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Sample records for systemic gemcitabine chemotherapy

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Prevent Impact of Chemotherapy with Gemcitabine in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

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    Richard F. Knoop

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: We could demonstrate for the first time that an improvement in median overall survival with gemcitabine is significantly abolished by a persistent mild chronic pancreatitis and a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In particular, the inflammation biomarkers C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-1α could indicate the prognostic benefit of gemcitabine chemotherapy and should now be tested in prospective patient-controlled trials.

  2. Usefulness of chemotherapy with gemcitabine for unresectable advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of chemotherapy with gemcitabine for unresectable advanced pancreatic carcinoma. We examined 121 cases with unresectable advanced pancreatic carcinoma. They consisted of 65 locally advanced cases with no distant metastasis (Stage IVa) and 56 cases with distant metastasis (Stage IVb). Seventy-three cases were treated by chemotherapy with only gemcitabine (GEM) alone. Forty cases were not treated. Eight cases received chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combined with GEM. Their survival curves were compared. The survival curve of the GEM group was significantly longer than that of the no therapy group. In the locally advanced and distant metastasis groups, the survival curve of the GEM group was significantly longer than that of the no therapy group. And in the GEM group, the survival curve of the locally advanced group was significantly longer than that of the distant metastasis group. The survival curve of the CRT group was significantly longer than that of GEM group. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine for unresectable advanced pancreatic carcinoma was useful but the prognosis remained poor. (author)

  3. 3D Radiotherapy Can Be Safely Combined With Sandwich Systemic Gemcitabine Chemotherapy in the Management of Pancreatic Cancer: Factors Influencing Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; MacLeod, Craig; Borg, Martin; Ngan, Samuel Y.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Graham, Peter; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Davies, Terri; Reece, William H.H.; Iacopetta, Barry; Goldstein, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this Phase II study was to examine whether concurrent continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (CI 5FU) plus three-dimensional conformal planning radiotherapy sandwiched between gemcitabine chemotherapy is effective, tolerable, and safe in the management of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients were enrolled in two strata: (1) resected pancreatic cancer at high risk of local relapse (postsurgery arm, n = 22) or (2) inoperable pancreatic cancer in head or body without metastases (locally advanced arm, n = 41). Gemcitabine was given at 1,000 mg/m 2 weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week rest then 5-6 weeks of radiotherapy and concurrent CI 5FU (200 mg/m 2 /day). After 4 weeks' rest, gemcitabine treatment was reinitiated for 12 weeks. Results: For the two arms combined, treatment-related Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were reported by 25 (39.7%) and 7 (11.1%) patients, respectively. No significant late renal or hepatic toxicity was observed. In the postsurgery arm (R1 54.5%), median time to progressive disease from surgery was 11.0 months, median time to failure of local control was 32.9 months, and median survival time was 15.6 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 63.6% and 31.8%. No significant associations between outcome and mutations in K-ras or TP53 or microsatellite instability were identified. Post hoc investigation of cancer antigen 19-9 levels found baseline levels and increases postbaseline were associated with shorter survival (p = 0.0061 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions: This three-dimensional chemoradiotherapy regimen is safe and promising, with encouraging local control for a substantial proportion of patients, and merits testing in a randomized trial

  4. A meta-analysis of gemcitabine containing chemotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma

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    Ma Yue

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of the present study are to investigate the efficacy and safety profile of gemcitabine-based combinations in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LA/MPC. Methods We performed a computerized search using combinations of the following keywords: "chemotherapy", "gemcitabine", "trial", and "pancreatic cancer". Results Thirty-five trials were included in the present analysis, with a total of 9,979 patients accrued. The analysis showed that the gemcitabine-based combination therapy was associated with significantly better overall survival (OS (ORs, 1.15; p = 0.011, progression-free survival (PFS (ORs, 1.27; p Conclusions Gemcitabine in combination with capecitabine or oxaliplatin was associated with enhanced OS and ORR as compared with gemcitabine in monotherapy, which are likely to become the preferred standard first-line treatment of LA/MPC.

  5. Transarterial infusion chemotherapy with a combination of gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil in advanced pancreatic carcinoma

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    Shi Haifeng; Jin Zhengyu; Yang Ning; Liu Wei; Pan Jie; Cai Lixing; Zhao Yupei; Zhou Zhiqiang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the effectiveness of transarterial infusion chemotherapy of gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil in advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: Twenty-two patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma were treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil was administered to the patients via an interarterial catheter. Then the tumor response rate and clinical benefit were observed. Results: A clinical benefit was obtained in 8 patients (36.4%). The tumor response rate was 13.6%. Median survival for all the patients was 6.1 months. Median time to tumor progression was 2.9 months. Conclusion: Transarterial infusion chemotherapy with a combination of gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil appears to have good clinical benefit and may prolong the survival time of patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma

  6. Gemcitabine concurrent with thoracic radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine/vinorelbine in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase I study

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    Gagel, B.; Piroth, M.; Pinkawa, M.; Fischedik, K.; Asadpour, B.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Eble, M.J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Reinartz, P.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Stanzel, S. [Inst. for Medical Statistics, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Breuer, C.; Skobel, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every 2 weeks to a concurrent radiotherapy administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radio-/chemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were observed and treated in accordance with a combined radio-/chemotherapy protocol. This included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m{sup 2}) at days 1, 8 and 22, 29, followed by concurrent radiotherapy including [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-(FDG-PET-) based target volume definition (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every 2 weeks at days 43, 57, and 71. The initial dose was 300 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of gemcitabine was increased by 100 mg/m{sup 2} until the MTD was realized. Three patients were enrolled for each dose level. Results: dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was identified for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2}, due to grade 2 esophagitis (next to grade 3) in all patients. 6 weeks after the completion of radio-/chemotherapy, most patients still presented treatment-induced esophagitis. In accordance with expected complications, such as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, the MTD was defined at this dose level, although no DLT grade 3 was reached. Conclusion: after induction chemotherapy, the MTD and frequency of gemcitabine in locally advanced NSCLC is 500 mg/m{sup 2} every 2 weeks during a maximum of 7 weeks of thoracic radiotherapy. (orig.)

  7. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

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    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  8. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant

  9. Meta-analysis of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination chemotherapy versus gemcitabine alone for pancreatic cancer

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    Diyu Huang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Overall response rate, stable disease, and progressive disease, as well as 1-year survival rate in patients who received GEM + CIS, were superior to those treated with GEM alone. Combination chemotherapy with GEM and CIS may offer greater benefits in the treatment of pancreatic cancer than that of GEM alone although the combination group had higher hematological toxicities.

  10. Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy in Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Multicenter Study of Efficacy and Predictive Factors.

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    Henning, Judith E K; Deutschbein, Timo; Altieri, Barbara; Steinhauer, Sonja; Kircher, Stefan; Sbiera, Silviu; Wild, Vanessa; Schlötelburg, Wiebke; Kroiss, Matthias; Perotti, Paola; Rosenwald, Andreas; Berruti, Alfredo; Fassnacht, Martin; Ronchi, Cristina L

    2017-11-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare and confers an unfavorable prognosis in advanced stages. Other than combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitotane, the second- and third-line regimens are not well-established. Gemcitabine (GEM)-based chemotherapy was suggested in a phase 2 clinical trial with 28 patients. In other solid tumors, human equilibrative nucleoside transporter type 1 (hENT1) and/or ribonucleotide reductase catalytic subunit M1 (RRM1) expression have been associated with resistance to GEM. To assess the efficacy of GEM-based chemotherapy in ACC in a real-world setting and the predictive role of molecular parameters. Retrospective multicenter study. Referral centers of university hospitals. A total of 145 patients with advanced ACC were treated with GEM-based chemotherapy (132 with concomitant capecitabine). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor material was available for 70 patients for immunohistochemistry. The main outcome measures were progression-free survival (PFS) and an objective response to GEM-based chemotherapy. The secondary objective was the predictive role of hENT1 and RRM1. The median PFS for the patient population was 12 weeks (range, 1 to 94). A partial response or stable disease was achieved in 4.9% and 25.0% of cases, with a median duration of 26.8 weeks. Treatment was generally well tolerated, with adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurring in 11.0% of cases. No substantial effect of hENT1 and/or RRM1 expression was observed in response to GEM-based chemotherapy. GEM-based chemotherapy is a well-tolerated, but modestly active, regimen against advanced ACC. No reliable molecular predictive factors could be identified. Owing to the scarce alternative therapeutic options, GEM-based chemotherapy remains an important option for salvage treatment for advanced ACC. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  11. Randomized, phase III study of gemcitabine or erlotinib maintenance therapy versus observation, with predefined second-line treatment, after cisplatin-gemcitabine induction chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

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    Pérol, Maurice; Chouaid, Christos; Pérol, David; Barlési, Fabrice; Gervais, Radj; Westeel, Virginie; Crequit, Jacky; Léna, Hervé; Vergnenègre, Alain; Zalcman, Gérard; Monnet, Isabelle; Le Caer, Hervé; Fournel, Pierre; Falchero, Lionel; Poudenx, Michel; Vaylet, Fabien; Ségura-Ferlay, Céline; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Taron, Miquel; Milleron, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    This phase III study investigated whether continuation maintenance with gemcitabine or switch maintenance with erlotinib improves clinical outcome compared with observation in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease was controlled after cisplatin-gemcitabine induction chemotherapy. Four hundred sixty-four patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC without tumor progression after four cycles of cisplatin-gemcitabine were randomly assigned to observation or to gemcitabine (1,250 mg/m(2) days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle) or daily erlotinib (150 mg/day) study arms. On disease progression, patients in all three arms received pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2) once every 21 days) as predefined second-line therapy. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). PFS was significantly prolonged by gemcitabine (median, 3.8 v 1.9 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.56; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.72; log-rank P benefit was consistent across all clinical subgroups. Both maintenance strategies resulted in a nonsignificant improvement in overall survival (OS); patients who received second-line pemetrexed or with a performance status of 0 appeared to derive greater benefit. Exploratory analysis showed that magnitude of response to induction chemotherapy may affect the OS benefit as a result of gemcitabine maintenance. Maintenance gemcitabine and erlotinib were well tolerated with no unexpected adverse events. Gemcitabine continuation maintenance or erlotinib switch maintenance significantly reduces disease progression in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with cisplatin-gemcitabine as first-line chemotherapy. Response to induction chemotherapy may affect OS only for continuation maintenance.

  12. Gemcitabine-Based Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation With Capecitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreas Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sameer; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Griffith, Kent A.; Simeone, Diane; Greenson, Joel K.; Francis, Isaac R.; Hampton, Janet; Colletti, Lisa; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for patients with resected pancreas cancer treated with an adjuvant regimen consisting of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy followed by capecitabine and radiation. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a series of patients treated at a single institution with a common postoperative adjuvant program. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 43 resected pancreas cancer patients were offered treatment consisting of 4, 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 1 g/m 2 intravenously over 30 min on Days 1 and 8, with either cisplatin 35 mg/m 2 intravenously on Days 1 and 8 or capecitabine 1500 mg/m 2 orally in divided doses on Days 1-14. After completion of combination chemotherapy, patients received a course of radiotherapy (54 Gy) with concurrent capecitabine (1330 mg/m 2 orally in divided doses) day 1 to treatment completion. Results: Forty-one patients were treated. Median progression-free survival for the entire group was 21.7 months (95% confidence interval 13.9-34.5 months), and median overall survival was 45.9 months. In multivariate analysis a postoperative CA 19-9 level of ≥180 U/mL predicted relapse and death. Toxicity was mild, with only two hospitalizations during adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: A postoperative adjuvant program using combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and either cisplatin or capecitabine followed by radiotherapy with capecitabine is tolerable and efficacious and should be considered for Phase III testing in this group of patients.

