridged immune TROVE2 complexes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus ...

  19. Bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients through clinical and laboratorial evaluation, ultrasonography, radiological and endoscopic examination. Methods: Thirty-nine patients, either outpatients or inpatients at the Department of Rheumatology of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina from Universidade de São Paulo were evaluated as to clinical and laboratorial data. All patients were submitted to ultrasonographic evaluation of the upper urinary tract, radiological and endoscopic examinations of the middle and lower urinary tracts. Rresults: Mean age of patients varied between 13 and 62 years (median = 29 years. Thirty-six were females and three were males. The disease varied from 6 months to 22 years (median three years and one month. Clinical and laboratory activity of the disease was present in 30 patients. Twenty-two patients had the diagnosis of lupus established for three years or more. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic and all had received corticosteroids for treatment at least once. Twenty-three received antimalarial drugs; ten received cytostatics, and seven patients received non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Upper urinary tract ultrasonography was normal in all cases but one with staghorn calculus associated with neurogenic bladder secondary to neurological involvement by the disease. Vesicoureteral reflux was observed in two cases. Other two patients had significant post-voiding residual urine, both with neurogenic bladder secondary to nervous system involvement by lupus. The average bladder maximum capacity in an awaken patient was 342 mL, and was decreased in 18.9% of cases. This subgroup of patients presented a greater frequency of urinary symptoms and greater use of cytostatic drugs (Z > Z5%. A pathognomonic cystoscopic pattern of bladder involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus could not be established. Cystoscopic aspects similar to those seen in the initial or minor

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Moroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumornecrosis-factor (TNF ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10, Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus and granulomatous lymphadenopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Devendra; Dhakal, Ajaya Kumar; Shiva, Raj K C; Shakya, Arati; Shah, Subhash Chandra; Shakya, Henish

    2013-11-05

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is known to present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Lymphadenopathy is frequently observed in children with SLE and may occasionally be the presenting feature. SLE presenting with granulomatous changes in lymph node biopsy is rare. These features may also cause diagnostic confusion with other causes of granulomatous lymphadenopathy. We report 12 year-old female who presented with generalized lymphadenopathy associated with intermittent fever as well as weight loss for three years. She also had developed anasarca two years prior to presentation. On presentation, she had growth failure and delayed puberty. Lymph node biopsy revealed granulomatous features. She developed a malar rash, arthritis and positive ANA antibodies over the course of next two months and showed WHO class II lupus nephritis on renal biopsy, which confirmed the final diagnosis of SLE. She was started on oral prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine with which her clinical condition improved, and she is currently much better under regular follow up. Generalized lymphadenopathy may be the presenting feature of SLE and it may preceed the other symptoms of SLE by many years as illustrated by this patient. Granulomatous changes may rarely be seen in lupus lymphadenitis. Although uncommon, in children who present with generalized lymphadenopathy along with prolonged fever and constitutional symptoms, non-infectious causes like SLE should also be considered as a diagnostic possibility.

  2. [Systemic lupus erythematosus : Unusual cutaneous manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockinger, T; Richter, L; Kanzler, M; Melichart-Kotik, M; Pas, H; Derfler, K; Schmidt, E; Rappersberger, K

    2016-12-01

    Various different mucocutaneous symptoms may affect up to 80 % of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To investigate, various unspecific, but otherwise typical clinical symptoms of skin and mucous membranes that arise in SLE patients other than those defined as SLE criteria such as butterfly rash, chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, oral ulcers, and increased photosensitivity. Extensive search of peer-reviewed scientific articles was performed, medical histories of several SLE patients seen in our department were analyzed, and the rare disease courses in three SLE patients are presented. Here we present a variety of unspecific but typical mucocutaneous manifestations in SLE patients: periungual erythema, periungual telangiectasia and periungual splinter hemorrhage, papules on the dorsum of the hands, scaling erythema, sometimes associated with necrosis, especially of the ears, along with complement deficiency, and the bizarre necroses of antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, we show the typical clinico-histological features of neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, as well as those of bullous SLE and finally a severe course of bacterial sepsis with Neisseria flavescens/macacae. Here we show several unspecific but rather typical mucocutaneous symptoms in lupus patients that are indicative of SLE and thus may lead to an early diagnosis. Also, life-threatening bacterial sepsis may occur with microorganisms that are commonly considered "apathogenic", such as Neisseria flavescens/macacae, which exclusively affect immunosuppressed patients.

  3. Catatonia due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Pinto Cabral Júnior Rabello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Discuss neuropsychiatric aspects and differential diagnosis of catatonic syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a pediatric patient. Methods Single case report. Result A 13-year-old male, after two months diagnosed with SLE, started to present psychotic symptoms (behavioral changes, hallucinations and delusions that evolved into intense catatonia. During hospitalization, neuroimaging, biochemical and serological tests for differential diagnosis with metabolic encephalopathy, neurological tumors and neuroinfections, among other tests, were performed. The possibility of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, steroid-induced psychosis and catatonia was also evaluated. A complete reversal of catatonia was achieved after using benzodiazepines in high doses, associated with immunosuppressive therapy for lupus, which speaks in favor of catatonia secondary to autoimmune encephalitis due to lupus. Conclusion Although catatonia rarely is the initial clinical presentation of SLE, the delay in recognizing the syndrome can be risky, having a negative impact on prognosis. Benzodiazepines have an important role in the catatonia resolution, especially when associated with parallel specific organic base cause treatment. The use of neuroleptics should be avoided for the duration of the catatonic syndrome as it may cause clinical deterioration.

  4. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  5. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus

  6. Recent insights into the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Kathy L.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Harley, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variation was first shown to be part of the cause of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) in the 1970s with associations in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Almost four decades later, and with the help of increasingly powerful genetic approaches, more than 25 genes are now known to contribute to the mechanisms that predispose individuals to lupus. Over half of these loci have been discovered in the past two years, underscoring the extraordinary success of recent genome...

  7. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes ... out of their control, like: gender: Many more women get lupus than men; for every 1 man ...

  8. Severe Tissue Trauma Triggers the Autoimmune State Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in the MRL/++ Lupus-Prone Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    progression of renal disease in lupus -prone mice. Following sham- treatment and burn injury, we monitored urine protein levels on a weekly basis as an...glomerulonephritis, membranous nephropathy, and lupus nephritis . Kidney Int 1997; 51: 270-276. 61 Bijl M, Dijstelbloem HM, Oost WW, et al. IgG subclass... Lupus (2009) 18, 318-331 http://lup.sagepub.com PAPER Severe tissue trauma triggers the autoimmune state systemic lupus erythematosus in the MRL

  9. Pregnancy and contraception in systemic and cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Morel, N; Le Guern, V; Plu-Bureau, G; Frances, C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2016-10-01

    A causal link has long been described between estrogen and systemic lupus erythematosus activity. Contraceptive and pregnancy management is now common for lupus patients, but pregnancy continues to be associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients than among the general population. Potential complications include lupus flares, obstetric complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, premature birth) and neonatal lupus syndrome. Association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetric complications. Anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies put fetuses at risk for neonatal lupus. Improving the outcome of such pregnancies depends upon optimal systematic planning of pregnancy at a preconception counseling visit coupled with a multidisciplinary approach. Absence of lupus activity, use of appropriate medication during pregnancy based on the patient's medical history and risk factors, and regular monitoring constitute the best tools for achieving a favorable outcome in such high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the management of contraception and pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus, cutaneous lupus and/or antiphospholipid syndrome in order to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  11. B cell signature during inactive systemic lupus is heterogeneous: toward a biological dissection of lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Garaud

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosous (SLE is an autoimmune disease with an important clinical and biological heterogeneity. B lymphocytes appear central to the development of SLE which is characterized by the production of a large variety of autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia. In mice, immature B cells from spontaneous lupus prone animals are able to produce autoantibodies when transferred into immunodeficient mice, strongly suggesting the existence of intrinsic B cell defects during lupus. In order to approach these defects in humans, we compared the peripheral B cell transcriptomas of quiescent lupus patients to normal B cell transcriptomas. When the statistical analysis is performed on the entire group of patients, the differences between patients and controls appear quite weak with only 14 mRNA genes having a false discovery rate ranging between 11 and 17%, with 6 underexpressed genes (PMEPA1, TLR10, TRAF3IP2, LDOC1L, CD1C and EGR1. However, unforced hierarchical clustering of the microarrays reveals a subgroup of lupus patients distinct from both the controls and the other lupus patients. This subgroup has no detectable clinical or immunological phenotypic peculiarity compared to the other patients, but is characterized by 1/an IL-4 signature and 2/the abnormal expression of a large set of genes with an extremely low false discovery rate, mainly pointing to the biological function of the endoplasmic reticulum, and more precisely to genes implicated in the Unfolded Protein Response, suggesting that B cells entered an incomplete BLIMP1 dependent plasmacytic differentiation which was undetectable by immunophenotyping. Thus, this microarray analysis of B cells during quiescent lupus suggests that, despite a similar lupus phenotype, different biological roads can lead to human lupus.

  12. Occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Danish community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustrup, H; Voss, A; Green, A

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and annual incidence of definite systemic lupus erythematosus (D-SLE) and incomplete SLE (I-SLE) in a community-based lupus cohort of predominantly Nordic ancestry in an 8-year prospective study from 1995 to 2003, and also to calculate the annual transition......-years at risk [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44-7.55]. Conclusions: Denmark is a low-incidence lupus area but lupus prevalence is increasing slowly. I-SLE is a disease variant that may eventually convert into D-SLE....

  13. Case Report: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease with multisystem involvement with varied presentation. Autoimmune adrenal disease, on the other hand, can be associated with other autoimmune diseases. Adrenal insufficiency as a presenting feature of Systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare occurrence.

  14. Unique Protein Signature of Circulating Microparticles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer; Iversen, Line V

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases.......To characterize the unique qualities of proteins associated with circulating subcellular material in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy controls and patients with other chronic autoimmune diseases....

  15. Parvovirus B19 viremia in children with systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Parvovirus B19 infection may present with fever, rash, nonerosive arthritis, hepatitis, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and positive ANA, B19 infection may be misdiagnosed as new onset systemic lupus erythematosus. At the same time, B19 infection and systemic lupus erythematosus may occur ...

  16. Genitourinary complications of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, K E; Pfieffer, S; Lu, T; Kaplan, B S

    2000-05-01

    A 14-year-old African-American girl was diagnosed with antiphospholipid-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in July 1994. The course was complicated by nephrotic syndrome, sepsis, hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, saphenous vein thrombosis, cutaneous vasculitis, mesenteric vasculitis, appendicitis, hemorrhagic cystitis, and avascular necrosis of the hips. In August 1997, she developed ovarian and fallopian tube complications secondary to SLE. Genitourinary complications of SLE, however, are uncommon, and ovarian vasculitis has not previously been reported as a complication of SLE. This report describes the course of an adolescent patient with SLE and focuses specifically on her genitourinary complications.

  17. Management of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2017-01-14

    Reproductive issues including contraception, fertility, and pregnancy are important components of the comprehensive care of women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE pregnancies are complicated due to risk for maternal disease exacerbation and potential for fetal and neonatal complications. Pre-pregnancy assessment is important to identify patients with severe disease-related damage who should avoid pregnancy, counsel patients to conceive when disease has been stable and inactive on appropriate medications, and assess relevant risk factors including renal disease, antiphospholipid antibody, and anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B antibodies. With careful planning, monitoring, and care, most women with SLE can anticipate a successful pregnancy.

  18. Hypogammaglobulinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, E; Tao, Y; White, A J; French, A R; Cooper, M A

    2013-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease typically associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG). Hypogammaglobulinemia in SLE patients has been attributed to immunosuppressive treatment or a transient effect associated with nephrotic syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric SLE patients from a single institution to identify patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and risk factors for hypogammaglobulinemia. A total of 116 pediatric SLE cases from 1997 to 2011 were reviewed and patients with hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG lupus nephritis at SLE diagnosis, disease activity at diagnosis, initial IgG level, and drug treatment. Eighty-six patients were included in our study, with a median age of 15 years and a median follow-up of 39.5 months. Seven percent (six of 86) of patients had hypogammaglobulinemia with a median onset of 27 months (0-72 months) after SLE diagnosis. Significant associations were noted for white race (p value 0.029), male sex (p value 0.009), and the presence of lupus nephritis at SLE diagnosis (p value 0.004). Use of immunosuppressive treatment did not show a statistical association with hypogammaglobulinemia, although two of the patients with hypogammaglobulinemia did receive rituximab. Most patients with hypogammaglobulinemia received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement therapy because of infections and/or concern for infection. Measurement of immunoglobulin levels during treatment in SLE could help identify patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who might require more aggressive follow-up to monitor for increased risk of infection and need for IVIG treatment. A prospective study is needed to validate associated risk factors identified in this study.

  19. Treatment Algorithms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchan, Chayawee; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Bernatsky, Sasha R; Smith, C Douglas; Hudson, Marie; Inanç, Murat; Rothfield, Naomi F; Nash, Peter T; Furie, Richard A; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Chandran, Vinod; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Pope, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    To establish agreement on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. SLE experts (n = 69) were e-mailed scenarios and indicated preferred treatments. Algorithms were constructed and agreement determined (≥50% respondents indicating ≥70% agreement). Initially, 54% (n = 37) responded suggesting treatment for scenarios; 13 experts rated agreement with scenarios. Fourteen of 16 scenarios had agreement as follows: discoid lupus: first-line therapy was topical agents and hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids then azathioprine and subsequently mycophenolate (mofetil); uncomplicated cutaneous vasculitis: initial treatment was glucocorticoids ± hydroxychloroquine ± methotrexate, followed by azathioprine or mycophenolate and then cyclophosphamide; arthritis: initial therapy was hydroxychloroquine and/or glucocorticoids, then methotrexate and subsequently rituximab; pericarditis: first-line therapy was nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, then glucocorticoids with/without hydroxychloroquine, then azathioprine, mycophenolate, or methotrexate and finally belimumab or rituximab, and/or a pericardial window; interstitial lung disease/alveolitis: induction was glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide, then rituximab or intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG), and maintenance followed with azathioprine or mycophenolate; pulmonary hypertension: glucocorticoids and mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide and an endothelin receptor antagonist were initial therapies, subsequent treatments were phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and then prostanoids and rituximab; antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: standard anticoagulation with/without hydroxychloroquine, then a thrombin inhibitor for venous thrombosis, versus adding aspirin or platelet inhibition drugs for arterial events; mononeuritis multiplex and central nervous system vasculitis: first-line therapy was glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide followed by maintenance with azathioprine or mycophenolate, and

  20. Cardiovascular events prior to or early after diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in the systemic lupus international collaborating clinics cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Anderson, N M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of myocardial infarction (MI) prior to the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and within the first 2 years of follow-up. METHODS: The systemic lupus international collaborating clinics (SLICC) atherosclerosis inception cohort enters patients withi...

  1. Iron status alters murine systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, L M; Reuhl, K R; Racis, S P; Sherman, A R

    1995-03-01

    The effect of Fe status on murine systemic lupus erythematosus was investigated. Weanling female MRL/MPJ-lpr/lpr mice (systemic lupus erythematosus strain) were fed diets with the following levels (mg Fe/kg diet): 3 (severely deficient), 10 (moderately deficient), 35 (control) and 250 (supplemented). A fifth group was pair fed the control diet in the amounts consumed by the severely deficient group. C3H/Hej mice fed the same diets were used as non-lupus controls. Anemia was more severe in severely deficient mice than in all other MRL groups and C3H severely deficient mice. Incidence of skin lesions was highest in MRL severely and moderately deficient mice compared with pair-fed, control and supplemented mice. By 22 wk of age, mortality was higher in supplemented and severely deficient mice than in moderately deficient, pair-fed and control MRL mice. Anti-dsDNA activity in serum was not altered by Fe. In a second experiment, kidney function was examined in mice fed severely deficient, control, supplemented and pair-fed diets. Urine protein concentration was highest in supplemented mice at 14 wk of age. Serum urea nitrogen was significantly higher in MRL severely deficient mice than in pair-fed and control mice at 18 wk of age. Glomerular filtration rate, measured by creatinine clearance, was significantly lower in MRL severely deficient mice than in pair-fed and Fe supplemented mice at 16 wk of age and pair-fed and control mice at 18 wk of age. Renal histopathology was more severe in Fe supplemented mice than in pair-fed and control mice, and more severe in severely deficient and pair-fed mice than in control mice. Fluorescent staining of kidneys with anti-Ig G and anti-C3 fluorescein-conjugated antibodies was most intense in severely deficient mice, and the concentration of circulating immune complexes in serum was significantly higher in severely deficient mice than in all other groups. These data demonstrate that systemic lupus erythematosus in MRL

  2. Interferon Alpha in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy B. Niewold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic cytokine interferon alpha is involved in multiple aspects of lupus etiology and pathogenesis. Interferon alpha is important under normal circumstances for antiviral responses and immune activation. However, heightened levels of serum interferon alpha and expression of interferon response genes are common in lupus patients. Lupus-associated autoantibodies can drive the production of interferon alpha and heightened levels of interferon interfere with immune regulation. Several genes in the pathways leading to interferon production or signaling are associated with risk for lupus. Clinical and cellular manifestations of excess interferon alpha in lupus combined with the genetic risk factors associated with interferon make this cytokine a rare bridge between genetic risk and phenotypic effects. Interferon alpha influences the clinical picture of lupus and may represent a therapeutic target. This paper provides an overview of the cellular, genetic, and clinical aspects of interferon alpha in lupus.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus: a review for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Lam, David K; Clokie, Cameron M L; Sándor, George K B

    2007-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease with far-reaching systemic implications. The hallmark feature in SLE is chronic inflammation. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, lungs, nervous system, serous membranes such as the pleura and pericardium, mucous membranes and other organs of the body. It is imperative that the dental practitioner be familiar with the broad range of systemic and oral implications, including the clinical and biochemical features of SLE. This review article offers an overview of the multiple organ systems affected by this complex heterogeneous disease process that are most relevant to both the general practitioner and the dental specialist. In particular, ways to recognize and manage the oral and dental manifestations of this systemic illness are presented.

  4. Research Progress on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Complicated with Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weisan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in treatment standardization of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infections and serious complications became the leading cause of death related to this disease, exceeding those of renal involvement and lupus encephalopathy. SLE coinfection is mainly related to defects in humoral immunity and cellular immunity, SLE disease activity, and doses of hormone and immune inhibitors.

  5. Clinical features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the most common features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus attending the outpatient clinic at Universitas Hospital in ... This article has been peer reviewed. Full text available at ... pathology were the most common clinical features seen at diagnosis.7. Because many lupus ...

  6. Plasma C4d as marker for lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Myriam; Smoląg, Karolina I; Björk, Albin; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Okrój, Marcin; Leffler, Jonatan; Jönsen, Andreas; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2017-12-06

    In the present study, we sought to evaluate the complement activation product C4d as a marker for lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C4d levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in plasma samples of patients with established SLE using a novel approach based on detection of a short linear cleavage neoepitope. Cross-sectional associations were studied in 98 patients with SLE with samples taken at lower or higher respective disease activity. Temporal associations were investigated in 69 patients with SLE who were followed longitudinally for up to 5 years. Plasma samples from 77 healthy donors were included as controls. C4d levels were negligible in healthy control subjects and significantly increased in patients with SLE in the cross-sectional study (p Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (p = 0.011) and predominantly with lupus nephritis (p = 0.003), exhibiting a sensitivity of 79% to identify patients with nephritis. High C4d levels together with the presence of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies preceded and thus predicted future lupus nephritis in the longitudinal study (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.4-21.3). When we considered only patients with renal involvement (19 of 69) during the longitudinal study, we found that high C4d levels alone could forecast recurrence of future lupus nephritis (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-9.6). C4d appears to be a valuable marker for use in monitoring of patients with SLE, particularly for lupus nephritis. Importantly, C4d levels can predict impending flares of lupus nephritis and may thus be useful for informing treatment.

  7. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Definitions, Contexts, Conflicts, Enigmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2018-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inadequately defined syndrome. Etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. SLE is on the other hand a seminal syndrome that has challenged immunologists, biologists, genetics, and clinicians to solve its nature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple, etiologically unlinked manifestations. Unexpectedly, they seem to occur in different stochastically linked clusters, although single gene defects may promote a smaller spectrum of symptoms/criteria typical for SLE. There is no known inner coherence of parameters (criteria) making up the disease. These parameters are, nevertheless, implemented in The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria to classify SLE. Still, SLE is an abstraction since the ACR or SLICC criteria allow us to define hundreds of different clinical SLE phenotypes. This is a major point of the present discussion and uses “The anti-dsDNA antibody” as an example related to the problematic search for biomarkers for SLE. The following discussion will show how problematic this is: the disease is defined through non-coherent classification criteria, its complexity is recognized and accepted, its pathogenesis is plural and poorly understood. Therapy is focused on dominant symptoms or organ manifestations, and not on the syndrome itself. From basic scientific evidences, we can add substantial amount of data that are not sufficiently considered in clinical medicine, which may change the paradigms linked to what “The Anti-DNA antibody” is—and is not—in context of the imperfectly defined syndrome SLE. PMID:29545801

  8. Illness perceptions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleboudt, G M N; Broadbent, E; Berger, S P; Kaptein, A A

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the illness perceptions of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and whether perceptions are influenced by type of treatment for proliferative lupus nephritis. In addition, the illness perceptions of SLE patients were compared with those of patients with other chronic illnesses. Thirty-two patients who had experienced at least one episode of proliferative lupus nephritis were included. Patients were treated with either a high or low-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) regimen (National Institutes of Health [NIH] vs. Euro-Lupus protocol). Illness perceptions were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and a drawing assignment. The low-dose CYC group perceived their treatment as more helpful than the high-dose CYC group. In comparison with patients with asthma, SLE patients showed more negative illness perceptions on five of the eight illness perception domains. Drawings of the kidney provided additional information about perceptions of treatment effectiveness, kidney function and patients' understanding of their illness. Drawing characteristics showed associations with perceptions of consequences, identity, concern and personal control. These findings suggest that the type of treatment SLE patients with proliferative lupus nephritis receive may influence perceptions of treatment effectiveness. In addition, patients' drawings reveal perceptions of damage caused by lupus nephritis to the kidneys and the extent of relief provided by treatment. The finding that SLE is experienced as a more severe illness than other chronic illnesses supports the need to more frequently assess and aim to improve psychological functioning in SLE patients.

  9. Dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus: just another comorbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Koumaras, Charalambos; Gladman, Dafna D; Urowitz, Murray B

    2016-04-01

    Among traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, dyslipidemia is believed to decisively affect the long-term prognosis of lupus patients, not only with regard to cardiovascular events but also by influencing other manifestations, such as lupus nephritis. The aim of this study was to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, evidence for its impact on atherosclerosis manifestations and management of dyslipidemia in lupus patients. English-restricted MEDLINE database search (Medical Subject Headings: lupus or systemic lupus erythematosus and dyslipidemia or hyperlipidemia). The prevalence of dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ranges from 36% at diagnosis to 60% or even higher after 3 years, depending on definition. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms are implicated, including antibodies against lipoprotein lipase and cytokines affecting the balance between pro- and anti-atherogenic lipoproteins. Dyslipidemia has a clear impact on clinical cardiovascular disease and surrogate markers for subclinical atherosclerosis. Moreover, it negatively affects end-organ damage (kidneys and brain). Treatment with statins yielded contradictory results as per minimizing cardiovascular risk. Dyslipidemia is a significant comorbidity of lupus patients with multiple negative effects in the long term. Its treatment represents a modifiable risk factor; prompt and adequate treatment can minimize unnecessary burden in lupus patients, thus reducing hospitalizations and their overall morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmier, D; Marchand-Adam, S; Diot, P; Diot, E

    2010-10-01

    Respiratory involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is not as well-known as the cutaneous, rheumatological and renal manifestations. It occurs frequently but the diagnosis may be difficult because of the heterogeneity of the anatomical and clinical presentations. A precise diagnosis is crucial as new immunosuppressive drugs have considerably improved the prognosis. The pathology involves genetic, endocrine, environmental, pharmacological and immunological factors with a cytotoxic reaction of auto-antibodies against complement, a circulating immune complex reaction and a hyperactivity of B lymphocytes. Respiratory involvement in SLE can be classified in five groups based on the anatomy: pleural involvement, infiltrating pneumonia (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia and acute lupus pneumonitis), airways involvement (upper airways, bronchi), vascular involvement (pulmonary hypertension, acute reversible hypoxaemia, alveolar haemorrhage, and antiphospholipid syndrome), muscular and diaphragmatic involvement (shrinking lung syndrome).Treatment is based, depending upon the type of involvement and its severity, on steroids which may be combined with immunosuppressants and plasmapherisis. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio E.

    2004-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2 * gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  12. [NEUROPSYCHIATRIC MANIFESTATIONS OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjer, Rafael; Shriki Tal, Liron; Gizunterman, Alex; Amital, Daniela; Amital, Howard; Kotler, Moshe

    2017-12-01

    This review deals with the neuropsychiatric disorders resulting from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that impacts all systems in the human body, including the central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in SLE are a common complication of the disease. This complication has significant implications for the severity of the illness. In most cases no thorough psychiatric assessment is performed during initial evaluation of the disease and no protocol or clear guidelines for treating the psychiatric symptoms in SLE are available. Early diagnosis of the psychiatric symptoms in SLE is critical since absence of treatment may result in severe psychiatric complications. Clinical pharmacological studies are needed in order to develop guidelines for treating psychiatric symptoms in SLE.

  13. [Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus - diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka, Magdalena

    Nervous system involvement in lupus belongs to its severe complications and significantly impacts its prognosis. Neuropsychiatric lupus includes 19 disease manifestations concerning both central and peripheral nervous system. This paper presents clinical aspects of central nervous system involvement in lupus. It reviews its epidemiology, risk factors and principles of diagnosis and therapy.

  14. [Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as Stevens-Johnson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellakhal, S; Ben Kaab, B; Teyeb, Z; Souissi, A; Derbel, F; Douggui, M-H

    2015-09-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are life-threatening dermatological conditions. Their most common cause is medication. However, in a small proportion of patients these dermatological conditions could be the first presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We now describe a 34-year-old patient who presented with manifestations of Stevens-Johnson as a first feature of systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus reveled by Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been infrequently reviewed in the previous literature. This diagnosis should be considered when cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur without clear drug causality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein losing enteropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, A; Narasimhan, Denesh; Krishnaveni, J; Rajendiran, G

    2013-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic immunologic disorder that may affect multiple organ systems and present with myriad of clinical features. Gastro-intestinal (GI) manifestations are oral ulcers, dysphagia and abdominal pain caused by autoimmune peritonitis/intestinal vasculitis. Hypoalbuminaemia due to GI loss is uncommon. Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) is a group of clinical entities where there is loss of protein through GI tract. PLE due to SLE is rare but it can be the initial manifestation. Patients usually present with pedal oedema mimicking nephrotic syndrome clinically. It is diagnosed by excluding other causes of hypoalbuminaemia. Radio nucleotide labelled albumin scan is useful in confirming albumin loss through GI tract. Often there is a good response to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs. Here we present two SLE patients whose presenting manifestation was protein losing enteropathy and both improved with corticosteroids.

  16. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko

    1989-01-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author)

  17. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Hypertension in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen R. Kamel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a serious and often fatal complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Because the diagnosis of PAH often is made years after symptom onset, early diagnostic strategies are essential. Doppler echocardiography currently is considered the noninvasive screening test of choice for evaluating pulmonary hypertension. Aim Screening for asymptomatic pulmonary hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus patients using Doppler echocardiography, and correlating it with inflammatory parameters of the disease. Patients and Methods Doppler echocardiography was performed in 74 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus over one year (66 adult and 8 juvenile, adult SLE included 57 patients with adult-onset and 9 patients with childhood-onset. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed if the peak systolic pressure gradient at the tricuspid valve was more than 30 mmHg. All patients were subjected to full history taking, rheumatological examination, laboratory studies and chest x-ray. Results In seventy four SLE patients, the pulmonary hypertension was detected in 8 patients (10.8%, 7 adult-onset SLE patients (aged from 19 to 30 years and 1 juvenile SLE (aged 12 years. The range of pulmonary artery systolic pressure was 34–61.2 mmHg (43.19 ± 9.28. No significant differences between patients with and those without pulmonary hypertension as regard clinical features. Significantly higher frequencies of rheumatoid factor and anti-cardiolipin antibodies were found in patients with pulmonary hypertension versus those without ( P = 0.02, P = 0.008 respectively. Positive rheumatoid factor and ACL were significantly associated with occurrence of PAH in SLE ( P = 0.007, P = 0.006 respectively. No significant correlations were found between pulmonary artery pressure, disease duration, SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI, ESR, and anti-ds DNA. Conclusion Patients with SLE have an increased risk of pulmonary arterial

  18. Dengue fever evolving into systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajadhyaksha, A; Mehra, S

    2012-08-01

    Dengue viremia may be the trigger for immune complex formation in patients who are predisposed to developing autoimmune disease. We report a rare case of dengue virus infection evolving into systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of dengue fever evolving into lupus nephritis. A 22 year old female presented with having had high grade fever, skin rash, breathlessness, retro-orbital pain, abdominal pain, arthralgias and myalgias for 10 days. She tested positive for dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM). She was given supportive treatment and was subsequently discharged. Four weeks later she developed recurrent fever, arthralgia, rash and anasarca. She was suspected as having SLE with active lupus nephritis. Antinuclear antibody (ANA), and anti double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti dsDNA) titers were positive and complements were low. Renal biopsy showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis grade IV. She was treated with steroids and immunosuppressants to which she responded. Dengue viremia incites antibody production, which if excessive causes deposition of viral antigen-antibody immune complexes. This could possibly lead to renal tubular damage and glomerulonephritis in susceptible individuals. Dengue fever leading to development of glomerulonephritis is rarely seen. Our patient developed dengue fever and after a month presented with manifestations of SLE and lupus nephritis. Both dengue fever and SLE have common manifestations of fever, arthralgia, rash, leucopenia with thrombocytopenia and serositis. Bacterial and viral infections may act as a 'trigger' for starting or relapsing lupus activity in genetically predetermined individuals. In our case it may be possible that dengue virus could have triggered a dysfunctional immune response, resulting in the developing of autoimmunity and SLE with lupus nephritis.

  19. [Therapeutic strategies for systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic strategy means the definition of a long-term target, which should be reached by a chosen management. As for rheumatoid arthritis, the treat to target initiative recommends remission as the target for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but the command variables of remission are not yet defined. The basis of a therapeutic strategy is first the analysis of those factors that may influence the achievement of the objectives: SLE disease activity, the differentiation of damage, organ manifestations, comorbidities, genetics, sex, age of onset and considering the pathophysiological basis are some of these factors. The next step is the analysis of the available substances and concepts that allow the target to be reached. Finally, rules for management (e.g. guidelines) are needed that enrich the possibility to reach the target and improve the prognosis of patients suffering from SLE.

  20. Biological Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Postal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototypic inflammatory autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem involvement and fluctuating disease activity. Symptoms range from rather mild manifestations such as rash or arthritis to life-threatening end-organ manifestations. Despite new and improved therapy having positively impacted the prognosis of SLE, a subgroup of patients do not respond to conventional therapy. Moreover, the risk of fatal outcomes and the damaging side effects of immunosuppressive therapies in SLE call for an improvement in the current therapeutic management. New therapeutic approaches are focused on B-cell targets, T-cell downregulation and costimulatory blockade, cytokine inhibition, and the modulation of complement. Several biological agents have been developed, but this encouraging news is associated with several disappointments in trials and provide a timely moment to reflect on biologic therapy in SLE.

  1. Oral manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus: lupus nephritis--report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverzut, Alexander Tadeu; Allais, Marvis; de Maurette, Marvis Allais; Mazzonetto, Renato; de Moraes, Marcio; Passeri, Luis Augusto; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease of unknown origin that can affect organs and cause severe damage. Lupus is diagnosed through biopsies and laboratory examinations; however, certain clinical characteristics and the presence of lesions can help with early diagnosis and improve the disease prognosis. SLE patients generally receive immunosuppressants that may cause systemic implications---such as suture dehiscence, increased risk of infection, and delayed healing--that deserve specific attention during dental treatment. This article presents a case of a SLE patient with oral manifestations: ulcerative lesions in the mouth and development of lupus nephritis. This article seeks to emphasize the importance of recognizing the lesions related to SLE, which may help the dentist to establish an early diagnosis.

  2. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Definitions, Contexts, Conflicts, Enigmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Petter Rekvig

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an inadequately defined syndrome. Etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. SLE is on the other hand a seminal syndrome that has challenged immunologists, biologists, genetics, and clinicians to solve its nature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple, etiologically unlinked manifestations. Unexpectedly, they seem to occur in different stochastically linked clusters, although single gene defects may promote a smaller spectrum of symptoms/criteria typical for SLE. There is no known inner coherence of parameters (criteria making up the disease. These parameters are, nevertheless, implemented in The American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics (SLICC criteria to classify SLE. Still, SLE is an abstraction since the ACR or SLICC criteria allow us to define hundreds of different clinical SLE phenotypes. This is a major point of the present discussion and uses “The anti-dsDNA antibody” as an example related to the problematic search for biomarkers for SLE. The following discussion will show how problematic this is: the disease is defined through non-coherent classification criteria, its complexity is recognized and accepted, its pathogenesis is plural and poorly understood. Therapy is focused on dominant symptoms or organ manifestations, and not on the syndrome itself. From basic scientific evidences, we can add substantial amount of data that are not sufficiently considered in clinical medicine, which may change the paradigms linked to what “The Anti-DNA antibody” is—and is not—in context of the imperfectly defined syndrome SLE.

  3. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing, E-mail: ydqahmu@gmail.com

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  5. Circulating cell free DNA as a predictor of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Circulating cell free DNA as a predictor of systemic lupus erythematosus severity and monitoring of therapy. Olfat M. Hendy, Tawfik Abdel Motalib, Mona A. El Shafie, Fatma A. Khalaf, Sobhy E. Kotb, Aziza Khalil, Salwa R. Ali ...

  6. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia Tanas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patients...

  7. Oral candidiasis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangtham, M; Magder, L S; Petri, M A

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the frequency of oral candidiasis and the association between demographic variables, disease-related variables, corticosteroid treatment, other treatments and the occurrence of oral candidiasis in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort. In this large prospective cohort study of 2258 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), demographic and clinical associates of oral candidiasis were estimated by univariate, multivariate and within-person regression models. There were 53,548 cohort visits. Oral candidiasis was diagnosed at 675 visits (1.25%) in 325 (14%) of the patients. In the multivariate analyses, oral candidiasis was associated with African-American ethnicity, SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity, high white blood cell count, a history of bacterial infection, prednisone use and immunosuppressive use. The urine protein by urine dip stick was higher in SLE patients with oral candidiasis. Considering only patients who had candidiasis at some visits in a 'within-person' analysis, candidiasis was more frequent in visits with higher SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity, high white blood cell count, proteinuria by urine dip stick, a history of bacterial infection and prednisone use. The use of hydroxychloroquine was associated with a lower risk of oral candidiasis, but was not statistically significant (p = 0.50) in the within-person analysis models. This study identified multiple risk factors for oral candidiasis in SLE. Inspection of the oral cavity for signs of oral candidiasis is recommended especially in SLE patients with active disease, proteinuria, high white blood cell count, taking prednisone, immunosuppressive drugs or antibiotics. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus onset patterns in Vietnamese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dung, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Loan, Huynh Thoai; Nielsen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    to have systemic lupus erythematosus (f/m = 4/1) were referred to the Ho Chi Minh City Children's Hospital No.1 during a 12-month period in 2009. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (SD = 2.5). Thirty-seven (82%) fulfilled criteria for lupus nephritis (LN). At diagnosis, impressively high...... No. 1 during a16 month period from 2008-2009. These patients had a strikingly high prevalence of Coombs positive anaemia, a high prevalence of lupus nephritis, and very high SLEDAI and ECLAM scores at the time of diagnosis. While there may be referral biases, our Vietnamese SLE patients appear...

  9. Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačević Zoran; Rabrenović Violeta; Jovanović Dragan; Petrović Marijana; Rabrenović Milorad; Matunović Radomir

    2009-01-01

    Background. Systemic lupus erithematodes (SLE) is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction) and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascit...

  10. Lupus enteritis: An uncommon manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus as an initial presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Bodh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder generally affects young to middle-aged women, commonly presenting as a triad of fever, rash, and joint pain but can affect multiple organs and can present in a complex fashion, varying based on the degree and severity of organ involvement. The differential for abdominal pain and diarrhea in SLE is vast and can include VIPomas, serositis, pancreatitis, intestinal vasculitis, and protein – losing enteropathy, gluten – enteropathy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and infection. The pathology of lupus enterits thought to be immune-complex deposition and complement activation, with subsequent mucosal edema. We present a case of a woman with no history of SLE, but with a prolonged course of abdominal pain, diarrhoea and vomiting and eventual diagnoses of lupus enteritis.

  11. Simultaneous presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis in mother and son.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F; Zhang, C; Zhang, D; Wu, X; Zhu, C; Jiang, G

    2011-12-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been attributed to complex interactions between genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. The influence of a genetic predisposition to SLE is supported by family aggregation and a high concordance rate in monozygotic twins. Here we present a rare case of simultaneous presentation of SLE and lupus nephritis in a mother and son. Both patients had nephrotic-range proteinuria, and the renal pathological classifications of the son and his mother were Class IV-G (A) and Class III (A/C), respectively, according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) 2003 classification of lupus nephritis. Apart from the renal involvement, both patients had leucopenia and anemia, and the mother also had typical cutaneous lesions and secondary Sjögren's syndrome. This case supports the genetic role in the etiology of SLE, and displayed different clinical presentations and disease severity in familial SLE patients of different gender and age.

  12. Deforming arthropathy or lupus and rhupus hands in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; Derksen, R. H.; Kater, L.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Although deforming arthropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterised by a number of manifestations, definitive criteria for the different forms have not yet been established. To define deforming arthropathy and its different types a study was undertaken of 176 SLE patients. Using as

  13. T-cell-directed therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandkumar, P; Furie, R

    2016-09-01

    Drug development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has largely focused on B-cell therapies. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE coupled with advanced bioengineering has allowed for clinical trials centered on other targets for SLE therapy. The authors discuss the benefits and shortcomings of focusing on T-cell-directed therapies in SLE and lupus nephritis clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Approach to systemic lupus erythematosus and skin lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Mullaaziz, Didem; Tınazlı, mehtap; kaptanoglu, aslı feride

    2015-01-01

    AbstractSystemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, autoimmune disease that involves a broad spectrum of symptoms. The underlying cause of LE is unknown but the etiology is thought to be multifactorial and polygenic. Although it can occur in both genders, it has a higher incidence in women, commonly around 30 years of age. The cutaneous manifestations of lupus are pleomorphic. Various cutaneous manifestations of LE are divided into LE-specific and LE-nonspecific skin diseases based on hi...

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus and splenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnizo Z, Pilar; Ramirez R, Francisco Alejandro; Ramirez G, Luis Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease in which there is an increase risk of infections by common germ as by opportunistic germs. This fact is explained by the alterations in the humoral and cellular immunity, and phagocytic mononuclear system due to the disease and the immunosuppressive therapy use for its treatment. Multiple infectious processes have been describes in patients with SLE and within them, the splenic abscess, although in few cases. Usually its presence is associated with an underlying disease such as sepsis or peritonitis, with multiple outcomes. Due to its low frequency as well as the unusual presentation, we reported a case of a solitary splenic abscess documented by ultrasound in a teenager with SLE and immunosuppressive treatment, without any underlying infection, who presents with fever, abdominal pain, leucocytosis and elevation of acute phase reactants. He received antibiotic therapy with clindamycin and ceftriaxone and percutaneous drainage of the abscess guided by ultrasound and sent to culture in which grew non-typificable anaerobe germs, with a favorable evolution after 5 year of follow up

  16. Study of audiovestibular dysfunction in children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Ghada Ibrahim; Mohamed, Somaia Tawfik; Awwad, Khaled Salah; Mohamed, Rehab Fetoh

    2013-09-01

    Inner ear dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosis patients has been reported but audiovestibular involvement is not well documented especially in pediatrics. This study was designed to evaluate silent audiovestibular dysfunction among SLE children. Case control study examined in allergy and immunology clinic; pediatrics hospital and audiovestibular clinic; Ain Shams University from January 2009 to December 2010. Thirty-five systemic lupus erythematosus children (diagnosed according to American College of Rheumatology); age group 8-16 years, were randomly selected. Five of them were excluded due to one or more exclusion criteria (previous otitis media, stroke, lupus cerebritis, meningitis or encephalitis, audiovestibular symptom). Ten of them refused enrollment or could not complete full battery. Seventeen females and three males, mean age 12.9 ± 2.6 years, completed the study. Control group included 20 normal subjects, age and sex matched. Full clinical assessment, basic audiological evaluation and vestibular testing (videonystagmography VNG and computerized dynamic posturography CDP) were conducted for children included in the study. Five systemic lupus erythematosus patients had sensorineural hearing loss strongly associated with +ve antiphospholipid antibody and two had conductive hearing loss. Two children in control group had conductive hearing loss (p=0.05). Abnormal VNG findings was significantly higher among systemic lupus erythematosus children (40%) compared to controls (0%) and associated with +ve antiphospholipid antibodies (χ(2)=10, p=0.002, Fisher exact test=0.003). Twenty-five percentage of systemic lupus erythematosus children had abnormal CDP findings reflecting impaired balance function associated with positive antiphospholipid antibodies showing significant statistical difference compared to controls (0% affection) (χ(2)=5.7, p=0.017, Fisher exact test=0.047). Silent audiovestibular dysfunction is prevalent among systemic lupus

  17. Derivation and Validation of Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Classification Criteria for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Gordon, Caroline; Merrill, Joan T.; Fortin, Paul R.; Bruce, Ian N.; Isenberg, David; Wallace, Daniel J.; Nived, Ola; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Hanly, John G.; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Clarke, Ann; Aranow, Cynthia; Manzi, Susan; Urowitz, Murray; Gladman, Dafna; Kalunian, Kenneth; Costner, Melissa; Werth, Victoria P.; Zoma, Asad; Bernatsky, Sasha; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther A.; Jacobsen, Soren; Buyon, Jill P.; Maddison, Peter; Dooley, Mary Anne; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Ginzler, Ellen; Stoll, Thomas; Peschken, Christine; Jorizzo, Joseph L.; Callen, Jeffrey P.; Lim, S. Sam; Fessler, Barri J.; Inanc, Murat; Kamen, Diane L.; Rahman, Anisur; Steinsson, Kristjan; Franks, Andrew G.; Sigler, Lisa; Hameed, Suhail; Fang, Hong; Pham, Ngoc; Brey, Robin; Weisman, Michael H.; McGwin, Gerald; Magder, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) SLE classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements and incorporate new knowledge in SLE immunology. Methods The classification criteria were derived from a set of 702 expert-rated patient scenarios. Recursive partitioning was used to derive an initial rule that was simplified and refined based on SLICC physician consensus. SLICC validated the classification criteria in a new validation sample of 690 SLE patients and controls. Results Seventeen criteria were identified. The SLICC criteria for SLE classification requires: 1) Fulfillment of at least four criteria, with at least one clinical criterion AND one immunologic criterion OR 2) Lupus nephritis as the sole clinical criterion in the presence of ANA or anti-dsDNA antibodies. In the derivation set, the SLICC classification criteria resulted in fewer misclassifications than the current ACR classification criteria (49 versus 70, p=0.0082), had greater sensitivity (94% versus 86%, p<0.0001) and equal specificity (92% versus 93%, p=0.39). In the validation set, the SLICC Classification criteria resulted in fewer misclassifications (62 versus 74, p=0.24), had greater sensitivity (97% versus 83%, p<0.0001) but less specificity (84% versus 96%, p<0.0001). Conclusions The new SLICC classification criteria performed well on a large set of patient scenarios rated by experts. They require that at least one clinical criterion and one immunologic criterion be present for a classification of SLE. Biopsy confirmed nephritis compatible with lupus (in the presence of SLE autoantibodies) is sufficient for classification. PMID:22553077

  18. The Pathology of T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the production of a wide array of autoantibodies. Thus, the condition was traditionally classified as a “B-cell disease”. Compelling evidence has however shown that without the assistance of the helper T lymphocytes, it is indeed difficult for the “helpless” B cells to become functional enough to trigger SLE-related inflammation. T cells have been recognized to be crucial in the pathogenicity of SLE through their capabilities to communicate with and offer enormous help to B cells for driving autoantibody production. Recently, a number of phenotypic and functional alterations which increase the propensity to trigger lupus-related inflammation have been identified in lupus T cells. Here, potential mechanisms involving alterations in T-cell receptor expressions, postreceptor downstream signalling, epigenetics, and oxidative stress which favour activation of lupus T cells will be discussed. Additionally, how regulatory CD4+, CD8+, and γδ T cells tune down lupus-related inflammation will be highlighted. Lastly, while currently available outcomes of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic agents which manipulate the T cells such as calcineurin inhibitors indicate that they are at least as efficacious and safe as conventional immunosuppressants in treating lupus glomerulonephritis, larger clinical trials are undoubtedly required to validate these as-yet favourable findings.