  13. Effect of gemcitabine chemotherapy on immune function and VEGF in patients with middle and advanced liver cancer

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    Ling Zuo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of gemcitabine chemotherapy on the immune function and VEGF in patients with middle and advanced liver cancer. Methods: A total of 90 patients with middle and advanced liver cancer who were admitted in our hospital from June, 2014 to July, 2015 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group with 45 cases in each group. The patients in the control group were given adriamycin, and the patients in the observation group were given gemcitabine chemotherapy. The efficacy, immunological function indicators, VEGF level, and the occurrence of adverse reactions in the two groups were compared. Results: IL-6 and TNF-毩 levels after treatment in the two groups were significantly elevated, and the increased degree in the observation group was significantly greater than that in the control group (P0.05. VEGF level after treatment in the two groups was significantly reduced, and the reduced degree in the observation group was significantly greater than that in the control group (P<0.05. The improvement of T cell subsets after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group (P<0.05. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Gemcitabine chemotherapy on patients with middle and advanced liver cancer can effectively improve the immunological function, and enhance the efficacy, with a higher safety.

  14. Gemcitabine and S-1 Combination Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer:A Retrospective Study

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    Kazuhito Mita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 15 consecutive patients. Gemcitabine was administered intravenously at 1,000 mg/m2 on days 8 and 15. Oral S-1 (60 mg/m2 in 2 divided doses was given daily for the first 2 weeks, followed by 1 week of rest. This 3-week course of treatment was repeated. The primary endpoint was response rate, and the secondary endpoints were overall survival, progression-free survival, and safety. Results: The overall response rate was 26.7%, and the disease control rate was 73.4%. The overall survival was 12.0 months (95% CI, 9.5–14.5 months, and the progression-free survival was 8.0 months (95% CI, 4.3–11.7 months. Adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 33.3%, and the major grade 3/4 toxicities were anemia (20.0%, leukopenia (13.3%, and anorexia (13.3%. Conclusion:Gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy is effective and safe in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer.

  15. Phase II study of gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy combined with intensity modulated radiotherapy in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Dan; He Xiayun; Hu Chaosu; Ying Hongmei; Zhu Guopei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GP) chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 71 patients (Stage III: 41, Stage IV A : 30) with locoregionally advanced NPC were entered this study. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was consisted of cisplatin 25 mg/m 2 intravenously on d1-3 and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 in 30 minutes intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks for 2 cycles. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 2 cycles of the same GP regimen was given at 28 days after the end of radiotherapy. The prescription doses was 66.0-70.4 Gy to the gross tumor volume, 66 Gy to positive neck nodes, 60 Gy to the high-risk clinical target volume, 54 Gy to the low-risk clinical target volume. Results: The overall response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 91.2%, acute toxicity was mainly grade 1-2 myleosuppression. All patients completed IMRT. The median follow-up duration was 38 months. The 3-year nasopharyngeal local control, regional control, distant metastasis-free survival rate and overall survival rate were 93%, 99%, 91%, 90%, respectively. Severe late toxicities included grade 3 trismus in 1 patient, grade 3 hearing impairment in 2 patients and cranial nerve palsy in 2 patients, respectively. No grade 4 late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The combination of GP chemotherapy and IMRT for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma is well-tolerated, convenient, effective, and warrants further studies of more proper cycles of GP regimen. (authors)

  16. Concurrent Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival

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    Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Hirokawa, Naoki [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Tsutomu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). Results: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

  17. Ten Years of Complete Remission of Pulmonary Metastasis after Post-Cystectomy Palliative Cisplatin-Gemcitabine Chemotherapy with Gefitinib for Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Case Report.

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    Fahmy, Omar; Scharpf, Marcus; Schubert, Tina; Feyerabend, Susan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schwentner, Christian; Fend, Falko; Gakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is considered one of the most lethal malignancies with high metastatic potential. Usually, metastatic bladder cancer carries worse prognosis with a median survival rate of approximately 6 months, which can be prolonged for up to 14 months with palliative systemic chemotherapy. We present the case of a 61-year-old male patient diagnosed with localized MIBC 10 years ago. He underwent nerve-sparing radical cystectomy with ileal neobladder, but developed pulmonary metastatic disease 7 months postoperatively. Six cycles of gemcitabine/cisplatin combination chemotherapy with an addition of gefitinib as daily oral medication were administered within a randomized phase II clinical trial; this resulted in complete remission of the pulmonary metastases. Until now, the patient is still on gefitinib daily without any side effects. Although, the addition of gefitinib to standard systemic chemotherapy has not been shown to improve the survival in metastatic urothelial cancer, this case represents a very pleasant albeit uncommon long-term outcome. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. A multicentre phase-II feasibility study evaluating gemcitabine /vinorelbine / prednisolone combination chemotherapy in relapsed / refractory hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmad, S.; Shah, I.; Khattak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of Gemcitabine, Vinorelbine and Prednisolone (GVP) salvage chemotherapy in relapsed / refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL). Study Design: A phase-II non-randomized single arm study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital and Medical College Lahore, Mayo Hospital, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Allied Hospital, Punjab Medical College, Faisalabad and Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2007 to December 2007. Methodology: Fifty adult patients with relapsed/refractory HL, adequate marrow reserve, hepatorenal and pulmonary functions, with radiological measurable disease and Karnofsky performance status of 0 - 2 non-candidates for stem cell transplantation, were enrolled. Four 28 days cycles of GVP (Gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2, Vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 intravenously with oral Prednisolone 100 mg/day on day 1 - 5) were given. Response evaluation done according to Cotswolds meeting recommendations and toxicity was evaluated with NCI-CTC (National Cancer Institute - Common Terminology Criteria for adverse events v 3.0). Results: Forty patients completing 4 cycles of GVP, 14 refractory/early relapse and 26 late relapsed (one year postprimary treatment with ABVD) were available for evaluation. The overall response (CRu+PR) rate was 77.5% with better response 85% in late relapsed patients. Haematological toxicity was most common and seen in 70% of cases. Conclusion: GVP is well-tolerated regimen with high response rate and needs to be tested in late relapsed HL. (author)

  19. The effects of multidisciplinary therapies, surgery plus gemcitabine, cisplatin and paclitaxel (GCP) chemotherapy, against advanced urothelial carcinoma

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    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Saika, Takashi; Fujio, Kei

    2008-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy with Gemcitabine, Cisplatin and Paclitaxel (GCP) is an active and well-tolerated combination for the treatment of advanced urothelial carcinoma. There is no evidence that multidisciplinary therapy, surgery plus GCP chemotherapy, can improve survival for patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the tolerability and efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy, surgery plus GCP chemotherapy, against advanced urothelial carcinoma. In this institution, patients (pts) with histologically verified advanced urothelial carcinoma received 2-4 cycles of gemcitabine 1,200 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 8, cisplatin 70 mg/m 2 on day 1, and paclitaxel 80 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 8 prior or subsequent to surgery. Radiologic response was evaluated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Between May 2003 and Oct 2007, 19 pts (8 pts as neoadjuvant therapy (group A) and 11 as adjuvant therapy (group B)) were analyzed. Median age was 57 years. All pts had Performance Status 0 or 1. Initial tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) stage was T3-4 N0 M0 in 5, T any N1-2 M0 in 9 and T any N any M1 in 5 pts. The chemotherapy was well tolerated with infrequent grade III/IV toxicity (neutropenia in 6 and anemia in 2, thrombocytopenia in 4 patients). Median follow-up was 18 months (4-47). By Oct 2007, 18 pts had undergone radical surgery (9 pts radical cystectomy, 8 pts nephroureterectomy, and 1 pt retroperitoneal lymph node dissection). In group A, the radiologic response rate was documented in 6 out of 8 accessible pts (75%), including 1 complete response (CR) and 1 pathological CR. Two out of 8 pts (25%) relapsed and died. In group B, 6 pts out 11 (55%) relapsed and 2 (18%) died of the cancer. Median estimated progression-free survival and median overall survival were 15.4 months and 19.9 months respectively. Multidisciplinary therapy, surgery plus GCP chemotherapy, is effective and tolerable even in cases of metastatic urothelial carcinoma. A

  20. Genetically modified tumour vaccines producing IL-12 augment chemotherapy of HPV16-associated tumours with gemcitabine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikyšková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan; Reiniš, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 6 (2011), s. 1683-1689 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/1024; GA ČR GA301/07/1410 Grant - others:EK(XE) EU-FP6-NOE018933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gemcitabine * human papilloma virus * interleukin 12 * lung metastases * cellular vaccines * immunotherapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.835, year: 2011

  1. Gemcitabine plus nedaplatin as salvage therapy is a favorable option for patients with progressive metastatic urothelial carcinoma after two lines of chemotherapy.

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    Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Mochizuki, Kohei; Hirayama, Takahiro; Ikeda, Masaomi; Nishi, Morihiro; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Okazaki, Miyoko; Fujita, Tetsuo; Taoka, Yoshinori; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a combination of gemcitabine and nedaplatin therapy among patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma previously treated with two lines of chemotherapy. Between February 2009 and August 2013, 30 patients were treated with gemcitabine and paclitaxel as a second-line chemotherapy. All had received a first-line chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. Ten patients who had measurable histologically proven advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder and upper urinary tract received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 and nedaplatin 70 mg/m2 on day 2 as a third-line chemotherapy. Tumors were assessed by imaging every two cycles. The median number of treatment cycles was 3.5. One patient had partial response and three had stable disease. The disease-control rate was 40%, the median overall survival was 8.8 months and the median progression-free survival was 5.0 months. The median overall survival times for the first-line and second-line therapies were 29.1 and 13.9 months, respectively. Among disease-controlled patients (n=4), median overall survival was 14.2 months. Myelosuppression was the most common toxicity. There were no therapy-related deaths. Gemcitabine and nedaplatin chemotherapy is a favorable third-line chemotherapeutic option for patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Given the safety and benefit profile seen in this study, further prospective trials are warranted given the implications of our results with regard to strategic chemotherapy for patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma.

  2. Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Michala; Goldstein, David; Halkett, Georgia; Reece, William; Borg, Martin; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Spry, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m 2 weekly ×3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m 2 /d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were −3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

  3. Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Michala [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Goldstein, David [Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Halkett, Georgia [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Reece, William [Covance Asia Pacific, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Borg, Martin [Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Zissiadis, Yvonne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Spry, Nigel, E-mail: Nigel.Spry@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly Multiplication-Sign 3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m{sup 2}/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

  4. Gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) as salvage chemotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fei; Dong, Mei; He, Xiaohui; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Weihu; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jianliang; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Shengyu; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-02-01

    Standard therapeutic options for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) remain unclear. There are few large cohort studies specifically focused on gemcitabine-based chemotherapy for PTCL-NOS. We retrospectively reviewed patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL-NOS who received salvage GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing, China, from May 2008 to August 2014. Twenty-five patients were enrolled and analyzed. The median number of cycles of GDP chemotherapy per patient was four (range, 2-8 cycles). Overall response rate was 64.0% (16/25) with five achieved complete remission or complete remission unconfirmed. After a median follow-up of 9 months, median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival after relapse or progression (second-PFS) were 9.3 and 5.4 months. One-year PFS rate and 1-year OS rate were 27.4% and 43.9%, respectively. Median second-PFS was significantly longer in patients sensitive to GDP than the ones resistant to the treatment (10.3 vs. 2.8 months, p GDP including neutropenia (8/25), thrombocytopenia (5/25), and anemia (4/25). Taken together, our study suggests that GDP is an effective and optional salvage regimen for relapsed or refractory PTCL-NOS.