  19. Antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlgen, U; Yayla, M E; Ateş, A; Okatan, İ E; Yurteri, E U; Torgutalp, M; Keleşoğlu, A B D; Turgay, T M; Kınıklı, G

    2018-04-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic and non-gestational manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant were identified and grouped as systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-APS), systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/lupus anticoagulant without antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-aPL), and systemic lupus erythematosus with negative aPLs (SLE-No aPL). Groups were compared in terms of non-thrombotic systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and laboratory features retrospectively. Results A total of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 26 with SLE-APS, 25 with SLE-aPL, and 99 with SLE-No aPL, were identified. Livedo reticularis, neurologic involvement, and thrombocytopenia were more common in antiphospholipid antibody positive systemic lupus erythematosus cases. Malar rash, arthritis, and pleuritis were more common in the SLE-No aPL, SLE-APS, and SLE-aPL groups, respectively. Positivity rates and titers of specific antiphospholipid antibodies did not differ between the SLE-APS and SLE-aPL groups. Conclusions Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome or persistent antiphospholipid antibodies may be related to non-thrombotic and non-gestational systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus plus antiphospholipid syndrome and persistent antiphospholipid antibodies without antiphospholipid syndrome also differ in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations.

  20. Unmet medical needs in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of diverse manifestations, with onset usually in young women in the third to fourth decade of life. The chronic nature of this relapsing remitting disease leads to organ damage accrual over time. Mortality and morbidity are increased in patients with SLE compared with the general population. Therapeutic advances over the last few decades have led to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Five-year survival has improved to over 90% from a low of 50% in the 1950s. However, multiple aspects of the management of SLE patients are still far from optimal. Early diagnosis remains a challenge; diagnostic delays leading to delay in definitive treatment are common. Monitoring treatment remains problematic due to the paucity of sensitive biomarkers. Current treatment regimens rely heavily on corticosteroids, even though corticosteroids are well known to cause organ damage. Treatment of refractory disease manifestations such as nephritis, recalcitrant cutaneous lesions and neurological involvement require new approaches with greater efficacy. Cognitive dysfunction is common in SLE patients, but early recognition and adequate treatment are yet to be established. Premature accelerated atherosclerosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Fatigue is one of the most disabling symptoms, and contributes to the poor quality of life in patients with SLE. Ongoing research in SLE faces many challenges, including enrollment of homogeneous patient populations, use of reliable outcome measures and a standard control arm. The current review will highlight some of the outstanding unmet challenges in the management of this complex disease. PMID:23281889

  1. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowo, O O; Olaosebikan, B H; Animashaun, B A; Akintayo, R O

    2017-03-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is a complex multisystemic autoimmune disorder of unknown cause. It accounts for about one in five cases of SLE. The tendency for SLE to run a fulminant course when it starts in childhood has made JSLE a potentially more severe disease than adult SLE. Reports of JSLE from sub-Saharan Africa are scanty in spite of the increasing reports of adult SLE. We conducted a 4-year retrospective study of JSLE cases seen at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. Out of the 12 patients studied, eight were girls and four were boys. All patients had positive antinuclear antibody and extractable nuclear antibody tests. Anti-dsDNA antibody was positive in 10 patients. Eight patients had renal disease while four patients had neuropsychiatric manifestations. Haematological abnormalities and constitutional symptoms were present in all patients. Patients were treated with pulse methylprednisolone, oral prednisolone, hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine. Three patients also received rituximab. In conclusion, JSLE exists in Nigeria and exhibits clinical and immunological characteristics similar to its pattern in other parts of the world. It is, however, diagnosed late and is possibly being underdiagnosed as there is no paediatric rheumatologist in the country.

  2. Gastrointestinal system manifestations in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Karhan, Asuman Nur; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Bilginer, Yelda; Gümüş, Ersin; Demir, Hülya; Yüce, Aysel; Özen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which may involve gastrointestinal system (GIS). The aim of this study was to present GIS manifestations of pediatric SLE patients. The medical files of 69 children with SLE followed between January 2011 and January 2016 were reviewed. All fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria. All patients (≤18 years of age) with GIS manifestations were included. GIS manifestations were observed in 19 (27.5%) out of 69 SLE patients and present at the time of SLE diagnosis in 13 (68.4%). The GIS manifestations due to SLE were autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) (n = 8) and lupus enteritis (n = 1). Manifestations associated with SLE were hepatomegaly and hypertransaminasemia due to macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (n = 3) and hepatic steatosis (n = 1). GIS manifestations as a result of the adverse events of drugs were as follows: toxic hepatitis (n = 3; associated with methotrexate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in one, methotrexate in another, and azathioprine in another patient), azathioprine-induced cholestatic hepatitis (n = 1), and gastritis associated with corticosteroid (n = 1). In one patient, acute appendicitis occurred as a coincidence. In this study, one of every five pediatric SLE patients had GIS-related manifestations. GIS involvement may occur as an initial manifestation of the disease.

  3. Pregnancy outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus in relation to lupus activity before and during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Jie; Chen, Chih-Yao; Chang, Wen-Hsun; Tseng, Jen-Yu; Yeh, Chang-Ching

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the pregnancy complications and pregnancy outcome relating to the disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus before conception and during pregnancy. Seventy-two pregnancies were collected in a single tertiary medical center within a 5-year period. Twelve pregnancies were terminated due to various causes in the first half of pregnancy. Analysis of pregnancy complications and pregnancy outcome relating to the lupus activity before conception and during pregnancy was made among the remaining 60 pregnancies with gestational length > 26 weeks. The assessment of lupus activity was based on the routine monitoring, including urine routine, white blood cell count, hemoglobin and platelet count, erythrocyte sediment rate, serum titers of C3, C4, and double-stranded DNA. Monitoring of renal function with daily urinary protein loss and clearance rate of creatinine was needed when worsened nephropathy was suspected. The etiologies of the terminated pregnancies were deteriorated nephropathy (6 cases), involvement of central nervous system (1 case), unwanted pregnancy due to drug exposure (3 cases), and two early intrauterine fetal deaths (both during the 23(rd) week of gestation). Pregnancy complications were related to the lupus activity before conception [odds ratio = 0.238, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.073, 0.778, p = 0.014] and during pregnancy (odds ratio = 0.153, 95% CI = 0.031, 0.754, p = 0.012). Meanwhile, pregnancy outcome significantly related to the lupus activity of the preconception period and during pregnancy. The gestational length was significantly longer in the pregnancies with remitted lupus activity either before conception (38.2 ± 1.6 weeks vs. 36.3 ± 3.4 weeks, p = 0.011 and 95% CI = -3.454, -0.478) or during pregnancy (38.2 ± 1.6 weeks vs. 35.2 ± 3.8 weeks, p = 0.005 and with 95% CI = -4.988, -1.005). Significant relationships were also found between newborn birth weights and lupus activity preconceptionally (2940 ± 389 g vs. 2448

  4. Gut Microbiota in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin M; Edwards, Michael R; Mu, Qinghui; Yu, Yang; Vieson, Miranda D; Reilly, Christopher M; Ahmed, S Ansar; Bankole, Adegbenga A

    2018-02-15

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been observed in a number of autoimmune diseases. However, the role of the gut microbiota in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypical autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation in multiple organs of the body, remains elusive. Here we report the dynamics of the gut microbiota in a murine lupus model, NZB/W F1, as well as intestinal dysbiosis in a small group of SLE patients with active disease. The composition of the gut microbiota changed markedly before and after the onset of lupus disease in NZB/W F1 mice, with greater diversity and increased representation of several bacterial species as lupus progressed from the predisease stage to the diseased stage. However, we did not control for age and the cage effect. Using dexamethasone as an intervention to treat SLE-like signs, we also found that a greater abundance of a group of lactobacilli (for which a species assignment could not be made) in the gut microbiota might be correlated with more severe disease in NZB/W F1 mice. Results of the human study suggest that, compared to control subjects without immune-mediated diseases, SLE patients with active lupus disease possessed an altered gut microbiota that differed in several particular bacterial species (within the genera Odoribacter and Blautia and an unnamed genus in the family Rikenellaceae ) and was less diverse, with increased representation of Gram-negative bacteria. The Firmicutes / Bacteroidetes ratios did not differ between the SLE microbiota and the non-SLE microbiota in our human cohort. IMPORTANCE SLE is a complex autoimmune disease with no known cure. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been reported for both mice and humans with SLE. In this emerging field, however, more studies are required to delineate the roles of the gut microbiota in different lupus-prone mouse models and people with diverse manifestations of SLE. Here, we report changes in the gut microbiota in NZB/W F1 lupus-prone mice and a

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients : pooled analysis and systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Wenjie; Chen, Min; Liu, Jia; Hagen, Ferry; Ms, Abdullah; Al-Hatmi, A M S; Zhang, Peilian; Guo, Yun; Boekhout, Teun; Deng, Danqi; Xu, Jianping; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an important fungal infection among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We conducted a pooled analysis and systematic review to describe the epidemiological and clinical profile of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. From two hospitals in

  6. [B lymphocyte stimulator in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Ulises

    2012-01-01

    The B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is an essential protein for the growth and survival of B cells. BLyS is expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. BLyS binds to three receptors on B cells: BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI. BLyS overexpression in mice leads to lupus-like syndrome, but not in all, whereas BLyS deficient mice results in a block of B cell development. High serum levels of BLyS can be detected in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. BLyS antagonists are an attractive target for treating autoimmune diseases.

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus diagnostics in the ‘omics’ era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriens, Cristina; Mohan, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease affecting multiple organ systems. Currently, diagnosis relies upon meeting at least four out of eleven criteria outlined by the ACR. The scientific community actively pursues discovery of novel diagnostics in the hope of better identifying susceptible individuals in early stages of disease. Comprehensive studies have been conducted at multiple biological levels including: DNA (or genomics), mRNA (or transcriptomics), protein (or proteomics) and metabolites (or metabolomics). The ‘omics’ platforms allow us to re-examine systemic lupus erythematosus at a greater degree of molecular resolution. More importantly, one is hopeful that these ‘omics’ platforms may yield newer biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus that can help clinicians track the disease course with greater sensitivity and specificity. PMID:24860621

  8. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

  9. Voice disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena S F C de Macedo

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic disease characterized by progressive tissue damage. In recent decades, novel treatments have greatly extended the life span of SLE patients. This creates a high demand for identifying the overarching symptoms associated with SLE and developing therapies that improve their life quality under chronic care. We hypothesized that SLE patients would present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can reduce life quality, identifying a potential SLE-related dysphonia could be relevant for the appraisal and management of this disease. We measured objective vocal parameters and perceived vocal quality with the GRBAS (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain scale in SLE patients and compared them to matched healthy controls. SLE patients also filled a questionnaire reporting perceived vocal deficits. SLE patients had significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonics to noise ratio, as well as increased jitter and shimmer. All subjective parameters of the GRBAS scale were significantly abnormal in SLE patients. Additionally, the vast majority of SLE patients (29/36 reported at least one perceived vocal deficit, with the most prevalent deficits being vocal fatigue (19/36 and hoarseness (17/36. Self-reported voice deficits were highly correlated with altered GRBAS scores. Additionally, tissue damage scores in different organ systems correlated with dysphonic symptoms, suggesting that some features of SLE-related dysphonia are due to tissue damage. Our results show that a large fraction of SLE patients suffers from perceivable dysphonia and may benefit from voice therapy in order to improve quality of life.

  10. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus; Calcificacoes intracranianas macicas em um paciente com lupus eritematoso sistemico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica. Servico de Radiologia Medica]. E-mail: gasparetto@hotmail.com; Ono, Sergio E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-12-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2{sup *} gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  11. Psoriasis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Konstantinos; Yap, Kristy Su-Ying; Pakchotanon, Rattapol; Polachek, Ari; Su, Jiandong; Urowitz, Murray B; Gladman, Dafna D

    2017-04-01

    The coexistence of psoriasis with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been reported in limited case series, raising hypotheses about shared pathogenetic mechanisms. Nevertheless, important differences regarding treatment do exist. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of psoriasis in a defined cohort of lupus patients. Patients with psoriasis were retrieved from the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic from its inception in 1970 up to 2015. Charts were hand-searched to collect information concerning demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Patients were matched with non-psoriasis lupus patients to identify the impact of supervening psoriasis on lupus activity, damage accrual, and venous thromboembolic (VTEs) and cardiovascular events (CVEs). Psoriasis was diagnosed in 63 patients (49 females, 14 males) for a prevalence of 3.46% (63/1823). The male-to-female ratio was significantly higher in non-psoriasis patients (0.286 vs. 0.138, p = 0.017). Plaque psoriasis was the most prominent type (55/63, 87.3%) whereas three patients had pustular disease; one had psoriatic arthritis. Nine patients (14.3%) were administered systemic treatment with methotrexate (n = 5), azathioprine (n = 1), ustekinumab (n = 3), and etanercept (n = 1). Psoriasis was definitely deteriorated by hydroxychloroquine in one patient. There was no significant impact of psoriasis on disease activity, damage accrual, VTEs, and CVEs. The prevalence of psoriasis was twice as high as that of the general Canadian population in this lupus cohort. Plaque psoriasis was the most prominent subtype, and topical treatment was adequate in the majority of patients. Supervening psoriasis had no significant impact on lupus activity and damage accrual.

  12. Immunoglobulin E and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by intense polyclonal production of autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes. Some reports have associated SLE with a Th2 immune response and allergy. In the present study 21 female patients with SLE were investigated for total IgE and IgE antibodies to dust house aeroallergens by an automated enzyme-linked fluorescent assay, and were also evaluated for antinuclear IgE autoantibodies by a modified indirect immunofluorescence test using HEp-2 cells as antigen substrate. Additionally, immunocapture ELISA was used to investigate serum anti-IgE IgG autoantibodies. Serum IgE above 150 IU/ml, ranging from 152 to 609 IU/ml (median = 394 IU IgE/ml, was observed in 7 of 21 SLE patients (33%, 5 of them presenting proteinuria, urinary cellular casts and augmented production of anti-dsDNA antibodies. While only 2 of 21 SLE patients (9.5% were positive for IgE antibodies to aeroallergens, all 10 patients with respiratory allergy (100% from the atopic control group (3 males and 7 females, had these immunoglobulins. SLE patients and healthy controls presented similar anti-IgE IgG autoantibody titers (X = 0.37 ± 0.20 and 0.34 ± 0.18, respectively, differing from atopic controls (0.94 ± 0.26. Antinuclear IgE autoantibodies were detected in 17 of 21 (81% sera from SLE patients, predominating the fine speckled pattern of fluorescence, that was also observed in IgG-ANA. Concluding, SLE patients can present increased IgE levels and antinuclear IgE autoantibodies without specific clinical signs of allergy or production of antiallergen IgE antibodies, excluding a possible association between SLE and allergy.

  13. Circulating microparticles in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookston, Kendall P; Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Chandler, Wayne L; Qualls, Clifford R; Roldan, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine-rich microparticles derived from endothelial cells, platelets and leukocytes have been implicated as surrogate markers of cellular activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Because microparticles have also been associated with many primary neurologic diseases, this study investigated whether cellular-derived microparticles are also implicated in neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE). Plasma microparticles were measured in 51 SLE patients and 22 age- and gender-matched controls. Acute NPSLE was defined as major NPSLE (acute stroke, transient ischemic attack, psychosis, isolated seizures, major cognitive disorder, or acute confusional state) and NPSLE disease activity was measured with the neurologic components of the SLE Disease Activity Index (Neuro-SLEDAI). Neuro-SLEDAI levels varied widely in SLE patients, consistent with variable NPSLE activity. When considering all patients with SLE, there was no difference in total microparticles relative to matched controls, 2158/μL (interquartile range [IQR] 1214-3463) versus 2782/μL (IQR 1586-2990; P = 0.57) nor differences in microparticles derived from either platelets (P = 0.40), monocytes (P = 0.15) or endothelial cells (P = 0.32). However, levels of circulating monocyte-derived microparticles significantly and independently correlated with NPSLE (r = -0.28; P = 0.045), corticosteroid dosage (r = -0.38; P = 0.006) and levels of circulating C5a (r = 0.54; P microparticles. Circulating cell-derived microparticles are reduced in active NPSLE, although the relative contribution of reduced microparticle production, increased consumption or intravascular sequestration, remain uncertain. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Elena; Nadig, Ajay; Richardson, Bruce C; Freedman, Barry I; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Niewold, Timothy B; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Ziegler, Julie T; Langefeld, Carl D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth E; Kimberly, Robert P; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Martin, Javier; Park, So-Yeon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Moser, Kathy L; Vyse, Timothy J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease. A number of genetic loci that increase lupus susceptibility have been established. This study examines if these genetic loci also contribute to the clinical heterogeneity in lupus. 4001 European-derived, 1547 Hispanic, 1590 African-American and 1191 Asian lupus patients were genotyped for 16 confirmed lupus susceptibility loci. Ancestry informative markers were genotyped to calculate and adjust for admixture. The association between the risk allele in each locus was determined and compared in patients with and without the various clinical manifestations included in the ACR criteria. Renal disorder was significantly correlated with the lupus risk allele in ITGAM (p=5.0 × 10(-6), OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.35) and in TNFSF4 (p=0.0013, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.25). Other significant findings include the association between risk alleles in FCGR2A and malar rash (p=0.0031, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.33), ITGAM and discoid rash (p=0.0020, OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.33), STAT4 and protection from oral ulcers (p=0.0027, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and IL21 and haematological disorder (p=0.0027, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.22). All these associations are significant with a false discovery rate of manifestations and the FCGR2A, ITGAM, STAT4, TNSF4 and IL21 genes. The findings suggest that genetic profiling might be a useful tool to predict disease manifestations in lupus patients in the future.

  15. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: How to manage pregnancy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Morel, N; Vauthier, D; Tsatsaris, V; Pannier, E; Piette, J-C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is a common situation that remains associated with higher maternal and fetal mortality/morbidity than in the general population. Complications include lupus flares, obstetrical complications (fetal loss, in utero growth retardation, prematurity) and neonatal lupus syndrome. The association with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome increases the risk of obstetrical complications. Improving the care of these pregnancies depends upon a systematic pregnancy planning, ideally during a preconception counseling visit and a multidisciplinary approach (internist/rheumatologist, obstetrician and anesthetist). The absence of lupus activity, the use of appropriate medications during pregnancy adjusted to the patient's medical history and risk factors, and a regular monitoring are the best tools for a favorable outcome for these high-risk pregnancies. The aim of this review article is to perform an update on the medical care of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome to reduce the risk of complications and to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  17. Invasive fungal infections in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Alza, Y; Sánchez-Bautista, J; Fajardo-Rivero, J F; Figueroa, C L

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement. Complications, such as invasive fungal infections usually occur in patients with a greater severity of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk variables associated with invasive fungal infections in a Colombian systemic lupus erythematosus population. Materials and methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study that evaluated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for six years. The primary outcome was invasive fungal infection. Descriptive, group comparison and bivariate analysis was performed using Stata 12.0 software. Results Two hundred patients were included in this study; 84.5% of the patients were women and the median age was 36 years; 68% of the subjects had haematological complications; 53.3% had nephropathy; 45% had pneumopathy and 28% had pericardial impairment; 7.5% of patients had invasive fungal infections and the most frequently isolated fungus was Candida albicans. Pericardial disease, cyclophosphamide use, high disease activity, elevated ESR, C3 hypocomplementemia, anaemia and lymphopenia had a significant association with invasive fungal infection ( P lupus erythematosus, which was higher than that reported in other latitudes. In this population the increase in disease activity, the presence of pericardial impairment and laboratory alterations (anaemia, lymphopenia, increased ESR and C3 hypocomplementemia) are associated with a greater possibility of invasive fungal infections. Regarding the use of drugs, unlike other studies, in the Colombian population an association was found only with the previous administration of cyclophosphamide. In addition, patients with invasive fungal infections and systemic lupus erythematosus had a higher prevalence of mortality and hospital readmission compared with patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without invasive fungal infection.

  18. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  19. Extracellular Vesicles as Biomarkers of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and typically manifests in multiple organs. The damage caused by this disorder is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including microvesicles (also known as microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and exosomes, are recognized vehicles of intercellular communication, carrying autoantigens, cytokines, and surface receptors. Therefore, the evidence of EVs and their cargo as biomarkers of autoimmune disease is rapidly expanding. This review will focus on biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, their pathophysiological roles, and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in inflammatory disease, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare triggered by a spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Nares, Eduardo; López Iñiguez, Alvaro; Ontiveros Mercado, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with a relapsing and remitting course characterized by disease flares. Flares are a major cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Some triggers for these exacerbations have been identified, including infections, vaccines, pregnancy, environmental factors such as weather, stress and drugs. We report a patient who presented with a lupus flare with predominantly mucocutaneous, serosal and cardiac involvement after being bitten by a spider and we present the possible mechanisms by which the venom elicited such a reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-07-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental.

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation in refractory systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Gross, D.J.; Braverman, A.; Weshler, Z.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.; Eliakim, M.

    1986-01-01

    In two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, conventional therapy was considered to have failed because of persistent disease activity and unacceptable side effects. Both were treated with total lymphoid irradiation without clinical benefit, despite adequate immunosuppression as documented by markedly reduced numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte-dependent proliferative responses in vitro. The first patient developed herpes zoster, gram-negative septicemia, neurologic symptoms, and deterioration of lupus nephritis. The second patient developed massive bronchopneumonia, necrotic cutaneous lesions, and progressive nephritis and died 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. These observations, although limited to two patients, indicate that total lymphoid irradiation in patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus should be regarded as strictly experimental

  3. Occult systemic lupus erythematosus with active lupus nephritis presenting as Libman-Sacks endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankajkumar Ashok Kasar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE depends on clinical evidence of renal, rheumatologic, cutaneous, and neurologic involvement, supported by serological markers. A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented with Libman-Sacks endocarditis involving the aortic valve as the first manifestation of SLE. Even though she did not satisfy the American College of Rheumatology criteria for diagnosing SLE, she had anemia, proteinuria, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, low complement 4 (C4 levels, and strongly positive antinuclear antibody titer. A renal biopsy showed stage IV lupus nephritis. Treatment was initiated with immunosuppressants and steroids. This type of presentation may be misdiagnosed as infective endocarditis missing the underlying collagen vascular disease.

  4. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis in a Young Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Tooba; Madihi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE) is an autoimmune blistering disease occurring in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is a rare disease, especially in children. A 14-year-old girl initially presented with fatigue, generalized vesiculobullous skin lesions, and ulcers over the hard palate and oral mucosa. Clinical investigations revealed hematuria and proteinuria, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and titer of antinuclear antibody, and anti-double-stranded DNA. Skin biopsy findings were suggestive of BSLE. A renal biopsy confirmed the features of class V lupus nephritis. Based on the clinical features and investigations, a diagnosis of BSLE with nephritis was made. She received methylprednisolone pulse therapy and hydroxychloroquine; however, it did not alleviate the vesiculobullous eruption, so treatment with dapsone started and resulted in the dramatic disappearance of the lesions. Interruption of dapsone due to hemolysis did not aggravate the bullous disease. During follow-up, she had multiple flare-ups of disease and nephritis without rebound of bullous lesions. BSLE is a rare presentation of SLE in children. Differentiating it from other skin bullous diseases and SLE with blister is important for the correct management. The unusual presentation of this disease may delay the diagnosis and therefore requires a high index of clinical suspicion.

  5. Cell death in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2017-12-01

    Nephritis is one of the most severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). One key characteristic of lupus nephritis (LN) is the deposition of immune complexes containing nucleic acids and/or proteins binding to nucleic acids and autoantibodies recognizing these molecules. A variety of cell death processes are implicated in the generation and externalization of modified nuclear autoantigens and in the development of LN. Among these processes, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis, NETosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy have been proposed to play roles in tissue damage and immune dysregulation. Cell death occurs in healthy individuals during conditions of homeostasis yet autoimmunity does not develop, at least in part, because of rapid clearance of dying cells. In SLE, accelerated cell death combined with a clearance deficiency may lead to the accumulation and externalization of nuclear autoantigens and to autoantibody production. In addition, specific types of cell death may modify autoantigens and alter their immunogenicity. These modified molecules may then become novel targets of the immune system and promote autoimmune responses in predisposed hosts. In this review, we examine various cell death pathways and discuss how enhanced cell death, impaired clearance, and post-translational modifications of proteins could contribute to the development of lupus nephritis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis in a Young Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooba Momen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE is an autoimmune blistering disease occurring in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It is a rare disease, especially in children. A 14-year-old girl initially presented with fatigue, generalized vesiculobullous skin lesions, and ulcers over the hard palate and oral mucosa. Clinical investigations revealed hematuria and proteinuria, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and titer of antinuclear antibody, and anti-double-stranded DNA. Skin biopsy findings were suggestive of BSLE. A renal biopsy confirmed the features of class V lupus nephritis. Based on the clinical features and investigations, a diagnosis of BSLE with nephritis was made. She received methylprednisolone pulse therapy and hydroxychloroquine; however, it did not alleviate the vesiculobullous eruption, so treatment with dapsone started and resulted in the dramatic disappearance of the lesions. Interruption of dapsone due to hemolysis did not aggravate the bullous disease. During follow-up, she had multiple flare-ups of disease and nephritis without rebound of bullous lesions. BSLE is a rare presentation of SLE in children. Differentiating it from other skin bullous diseases and SLE with blister is important for the correct management. The unusual presentation of this disease may delay the diagnosis and therefore requires a high index of clinical suspicion.

  7. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, H

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is "autoimmunity." Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of these

  8. Lenalidomide for refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E Y; Schanberg, L E; Wershba, E C; Rabinovich, C E

    2017-05-01

    Objective Cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus cause significant morbidity. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, has shown promise treating cutaneous lupus erythematosus in adults. Our objective was to evaluate lenalidomide's efficacy and safety in treating refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 10 adolescents who received lenalidomide for recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Information was gathered at drug initiation and 6-month follow-up. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used to assess change in quantitative parameters of disease activity. Results Nine subjects were girls and six were African-American. Indications for lenalidomide treatment included alopecia, nasal and oral ulcers, extensive malar rash, discoid lesions, bullous lesions, panniculitis, cutaneous vasculitis, and Raynaud's phenomenon with digital ulcerations. Within 6 months, all patients demonstrated complete or near resolution based on physician report. Prednisone dose decreased from a mean 23.5 mg (SD± 13.3) to 12.25 mg (SD± 9.2) ( P= 0.008). Sedimentation rate decreased from a mean 29 mm/hour (SD± 31.5) to 17 mm/hour (SD± 18.1) ( P= 0.004). Lenalidomide was well tolerated. Conclusion Lenalidomide is an effective and safe treatment for a spectrum of dermatological conditions in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Its use may allow a reduction in prednisone dose and decreased disfigurement. Prospective study is needed to clarify lenalidomide's role in treating cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  9. Prolactin has a pathogenic role in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Saavedra, Miguel A; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio; Navarro, Carmen; Vazquez Del Mercado, Monica; Espinoza, Luis R

    2017-04-01

    Prolactin, a 23-kDa peptide hormone, is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and extrapituitary sites including the immune cells. Prolactin (PRL) participates in innate and adaptive immune response. PRL stimulates the immune cells by binding to receptor (PRL-R). Binding of PRL to its receptor activates the Janus kinase-signal transducer (JAK-STAT). Activation of these cascades results in endpoints such as immunoestimulator and immunosupressor action. Prolactin belongs to the network of immune-neuroendocrine interaction. Hyperprolactinemia has been found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and new evidence has confirmed a significant correlation between serum PRL levels and disease activity. PRL participates in activation of SLE during pregnancy and in pathogenesis of lupus nephritis, neuropsychiatric, serosal, hematologic, articular, and cutaneous involvement. Hyperprolactinemia was associated with increase IgG concentrations, anti-DNA antibodies, immune complex, glomerulonephritis, and accelerated mortality in murine lupus. Bromocriptine, a dopamine analog that suppresses PRL secretion, was associated with decreased lupus activity, prolonged lifespan, and restoration of immune competence in experimental model. In clinical trials, bromocriptine and derivative drugs showed beneficial therapeutic effect in treating human lupus, including pregnancy. Taken together, clinical and experimental results leave little doubt that PRL indeed contributes to the pathogenesis and clinical expression of SLE.

  10. Guillain barre syndrome as initial presentation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multiple organ involvement including the peripheral nervous system. Guillan- Barrè syndrome (GBS) has an established association with SLE as one of its neurologic manifestations. However, GBS as an initial manifestation of ...

  11. Clinical features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease, a type of self-allergy, whereby the patient's immune system creates antibodies that attack the person's own body tissues instead of protecting the body from bacteria and viruses. In most cases the cause of SLE is unknown, although it is believed ...

  12. Apoptotic cell clearance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reefman, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an incurable multi-organ autoimmune disease characterized by a wide array of clinical manifestations, ranging from skin and mucosal lesions to severe injuries in the central nervous system, kidneys and other organs. The disease primarily affects women in their

  13. case reports atypical presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... SUMMARY. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, auto- immune multi-system disorder. About seventy to nine- ty percent of all cases of SLE occur in women. Alt- hough the disease is common in black young women residing in Europe and North America, it is reputed to be a very rare diagnosis ...

  14. Atypical presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus in a west ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, autoimmune multi-system disorder. About seventy to ninety percent of all cases of SLE occur in women. Although the disease is common in black young women residing in Europe and North America, it is reputed to be a very rare diagnosis in West Africa. A case of atypical ...

  15. Gastrointestinal manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Chalem, Philippe; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the history of the gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus since century XIX to our days, making a review of every organ and system involved, with special emphasis in gastropathy, enteritis, ileitis, malabsorption syndrome vasculitis bowel vasculopathy, mesenteric thrombosis, pancreatitis, ascites, peritonitis autoimmune hepatitis and more

  16. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Severe Nephritis That Mimicked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) belongs to a family of related autoimmune rheumatic disorders that are capable of affecting multiple organs, and they are all associated with a variety of autoantibodies. Henoch Schoenlein purpura (HSP) is a sort of systemic vasculitis that is not associated with ...

  17. Acute Stroke as the first manifestation of Systemic Lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune, multisystem disease that is characterized by a bewildering array of antibodies. Central nervous system manifestations of SLE are highly diverse and often have major prognostic consequences, accounting for 15% of cases. It is a known cause of 'stroke in the young' ...

  18. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, with episodic course. It is characterized by periods of relative quiescence and periods of exacerbations which may involve any organ or system. About a young woman with a clinical delirium state, we revised the clinical neuropsychiatric features of SLE in the literature.

  19. Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Betz, Rebecca; Specker, Christof

    2017-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Pregnancy in SLE nowadays has favorable outcomes for the majority of women. However, flares of disease activity, preeclampsia, fetal loss, and preterm birth are well-known risks in such pregnancies. Anti-SS-A(Ro)/SS-B(La) antibodies put fetuses at risk for congenital heart block and neonatal lupus. Several risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes have been identified. Women with antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome and lupus nephritis represent a group with high risk for obstetric complications. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, and intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy are essential to improve pregnancy outcome. The aim of this review article is to update on the medical care of pregnancy in these women to ensure the best maternal and fetal prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O; Fang, H; Alarcón, G S; Gordon, C; Merrill, Jt; Fortin, P R; Bruce, I N; Isenberg, D A; Wallace, D J; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Bae, S-C; Hanly, J G; Sanchez-Guerrero, J; Clarke, A E; Aranow, C B; Manzi, S; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Kalunian, K C; Costner, M I; Werth, V P; Zoma, A; Bernatsky, S; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Khamashta, M A; Jacobsen, S; Buyon, J P; Maddison, P; Dooley, M A; Van Vollenhoven, R F; Ginzler, E; Stoll, T; Peschken, C; Jorizzo, J L; Callen, J P; Lim, S S; Fessler, B J; Inanc, M; Kamen, D L; Rahman, A; Steinsson, K; Franks, A G; Sigler, L; Hameed, S; Pham, N; Brey, R; Weisman, M H; McGwin, G; Magder, L S; Petri, M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. Information and blood samples were obtained in a cross-sectional study from patients with SLE (n = 308) and other rheumatologic diseases (n = 389) from 25 clinical sites (84% female, 68% Caucasian, 17% African descent, 8% Asian, 7% other). IgG anti-C1q against the collagen-like region was measured by ELISA. Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Radiologic findings in late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Weissman, B.N.; Sosman, J.L.; Schur, P.H.

    1983-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly has a different clinical and serologic course from that in young patients. Radiographic findings in patients in whom the diagnosis was made after age 50 were compared with findings in younger patients to see if the radiologic patterns are also different. The only significant radiographic difference between the two groups was that the older group had a greater incidence of soft-tissue swelling of the hands and wrists (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in osteopenia, erosion, soft-tissue calcification, alignment abnormalities, or intrathoracic findings. Of 24 patients over age 50, two developed lymphoma and another developed multiple myeloma. The data agree with clinical observations that there is a higher incidence of arthritis in late-onset lupus, but clinical findings of increased incidence of pleuropericardial disease are not confirmed radiographically. The coincidence of hematologic malignancy with late-onset lupus in this series is noteworthy.

  2. Refractory Angioedema in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Habibagahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema secondary to C1 inhibitor deficiency has been rarely reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. A genetic defect of C1 inhibitor produces hereditary angioedema, which is usually presented with cutaneous painless edema, but edema of the genital area, gastrointestinal and laryngeal tracts have also been reported. In lupus patients, angioedema may be the result of an acquired type of C1 inhibitor deficiency, most probably due to antibody formation directed against the C1 inhibitor molecule. Herein we report a new case of lupus nephritis that developed angioedema and a rapid course of disease progression with acute renal failure and alveolar hemorrhage without response to high dose steroid and plasmapheresis.

  3. Radiologic findings in late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Weissman, B.N.; Sosman, J.L.; Schur, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly has a different clinical and serologic course from that in young patients. Radiographic findings in patients in whom the diagnosis was made after age 50 were compared with findings in younger patients to see if the radiologic patterns are also different. The only significant radiographic difference between the two groups was that the older group had a greater incidence of soft-tissue swelling of the hands and wrists (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in osteopenia, erosion, soft-tissue calcification, alignment abnormalities, or intrathoracic findings. Of 24 patients over age 50, two developed lymphoma and another developed multiple myeloma. The data agree with clinical observations that there is a higher incidence of arthritis in late-onset lupus, but clinical findings of increased incidence of pleuropericardial disease are not confirmed radiographically. The coincidence of hematologic malignancy with late-onset lupus in this series is noteworthy

  4. Association of Sweet's Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Barton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder but can also be drug induced, associated with hematopoetic malignancies and myelodysplastic disorders, and more, infrequently, observed in autoimmune disorders. Sweet's syndrome has been reported in three cases of neonatal lupus, three cases of hydralazine-induced lupus in adults, and in nine pediatric and adult systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. We describe three additional adult cases of Sweet's associated with SLE and provide a focused review on nondrug-induced, nonneonatal SLE and Sweet's. In two of three new cases, as in the majority of prior cases, the skin rash of Sweet's paralleled underlying SLE disease activity. The pathogenesis of Sweet's remains elusive, but evidence suggests that cytokine dysregulation may be central to the clinical and pathological changes in this condition, as well as in SLE. Further research is needed to define the exact relationship between the two conditions.

  5. [Dyslipidaemia and atherogenic risk in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batún Garrido, José Antonio de Jesús; Radillo Alba, Hugo Alberto; Hernández Núñez, Éufrates; Olán, Francisco

    2016-07-15

    Dyslipidaemia is a common comorbidity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Fifty-one patients were included. Variables associated with the disease and the drugs used were recorded. Atherogenic risk was calculated. Chi square was used for categorical variables. ANOVA was performed and a logistic regression model to determine the association of the variables with the presence of dyslipidaemia. A percentage of 68.6 had dyslipidaemia. A significant difference between the presence of dyslipidaemia and activity index measured by SLEDAI was found, the presence of lupus nephritis, use of prednisone≥20mg/day, evolution of the diseasesystemic lupus erythematosus have a high prevalence of dyslipidaemia and a high atherogenic rate, which increases cardiovascular risk significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, A.G.; Boyer, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ischemic neurologic events and neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 70% of patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The CT and MR findings in adults with central nervous system (CNS) SLE have been described, but to the authors' knowledge no pediatric series has been reported. The MR and CT findings in four children with CNS SLE are compared with those reported in adults. Large infarcts are less frequent in children than in adults with CNS SLE, while multiple small infarctions and white matter lesions are more common. These findings in children who have no obvious source of emboli, intracardiac shunt, or history of trauma should raise the suspicion of SLE

  7. Gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, M; Edrees, A; Okasha, H; El Ashmaui, A; Ragab, G

    2016-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem involvement, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. There is a significant variation in the clinical presentation and severity of GI disorders. When GI symptoms present as the initial manifestation of SLE, there is likely to be a delay in the diagnosis. The cause of these GI manifestations in SLE may be the disease, or the side effects of medications, or infections. In this study we investigated the GI manifestations in a group of SLE patients. Our study was conducted on 40 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls to assess the prevalence of GI symptoms in SLE patients. The prevalence of gastrointestinal manifestations in our study was 42.5%. GI manifestations in our SLE patients were: acute abdominal pain (due to pleurisy and peritonitis), 6%; diffuse abdominal pain, 23.5%; epigastric pain, 29%; epigastric pain with vomiting, 23.5%; epigastric pain with chronic constipation, 6%; chronic constipation, 6%; and diffuse abdominal pain with bleeding per rectum, 6%. In our study, we found a higher incidence of Giardia infestation in SLE patients than in healthy controls, and 10% of these patients were asymptomatic. There was more Giardia infestation in patients with GI symptoms as compared with patients with no GI symptoms, with a P value of 0.009. In our study SLE patients with GI symptoms had a peak systolic velocity (cm/s) with a mean of 108.4 ± 32.1 standard deviation (SD) in the celiac Doppler study. Patients without GI symptoms had a peak systolic velocity with a mean of 111.9 ± 37.7 SD, meaning that our patients mostly had no evidence of celiac trunk stenosis, but there was significant difference between SLE patients without GI symptoms and controls, as the mean was higher in SLE patients than in the controls. Also, the celiac end diastolic velocity was higher in both groups of SLE patients with GI symptoms and those without GI symptoms, compared to controls.

  8. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATUSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navalgunda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is one of the common autoimmune diseases seen in young patients, predominantly affecting females. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this prospective study is to determine ocular presentations in SLE METHODS: In this descriptive, prospective, observational, cross sectional study, all patients who presented to the department of dermatology during this study period of 12 months from January 2010 - December 2010 in Belgaum Institute of Medical Sciences were included . RESULTS: Total number of females in the present study was 19(74%, males in the study was 6 (26%. Mean age of the patients was 26.2 ± 2.8 (SD years, maximum age being 36 years and minimum age being 20 years, number of patients in the age group 20 - 25 years was 14 (56%, 26 - 30 years was 6 (24%, 30 - 35 years was 3 (12%, number of patients in 36 - 40 years was 2 (8% Maximum number of patients was in their middle age between 20 - 25 years. Ocular symptoms in present study scelritis was seen in 8(32% patients, episcelritis was seen i n 10(40% patients, conjunctivitis was seen in 5(20% patients, ANA - positive was seen in 20 (80% patients, episcelritis was seen in maximum number of patients i.e. 10 (40%. Distribution of ocular symptoms in present study between two eyes, scelritis was seen in 6(75% in right eye, was seen in 2(25% in left eye, scelritis was seen in 7(70% in right eye, was seen in 3(30% in left eye, conjunctivitis was seen in scelritis was seen in 2 (40% in right eye, was seen in 3(60% in left eye. Ocular symptoms a nd sex distribution, scelritis was seen in 6 (31.57% patients in females, Episcelritis was seen in 8(42.10% females, Conjunctivitis was seen in 5(26.31% males, and ANA positivity was seen in 18 (72% females. Scelritis was seen in 2 (33.33% patients in males, Episcelritis was seen in 2 (33.33% males, Conjunctivitis was not seen in males, and ANA positivity was seen in 2 (8% males. P value of all ocular symptoms is insignificant. P

  9. [Detection of lupus anticoagulants in the routine blood coagulation laboratory exemplified by 36 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbmayer, W M; Haushofer, A; Schratzberger, W; Petera, P; Duschet, P; Fischer, M

    1993-07-15

    36 patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were subjected to various screening and confirmation tests for the presence of lupus anticoagulants (LA) which are a risk for thrombosis. In five out of the 36 patients (14%) lupus anticoagulants could be found. Five out of the 36 patients (14%) showed increased antiphospholipid antibody (APA) levels whereby only two of these patients were at the same time LA-positive. The specificity, sensitivity and effectiveness of various tests in respect of LA-demonstrability have been assessed and the results taken as the basis for proposal of a largely automated stepwise diagnostic procedure for LA-determination within the routine coagulation laboratory.

  10. The serum levels of connective tissue growth factor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F-M; Yu, F; Tan, Y; Liu, G; Zhao, M-H

    2014-06-01

    The expression of connective tissue growth factor mRNA in human kidneys may serve as an early marker for lupus nephritis progression. Therefore, we speculated that connective tissue growth factor may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. In this study, we set out to investigate the associations between serum connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. Serum samples from patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus, renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis and healthy control subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum connective tissue growth factor levels. The associations between connective tissue growth factor levels and clinicopathological features of the patients were further analysed. The levels of serum connective tissue growth factor in patients with non-renal systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis were both significantly higher than those in the normal control group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 22.8 ± 3.0 ng/ml, plupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis group (34.14 ± 12.17 ng/ml vs. 44.1 ± 46.8 ng/ml, p = 0.183). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were significantly higher in lupus nephritis patients with the following clinical manifestations, including anaemia (51.3 ± 51.4 ng/ml vs. 23.4 ± 9.7 ng/ml, plupus nephritis (63.3 ± 63.4 ng/ml vs. 38.3 ± 37.9 ng/ml, p = 0.035, respectively). Serum connective tissue growth factor levels were negatively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.46, plupus nephritis (plupus and correlated with chronic renal interstitial injury and doubling of serum creatinine in patients with lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Health-related quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: development and validation of a lupus specific symptom checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Schreurs, K. M. G.; de Glas-Vos, J. W.; Hagen, E. C.; van den Wall Bake, A. W. L.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; van den Hoogen, F. H. J.; Bijl, M.; van Houwelingen, J. C.; Snoek, F. J.; Berden, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable and sensitive measures are needed to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No lupus specific questionnaires are available. This study describes the development and validation of a disease-specific questionnaire for lupus patients, which

  12. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small n...

  13. Calcinosis cutis universalis – a rare manifestation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcinosis cutis (or skin and subcutaneous calcification) is a feature of a variety of rheumatic conditions (most commonly dermatomyositis and scleroderma), but is rarely reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE ). When calcinosis cutis does occur in patients with SLE, it tends to be localised (circumscripta) rather than ...

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus: 2 case reports from Eritrea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, but is probably of multi-factorial origin, including a variable genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the disease. It is much common among certain races including population groups including Africans,.

  15. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-01-01

    of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from...

  16. Paraoxonase 1 activity and genotyping in systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by an enhanced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Human serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an antioxidant enzyme closely associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL), has been implicated in the prevention of low density ...

  17. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langefeld, Carl D.; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Graham, Deborah S. Cunninghame; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Howard, Timothy D.; Ramos, Paula S.; Croker, Jennifer A.; Morris, David L.; Sandling, Johanna K.; Almlof, Jonas Carlsson; Acevedo-Vasquez, Eduardo M.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Babini, Alejandra M.; Baca, Vicente; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; Bijl, Marc; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Catoggio, Luis; Cervera, Ricard; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M.; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Da Silva, Berta Martins; de la Rua Figueroa, Inigo; Doria, Andrea; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Endreffy, Emoke; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Fortin, Paul R.; Freedman, Barry I.; Frostegard, Johan; Garcia, Mercedes A.; Garcia de la Torre, Ignacio; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Guthridge, Joel M.; Huggins, Jennifer L.; James, Judith A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Karp, David R.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Laustrup, Helle; Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Li, Quan-Zhen; Maradiaga-Cecena, Marco A.; Martin, Javier; McCune, Joseph M.; McWilliams, David R.; Merrill, Joan T.; Miranda, Pedro; Moctezuma, Jose F.; Nath, Swapan K.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Orozco, Lorena; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Petri, Michelle; Pineau, Christian A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Pope, Janet; Raj, Prithvi; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Russell, Laurie P.; Sabio, Jose M.; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Scorza, Raffaella; Seldin, Michael F.; Sjowall, Christopher; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Thompson, Susan D.; Toloza, Sergio M. A.; Truedsson, Lennart; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Vila, Luis M.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael H.; Wither, Joan E.; Bhangale, Tushar; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Rioux, John D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Ronnblom, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Tsao, Betty P.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Silverman, Earl D.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Harley, John B.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Graham, Robert R.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify 58

  18. Transancestral mapping and genetic load in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langefeld, Carl D; Ainsworth, Hannah C; Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with marked gender and ethnic disparities. We report a large transancestral association study of SLE using Immunochip genotype data from 27,574 individuals of European (EA), African (AA) and Hispanic Amerindian (HA) ancestry. We identify...

  19. Case Report: An atypical case of systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease that can be a diagnostic conundrum. Case report: We describe a patient who presented with recurrent fleeting exudative and hemorrhagic pleural effusion. It took multiple visits over 3 months and renal biopsy to con rm the diagnosis of SLE.

  20. Crusted scabies in a chid with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurimar C.F. Wanke

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available A child with systemic lupus erythematosus who has been treated with prednisone for three years, developed crusted scabies. Scrapings from lesions revealed Sarcoptes scabiei adult mites mad eggs. The patient died with septicemia and renal failure soon after starting topical 20% sulfur. A marked improvement was observed in the cutaneous lesions.

  1. Psychiatric symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus: an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wekking, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one studies on the prevalence and type of psychiatric symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are reviewed and evaluated. Substantial differences in prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in SLE-patients (from 17%-71%) have been reported. Of the investigated methodological aspects,

  2. Influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus : Safe and protective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Bert; Huckriede, Anke; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show decreased immune responsiveness and are vulnerable for infectious diseases, due to the underlying disease and the frequent use of immunosuppressive drugs. Influenza has a high incidence in the population and is associated with increased morbidity

  3. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patien...... generation of MPs may partake in the pathology of SLE and that new diagnostic, monitoring, and treatment strategies targeting these processes may be advantageous....

  4. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngou J. Graafland H, Segondy M. Antibodies against polypeptides of purified. Epstein-Barr virus in sera grown from patients with connective tissue diseases'. J Autoimmun 1992; 5: 243-249. 4. Stancek D, Rovensky J. Enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus antibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  5. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  6. Amyloïdosis, sarcoidosis and systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of renal and multiple organ Amyloïdosis is currently considered exceptional in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a case of a concomitant SLE and Amyloïdosis in a 57 year old female patient with hypothyroidism history, who presented with erythema nodosum, fever, arthralgia and sicca ...

  7. Reversible blindness in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropsychiatric manifestations can occur in majority of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). We describe a patient who presented with acute onset binocular visual loss and was found to have inflammation of optic chiasma on imaging. The patient was treated with immunosuppression. She responded ...

  8. Treat-to-target in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Marta; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    on May 8, 2012 to discuss whether a treat-to-target approach could be applied in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (T2T/SLE), define a research agenda, and establish a plan for moving forward. In the present paper, observations raised at the meeting and literature data on potential...

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus in a black South African child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly described among black children in Africa despite being more frequent among some black adult populations than their white counterparts. The first black South African child with SLE is documented. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who had fever, facial rash (with complement ...

  10. Renal Tubular Function in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus | Jessop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal function is commonly assessed by measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, defects in tubular function may still exist in the presence of a normal GFR. In 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 6 of whom had previously been shown to have renal impairment, glomerular and tubular ...

  11. Pattern of systemic Lupus erythematosus in Egyptian patients: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) afflicts young people disproportionately, often at a crucial time in their lives when they are trying to establish relationships, start families and launch careers. As a result, persons with SLE may experience a wide range of physical and psychosocial problems that are not ...

  12. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcomes for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have improved during the last two decades as our understanding of the disease expands. In particular, the importance of antimalarial therapy for addressing and preventing a host of complications in SLE has emerged. Furthermore, evidence is mounting that ...

  13. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in HIV seropositive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Viral agents especially retroviruses play either an aetiologic or contributory role in autoimmune diseases. Aim: To determine the rate of occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in already confirmed HIV positive individuals. Methods: Subjects comprised of already diagnosed patients with HIV and ...

  14. a possible biomarker of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease; different cytokines play a role in the immunopathogenesis of SLE. IL-27 has both immunosuppressive and pro-inflammatory roles and its role is unclear in SLE. Objectives: To measure serum interleukin (IL)-27 among a group of patients ...

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus South African child a black

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-19

    Jan 19, 1991 ... Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly described among black children in Africa despite being more frequent among some black adult populations than their white counter- parts. The first black South African child with SLE is docu- mented. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who had fever, facial rash ...

  16. Systemic lupus Erythematosus: 2 case reports from Eritrea | Zerai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder, occurring predominantly in women during reproductive age and characterized by the presence of antibodies in the serum against the nuclear components (ANA), leading to inflammation in kidney, brain, and skin manifestations. The diversity of the disease the ...

  17. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in HIV seropositive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Viral agents especially retroviruses play either an aetiologic or contributory role in autoimmune diseases. Aim: To determine the rate of occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in already confirmed HIV positive individuals. Methods: Subjects comprised of already diagnosed patients with HIV ...

  18. Lack of recording of systemic lupus erythematosus in the death certificates of lupus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Alén, J; Alarcón, G S; Campbell, R; Fernández, M; Reveille, J D; Cooper, G S

    2005-09-01

    To determine to what extent the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in deceased lupus patients is under-reported in death certificates, and the patient characteristics associated with such an occurrence. The death certificates of 76 of the 81 deceased SLE patients from two US lupus cohorts (LUMINA for Lupus in Minorities: Nature vs Nurture and CLU for Carolina Lupus Study), including 570 and 265 patients, respectively, were obtained from the Offices of Vital Statistics of the states where the patients died (Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas). Both cohorts included patients with SLE as per the American College of Rheumatology criteria, aged > or =16 yr, and disease duration at enrolment of < or =5 yr. The median duration of follow-up in each cohort at the time of these analyses ranged from 38.1 to 53.0 months. Standard univariable analyses were performed comparing patients with SLE recorded anywhere in the death certificate and those without it. A multivariable logistic regression model was performed to identify the variables independently associated with not recording SLE in death certificates. In 30 (40%) death certificates, SLE was not recorded anywhere in the death certificate. In univariable analyses, older age was associated with lack of recording of SLE in death certificates [mean age (standard deviation) 50.9 (15.6) years and 39.1 (18.6) yr among those for whom SLE was omitted and included on the death certificates, respectively, P = 0.005]. Patients without health insurance, those dying of a cardiovascular event and those of Caucasian ethnicity were also more likely to be in the non-recorded group. In the multivariable analysis, variables independently associated with not recording SLE as cause of death were older age [odds ratio = (95% confidence interval) 1.043 (1.005-1.083 per yr increase); P = 0.023] and lack of health insurance [4.649 (1.152-18.768); P = 0.031]. A high proportion of SLE diagnoses are not

  19. Organ involvement other than lupus nephritis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, J L; Holland, M J; Brunner, H I

    2016-07-01

    In this review we critically analyze pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiac manifestations of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE). Clinical manifestations of these organ systems may be the initial manifestation of cSLE; frequently occur with very active cSLE; and are potential life-threatening manifestations often presenting to the emergency department and requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Early recognition and treatment of the pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiac manifestations of cSLE will result in improved prognosis and better outcomes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Echocardiographic evaluation of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, S.; Malik, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac disease occurs in various forms and is a common cause of death in systemic lupus erythematosus. The objective was to detect cardiac abnormalities by transthoracic echocardiography and determine their association in SLE patients. We conducted a transthoracic echocardiographic study in 48 inpatients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical and serological evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of lupus was done in all patients. There were 44 women (91.6%) and 4 men with a mean age of 26 years. Anti ds DNA was positive in 34 patients (68.75%). Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormality in 28 patients (58.33%). Of these, 16 patients (57%) had pericardial involvement with variable amount of effusion. Twelve patients (43%) had some valvular involvement and some degree of myocardial systolic dysfunction was found in 12 patients (43%). Only 4 patients (14%) had all three abnormalities. Anti ds DNA was positive in 71% of patients with cardiac abnormalities. Cardiac involvement is common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Serological abnormalities had an association with cardiac abnormalities, and were found to be more prevalent in young patients. (author)

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  3. The lupus impact tracker is responsive to changes in clinical activity measured by the systemic lupus erythematosus responder index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilliers, H; Bonithon-Kopp, C; Jolly, M

    2017-04-01

    Objective The lupus impact tracker (LIT) is a 10-item patient reported outcome tool to measure the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus or its treatment on patients' daily lives. Herein, we describe the responsiveness of the LIT and LupusQoL to changes in disease activity, using the systemic lupus erythematosus responder index (SRI). Methods A total of 325 adult systemic lupus erythematosus patients were enrolled in an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study, conducted across the USA and Canada. Data (demographics, LIT, LupusQoL, BILAG, SELENA-SLEDAI) were obtained three months apart. Modified SRI was defined as: a decrease in SELENA-SLEDAI (4 points); no new BILAG A, and no greater than one new BILAG B; and no increase in the physician global assessment. Standardised response mean and effect size for LIT and LupusQoL domains were calculated among SRI responders and non-responders. Wilcoxon's test was used to compare the LIT and LupusQoL variation by SRI responder status. Results Of the participants 90% were women, 53% were white, 33% were of African descendant and 17% were Hispanic. Mean (SD) age and SELENA-SLEDAI at baseline were 42.3 (16.2) years and 4.3 (3.8), respectively. Mean (SD) LIT score at baseline was 39.4 (22.9). LIT standardised response mean (effect size) among SRI responders and non-responders were -0.69 (-0.36) and -0.20 (-0.12), respectively ( P = 0.02). For LupusQoL, two domains were responsive to SRI: standardised response mean (effect size) for physical health and pain domains were 0.42 (0.23) and 0.65 (0.44), respectively. Conclusions LIT is moderately responsive to SRI in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Inclusion of this tool in clinical care and clinical trials may provide further insights into its responsiveness. This is the first systemic lupus erythematosus patient reported outcome tool to be evaluated against composite responder index (SRI) used in clinical trials.

  4. DEPRESSION--A FELLOW TRAVELER WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Doina-Clementina; Costin, Melania; Bădeanu, Lucia Elena; Negru, R D; Aursulesei, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem inflammatory disorder that occurs primarily in women of childbearing age, immunologic abnormalities being a prominent feature of the disease. Psychiatric disorders frequently coexist, depression being the most common mood disorder in neuropsychiatric lupus. This literature review was performed through searching MEDLINE database for full-text English-language articles--original research, systematic review and updates published in the last five years (2010-2015), using the keywords "depression and systemic lupus erythematosus". The main outcomes identified were prevalence and predictors of depression in various cultural and ethnic groups, depression-related clinical issues (suicidal ideation, cognitive impairment, altered body image, sleep and sexual disturbances, influence of SLE treatment), and influence on quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the polymorphism and individual variability of the SLE clinical manifestations helps to improve early detection of depression, which is responsible for the increased risk of comorbidities, suicidal attempts, decreased treatment adherence, and impaired quality of life. Physicians across all specialties involved in the care for lupus patients should be aware of the major prevalence of this condition, while helping patients to cope with their disabling disease.

  5. [A case of systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with psoriasis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidara, Kumi; Soejima, Makoto; Shiseki, Mariko; Ohta, Syuji; Nishinarita, Makoto

    2003-12-01

    A 49-years-old female admitted to our hospital because of skin eruptions on the extremities in 1985. She had suffered from polyarthralgia, skin eruptions since 1983. Physical examinations revealed discoid lesion, central nervous system involvement, and polyarthritis. Laboratory tests revealed leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Antinuclear antibody, ant-DNA antibody, LE test were positive. From these findings, she was diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She developed lupus peritonitis in 1990 and 1994, which was successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy. Since then, the activity of SLE was in good control under administration of prednisolone 10 mg/day. Chilblain lupus was seen from 1993, Raynaud's phenomenon from 1996, and she further developed subcutaneous induration on her chest, back and upper extremities in 1999. Skin biopsy findings were compatible with lupus panniculitis. In 2002, erythematous patches with scales were observed on her right hand and left knee, and these skin lesions were histologically diagnosed as psoriasis vulgaris. An autoimmune response similar to SLE is speculated in psoriasis. We describe a rare case of SLE with various skin lesions including psoriasis vulgaris.

  6. Lupus eritematoso sistêmico associado a miastenia gravis: relato de caso Systemic lupus erythematosus and myasthenia gravis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIO F. DE CARVALHO

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma mulher branca de 24 anos de idade admitida com lupus eritematoso sistêmico (com 4 anos de evolução de doença e início recente de miastenia gravis. São discutidos os principais diagnósticos diferenciais para a fraqueza muscular e a fadiga apresentadas por esta paciente. Uma revisão de literatura abordando a associação de miastenia gravis e lupus eritematoso é feita, com ênfase às características clínicas desses pacientes e ao papel do timoma e timectomia no desenvolvimento de lupus eritematoso em pacientes previamente miastênicos.We report the case of a 24-year-old white woman admitted with a four year diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and the recent onset of myasthenia gravis discussing the main differential diagnosis of weakness and fatigue in this patient. A review of literature approaching the association of myasthenia gravis and systemic lupus erythematosus is also done with emphasis on the clinical characteristics of these patients and the role of thymoma and thymectomy in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus in myasthenic patients.

  7. Flares of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy and the puerperium: prevention, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojan, George; Baer, Alan N

    2012-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects women in their reproductive age years. Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus now has favorable outcomes for the majority of women. However, flares of disease activity, preeclampsia, fetal loss, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm birth are established risks of such pregnancies. Active lupus nephritis at the time of conception poses the greatest risk for disease flares and poor obstetric outcomes. Patients should delay conception until their lupus has been in remission for at least 6 months. In addition, certain lupus medications are potentially teratogenic and need to be stopped before conception. The signs and symptoms of a lupus flare may mimic those of normal pregnancy, impeding its recognition during pregnancy. Hydroxychloroquine, low-dose prednisone, pulse intravenous methylprednisolone and azathioprine are commonly used to treat lupus flares during pregnancy.

  8. HPV and systemic lupus erythematosus: a mosaic of potential crossreactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Yahel; Dahan, Shani; Calabrò, Michele; Kanduc, Darja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-04-01

    Etiology, pathogenesis, and immunology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) form a complex, still undeciphered picture that recently has been further made complicated by a new factor of morbidity: human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Indeed, a prevalence of HPV infections has been reported among SLE patients. Searching for molecular mechanisms that might underlie and explain the relationship between HPV infection and SLE, we explored the hypothesis that immune responses following HPV infection may crossreact with proteins that, when altered, associate with SLE. Analyzing HPV L1 proteins and using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human retrovirus (HERV) as controls, we found a vast peptide overlap with human proteins comprehending lupus Ku autoantigen proteins p86 and p70, lupus brain antigen 1 homolog, lupus antigen expressed in neurons and muscles, natural killer cell IgG-like receptors, complement proteins C4-A and C4-B, complement receptor CD19, and others. The multitude and heterogeneity of peptide overlaps not only further support the hypothesis that crossreactivity can represent a primum movens in SLE onset, but also provide a molecular framework to the concept of SLE as "an autoimmune mosaic syndrome." Finally, once more, it emerges the need of using the principle of peptide uniqueness as a new paradigm for safe and efficacious vaccinology.

  9. Quality of Life in Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Yanih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE was keep growing. SLE attacked many women and developed between the age of 15-45. The treatment which used by patient with SLE just for reduced or faded the symptoms that occurred. It couldn’t heals the patient properly yet, so that sometimes that symptoms would occur again. The object of this study were to see the quality of life from 13 patient SLE in 8 domain from Quality of Life (QoL such as physical health, emotional health, body image, pain, planning, fatigue intimate relationship and burden to others. This study was a study case in 13 patient with SLE which lived in Surabaya and a member of Lupus Indonesia Foundation branch Surabaya. Primary data were collected by interview using LupusQoL questionnaire and the weight was measured by digital weight scales. In this study, there were 13 woman patient with SLE in the age between 15–40 years old with highly educated and having normal nutrition status. They usually work and having monthly income > Rp 1,740,000, were suffer SLE for more than 5 years and having good knowledge in Lupus and SLE. This study showed a good value quality of life in patient with SLE at 3 domain. That were body image, intimate relationship and physical health domain. Some patients had a bad even worse quality in pain, fatigue and burden to others domain. Some of patients with SLE had a good quality of life except pain, fatigue, and burden to others domain. Keywords: Quality of Life (QoL, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, desease duration

  10. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  11. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Perlemuter, G; Chaussade, S; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Dapoigny, M; Kahan, A; Godeau, P; Couturier, D

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aims—Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) reflects a dysfunction of the visceral smooth muscle or the enteric nervous system. Gastrointestinal manifestations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but CIPO has not been reported. Features of CIPO are reported in five patients with SLE. 
Methods—From 1988 to 1993, five patients with SLE or SLE-like syndrome were hospitalised for gastrointestinal manometric studies. CIPO was the onset feature in ...

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus and extreme thrombocytosis without autosplenectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Austin Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by multiorgan system involvement. Hematologic manifestations are common in SLE and include thrombocytopenia in as many as 50% of patients. Thrombocytosis is much less common in SLE, occurring in less than 5% of patients, and is typically reported in association with autosplenectomy. The following case report describes a 35-year-old female patient who presented for evaluation with extreme thrombocytosis of unclear etiol...

  13. The rate of and risk factors for frequent hospitalization in systemic lupus erythematosus: results from the Korean lupus network registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Park, D J; Kang, J H; Choi, S E; Yim, Y R; Kim, J E; Lee, K E; Wen, L; Kim, T J; Park, Y W; Sung, Y K; Lee, S S

    2016-11-01

    Objectives The survival rate of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus has improved in the last few decades, but the rate of hospitalization and health care costs for these patients remain higher than in the general population. Thus, we evaluated the rate of hospitalization and associated risk factors in an inception cohort of Korean patients with lupus. Methods Of the 507 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus enrolled in the KORean lupus NETwork, we investigated an inception cohort consisting of 196 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presenting within 6 months of diagnosis based on the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. We evaluated the causes of hospitalization, demographic characteristics, and laboratory and clinical data at the time of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis of hospitalized patients and during a follow-up period. We calculated the hospitalization rate as the number of total hospitalizations divided by the disease duration, and defined "frequent hospitalization" as hospitalization more than once per year. Results Of the 196 patients, 117 (59.6%) were admitted to hospital a total of 257 times during the 8-year follow-up period. Moreover, 22 (11.2%) patients were hospitalized frequently. The most common reasons for hospitalization included disease flares, infection, and pregnancy-related morbidity. In the univariate regression analysis, malar rash, arthritis, pericarditis, renal involvement, fever, systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index > 12, hemoglobin level risk factors for frequent hospitalization. Conclusions Our results showed that frequent hospitalization occurred in 11.2% of hospitalized patients and arthritis, pericarditis, and anti-Sjögren's syndrome A antibody positivity at the time of diagnosis were risk factors for frequent hospitalization.

  14. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozaffarian N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neelufar Mozaffarian,1 Steve Lobosco,2 Peng Lu,3 Adam Roughley,2 Gabriela Alperovich4 1Clinical Development, AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, USA; 2Adelphi Real World Ltd., Macclesfield, UK; 3Clinical Development, AbbVie Inc., Worcester, MA, USA; 4Global Medical Affairs Immunology, AbbVie Inc., Madrid, Spain Purpose: Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods: Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE or lupus nephritis (LN. Results: Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168 and 73.8% (152/206 of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99 with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113 with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7% on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445 for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4% on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695 for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied were more likely to have

  15. A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: A 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic immunological disease causing a significant morbidity and mortality in younger women and involving several organs and systems, most often the kidneys, being consequently the incidence of lupus nephritis (LN about 60%. Case report. We reported a 57 year-old patient with the diagnosed SLE in 1995. Pathohistological analysis of kidney biopsy revealed LN type V. The patient was treated with corticosteroid pulses and azathioprine during one year. A remission was achieved and maintained with prednisone, 15 mg daily. Nephrotic relapse was diagnosed in 2006 and the second kidney biopsy revealed recent kidney infarction due to extensive vasculitis. Soon, a cerebrovascul insult developed and CT-scan revealed endocranial infarctus. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide pulses (totally VI monthly pulses, and also with low-molecular heparine, anticoagulants and salicylates because of the right leg phlebothrombosis. After the pulses, the patient was adviced to take prednisone 20 mg daily and azothioprine 100 mg daily, and 6 months later mycophenolate mofetil because of persistent active serological immunological findings (ANA 1 : 320 and nephrotic syndrome. Mycophenolate mofetil was efficient in inducing and maintaining remission of nephrotic syndrome. Conclusion. The aim of LN treatment is to achieve and maintain remission, improve patients’ outcome, reduce the toxicity of immunosuppressive drugs and the incidence of relapses. Mycophenolate mofetil was shown to be efficient in inducing and maintaining remission of nephrotic syndrome in the frame of LN.

  16. Cognitive functions and autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Anna Bogaczewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoantibodies may occur in the course of various diseases. In the case of systemic lupus erythematosus the presence of specific autoantibodies is included in the classification criteria of the disease. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the presence of the serologic markers of systemic lupus erythematosus, i.e. anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies of the class IgM and IgG are linked with the results of neuropsychological tests evaluating selected cognitive functions in patients without overt neuropsychiatric lupus and without antiphospholipid syndrome. Material and methods: The study included 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. For the assessment of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies the immunoenzymatic method was used. For neuropsychological estimation of the selected cognitive functions the attention switching test and the choice reaction time were applied, in which the results are expressed as the average delay i.e. mean correct latency, using the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB. Results: The results of attention switching test in patients with anti-Sm antibodies were lower, but not significantly different from those obtained by the patients without such antibodies: 75.0 (73.12–88.12 vs. 92.5 (85–95. Choice reaction time was significantly longer in patients with anti-Sm antibodies in comparison to the patients without antiSm antibodies: 614.9 (520.6–740.8 vs. 476.7 (396.6–540 (p = 0.01. No significant difference was demonstrated in the results of attention switching test and choice reaction time with regard to the presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies. The results of attention switching test and choice reaction time were not different between the groups of patients with and without anticardiolipin antibodies in the IgM and IgG class. Conclusions: Anti-Sm antibodies seem to contribute to

  17. Toxocara canis infection: Unusual trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michaël; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Baudouin, Véronique; Guillem, Colette; Peuchmaur, Michel; Deschênes, Georges; Fila, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Infection by Toxocara canis can cause systemic vasculitis. We report here a unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) triggered by T. canis infection. An 8-year-old girl was treated with albendazole therapy for common toxocariasis, but she developed two weeks later, asthenia, fever, infiltrated maculopapular eruption of the face, peripheral vascular disease with necrosis of the fingers and inflammatory anemia with proteinuria. Anti-nuclear, anti-DNA and anti-Sm antibodies positivity, together with minimal change nephritis with mesangial exclusive IgM deposit on renal biopsy and clinical relapse after initially successful steroid therapy, led to the diagnosis of SLE. T. canis infection can trigger systemic lupus but must also be ruled out of the differential diagnosis given its association with autoimmunity. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. [Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (2nd part). Diagnostic and treatment tools in psychiatric or central nervous system manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, G; Zéphir, H; Michelin, E; Semah, F; Warembourg, F; Pruvo, J-P; Hachulla, E; Lenfant, P; Dubucquoi, S; Vermersch, P; Hatron, P-Y; Prin, L; Launay, D

    2012-09-01

    Neurological and psychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus are a heterogeneous set of clinical manifestations grouped under the term of "neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus". The classification of these manifestations published in 1999 has harmonized the definitions cases used in the studies but did not help the clinician to positively identify a specific manifestation of lupus or a neurological or psychiatric event occurred independently of the disease. Published cases series help us to identify neurological or psychiatric manifestations of lupus but modern diagnosis tools contribution have to be evaluated in order to optimize diagnosis management of such manifestations and to distinguish specific events related to lupus and independent manifestations. In this second part of our literature review about neuropsychiatric lupus, we propose to identify arguments, which could be in favor of lupus responsibility in front of a neurological or psychiatric event, and immunosuppressive treatments which are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Interleukin-27 and interleukin-23 in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: possible role in lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L P; Li, B F; Shen, H; Lu, J

    2015-05-01

    To analyse the concentration of interleukin (IL)-27 and IL-23 in serum and urine of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with healthy controls (HC). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyse the serum and urine concentration of IL-27 and IL-23 from 50 patients with lupus nephritis (LN), 55 patients without LN, and 30 HC. The correlations between the levels of IL-27, IL-23, and disease activity, clinical parameters in SLE patients were analysed. The levels of IL-27 and IL-23 increased significantly in the serum and urine of SLE patients with and without LN compared with HC. Moreover, urine levels of IL-27 and IL-23 were correlated with the renal SLE Disease Activity Index (rSLEDAI) score and 24-h urinary protein levels. After 6 months of immunosuppressive treatment, urine IL-27 expression rose significantly in SLE patients with LN. IL-27 and IL-23 may be involved in the pathogenesis of LN.

  20. Effect of Autoantibodies to Erythropoietin Receptor in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Biopsy-proven Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Akinori; Furuichi, Kengo; Yamahana, Junya; Yasuda, Haruka; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Shimizu, Miho; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We examined the clinical significance of autoantibodies to the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who had biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN). Forty-six Japanese patients with SLE with LN who had undergone renal biopsy during 1993-2014 were enrolled in this study and followed for a mean of 83 months. Sera from those patients were screened for anti-EPOR antibodies using ELISA. Anti-EPOR antibodies were detected in 18 (39%) of the 46 patients with SLE with anemia. Anti-EPOR antibodies were associated with low hemoglobin concentrations and reticulocytopenia. In addition, anti-EPOR antibodies were positively correlated with SLE disease activity, even though serum levels of the complement factors 3 and 4 did not differ between the 2 groups. In patients with International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 class IV LN, anti-EPOR antibodies were associated with active lesions including cellular crescents in glomeruli. Decrease in renal function was more frequently observed in patients without complete or partial renal response than in patients with it, and serum levels of the antibodies as well as renal response to treatment were significant risk factors for progression of renal dysfunction. The present study suggests that anti-EPOR antibodies might be involved in overall disease activity and active renal lesions, as well as in the impaired erythropoiesis in patients with SLE with LN. Further, the levels of anti-EPOR antibodies may be an additional predictor for renal injury.

  1. Dickkopf-1 Is a Biomarker for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Active Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jing; Yang, Jiali; Yang, Lijuan; Zhou, Shaolan; Ji, Chen; Wang, Xuemei; Yu, Nan; Liu, Xiaoming; Chi, Shuhong

    2017-01-01

    An early diagnosis of lupus nephritis (LN) has an important clinical implication in guiding treatments of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in clinical settings. In this study, the concentrations of Wnt-3A, Frizzled-8 (FZD-8), and Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) of Wnt signaling, as well as their diagnostic values for accessing LN, were evaluated by ELISA in sera and urine of 111 SLE patients (31 with LN and 80 without LN) and 70 healthy cohorts. Significantly more abundances of DKK-1 protein were determined in both of sera and urine of SLE patients compared to healthy cohorts ( p < 0.0001); in particular the serum DKK-1 concentration was even higher in LN-SLE patients relative to non-LN SLE subjects ( p < 0.0001). Intriguingly, concentrations of above examined proteins in SLE patients showed no correlation between serum and urine. Moreover, a combination of DKK-1 with anti-dsDNA and/or levels of complement C3 and C4 could not increase the specificity and/or sensitivity for identification of patients with LN diseases, but both ROC curve and multiple-factor nonconditional logistic regression analysis showed that serum DKK-1 was considered better positive biomarker for identification of LN in SLE patients. These results imply that serum and/or urine DKK-1 may be a valuable and independent biomarker for identification of SLE patients with LN.

  2. Differential activation mechanisms of serum C5a in lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yuko; Nagai, Tatsuo; Yoshio, Taku; Hirohata, Shunsei

    2017-03-01

    To explore the role of C5a in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) and lupus nephritis (LN). Sera were obtained from 29 patients with NPSLE, 25 with LN, 26 without NPSLE or LN [SLE alone], and 21 healthy donors. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained from 29 NPSLE patients. C5a and C5 were measured by ELISA. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) function was evaluated by Q albumin ([CSF albumin/serum albumin] × 10 3 ). Serum C5a, but not C5, was significantly increased in SLE compared with healthy control. Serum C5a, but not C5, was significantly higher in NPSLE and in LN than in SLE alone. Serum C4, but not C3, was lower in LN than in NPSLE. Q albumin was significantly higher in diffuse NPSLE than in focal NPSLE, whereas there were no significant differences in CSF or serum C5a between both groups. Notably, CSF C5 and C5a were significantly correlated with Q albumin, whereas serum C5a, but not C5, appeared to be inversely correlated with Q albumin. These results disclosed that serum C5a was elevated not only in NPSLE but also in LN through different mechanisms. Moreover, it is suggested that C5a might be consumed during BBB damages.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by intestinal vasculitis and pneumatosis intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinello, Débora Karine; Rafael, Daniane; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; Dominoni, Robson Luiz

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are not uncommon. Non specific symptoms are often observed, such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. On the other hand, pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, which is characterized by multiple gas-filled cysts located throughout the intestinal wall, is a rare condition in SLE. We describe a case of a 20-year-old man who was admitted with fever, weight loss, headache and arthralgia and had a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. During his hospital stay, he developed abdominal symptoms that suggested intestinal vasculitis. The computed tomography of the abdomen showed the double halo sign, or target sign and pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis. The patient presented complete recovery after conservative treatment, with intestinal rest and total parenteral nutrition.

  4. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial advice against pregnancy in the 1950s has been replaced by a common understanding that women with SLE often have successful pregnancy outcomes, and clinicians therefore advise on pregnancy planning, including possible drug adjustments, timing and close surveillance. The recently published Predictors of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from the PROMISSE cohort will hopefully identify serological biomarkers, possibly genes, and in addition, give valuable information about underlying disease mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight CL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Caroline L Knight, Catherine Nelson-Piercy Division of Women’s Health, Women’s Health Academic Centre, King’s College London and King’s Health Partners, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal–neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required, an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus. A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being, but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology follow-up. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling of therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sherwin, Catherine MT; Yu, Tian; Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Brunner, Hermine I; Vinks, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of different types of therapies in treating autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), there is a need to utilize pharmacokinetic (PK) strategies to optimize the clinical outcome of these treatments. Various PK analysis approaches, including population PK modeling and physiologically based PK modeling, have been used to evaluate drug PK characteristics and population variability or to predict drug PK profiles in a mechanistic manner. This review ou...

  7. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Cherag Daruwala; Giancarlo Mercogliano; Thomas P. Harder

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we analyze the effects of systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma on the gastrointestinal tract. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. The purpose of this review is to discuss these manifestations, the appropria...

  8. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherag Daruwala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the effects of systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma on the gastrointestinal tract. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. The purpose of this review is to discuss these manifestations, the appropriate diagnostic tests, and treatment.

  9. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

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    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.; Kajzerman, I.A.; Sinyachenko, O.V.; Dyadyk, A.I.; Nikolenko, Yu.I. (Donetskij Meditsinskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR))

    X-ray examination was carried out in 170 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain parameters of specific immunity were studied in 60 of them, while X-ray data were compared with morphological findings on autopsy in 20 cases. A tendency toward escalation of specific cell and humoral parameters was discovered in pulmonary lesion, predetermined by vasculitis and perivasculitis, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic alterations in the interstitial tissue.

  10. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.; Kajzerman, I.A.; Sinyachenko, O.V.; Dyadyk, A.I.; Nikolenko, Yu.I.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray examination was carried out in 170 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain parameters of specific immunity were studied in 60 of them, while X-ray data were compared with morphological findings on autopsy in 20 cases. A tendency toward escalation of specific cell and humoral parameters was discovered in pulmonary lesion, predetermined by vasculitis and perivasculitis, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic alterations in the interstitial tissue

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with sickle-cell disease: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Maamar, Mouna; Tazi-Mezalek, Zoubida; Harmouche, Hicham; Mounfaloti, Wafaa; Adnaoui, Mohammed; Aouni, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus has been only rarely reported in patients with sickle-cell disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a 23-year-old North-African woman with sickle-cell disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and discuss the pointers to the diagnosis of this combination of conditions and also present a review of literature. The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was delayed because our patient’s symptoms were initially attr...

  12. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Baenas DF

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diego F Baenas,1 Fernando A Diehl,1 María J Haye Salinas,2 Verónica Riva,3 Ana Diller,3 Pablo A Lemos1,4 1Clinical Medicine Department, 2Rheumatology Department, 3Pathology Department, Hospital Privado Universitario de Córdoba Medical Center, 4Instituto Universitario de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universitary Institute, Córdoba, Argentina Abstract: Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease, or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is an infrequent idiopathic disorder. It has been associated with autoimmune disorders, of which systemic lupus erythematosus is the most outstanding. The basis of its diagnosis relies on the histological examination of lymph nodes, which typically reveals necrosis surrounded by histiocytes with crescentic nucleus, immunoblasts and plasma cells, and absence of neutrophils. We report the case of a 27-year-old Argentinian female patient without any relevant past medical history to demonstrate the correlation between Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. Keywords: histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune disorders, febrile syndrome

  13. Paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus: prognostic impact of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, E; Durieu, I; Cochat, P; Vital Durand, D; Ninet, J; Fabien, N; Cimaz, R

    2008-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prognostic impact of aPL in paediatric onset systemic lupus erythematosus (p-SLE). This retrospective study included 56 patients with p-SLE. Chi2-test, Fisher's exact test, incidence rate ratio and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to compare aPL-positive and aPL-negative patients considering the value of SDI (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE) at the end of follow-up, the occurrence of thromboses, organ system involvements and need for immunosuppressive treatment in addition to corticosteroids. Anti-cardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulants were detected in 27 (49%) and 19 (35%) patients, respectively. These aPL were frequently transient or intermittent (10 and 15 cases, respectively), and only rarely persistent over time (five cases). The risk of thrombosis was significantly higher (odds ratio = 6.42) and occurred earlier in the presence of aPL, especially if aPL were persistent (P or = 1. The risk of damage (SDI > or = 1) in aPL-positive patients was three times higher than in aPL-negative patients (P < 0.05). Four of the six fatal cases occurred in the aPL-positive group. The presence of aPL in p-SLE could represent not only a risk factor for thrombosis but also a poor prognostic factor overall.

  14. Fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Majdan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE are at reproductive age. The mean age of SLE onset is 29 years. In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, in pregnant patients with SLE the disease is still active or even may be exacerbated. Pregnancy – preparation for it, its course, and the breastfeeding period – is a major therapeutic and organizational challenge for doctors taking care of patients with SLE. The management of pregnancy and puerperium in a patient with SLE requires close cooperation of doctors of various specialities, including in the first place rheumatologists and obstetricians. In the paper the recommendations are presented concerning preparation for pregnancy, treatment of the underlying disease and complications during pregnancy and the breastfeeding period in SLE patients. Particular attention is paid to the treatment according to the recently published recommendations for patients with lupus nephritis.

  15. Immunosuppression in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Moroni, Gabriella

    2015-05-01

    Most pregnancies are successful in women with systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly if the disease is quiescent and there are no signs of active nephritis. There is no major impact of immunosuppression on maternal outcome. However, high doses of cyclosporine and glucocorticoids are used which may favor development of hypertension or preeclampsia. Some immunosuppressive drugs may exert toxic effects on the fetus. Glucocorticoids may cause small birth weight, and azathioprine and calcineurin inhibitors may be associated with lower birth weight, gestational age and prematurity. Cyclophosphamide may cause fetal malformation when given in the first trimester. Mycophenolate and leflunomide are teratogenic drugs and should be withdrawn before conception in case of programmed pregnancy or should be rapidly discontinued in case of unexpected pregnancy. Option counseling for pregnancy and correct use of immunosuppressive drugs are prerequisites for a successful pregnancy in women with lupus.

  16. Crusted scabies in a chid with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Nurimar C.F. Wanke

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available A child with systemic lupus erythematosus who has been treated with prednisone for three years, developed crusted scabies. Scrapings from lesions revealed Sarcoptes scabiei adult mites mad eggs. The patient died with septicemia and renal failure soon after starting topical 20% sulfur. A marked improvement was observed in the cutaneous lesions.E descrito um caso de sarna crostosa em criança portadora de lupus eritematoso sistêmico em tratamento com prednisona há três anos. O raspado das lesões cutâneas revelou ovos e ácaros adultos de Sarcoptes scabiei. A paciente faleceu por sepsis e insuficiência renal pouco tempo após início da terapêutica tópica com enxofre a 20%. Melhora importante foi observada no quadro dermatológico.

  17. Shrinking lung syndrome complicating pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Natalie S.; Stevens, Anne M.; Iyer, Ramesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) can affect the lungs and pleura, usually manifesting with pleural effusions or diffuse parenchymal disease. A rare manifestation of SLE is shrinking lung syndrome, a severe restrictive respiratory disorder. While pleuropulmonary complications of pediatric SLE are common, shrinking lung syndrome is exceedingly rare in children. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl previously diagnosed with lupus, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion and restrictive pulmonary physiology. Her chest radiographs on presentation demonstrated low lung volumes, and CT showed neither pleural nor parenchymal disease. Fluoroscopy demonstrated poor diaphragmatic excursion. While shrinking lung syndrome is described and studied in adults, there is only sparse reference to shrinking lung syndrome in children. (orig.)

  18. Shrinking lung syndrome complicating pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Natalie S. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Stevens, Anne M. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Iyer, Ramesh S. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) can affect the lungs and pleura, usually manifesting with pleural effusions or diffuse parenchymal disease. A rare manifestation of SLE is shrinking lung syndrome, a severe restrictive respiratory disorder. While pleuropulmonary complications of pediatric SLE are common, shrinking lung syndrome is exceedingly rare in children. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl previously diagnosed with lupus, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion and restrictive pulmonary physiology. Her chest radiographs on presentation demonstrated low lung volumes, and CT showed neither pleural nor parenchymal disease. Fluoroscopy demonstrated poor diaphragmatic excursion. While shrinking lung syndrome is described and studied in adults, there is only sparse reference to shrinking lung syndrome in children. (orig.)

  19. Spontaneous soft tissue haemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Abdulla

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diversity in clinical presentations and complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE make the diagnosis and management challenging. The mechanisms of haemorrhagic manifestations in SLE have not been well elucidated. A 47-year-old woman with no comorbidities was admitted after suffering fatigue and low grade fever for six months. She had bilateral soft tissue haemorrhage over the forearm and intra retinal haemorrhages. She was assessed and diagnosed as having SLE based on positive antinuclear antibody, strongly positive anti double stranded DNA, thrombocytopenia and low C3 and C4 levels. We describe a case of spontaneous bilateral soft tissue haemorrhage in SLE and discuss the various mechanisms causing bleeding in lupus.

  20. Genetically engineered biological agents in therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Aleksandrovna Aseeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease. Its prevalence is 20 to 70 cases per 100,000 women and varies by race and ethnicity. Despite considerable progress in traditional therapy, many problems associated with the management of these patients need to be immediately solved: thus, 50-80% are found to have activity signs and/or frequent exacerbations and about 30% of the patients have to stop work; Class IV lupus nephritis increases the risk of terminalrenal failure. In the past 20 years great progress has been made in studying the pathogenesis of SLE: biological targets to affect drugs have been sought and fundamentally new therapeutic goals defined. Belimumab is the first genetically biological agent specially designed to treat SLE, which is rightly regarded as one of the most important achievements of rheumatology in the past 50 years.

  1. Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus

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    Kovačević Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erithematodes (SLE is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascites. Except for high parameters of inflammation, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, all immunological and laboratory tests for SLE were negative in the onset of the disease. During next six months the patient had clinical signs of paralitic ileus several times and was twice operated with progressive malabsorptive syndrome. The full picture of SLE was manifested seven months later associated with lupus nephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids and total parenteral nutrition (30 days induced stable remission of the disease. Conclusion. The SLE can be initially manifested with gastroenterological symptoms without any other clinical and immunologic parameters of the disease. If in patients with SLE and gastrointestinal tract involvement malabsorption syndrom is developed, a treatment success depends on both immunosupressive therapy and total parenteral nutrition.

  2. [Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacević, Zoran; Rabrenović, Violeta; Jovanović, Dragan; Petrović, Marijana; Rabrenović, Milorad; Matunović, Radomir

    2009-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction) and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascites). Except for high parameters of inflammation, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, all immunological and laboratory tests for SLE were negative in the onset of the disease. During next six months the patient had clinical signs of paralitic ileus several times and was twice operated with progressive malabsorptive syndrome. The full picture of SLE was manifested seven months later associated with lupus nephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids and total parenteral nutrition (30 days) induced stable remission of the disease. The SLE can be initially manifested with gastroenterological symptoms without any other clinical and immunologic parameters of the disease. If in patients with SLE and gastrointestinal tract involvement malabsorption syndrom is developed, a treatment success depends on both immunosupressive therapy and total parenteral nutrition.

  3. Gestational weight gain in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudy, A M; Siega-Riz, A M; Engel, S M; Franceschini, N; Howard, A G; Clowse, M E B; Petri, M

    2017-05-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus meeting Institute of Medicine guidelines for gestational weight gain and determine correlates of adherence to guidelines. Methods Singleton, live births in the Hopkins Lupus Pregnancy Cohort 1987-2015 were included. Pre-pregnancy weight was the weight recorded 12 months prior to pregnancy/first trimester. Final weight was the last weight recorded in the third trimester. Adherence to Institute of Medicine guidelines (inadequate, adequate, or excessive) was based on pre-pregnancy body mass index. Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance determined factors associated with not meeting guidelines. Stepwise selection estimated predictors of gestational weight gain. Results Of the 211 pregnancies, 34%, 24% and 42% had inadequate, adequate and excessive gestational weight gain, respectively. In exploratory analyses, differences in Institute of Medicine adherence were observed by pre-pregnancy body mass index, race, elevated creatinine during pregnancy and pre-pregnancy blood pressure. Odds of inadequate and excessive gestational weight gain increased 12% with each 1 kg/m 2 increase in pre-pregnancy body mass index. Lower maternal education was associated with increased odds of inadequate and excessive gestational weight gain. Conclusions As in the general population, most women with systemic lupus erythematosus did not meet Institute of Medicine guidelines. Our results identified predictors of gestational weight gain to aid in targeted interventions to improve guideline adherence in this population.

  4. [Gastrointestinal manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietkiewicz, Marcin; Smoleńska, Zaneta; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory connective tissue disease with an autoimmune background, involving various organs and systems during its course. The most important and characteristic clinical manifestations have been included in the revised diagnostic criteria for the classification of SLE published by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) in 1987. One of them is oral ulceration which occurs in 50% of SLE patients. Oral ulcers and other gastrointestinal complaints such as dyspepsia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, usually attributed to the side-effects of medications, are among the most frequent symptoms in patients with lupus. We report the case of a 42-year-old female suffering from long-standing lupus with kidney and joint involvement, who developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema, and cachexia. Our case illustrates the difficulties encountered when searching for the cause of gastrointestinal symptoms. Attention during diagnosis should be given to rare gastrointestinal manifestations of SLE, such as intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) and protein-losing enteropathy (PLE).

  5. Current role of rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2015-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by periods of flares and remission, resulting in organ damage over time caused by persistent disease activity and treatment-related complications. Conventional therapies are not ideal in terms of efficacy and safety. Novel biological therapies are being developed to enhance therapeutic efficacy, minimize disease exacerbation and reduce toxicities. As dysregulation of B cells is the hallmark of SLE, B-cell targeted therapies are the focus of recent clinical research. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been used with success in recalcitrant lupus manifestations. However, randomized controlled trials have failed to reveal its benefit in renal and non-renal SLE when combined with conventional immunosuppressive protocols. Although heterogeneity of SLE manifestations, pitfalls in study design and the limitations of the assessment tools for various clinical end points may have contributed to the discouraging results, rituximab remains an option in patients who are refractory or intolerant to conventional therapies. Recently, a regimen consisting of rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil without oral corticosteroids was reported to be effective in lupus nephritis. While the efficacy of this regimen has to be confirmed, future controlled trials should focus on the efficacy of rituximab in refractory lupus manifestations and its synergistic effect with other immunosuppressive agents such as cyclophosphamide. In short-term randomized controlled trials, a non-significant increase in serious adverse events was observed in SLE patients treated with rituximab. Long-term safety data of rituximab in SLE, in particular the incidence of hypogammaglobulinemia and serious/opportunistic infections, have to be continuously surveyed. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Infodemiology of systemic lupus erythematous using Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, M; Sciascia, S

    2017-07-01

    Objective People affected by chronic rheumatic conditions, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), frequently rely on the Internet and search engines to look for terms related to their disease and its possible causes, symptoms and treatments. 'Infodemiology' and 'infoveillance' are two recent terms created to describe a new developing approach for public health, based on Big Data monitoring and data mining. In this study, we aim to investigate trends of Internet research linked to SLE and symptoms associated with the disease, applying a Big Data monitoring approach. Methods We analysed the large amount of data generated by Google Trends, considering 'lupus', 'relapse' and 'fatigue' in a 10-year web-based research. Google Trends automatically normalized data for the overall number of searches, and presented them as relative search volumes, in order to compare variations of different search terms across regions and periods. The Menn-Kendall test was used to evaluate the overall seasonal trend of each search term and possible correlation between search terms. Results We observed a seasonality for Google search volumes for lupus-related terms. In the Northern hemisphere, relative search volumes for 'lupus' were correlated with 'relapse' (τ = 0.85; p = 0.019) and with fatigue (τ = 0.82; p = 0.003), whereas in the Southern hemisphere we observed a significant correlation between 'fatigue' and 'relapse' (τ = 0.85; p = 0.018). Similarly, a significant correlation between 'fatigue' and 'relapse' (τ = 0.70; p < 0.001) was seen also in the Northern hemisphere. Conclusion Despite the intrinsic limitations of this approach, Internet-acquired data might represent a real-time surveillance tool and an alert for healthcare systems in order to plan the most appropriate resources in specific moments with higher disease burden.