  5. Prospective randomized double-blind multicentre phase II study comparing gemcitabine and cisplatin plus sorafenib chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin plus placebo in locally advanced and/or metastasized urothelial cancer: SUSE (AUO-AB 31/05).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krege, Susanne; Rexer, Heidrun; vom Dorp, Frank; de Geeter, Patrick; Klotz, Theodor; Retz, Margitte; Heidenreich, Axel; Kühn, Michael; Kamradt, Joern; Feyerabend, Susan; Wülfing, Christian; Zastrow, Stefan; Albers, Peter; Hakenberg, Oliver; Roigas, Jan; Fenner, Martin; Heinzer, Hans; Schrader, Mark

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine and cisplatin in combination with sorafenib, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, compared with chemotherapy alone as first-line treatment in advanced urothelial cancer. The study was a randomized phase II trial. Its primary aim was to show an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) of 4.5 months by adding sorafenib to conventional chemotherapy. Secondary objectives were objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. The patients included in the trial had histologically confirmed locally advanced and/or metastatic urothelial cancer of the bladder or upper urinary tract. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1250 mg/qm on days 1 and 8) and cisplatin (70 mg/qm on day 1) repeated every 21 days, was administered to all patients in a double-blind randomization of additional sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) vs placebo (two tablets twice daily) on days 3-21. Treatment continued until progression or unacceptable toxicity, the maximum number of cycles was limited to eight. The response assessment was repeated after every two cycles. Between October 2006 and October 2010, 98 of 132 planned patients were recruited. Nine patients were ineligible. The final analysis included 40 patients in the sorafenib and 49 patients in the placebo arm. There were no significant differences between the two arms concerning ORR (sorafenib: complete response [CR] 12.5%, partial response [PR] 40%; placebo: CR 12%, PR 35%), median PFS (sorafenib: 6.3 months, placebo: 6.1 months) or OS (sorafenib: 11.3 months, placebo: 10.6 months). Toxicity was moderately higher in the sorafenib arm. Diarrrhoea occurred significantly more often in the sorafenib arm and hand-foot syndrome occurred only in the sorafenib arm. The study was closed prematurely because of slow recruitment. Although the addition of sorafenib to standard chemotherapy showed acceptable toxicity, the trial failed to show a 4.5 months improvement in PFS. © 2013 The Authors

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition disrupts nuclear factor-kappaB activity in pancreatic cancer, but fails to sensitize to gemcitabine chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamaghani Shadi

    2009-04-01

    chemotherapy agent gemcitabine. This lack of synergy might be context or cell line dependent, but could also be explained on the basis that although NF-kappaB is an important mediator of pancreatic cancer cell survival, it plays a minor role in gemcitabine resistance. Further work is needed to understand the mechanisms of this effect, including the potential for rational combination of GSK3 inhibitors with other targeted agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition disrupts nuclear factor-kappaB activity in pancreatic cancer, but fails to sensitize to gemcitabine chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaghani, Shadi; Patel, Satish; Hedley, David W

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant activation NF-kappaB has been proposed as a mechanism of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. Recently, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 has been shown to exert anti-tumor effects on pancreatic cancer cells by suppressing NF-kappaB. Consequently, we investigated whether inhibition of GSK-3 sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using the pharmacological agent AR-A014418 or siRNA against GSK-3 alpha and beta isoforms. Cytotoxicity was measured using a Sulphorhodamine B assay and clonogenic survival following exposure of six different pancreatic cancer cell lines to a range of doses of either gemcitabine, AR-A014418 or both for 24, 48 and 72 h. We measured protein expression levels by immunoblotting. Basal and TNF-alpha induced activity of NF-kappaB was assessed using a luciferase reporter assay in the presence or absence of GSK-3 inhibition. GSK-3 inhibition reduced both basal and TNF-alpha induced NF-kappaB luciferase activity. Knockdown of GSK-3 beta reduced nuclear factor kappa B luciferase activity to a greater extent than GSK-3 alpha, and the greatest effect was seen with dual knockdown of both GSK-3 isoforms. GSK-3 inhibition also resulted in reduction of the NF-kappaB target proteins XIAP, Bcl-X L , and cyclin D1, associated with growth inhibition and decreased clonogenic survival. In all cell lines, treatment with either AR-A014418, or gemcitabine led to growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, with the exception of PANC-1 where drug synergy occurred with some dose schedules, the inhibitory effect of combined drug treatment was additive, sub-additive, or even antagonistic. GSK-3 inhibition has anticancer effects against pancreatic cancer cells with a range of genetic backgrounds associated with disruption of NF-kappaB, but does not significantly sensitize these cells to the standard chemotherapy agent gemcitabine. This lack of synergy might be

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A resensitizes gemcitabine resistant urothelial carcinoma cells via suppression of TG-interacting factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Bi-Wen; Li, Wei-Ming; Li, Ching-Chia; Kang, Wan-Yi; Huang, Chun-Nung; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Liu, Zi-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) has been widely used for advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). However, resistance to this remedy has been noticed. We have demonstrated that increase of TG-interacting factor (TGIF) in specimens is associated with worse prognosis of upper tract UC (UTUC) patients. The roles of TGIF in the gemcitabine resistance of UC were explored. Specimens of 23 locally advanced/advanced stage UTUC patients who received GC systemic chemotherapy after radical nephroureterectomy were collected to evaluate the alterations of TGIF in the resistance to the remedy by using immunohistochemistry. In vitro characterizations of mechanisms mediating TGIF in gemcitabine resistance were conducted by analyzing NTUB1 cells and their gemcitabine-resistant subline, NGR cells. Our results show that increased TGIF is significantly associated with chemo-resistance, poor progression-free survival, and higher cancer-related deaths of UTUC patients. Higher increases of TGIF, p-AKT Ser473 and invasive ability were demonstrated in NGR cells. Overexpression of TGIF in NTUB1 cells upregulated p-AKT Ser473 activation, enhanced migration ability, and attenuated cellular sensitivity to gemcitabine. Knockdown of TGIF in NGR cells downregulated p-AKT Ser473 activation, declined migration ability, and enhanced cellular sensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, histone deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) inhibited TGIF, p-AKT Ser473 expression and migration ability. Synergistic effects of gemcitabine and TSA on NGR cells were also demonstrated. Collectively, TGIF contributes to the gemcitabine resistance of UC via AKT activation. Combined treatment with gemcitabine and TSA might be a promising therapeutic remedy to improve the gemcitabine resistance of UC. - Highlights: • TGIF expression in UC cells is associated with chemoresistance to gemcitabine. • TGIF-regulated AKT activation contributes to the gemcitabine resistance. • Increased TGIF is significantly

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A resensitizes gemcitabine resistant urothelial carcinoma cells via suppression of TG-interacting factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Bi-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Li, Wei-Ming [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Li, Ching-Chia [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Kang, Wan-Yi [Department of Pathology, Kuo General Hospital, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chun-Nung [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan [Institute of Biochemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Liu, Zi-Miao [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); and others

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) has been widely used for advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). However, resistance to this remedy has been noticed. We have demonstrated that increase of TG-interacting factor (TGIF) in specimens is associated with worse prognosis of upper tract UC (UTUC) patients. The roles of TGIF in the gemcitabine resistance of UC were explored. Specimens of 23 locally advanced/advanced stage UTUC patients who received GC systemic chemotherapy after radical nephroureterectomy were collected to evaluate the alterations of TGIF in the resistance to the remedy by using immunohistochemistry. In vitro characterizations of mechanisms mediating TGIF in gemcitabine resistance were conducted by analyzing NTUB1 cells and their gemcitabine-resistant subline, NGR cells. Our results show that increased TGIF is significantly associated with chemo-resistance, poor progression-free survival, and higher cancer-related deaths of UTUC patients. Higher increases of TGIF, p-AKT{sup Ser473} and invasive ability were demonstrated in NGR cells. Overexpression of TGIF in NTUB1 cells upregulated p-AKT{sup Ser473} activation, enhanced migration ability, and attenuated cellular sensitivity to gemcitabine. Knockdown of TGIF in NGR cells downregulated p-AKT{sup Ser473} activation, declined migration ability, and enhanced cellular sensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, histone deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) inhibited TGIF, p-AKT{sup Ser473} expression and migration ability. Synergistic effects of gemcitabine and TSA on NGR cells were also demonstrated. Collectively, TGIF contributes to the gemcitabine resistance of UC via AKT activation. Combined treatment with gemcitabine and TSA might be a promising therapeutic remedy to improve the gemcitabine resistance of UC. - Highlights: • TGIF expression in UC cells is associated with chemoresistance to gemcitabine. • TGIF-regulated AKT activation contributes to the gemcitabine resistance. • Increased

  10. The interplay between the immune system and chemotherapy: emerging methods for optimizing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, François; Apetoh, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have revealed an unexpected ability of the immune system to contribute to the success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Anticancer therapies can trigger immune system activation by promoting the release of danger signals from dying tumor cells and/or the elimination of immunosuppressive cells. We have, however, recently discovered that some chemotherapies, such as 5-fluorouracil and gemcitabine, exert conflicting effects on anticancer immune responses. Although 5-fluorouracil and Gem selectively eliminated myeloid-derived suppressive cells in tumor-bearing rodents, these chemotherapies promoted the release of IL-1β and the development of pro-angiogenic IL-17-producing CD4 T cells. The ambivalent effects of chemotherapy on immune responses should thus be carefully considered to design effective combination therapies based on chemotherapy and immune modulators. Herein, we discuss how the initial findings underscoring the key role of the immune system in mediating the antitumor efficacy of anticancer agents could begin to translate into effective therapies in humans.

  11. Chitosan and Glyceryl Monooleate Nanostructures Containing Gemcitabine: Potential Delivery System for Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Trickler, William J.; Khurana, Jatin; Nagvekar, Ankita A.; Dash, Alekha K.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to enhance cellular accumulation of gemcitabine with chitosan/glyceryl monooleate (GMO) nanostructures, and to provide significant increase in cell death of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The delivery system was prepared by a multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanostructure topography, size, and surface charge were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a zetameter. The cellular accumulation, cellular internalization and cytot...