  7. Isolated Tricuspid Valve Libman-Sacks Endocarditis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Secondary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Unic, Daniel; Planinc, Mislav; Baric, Davor; Rudez, Igor; Blazekovic, Robert; Senjug, Petar; Sutlic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis, one of the most prevalent cardiac presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, typically affects the aortic or mitral valve; tricuspid valve involvement is highly unusual. Secondary antiphospholipid syndrome increases the frequency and severity of cardiac valvular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman with lupus and antiphospholipid syndrome whose massive tricuspid regurgitation was caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis ...

  8. Histological aspects of the bladder in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to study pathological data from bladders of systemic lupus erythematosus patients, correlate them to clinical events and the use of therapeutic drugs, and compare them to bladder histopathological findings in individuals not affected by systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods: thirty-nine out or inpatients of the Department of Rheumatology at Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus were clinically and cystoscopically evaluated. Bladder biopsy was also performed. As a normal parameter, bladders taken from 20 corpses collected at the Death Verification Department  of São Paulo city, without autolysis or evidence of urinary tract or autoimmune disease were also histologically studied. This group was considered as a Control Group. A correlation among clinical, cystoscopic and histopathological data was carried out. Rresults: the patients’ mean age was 29 years (range 13-62. Thirty-six were females and three were males. Twenty-five patients were asymptomatic during the study period. In the Control Group the age range was 20-65 years. Nineteen were females (95% and one was male (5%. Cystoscopic examination of the group with systemic lupus erythematosus showed interstitial pattern in 16 cases (41.0% and normal in 15 (38.5%. The bladder was normal in four patients (10.3%. Chronic unspecific cystitis was observed in 18 (46.2% patients. In the remaining, several alterations were found, including bladder vasculitis in seven patients (17.9%. The mean number of mast cells in the bladder area was 2.223/mm2. In the Control Group, unspecific cystitis was found in three cases (15.0%. No other abnormalities were found. The mean number of mast cells in this group was 0.777/mm2 (±2.7. Chronic unspecific cystitis, bladder vasculitis and the mean number of mast cells were compared with each other and no statistical differences were found (p > 0.05. There were

  9. Management of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Caroline L; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease predominantly affecting women, particularly those of childbearing age. SLE provides challenges in the prepregnancy, antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods for these women, and for the medical, obstetric, and midwifery teams who provide their care. As with many medical conditions in pregnancy, the best maternal and fetal-neonatal outcomes are obtained with a planned pregnancy and a cohesive multidisciplinary approach. Effective prepregnancy risk assessment and counseling includes exploration of factors for poor pregnancy outcome, discussion of risks, and appropriate planning for pregnancy, with consideration of discussion of relative contraindications to pregnancy. In pregnancy, early referral for hospital-coordinated care, involvement of obstetricians and rheumatologists (and other specialists as required), an individual management plan, regular reviews, and early recognition of flares and complications are all important. Women are at risk of lupus flares, worsening renal impairment, onset of or worsening hypertension, preeclampsia, and/or venous thromboembolism, and miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and/or neonatal lupus syndrome (congenital heart block or neonatal lupus erythematosus). A cesarean section may be required in certain obstetric contexts (such as urgent preterm delivery for maternal and/or fetal well-being), but vaginal birth should be the aim for the majority of women. Postnatally, an ongoing individual management plan remains important, with neonatal management where necessary and rheumatology followup. This article explores the challenges at each stage of pregnancy, discusses the effect of SLE on pregnancy and vice versa, and reviews antirheumatic medications with the latest guidance about their use and safety in pregnancy. Such information is required to effectively and safely manage each stage of pregnancy in women with SLE.

  10. Recent insights into the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, K L; Kelly, J A; Lessard, C J; Harley, J B

    2009-07-01

    Genetic variation was first shown to be important in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) in the 1970s with associations in the human leukocyte antigen region. Almost four decades later, and with the help of increasingly powerful genetic approaches, more than 25 genes are now known to contribute to the mechanisms that predispose individuals to lupus. Over half of these loci have been discovered in the past 2 years, underscoring the extraordinary success of genome-wide association approaches in SLE. Well-established risk factors include alleles in the major histocompatibility complex region (multiple genes), IRF5, ITGAM, STAT4, BLK, BANK1, PDCD1, PTPN22, TNFSF4, TNFAIP3, SPP1, some of the Fcgamma receptors, and deficiencies in several complement components, including C1q, C4 and C2. As reviewed here, many susceptibility genes fall into key pathways that are consistent with previous studies implicating immune complexes, host immune signal transduction and interferon pathways in the pathogenesis of SLE. Other loci have no known function or apparent immunological role and have the potential to reveal novel disease mechanisms. Certainly, as our understanding of the genetic etiology of SLE continues to mature, important new opportunities will emerge for developing more effective diagnostic and clinical management tools for this complex autoimmune disease.

  11. New-onset systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunmei; Zhao, Jijun; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Zilian; Wang, Hongyue; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Hanshi; Yang, Niansheng

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have been published focusing on the clinical features of new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during pregnancy. This study examined the clinical characteristics of SLE during pregnancy or puerperium. The clinical characteristics and serological parameters of 48 patients with onset of SLE during pregnancy were retrospectively compared with those of age-matched new-onset SLE patients who were diagnosed in a period of more than 12 months without pregnancy (n = 65) and age-matched preeclampsia patients (n = 48). SLE tended to occur during the first and second trimesters (33 and 42 %, respectively). Lupus nephritis (LN) and severe thrombocytopenia were more commonly seen in new-onset SLE during pregnancy than in patients without pregnancy (68.8 vs 35.4 % and 25 vs 9.2 %, respectively, p pregnancy (n = 23), LN patients with pregnancy (n = 33) had more prominent proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome (p pregnancy had early onset of symptoms during gestation and were characterized by presence of fever, malar lesion, autoantibodies, hypocomplementemia, hyperuricemia, active urinary sediment, and multi-organ involvement. In conclusion, patients with their first onset of lupus during pregnancy generally have more severe disease with higher prevalence of renal and platelet involvement.

  12. Pregnancy-related issues in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abha G; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R

    2015-02-01

    While fertility is preserved in females with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), it is well established that pregnancy in these patients is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation, as well as neonatal mortality. Mechanisms underlying these adverse outcomes are poorly understood, and better understanding of these would allow development of targeted and personalized treatment strategies. Established risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes include active disease within 6 months prior to conception and during pregnancy, active nephritis, maternal hypertension, antiphospholipid antibodies and hypocomplementemia. While intensive monitoring is recommended, the comparative effectiveness of appropriate management strategies is unclear. While current strategies are able to achieve live births in 85-90% of pregnancies, certain aspects such as prevention of preterm birth, treatment of congenital heart block due to neonatal lupus and recurrent pregnancy loss despite best management, remains challenging. Pregnancy is also associated with an increased risk of flare of lupus, particularly in patients with active disease at time of conception or within 6 months prior to conception. Pregnant patients with SLE should be followed in a high-risk obstetric clinic, and care should be closely coordinated between the obstetrician and rheumatologist. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. A new onset of systemic lupus erythematosus developed after bee venom therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Young Hee; Woo, Jin-Hyun; Choi, Seong Jae; Lee, Young Ho; Ji, Jong Dae; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2009-09-01

    Lupus is a systemic autoimmune disease of an unknown origin, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be triggered by numerous stimuli. Bee venom therapy is an alternative therapy that is believed to be effective for various kinds of arthritis. We present here a case of a 49-year-old female who experienced a new onset lupus after undergoing bee venom therapy, and this looked like a case of angioedema. The patient was successfully treated with high dose steroids and antimalarial drugs. We discuss the possibility of bee venom contributing to the development of SLE, and we suggest that such treatment should be avoided in patients with lupus.

  14. Incidence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus Nephritis in Denmark: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise F; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Faurschou, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-07-01

    To determine the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE with concomitant or subsequent lupus nephritis (LN) in Denmark during 1995-2011, using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR). To assess the incidence of SLE, we identified all persons aged ≥ 18 years in the NPR with at least 1 International Classification of Diseases, 10th ed (ICD-10) code of SLE and at least 365 days of followup under this diagnosis. Identification of LN cases was based on fulfillment of these criteria and ≥ 1 registration under an ICD-10 code of nephritis concomitantly with or after first SLE registration. The overall annual incidence rate per 100,000 for SLE was 2.35 (95% CI 2.24-2.49); 0.69 (95% CI 0.60-0.78) for men and 3.96 (95% CI 3.75-4.17) for women. For LN, the mean annual incidence rate per 100,000 was estimated to be 0.45 (95% CI 0.38-0.53); 0.20 (95% CI 0.13-0.28) for men and 0.69 (95% CI 0.57-0.83) for women. The differences in SLE incidence rates between sexes decreased by age, and the incidence did not differ between men and women after the age of 60 years for LN. The estimated incidences showed no trends by calendar time. Estimated overall point prevalence (December 31, 2011) per 100,000 was 45.2 (95% CI 43.3-47.4) and 6.4 (95% CI 5.7-7.2) for SLE and LN, respectively. Our Danish population-based data showed a stable incidence of SLE and LN. As expected, we found higher incidence rates among women than among men, particularly in younger persons.

  15. Cryptococcal meningitis in steroid-treated systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Anees; Sbar, Sidney

    1975-01-01

    A case of cryptococcal meningitis complicating steroid-treated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) which was successfully treated with amphotericin B is described. Although apparently rare, this mycotic infection has been reported from six patients with SLE in the medical literature over the past 10 years. Four of the six had been treated with steroids for periods ranging from 10 weeks to 6 years. In only one of these was the fungal infection diagnosed and effectively treated. Because effective therapy is available it is imperative that cryptococcal meningitis be not confused with progressive central nervous system involvement of SLE. PMID:1197168

  16. Macrophage Activation Syndrome as Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Say-Tin Yeap

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is known to be a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorder, especially systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It is very rare for MAS to be an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl in whom MAS developed as an initial presentation of SLE. With early diagnosis and administration of cyclosporine A, she had a fair outcome. Further testing showed positive anti-dsDNA about 8 months later.

  17. Cardiac manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Rondon, Federico; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2001-01-01

    In this paper it is broadly and in depth reviewed the cardiac manifestation's history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), since an historical analysis of clinical manifestations both in pre and post corticosteroids period. The way how the heart and the cardiovascular system's functions have been studied by clinical and semiological views are showed, through clinical manifestations such as myocarditis pericarditis, endocarditis, rhythm alterations, etc, and the evolution of laboratory methods used to its study as well as immunologic prognostic markers and risk factors for coronary disease in SLE

  18. Risk factors for neuropsychiatric manifestations in children with systemic lupus erythematosus: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga Zambrano, Yenny Carolina; Guevara Ramos, Juan David; Penagos Vargas, Nathalia Elena; Benitez Ramirez, Diana Carol; Ramirez Rodriguez, Sandra Milena; Vargas Niño, Adriana Carolina; Izquierdo Bello, Alvaro Hernando

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in children with systemic lupus erythematosus cause high morbidity and disability. This study analyzed risk factors associated with neuropsychiatric presentation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus aged lupus erythematosus who were hospitalized with or without neuropsychiatric symptoms was collected between March 2007 and January 2012. Clinical variables, laboratory examinations, neuroimages, and disease activity (Systemic Erythematosus Lupus Disease Activity Index) and damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics) indices were analyzed. A total of 90 patients were selected, 30 with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The patients' average age was 12.2 years. The most common neuropsychiatric symptoms were seizures, migraine, and depression. The average Systemic Erythematosus Lupus Disease Activity Index was 19.86 (S.D. 10.83) and the average Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics index was 2.02 (S.D. 2.43), with higher values in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (P = 0.001). The levels of complement C3 and C4 were significantly higher in patients with a neuropsychiatric disorder (P = 0.003). Lupus anticoagulant was found in 51.5% of patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-10.0). Immunosuppression with azathioprine, rituximab, or cyclophosphamide delayed the time to neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus development by 18.5 months (95% confidence interval, 10.6-26.5) compared to patients who did not receive these agents. The presence of lupus anticoagulant was a risk factor in our patients. The use of immunosuppressants, such as cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and azathioprine, delayed the presentation of neuropsychiatric manifestations of lupus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toll-like receptors 4 and 9 expression in systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toll-like receptors 4 and 9 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis: Relation to clinical status and disease activity. ... Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder affecting almost all organs and tissues. Dermatomyositis (DM) is a chronic muscle disorder that leads to muscle ...

  20. Purtscher-like retinopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chan; Dai, Rongping; Dong, Fangtian; Wang, Qian

    2014-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of Purtscher-like retinopathy and its clinical implications among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Observational case series. setting: Tertiary medical center. patient population: Patients with SLE who were diagnosed with Purtscher-like retinopathy between 2002 and 2013. observation procedures: Assessment and follow-up in the ophthalmology department. main outcome measure: Visual acuity and funduscopic examination at presentation and at 6 month follow-up, with analysis of the association between Purtscher-like retinopathy and other systemic involvement of SLE and overall disease activity. Among 5688 patients with SLE evaluated, 8 cases of Purtscher-like retinopathy were diagnosed. Typical fundus abnormalities included Purtscher flecken, cotton-wool spots, retinal hemorrhages, macular edema, optic disk swelling, and a pseudo-cherry red spot. Fluorescein angiography abnormalities included areas of capillary nonperfusion corresponding to the retinal whitening, late leakage, peripapillary staining, precapillary occlusion, and slower filling of vessels. The prevalence of central nervous system lupus was significantly higher among those with Purtscher-like retinopathy (6/8) than among 240 patients randomly sampled from those without Purtscher-like retinopathy. A very high SLE Disease Activity Index (≥20) was present in all 8 patients with Purtscher-like retinopathy. All patients received corticosteroids combined with immunosuppressants. For the majority of patients, optic atrophy developed during follow-up with persistent low visual acuity. As a rare and severe ophthalmic complication of SLE, Purtscher-like retinopathy was associated with central nervous system lupus and highly active disease. Visual acuity recovery was usually poor despite prompt treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proliferative lupus nephritis in the absence of overt systemic lupus erythematosus: A historical study of 12 adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzot, Maxime; Terrier, Cécile Saint-Pastou; Faguer, Stanislas; Masson, Ingrid; François, Hélène; Couzi, Lionel; Hummel, Aurélie; Quellard, Nathalie; Touchard, Guy; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Daugas, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Severe lupus nephritis in the absence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare condition with an unclear clinical presentation and outcome.We conducted a historical observational study of 12 adult (age >18 years) patients with biopsy-proven severe lupus nephritis or lupus-like nephritis without SLE immunological markers at diagnosis or during follow-up. Excluded were patients with chronic infections with HIV or hepatitis B or C; patients with a bacterial infectious disease; and patients with pure membranous nephropathy. Electron microscopy was retrospectively performed when the material was available. End points were the proportion of patients with a complete response (urine protein to creatinine ratio treatment.The study included 12 patients (66% female) with a median age of 36.5 years. At diagnosis, median creatinine and proteinuria levels were 1.21 mg/dL (range 0.5-11.6) and 7.5 g/day (1.4-26.7), respectively. Six patients had nephrotic syndrome and acute kidney injury. Renal biopsy examinations revealed class III or class IV A/C lupus nephritis in all cases. Electron microscopy was performed on samples from 5 patients. The results showed mesangial and subendothelial dense deposits consistent with LN in 4 cases, and a retrospective diagnosis of pseudo-amyloid fibrillary glomerulonephritis was made in 1 patient.Patients received immunosuppressive therapy consisting of induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy, similar to treatment for severe lupus nephritis. Remission was recorded in 10 patients at 12 months after the initiation of treatment. One patient reached end-stage renal disease. After a median follow-up of 24 months, 2 patients relapsed.Lupus nephritis in the absence of overt SLE is a nosological entity requiring careful etiological investigation, including systematic electron microscopy examination of renal biopsies to rule out fibrillary glomerulonephritis. In this series, most patients presented with severe glomerulonephritis, which

  2. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-11-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  3. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... Hill GS, Hing1ais N, Tron F, Bach JF. Systemic lupus erythematosus: morphologic correlations with immunologic and clinical data at the time of biopsy. AmJ Med 1978; 64: 61-79. 13. Studenski S, Alien NB, Caldwell DS, Rice JR, Polisson RP. Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Rheum 1987 ...

  4. [Thallium poisoning which stimulated systemic lupus erythematosus in a child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Cabrera, M A; Sauceda-García, J M; Escalante-Galindo, P; López-Morales, E

    1991-01-01

    We report the case of a preschool boy who, without knowledge of his relatives, ingested thallium sulfate in a dose calculated in 30 mg/kg. He presented a systemic lupus erythematosus-like syndrome and only further alopecia oriented the diagnosis of thallium toxicosis; thallium blood levels were; 37.2 micrograms/dl and in urine: 2330 micrograms/L. Treatment with the chelating agent D. penicillamine was effective, the clinical picture disappeared and the decrease of the thallium levels was observed. Thallium intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of connective tissue disease as the above mentioned.

  5. Quality of Life in Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

    OpenAIRE

    Yanih, Irma

    2016-01-01

    The number of patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) was keep growing. SLE attacked many women and developed between the age of 15-45. The treatment which used by patient with SLE just for reduced or faded the symptoms that occurred. It couldn’t heals the patient properly yet, so that sometimes that symptoms would occur again. The object of this study were to see the quality of life from 13 patient SLE in 8 domain from Quality of Life (QoL) such as physical health, emotional health, ...

  6. [The influence of pregnancy on the systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheva, S; Nikolov, A; Monov, C; Shumnalieva, R; Monova, D; Rashkov, R

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease caused by the interaction between genetic and environment factors which leads to abnormal immune responses. SLE affects more commonly women of childbearing age which raises the following questions--the influence of the disease activity on pregnancy and the influence of pregnancy on disease activity. On the one hand physiological changes occurring during pregnancy could lead to increased SLE activity, on the other hand the latter could mimic SLE activity. Differentiating these manifestations is important for the clinical practice--pregnancy and delivering guidance and SLE therapy.

  7. A complicated multisystem flare of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Philip; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Lightstone, Liz

    2017-02-08

    We report a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a young woman who became pregnant amid a severe flare. She continued to have active disease in the face of aggressive treatments complicated by several side effects of immunosuppressive drugs including recurrent sepsis and gestational diabetes. Her fetus was at risk for congenital heart block during the second and third trimesters. Despite an extremely guarded prognosis, she delivered a healthy baby girl. This case highlights the complexities of SLE management during pregnancy. We discuss the therapeutic options available in pregnancy, and highlight the importance of cross-specialty multidisciplinary care in these women. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Disseminated tuberculosis masquerading as a presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Justin C-H; Fong, Warren; Wijaya, Limin; Leung, Ying Y

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection is the endemic in Asia-Pacific region. Miliary TB is a disseminated form which may present similarly as autoimmune conditions. Here we describe a 17-year-old girl who had miliary TB with manifestations mimicking new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including oral ulcers, serositis, cytopenia, proteinuria and raised autoantibody titers. Complex associations between SLE and TB are highlighted. High index of clinical suspicion for TB infection is needed upon presentations resembling immune diseases like SLE. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Chronic meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: An unusual etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Apart from immunological causes and drugs, the aseptic meningitis group can include some unidentified viral infections that cannot be detected by routine microbiological testing. It is imperative to do complete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF workup before implicating the symptoms to disease activity or drugs, as untreated infections cause significant mortality in SLE. We present a case of young female with SLE who presented with chronic meningitis of an uncommon etiology.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Toshio; Koseki, Keijiro

    1987-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus manifested by neurologic symptoms. The results were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT scans showed slight cerebral atrophy in four patients, including one with coexisting enlargement of the lateral ventricle. In three of them, MRI scans showed additional abnormal appearance, possibly reflecting cerebral infarction and reversible changes in water content of cerebral tissues. The findings of MRI and CT in a small series of patients was disappointing in the explanation of the occurrence of neurologic symptoms. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: association with global disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E; Carpentier, S; Shaw, E; Doucette, S; Hanly, J G

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether patients with neuropsychiatric (NP) events attributed to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have more global disease activity than patients with NP events not attributed to SLE. Patients were recruited from an academic lupus clinic. Global disease activity was measured with the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and organ damage with the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) damage index (SDI). NP disease was defined using the ACR case definitions and decision rules for attribution of NP events to SLE and non-SLE causes. There were 68 patients (age (mean ± SD) 40.8 ± 15.2 years, 85% female, 94% Caucasians) with 126 NP events. SLEDAI-2K scores in patients with NP events attributed to SLE were higher than in patients with NP events attributed to non-SLE causes even when NP variables were removed from the SLEDAI-2K (mean ± SD: SLE NP = 7.36 ± 5.42 vs non-SLE NP = 5.53 ± 4.57, P = 0.042). Patients with CNS and diffuse NP events, rather that PNS and focal events, accounted for the group differences in SLEDAI-2K scores. There were no significant differences in total SDI scores comparing NP events due to SLE vs. non-SLE causes (mean ± SD: 2.1 ± 1.8 vs. 1.7 ± 1.7; p = 0.28) even when NP variables were omitted. Increased global SLE disease activity is associated with concurrent NP events attributed to SLE, particularly for diffuse NP and CNS NP events. The findings have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for SLE patients with NP events and inform pathogenetic mechanisms underlying NPSLE.

  12. Association of smoking with cutaneous manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourré-Tessier, Josiane; Peschken, Christine A; Bernatsky, Sasha; Joseph, Lawrence; Clarke, Ann E; Fortin, Paul R; Hitchon, Carol; Mittoo, Shikha; Smith, C Douglas; Zummer, Michel; Pope, Janet; Tucker, Lori; Hudson, Marie; Arbillaga, Hector; Esdaile, John; Silverman, Earl; Chédeville, Gaelle; Huber, Adam M; Belisle, Patrick; Pineau, Christian A

    2013-08-01

    To examine the association between smoking and cutaneous involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a multicenter Canadian SLE cohort. Mucocutaneous involvement was recorded at the most recent visit using the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 Update (rash, alopecia, and oral ulcers), Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index (alopecia, extensive scarring, and skin ulceration), and the ACR revised criteria for SLE (malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and mucosal involvement). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the independent association between mucocutaneous involvement and cigarette smoking, age, sex, ethnicity, lupus duration, medications, and laboratory data. In our cohort of 1,346 patients (91.0% women), the mean ± SD age was 47.1 ± 14.3 years and the mean ± SD disease duration was 13.2 ± 10.0 years. In total, 41.2% of patients were ever smokers, 14.0% current smokers, and 27.1% past smokers. Active mucocutaneous manifestations occurred in 28.4% of patients; cutaneous damage occurred in 15.4%. Regarding the ACR criteria, malar rash was noted in 59.5%, discoid rash in 16.9%, and photosensitivity in 55.7% of patients. In the multivariate analysis, current smoking was associated with active SLE rash (odds ratio [OR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.07, 2.48]). Having ever smoked was associated with ACR discoid rash (OR 2.36 [95% CI 1.69, 3.29]) and photosensitivity (OR 1.47 [95% CI 1.11, 1.95]), and with the ACR total cutaneous score (OR 1.50 [95% CI 1.22, 1.85]). We did not detect any associations between previous smoking and active cutaneous manifestations. No association was found between smoking and cutaneous damage or mucosal ulcers. No interaction was seen between smoking and antimalarials. Current smoking is associated with active SLE rash, and ever smoking with the ACR total cutaneous score. This

  13. Urine levels of HMGB1 in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients with and without renal manifestations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Deena A.; Westra, Johanna; Bijzet, Johannes; Dolff, Sebastian; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe and frequent manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated but immune complexes are considered to contribute to the inflammatory pathology in LN. High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear

  14. [Treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: myths, certainties and doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Danza, Alvaro; Khamashta, Munther

    2013-12-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with different clinical forms of presentation, including a wide range of severity and organic involvement. Such circumstance, along with the fact of the uncommon nature of the disease and the absence of clinically representative response criteria, make it difficult to design controlled clinical trials in SLE patients. As a result, observational studies have a special relevance, being a source of valuable information of SLE prognosis and outcome as well as of the efficacy and adverse effects of the different therapies. Herein we update some of the main treatments used in SLE. Steroids may have more risks than benefits if used at high doses. New mechanisms of action have been described, supporting the use of lower doses, possibly with the same efficacy and less adverse effects. Intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide still have a role in the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis and other serious SLE manifestations. Mycophenolate mofetil has shown its efficacy both as induction and maintenance therapy of selected cases of lupus nephritis. Biological therapies have emerged as new promising options. Although clinical trials have not confirmed a clear superiority of rituximab in SLE, observational studies have shown good response rates in severe SLE manifestations or refractory forms. Belimumab has recently been added to the therapeutic armamentarium of SLE; although its place in clinical practice is not well-defined, it may be recommended in active patients with no response or good tolerance to standard therapies. Hydroxichloroquine improves survival, decreases the risk of thrombosis and flares and is safe in pregnancy, and should be considered the baseline therapy in most SLE patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of Type I Interferon Pathway in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Distinct Clinical Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgas, Theophanis P.; Tseronis, Dimitrios D.; Mavragani, Clio P.

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence over the last few years suggests a central role of type I IFN pathway in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disorders. Data from clinical and genetic studies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus-prone mouse models, indicates that the type I interferon system may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several lupus and associated clinical features, such as nephritis, neuropsychiatric and cutaneous lupus, premature atherosclerosis as well as lupus-specific autoantibodies particularly against ribonucleoproteins. In the current paper, our aim is to summarize the latest findings supporting the association of type I IFN pathway with specific clinical manifestations in the setting of SLE providing insights on the potential use of type I IFN as a therapeutic target. PMID:22162633

  16. Immunological aspects of biopsy-proven lupus nephritis in Bahraini patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M Farid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a frequent and potentially serious complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE that may influence morbidity and mortality. Immunological investigations are aiding tools to the kidney biopsy findings in early diagnosis, in addition to monitoring the effect of therapy. The aim of the present study is to highlight the role of these investigations in a group of Bahraini patients and to determine whether there is any positive association between these findings and the outcome of LN. The current study is a retrospective case-control study of randomly selected 88 SLE patients, 44 with biopsyproven LN and 44 without, acting as controls. All renal biopsies performed during the period from 1996 to 2012 were classified according to the World Health Organization classification. Immunological investigations analyzed are: Antinuclear antibodies (ANA, anti-ds DNA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (abs and complement components C3, C4. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing class II was performed on selected cases. All patients had positive ANA (100%. A significantly high frequency of anti-Smith abs among the non-LN group (43.18% compared with the LN group (18.18% was found (P <0.001. On the other hand, the anti-Ro/SSA abs in the non-LN group was also found at a statistically higher frequency (20.45% compared with that in the LN group (4.54% (P <0.01. Anti-ds-DNA abs were found to be higher in the LN group (84.09% compared with the non-LN group (70.45%, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.082. There was a positive association of ANA positivity and low C3 and or C4 in the studied group. In our study, 88.2% of the HLA typed patients had HLADR2, DR3 or both. In conclusion, in our Arabic Bahraini SLE patients, the presence of anti-Smith, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-RNP antibodies and the absence of anti-dsDNA antibodies are independent predictive markers for renal involvement. However, more prospective studies with a

  17. Early Lupus Project - A multicentre Italian study on systemic lupus erythematosus of recent onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, G D; Prevete, I; Piga, M; Iuliano, A; Bettio, S; Bortoluzzi, A; Coladonato, L; Tani, C; Spinelli, F R; Fineschi, I; Mathieu, A

    2015-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a high degree of variability at onset that is problematic for a correct and prompt diagnosis. We undertook this project with the purpose of collecting an inception cohort of Italian patients with recent-onset SLE, in order to obtain information on the main clinical and serological characteristics at the beginning of the disease. In this first report we describe the characteristics of this cohort at study entry. All patients with a diagnosis of SLE (1997 ACR criteria) and a disease duration less than 12 months were consecutively enrolled between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 in a multicentre prospective study. Information on clinical and serological characteristics at study entry and then every six months was collected into a specific electronic database. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Openstat program. Among 122 patients enrolled (103 F) 94.3% were Caucasians. Mean age (SD) of patients at study entry was 37.3 (14.3) years, mean age at disease onset was 34.8 (14.3) years, mean age at diagnosis was 36.9 (14.3) years, and mean disease duration was 2.9 (3.9) months. The frequency of the manifestations included in the 1997 ACR criteria was as follows: ANA 97.5%, immunologic disorders (anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, antiphospholipid antibodies) 85.2%, arthritis 61.8%, haematologic disorders 55.7%, malar rash 31.1%, photosensitivity 29.5%, serositis 27%, renal disorders 27%, oral/nasal ulcers 11.5%, neurologic disorders 8.2%, and discoid rash 5.7%. The cumulative frequency of mucocutaneous symptoms was 77.8%. At enrolment, autoantibody frequency was: ANA 100%, anti-dsDNA 83.6%, anti-SSA 28%, anticardiolipin 24.5%, anti-nRNP 20.4%, anti-beta2GPI 17.2%, lupus anticoagulant 16.3%, anti-Sm 16%, and anti-SSB 13.1%. In this paper we describe the main clinical and serological characteristics of an Italian inception cohort of patients with recent-onset SLE. At disease onset, mucocutaneous

  18. The systemic lupus erythematosus travel burden survey: baseline data among a South Carolina cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edith M; Ortiz, Kasim; Zhang, Jiajia; Zhou, Jie; Kamen, Diane

    2016-04-29

    Many studies on the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus or lupus have identified patient travel costs as being problematic. We administered a survey that examined the impact of self-rated travel burden on lupus patients. The systemic lupus erythematosus travel burden survey included 41 patients enrolled in the systemic lupus erythematosus database project at the Medical University of South Carolina. Most participants reported that travel caused medications to be discontinued or appointments to be missed. In unadjusted logistic regressions of the relationship between these outcomes and medical travel burden, both distance to rheumatologists and time to lupus medical care were significant. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to examine the influence of travel burden among this population, but data from this report could help to inform physicians, academic researchers, and other health professionals in South Carolina and other areas with significant rural populations on how travel burden may impact patients receiving care for lupus and provide an opportunity for the development of interventions aimed at assisting lupus patients with management of stressors related to travel burden.

  19. Estrogen in Cardiovascular Disease during Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Gilbert, Emily L.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women during their childbearing years. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in this patient population at an age when women often have low cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, and its prevalence is markedly increased in women with SLE. Estrogen has traditionally been implicated in SLE disease progression because of the prevalence of the disease in women; however, its role in cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension is unclear. The objective of this review is to discuss evidence for the role of estrogen in both human and murine SLE with emphasis on the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension. Methods PubMed was used to search for articles with terms related to estradiol and SLE. The references of retrieved publications were also reviewed. Findings The potential permissive role of estrogen in SLE development is supported by studies from experimental animal models of lupus in which early removal of estrogen or its effects leads to attenuation of SLE disease parameters, including autoantibody production and renal injury. However, data about the role of estrogens in human SLE are much less clear, with most studies not reaching firm conclusions about positive or negative outcomes after hormonal manipulations involving estrogen during SLE (ie, oral contraceptives, hormone therapy). Significant gaps in knowledge remain about the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors during SLE. Studies in women with SLE were not designed to determine the effect of estrogen or hormone therapy on blood pressure even though hypertension is highly prevalent, and risk of premature ovarian failure could necessitate use of hormone therapy in women with SLE. Recent evidence from an experimental animal model of lupus found that estrogen may protect against

  20. Sex differences in monocyte activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.

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    Wei Jiang

    Full Text Available TLR7/8 and TLR9 signaling pathways have been extensively studied in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE as possible mediators of disease. Monocytes are a major source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and are understudied in SLE. In the current project, we investigated sex differences in monocyte activation and its implications in SLE disease pathogenesis.Human blood samples from 27 healthy male controls, 32 healthy female controls, and 25 female patients with SLE matched for age and race were studied. Monocyte activation was tested by flow cytometry and ELISA, including subset proportions, CD14, CD80 and CD86 expression, the percentage of IL-6-producing monocytes, plasma levels of sCD14 and IL-6, and urine levels of creatinine.Monocytes were significantly more activated in women compared to men and in patients with SLE compared to controls in vivo. We observed increased proportions of non-classic monocytes, decreased proportions of classic monocytes, elevated levels of plasma sCD14 as well as reduced surface expression of CD14 on monocytes comparing women to men and lupus patients to controls. Plasma levels of IL-6 were positively related to sCD14 and serum creatinine.Monocyte activation and TLR4 responsiveness are altered in women compared to men and in patients with SLE compared to controls. These sex differences may allow persistent systemic inflammation and resultant enhanced SLE susceptibility.

  1. Bone mineral density in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Castro T.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated spine bone mineral density (BMD in Brazilian children with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE in order to detect potential predictors of reduction in bone mass. A cross-sectional study of BMD at the lumbar spine level (L2-L4 was conducted on 16 female JSLE patients aged 6-17 years. Thirty-two age-matched healthy girls were used as control. BMD at the lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Weight, height and pubertal Tanner stage were determined in patients and controls. Disease duration, mean daily steroid doses, mean cumulative steroid doses and JSLE activity measured by the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI were determined for all JSLE patients based on their medical charts. All parameters were used as potential determinant factors for bone loss. Lumbar BMD tended to be lower in the JSLE patients, however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.10. No significant correlation was observed in JSLE girls between BMD and age, height, Tanner stage, disease duration, corticosteroid use or disease activity. We found a weak correlation between BMD and weight (r = 0.672. In the JSLE group we found no significant parameters to correlate with reduced bone mass. Disease activity and mean cumulative steroid doses were not related to BMD values. We did not observe reduced bone mass in female JSLE.

  2. Pleural and pulmonary involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Olga; Harari, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare complex autoimmune disease with a multisystem involvement. The clinical manifestations of this disease include an erythematous rash, oral ulcers, polyarthralgia, nonerosive arthritis, polyserositis, hematologic, renal, neurologic, pulmonary and cardiac abnormalties. The involvement of the respiratory system is frequent. Pleuro-pulmonary manifestations are present in almost half of the patients during the disease course and may be the presenting symptoms in 4-5% of patients with SLE. Complications directly associated to the disease include pleuritis with or without pleural effusion, alveolitis, interstitial lung disease, lupus pneumonitis, pulmonary hemorrhage, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Complications due to secondary causes include pleuro-pulmonary manifestations of cardiac and renal failure, atelectasis due to diaphragmatic dysfunction, opportunistic pneumonia, and drug toxicity. The prevalence, clinical presentation, prognosis and response to treatment vary, depending on the pattern of involvement. As with other connective tissue diseases, early and specific therapeutic intervention may be indicated for many of these pleuro-pulmonary manifestations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Fc receptor gamma subunit polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansari, Aliya; Ollier, W.E.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Gul, Ahmet; Inanac, Murat; Ordi, Jose; Teh, Lee-Suan; Hajeer, Ali H.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible association between Fc receptor gamma polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have investigated the full FcR gamma gene for polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand confirmational polymorphisms and DNA sequencing .The polymorphisms identified were genotype using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Systemic lupus erythematosus cases and controls were available from 3 ethnic groups: Turkish, Spanish and Caucasian. The study was conducted in the year 2001 at the Arthritis Research Campaign, Epidemiology Unit, Manchester University Medical School, Manchester, United Kingdom. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, 2 in the promoter, one in intron 4 and, 2 in the 3'UTR. Four of the 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were relatively common and investigated in the 3 populations. Allele and genotype frequencies of all 4 investigated SNPs were not statistically different cases and controls. fc receptor gamma gene does not appear to contribute to SLE susceptibility. The identified polymorphisms may be useful in investigating other diseases where receptors containing the FcR gamma subunit contribute to the pathology. (author)

  4. Fatal evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus associated with Crohn's disease

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    CHEBLI Júlio M. Fonseca

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a young Brazilian woman who was treated of ileocolonic Crohn's disease sparing rectum, as confirmed by colonoscopy and histopathological examination. After a 4-year course of sulfasalazine treatment, she presented with skin facial lesions in vespertilio, fever, arthralgias and high titers of anti-ANA and LE cells. A sulfasalazine-induced lupus syndrome was diagnosed, because after sulfasalazine withdrawal and a short course of prednisone, the clinical symptoms disappeared and the laboratory tests returned to normal. Mesalazine 3 g/day was started and the patient remained well for the next 3 years, when she was again admitted with fever, weakness, arthralgias, diplopy, strabismus and hypoaesthesia in both hands and feet, microhematuria, haematic casts, hypocomplementemia and high titers of autoimmune antibodies. A diagnosis of associated systemic lupus erythematosus was made. Although a pulsotherapy with methylprednisolone was started, no improvement was noticed. A cyclophosphamide trial was tried and again no positive results occurred. The patient evolved to severe clinical manifestations of general vasculitis affecting the central and peripheral nervous system and lungs, having a fatal evolution after 2 weeks. Although uncommon, the association of both disease may occur, and the authors call attention to this possibility, making a brief review of literature.

  5. Outcomes of neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus based on clinical phenotypes; prospective data from the Leiden NP SLE cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro-Checa, C; Beaart-van de Voorde, L J J; Middelkoop, H A M; Dane, M L; van der Wee, N J; van Buchem, M A; Huizinga, T W J; Steup-Beekman, G M

    2017-04-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess whether clinical and patient's reported outcomes are associated with a different pathophysiological origin of neuropsychiatric events presenting in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods A total of 232 neuropsychiatric events presenting in 131 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were included. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis was established per event by multidisciplinary evaluation. All neuropsychiatric events were divided according to a suspected underlying pathophysiological process into one of the following: non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus related, inflammatory and ischaemic neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. The clinical outcome of all neuropsychiatric events was determined by a physician-completed four-point Likert scale. Health-related quality of life was measured with the subscales of the patient-generated Short Form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire. The change between scores at paired visits of all domain scores, mental component summary (SF-36 MCS) and physical component summary (SF-36 PCS) scores were retrospectively calculated and used as patient-reported outcome. The association among these outcomes and the different origin of neuropsychiatric events was obtained using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The clinical status of 26.8% non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus events, 15.8% ischaemic neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus and 51.6% inflammatory neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus improved after re-assessment. Almost all SF-36 domains had a positive change at re-assessment in all groups independently of the origin of neuropsychiatric events. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus ( B = 0.502; p lupus erythematosus ( B = 0.827; p lupus erythematosus ( B = 5.783; p lupus erythematosus ( B = 11.133; p lupus erythematosus events have better clinical outcome and

  6. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Pregnancies of Women With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowse, Megan E B; Grotegut, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; lupus) and pregnancy individually have significant racial disparities, with black women experiencing higher rates of complications, yet no large studies have focused on the impact of race/ethnicity on pregnancy outcomes among women with lupus. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for 2008-2010, pregnancy delivery discharges were identified and pregnancy outcomes were compared for women with lupus by maternal race/ethnicity. Adjusted odds ratios were used to compare pregnancy outcomes between black and white or Hispanic and white women with lupus. In this period, the NIS included 13,553 deliveries with lupus and 12,510,565 deliveries without lupus. Compared to white women with lupus, black and Hispanic women had higher rates of chronic hypertension, chronic renal failure, pneumonia, and acute renal failure. There was a high degree of pregnancy complication in all women with lupus, but especially in black and Hispanic women, with more than 40% cesarean-section delivery; preterm labor in 14.3% of white, 24.7% of black (odds ratio [OR] 1.97), and 20.6% of Hispanic (OR 1.56) deliveries; and preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in almost 20% of black and Hispanic pregnancies. After adjustment for predictors of pregnancy outcomes and racial differences in nonlupus pregnancy, black and Hispanic women with lupus had higher than expected rates of preeclampsia, preterm labor, and fetal growth restriction. Black and Hispanic women with lupus have disproportionately poor pregnancy outcomes. This study suggests that identifying the key causes of these differences and targeting interventions to the women of greatest need is an essential next step. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Value of HLA-DR genotype in systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a meta-analysis.

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    Niu, Zhili; Zhang, Pingan; Tong, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 allele polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, but the results of these previous studies have been inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to systematically summarize and explore whether specific HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility or resistance to SLE and lupus nephritis. This review was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) approach. A comprehensive search was made for articles from PubMed, Medline, Elsevier Science, Springer Link and Cochrane Library database. A total of 25 case-control studies on the relationship between gene polymorphism of HLA-DRB l and SLE were performed and data were analyzed and processed using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 11.0. At the allelic level, HLA-DR4, DR11 and DR14 were identified as protective factors for SLE (0.79 [0.69,0.91], P  0.05). DR4 and 11 (OR, 0.55 [0.39, 0.79], P  0.05; 0.90 [0.64, 1.27], P > 0.05; 0.61 [0.36, 1.03], P > 0.05, respectively) were not statistically significant between the lupus nephritis and control groups. The HLA-DR4, DR11, DR14 alleles might be protective factors for SLE and HLA-DR3, DR9, DR15 were potent risk factors. In addition, HLA-DR4 and DR11 alleles might be protective factors for lupus nephritis and DR3 and DR15 suggest a risk role. These results proved that HLA-DR3, DR15, DR4 and DR11 might be identified as predictors for lupus nephritis and SLE. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Systemic lupus erythaematosus in a multiethnic US cohort (LUMINA) LIII: disease expression and outcome in acute onset lupus.

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    Bertoli, A M; Vilá, L M; Reveille, J D; Alarcón, G S

    2008-04-01

    To determine the features associated with acute onset systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE). A total of 631 SLE patients from LUMINA (for "lupus in minority populations: nature vs nurture"), a multiethnic (Hispanics, African-Americans and Caucasians) cohort, were studied. Acute disease onset was defined as the accrual of > or = 4 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the classification of SLE in < or = 4 weeks. Socioeconomic demographic features, clinical manifestations, disease activity, damage accrual, mortality, autoantibodies, HLA class II and FCGR alleles, behavioural/psychological variables were compared between patients with acute and insidious disease onset by univariable (chi(2) and Student t test) and multivariable (stepwise logistic regression) analyses. A total of 94 (15%) patients had acute disease onset. In the multivariable analysis, patients with acute onset lupus had more renal involvement (odds ratio (OR) = 1.845, 95% CI 1.076-3.162; p = 0.026) and higher disease activity (OR = 1.057, 95% CI 1.005-1.112; p = 0.030). By contrast, age (OR = 0.976, 95% CI 0.956-0.997; p = 0.025), education (OR = 0.901, 95% CI 0.827-0.983, p = 0.019), health insurance (OR = 0.423, 95% CI 0.249-0.718; p = 0.001) and skin involvement (OR = 0.346, 95% CI 0.142-0.843; p = 0.019) were negatively associated with acute onset lupus. No differences were found regarding the serological, genetic and behavioural/psychological features; this was also the case for damage accrual and mortality. Patients with acute onset lupus seem to be younger, have a lower socio-economic status and display more severe disease in terms of clinical manifestations and disease activity. However, intermediate (damage) and long-term (mortality) outcomes appear not to be influenced by the type of disease onset in SLE.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5820 - Systemic lupus erythema-tosus immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5820 Systemic lupus erythema-tosus immunological test system. (a) Identification. A systemic... with cellular nuclear double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or other nuclear constituents that...

  10. Serum markers thrombophilia in pregnant women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Vanessa Marcon de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to determine the frequency of serum markers for hereditary and acquired thrombophilia and their association with pregnancy in women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. Methods: a case-control study was conducted among 25 pregnant women with SLE (study group and 32 pregnant women without known disease and with at least one previous pregnancy (control group. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and hereditary thrombophilia were examined in both groups. We used the y2 Test with Yates correction or Fisher's Exact Test to verify the associations and calculate the relative risk. Results: thrombophilia was present in 72.0% of pregnant women with SLE and in 6.0% of patients in the control group. A significant association was found between the presence of SLE and serum markers for hereditary thrombophilia / antiphospholipid antibodies (p<0.05. The relative risks for antiphospholipid antibodies were 13.20 (ICR95%= 1.81 - 96.46 in pregnant women with SLE, 7.26 (CI95%= 1.77 - 29.86 for the presence of serum markers of hereditary thrombophilia and 7.92 (CI95%= 2.62 - 3.94 for the presence of hereditary thrombophilia and/or antiphospholipid antibodies. Conclusions: the identification of markers for hereditary and/or acquired thrombophilia in pregnant women with lupus may be clinically useful to determine which patients have a higher risk of obstetric complications.

  11. Imaging Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Sara C. Croca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem, autoimmune disease known to be one of the strongest risk factors for atherosclerosis. Patients with SLE have an excess cardiovascular risk compared with the general population, leading to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although the precise explanation for this is yet to be established, it seems to be associated with the presence of an accelerated atherosclerotic process, arising from the combination of traditional and lupus-specific risk factors. Moreover, cardiovascular-disease associated mortality in patients with SLE has not improved over time. One of the main reasons for this is the poor performance of standard risk stratification tools on assessing the cardiovascular risk of patients with SLE. Therefore, establishing alternative ways to identify patients at increased risk efficiently is essential. With recent developments in several imaging techniques, the ultimate goal of cardiovascular assessment will shift from assessing symptomatic patients to diagnosing early cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients which will hopefully help us to prevent its progression. This review will focus on the current status of the imaging tools available to assess cardiac and vascular function in patients with SLE.

  12. Risk of infective endocarditis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Taiwan: a nationwide population-based study.

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    Chang, Y S; Chang, C C; Chen, Y H; Chen, W S; Chen, J H

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are considered vulnerable to infective endocarditis and prophylactic antibiotics are recommended before an invasive dental procedure. However, the evidence is insufficient. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk and related factors of infective endocarditis in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We identified 12,102 systemic lupus erythematosus patients from the National Health Insurance research-oriented database, and compared the incidence rate of infective endocarditis with that among 48,408 non-systemic lupus erythematosus controls. A Cox multivariable proportional hazards model was employed to evaluate the risk of infective endocarditis in the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort. Results After a mean follow-up of more than six years, the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort had a significantly higher incidence rate of infective endocarditis (42.58 vs 4.32 per 100,000 person-years, incidence rate ratio = 9.86, p lupus erythematosus cohort had lower risk (adjusted hazard ratio 11.64) than that of the younger-than-60-years systemic lupus erythematosus cohort (adjusted hazard ratio 15.82). Cox multivariate proportional hazards analysis revealed heart disease (hazard ratio = 5.71, p lupus erythematosus patients. Conclusions A higher risk of infective endocarditis was observed in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Risk factors for infective endocarditis in the systemic lupus erythematosus cohort included heart disease, chronic kidney disease, steroid pulse therapy within 30 days, and a recent invasive dental procedure within 30 days.

  13. [Clinical features and adverse pregnancy outcomes of new onset systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Z P; Yang, Y; Zhan, Y F; Chen, D Y; Liang, L Q; Yang, X Y

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics and adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with new onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during pregnancy. Methods: The clinical data of 263 pregnancies with SLE in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhongshan University from 2001 to 2015 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: Of all the 263 pregnancies, 188 were diagnosed before pregnancy and 75 were newly diagnosed during pregnancy. Among the 75 new onset SLE, 27, 31, 14 and 3 cases were diagnosed during first trimester, second trimester, third trimester and puerperium, respectively. Active lupus was noted in 81.3% of the patients with new onset SLE. The main clinical manifestations of new onset SLE were lupus nephritis (57.3%) and thrombocytopenia (38.7%). SLEPDAI scores as well as the prevalence of lupus nephritis, and thrombocytopenia in patients with new onset SLE was higher than those in the previously diagnosed ones ( P pregnancies, adverse pregnancy outcomesoccurred in 53 patients, including 34 with pregnancy loss, 15with premature, 8with intrauterine growth restriction, 5with fetal distress and5 with neonatal lupus. Compared with patients withnon-newonset SLE, patients with newonset SLEhad a higher prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes (56.4% vs 70.7%, P pregnancy loss (21.8% vs 45.3%, P lupus nephritis and thrombocytopenia. Patients with new onset SLE were more prone to active lupus, lupus nephritis and thrombocytopenia, as well as more adverse pregnancy outcomes and pregnancy loss.

  14. Serum interleukin-17 levels are associated with nephritis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliçari, Karina de Oliveira; Postal, Mariana; Sinicato, Nailú Angelica; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Fernandes, Paula Teixeira; Marini, Roberto; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-05-01

    To determine the serum interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and to evaluate the association between IL-17 and clinical manifestations, disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment. We included 67 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients [61 women; median age 18 years (range 11-31)], 55 first-degree relatives [50 women; median age 40 years (range 29-52)] and 47 age- and sex-matched healthy controls [42 women; median age 19 years (range 6-30)]. The childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were assessed for clinical and laboratory systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, disease activity [Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)], cumulative damage [Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index] and current drug use. Serum IL-17 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using commercial kits. The median serum IL-17 level was 36.3 (range 17.36-105.92) pg/mL in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29.47 (15.16-62.17) pg/mL in healthy controls (p=0.009). We observed an association between serum IL-17 levels and active nephritis (p=0.01) and migraines (p=0.03). Serum IL-17 levels were not associated with disease activity (p=0.32), cumulative damage (p=0.34), or medication use (p=0.63). IL-17 is increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric and renal manifestations. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine the role of IL-17 in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Serum interleukin-17 levels are associated with nephritis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Karina de Oliveira Peliçari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the serum interleukin-17 (IL-17 levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and to evaluate the association between IL-17 and clinical manifestations, disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment. METHODS: We included 67 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients [61 women; median age 18 years (range 11-31], 55 first-degree relatives [50 women; median age 40 years (range 29-52] and 47 age- and sex-matched healthy controls [42 women; median age 19 years (range 6-30]. The childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were assessed for clinical and laboratory systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, disease activity [Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI], cumulative damage [Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR Damage Index] and current drug use. Serum IL-17 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using commercial kits. RESULTS: The median serum IL-17 level was 36.3 (range 17.36-105.92 pg/mL in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29.47 (15.16-62.17 pg/mL in healthy controls (p=0.009. We observed an association between serum IL-17 levels and active nephritis (p=0.01 and migraines (p=0.03. Serum IL-17 levels were not associated with disease activity (p=0.32, cumulative damage (p=0.34, or medication use (p=0.63. CONCLUSION: IL-17 is increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric and renal manifestations. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine the role of IL-17 in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Tuberculosis and systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Pedro; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Cervera-Hernández, Miguel Enrique; Ocampo-Torres, Mario; Chaires-Garza, Luis Gerardo; Lastiri-González, Ernesto Alejandro; Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Bobadilla-Del-Valle, Miriam; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2018-04-20

    To determine, among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, factors associated with active tuberculosis. We performed a case-control study, in a tertiary-care center in Mexico City. We defined cases as systemic lupus erythematosus patients with active tuberculosis and matched them 1:1 with systemic lupus erythematosus patients without tuberculosis (controls) by age, date of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis, and disease duration. We analyzed clinical variables, lupus disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), and accumulated damage (SLICC/ARC-DI). We performed a nonconditional logistic regression to determine factors associated with tuberculosis. We identified 72 tuberculosis cases among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 58% were culture confirmed. Thirty-three percent (24/72) were pulmonary only, 47.2% (34/72) extrapulmonary only, and 19.4% both. After adjustment for age, gender, and socioeconomic status, SLEDAI-2K and SLICC/ARC-DI, a 1-year cumulative dose of prednisone ≥ 3 g (odds ratios (OR), 18.85; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 6.91-51.45) was associated with tuberculosis, and the antimalarial treatment was protective (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.04-0.36). Among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, cumulative dose of prednisone is associated with tuberculosis. Further research is required to elucidate the protective effect of antimalarial drugs for tuberculosis. Preventive strategies must be implemented in patients at risk.

  17. Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihl, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with multiple tissue manifestations. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC in the development of both murine lupus and human SLE. In the past decade, studies using selective DC depletions have demonstrated critical roles of DC in lupus progression. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggest activation of DC by self-antigens in lupus pathogenesis, followed by breakdown of immune tolerance to self. Potential treatment strategies targeting DC have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which DC modulate lupus pathogenesis that require further investigations. PMID:27034965

  18. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Hans-Joachim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease of unknown etiology mostly affecting the knee and foot. Until now an association with autoimmune diseases has not been reported. Case presentation The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made in a 15-year-old Caucasian girl based on otherwise unexplained fatigue, arthralgia, tenosynovitis, leukopenia, low platelets and the presence of antinuclear and deoxyribonucleic antibodies. At the age of 20 a renal biopsy revealed lupus nephritis class IV and she went into complete remission with mycophenolate mofetil and steroids. She was kept on mycophenolate mofetil for maintenance therapy. At the age of 24 she experienced a flare-up of lupus nephritis with nephrotic syndrome and new onset of pain in her right hip. Magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy and subtotal synovectomy identified pigmented villonodular synovitis as the underlying diagnosis. Although her systemic lupus erythematosus went into remission with another course of steroids and higher doses of mycophenolate mofetil, the pigmented villonodular synovitis persisted and she had to undergo open synovectomy to control her symptoms. Conclusion Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with many different musculoskeletal manifestations including synovitis and arthritis. Pigmented villonodular synovitis has not previously been reported in association with systemic lupus erythematosus, but as its etiology is still unknown, the present case raises the question about a causal relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus and pigmented villonodular synovitis.

  19. Sharing experiences and social support requests in an Internet forum for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Davide; Cicognani, Elvira

    2014-05-01

    Internet forums represent a useful but understudied resource to understand psychosocial aspects of living with systemic lupus erythematosus. This study was aimed to describe the demand/supply of social support through the Internet in relation with the description of personal illness experiences. All the posts (118) from an Italian forum for systemic lupus erythematosus patients were collected and analyzed combining qualitative content analysis with statistical textual analysis. The results showed different purposes for posts: starting new relationships, seeking information, receiving emotional support, and giving a contribution. Lexical analysis identified three ways of describing patients' experiences. Discussion focuses on the relationship between the requested/offered support and systemic lupus erythematosus experiences.

  20. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis. (author)

  1. Association between systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis: lupoid sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose B; Fernandez, Andres R; Quintana, Gerardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Gamarra, Antonio Iglesias

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with/without antiphospholipid syndrome are autoimmune illnesses. It has been described in many occasions the association of these two illnesses and the clinical picture of MS with characteristics of laboratory of SLE. When they affect to the central nervous system they can make it in a defined form for each illness or they can also make it in interposed or combined form of the two illnesses what has been called lupoid sclerosis; making that in some cases difficult the differentiation of the two illnesses and therefore to address the treatment. We present four cases of lupoid sclerosis, discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this entity and we make a differentiation of the multiple sclerosis with the neurological affectation of SLE especially for images and laboratory results.

  2. Active necrotizing cerebral vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Deepa; Reddy, S Rajashekhar; Sundaram, Challa; Prayaga, Aruna K; Rajasekhar, Liza; Narsimulu, Gumdal

    2007-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic disease with varied clinical manifestations. Focal cortical brain infarcts and CNS infections are the most common neuropathological features reported in most studies. This report describes a 32-year-old woman who had repeated episodes of strokes over 5 years. In view of polyarthritis, oral ulcers, presence of high titres of serum antinuclear antibodies, high titres of double-stranded DNA and strokes, she was treated as SLE. Despite prolonged immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and pulse cyclophosphamide, she succumbed to a brainstem stroke. Complete body autopsy showed multiple cerebral cortical and brainstem infarcts with fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall. Renal infarction with healed vasculitis and systemic vasculitis involving small vessels was seen. Extensive thrombosis was remarkable by its absence. Active necrotizing vasculitis of cerebral and renal vessels is a rare complication of SLE, which contributed to a fatal outcome in this patient.

  3. A Unique Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pelvic Vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Traisak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is diverse and vasculitis can be a potential manifestation. Cutaneous lesions involving small vessels are the most frequent presentation. However, medium and large vessel vasculitis may present with life-threatening visceral manifestations. We present a unique case of pelvic vasculitis mimicking a pelvic mass as an initial presentation of SLE. There are case reports of systemic vasculitis involving the female genital tract with giant cell arteritis (GCA, polyarteritis nodosa (PAN, and granulomatous with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis (GPA/MPA, among others, but only a few cases attributed to SLE. Awareness of this condition and a prompt diagnosis are warranted as this is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition.

  4. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  5. Serum Interleukin-23 in Polish Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Lupus Nephritis, Obesity, and Peripheral Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Katarzyna; Przepiera-Będzak, Hanna; Sawicki, Marcin; Walecka, Anna; Brzosko, Iwona; Brzosko, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To analyze the correlation between the serum concentration of interleukin- (IL-) 23 and atherosclerotic changes, traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, the autoantibody profile, and involvement of selected organs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Patients and Methods. We studied 94 SLE patients and 27 controls. We analyzed the IL-23 serum concentration, autoantibodies, carotid intima-media thickness and atherosclerotic plaque, the ankle-brachial index, atheroscler...

  6. Urinary interleukin 22 binding protein as a marker of lupus nephritis in Egyptian children with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Ahmed Mohamed Mahmoud; Farag, Yomna; Abdelshafy, Maie; Riad, Nermine Magdi

    2018-02-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is a multi-system autoimmune inflammatory disease. Generally, 60% of patients will develop lupus nephritis (LN); thus, early recognition and treatment is associated with better outcome. Interleukin 22 (IL-22) is involved in tissue inflammation and is regulated by interleukin 22 binding protein (IL-22BP). This study aimed to use IL-22BP as a non-invasive marker for disease activity in JSLE and LN. This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 82 subjects: 51 JSLE patients and 31 healthy controls of matched age and gender. Urinary IL-22BP was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and its level was correlated with different clinical and laboratory data in JSLE as well as Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2k), renal SLEDAI-2k, and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) renal activity score which were used to assess overall disease and renal activity. Our results showed that urinary IL-22BP level was significantly higher in JSLE patients with mean level of 4.13 ± 1.10, as compared to controls 1.63 ± 0.61 (P value < 0.001); also, patients with active LN had urinary levels of IL-22BP (5.47 ± 1.03) higher than patients with active JSLE without LN (4.23 ± 0.72) and patients with non-active JSLE/LN (3.5 ± 0.65) with a highly significant P value < 0.001. There was a positive correlation with SLEDAI-2k, renal SLEDAI, and renal activity scores (P < 0.001). Urinary IL-22BP may be used as a non-invasive marker for assessment of disease activity in children with JSLE and LN.

  7. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus: far beyond Th1/Th2 dualism lupus: cytokine profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Poliana Macedo; Scavuzzi, Bruna Miglioranza; Stadtlober, Nicole Perugini; Franchi Santos, Lorena Flor da Rosa; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Iriyoda, Tatiana Mayumi Veiga; Costa, Neide Tomimura; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Maes, Michael; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to delineate cytokine profiles of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), construct prediction models for diagnosis and disease activity using those profiles, and to examine the associations between TNFB Ncol polymorphism, body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D levels with cytokine levels. Two hundred SLE patients and 196 healthy controls participated in this case-control study. Plasma cytokines levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL- 4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-17 were measured and cytokines profiles were computed. IL-6, IL-12, IL-17, IFN-γ and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in SLE, while IL-4 was lower in SLE. The Th1/Th2 and Th1+Th17/Th2 profiles were significantly higher in SLE than in healthy controls, whereas there were no significant differences in the proinflammatory cytokine profile (TNFα+IL-6+IL-1β). In total, 90.4% of all subjects were correctly classified using Th1+Th17 profile and IL-10 (positively associated) and IL-4 (negatively associated) as predictor variables (sensitivity=66.7% and specificity=96.9%). In all, 20.9% of the variance in the SLE Disease Activity Index was predicted by the Th1+Th17/Th2 ratio, IL-10 and BMI (all positively) and proinflammatory profile (inversely associated). B1/B1 genotype is accompanied by increased IL-17 and Th17/Th2 ratio, while B1/B2 genotype is accompanied by higher IL-4 and IFNγ values. 25-OH vitamin D was inversely associated with IFN-γ levels. SLE is accompanied by Th1, Th17 and Treg profile and lowered IL-4 production. Lowered vitamin D levels and B1/B1 genotype, but not BMI, contribute to changes in cytokines profiles. Future treatments should target Th1, Th2 and Th17 profiles rather than inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Living With Lupus KidsHealth / For Parents / Living With Lupus What's in ... disease for both doctors and their patients. About Lupus A healthy immune system produces proteins called antibodies ...

  9. Prognostically distinct clinical patterns of systemic lupus erythematosus identified by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, C H; Mok, C C; Tang, S S K; Ying, S K Y; Wong, R W S; Lau, C S

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the patterns of clinical manifestations and their mortality in a large cohort of Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The cumulative clinical manifestations of a large group of Chinese systemic lupus erythematosus patients who fulfilled at least four American College of Rheumatology criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus were studied. Patients were divided into distinct groups by using the K-mean cluster analysis. Clinical features, prevalence of proliferative lupus nephritis (World Health Organization class III, IV), autoantibody profile, and treatment data were compared and the standardized mortality ratios were calculated for each cluster of patients. There were 1082 patients included in the study (mean age at systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis 30.5 years; mean systemic lupus erythematosus duration 10.3 years). Three distinct groups of patients were identified. Cluster 1 (n = 347) was characterized predominantly by mucocutaneous manifestations (malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcer) and arthritis but having the lowest prevalence of serositis, hematologic manifestations (hemolytic anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia), and proliferative lupus nephritis. Patients in cluster 2 (n = 409) had mainly renal and hematological manifestations but having the lowest prevalence of mucocutaneous manifestations. Pulmonary and gastrointestinal manifestations were significantly more frequent in cluster 2 than the other clusters. Cluster 3 patients (n = 326) had the most heterogeneous features. Besides having a high prevalence of mucocutaneous manifestations, serositis and hematologic manifestations, renal involvement, and proliferative lupus nephritis was also most prevalent among the three clusters. Patients in cluster 2 had a much higher standardized mortality ratio [standardized mortality ratio 7.23 (6.7-7.7), p lupus erythematosus could be clustered into prognostically distinct patterns of

  10. Isolated Tricuspid Valve Libman-Sacks Endocarditis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Secondary Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unic, Daniel; Planinc, Mislav; Baric, Davor; Rudez, Igor; Blazekovic, Robert; Senjug, Petar; Sutlic, Zeljko

    2017-04-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis, one of the most prevalent cardiac presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, typically affects the aortic or mitral valve; tricuspid valve involvement is highly unusual. Secondary antiphospholipid syndrome increases the frequency and severity of cardiac valvular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman with lupus and antiphospholipid syndrome whose massive tricuspid regurgitation was caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis isolated to the tricuspid valve. In addition, we discuss this rare case in the context of the relevant medical literature.

  11. Pericarditis as initial clinical manifestation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnostic laboratory features were lymphopenic leukopenia, a positive lupus erythematosus cell preparation and positive lupus anticoagulant tests. She responded well to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy. Unexplained pericarditis in any child should warrant immediate screening for SLE.

  12. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis-Like Lesions and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Possibly Triggered by Sulfasalazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Gül, Cigdem; Andersen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    elevated ferritin, and muscle wasting. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made, and mycophenolate mofetil and systemic glucocorticoids brought this severe disease under control. Toxic epidermal necrolysis-like lesions and hemophagocytic syndrome have been reported as manifestations of systemic...... lupus erythematosus. This patient possibly had spondyloarthritis or an undifferentiated connective tissue disease at presentation, and we suggest, based on the timing of events, that sulfasalazine may have acted as a trigger of the severe disease manifestations....

  13. MRI changes in the central nervous system in a child with lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieron, M.A.; Khoromi, S.; Campos, A.

    1995-01-01

    We report on a 10-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented in status epilepticus as the only manifestation of central nervous system involvement. MRI of the brain showed diffuse gray and white matter lesions which almost completely resolved after treatment with methylprednisolone. MRI findings in this child are similar to those in adults with diffuse clinical manifestations. The study is essential in the initial evaluation of patients suspected of central nervous system lupus. (orig.)

  14. Extracellular Vesicles as Therapeutic Agents in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hernandez, Javier; Redon, Josep; Cortes, Raquel

    2017-03-28

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease that affects multiple organs. Currently, therapeutic molecules present adverse side effects and are only effective in some SLE patient subgroups. Extracellular vesicles (EV), including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are released by most cell types, carry nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and play a crucial role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can stimulate or suppress the immune responses depending on the context. In SLE, EVs can work as autoadjuvants, enhance immune complex formation and maintaining inflammation state. Over the last years, EVs derived from mesenchymal stem cells and antigen presenting cells have emerged as cell-free therapeutic agents to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we summarize the current therapeutic applications of extracellular vesicles to regulate immune responses and to ameliorate disease activity in SLE and other autoimmune disorders.

  15. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus: epidemiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Giulio; Brennan, Michael T

    2013-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by production of autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens, affecting several organs. Although cause is largely unknown, pathophysiology is attributed to several factors. Clinically, this disorder is characterized by periods of remission and relapse and may present with various constitutional and organ-specific symptoms. Diagnosis is achieved via clinical findings and laboratory examinations. Therapies are based on disease activity and severity. General treatment considerations include sun protection, diet and nutrition, smoking cessation, exercise, and appropriate immunization, whereas organ-specific treatments include use of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressive agents, and biologic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tuberculosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Spain's situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Miras, María del Mar; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Jimenez Alonso, Juan

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in the incidence of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due mainly to earlier diagnosis, and increased survival. Tuberculosis in our country is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases, and one of the underlying causes would be HIV infection and increased immigration from areas with high tuberculosis prevalence; this phenomenon is truly important in patients with autoimmune diseases, as clinical presentation, severity and prognosis of tuberculosis are often different to that of immunocompetent patients. Studies of tuberculosis in patients with SLE are scarce and inconclusive, with many doubts existing about the performance or non-tuberculous prophylaxis in this population and the absence of a protocol due to lack of conclusive studies. New techniques for diagnosis of tuberculosis (IGRAs) may be useful in this population due to higher sensitivity than Mantoux, helping avoid false negatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Voss, Anne; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    2009-01-01

    -1118) in patients and 1068 ng/ml (95% CI 901-1246) in controls (p = 0.0004). Circulating SP-D did not differ significantly in patients with high, intermediate, or low SLE disease activity. Similarly, SP-D did not correlate with C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and anti-dsDNA seropositivity......OBJECTIVE: Deficiencies of innate immune molecules like mannan binding lectin (MBL) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) and MBL belong to the same family of innate immune molecules - the collectins, which share important...... structural and functional properties. We aimed to compare concentrations of serum SP-D in patients with SLE and in healthy controls, and to investigate if SP-D is associated with selected disease indicators. We investigated the possible association of the Met11Thr polymorphism with disease, since...

  19. Digital Blood Flow In Systemic Lupus Erythematosus By Photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital vascular status in 10 patients of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE suffering for 1 to 5 years and 5 control (normal subjects was assessed by a highly sensitive, non-invasive technique called photoplethysmography (PPG. Six patients (Group A showed clinical sign. PPG recordings were done by applying the PPG probe serially to the distal phalanges of all the digits of four limbs with Velcro-strap at an ambient temperature of 27 to 31C and humidity 60 to 65% Diminished capillary flow. On average, 12 digits (60% in Group A and 8 digits (40% in group B patients showed reduced blood circulation. Degree of vascular impairment had no bearing upon the duration of the disease. The PPG has objectively shown digital vascular impairment in all SLE patients having no correlation with the extent of clinical manifestations and the duration of the disease.

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  1. USE OF MYCOPHENOLATE MOPHETYL IN PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Valiyeva,

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reports a case of highly active SLE and lupusbnephritis in a 15 years old boy, who was treated with mycophenolate mophetyl the case was notable for high activity and aggressive course of the disease with rapid development of renal unsufficiency, polyorganic unsufficiency and antiphospholipid syndrome. Although the patient received an appropriate active therapy, including synchronized therapy (consisting of timebrelated plasmopherresis and infusions of cyclophosphamide and metyl prednisolone, glucocorticoides, preparations improving blood circulation (pentoxyphillin, dipiridamol, heparine, intravenous immunoglobulins, the disease activity control was unsufficient. The administration of mycophenolate mophetyl has led to diminuition of the disease activity, which was registered at the end of the second week of treatment, and finally has reached a level of clinical and laboratoty remission of the disease.Key words: systemic lupus erythematosus, mycophenolate mophetyl, children, treatment.

  2. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Hepatosplenic Granuloma: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease which is known to present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Case Report. A 15-year-old male presented with complaints of moderate grade fever and generalized body swelling. There was no history of cough, weight loss, joint pain, oral ulcerations, skin rash, photosensitivity, loss of hair, pain abdomen, jaundice, or any significant illness in the past. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed hypodense lesions in both liver and spleen (without contrast enhancement, suggestive of granulomas along with few retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes. On the basis of immunological tests and renal biopsy report, SLE with hepatosplenic granulomatosis diagnosis was made. He was given pulse methylprednisolone 500 mg, for 3 days and he showed dramatic improvement clinically. Conclusion. Hepatic and splenic granulomas are not common in SLE, but this should be kept in differential diagnosis.

  3. Why Targeted Therapies are Necessary for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Laura; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) continues to have important morbidity and accelerated mortality despite therapeutic advances. Targeted therapies offer the possibility of improved efficacy with fewer side-effects. Current management strategies rely heavily on non-specific immunosuppressive agents. Prednisone, in particular, is responsible for a considerable burden of later organ damage. There are a multitude of diverse mechanisms of disease activity, immunogenic abnormalities and clinical manifestations to take into consideration in SLE. Many targeted agents with robust mechanistic pre-clinical data and promising early phase studies have ultimately been disappointing in phase III randomized controlled studies. Recent efforts have focused on B cell therapies, in particular given the success of belimumab in clinical trials, with limited success. We remain optimistic regarding other specific therapies being evaluated including interferon alpha blockade. It is likely that in SLE, given the heterogeneity of the population involved, precision medicine is needed, rather than expecting that any single biologic will be universally effective. PMID:27497251

  4. A critical review of clinical trials in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Mary A.; Strand, Vibeke; Simon, Lee S.; Lipsky, Peter E.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in caring for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a paucity of approved therapeutics for treatment of the diverse disease manifestations. In the last 60 years, only one drug, belimumab, has been approved for SLE treatment. Critical evaluation of investigator initiated and pharma-sponsored randomized controlled trials (RCTs) highlights barriers to successful drug development in SLE, including disease heterogeneity, inadequate trial size or duration, insufficient dose finding before initiation of large trials, handling of background medications, and choice of primary endpoint. Herein we examine lessons learned from landmark SLE RCTs and subsequent advances in trial design, as well as discuss efforts to address limitations in current SLE outcome measures that will improve detection of true therapeutic responses in future RCTs. PMID:27497257

  5. [Systemic lupus erythematosus in the aged: clinical and laboratory characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, V; Bonfá, E; Levy Neto, M; Kumeda, C; Daud, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    The clinical and serologic characteristics of 199 systemic lupus erythematosus patients with early and late onset of disease were compared to determine if the disease in the older age group defines a specific subset of SLE. This study demonstrated that SLE in the elderly patients exhibits peculiar clinical features with a high frequency of muscular involvement (p manifestations (p manifestation was muscular pain and stiffness, arthritis and weight loss (over 10 kg). This condition is often hard to distinguish from polymyalgia rheumatica or underlying malignancy. The frequency of autoantibodies was similar in both groups. The absence of anti-La was surprising, however it was confirmed by "Western blotting". The symptoms of late onset SLE are not very prominent however the diagnosis should be considered in order to avoid delays in treatment.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus with hepatosplenic granuloma: a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Anju; Meena, Lalit Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which is known to present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Case Report. A 15-year-old male presented with complaints of moderate grade fever and generalized body swelling. There was no history of cough, weight loss, joint pain, oral ulcerations, skin rash, photosensitivity, loss of hair, pain abdomen, jaundice, or any significant illness in the past. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed hypodense lesions in both liver and spleen (without contrast enhancement), suggestive of granulomas along with few retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes. On the basis of immunological tests and renal biopsy report, SLE with hepatosplenic granulomatosis diagnosis was made. He was given pulse methylprednisolone 500 mg, for 3 days and he showed dramatic improvement clinically. Conclusion. Hepatic and splenic granulomas are not common in SLE, but this should be kept in differential diagnosis.

  7. Resilience and Treatment Adhesion in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Daniella Antunes Pousa; Revoredo, Luciana Silva; Vilar, Maria José; Eulália Maria Chaves, Maia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune, rheumatic inflammatory disease that can cause significant morbidity with evident psychological impacts and obvious harm to quality-of-life that require the patient to adapt treatment. Objective: Assessment of resilience and the self-reported treatment adhesion behaviors of patients with SLE, investigating which of these factors are associated to resilience. Method: Cross-sectional study of 40 women with SLE. A questionnaire with social demographic data, health history and the Wagnild Young Resilience Scale were used. Results: 62.5% followed the medical treatment properly but 55% found it difficult. 27.5% of the patients presented low resilience, 57.5% medium and 15% high resilience. Resilience was associated in the chi-square test (p-value individual capacities to learn how to tackle with the disease for which psychological support of family and doctors can play a significant role. PMID:24665352

  8. The in vitro photosensitivity of systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamansky, G B; Minka, D F; Deal, C L; Hendricks, K

    1985-03-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we studied the ability of skin fibroblasts derived from SLE patients to recover from ultraviolet (UV) light radiation of varying wavelengths. Four of five SLE cell strains were more sensitive to UV-C (254 nm), sun lamp, and UV-A (320 to 400 nm) light than were normal cells. SLE cellular recovery was most sensitive to broad spectrum, long wavelength light. This hypersensitivity did not appear to result from the UV light activation of a clastogenic factor. Experiments which examined the DNA repair capacity of irradiated cells indicated that SLE fibroblasts may be able to excise certain DNA lesions as well as normal cells. The mechanisms responsible for the hypersensitivity of SLE cells remain under investigation.

  9. Different types of headache in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badry, Reda; Gamal, Rania M

    2015-05-01

    Headache in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered a common neurological finding, although the relationship is unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate frequency and characteristics of different types of headache in patients with SLE. 40 SLE patients were chosen from those referred to the out patient clinic using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the diagnosis of SLE. Headache classification was done regarding the ICD-II criteria in the patients. Headache severity was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS), and subjects with VAS ≥4 were included in the study. 30 patients out of 40 SLE patients (75%) have different headache types: tension type in 37.5% (n = 15) and migraine in 30% (n = 12), cluster 2.5% (n = 1), and intracranial hypertension 5% (n = 2) of all patients. Headache is frequent in SLE especially tension and migraine types, but overall, it is not associated with disease activity.

  10. Immunoregulation of NKT Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwei; Wu, Meng; Wang, Jing; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with different variety of clinical manifestations. Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a regulatory role during broad range of immune responses. A number of studies demonstrated that the quantity and quality of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells showed marked defects in SLE patients in comparison to healthy controls. This finding suggests that iNKT cells may play a regulatory role in the occurrence and development of this disease. In this review, we mainly summarized the most recent findings about the behavior of NKT cells in SLE patients and mouse models, as well as how NKT cells affect the proportion of T helper cells and the production of autoreactive antibodies in the progress of SLE. This will help people better understand the role of NKT cells in the development of SLE and improve the therapy strategy.

  11. Cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and risk of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takvorian, S U; Merola, J F; Costenbader, K H

    2014-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex multisystem autoimmune disease whose pathogenesis is thought to involve both genetic and environmental factors. It is possible that common environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, might modify risk of disease development in certain individuals. Here we aim to review the epidemiologic evidence related to the association of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and the risk of developing SLE. A growing body of evidence suggests that cigarette smoking confers a short-term increased risk of SLE in genetically susceptible individuals. On the other hand, alcohol consumption in moderate doses may have a protective effect against the development of SLE, although this is still debated. We also have reviewed proposed mechanistic explanations underlying the role of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in SLE pathogenesis.

  12. Psoriatic Alopecia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Wimolsiri Iamsumang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent, and relatively common inflammatory dermatologic condition, which demonstrates various clinical manifestations including hair loss. It was once believed that alopecia was not a presentation of scalp psoriasis, but it is now widely accepted that psoriatic alopecia exists. Although the majority of patients get hair regrowth, it can potentially lead to permanent hair loss. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with scalp hair loss and nonpruritic scaly plaques on the scalp. Her clinical presentation, dermoscopic, and histopathologic findings were consistent with psoriatic alopecia. Additionally, we also described a novel scalp dermoscopic pattern of “patchy dotted vessels” which we detected in the lesion of scalp psoriasis.

  13. Influence of Education on Disease Activity and Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Data From the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Angela; Wong-Pak, Andrew; Peschken, Christine A; Silverman, Earl; Pineau, Christian; Smith, C Douglas; Arbillaga, Hector; Zummer, Michel; Bernatsky, Sasha; Hudson, Marie; Hitchon, Carol; Fortin, Paul R; Nevskaya, Tatiana; Pope, Janet E

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether socioeconomic status assessed by education is associated with disease activity and the risk of organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Data from the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus, a multicenter database of adult SLE patients, was used to compare education as either low (did not complete high school) or high (completed high school or further) for disease activity and damage. Education was also studied as a continuous variable. The relationships between education and SLE outcomes (any organ damage defined as a Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI] score ≥1, serious organ damage [SDI score ≥3], and end-stage renal disease) were evaluated using logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and disease duration. A total of 562 SLE patients met inclusion criteria (mean age 47 years, 91% female, and mean disease duration of 10 years); 81% had high education. The low education group was twice as likely to be work disabled (30%; P education was significantly associated with higher disease activity at enrollment into the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus database, after adjustment for age (at entry and at diagnosis), race/ethnicity, and sex (B 1.255 + 0.507 [SE], β = 0.115, P = 0.014). In our adjusted logistic regression models we were unable to demonstrate significant associations between education and SLE damage. Results did not change when varying the education variable. In this cohort, low education was associated cross-sectionally with higher disease activity and work disability, but not damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: current state of the art and novel approaches.

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    Postal, M; Lapa, A Tamires; Reis, F; Rittner, L; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease affecting 0.1% of the general population. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus have been more frequently recognized and reported in recent years, occurring in up to 75% of patients during the disease course. Magnetic resonance imaging is known to be a useful tool for the detection of structural brain abnormalities in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients because of the excellent soft-tissue contrast observed with MRI and the ability to acquire multiplanar images. In addition to conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques to evaluate the presence of atrophy and white matter lesions, several different magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been used to identify microstructural or functional abnormalities. This review will highlight different magnetic resonance imaging techniques, including the advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods used to determine central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Noninvasive cardiac assessment in children of women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Monteitro Pereira Leite, Maria de Fátima; Levy, Roger Aaron; Borges, Mônica Scott; Barbosa, Eduardo Correa; Ginefra, Paulo; Benchimol Barbosa, Paulo Roberto; Barbosa Benchimol, Paulo Roberto; Aoun, Nadia Barreto Tenório; Christiani, Luiz Alberto; Albanesi Filho, Francisco Manes

    2003-11-01

    Noninvasive cardiac assessment of newborns and infants of women with systemic lupus erythematosus. The children had no congenital total atrioventricular block and were compared with the children of healthy women. We prospectively assessed 13 newborns and infants aged 1 to 60 days, children of women with systemic lupus erythematosus and without congenital total atrioventricular block. These children were compared with 30 children of women who had no lupus or anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, and no risk factors for congenital heart disease either. Their age groups matched. The following examinations were performed: cardiological physical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and signal-averaged electrocardiography. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference in ventricular function or in the cardiac conduction system between the groups. In regard to the conduction system and ventricular function in the absence of total atrioventricular block, no statistically significant difference was observed between the children of women with systemic lupus erythematosus and children of healthy women.

  16. Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Gabriella; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    For many years pregnancy has been contraindicated in patients with SLE, particularly when kidney involvement was present. Today, pregnancy is no longer considered impossible in women with lupus. Yet, lupus pregnancies are still considered high-risk. The prognosis has considerably improved for pregnant women but the fetal risk, although progressively reduced, is still higher in pregnancies of patients with SLE than in pregnancies of healthy women. Miscarriage, premature delivery, and preeclampsia, as well as heart problems in the baby are the major complications that can occur. In this paper we will review the outcome of pregnant women with SLE, the influence of lupus on fetal outcome, the effects of pregnancy on lupus, and the management of pregnant lupus patients based on our personal experience and the revision of the most recent and significant papers on the subject. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus in the Fars Province of Iran.

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    Nazarinia, M A; Ghaffarpasand, F; Shamsdin, A; Karimi, A A; Abbasi, N; Amiri, A

    2008-03-01

    Clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been described from different geographical regions in the world. However, data from many Middle East countries, including Iran, are scarce. This study aims to demonstrate the demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics in Iranian patients with SLE. In this prospective study, all the patients referring to Shiraz educational hospitals (Nemazi-Hafez) with SLE (American College of Rheumatology criteria) during a 5-year period (2001 to 2006) were included. A complete history was taken; physical examination and routine hematological, serological, and immunological tests were done for each patient. There were 356 women and 54 men with an average age of 30.27 years at the onset of disease. Of the patients, 78% had hematological abnormalities, 65.5% had articular involvement, 54.5% had photosensitivity, and 60.5% had malar rash. Serositis occurred in 38% of patients of whom 12% had pericarditis and 26% had pleuritis. Nephritis was diagnosed in 48% of the cases and consisted always of glomerular nephritis. Biopsy-proven lupus nephritis was in most cases class IV(49.7% of all the biopsies). Oral ulcers were observed in 28% of patients. Neuropsychiatric manifestations, gastrointestinal involvement, and lymphadenopathy were observed in 31.5%, 8.3%, and 14.2% of patients, respectively. In all, 93% of patients were positive for antinuclear antibodies, whereas antidouble-stranded DNA was positive in 83% of patients. Coomb's positive hemolytic anemia appeared in 12.4% of the cases. Rheumatoid factor was detected in 9.7% of patients, and lupus erythematosus cell was seen in 32.5% of them. In all, 196 (47.8%) patients represented hypocomplementemia. Regarding hematological manifestations, 74.5% had microcytic hypochromic anemia, 64.6% had leukopenia, and 44.6% had thrombocytopenia; 18 (4.4%) patients died during the study period of which eight (2%) died because of cardiopulmonary involvement. Generally, there was

  18. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  19. Pathogenic inflammation and its therapeutic targeting in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Andrew Gottschalk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, lupus is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues including skin, kidneys and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B and T lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as Belimumab which targets the B cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immuno-suppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and

  20. Low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in hospitalized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: review of a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, T M; Mahadeshwar, P; Nguyen, S; Li, J; Kapoor, S; Bathon, J; Giles, J; Askanase, A

    2017-12-01

    Objective In the era of powerful immunosuppression, opportunistic infections are an increasing concern in systemic lupus erythematosus. One of the best-studied opportunistic infections is Pneumocystis pneumonia; however, the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in systemic lupus erythematosus is not clearly defined. This study evaluates the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with a focus on validating the Pneumocystis pneumonia and systemic lupus erythematosus diagnoses with clinical information. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluates the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in all systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital between January 2000 and September 2014, using electronic medical record data. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and patients with renal transplants (including both early and late post-transplant patients) represented immunocompromised control groups. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Pneumocystis pneumonia, HIV/AIDS, or renal transplant were identified using diagnostic codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9). Results Out of 2013 hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus patients, nine had presumed Pneumocystis pneumonia, yielding a low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in systemic lupus erythematosus of 0.45%. Three of the nine Pneumocystis pneumonia cases were patients with concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and HIV/AIDS. Only one of these nine cases was histologically confirmed as Pneumocystis pneumonia, in a patient with concomitant systemic lupus erythematosus and HIV/AIDS and a CD4 count of 13 cells/mm 3 . The prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia in renal transplant patients and HIV/AIDS patients was 0.61% and 5.98%, respectively. Conclusion Given the reported high rate of adverse effects

  1. Mucocutaneous manifestations in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiewchengchol, Direkrit; Murphy, Ruth; Edwards, Steven W; Beresford, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) often have skin and oral lesions as part of their presentation. These mucocutaneous lesions, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) in 1997, include malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity and oral ulcers. It is therefore essential to recognize mucocutaneous lesions to accurately diagnose JSLE. The mucocutaneous lesions can be divided into those with classical histological features (LE specific) and those strongly associated with and forming part of the diagnostic spectrum, but without the classical histological changes of lupus (LE nonspecific). A malar rash is the most commonly associated LE specific dermatological presentation. This skin manifestation is an acute form and also correlates with disease activity. Subacute (polycyclic or papulosquamous lesions) and chronic (discoid lesions) forms, whilst showing classical histological changes supportive of lupus, are less commonly associated with systemic lupus and do not correlate with disease activity. The most commonly associated skin lesions without classical lupus changes are cutaneous vasculitis, oral ulcers and diffuse non-scarring alopecia. These signs frequently relate to disease activity. An understanding of cutaneous signs and symptoms of lupus in children is important to avoid delay in diagnosis. They will often improve as lupus is adequately controlled and their reappearance is often the first indicator of a disease flare.

  2. Successful Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproduction in Woman With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hypertension: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, José Fernando; de Macedo, Gustavo Capinzaiki; Campos, Luciana Aparecida; Baltatu, Ovidiu Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a poor prognosis of pregnancy, since it is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity, including spontaneous miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death and pre-term delivery. We report a case with successful pregnancy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and hypertension. A 39-year-old nulliparous woman presented with systemic lupus erythematosus with antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, hypertension and recurrent pregnancy loss presented for assisted reproduction. The patient responded well to enoxaparin and prednisone during both assisted reproduction and prenatal treatment. This case report indicates that prescription of immunosuppressant and blood thinners can be safely recommended throughout the whole prenatal period in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Enoxaparin and prednisone may be prescribed concurrently during pregnancy.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with sickle-cell disease: a case report and literature review

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    Maamar Mouna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus has been only rarely reported in patients with sickle-cell disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a 23-year-old North-African woman with sickle-cell disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and discuss the pointers to the diagnosis of this combination of conditions and also present a review of literature. The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was delayed because our patient’s symptoms were initially attributed to sickle-cell disease. Conclusions Physicians should be alerted to the possible association of sickle-cell disease and systemic lupus erythematosus so as not to delay correct diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment.

  4. [Magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases in systemic lupus erythematosus].

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    Pizova, N V; Spirin, N N; Maksimov, G A; Bakhtin, A L

    2004-01-01

    Fifty one patients with systemic lupus erythematous were examined using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to determine cerebral hemodynamic features. A comprehensive study revealed different cerebral circulatory changes in this abnormality.

  5. Clinical features and antinuclear antibodies profile among adults with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nashwa; Shigidi, Mazin; Al Agib, Al Nour; Abdelrahman, Hassan; Taha, Elshafie

    2017-01-01

    Limited data is available regarding the clinical manifestations and pattern of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Sudan. This study aimed to determine the clinical manifestations and Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) profile among Sudanese adults with SLE and lupus nephritis (LN). A descriptive study was conducted in Omdurman Military Hospital, Sudan. It included all adults with SLE and on regular follow-up during the study period (December 2012 to May 2013). These were investigated regarding their demographic details, clinical features, and immunological profile (ANA, anti-double stranded DNA, and ANA profile 3 levels). Patients with LN had their pattern of renal involvement described; furthermore, associations between the various SLE reactive antibodies and the histological diagnosis of lupus were studied. Sixty-two Sudanese adults with SLE were included, their mean age was 31 ± 10.9 year. Females made 93.5% of patients. A clear predominance of those of Arab ancestry was seen, with most patients being from the Ja'alin and Shaigiya ethnic groups accounting for 29% and 12.9%, respectively. Arthritis was the dominant clinical manifestation seen in 85.5%, whereas renal involvement was seen in 66.1% of patients. Lupus nephritis class III was the dominant histological lesion, seen in 39% of patients. On correlating the ANA profile to the histopathological diagnosis of LN, anti-Nucleosomes and anti-AMA-M2 autoantibodies were found to be significantly associated with LN class IV and class VI, respectively (P values < 0.05). Further epidemiological studies regarding SLE and its ANA profile remain essential as they might help predicting the clinical patterns of the disease and its prognosis.

  6. Clinical and Serologic Features in Patients With Incomplete Lupus Classification Versus Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Teresa; Bourn, Rebecka L; Munroe, Melissa E; Chen, Hua; Roberts, Virginia C; Guthridge, Joel M; Bean, Krista; Robertson, Julie M; Sivils, Kathy L; Rasmussen, Astrid; Liles, Meghan; Merrill, Joan T; Harley, John B; Olsen, Nancy J; Karp, David R; James, Judith A

    2017-12-01

    Incomplete lupus erythematosus (ILE) involves clinical and/or serologic manifestations consistent with but insufficient for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification. Because the nature of ILE is poorly understood and no treatment recommendations exist, we examined the clinical manifestations, medication history, and immunologic features in a diverse collection of ILE and SLE patients. Medical records of subjects enrolled in the Lupus Family Registry and Repository were reviewed for medication history and American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria to identify ILE patients (3 ACR criteria; n = 440) and SLE patients (≥4 ACR criteria; n = 3,397). Participants completed the Connective Tissue Disease Screening Questionnaire. Anticardiolipin and plasma B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) by indirect immunofluorescence, and 13 autoantibodies by bead-based assays. On average, ILE patients were older than SLE patients (46.2 years versus 42.0 years; P manifestations occurred in 12.5% of ILE patients and were associated with non-European American race/ethnicity (P = 0.012). Hydroxychloroquine use increased over time, but was less frequent in ILE than SLE patients (65.2% versus 83.1%; P manifestations may require immunomodulatory treatments. Longitudinal studies are necessary to understand how ILE affects organ damage and future SLE risk, and to delineate molecular pathways unique to ILE. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance therapy for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients with severe lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizawa, Toshitaka; Nozawa, Tomo; Kikuchi, Masako; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Okudela, Koji; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Mori, Masaaki; Yokota, Shumpei; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated histological changes occurring in renal biopsy specimens, between the time before initial induction therapy and after 12 months' maintenance therapy, as well as changes in laboratory parameters, SLE disease activity (SLEDAI), and dosage of corticosteroid (CS) in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients treated with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients diagnosed with childhood-onset SLE and lupus nephritis. They were treated with pulsed mPSL and intravenous cyclophosphamide as induction therapy and MMF (500-1500 mg/day) plus CS as maintenance therapy. Renal biopsy was performed before the initial induction therapy and after 12 months' maintenance therapy. Pathological findings at second biopsy were improved in eight of nine patients (89%). The findings of SLEDAI, urinalysis, and blood tests also showed improvement. CS doses could be tapered satisfactorily. Adverse events were observed in two patients. No patients treated with MMF experienced any disease flares during maintenance therapy. MMF as maintenance therapy might be useful in that not only the histological findings of lupus nephritis were improved, but also CS doses could be beneficially tapered. Nonetheless, this is a retrospective report of only nine cases and further prospective multicenter studies are necessary.