  12. Chitosan and glyceryl monooleate nanostructures containing gemcitabine: potential delivery system for pancreatic cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickler, William J; Khurana, Jatin; Nagvekar, Ankita A; Dash, Alekha K

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to enhance cellular accumulation of gemcitabine with chitosan/glyceryl monooleate (GMO) nanostructures, and to provide significant increase in cell death of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The delivery system was prepared by a multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanostructure topography, size, and surface charge were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a zetameter. The cellular accumulation, cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the nanostructures were evaluated by HPLC, confocal microscopy, or MTT assay in Mia PaCa-2 and BxPC-3 cells. The average particle diameter for 2% and 4% (w/w) drug loaded delivery system were 382.3 +/- 28.6 nm, and 385.2 +/- 16.1 nm, respectively with a surface charge of +21.94 +/- 4.37 and +21.23 +/- 1.46 mV. The MTT cytotoxicity dose-response studies revealed the placebo at/or below 1 mg/ml has no effect on MIA PaCa-2 or BxPC-3 cells. The delivery system demonstrated a significant decrease in the IC50 (3 to 4 log unit shift) in cell survival for gemcitabine nanostructures at 72 and 96 h post-treatment when compared with a solution of gemcitabine alone. The nanostructure reported here can be resuspended in an aqueous medium that demonstrate increased effective treatment compared with gemcitabine treatment alone in an in vitro model of human pancreatic cancer. The drug delivery system demonstrates capability to entrap both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds to potentially provide an effective treatment option in human pancreatic cancer.

  13. In vitro and in vivo studies of pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy of D07001-F4, an oral gemcitabine formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Jong-Jing; Hsueh, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Pei-Jing; Chang, Li-Chien; Hsu, Chang-Shan; Hsu, Kuang-Yang

    2013-02-01

    The chemotherapy agent gemcitabine is currently administered intravenously because the drug has poor oral bioavailability. In order to assess the pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of D07001-F4, a new self-microemulsifying oral drug delivery system preparation of gemcitabine, this study was performed to compare the effect of D07001-F4 with administered gemcitabine in vitro and in vivo. D07001-F4 pharmacokinetics was examined by evaluation of in vitro deamination of D07001-F4 and gemcitabine hydrochloride by recombinant human cytidine deaminase (rhCDA) and in vivo evaluation of D07001-F4 pharmacokinetics in mice. Antitumor activity was evaluated by comparing the effect of D07001-F4 and gemcitabine hydrochloride in inhibiting growth in nine cancer cell lines and by examining the effect of D07001-F4 and gemcitabine in two xenograft tumor models in mice. In vitro deamination of D07001-F4 by rhCDA was 3.3-fold slower than deamination of gemcitabine hydrochloride. Growth inhibition by D07001-F4 of 7 of the 8 cancer cell lines was increased compared with that seen with gemcitabine hydrochloride, and D07001-F4 inhibited the growth of pancreatic and colon cancer xenografts. In vivo pharmacokinetics showed the oral bioavailability of D07001-F4 to be 34%. D07001-F4 was effective against several cancer types, was metabolized more slowly than gemcitabine hydrochloride, and exhibited enhanced oral bioavailability.

  14. Measuring body composition using the bioelectrical impedance method can predict the outcomes of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Mami; Tsuchiya, Aya; Ohta, Seiko; Iijima, Yukie; Maruyama, Miyuki; Onodera, Yoshiko; Hagihara, Megumi; Nakaya, Naoki; Sato, Itaru; Omura, Kenji; Ueno, Soichiro; Nakajima, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine the effect on body composition of anticancer drug treatments, the body composition rate in patients being treated with gemcitabine (GEM)-based chemotherapy was measured over time on an outpatient basis with a simple body composition monitor using the bioelectrical impedance (BI) method. The results revealed a significant reduction in the body fat rate (P=0.01) over the course of treatment in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer who became unable to continue GEM-based chemotherapy due to progressive disease or a decreased performance status. Meanwhile, no changes were observed in the body composition of control patients with urothelial carcinoma receiving GEM-based chemotherapy. In association with the adverse reactions to GEM and the hematotoxicity profile, a decreased white blood cell count was more likely to occur in body fat-dominant patients (mean fat rate, 25.8%; mean muscle rate, 26.2%), whereas a decreased blood platelet count was more likely to occur in skeletal muscle-dominant patients (mean fat rate, 23.3%; mean muscle rates, 28.7%). The correlation between body composition parameters and the relative dose intensity (RDI) associated with GEM administration was also analyzed. The results revealed a positive correlation between the RDI and basal metabolism amount (P=0.03); however, the RDI did not correlate with the body fat rate, skeletal muscle rate or body mass index (P=0.61, P=0.14 and P=0.20, respectively). In conclusion, the body composition rate measurement using the BI method over time may be useful for predicting the outcome of GEM-based chemotherapy and adverse events in patients with pancreatobiliary tract cancer. In particular, the present findings indicate that the changes in body fat rate may be helpful as an adjunct index for assessing potential continuation of chemotherapy and changes in physical conditions.

  15. Serum levels of LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 have prognostic roles on survival in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Faruk; Karabulut, Senem; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Sen, Fatma; Sakar, Burak; Disci, Rian; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Serum LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 levels are important tumor markers in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of serum LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 levels in metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the outcome of 196 MPC patients who are treated with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in our clinic. Positivity rates of serum LDH, CEA, and CA19-9 were 22, 40, and 83 %, respectively. Likewise, the rates of very high serum levels of tumor markers were correlated with these positivity rates (9 % for LDH, 30 % for CEA, and 55 % for CA19-9). The serum LDH levels were significantly higher in older patients (p = 0.05) and also in the patients with large tumors (p = 0.05), hepatic metastasis (p = 0.01), hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.01), and unresponsive to chemotherapy (p = 0.04). However, no correlation was found between both serum CEA and CA19-9 levels and possible prognostic factors (p > 0.05). The significant relationships were found between the serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 (r s = 0.24, p = 0.004), and serum LDH and CEA (r(s) = 0.193, p = 0.02). But, there was no correlation between serum LDH and CA19-9 levels (p = 0.39). One-year overall survival rate was 12.8 % (95 % CI 8-18). Increased serum levels of all the tumor markers significantly had adverse affect on survival (p = 0.001 for LDH, p = 0.002 for CEA, and p = 0.007 for CA19-9). However, no difference was observed in between high levels and very high levels of serum markers for all tumor markers (p > 0.05). Patients with normal serum levels of all three tumor markers had better outcome than others (p = 0.002) and those with normal serum LDH and CEA levels (whatever CA19-9) levels had associated with better survival compared with other possible alternatives (p CEA, and CA19-9 had significant affect on survival in MPC patients.

  16. Salvage chemotherapy of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas: a consortium for improving survival of lymphoma (CISL) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeong-Bae; Kim, Won Seog; Suh, Cheolwon; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Jeong-A; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Lee, Won Sik

    2015-11-01

    There is no standard salvage chemotherapy for relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). Gemcitabine combined with cisplatin has been known as an effective regimen for lymphoma treatment in the salvage setting. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory PTCLs in search of a more effective and less toxic therapy. Patients with relapsed or refractory PTCLs with more than one previous regimen were eligible. Treatment consisted of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) intravenously (i.v.) on days 1 and 8, dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1-4, and cisplatin 70 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1, and then every 21 days. Patients could proceed to autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after four cycles of GDP or receive up to six treatment cycles. Twenty-five eligible patients were evaluated for toxicity and response. The diagnoses of participants included 14 cases of PTCL-not otherwise specified (NOS) (56 %) and four cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (16 %) among others. The median age of the patients was 59 years (range 20-75 years). After treatments with GDP, which delivered a median of four GDP cycles, there were 12 patients with complete responses (CR; 48 %) and six with partial responses (PR; 24 %). The overall response rate (RR) was 72 %. Four patients preceded to ASCT, and three patients finally achieved CR. The median progression free survival was 9.3 months (95 % confidence interval (CI); 4.1-14.6) with a median follow-up duration of 27.1 months. In a total of 86 cycles of GDP, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 16.3 and 12.8 % of cycles, respectively. Three patients (3.3 %) experienced febrile neutropenia. GDP is a highly effective and optimal salvage regimen for relapsed or refractory PTCLs and can be administered with acceptable toxicity.

  17. Pathologic Response Rates of Gemcitabine/Cisplatin versus Methotrexate/Vinblastine/Adriamycin/Cisplatin Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Muscle Invasive Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin C. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare pathologic outcomes after treatment with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC versus methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin (MVAC in the neoadjuvant setting. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected on 178 patients with T2-T4 bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy between 2003 and 2011. Outcomes of interest included those with complete response (pT0 and any response (≤pT1. Odds ratios were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Compared to those who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, there were more patients with complete response (28% versus 9%, OR 3.11 (95% CI: 1.45–6.64, P=0.03 and any response (52% versus 25%, OR 3.23 (95% CI: 1.21–8.64, P=0.01. Seventy-two patients received GC (n=41 or MVAC (n=31. CR was achieved in 29% and 22% of GC and MVAC patients, respectively (multivariate OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.10–1.58. Any response (≤pT1 was achieved in 56% of GC and 45% of MVAC patients (multivariate OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.12–1.71. Conclusions. We observed similar pathologic response rates for GC and MVAC neoadjuvant chemotherapy in this cohort of patients with muscle invasive urothelial cancer (MIBC. Our findings support the use of GC as an alternative regimen in the neoadjuvant setting.

  18. Circular RNA Signature Predicts Gemcitabine Resistance of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine resistance is currently the main problem of chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer patients. The resistance is thought to be caused by altered drug metabolism or reduced apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism of Gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this study, we established Gemcitabine resistant PANC-1 (PANC-1-GR cell lines and compared the circular RNAs (circRNAs profiles between PANC-1 cells and PANC-1-GR cells by RNA sequencing. Differentially expressed circRNAs were demonstrated using scatter plot and cluster heatmap analysis. Gene ontology and pathway analysis were performed to systemically map the genes which are functionally associated to those differentially expressed circRNAs identified from our data. The expression of the differentially expressed circRNAs picked up by RNAseq in PANC-1-GR cells was further validated by qRT-PCR and two circRNAs were eventually identified as the most distinct targets. Consistently, by analyzing plasma samples form pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC patients, the two circRNAs showed more significant expression in the Gemcitabine non-responsive patients than the responsive ones. In addition, we found that silencing of the two circRNAs could restore the sensitivity of PANC-1-GR cells to Gemcitabine treatment, while over-expression of them could increase the resistance of normal PANC-1 and MIA PACA-2 cells, suggesting that they might serve as drug targets for Gemcitabine resistance. Furthermore, the miRNA interaction networks were also explored based on the correlation analysis of the target microRNAs of these two circRNAs. In conclusion, we successfully established new PANC-1-GR cells, systemically characterized the circRNA and miRNA profiles, and identified two circRNAs as novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for Gemcitabine non-responsive PDAC patients.