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Spanish males: a study of the Spanish Rheumatology Society Lupus Registry (RELESSER) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros Frutos, A; Casas, I; Rúa-Figueroa, I; López-Longo, F J; Calvo-Alén, J; Galindo, M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Pego-Reigosa, J M; Olivé Marqués, A

    2017-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical, and immunological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in male patients. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out of 3651 patients (353 men, 9.7%, and 3298 women, 90.2%) diagnosed with SLE, included in the Spanish Rheumatology Society SLE Registry (RELESSER). Results Mean ages (18-92 years) of symptom onset were 37 (SD 17) years (men) and 32 (SD 14) years (women). Male/female ratio was 1/9. Age of onset of symptoms and age at diagnosis were higher in men than in women ( p lupus nephritis was more common in men, being present in 155 (44.8%) of males versus 933 (29%) of females ( p  50 years had a higher mortality (odds ratios 3.6 and 2.1, respectively). Furthermore, SLE patients who developed pulmonary hemorrhage, pulmonary hypertension, psychiatric involvement, complement deficiency, and hemophagocytic syndrome also had higher mortality, regardless of gender. Conclusion Patients with SLE over the age of 50 years have an increased risk of mortality. In Caucasians, age at diagnosis and symptom onset is higher in men than in women. The diagnostic delay is shorter in men. Male SLE patients present more cardiovascular comorbidities, and also more serositis, adenopathies, splenomegaly, renal involvement, convulsion, thrombosis, and lupus anticoagulant positivity than women.

  9. Validation of the systemic lupus erythematosus responder index for use in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Rina; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S; Nelson, Shannen; Eberhard, B Anne; Higgins, Gloria; Singer, Nora G; Onel, Karen; Tucker, Lori; O'Neil, Kathleen M; Punaro, Marilynn; Levy, Deborah M; Haines, Kathleen; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Lovell, Daniel; Brunner, Hermine I

    2014-02-01

    This study tested the concurrent validity of the systemic lupus erythematosus responder index (SRI) in assessing improvement in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (jSLE). The SRI considers changes in the SELENA-SLEDAI, BILAG and a 3-cm visual analogue scale of physician-rated disease activity (PGA) to determine patient improvement. Using prospectively collected data from 760 unique follow-up visit intervals of 274 jSLE patients, we assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the SRI using these external standards: physician-rated improvement (MD-change), patient/parent-rated major improvement of wellbeing (patient-change) and decrease in prescribed systemic corticosteroids (steroid-change). Modifications of the SRI that considered different thresholds for the SELENA-SLEDAI, BILAG and 10-cm PGA were explored and agreement with the American College of Rheumatology/PRINTO provisional criteria for improvement of jSLE (PCI) was examined. The sensitivity/specificity in capturing major improvement by the MD-change were 78%/76% for the SRI and 83%/78% for the PCI, respectively. There was fair agreement between the SRI and PCI (kappa=0.35, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.73) in capturing major improvement by the MD-change. Select modified versions of the SRI had improved accuracy overall. All improvement criteria tested had lower sensitivity when considering patient-change and steroid-change as external standards compared to MD-change. The SRI and its modified versions based on meaningful changes in jSLE have high specificity but at most modest sensitivity for capturing jSLE improvement. When used as an endpoint of clinical trials in jSLE, the SRI will provide a conservative estimate regarding the efficacy of the therapeutic agent under investigation.

  10. Menopause hormonal therapy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; González-Pérez, Marisol; Durand-Carbajal, Marta; Lara-Reyes, Pilar; Jiménez-Santana, Luisa; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Cravioto, María-del-Carmen

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of menopause hormonal therapy on disease activity in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We conducted a double-blind, randomized clinical trial involving 106 women with SLE who were in the menopausal transition or in early or late postmenopause. Patients received a continuous-sequential estrogen-progestogen regimen (n = 52) or placebo (n = 54). Disease activity was assessed at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 months, according to the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). The primary outcome measure was global disease activity, estimated by measuring the area under the SLEDAI curve. Secondary outcome measures included maximum SLEDAI score, change in SLEDAI score, incidence of lupus flares, median time to flare, medication use, and adverse events. Results were studied using intent-to-treat analysis. At baseline, demographic and disease characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean +/- SD SLEDAI scores were 3.5 +/- 3.3 and 3.1 +/- 3.4 in the menopause hormonal therapy and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.57). Disease activity remained mild and stable in both groups throughout the trial. There were no significant differences between the groups in global or maximum disease activity, incidence or probability of flares, or medication use. Median time to flare was 3 months in both groups. Thromboses occurred in 3 patients who received menopause hormonal therapy and in 1 patient who received placebo. One patient in each group died during the trial due to sepsis. Menopause hormonal therapy did not alter disease activity during 2 years of treatment. However, an apparently increased risk of thrombosis seems to be a real threat in women with SLE who receive menopausal hormone therapy.

  11. Modified Framingham Risk Factor Score for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Murray B; Ibañez, Dominique; Su, Jiandong; Gladman, Dafna D

    2016-05-01

    The traditional Framingham Risk Factor Score (FRS) underestimates the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to determine whether an adjustment to the FRS would more accurately reflect the higher prevalence of CAD among patients with SLE. Patients with SLE without a previous history of CAD or diabetes followed regularly at the University of Toronto Lupus Clinic were included. A modified FRS (mFRS) was calculated by multiplying the items by 1.5, 2, 3, or 4. In the first part of the study, using one-third of all eligible patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the FRS and the different multipliers for the mFRS. In the second part of the study, using the remaining 2/3 of the eligible patients, we compared the predictive ability of the FRS to the mFRS. In the third part of the study, we assessed the prediction for CAD in a time-dependent analysis of the FRS and mFRS. There were 905 women (89.3%) with a total of 95 CAD events included. In part 1, we determined that a multiplier of 2 provided the best combination of sensitivity and specificity. In part 2, 2.4% of the patients were classified as moderate/high risk based on the classic FRS and 17.3% using the 2FRS (the FRS with a multiplier of 2). In part 3, a time-dependent covariate analysis for the prediction of the first CAD event revealed an HR of 3.22 (p = 0.07) for the classic FRS and 4.37 (p mFRS in which each item is multiplied by 2 more accurately predicts CAD in patients with SLE.

  12. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sara G; Yazdany, Jinoos; Kaiser, Rachel; Criswell, Lindsey A; Trupin, Laura; Yelin, Edward H; Katz, Patricia P; Julian, Laura J

    2012-09-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and cardiovascular disease are common and debilitating manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we evaluated the relationship between cardiovascular events, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and SLE-specific risk factors as predictors of cognitive dysfunction in a large cohort of participants with SLE. Subjects included 694 participants from the Lupus Outcomes Study (LOS), a longitudinal study of SLE outcomes based on an annual telephone survey querying demographic and clinical variables. The Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test were administered to assess cognitive function. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke), traditional cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, obesity, smoking), and SLE-specific risk factors (antiphospholipid antibodies [aPL], disease activity, disease duration) associated with cognitive impairment in year 7 of the LOS. The prevalence of cognitive impairment as measured by verbal memory and verbal fluency metrics was 15%. In adjusted multiple logistic regression analyses, aPL (odds ratio [OR] 2.10, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.3-3.41), hypertension (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.19-3.56), and a history of stroke (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.16-4.43) were significantly associated with cognitive dysfunction. In additional analyses evaluating the association between these predictors and severity of cognitive impairment, stroke was significantly more prevalent in participants with severe impairment when compared to those with mild or moderate impairment (P = 0.036). These results suggest that the presence of aPL, hypertension, and stroke are key variables associated with cognitive impairment, which may aid in identification of patients at greatest risk. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Aggressive Cardiac Involvement in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report and a Comprehensive Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ashrafi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We present the case of a 35-year-old gentleman who presented with an aggressive cardiomyopathy with normal coronary arteries. He was later diagnosed with systemic lupus-related cardiomyopathy. Methods. We undertook an extensive review of the literature regarding cardiac manifestations of lupus and used over 100 journals to identify the key points in pathology, diagnosis, and treatment. Results. We have shown that cardiac lupus can be rapidly progressive and, unless treated early, can have severe consequences. The predominant pathologies are immune complex and accelerated atherosclerosis drive. Treatment comprised of high-level immunosuppression.

  14. Severe malnutrition due to systemic lupus erythematosus associated protein losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Matan J; Theodor, Iris; Elazary, Anat Scheiman; Bekerman, Pazit; Nahmias, Avital; Rubinov, Alan; Ben-Yehuda, Arie

    2012-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus most often targets organs such as joints, serosa, skin, bone marrow, and the kidneys. Gastrointestinal complications are uncommon, and among these, protein losing enteropathy is particularly rare. We present a young woman who suffered from chronic abdominal pain and diarrhea, developed severe malnutrition, and was eventually diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and associated protein losing enteropathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Widespread osteonecrosis of the foot in systemic lupus erythematosus: Radiographic and gross pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Pineda, C.; Trudell, D.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla

    1985-01-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus required an amputation of the foot related to the presence of vascular disease and infection. Radiographs obtained prior to amputation revealed osteonecrosis in virtually every bone of the foot. Radiographic-pathologic correlation documented this widespread osseous involvement. Although ischemic necrosis of bone is a well-known feature of systemic lupus erythematosus, its localization in the small bones of the foot is rare. (orig.)

  16. Characterization of inflammatory markers associated with systemic lupus erythematosus patients undergoing treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Timóteo, Rodolfo Pessato; Micheli, Douglas Cobo; Teodoro, Reginaldo Botelho; Freire, Marlene; Bertoncello, Dernival; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Tavares-Murta, Beatriz Martins

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To characterize the inflammatory profiles of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving standard treatment compared to healthy controls. Patients and methods: Peripheral venous blood was collected from systemic lupus erythematosus patients (n = 14) and controls (n = 18) at enrollment. Blood samples were used for quantification, by flow cytometry, of CD11b (integrin) and Chemokine receptor CXCR2 expression surface antigen in neutrophils and lymphocytes, while cy...

  17. Widespread osteonecrosis of the foot in systemic lupus erythematosus: Radiographic and gross pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Pineda, C.; Trudell, D.

    1985-01-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus required an amputation of the foot related to the presence of vascular disease and infection. Radiographs obtained prior to amputation revealed osteonecrosis in virtually every bone of the foot. Radiographic-pathologic correlation documented this widespread osseous involvement. Although ischemic necrosis of bone is a well-known feature of systemic lupus erythematosus, its localization in the small bones of the foot is rare.

  18. Recovery from UV-induced potentially lethal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The repair of ultraviolet light-induced potentially lethal damage was investigated in density-inhibited skin fibroblast cell strains derived from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of exposure to polychromatic ultraviolet light composed of environmentally relevant wavelengths or to the more commonly studied, short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light was studied. Systemic lupus erythematosus cells, which are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light under growth promoting conditions, were able to repair potentially lethal damage as well as normal cells. (author)

  19. Healthcare costs of pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus: retrospective observational analysis from a US health claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, M; Daly, R P; Pushparajah, D S

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease, most frequently affecting women of childbearing age. Women with lupus are at increased risk of pregnancy complications that are exacerbated by active disease. Despite this, their use of medications and hospital resources has not been extensively studied. Retrospective analyses of the Truven Health MarketScan database (2006-2012) aimed to quantify drug and resource utilization in pregnant women with lupus, as well as the incidence of pregnancy complications in these patients. Records of women aged 12-54 were reviewed and both lupus patients and pregnancies identified. Pregnant women with lupus were matched 1:5 with either pregnant women without lupus, or non-pregnant women with lupus. Pregnancies with lupus were associated with increased complications when compared to pregnancies without lupus. During pregnancy, the use of immunosuppressants decreased in pregnant women with lupus, as did rheumatologist visits, while the number of women not treated with any immunosuppressant increased. Pregnant women with lupus showed higher overall treatment costs than controls. However, compared to non-pregnant women with lupus, medication costs actually dropped, possibly due to the withdrawal of medications from these patients or women becoming pregnant while disease activity was low. The large database analyses reported here revealed that pregnancies in women with lupus were associated with a higher risk of complications, higher healthcare costs, and fewer prescribed medications, including immunosuppressants, than the control groups. The increased risk of complications and decreased immunosuppressant use suggest that patients require additional guidance from physicians to give them the best chance of experiencing a safe pregnancy. Indeed, despite the recognized role active lupus plays in increasing pregnancy complications, women with lupus had fewer rheumatology visits during pregnancy, although their visits to their

  20. Myelitis in systemic lupus erythematosus frequently manifests as longitudinal and sometimes occurs at low disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X-Y; Xiao, P; Xiao, H-B; Zhang, L-J; Pai, P; Chu, P; Chan, T-M

    2014-10-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) is a relatively infrequent but severe complication in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Owing to its rarity and unfavorable outcome, we investigated its general features on MRI and incidence in the context of lupus activity, to facilitate early recognition and treatment. We report a case of a young man with clinically inactive lupus nephritis but who presented with a sudden attack of myelitis. We performed systematic literature search in Medline to study the clinical features of SLE-related TM. From 1960 to April 2013, a total of 72 articles containing 194 cases of lupus myelitis were found. Among acquired articles, 93 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority of the cases (88.8%) were female. Longitudinal myelitis was the predominant imaging finding on MRI (71.4%, 45/63). Nearly two-thirds (61/94) of lupus myelitis occurred in association with active lupus, and one-third (33/94) occurred in low disease activity. Upon literature review, we found myelitis in SLE more frequently manifested as longitudinal on MRI. Although lupus myelitis often presented at an active phase of SLE, one-third of events happened in the presence of low disease activity. Early initiation of effective immunosuppressive therapy facilitated recovery. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Illness perception in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: The roles of alexithymia and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbasio, Chiara; Vagelli, Roberta; Marengo, Davide; Querci, Francesca; Settanni, Michele; Tani, Chiara; Mosca, Marta; Granieri, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    Alexithymia and depressive mood have been described as important dimensions of several medical diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic condition characterized by unpredictable clinical manifestations. The relationships between alexithymia, depression, and illness perception were examined in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The interrelationships between psychological factors, such as alexithymia and depressive mood, were explored in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, and associations between these factors and illness perception in SLE were examined. We hypothesized that alexithymia and negative perceptions of illness would be associated in SLE patients, and depression would mediate this relationship. Subjects were 100 consecutive systemic lupus erythematosus patients attending the outpatient clinic at the University of Pisa rheumatology unit. They completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire. Clinical variables were measured, disease activity was evaluated using the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measure, and damage was assessed using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index. There were no associations between clinical variables, alexithymia, and depression. The results highlight the existence of significant links between alexithymia and illness perception for systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Moreover, our data suggest that some of these links are mediated by depression, which is the direct predictor of different aspects of perceived health. Our findings suggest that studying the role of psychological factors, such as alexithymia and depression, may contribute to a more comprehensive perspective of systemic lupus erythematosus, including their impact on patients' beliefs about treatment effectiveness and emotional adaptation to chronic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Could we abandon cyclophosphamide in systemic vasculitis and lupus nephritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Cyclophosphamide has greatly improved prognosis in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) and proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). However, the side effects of long-term cyclophosphamide treatment are considerable prompting a search for alternatives to cyclophosphamide.

  3. Treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Nutrition and Dendritic Cell Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease involving the inflammatory damages of multiple organs. Lupus nephritis (LN) as the manifestation in the kidney occurs in more than 50% of SLE patients and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Current treatments consist of immunosuppressants that always lead to compromised immune responses with increased risks of infections as the major side effect. To minimize this side effect, it is crucial to develop new treatments that are...

  4. Appearance of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis following Thymectomy: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Yun-A; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients who had undergone thymectomy. SLE developed in the patients 3 months or 13 yr after thymectomy, and polyarthritis was the main clinical manifestation of SLE. Both patients fulfilled at least four of the revised criteria for the classification of SLE. In this report, we describe two postthymectomy lupus patients and perform a comparative review of previous cases.

  5. Miliary tuberculosis: a severe opportunistic infection in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, Priscilla S.; Montoni, João D.; Ribeiro, Aline S.M.; Marques, Heloísa H.; Mauad, Thais; Silva, Clovis A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction One of the main issues in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) patients is infection, such as tuberculosis (TB). Of note, SLE patients are susceptible to pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. However, to our knowledge, this contagious disease was rarely reported in pediatric lupus population, particularly diffuse or miliary TB. Therefore, from January 1983 to December 2011, 5,635 patients were followed-up at our Pediatric Rheumatology Unit and 285 (5%) of them met th...

  6. Oral Ulcers in Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Rodsaward, Pongsawat; Prueksrisakul, Titipong; Deekajorndech, Tawatchai; Edwards, Steven W.; Beresford, Michael W.; Chiewchengchol, Direkrit

    2017-01-01

    Oral ulcers are the most common mucosal sign in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). The ulcers are one of the key clinical features; however, the terminology of oral ulcers, especially in JSLE patients, is often vague and ill-defined. In fact, there are several clinical manifestations of oral ulcers in JSLE, and some lesions occur when the disease is active, indicating that early management of the disease should be started. Oral ulcers are classified as lupus erythematosus (LE...

  7. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—An Immunological Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velciov, Silvia; Gluhovschi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg) cells, which attempt to regulate and adapt the immune system of the mother to the new conditions of pregnancy. Other components of the immune system also participate to maintain maternal-fetal immune tolerance. If the immune system of pregnant women with SLE is not able to maintain maternal immune tolerance to the fetus, pregnancy complications (miscarriage, fetal hypotrophy, and preterm birth) or maternal complications (preeclampsia or activation of SLE, especially in conditions of lupus nephritis) may occur. In certain situations this can be responsible for neonatal lupus. At the same time, it must be noted that during pregnancy, the immune system is able to achieve immune tolerance while maintaining the anti-infectious immune capacity of the mother. Immunological monitoring of pregnancy during SLE, as well as of the mother's disease, is required. It is important to understand immune tolerance to grafts in transplant pathology. PMID:26090485

  8. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--An Immunological Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Petrica, Ligia; Velciov, Silvia; Gluhovschi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg) cells, which attempt to regulate and adapt the immune system of the mother to the new conditions of pregnancy. Other components of the immune system also participate to maintain maternal-fetal immune tolerance. If the immune system of pregnant women with SLE is not able to maintain maternal immune tolerance to the fetus, pregnancy complications (miscarriage, fetal hypotrophy, and preterm birth) or maternal complications (preeclampsia or activation of SLE, especially in conditions of lupus nephritis) may occur. In certain situations this can be responsible for neonatal lupus. At the same time, it must be noted that during pregnancy, the immune system is able to achieve immune tolerance while maintaining the anti-infectious immune capacity of the mother. Immunological monitoring of pregnancy during SLE, as well as of the mother's disease, is required. It is important to understand immune tolerance to grafts in transplant pathology.

  9. Pregnancy Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Immune Tolerance in Pregnancy and Its Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—An Immunological Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gluhovschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a physiological condition that requires immune tolerance to the product of conception. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a disease with well-represented immune mechanisms that disturb immune tolerance. The association of pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus creates a particular immune environment in which the immune tolerance specific of pregnancy is required to coexist with alterations of the immune system caused by SLE. The main role is played by T regulatory (Treg cells, which attempt to regulate and adapt the immune system of the mother to the new conditions of pregnancy. Other components of the immune system also participate to maintain maternal-fetal immune tolerance. If the immune system of pregnant women with SLE is not able to maintain maternal immune tolerance to the fetus, pregnancy complications (miscarriage, fetal hypotrophy, and preterm birth or maternal complications (preeclampsia or activation of SLE, especially in conditions of lupus nephritis may occur. In certain situations this can be responsible for neonatal lupus. At the same time, it must be noted that during pregnancy, the immune system is able to achieve immune tolerance while maintaining the anti-infectious immune capacity of the mother. Immunological monitoring of pregnancy during SLE, as well as of the mother’s disease, is required. It is important to understand immune tolerance to grafts in transplant pathology.

  10. Expression of CD64 on Surface of Circulating Monocytes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: Relation to Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elhamid, Yasser A; Eltanawy, Refaat M; Fawzy, Rasha M; Fouad, Nehad A; Atlm, Ann M

    2017-01-01

    CD64 is a type of integral membrane glycoprotein known as FC receptor that binds monomeric IgG-type antibodies with high affinity. It is more commonly known as FC gamma receptor 1 (FC?R1) and it is expressed on monocytes surface. The goal of this study was to investigate the association of CD64 expression on the surface of peripheral blood monocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus patients with disease activity, and lupus nephritis. 30 SLE patients were enrolled into this study. They were subdivided into: 15 SLE patients with lupus nephritis and 15 SLE patients without lupus nephritis. In addition,Together with 25 age and sex matched healthy volunteers were enrolled as controls group. Disease activity was defined by SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score and the renal Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (rSLEDAI) score. Surface expression of CD64 on peripheral blood monocytes was evaluated by Flowcytometry. Renal biopsies of Lupus nephritis patients was obtained and evaluated using the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) classification scheme. There was a statistically significant difference in surface expression of CD64 on circulating monocytes (P > 0.001) in SLE patients with nephritis especially those with class II/III as compared to SLE without nephritis and healthy controls. The mean fluorescent intensity of CD64 staining correlated positively with markers of systemic inflammation, lupus nephritis, SLEDAI and rSLEDAI scores. In conclusions, surface expression of CD64 on circulating monocytes reflects systemic inflammation, renal injury and could be used as a rapid approach and good biomarker for disease activity and lupus nephritis in SLE patients. Copyright© by the Egyptian Association of Immunologists.

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Alakes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement. The skin is the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, alopecia, disfigurement, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific or may be non specific (LE non specific. Acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific has a strong association with systemic disease and non-specific skin lesions always indicate disease activity for which patients present to rheumatologists and internists. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for most efficient management. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the patterns and prevalence of skin lesions in patients with SLE and to assess the relationship between skin lesions and other systemic involvement. Materials and Methods: At the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, IPGME&R in Kolkata, 150 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (updated 1982 were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between January 2002 and January 2007. Results: Skin lesions were important clinical features. About 45 patients (30% presented with skin lesions although all patients had skin lesions during the follow-up period. Skin changes noted were as follows: Lupus specific lesions: malar rash in 120 patients (80%, photosensitive dermatitis in 75 patients (50%, generalized maculopapular rash in 40 patients (26.67%, discoid rash in 30 patients (20%, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE in 5 patients (3.34%, lupus profundus in 5 patients (3.34%. The lupus non-specific lesions were non-scarring alopecia in 130 patients (86.67%, oral ulcers in 85 patients (56.67%, vasculitic lesions in 50 patients (33.34%, bullous lesions in 15 patients (10%, Raynaud′s phenomenon in 10 patients (6

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Alakes Kumar; Ghosh, Alakendu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement. The skin is the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, alopecia, disfigurement, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific) or may be non specific (LE non specific). Acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific) has a strong association with systemic disease and non-specific skin lesions always indicate disease activity for which patients present to rheumatologists and internists. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for most efficient management. The aims of this study were to evaluate the patterns and prevalence of skin lesions in patients with SLE and to assess the relationship between skin lesions and other systemic involvement. At the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, IPGME&R in Kolkata, 150 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (updated 1982) were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between January 2002 and January 2007. Skin lesions were important clinical features. About 45 patients (30%) presented with skin lesions although all patients had skin lesions during the follow-up period. Skin changes noted were as follows: Lupus specific lesions: malar rash in 120 patients (80%), photosensitive dermatitis in 75 patients (50%), generalized maculopapular rash in 40 patients (26.67%), discoid rash in 30 patients (20%), subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) in 5 patients (3.34%), lupus profundus in 5 patients (3.34%). The lupus non-specific lesions were non-scarring alopecia in 130 patients (86.67%), oral ulcers in 85 patients (56.67%), vasculitic lesions in 50 patients (33.34%), bullous lesions in 15 patients (10%), Raynaud's phenomenon in 10 patients (6.67%), pyoderma gangrenosum in 2 patients (1

  13. Treatment of lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolff, Sebastian; Berden, Jo H. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is a severe disease manifestation characterized by various clinical and histopathological alterations The revised International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 classification defines the subclasses of lupus nephritis (LN)

  14. Immunoglobulin light chain allelic inclusion in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Louise D; Zhao, Yuan; Lutalo, Pamela M K; D'Cruz, David P; Cason, John; Silva, Joselli S; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Nayar, Saba; Cope, Andrew P; Spencer, Jo

    2015-08-01

    The principles of allelic exclusion state that each B cell expresses a single light and heavy chain pair. Here, we show that B cells with both kappa and lambda light chains (Igκ and Igλ) are enriched in some patients with the systemic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but not in the systemic autoimmune disease control granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Detection of dual Igκ and Igλ expression by flow cytometry could not be abolished by acid washing or by DNAse treatment to remove any bound polyclonal antibody or complexes, and was retained after two days in culture. Both surface and intracytoplasmic dual light chain expression was evident by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. We observed reduced frequency of rearrangements of the kappa-deleting element (KDE) in SLE and an inverse correlation between the frequency of KDE rearrangement and the frequency of dual light chain expressing B cells. We propose that dual expression of Igκ and Igλ by a single B cell may occur in some patients with SLE when this may be a consequence of reduced activity of the KDE. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Study of Flare Assessment in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Paper Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isenberg, D; Sturgess, J; Allen, E

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the level of agreement of disease flare severity (distinguishing severe, moderate, and mild flare and persistent disease activity) in a large paper-patient exercise involving 988 individual cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: A total of 988 individual lupus case...... histories were assessed by 3 individual physicians. Complete agreement about the degree of flare (or persistent disease activity) was obtained in 451 cases (46%), and these provided the reference standard for the second part of the study. This component used 3 flare activity instruments (the British Isles......, even if there were no new or worsening clinical features. CONCLUSION: Given the complexity of assessing lupus flare, we were encouraged by the overall results reported. However, the problem of capturing lupus flare accurately is not completely solved....

  16. Neonatal and Obstetrical Outcomes of Pregnancies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Abdwani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects women primarily of childbearing age. The objective of this study was to determine the neonatal and maternal outcomes of pregnancies in SLE patients compared to pregnancies in healthy controls. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a tertiary care hospital in Oman between January 2007 and December 2013. We analyzed 147 pregnancies and compared 56 (38.0% pregnancies in women with SLE with 91 (61.9% pregnancies in healthy control women. Disease activity was determined using the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI. Results: The mean age of the cohort was 30.0±5.0 years ranging from 19 to 44 years old. Patients with SLE were treated with hydroxychloroquine (n = 41; 73.2%, prednisolone (n = 38; 67.8%, and azathioprine (n = 17; 30.3%. There was no disease activity in 39.2% (n = 22 of patients while 41.0% (n = 23, 12.5% (n = 7, and 7.1% (n = 4 had mild (SLEDAI 1–5, moderate (SLEDAI 6–10, and severe (SLEDAI ≥ 11 disease activity, respectively, at onset of pregnancy. Pregnancies in patients with SLE were associated with higher abortions (42.8% vs. 15.3%; p < 0.001, gestational diabetes (28.3% vs. 10.2%; p = 0.004, polyhydramnios (7.1% vs. 0.0%; p = 0.020, previous preterm pregnancies (8.9% vs. 1.0%; p = 0.030, and intrauterine growth retardation (21.4% vs. 0.0%; p < 0.001 when compared to pregnancies in healthy control women. Furthermore, the neonates born to mothers with SLE were more likely to be preterm (28.5% vs. 1.0%; p < 0.001, have a low birth weight (< 2500 g (32.1% vs. 1.0%; p < 0.001, and were associated with stillbirth (7.1% vs. 0.0%; p = 0.010 when compared to neonates born to healthy control mothers. Conclusions: Pregnancies in women with SLE were associated with higher neonatal and maternal complications. Therefore, pregnant women with SLE should have their pregnancy accurately planned, monitored, and

  17. The involvement of galectin-3 in skin injury in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Meng, Z; Han, Y; Cao, C; Tan, G; Wang, L

    2018-04-01

    Objective Our previous research suggested that anti-galectin-3 antibody was highly associated with the development of lupus skin lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study we aimed to investigate the involvement of galectin-3 in SLE skin damage. Methods The study consisted of 49 patients with SLE, 16 with dermatomyositis and 11 with systemic scleroderma and 20 healthy controls. Galectin-3 was examined by ELISA and immunohistochemical staining in serum and skin, respectively. Results Serum galectin-3 was significantly higher in patients with SLE than in those with dermatomyositis ( P  0.05). As for subtypes of skin lesions in SLE, galectin-3 expression was lower in chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus than in acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus ( P = 0.0439). Conclusion Serum galectin-3 is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of lupus skin damage, but can be a potential biomarker for the measurement of SLE disease activity. Galectin-3 is greatly reduced in patients with lupus lesions compared with healthy controls, which may contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the skin.

  18. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlemuter, G; Chaussade, S; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Dapoigny, M; Kahan, A; Godeau, P; Couturier, D

    1998-07-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) reflects a dysfunction of the visceral smooth muscle or the enteric nervous system. Gastrointestinal manifestations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but CIPO has not been reported. Features of CIPO are reported in five patients with SLE. From 1988 to 1993, five patients with SLE or SLE-like syndrome were hospitalised for gastrointestinal manometric studies. CIPO was the onset feature in two cases. Antroduodenal manometry (three hours fasting, two hours fed) was performed in all patients, and oesophageal manometry in four. Intestinal hypomotility associated with reduced bladder capacity and bilateral ureteral distension was found in four patients and aperistalsis of the oesophagus in three. Treatment, which consisted of high dose corticosteroids, parenteral nutrition, promotility agents, and antibiotics, led to remission of both CIPO and urinary abnormalities in all cases. Antroduodenal manometry performed in two patients after remission showed increased intestinal motility. One patient died, and postmortem examination showed intestinal vasculitis. CIPO in SLE is a life threatening situation that can be reversed by treatment. It may be: (a) a complication or onset feature of the disease; (b) secondary to smooth muscle involvement; (c) associated with ureteral and vesical involvement; (d) the result of intestinal vasculitis.

  19. The sense of smell in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Flitman-Katzevman, Iveta; Paran, Daphna; Katz, Bat-sheva Porat; Kivity, Shaye; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-05-01

    To assess the olfactory functions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and to examine the association between the sense of smell and disease activity and central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Olfactory functions in 50 SLE patients and 50 age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks test, the 3 stages of which are threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) of different odors. TDI scores were analyzed according to SLE disease activity and CNS involvement. In both the SLE and control groups, smell deficit correlated with male sex and older age. A decrease in the sense of smell was observed in SLE patients (46%) and controls (25%) (Psmell (anosmia) was documented only in SLE patients (10%). Total TDI scores and individual stages of smell correlated with SLE Disease Activity Index (Psmell in SLE patients compared with healthy subjects and that the decrease in the sense of smell among SLE patients correlates with disease activity and CNS involvement.

  20. Cardiac tamponade as an initial presentation for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, William; Frohwein, Thomas; Ong, Kenneth

    2017-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease which follows a relapsing and remitting course that can manifest in any organ system. While classic manifestations consist of arthralgia, myalgia, frank arthritis, a malar rash and renal failure to name a few, cardiac tamponade, however, is a far less common and far more dangerous presentation. We highlight the case of a 61year-old male with complaints of acute onset shortness of breath and generalized body aches associated with a fever and chills in the ER. A bedside echocardiogram revealed a significant pericardial effusion concerning for pericardial tamponade. An emergent pericardiocentesis performed drained 800mL of serosanguinous fluid. While denying a history of any rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, or seizures, his physical examination did reveal metacarpal phalangeal joint swelling along with noted pulsus paradoxus of 15-200mmHg. Subsequent lab work revealed ANA titer of 1:630 and anti-DS DNA antibody level of 256IU/mL consistent with SLE. This case highlights cardiac tamponade as a rare but life-threatening presentation for SLE and raises the need to keep it in the differential when assessing patients presenting with pertinent exam findings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Alcohol, smoking and illicit drug use in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Marlon; Queiroz, Lígia B; Lourenço, Daniela M R; Kozu, Katia; Lourenço, Benito; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate alcohol, smoking and/or illicit drug use, and history of bullying in adolescent childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and healthy controls. 174 adolescents with pediatric rheumatic diseases were selected. All of the 34 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 35 healthy controls participated in this study. A cross-sectional study included demographic/anthropometric data and puberty markers assessments; structured questionnaire and CRAFFT screening interview. McNemar tests indicated an excellent test-retest reliability of the structured questionnaire (p=1.0). The median current age was similar between childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls [15 (12-18) vs. 15 (12-18) years, p=0.563]. The median of menarche age was significantly higher in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls [12 (10-15) vs. 11.5 (9-15) years, p=0.041], particularly in those that lupus had occurred before first menstruation [13 (12-15) vs. 11.5(9-15) years, p=0.007]. The other puberty marker and sexual function parameters were similar in both groups (p>0.05). Alcohol use was similar in both childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls (38% vs. 46%, p=0.628). A trend of lower frequency of CRAFFT score ≥2 (high risk for substance abuse/dependence) was evidenced in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls (0% vs. 15%, p=0.053). Bullying was reported similarly for the two groups (43% vs. 44%, p=0.950). Further analysis in lupus patients regarding alcohol/smoking/illicit drug use showed no differences in demographic data, puberty markers, history of bullying, sexual function, contraceptive use, disease activity/damage scores, clinical/laboratorial features and treatments (p>0.05). This study showed high frequencies of early alcohol use in lupus adolescents and healthy controls, despite of a possible low risk for substance abuse/dependence in

  2. Clinical and immunological characteristics of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients in Jamaica: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, K C; Ferguson, T S; Stewart, H D; Myers, A A; De Ceulaer, K

    2017-11-01

    Background Epidemiological studies in systemic lupus erythematosus have been reported in the literature in many countries and ethnic groups. Although systemic lupus erythematosus in Jamaica has been described in the past, there has not been a detailed evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus patients in urban Jamaica, a largely Afro-Caribbean population. The goal of this study was to describe the clinical features, particularly disease activity, damage index and immunological features, of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus subjects. Methods 150 adult patients (≥18 years) followed in rheumatology clinic at a tertiary rheumatology hospital centre (one of two of the major public referral centres in Jamaica) and the private rheumatology offices in urban Jamaica who fulfilled Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria were included. Data were collected by detailed clinical interview and examination and laboratory investigations. Hence demographics, SLICC criteria, immunological profile, systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and SLICC/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) damage index (SDI) were documented. Results Of the 150 patients, 145 (96.7%) were female and five (3.3%) were male. The mean age at systemic lupus erythematosus onset was 33.2 ± 10.9. Mean disease duration was 11.3 ± 8.6 years. The most prevalent clinical SLICC criteria were musculoskeletal, with 141 (94%) of subjects experiencing arthralgia/arthritis, followed by mucocutaneous manifestations of alopecia 103 (68.7%) and malar rash 46 (30.7%), discoid rash 45 (30%) and photosensitivity 40 (26.7%). Lupus nephritis (biopsy proven) occurred in 42 (28%) subjects and 25 (16.7%) met SLICC diagnostic criteria with only positive antinuclear antibodies/dsDNA antibodies and lupus nephritis on renal biopsy. The most common laboratory SLICC criteria were positive antinuclear antibodies 136 (90.7%) followed by anti-dsDNA antibodies 95 (63.3%) and

  3. Development of systemic lupus erythematosus in-patient with systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jose B; Medina, Yimmy F; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Iglesias G, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    A 56 years old woman with systemic sclerosis consult by rapidly progressive deterioration of his pulmonary and renal function developing a superposition syndrome with systemic lupus erythematosus, unusual presentation that respond to high doses of corticosteroid and ciclophos- phamide. This is the first reported case in the literature of a superposition syndrome that begins with systemic sclerosis. The clinical finding, immunologic profile and its possible association are discussed

  4. Evaluation of cerebral perfusion in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus using 123I-IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Atsuko; Shishido, Fumio; Kato, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Seino, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    In the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), central nervous system (CNS) complications occur at a high frequency. An accurate diagnosis of CNS lupus, differentiated from secondary CNS involvement, is difficult. CNS lupus is indicative of advancing primary disease and is treated by steroid pulse therapy or increased dosage of steroids. In contrast, if symptoms are caused by secondary CNS complications, it is possible to observe or treat these complications using symptomatic therapy. We examined whether quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured using cerebral perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used to differentiate CNS lupus from secondary CNS involvement. We divided 18 SLE patients with CNS symptoms into a CNS lupus group and a non-CNS lupus group, and then compared the mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) of each group of patients. SPECT was performed with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine (IMP), with quantitation carried out by table look-up and autoradiographic methods. The mCBF of both groups was decreased; however, the mCBF of patients with CNS lupus was significantly lower than that of non-CNS lupus patients. Quantitative CBF may provide a useful tool to distinguish CNS lupus from non-CNS lupus. (author)

  5. Beta-adducin and sodium-calcium exchanger 1 gene variants are associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Giuseppe A; Lanzani, Chiara; Bozzolo, Enrica P; Zagato, Laura; Citterio, Lorena; Casamassima, Nunzia; Canti, Valentina; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manunta, Paolo; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2015-12-01

    Genetic research in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is rapidly developing, and numerous sets of genes are being associated with specific clinical subphenotypes in the setting of SLE. On the other hand, basic science studies are revealing strong connections between salt-water balance and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether variants of genes known to influence the individual susceptibility to hypertension also influence the renal function in a cohort of SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis (LN). This study is a case-control study with candidate gene approach. A total of 111 patients with SLE (50 with SLE without nephritis, 55 with LN and 6 with simple urinary sediment abnormalities) and 62 healthy controls (HC) were genotyped for NCX1 rs11893826 (NCX1a) and rs434082 (NCX1b) and ADD2 rs4984 SNPs. Patients with ADD2 CT genotype were protected from LN and skin involvement; ADD2 CC | NCX1a AA/AG genotypes were associated with the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies; NCX1a AA genotype was slightly more frequent in lupus patients than in HC and associated with relapse risk and higher creatinine in patients with LN. NCX1b GG patients with LN had increased chances to reach complete remission. NCX1b GG | NCX1a GG genotype is associated with joint involvement. ADD2 and NCX1 variants influence the risk and the clinical features of SLE and LN, highlighting their potential role in regulating systemic inflammation and/or the local response to immune-mediated injury.

  6. Preterm deliveries in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine A; Spitzer, Karen A; Nadler, Jamie N; Laskin, Carl A

    2003-10-01

    To compare the clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables of women in our clinic with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who have had a pregnancy resulting in a live birth and identify any correlations with either term or preterm delivery. Pregnancies in women with SLE from 1999 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. We recorded demographic data, disease activity (SLE Disease Activity Index, SLEDAI), obstetric history, prednisone dosage, other medications taken during pregnancy, history of renal disease, and autoantibody status [including antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA, anticardiolipin IgG (aCL), and lupus anticoagulant (LAC)]. Preterm delivery was defined as gestational age at delivery pregnancy, and outcome. Of the 72 pregnancies, 28 (38.9%) resulted in preterm deliveries. There were no significant differences in any demographic or disease variables measured comparing term versus preterm delivery groups. More women in the preterm group were taking > or = 10 mg/day prednisone during their pregnancy (50.0% vs 22.2%; p = 0.028), and the mean dose was significantly higher than the term group taking > or = 10 mg/day (24.8 vs 16.7 mg/day; p = 0.047). There was a higher prevalence of women with aCL IgG in the preterm group (p = 0.023). The mean weeks gestation was shorter for women positive for aCL IgG compared to the group negative for aCL (34.9 +/- 4.4 vs 37.5 +/- 3.2 weeks, respectively; p = 0.032). There was no difference in second trimester disease activity between the term and preterm groups (33.3% and 36.4% of each group had a SLEDAI of 0). However, significantly more women in the term group received no medication during their pregnancies compared to women in the preterm group (20.0% vs 0.0%; p = 0.031). The rates of preterm deliveries, premature rupture of membranes, intrauterine growth restriction, and aPL in SLE pregnancies vary considerably in published reports, most of which are retrospective analyses. Our rates closely approximate the median values for

  7. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy.

  8. Hepatic venous outflow block in a young patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavidel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatic venous outflow block or Budd-Chiari syndrome is a severe liver disease with a 3 years survival rate of 50%. Several conditions have been implicated as a cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome, including myeloproliferative disorders, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, the presence of lupus anti-coagulant, oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and others. In a small number of cases, Budd-Chiari syndrome is associated with the presence of lupus anticoagulant. Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA are similar to lupus anti-coagulant antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs, which have been described in patients with recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, fetal loss, or miscarriage. Case Report: A 23-year-old woman is reported with Budd-Chiari syndrome in whom lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were shown; 9 months after diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE treatment with steroids admitted with gastrointestinal problems, abdominal pain and ascites and treated oral anticoagulants induced a considerable improvement. This treatment was continued after 1 year, but interruption was followed by redevelopment of ascites. Further treatment with anticoagulants was continued for 5 years with noticeable improvement. Conclusion: Patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome should be tested for lupus anticoagulants and anticardiolipin antibodies, Budd-Chiari syndrome resulting from this cause may have a good response to treatment with oral anticoagulants; this treatment should be maintained permanently, and pregnancy in such patients may initiate serious difficulties. The condition of the patient at follow-up was good.

  9. MR imaging findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscal, Eyal; De Guzman, Marietta M.; Myones, Barry L.; Traipe, Elfrides; Hunter, Jill V.; Brey, Robin L.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial damage, hypertension and cytotoxic medications may serve as risk factors for the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in systemic lupus erythematosus. There have been few case reports of these findings in pediatric lupus patients. We describe clinical and neuroimaging findings in children and adolescents with lupus and a PRES diagnosis. We identified all clinically acquired brain MRIs of lupus patients at a tertiary care pediatric hospital (2002-2008). We reviewed clinical features, conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of patients with gray- and white-matter changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES. Six pediatric lupus patients presenting with seizures and altered mental status had MRI findings suggestive of PRES. In five children clinical and imaging changes were seen in conjunction with hypertension and active renal disease. MRI abnormalities were diffuse and involved frontal regions in five children. DWI changes reflected increased apparent diffusivity coefficient (unrestricted diffusion in all patients). Clinical and imaging changes significantly improved with antihypertensive and fluid management. MRI changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES may be seen in children with active lupus and hypertension. The differential diagnosis of seizures and altered mental status should include PRES in children, as it does in adults. (orig.)

  10. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE: A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ku

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome, disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement. We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy.

  11. Predictors of poor sleep quality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; Shiozawa, K; Yoshihara, R; Yamane, T; Shima, Y; Hirano, T; Makimoto, K

    2017-05-01

    Sleep problems are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to examine the following: (1) predictors of sleep quality and (2) fluctuations in sleep quality in patients with SLE. Patients with SLE were recruited from three rheumatology centers in Japan. We collected demographic and clinical data and data on sleep quality as measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-12, and the Lupus Patient Reported Outcome Tool (LupusPRO). Fluctuations in sleep quality were examined by administering the PSQI a second time after a 2-week interval. We used multiple linear regression analysis to predict sleep quality. Of 205 patients who completed the survey, 62.9% showed poor sleep quality. The largest fluctuation in sleep quality was for "waking in the middle of the night or early morning." "LupusPRO pain/vitality" was a major predictor of poor sleep. The other significant predictors were mostly LupusPRO subscales and clinical variables and SF-12 subscales were mostly non-predictive. The majority of the participants had poor sleep quality. A lupus-specific QoL scale is important for understanding poor sleep quality in SLE patients. Symptom management appeared to play a key role in improving sleep quality.

  12. MR imaging findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscal, Eyal; De Guzman, Marietta M.; Myones, Barry L. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and Pediatric Rheumatology Center, Houston, TX (United States); Traipe, Elfrides; Hunter, Jill V. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Brey, Robin L. [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Neurology, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Endothelial damage, hypertension and cytotoxic medications may serve as risk factors for the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in systemic lupus erythematosus. There have been few case reports of these findings in pediatric lupus patients. We describe clinical and neuroimaging findings in children and adolescents with lupus and a PRES diagnosis. We identified all clinically acquired brain MRIs of lupus patients at a tertiary care pediatric hospital (2002-2008). We reviewed clinical features, conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of patients with gray- and white-matter changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES. Six pediatric lupus patients presenting with seizures and altered mental status had MRI findings suggestive of PRES. In five children clinical and imaging changes were seen in conjunction with hypertension and active renal disease. MRI abnormalities were diffuse and involved frontal regions in five children. DWI changes reflected increased apparent diffusivity coefficient (unrestricted diffusion in all patients). Clinical and imaging changes significantly improved with antihypertensive and fluid management. MRI changes suggestive of vasogenic edema and PRES may be seen in children with active lupus and hypertension. The differential diagnosis of seizures and altered mental status should include PRES in children, as it does in adults. (orig.)

  13. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Focus on Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shala Ghaderi Berntsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML caused by reactivation of the JC virus (JCV, a human polyomavirus, occurs in autoimmune disorders, most frequently in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. We describe a HIV-negative 34-year-old female with SLE who had been treated with immunosuppressant therapy (IST; steroids and azathioprine since 2004. In 2011, she developed decreased sensation and weakness of the right hand, followed by vertigo and gait instability. The diagnosis of PML was made on the basis of brain MRI findings (posterior fossa lesions and JCV isolation from the cerebrospinal fluid (700 copies/ml. IST was immediately discontinued. Cidofovir, mirtazapine, mefloquine and cycles of cytarabine were sequentially added, but there was progressive deterioration with a fatal outcome 1 year after disease onset. This report discusses current therapeutic choices for PML and the importance of early infection screening when SLE patients present with neurological symptoms. In the light of recent reports of PML in SLE patients treated with rituximab or belimumab, we highlight that other IST may just as well be implicated. We conclude that severe lymphopenia was most likely responsible for JCV reactivation in this patient and discuss how effective management of lymphopenia in SLE and PML therapy remains an unmet need.

  14. T Cell Transcriptomes Describe Patient Subtypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean J Bradley

    Full Text Available T cells regulate the adaptive immune response and have altered function in autoimmunity. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE has great diversity of presentation and treatment response. Peripheral blood component gene expression affords an efficient platform to investigate SLE immune dysfunction and help guide diagnostic biomarker development for patient stratification.Gene expression in peripheral blood T cell samples for 14 SLE patients and 4 controls was analyzed by high depth sequencing. Unbiased clustering of genes and samples revealed novel patterns related to disease etiology. Functional annotation of these genes highlights pathways and protein domains involved in SLE manifestation.We found transcripts for hundreds of genes consistently altered in SLE T cell samples, for which DAVID analysis highlights induction of pathways related to mitochondria, nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication. Fewer genes had reduced mRNA expression, and these were linked to signaling, splicing and transcriptional activity. Gene signatures associated with the presence of dsDNA antibodies, low complement levels and nephritis were detected. T cell gene expression also indicates the presence of several patient subtypes, such as having only a minimal expression phenotype, male type, or severe with or without induction of genes related to membrane protein production.Unbiased transcriptome analysis of a peripheral blood component provides insight on autoimmune pathophysiology and patient variability. We present an open source workflow and richly annotated dataset to support investigation of T cell biology, develop biomarkers for patient stratification and perhaps help indicate a source of SLE immune dysfunction.

  15. [Pulmonary pathology in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, A L; Chugunnaia, S M; Arshinov, A V; Driazhenkova, I V; Masina, I V

    2005-01-01

    To characterize pulmonary lesion in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on the basis of clinical device and biochemical examination regarding features of the disease onset and development. The study included 60 SLE patients. Mean age 41.1 +/- 1.32 years. Mean SLE duration 12.42 +/- 1.06 years. Activity according to the SLEDAI and ECLAM indices--16.23 +/- 0.93 and 3.09 +/- 0.18 scores, respectively. The comparison groups: 30 patients with bronchial asthma (BA), 15--with chronic bronchitis (CB), 15--with chronic obstructive bronchitis (COB), 30 healthy donors. The following parameters were studied: spirometric, bodyplethismographic evidence, diffuse ability of the lungs (DAL), plasm concentrations of adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonine, histamine, hemodynamics, anxiety, depression, social adaptation (quality of life) and vegetative dysfunctions. Statistics were obtained with BIOSTATISTIKA program. DAL depends on duration of SLE, severity of lung hypertension (LH), severity of anemia. LH in SLE deteriorated vegetative disorders and social adaptation. Lowering of plasm dopamine concentration was accompanied with LH, formation of vegetative dysfunction and worse social adaptation. Affection of the lungs in SLE patients runs without evident clinical symptoms. Initial signs of lung affection manifest with low DAL, LH, moderate restrictive, obstructive and mixed disorders of external respiration function.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus observations of travel burden: A qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edith M; Ortiz, Kasim; Flournoy-Floyd, Minnjuan; Bruner, Larisa; Kamen, Diane

    2015-09-01

    Explorations of travel impediments among patients suffering from rheumatic diseases have been very limited. Research has consistently indicated a shortage of rheumatologists, resulting in patients potentially having to travel long distances for care. The purpose of our study was to explore how systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients experience travel issues differentially by race and socio-economic status. We conducted semi-structured interviews and a brief demographic survey with 10 patients diagnosed with SLE. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using NVivo Analysis Software to facilitate the reporting of recurrent themes and supporting quotations, and an initial codebook was independently developed by two researchers on the study team and then verified together. Patients described three major areas of concern with respect to travel burden in accessing their rheumatologists: reliance on caregivers; meeting financial priorities; and pain and physical limitations. Our data suggest general traveling challenges interfering with medical appointment compliance for several participants and the importance of socio-economic issues when considering travel issues. This study highlights an important area with implications for adherence to medical appointments and participation in research among patients with SLE. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Pregnancy and reproductive aspects of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Laura; Crisafulli, Francesca; Tincani, Angela

    2017-09-01

    To discuss pregnancy and reproductive aspects in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with particular focus on preconception counselling, maternal and foetal outcomes, safety and beneficial effects of drugs during pregnancy as well as contraception methods, assisted reproduction techniques and strategies for thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of family planning and women's health issues in SLE and/or APS have been developed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. The primary aim of these recommendations is to provide a practical tool for facilitating physician-patient communication on reproductive issues. Points-to-consider and guidelines were also released on the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. Women with SLE should be timely and periodically counselled on family planning. Preconception counselling and risk stratification (based on disease activity and serological profile) are key points for having successful pregnancies thanks to individualized treatments and close monitoring for maternal and foetal complications. Contraception and assisted reproduction techniques are feasible in women with SLE, provided that potential risks are minimized by individualized management and appropriate prophylaxis.

  18. Healthcare Utilization and Costs of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Medicaid

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    Hong J. Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Healthcare utilization and costs associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a US Medicaid population were examined. Methods. Patients ≥ 18 years old with SLE diagnosis (ICD-9-CM 710.0x were extracted from a large Medicaid database 2002–2009. Index date was date of the first SLE diagnosis. Patients with and without SLE were matched. All patients had a variable length of followup with a minimum of 12 months. Annualized healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE and costs of SLE flares were assessed during the followup period. Multivariate regressions were conducted to estimate incremental healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE. Results. A total of 14,777 SLE patients met the study criteria, and 14,262 were matched to non-SLE patients. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare utilization per year than their matched controls. The estimated incremental annual cost associated with SLE was $10,984, with the highest increase in inpatient costs (P<0.001. Cost per flare was $11,716 for severe flares, $562 for moderate flares, and $129 for mild flares. Annual total costs for patients with severe flares were $49,754. Conclusions. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare resource utilization and costs than non-SLE patients. Patients with severe flares had the highest costs.

  19. Cortical Thickness and Episodic Memory Impairment in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Bernardo Canedo; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Netto, Tania Maria; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in brain cortical thickness of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with and without episodic memory impairment and healthy controls. We studied 51 patients divided in 2 groups (SLE with episodic memory deficit, n = 17; SLE without episodic memory deficit, n = 34) by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and 34 healthy controls. Groups were paired based on sex, age, education, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and accumulation of disease burden. Cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging scans was determined using the FreeSurfer software package. SLE patients with episodic memory deficits presented reduced cortical thickness in the left supramarginal cortex and superior temporal gyrus when compared to the control group and in the right superior frontal, caudal, and rostral middle frontal and precentral gyri when compared to the SLE group without episodic memory impairment considering time since diagnosis of SLE as covaried. There were no significant differences in the cortical thickness between the SLE without episodic memory and control groups. Different memory-related cortical regions thinning were found in the episodic memory deficit group when individually compared to the groups of patients without memory impairment and healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosus activity and beta two microglobulin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Larocca Skare

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with a cyclical clinical course. Evaluation of the clinical activity of this disease is important for choosing the correct treatment. The objective of this study was to analyze the value of beta-2 microglobulin (β2M serum levels in determining SLE clinical activity.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional analytical study conducted at the rheumatology outpatient clinic of a private university hospital.METHODS: 129 SLE patients were studied regarding disease activity using SLEDAI (SLE Disease Activity Index and cumulative damage using SLICC ACR (SLE International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE. At the same time, the β2M serum level, ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anti-dsDNA (anti-double-stranded DNA and C3 and C4 complement fractions were determined.RESULTS: β2M levels correlated positively with SLEDAI (P = 0.02 and ESR (P = 0.0009 and negatively with C3 (P = 0.007. Patients who were positive for anti-dsDNA had higher β2M serum levels (P = 0.009.CONCLUSION: β2M levels are elevated in SLE patients with active disease.

  1. The clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Ünlü, Ozan; Zuily, Stephane; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Thirty to forty percent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are tested positive for aPL, which may have an impact on the SLE presentation, management, and prognosis. Compared with SLE patients without aPL, those with aPL have a higher prevalence of thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity, valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, livedo reticularis, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, acute/chronic renal vascular lesions, and moderate/severe cognitive impairment; worse quality of life; and higher risk of organ damage. The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is controversial for primary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention because of the lack of strong prospective controlled data. Similarly, the use of anticoagulation is controversial for patients with an aPL-related nephropathy. Until further studies are available, physicians should discuss the risk/benefits of LDA or anticoagulation as well as the available literature with patients. PMID:27708976

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus vulgaris: association or coincidence.

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    Calebotta, A; Cirocco, A; Giansante, E; Reyes, O

    2004-01-01

    Few cases have been published relating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We describe a patient with this association. A 35-year old woman who started to develop persistent pain and morning stiffness of proximal inter and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. During the following year, the patient recalled the onset of blisters on both legs, face, arms and thorax, as well as erosions appearing on oral mucous membranes. We observed generalized multiple erosions on her trunk and legs, flaccid bullae located on her right thigh and multiple erosions on oral mucous membranes. A skin biopsy reported PV Direct immunofluorescence on the perilesional skin specimen, showed beehive intercellular IgG deposits in the epidermis (+++), suggesting PV; granular discontinuous IgM and C3 deposits in the dermal-epidermal union (+++), suggesting SLE. Direct immunofluorescence of the healthy unexposed skin specimen, reported granular discontinuous IgG deposits in the dermal-epidermal union and beehive intercellular IgG deposits in the lower levels of the epidermis (+++); granular continuous IgM deposits in the dermal-epidermal union (+++). The results of rheumatic studies were obtained as follows: ANA :3 +, Anti-DNA, Anti-Sm, Anti-Ro and Anti-La :4 + . The definite diagnosis was PVand SLE. Treatment with 50 mg of prednisone daily with good evolution.

  3. Temperament and character in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Mani, Arash; Rostami, Anahita; Aflaki, Elham; Ravanfar, Parsa

    2018-01-01

    In addition to identified neuropsychiatric characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), changes in personality seem to occur in patients with SLE. Even in absence of an axis I psychiatric diagnosis, personality variations play important role in general wellbeing of these patients. This study investigated personality features in patients with SLE using Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). In this case-control study personality features of 59 patients with confirmed diagnosis of SLE were evaluated using Persian version of TCI-125 questionnaire. Collected data from patients with SLE were statistically compared with normative data for Iranian population. Among four subscales of temperament, reward dependence (RD) and harm-avoidance (HA) were significantly lower than general population. Self-directedness (SD) character dimension was significantly lower in SLE patients compared to normative data. No significant difference was noted in novelty-seeking (NS) and persistence (PS) temperament scales and cooperativeness (CO) and self-transcendence (ST) character scales. Personality changes in SLE is characterized by higher HA and RD along with low SD. These features are associated with higher anxiety, social withdrawal and lower resourcefulness and purposefulness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    de Andrade, F A; Guimarães Moreira Balbi, G; Bortoloti de Azevedo, L G; Provenzano Sá, G; Vieira de Moraes Junior, H; Mendes Klumb, E; Abramino Levy, R

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect different ocular structures, such as cornea, conjunctiva, episclera, sclera, uveal tract, retina, optic nerve and vessels. Neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations in SLE include different degrees of involvement of retina, choroid and optic nerve. Retinal changes are one of the most common ocular involvements and are frequently used as clinical criteria for activity, even if isolated. Studies show that up to 29% of patients with active SLE manifest retinal disease. The exact prevalence of choroidal disease is unknown, but is thought to be less common than retinopathy, due to under-diagnosis. Optic nerve disease, represented by optic neuritis and anterior/posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy, affects approximately 1% of SLE patients. These ocular manifestations have been associated with neurologic flares, antiphospholipid antibodies, nephropathy, and increased mortality. The aim of this paper is to review the different aspects of neuro-ophthalmologic involvement in SLE. Since these manifestations are frequent and potentially severe, a multi-professional team approach is needed to investigate properly and provide early aggressive treatment in order to avoid visual sequelae.

  5. Myelitis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus: review.

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    Łukjanowicz, Małgorzata; Brzosko, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Myelopathy manifested clinically as acute longitudinal or transverse myelitis constitutes one of the most severe and rare neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (1-3% of patients). Myelitis has been observed less commonly in other connective tissue diseases, mostly in antiphospholipid syndrome, and rarely in Sjögren's syndrome, Behçet's disease and mixed connective tissue disease. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) may also be present in diseases of various etiology, including multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, infectious diseases and malignancies. Myelitis in SLE is manifested as a dramatic spinal cord injury leading to paralysis or muscular paresis, sensory deficits, and smooth muscle dysfunction usually in the form of sphincter dysfunction. The imaging technique of choice in case of suspected ATM is magnetic resonance imaging with intravenous contrast agent (gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacid). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination in patients with ATM in the course of SLE indicate usually pleocytosis with prevalence of granulocytes, increased protein levels, low glucose levels, significantly hindering differential diagnosis in the early stage of the disease. Observations made by the authors (2 female patients with SLE) show that antibodies specific to SLE can be found in the CSF collected in the acute phase of myelitis. These observations have not yet been confirmed by other researchers. Early introduction of intravenous immunosuppression with large doses of cyclophosphamide and glucocorticosteroids improves the long-term prognosis. Other therapeutic approaches have been also used in more severe cases. Even with appropriate therapy, prognosis in this disease is uncertain.

  6. [Psychic changes in systemic lupus erythematosus: a multidisciplinary prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel Filho, E C; Pereira, R M; Busatto Filho, G; Shavitt, R G; Hirsch, R; de Sá, L C; de Arruda, P C

    1990-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of psychic symptoms in lupus patients, there are few systematic studies in this area. Through a multidisciplinary approach, the authors developed a prospective study to characterize and correlate psychopathological aspects with clinical and laboratory data concerning neural manifestations of the disease. Out of 23 patients studied, 12 showed psychic alterations, which were interpreted as primary manifestations of the disease. All of them presented organic mental syndromes (DSM-III-R) in which cognitive symptoms were the most prominent, followed by affective, catatonic and hallucinatory features. The neurologic findings (seizure, migraine and muscular atrophy), as well as the ophthalmologic alterations (hemorrhage and soft exudates) were frequent and concomitant with the psychic features. The laboratory findings were: LE cells 50%; anti-Sm: 16%; anti-U1 RNP: 50%; anti-Ro/SS-A: 50%; anti-nDNA: 58%; decreased CH50 or fractions (C3, C4): 67%; anti-P: 18%; antigangliosides IgG: 67%; antigangliosides IgM: 78%. The cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed: increased cellularity: 18%; elevated protein: 36%; antigangliosides IgG: 67%; antigangliosides IgM: 33%; immunocomplexes: 36%. In spite of the absence of an adequate control group and of the small number of patients, the multidisciplinary approach leads to a better characterization of the nervous system involvement in this disease.

  7. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunctions in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak; Mosca, Marta; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ruffilli, Ilaria; Corti, Alessandro; Panicucci, Erica; Neri, Rossella; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2010-06-01

    The association of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and thyroid autoimmunity has been reported by several studies in a wide range of variability. However, from a review of the literature, discrepant results have been reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of clinical and subclinical thyroid disorders in patients with SLE vs sex- and age-matched controls. Thyroid hormones and the presence of antithyroid antibodies were tested and thyroid ultrasonography was performed in 213 patients with SLE vs 426 sex- and age-matched controls, from the same geographic area, with a well-defined status of iodine intake. The odds ratio for subclinical hypothyroidism for female patients with SLE with respect to controls was 4.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-8.4); for antithyroid peroxidase antibody (AbTPO) positivity, it was 2.6 (95% CI, 1.7-4.1); and for thyroid autoimmunity, it was 2.9 (95% CI, 2.0-4.4). The mean values of thyroid-stimulating hormone and AbTPO were higher in female SLE patients than in controls (P illness syndrome" vs 0 control. Thyroid function and AbTPOs should be tested and ultrasonography should be performed as part of the clinical profile in SLE patients. Subjects at high risk (women, positive AbTPOs, hypoechoic, and small thyroid) should have thyroid function follow-up and appropriate treatment in due course. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tolerogenic probiotics: potential immunoregulators in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

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    Esmaeili, Seyed-Alireza; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Momtazi, Amir Abbas; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Doulabi, Hassan; Rastin, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Probiotics are commensal or nonpathogenic microbes that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and confer beneficial effects on the host through several mechanisms such as competitive exclusion, anti-bacterial effects, and modulation of immune responses. There is growing evidence supporting the immunomodulatory ability of some probiotics. Several experimental and clinical studies have been shown beneficial effect of some probiotic bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria strains, on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is mainly characterized by immune intolerance towards self-antigens. Some immunomodulatory probiotics have been found to regulate immune responses via tolerogenic mechanisms. Dendritic and T regulatory (Treg) cells, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-23 can be considered as the most determinant dysregulated mediators in tolerogenic status. As demonstrated by documented experimental and clinical trials on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, a number of probiotic bacterial strains can restore tolerance in host through modification of such dysregulated mediators. Since there are limited reports regarding to impact of probiotic supplementation in SLE patients, the preset review was aimed to suggest a number of probiotics bacteria, mainly from Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus strains that are able to ameliorate immune responses. The aim was followed through literature survey on immunoregulatory probiotics that can restore tolerance and also modulate the important dysregulated pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Splenectomy increases the subsequent risk of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Hsu, Chung Y; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Splenectomy may be necessary to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with thrombocytopenia; however, whether performing a splenectomy on patients without SLE increases the subsequent risk of SLE remains unknown. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the association between splenectomy and SLE. We conducted a cohort study by using data from the Taiwan National Health Institute Research Database to identify 10,298 patients with received a splenectomy between 2000 and 2006 and 41,192 participants without received a splenectomy who were selected by frequency matched based on sex, age, and the index year. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of developing SLE associated with splenectomy compared with patients who did not receive a splenectomy. During the study period, the overall incidence density rate of SLE was higher in the splenectomy cohort than in the non-splenectomy cohort (adjusted HR 10.55; 95 % CI 50.55-20.05). The incidence density rates of SLE in women and men who received a splenectomy were higher than those of patients who did not receive a splenectomy. Non-traumatic splenectomy increases the subsequent risk of SLE. The risk of SLE should be considered before performing a splenectomy, particularly in women and younger patients.

  10. Acquired Von Willebrand’s Syndrome in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Taveras Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS is an uncommon, underdiagnosed, and heterogeneous disease which is increasingly recognized as a cause of bleeding diatheses. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an infrequent cause of AVWS. Herein, we report a case of AVWS diagnosed during the initial presentation of SLE in a previously healthy young man with no family history of bleeding diathesis who presented with worsening epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and anasarca. He was found to have severe anemia and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT with severely decreased levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF measurements in addition to markedly decreased factor VIII levels. Further evaluation revealed nephrotic syndrome and interstitial lung disease due to SLE. He initially received combination therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates without significant improvement. Treatment with steroids, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab was followed by clinical improvement evidenced by cessation of bleeding. The short follow-up did not allow us to definitely prove the therapeutic effect of immunosuppressive treatment on AVWS in SLE patients. This case adds to the literature supporting the relationship between AVWS and SLE and highlights the importance of combination therapy in the treatment of severe AVWS as well as the role of IVIG, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab in AVWS associated with SLE.

  11. [Assessing the cardiovascular risk in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

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    Arnaud, L; Mathian, A; Bruckert, E; Amoura, Z

    2014-11-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Among these are the so-called classical cardiovascular risk factors, the disease itself through its activity, treatments, and complications, and the thrombotic risk due to antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Observational studies suggest that most classical cardiovascular risk factors are observed more frequently in SLE patients than in the general population, and that these are insufficient to explain the increased cardiovascular risk observed in most studies. Given this high risk, adequate management of cardiovascular risk factors should be recommended in SLE patients. Paradoxically, the benefit due to the anti-inflammatory properties of treatments such as corticosteroids may exceed, in certain cases, their pro-atherogenic effect. Importantly, the tools that were developed for the estimation of cardiovascular risk at the individual level among the general population cannot be used reliably in SLE patients, as these tools appear to underestimate the true cardiovascular risk. The adequate indications and targets of cardiovascular treatments are therefore not fully known in SLE. A better understanding of the determinants of the cardiovascular risk in SLE will allow the identification and more tailored management of these high-risk patients. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Aging and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Immunosenescence and Beyond.

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    van den Hoogen, Lucas Laurens; Sims, Gary Patrick; van Roon, Joel Adrianus Gijsbert; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth Dorothea Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The lifespan of humans has increased drastically over the last decades; considerable effort has been applied to delineate the mechanisms behind aging in order to find strategies for longevity. As the benefits of the gained knowledge might extend to diseases, where accelerated aging is suspected, the role of aging in the systemic autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is of particular interest. In this review the immunological similarities of SLE and aging are analyzed on three levels: the clinical, the cellular and the molecular, in order to find possible common pathological mechanisms. Common clinical features (e.g. increased infection rates, incidence of tumors and cardiovascular diseases) of SLE-patients and elderly individuals and shared characteristics of immuno-senescence and SLE are identified. These similarities are strongest in the adaptive immune system, where terminally differentiated T-cells and an immunological risk profile are found in both conditions. Also the aging innate immune system has overlapping features with SLE, exemplified by a generally lowered phagocytic capacity. However, great disparities between the aging immune system and SLE become apparent on a closer look, affecting numbers, phenotype and function of most immune cells, ranging from NETosis by granulocytes to the mechanisms underlying abnormal IL-2 production by T-cells. On the molecular level, also the increased presence of aging mechanisms like telomere attrition, DNA damage, autophagy and the characteristics of the mTOR pathway in SLE, possibly contributing to the shared changes on the cellular and clinical level are elaborated. The possible implications thereof concern existing (hydroxychloroquine, rapamycine, Glucocorticoids) as well as novel therapeutic strategies targeting more specific pathways which might rapidly reach the clinical arena. Overall a differential view on the similarities of aging and SLE and possible consequences is presented.

  13. Linguistic Validation of the LupusQoL for the Assessment of Quality of Life in Iranian Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeimehossadat Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Persian LupusQoL for the evaluation of quality of life in Iranian systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. Methods. The LupusQoL was translated to Persian language. Patients with SLE (n=78 completed the LupusQoL and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Disease activity and cumulative disease damage were assessed with standard indices. The psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated. Results. The Cronbach’s alpha was 0.97 for the total LupusQoL (above 0.8 for subscales. There were strong corrected item-total (r>0.4, item-subscale (r≥0.5, and subscale-total correlations (r>0.6, as well as intersubscale correlations (r>0.5. Patients with active disease and patients with disease damage index of ≥1 had lower scores in domains of planning, emotional health, burden to others, and body image than patients with inactive disease and those with no disease damage, respectively (P0.4. Conclusion. The psychometric characteristics of the Persian version of LupusQoL questionnaire are acceptable in Iranian population. This instrument can be used to evaluate quality of life in Iranian SLE patients.

  14. Lupus nephritis: current update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The general consensus is that 60% of lupus patients will develop clinically relevant nephritis at some time in the course of their illness. Prompt recognition and treatment of renal disease is important, as early response to therapy is correlated with better outcome. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying lupus nephritis and how the disease is currently diagnosed and treated. PMID:22078716

  15. Lupus Activity in Pregnancy

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    Clowse, Megan E. B.

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy in a woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) can be complicated by both lupus activity and pregnancy mishaps. The majority of recent studies demonstrate an increase in lupus activity during pregnancy, perhaps exacerbated by hormonal shifts required to maintain pregnancy. Increased lupus activity, in turn, prompts an elevated risk for poor pregnancy outcomes, including stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight, and preeclamspsia. Fortunately, the majority of pregnancies in wo...

  16. Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus, 1995-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Laustrup, H; Hjelmborg, J

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveThe objective of this paper is to investigate survival and causes of death in a Danish lupus population.MethodsTwo hundred and fifteen SLE patients (94% Caucasians) were followed prospectively for up to 16 years. Thirty-eight patients died. Survival rate and causes of death were analysed......%) and malignancies (13%). Deaths due to infections and active SLE were rare and predominated within the first seven years after diagnosis and before age 40, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed after 20 years' follow-up.ConclusionThis study shows that despite progress in lupus management, including direct access...... to specialized hospital care and increased use of hydroxychloroquine, mortality in lupus patients is still increased. Main causes of death were active disease and infections among the young and newly diagnosed, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed in longstanding disease....

  17. Neurodevelopmental disorders in children born to mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Vinet, É; Pineau, C A; Clarke, A E; Fombonne, É; Platt, R W; Bernatsky, S

    2014-10-01

    Children born to women with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to have a potentially increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders compared to children born to healthy women. Recent experimental data suggest in utero exposure to maternal antibodies and cytokines as important risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. Interestingly, women with systemic lupus erythematosus display high levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, which have been shown, in animal models, to alter fetal brain development and induce behavioral anomalies in offspring. Furthermore, subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurodevelopmental disorders share a common genetic predisposition, which could impair the fetal immune response to in utero immunologic insults. Moreover, systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancies are at increased risk of adverse obstetrical outcomes and medication exposures, which have been implicated as potential risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge on neurodevelopmental disorders and their potential determinants in systemic lupus erythematosus offspring. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. A case of systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as bilateral avascular necrosis of femur.

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    Adikari, Madura; Gunawardane, Aloka; Illangantilaka, Sachithra; Atukorale, Himantha; Rubasinghe, Jeevanie

    2016-08-05

    Avascular necrosis occur as a result of diverse etiology. Chronic inflammatory conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus considered as a recognize cause. Many cases were reported in systemic lupus erythematosus after treating with corticosteroids. We report a case of a corticosteroid naïve patient presented as bilateral avascular necrosis of femoral head and later progressed to a case of systemic lupus erythematosus. A 26 year old lady presented with right sided hip pain and diagnosed as avascular necrosis of the femoral head. After 6 months she presented a similar pain in left hip, which revealed avascular necrosis of left femoral head as well. A probable cause for her clinical presentation could not be found after extensive clinical and laboratory evaluation. Patient reported high erythrocyte sedimentation rate persistently, and over the next few years progressed as a case of systemic lupus erythematosus. Above case illustrated avascular necrosis could be an early musculoskeletal manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus even in the absence of corticosteroid administration.

  19. Management of cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, C; Fuego, C; Manrique-Arija, S; Fernández-Nebro, A

    2017-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of this study was to review the effectiveness of interventions for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality and to review the effectiveness of interventions for cardiovascular risk factor reduction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. A systematic review was conducted. Electronic databases Medline and Embase (1961-2015) were searched. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected. Low-calorie and/or low glycaemic index calories may be a useful option for secondary prevention in obese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and exercise would be useful in improving the endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation in this group of patients. The use of lipid-lowering drugs may improve the lipid profile in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and hyperlipidaemia, but the effect of this treatment on overall cardiovascular mortality remains unknown. Antiplatelets, anticoagulants, antimalarials and lipid-lowering drugs may be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of major cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Similarly, lipid-lowering drugs and antimalarial drugs appear to reduce the serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, glucose, diastolic blood pressure and calcium deposition at the coronary arteries. They may also improve insulin resistance and the level of high-density lipoproteins. It appears that treatment with antihypertensive drugs reduces blood pressure in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, but the available studies are of low quality.

  20. Cytokines in relation to autoantibodies before onset of symptoms for systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Eriksson, C; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S

    2014-06-01

    A number of cytokines and chemokines were analysed and related to autoantibodies in blood samples pre-dating the onset of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thirty-five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were identified as having donated blood samples, prior to symptom onset, to the Biobank of northern Sweden. Altogether, 140 age- and sex-matched controls were also identified. The concentrations of interferon-α, interleukin-4, interleukin-9, interleukin-10, interferon inducible protein-10 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were analysed using multiplex technology and related to autoantibodies (ANA, ENA, anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies) analysed from the same blood sample. The interferon-γ inducible protein-10 levels were higher in the pre-symptomatic individuals than in controls (p lupus erythematosus. An increased concentration of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 pre-dated the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus and was related to autoantibodies before the onset of disease. The levels of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 and interferon-α were correlated. These findings support the proposal that the interferon system is important early in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and autoantibody formation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. 17-β Estradiol reduces atherosclerosis without exacerbating lupus in ovariectomized systemic lupus erythematosus-susceptible LDLr−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, KA; Cline, JM; Cann, JA

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that estrogen treatment in a radiation chimera mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and atherosclerosis will increase SLE-associated atherosclerosis by increasing autoantibody production and inflammation. Methods We used a radiation chimera mouse model in which bone marrow from the polygenic B6.Sle1.2.3 model of SLE was transferred to the low density lipoprotein receptor knock out (LDLr−/−) model of atherosclerosis on a C57BL/6 background (Sle/LDLr−/−). Ovariectomized chimeric mice were treated for 10 weeks with either 5.6 ug/day of 17β-estradiol or placebo; outcomes included atherosclerosis plaque size, anti-dsDNA autoantibody production and renal pathology. Results Mean atherosclerosis plaque size was 67.4 ± 7.6% smaller in the estrogen treated group (patherosclerosis lesion size and either the renal histology score or UP:UC ratio in Sle/LDLr−/− mice. Conclusion These results indicate that 17β-estradiol is atheroprotective within the context of murine SLE independent of changes in serum cholesterol concentration, autoantibody concentration, or renal pathology. The SLE phenotype in Sle/LDLr−/− mice is not exacerbated by exogenous 17β-estradiol administration, and the reduced UP:UC ratio suggests a protective effect against lupus nephritis. PMID:23395521

  2. CXCL13 as a new biomarker of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis - from bench to bedside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, L; Worthmann, K; Haller, H; Schiffer, M

    2015-01-01

    Different studies over the last decade have linked the B cell-attracting chemokine CXC ligand 13 (CXCL13) to the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A pathogenetic role of this chemokine for disease manifestation in SLE was described initially in mouse models for SLE. Mechanisms of CXCL13 actions were also identified in SLE patients. Moreover, various clinical studies have identified CXCL13 serum levels as a useful biomarker in patients with SLE of different ethnicities for disease activity. In addition, CXCL13 seems to be a promising marker for the diagnosis of lupus nephritis, one of the most severe complications of SLE. However, its exact place within the mechanisms that lead to SLE remains to be defined. Further research is needed to resolve more details of the pathomechanism and the signalling pathway of CXCL13 in SLE. Blocking CXCL13 or the signal pathways of CXCL13 is seen as a promising therapeutic approach for SLE and will be addressed in the near future. This review summarizes all papers that linked CXCL13 to SLE and highlights its importance in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of SLE. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  3. The African Lupus Genetics Network (ALUGEN) registry: standardized, prospective follow-up studies in African patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, B; Mapiye, D; Jayne, D; Kalla, A; Tiffin, N; Okpechi, I

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence and severity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) differs between ethnic groups and geographical regions. Although initially reported as rare, there is growing evidence that SLE is prevalent and runs a severe course in Africa. There is a paucity of prospective studies on African SLE patients. The African Lupus Genetics Network (ALUGEN) is a multicentred framework seeking to prospectively assess outcomes in SLE patients in Africa. Outcomes measured will be death, hospital admission, disease activity flares, and SLE-related damage. We will explore predictors for these outcomes including clinical, serological, socio-demographic, therapeutic and genetic factors. Further, we will investigate comorbidities and health-related quality of life amongst these patients. Data of patients recently (≤ 5 yrs) diagnosed with SLE will be collected at baseline and annual follow-up visits, and captured electronically. The ALUGEN project will facilitate standardized data capture for SLE cases in Africa, allowing participating centres to develop their own SLE registries, and enabling collaboration to enrich our understanding of inter-ethnic and regional variations in disease expression. Comprehensive, high-quality multi-ethnic data on African SLE patients will expand knowledge of the disease and inform clinical practice, in addition to augmenting research capacity and networking links and providing a platform for future biomarker and interventional studies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as a presenting feature of systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Chawki, Sylvain; Aouizerate, Jessie; Trad, Selim; Prinseau, Jacques; Hanslik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is an unusual presenting clinical feature of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report: We report the case of a young woman who was admitted to hospital for sudden sensorineural hearing loss and hemophagocytic syndrome which was attributed to systemic lupus erythematosus on the basis of specific renal involvement, thrombocytopenia, and consistent autoantibodies. Favorable outcome was obtained on high-dose corticosteroids, and the hearing fully recovered. Discussion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in systemic lupus erythematosus is seemingly more frequently associated with severe systemic involvement and antiphospholipid antibodies may be present. Although management remains empirical, the high risk of permanent hearing impairment seems to justify emergency treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. When the clinical and laboratory criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome are met, antiplatelets agents or anticoagulation therapy shall be considered. PMID:27603334

  5. BUDGET IMPACT ANALYSIS OF BELIMUMAB IN TREATING SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierotti, Francesca; Palla, Iaria; Pippo, Lara; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluates the costs of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the budget impact due to the introduction of belimumab in the Italian setting. Adaptation to the Italian setting of a budget impact model with a time horizon of 4 years (year 0 without belimumab, years 1-3 with belimumab) to compare treatment, administration, and clinical monitoring costs of standard therapy and of the alternative scenario in which belimumab is administered in addition to the standard therapy to the subgroup of patients selected according to the label approved by the European Medicines Agency. The model takes also into account the costs of flares. Over 3 years, belimumab is able to prevent cumulatively 1,111 severe flares and 3,631 nonsevere flares with a total saving for the Italian National Health System (NHS) of approximately €6.2 million. Budget impact ranges from €4.4 million in the first year to €20.3 million in the third year. The decrease in the number of flare partially counterbalances the costs of the new technology (impact attenuation of approximately 16 percent). These data elucidate the importance to control and monitor the disease progression and to prevent exacerbations, which are the major causes of the increase in costs paid by the NHS and by the society. The financial impact could be replicate on a regional basis, to inform local decision makers. Further developments are possible as the model does not consider the additional clinical and economic benefits of reduced damage accrual and slowed disease progression.

  6. Novel Evidence-Based Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furie, Richard A.; Petri, Michelle A.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Stohl, William; Chatham, W. Winn; Strand, Vibeke; Weinstein, Arthur; Chevrier, Marc R.; Zhong, John; Freimuth, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe a new systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Responder Index (SRI) based on the belimumab phase II SLE trial and demonstrate its potential utility in SLE clinical trials. Methods Data from a 449-patient randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 3 doses of belimumab (1, 4, 10 mg/kg) or placebo plus standard of care therapy (SOC) over a 56-week period were analyzed. SELENA-SLEDAI and BILAG SLE disease activity instruments, SF-36 Health Survey, and biomarker analyses were used to create a novel SRI. Response to treatment in a subset of SLE patients (n=321) who were serologically active (ANA ≥1:80 and/or anti-dsDNA antibody ≥30 IU) at baseline was retrospectively evaluated using the SRI. Results SRI response is defined as: 1) ≥4-point reduction in SELENA-SLEDAI score; 2) no new BILAG A or no more than 1 new BILAG B domain score; and 3) no deterioration from baseline in the Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA) by ≥0.3 points. In serologically active patients, addition of belimumab to SOC resulted in a response in 46% of patients at week 52 compared with 29% for the placebo patients (P=0.006). SRI responses were independent of baseline autoantibody subtype. Conclusion Evidence-based evaluation of a large randomized, placebo-controlled trial in SLE resulted in the ability to define a robust responder index based on improvement in disease activity without worsening of the overall condition or the development of significant disease activity in new organ systems. PMID:19714615

  7. Radiologically detectable musculoskeletal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, M. M.; Manjon, P.; Diaz de Bustamante, T.; Galindo, M.; Buj, M. J.; Cabezudo, J.

    2000-01-01

    We show a wide spectrum of musculoskeletal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that can be detected by radiological examination. We determined the indications of different imaging techniques in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease. We reviewed the clinical and radiological histories of 37 patients diagnosed as having SLE on the basis of serological and musculoskeletal criteria. We assessed the personal data of each patient, the association of the disease with autoimmune processes, serology, treatment and radiological findings using plain X ray, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). Of the 37 cases reviewed, only ten presented changes in one or more of the imaging studies performed. the most common radiological finding was symmetric poly arthritis located at different sites. Other signs included avascular necrosis (late and early), inflammation and tendon and/or ligament rupture, nonerosive deforming arthropathies , soft tissue calcifications and arthritis (staphylococcal and tuberculous). A direct correlation was established between the anticardiolipin antibody titer, steroid doses and avascular necrosis. In SLE, radiologically detectable osteoarticular lesions are uncommon. Symmetric polyarthritis is the earliest lesion and that occurring most frequently. Other signs do not appear as often, with the exception of osteonecrosis, which usually occurs late. It developed early and was unusually aggressive in two youths with elevated anticardiolipin antibody titers and substantial systemic involvement in our series. The contributions of ultrasound and MR in the assessment of musculoskeletal involvement in SLE are especially relevant in the study of inflammations and tendon rupture and in the management of avascular necrosis, respectively. (Author) 17 refs

  8. Disease characterization of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, R; Bernatsky, S; Rahme, E

    2017-08-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by an array of organ manifestations that can appear during flares and disappear during remissions. The objectives of this study were: (i) to examine SLE manifestation groups longitudinally in an SLE cohort; and (ii) to assess the association between early antimalarial treatment and renal manifestations. Methods Seven SLE manifestation groups-cutaneous, hematologic, lung, musculoskeletal, neuropsychiatric, serositis, renal-were tracked using Kaplan-Meier survival curves in an incident SLE cohort from Quebec health administrative data ( n = 2010). A subgroup with provincial drug insurance coverage was followed over time to examine the association between early antimalarial treatment (within three months after SLE diagnosis) and renal manifestations using a Cox proportional hazards survival model. Results Cutaneous manifestations was the most common manifestation at SLE diagnosis (30.0%, 95% CI: 27.7-32.2%). About two-thirds (66.2%, 95% CI: 63.4-68.9%) of patients had evidence of at least one SLE manifestation at diagnosis, which increased to 87.2% (95% CI: 84.2-90.3%) by the end of follow-up. After adjusting for age, sex, early concomitant systemic steroid therapy, Charlson comorbidity index, primary care visits in the year prior and other SLE manifestations at baseline, no statistically significant association was established between antimalarial therapy and renal manifestations. Conclusion This study provides insight regarding organ manifestations within a population-based sample. Most patients identified with SLE had other diagnostic evidence that supports an underlying diagnosis of SLE. No protective effects for antimalarial agents against renal manifestations could be established in this population-based cohort.

  9. Incidence and risk of heart failure in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang H; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Jandali, Bochra; Askari, Ali D; Zacharias, Michael; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2017-02-01

    Although case series suggest a higher burden of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with the general population, the association between SLE and heart failure (HF) remains undefined. We sought to investigate the incidence and risk of HF in patients with SLE. In April 2016, we performed a retrospective cohort analysis using the Explorys platform, which provides aggregated electronic medical record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems across the USA from 1999 to present. Demographic and regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of SLE on HF incidence. Among 45 284 540 individuals in the database, we identified 95 400 (0.21%) with SLE and 98 900 (0.22%) with a new diagnosis of HF between May 2015 and April 2016. HF incidence was markedly higher in the SLE group compared with controls (0.97% vs 0.22%, relative risk (RR): 4.6 (95% CI 4.3 to 4.9)), as were other cardiovascular risk factors. In regression analysis, SLE was an independent predictor of HF (adjusted OR: 3.17 (2.63 to 3.83), prisk but decreasing RR with advancing age in both sexes. Renal involvement in SLE correlated with earlier and higher incidence of HF. The findings of this study suggest that patients with SLE have significantly higher risk of developing HF and a worse cardiovascular risk profile compared with the general population. These results need to be confirmed by prospective studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Skin lesions in lupus erythematosus: A marker of systemic involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Kanti Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lupus erythematosus (LE is an autoimmune disorder with diverse clinical manifestation ranging from mild cutaneous disorder to life-threatening systemic illness (SLE. In some patients, it remains to persist in the skin-limited form while in others it evolves into SLE. Here comes the role of identifying the markers of systemic involvement, which could determine the course and prognosis of the disease. Aim: To identify those manifestations that could be used to identify the activity of the disease SLE. Materials and Methods: An institution based, descriptive, cross-sectional study carried out over 1 year period. Sixty patients (male : female 1 : 4 with cutaneous LE were recruited for the study. The patients were classified in two groups depending on the presence or absence of ARA criteria of SLE. Detailed account of LE-specific and nonspecific lesions were noted. Statistical significance of the results was compared between the two groups using the chi-square test. Results: Among the different cutaneous manifestations, highly significant (P value <0.001 was found between SLE and nonscarring alopecia, photosensitivity, oral ulcer, malar rash (in decreasing order of odds favoring the association with SLE. Dimorphic skin lesions (P value=0.0326 also showed significant association where as discoid lesion (especially localized variant predicted toward a skin limited form of the disease with high probability of not developing SLE (P value <0.0001. No significant association was found between SLE and papulosquamous lesions, Raynaud′s phenomenon or scarring alopecia. Conclusion: Identification of lesions with high degree of association with SLE can alert the physician of the unfavorable prognosis and allow timely intervention and institution of appropriate management strategies.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (EBV-EA/D)-directed immunoglobulin A antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, A H; Jørgensen, J M; Müller, H

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.......We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients....

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: pooled analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenjie; Chen, Min; Liu, Jia; Hagen, Ferry; Ms, Abdullah; Al-Hatmi; Zhang, Peilian; Guo, Yun; Boekhout, Teun; Deng, Danqi; Xu, Jianping; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2016-09-07

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an important fungal infection among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We conducted a pooled analysis and systematic review to describe the epidemiological and clinical profile of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. From two hospitals in China and nine literature databases, cases and prevalence data were collected for pooled analysis and meta-analysis, respectively. Categorical variables of cases were compared using a χ(2)-test on the statistical program of SAS. A multiple regression analysis was performed to ascertain independent predictors significantly correlated with prognosis. Meta-analysis was conducted by the statistical program of R. The prevalence of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients was 0.5%. Patients were predominantly females and adults. A prednisone equivalent of more than 30 mg/day before infection was associated with higher mortality (odds ratio (OR)=9.69 (1.54, 60.73)). In all, 36.8-38.9% patients showed low lupus activity when they developed the crytococcal infection. Moreover, 38.2% of the patients were misdiagnosed. The estimated case-fatality rate was 23.6%. Our results suggest that more emphasis should be placed to further understand lupus-related cryptococcal meningitis and to develop better prophylaxis and management strategies to combat this condition.

  13. Is there an association between systemic lupus erythematosus and periodontal disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Débora Cerqueira; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; de Mendonça, Santuza Maria Souza; Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Santos, Fabrícia Xavier; Sanção, João Guilherme Capinam; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from the interaction between pathogenic bacteria that colonize supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host, triggering an inflammatory response, with systemic effects leading to immune-mediated destruction of the attachment apparatus and loss of supporting alveolar bone. Immunological pathways and predisposing genetic factors common to periodontal disease and rheumatic diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, have been described. Case reports have suggested greater severity of periodontal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. However, studies evaluating the influence of the treatment of one disease on the clinical and laboratory manifestations of the other have yielded conflicting results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Is there an association between systemic lupus erythematosus and periodontal disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Cerqueira Calderaro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Periodontal disease results from the interaction between pathogenic bacteria that colonize supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host, triggering an inflammatory response, with systemic effects leading to immune-mediated destruction of the attachment apparatus and loss of supporting alveolar bone. Immunological pathways and predisposing genetic factors common to periodontal disease and rheumatic diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, have been described. Case reports have suggested greater severity of periodontal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. However, studies evaluating the influence of the treatment of one disease on the clinical and laboratory manifestations of the other have yielded conflicting results.

  15. TGF-β1 Gene Polymorphism at Position -800G /A and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    S Naeimi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance. Transforming growth factor-β1 is a cytokine produced by both immune and non immune cells, and it has a wide operating range. human TGF-β1 gene is located on chromosome 19q13 . The aim of this study was investigating the TGF-β1 Gene Polymorphism at Position -800G /A and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus the possible difference in two p...

  16. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk of congenital heart block in infants. ↓ Number and severity of lupus flares. TG = triglycerides; VLDL = very lowdensity lipoproteins; TC = total cholesterol; .... immunosuppressive therapy, whereas ischaemic events may require anticoagulation. Moreover, SLE is a wellknown risk factor for depres sion, anxiety and fatigue ...

  17. The classification of glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weening, Jan J.; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Schwartz, Melvin M.; Seshan, Surya V.; Alpers, Charles E.; Appel, Gerald B.; Balow, James E.; Bruijn, Jan A.; Cook, Terence; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Hebert, Lee; Hill, Gary; Hill, Prue; Jennette, J. Charles; Kong, Norella C.; Lesavre, Philippe; Lockshin, Michael; Looi, Lai-Meng; Makino, Hirofumi; Moura, Luiz A.; Nagata, Michio

    2004-01-01

    The currently used classification reflects our understanding of the pathogenesis of the various forms of lupus nephritis, but clinicopathologic studies have revealed the need for improved categorization and terminology. Based on the 1982 classification published under the auspices of the World

  18. Grasping the Existential Experience of Living with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander

    Dette projekt havde til formål at undersøge eksistentielle vilkår hos kvinder med sygdommen, systemisk lupus erythematosus, herunder hvordan disse vilkår blev erfaret gennem et langvarigt sygdomsforløb. Data blev konstrueret gennem 3 konsekutive, personlige interview sessions på dag 0, efter 6 og...