  19. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of tigatuzumab (CS-1008), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting death receptor 5, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero-Torres, Andres; Infante, Jeffrey R; Waterhouse, David; Wong, Lucas; Vickers, Selwyn; Arrowsmith, Edward; He, Aiwu Ruth; Hart, Lowell; Trent, David; Wade, James; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Austin, TaShara; Rosen, Michael; Beckman, Robert; Roemeling, Reinhard von; Greenberg, Jonathan; Saleh, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Tigatuzumab is the humanized version of the agonistic murine monoclonal antibody TRA-8 that binds to the death receptor 5 and induces apoptosis of human cancer cell lines via the caspase cascade. The combination of tigatuzumab and gemcitabine inhibits tumor growth in murine pancreatic xenografts. This phase 2 trial evaluated the efficacy of tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine in 62 chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients received intravenous tigatuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 3 mg/kg weekly) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m 2 once weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest) until progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) (complete responses plus partial responses), duration of response, and overall survival (OS). Safety of the combination was also evaluated. Mean duration of treatment was 18.48 weeks for tigatuzumab and 17.73 weeks for gemcitabine. The PFS rate at 16 weeks was 52.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.3–64.1%). The ORR was 13.1%; 28 (45.9%) patients had stable disease and 14 (23%) patients had PD. Median PFS was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.4 months). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–9.6 months). The most common adverse events related to tigatuzumab were nausea (35.5%), fatigue (32.3%), and peripheral edema (19.4%). Tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine was well tolerated and may be clinically active for the treatment of chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

  20. Cytoplasmic Hu-Antigen R (HuR) Expression is Associated with Poor Survival in Patients with Surgically Resected Cholangiocarcinoma Treated with Adjuvant Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Naru; Uemura, Kenichiro; Nakagawa, Naoya; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2018-05-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the stability, translation, and nucleus-to-cytoplasm translocation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of HuR in cholangiocarcinoma patients who received adjuvant gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (AGC) after surgical resection. Nuclear and cytoplasmic HuR expression was investigated immunohistochemically in 131 patients with resected cholangiocarcinoma, including 91 patients administered AGC and 40 patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The correlation between HuR expression and survival was evaluated by statistical analysis. High nuclear and cytoplasmic HuR expression was observed in 67 (51%) and 45 (34%) patients, respectively. Cytoplasmic HuR expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.01), while high cytoplasmic HuR expression was significantly associated with poor disease-free survival [DFS] (p = 0.03) and overall survival [OS] (p = 0.001) in the 91 patients who received AGC, but not in the 40 patients who did not receive AGC (DFS p = 0.17; OS p = 0.07). In the multivariate analysis of patients who received AGC, high cytoplasmic HuR expression was an independent predictor of poor DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.77; p = 0.04) and OS (HR 2.09; p = 0.02). Nuclear HuR expression did not affect the survival of enrolled patients. High cytoplasmic HuR expression was closely associated with the efficacy of AGC in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. The current findings warrant further investigations to optimize adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for resectable cholangiocarcinoma.

  1. Self-Delivery Nanoparticles of Amphiphilic Methotrexate-Gemcitabine Prodrug for Synergistic Combination Chemotherapy via Effect of Deoxyribonucleotide Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Huang, Ping; Hu, Minxi; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-11-16

    The distinct and complementary biochemical mechanisms of folic acid analog methotrexate (MTX) and cytidine analog gemcitabine (GEM) make their synergistic combination effective. Unfortunately, such a combination faces severe pharmacokinetic problems and several transportation barriers. To overcome these problems, a new strategy of amphiphilic small molecule prodrug (ASMP) is developed to improve their synergistic combination effect. The ASMP was prepared by the amidation of the hydrophilic GEM with the hydrophobic MTX at a fixed ratio. Owing to its inherent amphiphilicity, the MTX-GEM ASMP self-assembled into stable nanoparticles (ASMP-NPs) with high drug loading capacity (100%), in which the MTX and GEM could self-deliver without any carriers and release synchronously in cancer cells. In vitro studies showed that the MTX-GEM ASMP-NPs could greatly improve the synergistic combination effects by the reason of arresting more S phase of the cell cycle and reducing levels of deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP), deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP), and deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP). The stronger synergistic effects caused the higher cell cytotoxicity and apoptotic ratio, and circumvented the multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells. Additionally, MTX-GEM ASMP-NPs could achieve the same anticancer effect with the greatly reduced dosage compared with the free drugs according to the dose-reduction index (DRI) values of MTX and GEM in MTX-GEM ASMP-NPs, which may be beneficial for reducing the side effects.

  2. Streptokinase increases the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to chemotherapy by gemcitabine and cis-platine in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, V.; Pintérová, D.; Kološtová, K.; Boubelík, Michael; Douglas, J.; Teyssler, P.; Pavlásek, J.; Kovařík, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 237, č. 1 (2006), s. 95-101 ISSN 0304-3835 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chemotherapy * radiation * colon cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.277, year: 2006

  3. Twice-daily reirradiation for recurrent and second primary head-and-neck cancer with gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, Michael T.; Vokes, Everett E.; Salama, Joseph K.; Stenson, Kerstin M.; Kao, Johnny; Witt, Mary-Ellyn; Mittal, Bharat B.; Argiris, Athanassios; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Haraf, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated the efficacy of concurrent gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and 5-fluorouracil in conjunction with twice-daily (1.5-Gy) radiotherapy delivered on alternating weeks (TFGX 2 ) in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Here, we report the clinical outcome and late toxicity of TFGX 2 in a subset of patients previously irradiated to the head and neck. Methods and materials: Twenty-nine previously irradiated patients, presenting with recurrent or second primary head-and-neck cancer, underwent TFGX 2 . Twelve patients underwent attempted surgical resection before chemoradiotherapy, 10 of whom were left with no measurable disease. Patients with measurable disease received a median radiation dose of 72 Gy; those with no measurable disease received a median dose of 61 Gy. The cumulative dose ranged from 74.4 to 156.4 Gy (mean, 125.7 Gy; median, 131.0 Gy). Results: The median follow-up was 19.1 months (50.9 months for living patients). The 5-year overall survival rate was 34.5%, and the locoregional control rate was 54.5%. In patients with measurable disease at treatment, the 5-year overall survival and locoregional control rate was 26.3% and 45.1%, respectively, compared with 50.0% (p = 0.14) and 70% (p = 0.31), respectively, for those with no measurable disease. Measurable disease and radiation dose were highly statistically significant for overall survival and locoregional control on multivariate analysis. Of 14 patients assessable for late toxicity, 3 developed Grade 4-5, 8 Grade 2-3, and 3 Grade 0-1 toxicity. Conclusion: Aggressive reirradiation with chemotherapy in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer provides a chance for long-term cure at the expense of toxicity. Attempted surgical resection before chemoradiotherapy improved disease control and survival

  4. Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin combination chemotherapy in 30 patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma%吉西他滨联合奥沙利铂治疗晚期胰腺癌30例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity and safety of combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen) in patients of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: 30 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into this study. All patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2, given by 30-minute intravenous infusion, on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle. Oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2 was administered as a 2 h infusion on day 1 of each 21 day. Clinical outcomes for patients treated with two cycles of chemotherapy were evaluated according to WHO criteria. Results: All 30patients were eligible for effectiveness and safety analysis. Objective response rate was approximately 20.0%. Clinical benefit response (CBR) was a composite of assessment of pain, performance status and body weight. The pain relief rate, improvement rate of performance status and body weight were 53.3%, 46.7% and 36.7%, respectively. The main adverse effects were bone marrow depression, peripheral nerve toxicity and gastrointestinal reaction. There was no treatment-related death during the chemotherapy. Conclusion: The high response rate with low toxicity observed in this study suggests that GEMOX regimen may be an effective alternative curative treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma and can be used more extensively in clinical practice.

  5. A phase I dose escalation trial of AXP107-11, a novel multi-component crystalline form of genistein, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, Johannes-Matthias; Karimi, Masoud; Omazic, Brigitta; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Verbeke, Caroline Sabine; Berkenstam, Anders; Frödin, Jan-Erik

    2016-01-01

    AXP107-11 is a novel, multi-component crystalline form of the naturally occurring compound genistein. AXP107-11 has improved physiochemical properties and oral bioavailability compared to the natural form of genistein, and it is possible that combining AXP107-11 with chemotherapy may increase the effect and reduce chemoresistance. The purpose of this dose escalation phase Ib study was to assess the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of AXP107-11 in combination with gemcitabine in treatment-naïve patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma. AXP107-11 was given orally in escalating doses (400 mg-1600 mg daily) in combination with standard gemcitabine treatment (1000 mg/m(2)/week) for the first seven of eight weeks and thereafter for a maximum of four × four-week treatment cycles. PK, safety, MTD and efficacy of AXP107-11 in combination with gemcitabine were evaluated. Sixteen patients were enrolled and received AXP107-11. The maximum concentration in serum of unconjugated (free) genistein was 1 μM. Neither dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) nor signs of hematological or non-hematological toxicities related to AXP107-11 were observed over a period ranging from 0.7 to 13.2 months. The median overall survival time was 4.9 months (range 1.5-19.5 months). Seven patients (44%) survived longer than six months and 19% were alive at the one-year follow-up. Treatment of pancreatic cancer patients with AXP107-11 in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a favorable PK-profile with high serum levels without signs of either hematological or non-hematological toxicity. Accordingly, we suggest further studies with AXP107-11 in pancreatic cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Significance of sarcopenia as a prognostic factor for metastatic urothelial carcinoma patients treated with systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hideyuki; Takei, Kohei; Uematsu, Toshitaka; Tokura, Yuumi; Suzuki, Issei; Sakamoto, Kazumasa; Nishihara, Daisaku; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Mizuno, Tomoya; Nukui, Akinori; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kamai, Takao

    2018-04-01

    Recently, numerous studies have reported an association between sarcopenia and poor outcomes in various kinds of malignancies. We investigated whether sarcopenia predicts the survival of patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma who underwent systemic chemotherapy. We reviewed 87 metastatic urothelial carcinoma patients who underwent chemotherapy (gemcitabine plus cisplatin or gemcitabine plus carboplatin for cisplatin-unfit patients) between 2007 and 2015. A computed tomography scan prior to chemotherapy was used for evaluating sarcopenia, and we measured three cross-sectional areas of skeletal muscle at the third lumbar vertebra and calculated the skeletal muscle index (SMI), the paraspinal muscle index (PSMI), and the total psoas area (TPA) of each patient. Predictive values of survival were assessed using Cox regression analysis. The median overall survival (OS) was 16 months (95% CI 13.5-18). Although SMI alone was not a significant predictor of shorter OS (P = 0.117) in univariate analysis, SMI stratified by the value of the body mass index (BMI) was a significant predictor of shorter OS in univariate analysis (P = 0.037) and was also an independent predictor of shorter OS in multivariate analysis (P = 0.026). PSMI and TPA were not significant prognostic factors even when stratified by BMI (P = 0.294 and 0.448), respectively. Neither PSMI nor TPA could substitute SMI as a predictor for poor outcomes in metastatic urothelial carcinoma patients treated with systemic chemotherapy in our study. SMI stratified by BMI is a useful predictor of prognosis in these patients.

  7. Toxicoderma by gemcitabine: About a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora López-López

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin reactions are often related with drugs, particularly with chemotherapy. Several types of cutaneous involvement have been described from pruritus alone to generalized eruptions not always but generally related with hypersensitivity or inflammatory reactions that usually are independent of primary tumor location. Gemcitabine is a widely used chemotherapy drug that may typically produce a mild skin rash. Herein, we show a case of uncommon and severe direct skin toxicity because of gemcitabine in context of thrombocytopenia. We have also performed a review of the literature showing that this may be the first case of such toxicity.