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loët, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by email to obtain the files of patients with TNF-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-two cases were collected, revealing two aspects of these manifestations. Ten patients (six patients receiving infliximab, four patients receiving etanercept) only had anti-DNA antibodies and skin manifestations one could classify as 'limited skin lupus' or 'toxidermia' in a context of autoimmunity, whereas 12 patients (nine patients receiving infliximab, three patients receiving etanercept) had more complete drug-induced lupus with systemic manifestations and at least four American Congress of Rheumatology criteria. One patient had central nervous system manifestations. No patients had lupus nephritis. The signs of lupus occurred within a mean of 9 months (range 3-16 months) in patients treated with infliximab and within a mean of 4 months (range 2-5 months) in patients treated with etanercept. In all cases after diagnosis was determined, anti-TNF was stopped and specific treatment introduced in eight patients: two patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, four patients received oral steroids (15-35 mg/day), and two patients received topical steroids. Lupus manifestations abated within a few weeks (median 8 weeks, standard deviation 3-16) in all patients except one with longer-lasting evolution (6 months). At that time, cautious estimations (unpublished data from Schering Plough Inc. and Wyeth Inc.) indicated that about 7700 patients had been exposed to infliximab and 3000 to

  20. Autoantibodies against complement components in systemic lupus erythematosus - role in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, M H; Stoyanova, V S

    2017-12-01

    Many complement structures and a number of additional factors, i.e. autoantibodies, receptors, hormones and cytokines, are implicated in the complex pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Genetic defects in the complement as well as functional deficiency due to antibodies against its components lead to different pathological conditions, usually clinically presented. Among them hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, different types of glomerulonephritis as dense deposit disease, IgA nephropathy, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome and lupus nephritis are very common. These antibodies cause conformational changes leading to pathological activation or inhibition of complement with organ damage and/or limited capacity of the immune system to clear immune complexes and apoptotic debris. Finally, we summarize the role of complement antibodies in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and discuss the mechanism of some related clinical conditions such as infections, thyroiditis, thrombosis, acquired von Willebrand disease, etc.

  1. The antiphospholipid syndrome in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J; Andreoli, Laura; Scanzi, Francesco; Cervera, Ricard; Tincani, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the occurrence of venous and/or arterial thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies known as antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). APS may be associated with other diseases, mainly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The presence or absence of SLE might modify the clinical or serological expression of APS. Apart from the classical manifestations, APS patients with associated SLE more frequently display a clinical profile with arthralgias, arthritis, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, livedo reticularis, epilepsy, glomerular thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. The management of patients with SLE and APS/aPL should include an accurate stratification of vascular risk factors. Low dose aspirin and hydroxychloroquine should be considered as primary prophylaxis. In high risk situations, such as surgery, prolonged immobilization, and puerperium, the prophylaxis should be potentiated with low molecular weight heparin. The challenge of treating patients with a previous vascular event (secondary prophylaxis) is the choice of treatment (anti-platelet agents, anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists or combined therapy) and its duration, based on individual risk stratification and the site of vascular presentation. The role of novel anticoagulants in APS patients is still to be clearly defined. Novel approaches are needed since the prognosis of SLE patients with APS/aPL is still worse than that of SLE patients with negative aPL. The goal for the future is to improve the outcome of these patients by means of early recognition and optimal preventative treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipid profile among girls with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daniele; Sarni, Roseli O S; Abad, Thaís T O; Silva, Simone G L; Khazaal, Eugênia J B; Hix, Sonia; Correia, Milena S G; Suano-Souza, Fabíola I; Len, Claudio A; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe biomarkers of lipid metabolism associated with increased cardiovascular risk and their correlation with disease variables and markers of inflammation in adolescent females with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This cross-sectional controlled study evaluated 33 adolescent females with juvenile SLE and 33 healthy controls. Anthropometric data, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), medications, proteinuria, ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP), lipid profile (total cholesterol, LDL-c, HDL-c and triglycerides), apolipoproteins A and B (Apo A-I and B), paraoxonase, and myeloperoxidase were evaluated. Median age of the patients and the median disease duration were 16.7 years and 54 months, respectively. SLEDAI scores above 4 were observed in 11 (33.3 %) patients. Moreover, 12 (36.4 %) patients were overweight, and 5 (15.2 %) had low height for age ratios. Dyslipidemia was observed in 13 (39.4 %) patients and in 7 (21.2 %) controls with a decrease in HDL-c concentrations in SLE patients even after adjustment for their nutritional status. In the group with SLE, us-CRP concentrations were inversely correlated with LDL-c/ApoB ratio (p = 0.031). After multivariate regression analysis, the SLE group showed lower concentration of Apo A-I and a decreased LDL-c/ApoB ratio. SLE adolescent females with low disease activity, with preserved kidney function and on low dose of corticosteroids, regardless of nutritional status and food intake, have proatherogenic lipid biomarkers, which may contribute to an increased atherosclerotic risk.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Y Popkova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize metabolic syndrome (M S in pts wit h systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and determine contribution of immune inflammation to the development of MS. Material and methods. 156 females with SLE (mean age 35 years, mean disease duration 99 months were included. Control group consisted of 69 people of comparable age without rheumatic diseases. MS was diagnosed according to ATP III criteria, \\fascular atherosclerotic damage was assessed by carotid sonographic evaluation. Serum cholesterol (CS, triglycerides (TG and high-density lipoprotein (HDLP CS concentration was assessed with colorimetric and photometric methods, hs CRP level — with nephelometric immunoassay. Results. MS was revealed in 29 from 154 (19% pts with SLE and in 5 from 69 (7% controls (p=0,02. MS components (hypertension, TG elevation and a lipoprotein decrease in SLE were significantly more frequent than in control group. TG, HDLP CS and CRP levels in SLE were higher than in control. Thickness of carotid intima-media complex did not differ in SLE and control. Frequency of atherosclerotic plaques (15% and coronary heart disease (14% in SLE was higher than in control (4% and 2% respectively, p=0,01. Pts with SLE and MS were older, had higher disease activity and maximal glucocorticoid dose during disease period (p<0,05. CRP concentration in SLE with MS was significantly higher. Subclinical signs of atherosclerosis in SLE with MS were more frequent than in SLE without MS (p<0,05. Frequency of clinical signs of atherosclerosis did not differ in these groups. Conclusion. Autoimmune inflammation in SLE plays an important role in the development of MS.

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus and thymus persistens: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević-Carević Silvija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thymus plays an important role in the maturation of T-lymphocytes and in the development of immune tolerance. Its involution comes after puberty. If thymic tissue remains preserved in an advanced age it is considered to be the thymus persistens. According to the available data, 5% of patients with a thymoma have some of the autoimmune disorders. Medical data on the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE association with the thymus persistens are scarce. Case report. A 29-year-old patient was diagnosed with SLE at the age of 12. She was treated with continuous doses of corticosteroids and an antimalarial drug (chloroquine. After ten years, the first, and then two more recurrences of the disease with the last recurrence in 2011 occurred. The performed laboratory analyses indicated the disease activity. The radiography of thorax showed a change on the right lung, with enlarged mediastinal shadow. Therefore the multislice computed tomography (MSCT of thorax was made. The pathohistology findings confirmed that the change on the right lung was focus of chronic pneumonitis, while the change in mediastinum was thymus persistens. The thymectomy was performed. Due to pneumonitis, the treatment of SLE was continued with corticosteroids, antimalarial drug and pulse doses of cyclophosphamide. The patient received six monthly and six quarterly pulsed doses of the drug. The remission of the disease maintained all the time. Conclusion. The disorder of thymic function should be considered as a possible cause in the development of SLE. Though the effect of thymectomy is difficult to assess, patients should be carefully monitored.

  5. Work dynamics among persons with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelin, Edward; Trupin, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Criswell, Lindsey; Yazdany, Jinoos; Gillis, Joann; Panopalis, Peter

    2007-02-15

    To track changes in the proportion of persons ages 18-64 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were employed from diagnosis through 2004, to estimate changes in annual work hours during this time, and to describe risk factors for work loss among those employed at diagnosis. A structured telephone survey was administered to a cohort of 982 persons with SLE, which was assembled between 2002 and 2004. Of the 900 enrolled in 2002-2003, 832 (92%) were re-interviewed in 2004. We tabulated the proportion employed at diagnosis, at baseline interview, and at followup in 2004. Among individuals employed at each time frame, we estimated the hours of work per year. We then used the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate time until work loss among individuals employed at diagnosis and Cox proportional hazards regression to describe the risk factors for such work loss. Between diagnosis and followup interview, the proportion employed declined from 74% to 54%. Over the same period, hours of work per year declined by 32.2% among all individuals with a work history, but by only 1% among those continuously employed. Among individuals working at diagnosis, the proportion employed declined by 15% and 63% after 5 and 20 years, respectively. Demographics (age, sex, and education) and work characteristics (physical and psychological demands of jobs and level of control) were the principal determinants of work loss. Total cessation of employment, rather than reduced hours among employed persons, accounts for most of the decline in annual work hours among persons with SLE.

  6. Antiphospholipid antibodies in Chilean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Ivan; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcon, Marcelo; Larrain, Ana Maria; Pinochet, Carmen; Vasquez, Marcela; Velez, Maria T; Leon, M; Espinola, Ricardo; Pierangeli, Silvia

    2002-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are a heterogeneous family of antibodies found in autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, and other situations. The presence of different aPLs has been associated with various clinical manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aPLs in a group of 90 Chilean patients with systemic lupus erytematosus (SLE) and 90 healthy controls. We measured anticardiolipin antibodies (aCLs), antiphosphatidylserine antibodies (aPSs), anti-beta(2) glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta(2)GPIs), and antiprothrombin antibodies (aPTs) with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent technique using "in-house" assays. Fifty-four of 90 SLE patients (60.0%) had some type of aPL. Forty of 90 (44.4%) were positive for aCLs, 9 of 61 (14.8%) had aPSs, 21 of 90 (23.3%) had anti-beta(2)GPIs, and 18 of 90 (20.0%) had aPTs. In the control group, prevalences were as follows: aCLs, 3.3%; aPSs, 1.1%; anti-beta(2)GPIs, 1.1%; aPTs, 2.2%. In most cases, values were in the low-positive range. Of all aPL detected, 29.5% was of the IgG isotype, 37.5% IgM, and 33.0% IgA. We observed a correlation between aCLs and aPSs and of these antibodies with anti-beta(2)GPIs and aPTs but not between anti-beta(2)GPIs and aPTs. Our results show a high prevalence of aPLs in SLE patients. An association between different specificities and isotypes of aPLs was also observed.

  7. Typing TREX1 gene in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fredi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An impaired expression of interferon-α regulated genes has been reported in patients with either systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS, a rare monogenic encephalopathy with onset in infancy. One of mutations causing AGS is located in the TREX1 gene on chromosome 3. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were reported in SLE patients. TREX1 is a DNA exonuclease with specificity for ssDNA. An impairment of its activity may result in the accumulation of nucleid acid. A recent study described a significant association between a haplotype including several common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of TREX1 and neurological manifestations in European SLE patients. Fifty-one SLE patients were screened for TREX1 gene, and the corresponding data were collected from clinical charts. A novel heterozygous variant (p.Asp130Asn was identified in one patient and in none of 150 controls. A missense variation was located in one of the three active sites of the gene and was classified as probably damaging. Variations of SNP rs11797 were detected in 33 SLE patients and a variation of rs3135944 in one. A significantly higher rate of the minor allele (T nucleotide of SNP rs11797 was found in SLE patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations [12/16 (75% vs 28/86 (32.5% O=0.002, odds ratio=6.42 95% confidence interval (1.7-26.2]. Only 1 out of 8 patients (12.5% with neuropsychiatric SLE carried the wild-type form in homozygosity. Although we analyzed a small number of patients, we found a novel variation of TREX1, which may be pathogenic. The polymorphism of rs11797 was more frequent in SLE patients with neurological manifestations.

  8. Cytomegalovirus in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus: prevalence and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblyum, E V; Levy, D M; Allen, U; Harvey, E; Hebert, D; Silverman, E D

    2015-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpesvirus and antibodies to this virus are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, few studies have examined the relationship between CMV infection and SLE. Our objectives were: 1) to determine the prevalence of CMV infection at the time of SLE diagnosis, and 2) to determine the risk factors for CMV infection. A database review of 670 patients with pediatric SLE (pSLE) seen over a 20-year period identified seven patients with a CMV infection detected at the time of diagnosis of SLE. CMV was diagnosed by serology, urine and bronchoalveolar lavage. Clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, virology studies and treatments were reviewed. CMV infection was detected in seven patients at the time of SLE diagnosis (1.04% of total cohort): six were female: mean age was 13 years. Predominant features included non-Caucasian ethnicity (p < 0.01 as compared to total SLE cohort), persistent fevers on prednisone in seven and nephrotic syndrome in four. Laboratory findings included: anemia in seven, lymphopenia in five, elevated liver enzymes in four, with anti-dsDNA and anti-RNP antibodies present in six and five, respectively. Six patients received ganciclovir and CMV hyperimmune globulin (Cytogam®) with the continuation of prednisone during CMV treatment. Six of seven fully recovered without sequelae (one without treatment) but one patient died with active CMV infection. There were 1.04% of patients with pSLE who developed CMV infection. All were of non-Caucasian ethnicity. Persistent fever despite prednisone, with concomitant anemia, may be additional clues to CMV infection in pSLE. We suggest all patients have routine testing for CMV immunity at initial presentation of pSLE. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Evans syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus: clinical presentation and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costallat, Guilherme Lavras; Appenzeller, Simone; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras

    2012-07-01

    To review the clinical, laboratory and outcome features of Evans syndrome (ES) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We reviewed the charts of 953 SLE patients followed up regularly at our service. ES was defined as the presence of hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia concomitantly or sequentially. Clinical and laboratory manifestations occurring during the disease course, as well as concomitant diseases and survival was carefully reviewed. We identified ES in 26 of 953 (2.7%) SLE patients. Twenty-three were women with mean age at SLE diagnosis of 25.7 years. Four (15%) patients had disease onset before the age of 16. In the majority of patients (92%), immune thrombocytopenia and AIHA appeared simultaneously at the beginning of SLE. Active features of SLE were a frequent finding concomitant to ES, especially arthritis (77%), malar rash (61.5%), photosensitivity (57.6%), oral ulcers (34.6%), nephritis (73%), serositis (54%), neuropsychiatric (19%) and pulmonary (15%) manifestations. In addition to this multisystemic disease, 34.6% of our patients had an association with another autoimmune disease such as antiphospholipid syndrome. Recurrence of ES was observed in only four (15%) patients. After follow-up time of 8.72 years, 19 patients (73%) were in remission and seven (27%) patients died. ES is a rare manifestation in SLE, occurring in patients with severe multisystemic SLE manifestations. Treatment strategies frequently used in SLE contribute to longer disease remission and less frequent exacerbation than observed in the general population with ES. Copyright © 2011 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of estimates of body fat content in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicato, N A; Peres, F A; de Oliveira Peliçari, K; de Oliveira Santos, A; Ramos, C D; Marini, R; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Objective We aimed to compare estimates of body fat content with respect to their ability to predict the percentage of body fat, confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We included 64 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 64 healthy age and sex-matched controls in a cross-sectional study. Anthropometric data, body mass index and body adiposity index were calculated for all subjects. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were further assessed for clinical and laboratory childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and fat mass, lean mass and percentage of body fat evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Elevated waist/hip ratio was observed in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients when compared to controls ( p lupus erythematosus patients and controls. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as gold standard we observed that all indirect estimates of body fat were correlated with whole body fat mass. We observed a correlation between height and cumulative corticosteroid dose adjusted by weight ( r = 0.429, p = 0.005) in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. On whole body analysis we observed a correlation between lean mass and ACR Damage Index scores ( r = -0.395; p = 0.019); percentage of body fat and adjusted Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index ( r = 0.402; p = 0.008), disease duration ( r = -0.370; p = 0.012). On trunk analysis we observed a correlation between lean mass and ACR Damage Index ( r = -0.319; p = 0.042); percentage of body fat with adjusted Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index ( r = 0.402; p = 0.005), disease duration ( r = -0.408; p = 0.005). Conclusions This is the first study analyzing body adiposity index in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We observed that all indirect

  11. Metabolic syndrome in Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Alimohammad; Ghanbarian, Azadeh; Sayedbonakdar, Zahra; Kazemi, Mehdi; Smiley, Abbas

    2018-01-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its determinants. In a cross-sectional study, 98 patients with SLE and 95 controls were enrolled. Prevalence of MetS was determined based on American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) and 2009 harmonizing criteria. In addition, demographic features and lupus characteristics such as disease duration, pharmacological treatment, laboratory data, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage index (SDI) were recorded. The predictors of MetS were obtained by backward stepwise regression analysis. Using AHA/NHLBI, MetS was observed in 35 (35.7%) patients and 28 (29.8%) controls (P = 0.4). Using harmonizing criteria, MetS was observed in 37 (37.7%) patients and 33 (35.1%) controls (P = 0.7). There was no difference in frequency distribution of MetS components between the patients and the controls. In multivariate regression analysis, low C3, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and body mass index were independent determinants of MetS in lupus patients. BUN, low C3, and body mass index were the major determinants of MetS in lupus patients.

  12. Histological antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy versus lupus nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: an observational cross-sectional study with longitudinal follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardsson, Jakob; Sundelin, Birgitta; Zickert, Agneta; Padyukov, Leonid; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2015-04-27

    Renal involvement is a severe complication in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Moreover, a subset of SLE patients develop the anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), characterised by the occurrence of anti-phospholipid antibodies in combination with macro- and microvascular thrombotic manifestations, including acute and chronic antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (APLN). Clinical presentations of lupus nephritis and APLN are similar and a renal biopsy is necessary to differentiate between the conditions. Our aim with this study was to investigate the occurrence of histopathological findings consistent with APLN (hAPLN) in renal biopsies from SLE patients and to investigate associations with anti-phospholipid antibody specificities, clinical manifestations, HLA-DRB1 alleles, and long-term renal outcome. Consecutive renal biopsies from 112 SLE patients with renal involvement were investigated and evaluated for findings of hAPLN; in all there were 236 renal biopsies. Data from biopsy reports and clinical information were collected. Autoantibodies against cardiolipin and β2-glycoprotein-1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A lupus anticoagulant test was determined with a modified Dilute Russel Viper Venom method. HLA genotyping was performed by sequence-specific primer PCR. Renal outcome was determined at study end. The prevalence of hAPLN was 14.3% among SLE patients with renal involvement. Compared to patients with pure lupus nephritis, occurrence of hAPLN was associated with intima changes (odds ratio (OR) = 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.0 to 189.8; P lupus nephritis patients (median 116 versus 75 μmol/L; P lupus nephritis. hAPLN is a severe and often unrecognized condition in SLE patients with renal involvement. We have demonstrated an increased risk for development of renal impairment and a genetic predisposition in hAPLN patients compared to lupus nephritis patients.

  13. Utility of urinary transferrin and ceruloplasmin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus for differentiating patients with lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Tomás; Ortiz-Reyes, Blanca; Vanegas-García, Adriana L; Muñoz, Carlos H; González, Luis A; Vásquez, Gloria; Gómez-Puerta, José A

    2018-03-09

    Diagnosis of lupus nephritis (LN) is usually based on renal biopsy, which is an invasive technique that involves multiple risks. Therefore, different biomarkers have emerged as alternatives for the diagnosis of LN. Nonetheless, studies regarding urinary biomarkers in Latin American patients are limited. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of urinary transferrin and ceruloplasmin to differentiate patients who have renal involvement from those who do not. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients that met the revised American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria were recruited. Patients with another autoimmune disease, active infection (urinary tract or systemic infection), renal replacement therapy, human immunodeficiency virus infection or pregnancy were excluded. A urine sample was collected from each patient. LN was diagnosed according to ACR criteria. The activity and chronicity of LN were measured using the Austin indices. Urinary transferrin and ceruloplasmin levels were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Mann-Whitney U test and Student's t-test were used to compare data. Spearman's rank correlation was used to determine associations. Lastly, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were created. The study involved 120 SLE patients. In all, 85% were female, 76% mestizo, the mean age was 32.8±12.1years and mean systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI) was 8.4±8.9; 64% had renal involvement. Urinary levels of the two biomarkers were significantly higher in patients with LN compared to those without LN. Similarly, urinary levels of both biomarkers were significantly higher in patients with active LN compared to those with inactive LN. Furthermore, urinary transferrin levels were significantly higher in Afro-Latin American patients. On the other hand, urinary transferrin levels correlated with SLEDAI and proteinuria, and transferrin and ceruloplasmin

  14. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji and others

    1989-04-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author).

  15. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author)

  16. Ficolins and the lectin pathway of complement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Nielsen, Louise Aas; Nielsen, Christoffer T

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a pathophysiological role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aims to investigate whether an association exists between the ficolins that are part of the lectin complement pathway and SLE. EDTA plasma samples from 68 Danish SLE patients and 29 healthy...... Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index] (SDI) (Rho=0.27, P=0.026). The Ficolin-1 concentration was also associated with the occurrence of arterial (P=0.0053) but not venous thrombosis (P=0.42). Finally, deposition of C4, C3 and TCC...

  17. Diagnosis, Monitoring, and Treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, David J; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Kim, Siah; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2015-10-01

    Management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is complex and variability in practices exists. Guidelines have been developed to help improve the management of SLE patients, but there has been no formal evaluation of these guidelines. This study aims to compare the scope, quality, and consistency of clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of patients with SLE. Electronic databases were searched up to April 2014. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument and textual synthesis was used to appraise and compare recommendations. Nine clinical practice guidelines and 5 consensus statements were identified, which covered 7 topics: diagnosis, monitoring, treatment, neuropsychiatric SLE, lupus nephritis, antiphospholipid syndrome, and other manifestations of lupus. The methodological quality of the guidelines was variable, with the overall mean AGREE II scores ranging from 31% to 75%, out of a maximum 100%. Scores were consistently low for applicability, with only 1 guideline scoring above 50%. There was substantial variability in the treatments recommended for class II and V lupus nephritis, the recommended duration of maintenance therapy for class III/IV lupus nephritis (from 1 to 4 years), and timing of ophthalmologic examination for patients taking corticosteroids. Published guidelines on SLE cover a complex area of clinical care, but the methodological quality, scope, and recommendations varied substantially. Collaborative and multidisciplinary efforts to develop comprehensive, high-quality evidence-based guidelines are needed to promote best treatment and health outcomes for patients with SLE. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancies: ten-year data from a single centre in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, C L; Wan, S A; Cheong, Y K; Ling, G R

    2017-02-01

    We performed a retrospective study of all systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) pregnancies during a 10-year period (2006-2015) to describe the clinical features, maternal and foetal outcomes in our centre. There were 115 pregnancies in 86 women with SLE. Our patients had a mean age of 29.1 years (SD 5.80) and a mean disease duration of 44.63 months (SD 41.17). Fifteen patients had antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Our patients had complicated pregnancies: 26.1% had SLE flares, 13.9% had pre-eclampsia and 45.1% needed caesarean sections. There were 23.3% foetal losses and 25% preterm deliveries in our patients. There was a higher rate of unplanned pregnancies and lupus flare among pregnancies with active SLE at conception. Pregnancies in lupus nephritis have higher incidence of lupus flares during pregnancy but similar maternal and foetal outcomes compared to those without nephritis. The prognostic indicators for adverse foetal outcome in our patients were flare of SLE (HR 4.08 [CI 95% 1.65-10.13, p Lupus pregnancies in our centre remained as high-risk pregnancies with significant maternal and foetal complications.

  19. Use of belimumab throughout pregnancy to treat active systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danve, Abhijeet; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2014-10-01

    Pregnancy can lead to flares in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and the presence of SLE in pregnancy could lead to a poor outcome for the mother and the fetus. To describe a patient whose active SLE (including lupus nephritis) was managed with the use of belimumab throughout pregnancy. A case report and review of relevant literature is presented. A 38-year-old Caucasian woman with SLE was seen for advice regarding planning a pregnancy and management of her active lupus (cutaneous lupus, angioedema, lupus nephritis, leukopenia, and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome) that could only be controlled by mycophenolate, a drug contraindicated in pregnancy. Azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, rituximab, and moderate doses of prednisone were either unable to control her disease or led to unacceptable toxicity. After detailed discussions, she was treated with belimumab, which controlled her SLE and allowed withdrawal of mycophenolate. Belimumab was continued throughout the pregnancy, leading to well-controlled SLE and uneventful course, albeit with the presence of mild Ebstein's anomaly in the baby. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of belimumab use throughout pregnancy for controlling active SLE. Data from the belimumab pregnancy registry would be useful to confirm our findings and to further assess safety of this agent for use in pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Is there an association between systemic lupus erythematosus and periodontal disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Cerqueira Calderaro; Gilda Aparecida Ferreira; Santuza Maria Souza de Mendonça; Jôice Dias Corrêa; Fabrícia Xavier Santos; João Guilherme Capinam Sanção; Tarcília Aparecida da Silva; Antônio Lúcio Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease results from the interaction between pathogenic bacteria that colonize supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host, triggering an inflammatory response, with systemic effects leading to immune-mediated destruction of the attachment apparatus and loss of supporting alveolar bone. Immunological pathways and predisposing genetic factors common to periodontal disease and rheumatic diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, have been described. Case repo...

  1. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus: still not resolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rekvig, O.P.; Vlag, J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease with various clinical manifestations affecting different tissues. A characteristic feature of SLE is the presence of autoantibodies against double-stranded (ds)DNA, histones and nucleosomes, and other chromatin components. SLE is a

  2. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura as Initial Manifestation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bağcıer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ system. Its presentation and course are highly variable. The classic presentation of SLE in a woman of childbearing age is fever, arthritis, and malar rash triad. However, patients may present rare types of manifestations such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  3. Pancreatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus Pancreatitis y lupus eritematoso sistémico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lariño Noia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with SLE are common, specifically abdominal pain. However, the rate of pancreatic diseases is much lower and does not reach 5% according to published series in Europe and the USA. This association between SLE and pancreatic disease is basically at the expense of episodes of acute pancreatitis. An association with chronic pancreatitis is much more uncommon, and only four articles have been published showing this relationship. Three cases of SLE-associated pancreatitis are described, and disease onset, etiological factors, and clinical progression are analyzed. A review of the literature and a brief discussion about pathophysiological mechanisms and the role of corticosteroids are also included.Los síntomas gastrointestinales en los pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES son comunes, específicamente el dolor abdominal. Sin embargo la tasa de enfermedades pancreáticas es mucho menor, una tasa que no alcanza ni al 5% según las series publicadas en Europa y EE. UU. Esta asociación entre enfermedades pancreáticas y LES es fundamentalmente a expensas de episodios de pancreatitis aguda. La asociación con pancreatitis crónica es muchísimo más infrecuente, teniendo en cuenta que tan sólo cuatro artículos han sido publicados reflejando esta asociación. Describimos tres casos de asociación entre pancreatitis y LES, analizando el debut de la enfermedad, los factores etiológicos y también la evolución clínica. Hemos realizado, además, una breve discusión de la fisiopatología y del papel de corticosteroides, así como una revisión de la literatura.

  4. Oral manifestations of patients with lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael T; Valerin, Manuel A; Napeñas, Joel J; Lockhart, Peter B

    2005-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus manifests as cutaneous variants, such as discoid lupus erythematosus or systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by general autoantibody production and a wide range of mucocutaneous, renal, neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, infectious, and hematologic manifestations. This article discusses the prevalence of and considerations for oral mucosal lesions in lupus erythematosus and the impact of the various disease manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus on dental management.

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuhua; Li, Min; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Weixi; Peng, Fuhua

    2015-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic immunologic disorder that can affect multiple organ systems and makes the patient susceptible to infection. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a rare but often fatal complication of SLE. In this study, 6 patients with CM were identified among 631 patients with SLE. The demographic, clinical, laboratory profiles, serological features and outcomes of these 6 SLE patients with CM were retrospectively analyzed. The mean age of these patients was 24.1 years (range 12-42) at the time of SLE diagnosis, and 27.1 years (range 14-42) at the time of Cryptococcus neoformans infection, with mean disease duration of 37 months (range 3-72). Four patients had active SLE. All patients were receiving glucocorticoids therapy (mean prednisone dose of 20.5 (5.0-36.0) mg/day) at the onset of infection. Five patients had received other immunosuppressive drugs. The most common presentations of CM were headache and fever and 4 of the 6 patients were normal on physical examination. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) indices (protein and glucose) were normal in 4 cases, whereas they were mildly abnormal in the other 2 patients. White counts in the CSF ranged from 8 to 240 cells/mm. C. neoformans were isolated from CSF of 4 patients. The isolation of crytococci from extraneural sites, including blood and lungs, was found in 2 patients. Results of the head computed tomography scan were unremarkable in 5 of the patients. The infection was completely resolved in 5 patients, and it was resolved with serious sequelae in one patient. In conclusion, the key to a rapid diagnosis of CM in patients with SLE is to maintain a high degree of awareness which will help avoid delays in treatment. This is mainly due to the fact that the clinical presentation and laboratory results from routine hematological, biochemical and CSF analyses of CM in patients with SLE are mostly non-specific. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiographic findings of systemic lupus erythematosus enteritis (a report of 4 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ailian; Li Ruilan; Gao Yu'ao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the radiographic findings and diagnosis in lupus enteritis. Methods: 4 cases of lupus enteritis (male 1, female 3) were studied. Abdominal pain was the chief complaint in all these cases. Before and after steroid therapy, small bowel contrast study was performed. Results: In one patient abdominal plain film revealed slight dilatation of jejunum with air-fluid levels. Small bowel contrast study showed effacement and (or) nodules of the mucosal folds, thumb printing, spasm and some degree of rigidity and narrowing of the lumen. Clinical symptoms and radiographic findings became normal after steroid therapy. Conclusions: If a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus presents abdominal symptoms, small bowel contrast study should be done. It is important and helpful to assist the diagnosis, to decide therapeutic plan and to follow up the effect of treatment

  7. Visceral leishmaniasis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Filipe Santos Silva

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis in a patient with lupus presenting with fever and multisystemic manifestations includes infectious or neoplastic disorders. The patient lived in an endemic area of Leishmania, and typical clinical and analytical changes were all present, making this case highly educational. The case highlights the importance of a patient's epidemiological background and how it can lead to the diagnosis and timely treatment of a rare disease.

  8. Pregnancy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients with Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Pateinakis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in patients with lupus nephritis is a challenging clinical situation. Although not absolutely contraindicated, it is associated with increased risk for foetal and maternal complications, including foetal loss, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, nephritis flare, and, rarely, maternal death. The complication rate is further increased in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies or the antiphospholipid syndrome. Proliferative classes of nephritis (III and IV also appear to confer excess risk for complications. Immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate, and antihypertensives such as angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers need to be stopped due to teratogenic effects. Agents like corticosteroids, azathioprine, and probably calcineurin inhibitors are considered compatible with gestation. Lupus activity needs to be assessed and carefully monitored. Thrombotic risk due to antiphospholipid antibodies, thrombotic events, or nephrosis needs to be evaluated and managed accordingly, with the use of aspirin and/or unfractioned or low molecular weight heparin. Differentiating between severe pre-eclampsia and lupus nephritis flare might require a renal biopsy, which might not always be feasible, for example after the 32nd gestational week or in a setting of uncontrolled hypertension or thrombocytopaenia. A 6-month history of quiescent disease on non-teratogenic agents seems to be associated with best chance for favourable outcomes. Pregnancy is optimally managed by a multidisciplinary team of experienced specialists, and close monitoring for disease activity during gestation; additionally, follow-up for maternal flare postpartum is also advised.

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy: clinical evolution, maternal and perinatal outcomes and placental findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Garanhani de Castro Surita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic disease that is more frequent in women of reproductive age. The relationship between lupus and pregnancy is problematic: maternal and fetal outcomes are worse than in the general population, and the management of flare-ups is difficult during this period. The aim here was to compare the outcomes of 76 pregnancies in 67 women with lupus, according to the occurrence or absence of flare-ups. DESIGN AND SETTING: An observational cohort clinical study evaluating the evolution of pregnant women with lupus who were receiving care at the prenatal outpatient clinic, Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/Unicamp, between 1995 and 2002. METHODS: Data were collected on a precoded form. The women were divided into two groups according to the occurrence or absence of flare-ups, as defined by the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI. The presence or absence of flare-ups and renal involvement was considered to be the independent variable and the other results were dependent variables. RESULTS: Flare-ups occurred in 85.3% of cases, and were most significant when there was renal involvement. This was related to greater numbers of women with preeclampsia and poor perinatal outcome. Intrauterine growth restriction was more common in the women with active disease. Placental weight was significantly lower in the women with renal involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Flare-ups and renal involvement in lupus patients during pregnancy are associated with increased maternal and perinatal complications.

  10. Are Toll-Like Receptors and Decoy Receptors Involved in the Immunopathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Lupus-Like Syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Guggino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus our attention on the role of two families of receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLR and decoy receptors (DcR involved in the generation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and lupus-like syndromes in human and mouse models. To date, these molecules were described in several autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, antiphospholipids syndrome, bowel inflammation, and SLE. Here, we summarize the findings of recent investigations on TLR and DcR and their role in the immunopathogenesis of the SLE.

  11. Th-17 related regulatory network in the pathogenesis of Arab patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFadhli, Suad; AlFailakawi, Asma'a; Ghanem, Aqeel A M

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to identify the genes involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Arabs by investigating a panel of 84 genes related to the t helper (Th)17-related regulatory network and to further explore the expression levels of serum interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F in a studied cohort. A comparative analysis of gene expression profile in SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) patients against that of healthy controls (HC) was performed. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (Th17 autoimmunity and inflammation) array analysis was performed in peripheral white blood cells of 66 SLE patients under specific medical treatment and 30 age/gender/ethnically matched healthy controls. Statistical analysis was carried out using the RT(2) Profiler TM PCR Data Analysis tool. The analysis of Th17 pathway revealed 14 genes (IL-17A, IL-17C, IL-17D, IL-17F, IL-18, IL-12RB2, IL-23R, CCL2, CCL20, CXCL5, MMP3, RORC, STAT4 and TRAF6) that are differentially expressed in SLE and HC (fold change [FC] < 2, P < 0.0006). No significant difference in expression profiles was observed between SLE and LN. A significant difference in serum concentration of IL-17A (P = 0.002) and IL-17F (P = 0.002) was observed between SLE (13.91 ± 4.25) and LN (18.26 ± 4.24). Our study is the first to investigate a panel of 84 genes related to Th17 regulatory pathway in Arab SLE subjects and the first to explore the effect of current immunosuppression regimens on Th17 regulatory pathway. It paves the way for understanding the etiology of SLE and autoimmune diseases in general. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus in an African Caribbean population: incidence, clinical manifestations, and survival in the Barbados National Lupus Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Cindy; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hambleton, Ian R; Nicholson, George D; Liang, Matthew H

    2012-08-01

    To assess the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the predominantly African Caribbean population of Barbados. A national registry of all patients diagnosed with SLE was established in 2007. Complete case ascertainment was facilitated by collaboration with the island's sole rheumatology service, medical practitioners, and the lupus advocacy group. Informed consent was required for inclusion. Between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2009, there were 183 new cases of SLE (98% African Caribbean) affecting 172 women and 11 men for unadjusted annual incidence rates of 12.21 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 10.46-14.18) and 0.84 (95% CI 0.42-1.51) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Excluding pediatric cases (ages <18 years), the unadjusted incidence rate among women was 15.14 per 100,000 person-years. The principal presenting manifestations were arthritis (84%), nephritis (47%), pleuritis (41.5%), malar rash (36.4%), and discoid lesions (33.1%). Antinuclear antibody positivity was 95%. The overall 5-year survival rate was 79.9% (95% CI 69.6-87.1), decreasing to 68% in patients with nephritis. A total of 226 persons with SLE were alive at the end of the study for point prevalences of 152.6 (95% CI 132.8-174.5) and 10.1 (95% CI 5.4-17.2) per 100,000 among women and men, respectively. Rates of SLE in Barbadian women are among the highest reported to date, with clinical manifestations similar to African American women and high mortality. Further study of this population and similar populations of West African descent might assist our understanding of environmental, genetic, and health care issues underpinning disparities in SLE. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Human Epididymis Protein 4: A Novel Biomarker for Lupus Nephritis and Chronic Kidney Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Zhang, Zhiyu; Qin, Baodong; Wu, Ping; Zhong, Renqian; Zhou, Lin; Liang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is an available tumor biomarker for detecting ovarian cancer. However, it is unknown if serum HE4 could be a novel biomarker for diagnosis of lupus nephritis (LN) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study enrolled 209 SLE patients, 75 patients with renal dysfunction without SLE and 32 healthy subjects. HE4 concentrations were analyzed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; Fujirebio Diagnostics, Sweden). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to assess diagnostic accuracy of HE4 for LN or CKD in SLE. Serum HE4 level was significantly higher in SLE patients than that in healthy controls (P < 0.001), especially for those with LN or CKD. It was also higher in patients with renal dysfunction without SLE than healthy controls (P < 0.001), while there was no significant difference between these patients and those with SLE with CKD (P = 0.73). Multivariate analysis showed significant association between increased HE4 and LN or CKD after controlling for confounders. ROC curves showed the cutoff values were 150.1 pM (sensitivity, 76.8%; specificity, 91.1%) for the diagnosis of LN in SLE and 233.9 pM (sensitivity, 92.9%; specificity, 93.5%) for CKD in SLE. Increased serum HE4 level is closely associated with the development of LN or CKD in SLE patients. Furthermore, it can be used as a novel and useful biomarker for diagnosis of LN or CKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Relationship between MCP-1 promoter -2518 A/G gene polymorphism (rs1024611) and systemic lupus erythematosus/lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei; Liang, Meng-Jun; Huang, Ya-Juan

    2015-02-01

    Results from the published studies on the association between monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) promoter -2518 A/G (rs1024611) gene polymorphism and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/lupus nephritis (LN) are still conflicting. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between MCP-1 A/G gene polymorphism and SLE/LN and to explore whether MCP-1 A allele, AA genotype or GG genotype could become a predictive marker for SLE/LN risk. Association studies were identified from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and CBM-disc (China Biological Medicine Database) as of 1 January 2014, and eligible investigations were synthesized using meta-analysis method. Results were expressed with odds ratios (OR) for dichotomous data, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were also calculated. Sixteen investigations were identified for the analysis of association between MCP-1 A/G gene polymorphism and SLE, consisting of 2425 patients with SLE and 2567 controls. In the overall populations, Asians, Caucasian population, the association between MCP-1 A/G gene polymorphism and SLE susceptibility was not found. Interestingly, a trend toward an association between A allele/AA genotype and LN risk was observed in overall populations, although there was no statistical difference. However, this meta-analysis indicated that AA genotype was associated with LN risk in Caucasians (OR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.54-0.93; p = 0.01). In conclusion, our results indicate that AA homozygous might be a significant genetic molecular marker to predict the SLE patients developing into LN in Caucasians. However, more investigations are required to further clarify this association.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M. Attar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypovitaminosis D is common in the general population. Many studies that have been conducted to show the association between vitamin D deficiency and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE reveal that deficiencies in vitamin D are common in this group of patients. Our aim was to study the relationship between 25(OHD and disease activity in patients with SLE.Methods: Retrospective cohort study of patients with SLE who were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, from January 2007 to November 2010. Demographic and clinical data were recorded and the 25(OHD levels of the patients were measured. Chi square tests, Student’s t-test, ANOVA and Pearson tests were used for data analysis. ANOVA test was followed by Bonferroni correction. A p-value <0.05 was considered significant.Results: Ninety-five patients with SLE were enrolled in the study. The levels of 25(OHD were significantly lower in patients with active SLE (n=41; 43% than in those with inactive disease (n=54; 57%; p=0.04. The mean (SD levels were 22.3 (14 nmol/L for patients with active disease against 25.0 (14 nmol/L for patients with inactive SLE. No correlation was detected between 25(OH D levels and disease activity score evaluated by SLEDAI-2K. By Pearson correlation, a significant negative correlation existed between 25(OH D and anti ds-DNA (r=-0.38; p<0.001; a positive correlation existed between 25(OHD levels and C4 (r=0.25; p=0.25. By chi square testing, azathioprine treatment (OR=3.5, low C4 (OR= 2.23, low C3 (OR=1.92, and active disease (OR=1.6 were associated with 25(OHD deficiency in SLE patients.Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequent in patients with SLE. Patients with SLE have a higher risk of developing 25(OHD deficiency in the presence of low serum C3 and C4 levels, and high anti-dsDNA levels.

  16. Serum neuron specific enolase - a novel indicator for neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawro, T; Bogucki, A; Krupińska-Kun, M; Maurer, M; Woźniacka, A

    2015-12-01

    Neuropsychiatric (NP) lupus, a common manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is still insufficiently understood, in part, because of the lack of specific biomarkers. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), an important neuronal glycolytic enzyme, shows increased serum levels following acute brain injury, and decreased serum levels in several chronic disorders of the nervous system, including multi infarct dementia, multiple sclerosis and depression. The aim of the study was to evaluate serum NSE levels in SLE patients with and without nervous system involvement, and in healthy controls, and to assess the correlation of NSE serum levels of patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) with clinical parameters. The study comprised 47 SLE patients and 28 controls. SLE activity was assessed using the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM). A neurologist and a psychiatrist examined all patients. NP involvement was diagnosed according to strict NPSLE criteria proposed by Ainiala and coworkers, as modification to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) nomenclature and case definitions. NSE serum levels were determined by use of an immunoassay. Mean NSE serum concentrations in patients with NPSLE were significantly lower than in non-NPSLE patients (6.3 ± 2.6 µg/L vs. 9.7 ± 3.3 µg/L, p manifestations diagnosed (-0.37; p = 0.001). Decreased serum concentrations of NSE may reflect chronic neuronal damage with declined metabolism of the nervous tissue in patients with NPSLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Noninvasive cardiac assessment in children of women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Monteitro Pereira Leite

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Noninvasive cardiac assessment of newborns and infants of women with systemic lupus erythematosus. The children had no congenital total atrioventricular block and were compared with the children of healthy women. METHODS: We prospectively assessed 13 newborns and infants aged 1 to 60 days, children of women with systemic lupus erythematosus and without congenital total atrioventricular block. These children were compared with 30 children of women who had no lupus or anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, and no risk factors for congenital heart disease either. Their age groups matched. The following examinations were performed: cardiological physical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and signal-averaged electrocardiography. RESULTS: The statistical analysis showed no significant difference in ventricular function or in the cardiac conduction system between the groups. CONCLUSION: In regard to the conduction system and ventricular function in the absence of total atrioventricular block, no statistically significant difference was observed between the children of women with systemic lupus erythematosus and children of healthy women.

  18. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus in a population-based cohort using revised 1997 American College of Rheumatology and the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungprasert, P; Sagar, V; Crowson, C S; Amin, S; Makol, A; Ernste, F C; Osborn, T G; Moder, K G; Niewold, T B; Maradit-Kremers, H; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Chowdhary, V R

    2017-03-01

    In 2012, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group published a new set of classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Studies applying these criteria to real-life scenarios have found either equal or greater sensitivity and equal or lower specificity to the 1997 ACR classification criteria (ACR 97). Nonetheless, there are no studies that have used the SLICC 12 criteria to investigate the incidence of lupus. We used the resource of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify incident SLE patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1993 to 2005, who fulfilled the ACR 97 or SLICC 12 criteria. A total of 58 patients met criteria by SLICC 12 and 44 patients met criteria by ACR 97. The adjusted incidence of 4.9 per 100,000 person-years by SLICC 12 was higher than that by ACR 97 (3.7 per 100,000 person-years, p = 0.04). The median duration from the appearance of first criterion to fulfillment of the criteria was shorter for the SLICC 12 than for ACR 97 (3.9 months vs 8.1 months). The higher incidence by SLICC 12 criteria came primarily from the ability to classify patients with renal-limited disease, the expansion of the immunologic criteria and the expansion of neurologic criteria.

  19. Autoantibodies to box A of high mobility group box 1 in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, F.; de Leeuw, K.; Horst, G.; Maas, F.; Bootsma, H.; Heeringa, P.; Limburg, P. C.; Westra, J.

    Autoantibodies to nuclear structures are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), including autoantibodies to nuclear protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). HMGB1 consists of three separate domains: box A, box B and an acidic tail. Recombinant box A acts as a competitive antagonist for

  20. Depression in systemic lupus erythematosus, dependent on or independent of severity of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Exel, E.; Jacobs, J.; Korswagen, L.A.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Stek, M.L.; Dekker, J.; Bultink, I.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of depression in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in relation to the general population and to unravel the relation between depression and SLE disease characteristics. Methods: One hundred and two subjects with SLE (mean age 44.4 years) were