  8. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  9. Phase III study comparing cisplatin plus gemcitabine with cisplatin plus pemetrexed in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, G.V.; Parikh, P.; Pawel, J. von

    2008-01-01

    , in patients with squamous cell histology, there was a significant improvement in survival with cisplatin/ gemcitabine versus cisplatin/pemetrexed (n = 473; 10.8 v 9.4 months, respectively). For cisplatin/pemetrexed, rates of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia (P ... neutropenia (P = .002); and alopecia (P

  10. Induction Chemotherapy With Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin Followed by Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Taiwan Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ch' ang, Hui-Ju [National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yu-Lin [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Hsiu-Po [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yen-Feng [Institute of Public Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ming-Chu [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chih-Hung [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tien, Yu-Wen [Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jen-Shi [Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen [Department of Internal Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Pin-Wen; Shan, Yan-Shen [Department of Surgery, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jang-Yang [National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Whang-Peng, Jacqueline [National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Tsann-Long, E-mail: hwangtl@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Surgery, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of 3-month triplet induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Patients and Methods: Chemonaieve patients with measurable, histologically confirmed LAPC were eligible. The ICT consisted of biweekly gemcitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2}) infusion at a fixed dose rate (10 mg/m{sup 2}/min), followed by 85 mg/m{sup 2} oxaliplatin and 48-h infusion of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (3000/150 mg/m{sup 2}) for 6 cycles. Patients without disease progression 4 weeks after ICT would receive weekly 400 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine and 5040 cGy radiation in 28 fractions. After CCRT, patients were subjected for surgical intervention and/or maintenance chemotherapy until progression or intolerable toxicity. Results: Between December 2004 and August 2008, 50 patients were enrolled. The best responses after ICT were partial response (PR) in 9, stable disease in 26, and progressive disease or not evaluable in 15. Among the former 35 patients, 2 had disease progression before CCRT, and 3 declined to have CCRT. Of the 30 patients receiving CCRT, an additional 4 and 1 patient(s) achieved PR at the end of CCRT and during maintenance chemotherapy, respectively. On intent-to-treat analysis, the overall best response was PR in 14 patients and stable disease in 21. The overall response rate and disease control rate were 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.2-42.5%) and 70% (95% CI, 44.4-99.2%), respectively. The median time to progression and overall survival of the intent-to-treat population was 9.3 (95% CI, 5.8-12.8) months and 14.5 (95% CI, 11.9-17.1) months, respectively. One- and two-year survival rates were 68% (95% CI, 55.1-80.9%) and 20.6% (95% CI, 8.7-32.5%), respectively. Neutropenia was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity of both ICT and CCRT, with a frequency of 28% and 26.7%, respectively. Significant sensory neuropathy occurred in 9 patients (18

  11. Induction Chemotherapy With Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin Followed by Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Taiwan Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ch’ang, Hui-Ju; Lin, Yu-Lin; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Chang, Ming-Chu; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jen-Shi; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Lin, Pin-Wen; Shan, Yan-Shen; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Chang, Jang-Yang; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Hwang, Tsann-Long

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of 3-month triplet induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Patients and Methods: Chemonaïve patients with measurable, histologically confirmed LAPC were eligible. The ICT consisted of biweekly gemcitabine (800 mg/m 2 ) infusion at a fixed dose rate (10 mg/m 2 /min), followed by 85 mg/m 2 oxaliplatin and 48-h infusion of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (3000/150 mg/m 2 ) for 6 cycles. Patients without disease progression 4 weeks after ICT would receive weekly 400 mg/m 2 gemcitabine and 5040 cGy radiation in 28 fractions. After CCRT, patients were subjected for surgical intervention and/or maintenance chemotherapy until progression or intolerable toxicity. Results: Between December 2004 and August 2008, 50 patients were enrolled. The best responses after ICT were partial response (PR) in 9, stable disease in 26, and progressive disease or not evaluable in 15. Among the former 35 patients, 2 had disease progression before CCRT, and 3 declined to have CCRT. Of the 30 patients receiving CCRT, an additional 4 and 1 patient(s) achieved PR at the end of CCRT and during maintenance chemotherapy, respectively. On intent-to-treat analysis, the overall best response was PR in 14 patients and stable disease in 21. The overall response rate and disease control rate were 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.2–42.5%) and 70% (95% CI, 44.4–99.2%), respectively. The median time to progression and overall survival of the intent-to-treat population was 9.3 (95% CI, 5.8–12.8) months and 14.5 (95% CI, 11.9–17.1) months, respectively. One- and two-year survival rates were 68% (95% CI, 55.1–80.9%) and 20.6% (95% CI, 8.7–32.5%), respectively. Neutropenia was the most common Grade 3–4 toxicity of both ICT and CCRT, with a frequency of 28% and 26.7%, respectively. Significant sensory neuropathy occurred in 9 patients (18%). Conclusion

  12. Modelling non-homogeneous stochastic reaction-diffusion systems: the case study of gemcitabine-treated non-small cell lung cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecca, Paola; Morpurgo, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion based models have been widely used in the literature for modeling the growth of solid tumors. Many of the current models treat both diffusion/consumption of nutrients and cell proliferation. The majority of these models use classical transport/mass conservation equations for describing the distribution of molecular species in tumor spheroids, and the Fick's law for describing the flux of uncharged molecules (i.e oxygen, glucose). Commonly, the equations for the cell movement and proliferation are first order differential equations describing the rate of change of the velocity of the cells with respect to the spatial coordinates as a function of the nutrient's gradient. Several modifications of these equations have been developed in the last decade to explicitly indicate that the tumor includes cells, interstitial fluids and extracellular matrix: these variants provided a model of tumor as a multiphase material with these as the different phases. Most of the current reaction-diffusion tumor models are deterministic and do not model the diffusion as a local state-dependent process in a non-homogeneous medium at the micro- and meso-scale of the intra- and inter-cellular processes, respectively. Furthermore, a stochastic reaction-diffusion model in which diffusive transport of the molecular species of nutrients and chemotherapy drugs as well as the interactions of the tumor cells with these species is a novel approach. The application of this approach to he scase of non-small cell lung cancer treated with gemcitabine is also novel. We present a stochastic reaction-diffusion model of non-small cell lung cancer growth in the specification formalism of the tool Redi, we recently developed for simulating reaction-diffusion systems. We also describe how a spatial gradient of nutrients and oncological drugs affects the tumor progression. Our model is based on a generalization of the Fick's first diffusion law that allows to model diffusive transport in non

  13. The Impact of SMAD4 Loss on Outcome in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Ormanns

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the tumor suppressor mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4 has not yet been defined in patients (pts with advanced pancreatic cancer (aPC. This translational research study was designed to evaluate the impact of tumoral SMAD4 loss on clinicopathological parameters and outcome in PC patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined SMAD4 expression in tumor tissue of 143 aPC pts treated within completed prospective clinical and biomarker trials. In uni- and multivariate analyses, SMAD4 expression status was correlated to clinicopathological patient characteristics and outcome. At chemotherapy initiation, 128 pts had metastatic PC; most pts (n = 99 received a gemcitabine-based regimen. SMAD4 loss was detected in 92 pts (64%; patient characteristics such as gender, age, tumor grading, disease stage or number of metastatic sites had no significant impact on tumoral SMAD4 status. In univariate analyses, SMAD4 loss had no impact on overall survival (hazard ratio (HR 1.008, p = 0.656; however, we observed a prolonged progression-free survival (HR 1.565, p = 0.038 in pts with tumoral SMAD4 loss. This finding was confirmed in multivariate analyses (HR 1.790, p = 0.040, but only for gemcitabine-treated pts. In contrast to previous studies in resectable PC, loss of SMAD4 expression was not associated with a negative outcome in patients with advanced PC receiving systemic chemotherapy.

  14. [A case report-advanced pancreas cancer with liver and lung metastases well controlled over one year by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion in an outpatient setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasuike, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Yamada, Masaharu; Minami, Yukiko; Ezumi, Koji; Kashiwazaki, Masaki; Fujimoto, Takayoshi

    2008-11-01

    We report a case of advanced pancreatic cancer with liver and lung metastases that was well controlled over one year by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion in an outpatient setting. The patient was a 74-year-old woman. Chief complaints were back pain and anorexia. She was diagnosed with pancreas cancer with liver and lung metastases at the time of first visit. We started systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine 1 g/body and 5-FU 1 g/body alternately every other week on an outpatient basis. At 1.5 months (M) after initiation of chemotherapy, we started radiation therapy to the main tumor at a total dose of 40 Gy. After radiation, chemotherapy was resumed. As a result, the size of the main tumor decreased but metastatic liver tumors got larger. Then we changed to combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy (gemcitabine and 5-FU) and hepatic arterial infusion (5-FU weekly). Liver metastases almost disappeared after 7.5 M. Despite all these treatments, however, the number of metastatic lung tumors increased. The patient was hospitalized for 15 M and died after 17 M. We focused on and succeeded in the prolongation of lifetime and maintenance of QOL by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion therapy.

  15. Locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer: Induction chemoradiotherapy followed by maintenance gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone: Definitive results of the 2000-2001 FFCD/SFRO phase III trial; Cancer du pancreas localement evolue non resecable: chimioradiotherapie d'induction suivie de chimiotherapie par gemcitabine contre chimiotherapie exclusive par gemcitabine: resultats definitifs de l'etude de phase III 2000-2001de la FFCD et de la SFRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barhoumi, M.; Mornex, F. [EA 3738, departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69310 Pierre-Benite (France); Bonnetain, F. [EA 4184, unite de biostatistiques et d' epidemiologie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21034 Dijon cedex (France); Inserm UMR 866, faculte de medecine, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Universite de Bourgogne, BP 27877, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Rougier, P. [Service d' hepato-gastro-enterologie oncologie digestive, centre hospitalier Ambroise-Pare, 9, avenue Charles-de-Gaulle, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt (France); Mariette, C. [Service de chirurgie digestive et generale, rez-de-jardin-aile-ouest, hopital Claude-Huriez, 59037 Lille cedex (France); Bouche, O. [CHU, 51092 Reims cedex (France); Bosset, J.F. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU de Besancon, 25030 Besancon cedex (France); Aparicio, T. [Service de gastroenterologie, hopital Avicenne, AP-HP, 93000 Bobigny (France); Mineur, L. [Service de radiotherapie oncologie digestive, institut Sainte-Catherine, 84082 Avignon cedex 2 (France); Azzedine, A. [Centre hospitalier Henri-Duffaut, 84902 Avignon (France); Hammel, P. [Service de gastroenterologie pancreatologie, hopital Beaujon, 92110 Clichy (France); Butel, J. [Hopital d' Abbeville, 80142 Abbeville (France); Stremsdoerfer, N. [Service d' hepatogastroenterologie, centre hospitalier Pierre-Oudot, 38317 Bourgoin-Jallieu (France); Maingon, P. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21079 Dijon cedex (France); Bedenne, L. [Inserm UMR 866, faculte de medecine, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Universite de Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Service d' hepatogastroenterologie, CHU Le-Bocage, 21034 Dijon cedex (France); Chauffert, B. [Inserm UMR 866, faculte de medecine, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Universite de Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Departement d' oncologie medicale, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21079 Dijon cedex (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - To compare chemo-radiation with systemic chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods. - One hundred and nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, with World Health Organization performance status of zero to two were randomly assigned to either the induction chemo-radiation group (60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction; concomitant 5-fluoro-uracil infusion, 300 mg/m{sup 2} per day, days 1-5 for 6 weeks; cisplatin, 20 mg/m{sup 2} per day, days 1-5 during weeks 1 and 5) or the induction gemcitabine group (GEM: 1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 7 weeks). Maintenance gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, 3/4 weeks) was given in both arms until disease progression or toxicity. Results. - Overall survival was shorter in the chemo-radiation than in the gemcitabine arm (median survival 8.6 [99% confidence interval 7.1-11.4] and 13 months [8,9,9-18], p = 0.03). One-year survival was, respectively, 32 and 53%. These results were confirmed in a per-protocol analysis for patients who received 75% or more of the planned dose of radiotherapy. More overall grades 3-4 toxic effects were recorded in the chemo-radiation arm, both during induction (36 versus 22%) and maintenance (32 versus 18%). Conclusion. - This intensive induction schedule of chemo-radiation was more toxic and less effective than gemcitabine alone. (authors)

  16. A case of severe rectal hemorrhage possibly caused by radiation recall after administration of gemcitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Akise, Yushi; Uchida, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Masaharu; Kutsuki, Shoji; Hashimoto, Subaru

    2016-01-01

    Radiation recall is an acute inflammatory reaction that can be triggered when systemic agents are administered long time after radiotherapy. Because radiotherapy is now indicated for many types of cancer, care should be taken regarding possible toxic events relating to radiotherapy in combination with radio-sensitizing agents. Gemcitabine, one such anti-cancer agent, is widely used, especially for urologic cancers. We report an intriguing case of possible radiation recall in the rectum caused by gemcitabine administration 37 years after radiation therapy. From a review of the literature, it appears that there have been no reported cases of radiation recall in the rectum with such a long interval between radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Here, we describe the case and provide a literature review. (author)

  17. Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurse can help you balance the risks of chemotherapy against the potential benefits. It is important to note that the information provided here is basic and does not take the place of professional advice. If you have any questions ... Publication Quimioterapia (Chemotherapy) Una publicación de ...

  18. Interdependence of Gemcitabine Treatment, Transporter Expression, and Resistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hagmann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is widely used as first-line chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Our previous experimental chemotherapy studies have shown that treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU alters the cellular transporter expression profile and that modulation of the expression of multidrug resistance protein 5 (MRP5; ABCC5 influences the chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Here, we studied the influence of acute and chronic gemcitabine treatment on the expression of relevant uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblot analyses. The specific role of MRP5 in cellular gemcitabine sensitivity was studied by cytotoxicity assays using MRP5-overexpressing and MRP5-silenced cells. Exposure to gemcitabine (12 nM for 3 days did not alter the messenger RNA (mRNA expression of MRP1, MRP3, MRP5, and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1, whereas high dosages of the drug (20 µM for 1 hour elicited up-regulation of these transporters in most cell lines studied. In cells with acquired gemcitabine resistance (up to 160 nM gemcitabine, the mRNA or protein expression of the gemcitabine transporters MRP5 and ENT1 was upregulated in several cell lines. Combined treatment with 5-FU and gemcitabine caused a 5- to 40-fold increase in MRP5 and ENT1 expressions. Cytotoxicity assays using either MRP5-overexpressing (HEK and PANC-1 or MRP5-silenced (PANC1/shMRP5 cells indicated that MRP5 contributes to gemcitabine resistance. Thus, our novel data not only on drug-induced alterations of transporter expression relevant for gemcitabine uptake and export but also on the link between gemcitabine sensitivity and MRP5 expression may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine in pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  19. SPIRE - combining SGI-110 with cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy for solid malignancies including bladder cancer: study protocol for a phase Ib/randomised IIa open label clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Crabb, Simon; Caddy, Joshua; Dunkley, Denise; Rajaram, Jessica; Ellis, Deborah; Hill, Stephanie; Whitehead, Amy; Huddart, Robert; Griffiths, Gareth; Kalevras, Michail

    2018-01-01

    Background: urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) accounts for 10,000 new diagnoses and 5000 deaths annually in the UK (Cancer Research UK, http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/statistics-by-cancer-type/bladder-cancer , Cancer Research UK, Accessed 26 Mar 2018). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is standard of care therapy for UBC for both palliative first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic disease and radical neoadjuvant treatment of localised muscle invasive bladder...

  20. Alterations in Pharmacokinetics of Gemcitabine and Erlotinib by Concurrent Administration of Hyangsayukgunja-Tang, a Gastroprotective Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Shin, Soyoung; Kim, Sarah; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Weon, Kwon-Yeon; Joo, Sang Hoon; Ma, Eunsook; Yoo, Sun Dong; Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Jeong, Seok Won; Lee, Da Young; Shin, Beom Soo

    2017-09-10

    Gemcitabine and erlotinib are the chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of various cancers and their combination is being accepted as a first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Hyangsayukgunja-tang (HYT) is a traditional oriental medicine used in various digestive disorders and potentially helpful to treat gastrointestinal adverse effects related to chemotherapy. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of HYT on the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and erlotinib given simultaneously in rats. Rats were pretreated with HYT at an oral dose of 1200 mg/kg/day once daily for a single day or 14 consecutive days. Immediately after pretreatment with HYT, gemcitabine and erlotinib were administered by intravenous injection (10 mg/kg) and oral administration (20 mg/kg), respectively. The effects of HYT on pharmacokinetics of the two drugs were estimated by non-compartmental analysis and pharmacokinetic modeling. The pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and erlotinib were not altered by single dose HYT pretreatment. However, the plasma levels of OSI-420 and OSI-413, active metabolites of erlotinib, were significantly decreased in the multiple dose HYT pretreatment group. The pharmacokinetic model estimated increased systemic clearances of OSI-420 and OSI-413 by multiple doses of HYT. These data suggest that HYT may affect the elimination of OSI-420 and OSI-413.

  1. Use of gemcitabine and ginger extract infusion may improve the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... Key words: Gemcitabine, ginger, chemotherapy, chemoprevention, cytotoxicity, cervical cancer. INTRODUCTION ... leading to side effects such as nausea and vomiting. (64%) ... indole- 3 -carbinol (I3C), curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin- 3 ... kindly provided by Dr. K. Satyamoorthy (Manipal University, India).

  2. A combination therapy with preoperative full-dose gemcitabine, concurrent 3-dimensional conformal radiation, surgery and postoperative liver perfusion chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Due to the high incidence of local recurrence and liver metastasis, long-term outcomes for patients after resection of pancreatic cancer are extremely poor. For improving the survival of the patients, a combination of preoperative chemoradiation, surgery, and postoperative liver-perfusion chemotherapy (LPC) were performed. Postoperative histopathologic study revealed a marked degenerative change in cancer tissue, showing negative surgical margins (R0) in 98% of patients and negative nodal involvement in 85% of patients. The 5-year survival rate after pancreatectomy was 56%, with low incidences of both local recurrence (11%) and liver metastasis (9%). This combination therapy were able to effectively reduce the incidence of both local and liver recurrence and improved long-term outcomes for patients with T3-4 cancers of the pancreas. (author)

  3. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa; Li, Ying-Yi; Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato; Matsugo, Seiichi; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization

  4. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Li, Ying-Yi [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Matsugo, Seiichi [School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sasaki, Soichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: mukaida@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  5. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin for pancreatic cancer: from the laboratory to the clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symon, Zvi; Davis, Mary; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We have reported that gemcitabine and concurrent radiation is a promising therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. We investigated whether the addition of cisplatin, which may increase the systemic efficacy of gemcitabine, would be synergistic with gemcitabine and/or radiation in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: BxPc3 and Panc-1 human pancreatic cancer cells were treated with three different schedules before radiation: (A) a sequential incubation of gemcitabine for 2 h followed by cisplatin for 2 h, (B) gemcitabine for 2 h, followed by washout of drug, replenishment of media for a 24-h incubation, followed by cisplatin for 2 h, and (C) gemcitabine for 24 h with a concurrent incubation of cisplatin for the last 2 h. Cells were assessed for clonogenic survival using a standard assay. Synergism was evaluated by the median effect analysis. Results: The schedule shown to be maximally synergistic for both cell lines was the consecutive 2-h gemcitabine, 2-h cisplatin exposure, particularly at surviving fractions of <0.5. Cisplatin did not produce radiosensitization nor did it affect gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization. Conclusion: Cisplatin produces synergistic cytotoxicity with gemcitabine without compromising gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization. On the basis of these laboratory and previous clinical observations, we have initiated a Phase I trial of cisplatin plus gemcitabine and radiotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer

  6. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/ gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy: EORTC intergroup study 30987

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bellmunt (Joaquim); H. von der Maase (Hans); G.M. Mead (Graham); I. Skoneczna (I.); M. de Santis (Maria); G. Daugaard (Gedske); J. Boehle; C. Chevreau (Christine); L. Paz-Ares (Luis); L.R. Laufman (Leslie); E. Winquist (Eric); R. Raghavan (Raghu); S. Marreaud (Sandrine); S. Collette (Sandra); R. Sylvester (Richard); R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival.

  7. Reversal of Jaundice in Two Patients with Inoperable Cholangiocarcinoma Treated with Cisplatin and Gemcitabine Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Criel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two patients are presented with severe jaundice, due to inoperable cholangiocarcinoma. The chemotherapeutic approach in patients with severe jaundice is discussed. Many schedules of chemotherapy were developed in this tumor type with normal serum bilirubin. We report here the first successful use of cisplatin and gemcitabine combination chemotherapy in these patients. Tolerability was good and liver function tests gradually improved.

  8. Bitter melon juice targets molecular mechanisms underlying gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    SOMASAGARA, RANGANATHA R.; DEEP, GAGAN; SHROTRIYA, SANGEETA; PATEL, MANISHA; AGARWAL, CHAPLA; AGARWAL, RAJESH

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PanC) is one of the most lethal malignancies, and resistance towards gemcitabine, the front-line chemotherapy, is the main cause for dismal rate of survival in PanC patients; overcoming this resistance remains a major challenge to treat this deadly malignancy. Whereas several molecular mechanisms are known for gemcitabine resistance in PanC cells, altered metabolism and bioenergetics are not yet studied. Here, we compared metabolic and bioenergetic functions between gemcita...

  9. Synergistic activity of troxacitabine (Troxatyl™ and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leblond Lorraine

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemcitabine, a deoxycytidine nucleoside analog, is the current standard chemotherapy used as first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer of the pancreas, and extends life survival by 5.7 months. Advanced pancreatic cancer thus remains a highly unmet medical need and new therapeutic agents are required for this patient population. Troxacitabine (Troxatyl™ is the first unnatural L-nucleoside analog to show potent preclinical antitumor activity and is currently under clinical investigation. Troxacitabine was recently evaluated as a first-line therapy in 54 patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and gave comparable overall results to those reported with gemcitabine in recently published randomized trials. Methods The human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, AsPC-1, Capan-2, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1, were exposed to troxacitabine or gemcitabine alone or in combination, for 72 h, and the effects on cell growth were determined by electronic particle counting. Synergistic efficacy was determined by the isobologram and combination-index methods of Chou and Talalay. Mechanistic studies addressed incorporation of troxacitabine into DNA and intracellular levels of troxacitabine and gemcitabine metabolites. For in vivo studies, we evaluated the effect of both drugs, alone and in combination, on the growth of established human pancreatic (AsPC-1 tumors implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Statistical analysis was calculated by a one-way ANOVA with Dunnett as a post-test and the two-tailed unpaired t test using GraphPad prism software. Results Synergy, evaluated using the CalcuSyn Software, was observed in all four cell-lines at multiple drug concentrations resulting in combination indices under 0.7 at Fa of 0.5 (50% reduction of cell growth. The effects of drug exposures on troxacitabine and gemcitabine nucleotide pools were analyzed, and although gemcitabine reduced phosphorylation of

  10. Synergistic activity of troxacitabine (Troxatyl™) and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damaraju, Vijaya L; Bouffard, David Y; Wong, Clarence KW; Clarke, Marilyn L; Mackey, John R; Leblond, Lorraine; Cass, Carol E; Grey, Mike; Gourdeau, Henriette

    2007-01-01

    Gemcitabine, a deoxycytidine nucleoside analog, is the current standard chemotherapy used as first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer of the pancreas, and extends life survival by 5.7 months. Advanced pancreatic cancer thus remains a highly unmet medical need and new therapeutic agents are required for this patient population. Troxacitabine (Troxatyl™) is the first unnatural L-nucleoside analog to show potent preclinical antitumor activity and is currently under clinical investigation. Troxacitabine was recently evaluated as a first-line therapy in 54 patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and gave comparable overall results to those reported with gemcitabine in recently published randomized trials. The human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, AsPC-1, Capan-2, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1, were exposed to troxacitabine or gemcitabine alone or in combination, for 72 h, and the effects on cell growth were determined by electronic particle counting. Synergistic efficacy was determined by the isobologram and combination-index methods of Chou and Talalay. Mechanistic studies addressed incorporation of troxacitabine into DNA and intracellular levels of troxacitabine and gemcitabine metabolites. For in vivo studies, we evaluated the effect of both drugs, alone and in combination, on the growth of established human pancreatic (AsPC-1) tumors implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Statistical analysis was calculated by a one-way ANOVA with Dunnett as a post-test and the two-tailed unpaired t test using GraphPad prism software. Synergy, evaluated using the CalcuSyn Software, was observed in all four cell-lines at multiple drug concentrations resulting in combination indices under 0.7 at Fa of 0.5 (50% reduction of cell growth). The effects of drug exposures on troxacitabine and gemcitabine nucleotide pools were analyzed, and although gemcitabine reduced phosphorylation of troxacitabine when cells were exposed at equal drug

  11. Advances of Drug Resistance Marker of Gemcitabine for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baorui LIU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available With the development of pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics, personal therapy based on genes has become one of the most effective ways to enhance chemotherapeutic effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Much attention has been paid to validate the predictive biomarkers of chemotherapy in order to guide chemotherapy and enhance effect in general. Gemcitabine is one of the common agents treating NSCLC recently. This review is mainly about the recent reports on potential biomarkers of Gemcitabine in tailored therapy of NSCLC.

  12. Radiation recall gastritis secondary to combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib in pancreatic cancer and response to PPI - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ji; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Kim, Jun Suk

    2016-08-02

    Radiation recall gastritis is rare but can be induced after concurrent chemoradiation for pancreatic cancer. We report a patient with pancreatic cancer who developed radiation-recall gastritis related to a combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib. A 54-year-old female with unresectable pancreatic cancer received gemcitabine in combination with radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy with gemcitabine and erlotinib. After completing 2 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient had epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed diffuse wall thickening of the stomach, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed multiple gastric ulcers. The patient was treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and was continued on maintenance chemotherapy. Two months later, the patient presented with the similar symptoms and persistent gastric ulcers were observed during subsequent EGD. Nevertheless, the patient's symptom had resolved with PPI therapy. Thus, the patient underwent maintenance chemotherapy with gemcitabine and erlotinib for additional 4 cycles. Eventually, follow-up abdominal CT Scan and EGD at 6 months demonstrated resolution of the gastric ulcers. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of radiation recall gastritis associated with a combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib. Administration of PPIs may mitigate the adverse effects of gemcitabine and erlotinib in the presence of radiation recall gastritis; however further studies are warranted.

  13. Radiation recall gastritis secondary to combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib in pancreatic cancer and response to PPI - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Ji; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Kim, Jun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Radiation recall gastritis is rare but can be induced after concurrent chemoradiation for pancreatic cancer. We report a patient with pancreatic cancer who developed radiation-recall gastritis related to a combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib. A 54-year-old female with unresectable pancreatic cancer received gemcitabine in combination with radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy with gemcitabine and erlotinib. After completing 2 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient had epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed diffuse wall thickening of the stomach, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed multiple gastric ulcers. The patient was treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and was continued on maintenance chemotherapy. Two months later, the patient presented with the similar symptoms and persistent gastric ulcers were observed during subsequent EGD. Nevertheless, the patient’s symptom had resolved with PPI therapy. Thus, the patient underwent maintenance chemotherapy with gemcitabine and erlotinib for additional 4 cycles. Eventually, follow-up abdominal CT Scan and EGD at 6 months demonstrated resolution of the gastric ulcers. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of radiation recall gastritis associated with a combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib. Administration of PPIs may mitigate the adverse effects of gemcitabine and erlotinib in the presence of radiation recall gastritis; however further studies are warranted

  14. Dimethylaminoparthenolide and gemcitabine: a survival study using a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip-Schneider, Michele T; Wu, Huangbing; Stantz, Keith; Agaram, Narasimhan; Crooks, Peter A; Schmidt, C Max

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest cancers due to lack of early detection and absence of effective treatments. Gemcitabine, the current standard-of-care chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, has limited clinical benefit. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with gemcitabine has been shown to induce the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) which regulates the expression of genes involved in the inflammatory response and tumorigenesis. It has therefore been proposed that gemcitabine-induced NF-κB activation may result in chemoresistance. We hypothesize that NF-κB suppression by the novel inhibitor dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT) may enhance the effect of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. The efficacy of DMAPT and gemcitabine was evaluated in a chemoprevention trial using the mutant Kras and p53-expressing LSL-Kras G12D/+ ; LSL-Trp53 R172H ; Pdx-1-Cre mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mice were randomized to treatment groups (placebo, DMAPT [40 mg/kg/day], gemcitabine [50 mg/kg twice weekly], and the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine). Treatment was continued until mice showed signs of ill health at which time they were sacrificed. Plasma cytokine levels were determined using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. Statistical tests used included log-rank test, ANOVA with Dunnett’s post-test, Student’s t-test, and Fisher exact test. Gemcitabine or the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine significantly increased median survival and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The DMAPT/gemcitabine combination also significantly decreased tumor size and the incidence of metastasis to the liver. No significant differences in the percentages of normal pancreatic ducts or premalignant pancreatic lesions were observed between the treatment groups. Pancreata in which no tumors formed were analyzed to determine the extent of pre-neoplasia; mostly normal ducts or low grade pancreatic lesions were observed, suggesting prevention

  15. Transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) with gemcitabine: Phase II study in patients with liver metastases of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, Katrin, E-mail: k.eichler@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Jakobi, Silke; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Hammerstingl, Renate; Vogl, Thomas J.; Zangos, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of transarterial chemoembolization with gemcitabine in patients with inoperable liver metastases of breast cancer. Materials and methods: Open-label, prospective non-randomized single-center study design; patients had previous chemotherapy including anthracyclines and/or taxanes in the metastatic setting, adequate bone marrow reserve, sufficient liver/renal function, no centralnervous system metastases, Karnovsky-performance-status >70%, and life expectancy >12 weeks. Forty-three patients were enrolled (median 58 years, range 48–71). A suspension of gemcitabine 1.200 mg/m{sup 2}, 2–10 ml/m{sup 2} of Lipiodol, and 5 ml of a degradable starch microsphere (Embocept) suspension, were administered intra-arterially up to 3 times with a 4-weaks-interval. Dose-limiting toxicit is defined as grade 4 thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or nonhematologic toxicity > grade 3. Tumor response was evaluated by magnetic resonance (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Results: All patients tolerated the treatment well; with no dose limiting toxicities. Imaging follow-up according to the RECIST-criteria (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) revealed a partial response in 3 patients, stable disease in 16 patients and progression in 22 patients. The progression free survival was 3.3 months. A significant correlation exists only with the factor vascularization: strongly vascularized tumors show a significantly lowered response. Patients with complete or partial response and the main fraction of the stable disease group showed in the MRI and angiography only a moderate vascularization. The resulting estimate of the total survival rate amounts to a median of 10.2 months. Conclusion: Transarterial chemoembolization with gemcitabine is well tolerated and provides an alternative treatment method for patients with liver metastases of breast cancer.

  16. Potential Development of Tumor-Targeted Oral Anti-Cancer Prodrugs: Amino Acid and Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Drelich, Adam J; Smith, David E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-08-10

    One of the main obstacles for cancer therapies is to deliver medicines effectively to target sites. Since stroma cells are developed around tumors, chemotherapeutic agents have to go through stroma cells in order to reach tumors. As a method to improve drug delivery to the tumor site, a prodrug approach for gemcitabine was adopted. Amino acid and dipeptide monoester prodrugs of gemcitabine were synthesized and their chemical stability in buffers, resistance to thymidine phosphorylase and cytidine deaminase, antiproliferative activity, and uptake/permeability in HFF cells as a surrogate to stroma cells were determined and compared to their parent drug, gemcitabine. The activation of all gemcitabine prodrugs was faster in pancreatic cell homogenates than their hydrolysis in buffer, suggesting enzymatic action. All prodrugs exhibited great stability in HFF cell homogenate, enhanced resistance to glycosidic bond metabolism by thymidine phosphorylase, and deamination by cytidine deaminase compared to their parent drug. All gemcitabine prodrugs exhibited higher uptake in HFF cells and better permeability across HFF monolayers than gemcitabine, suggesting a better delivery to tumor sites. Cell antiproliferative assays in Panc-1 and Capan-2 pancreatic ductal cell lines indicated that the gemcitabine prodrugs were more potent than their parent drug gemcitabine. The transport and enzymatic profiles of gemcitabine prodrugs suggest their potential for delayed enzymatic bioconversion and enhanced resistance to metabolic enzymes, as well as for enhanced drug delivery to tumor sites, and cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. These attributes would facilitate the prolonged systemic circulation and improved therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine prodrugs.

  17. Modulation of the ribonucleotide reductase M1-gemcitabine interaction in vivo by N-ethylmaleimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhengming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yingtao [Developmental Therapeutics Program, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Bepler, Gerold, E-mail: beplerg@karmanos.org [Developmental Therapeutics Program, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Gemcitabine induces a RRM1 conformational change in tumor cell lines and xenografts. {yields} The 110 kDa RRM1 is unique to gemcitabine interaction among 12 cytotoxic agents. {yields} The 110 kDa RRM1 can be stabilized by the thiol alkylator N-ethylmaleimide. {yields} C218A, C429A, and E431A mutations in RRM1 abolished the conformational change. {yields} The 110 kDa RRM1 may be a specific biomarker of gemcitabine's therapeutic efficacy. -- Abstract: Ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) is the regulatory subunit of the holoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides. Its function is indispensible in cell proliferation and DNA repair. It also serves as a biomarker of therapeutic efficacy of the antimetabolite drug gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) in various malignancies. However, a mechanistic explanation remains to be determined. This study investigated how the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) interacts with the inhibitory activity of gemcitabine on its target protein RRM1 in vivo. We found, when cells were treated with gemcitabine in the presence of NEM, a novel 110 kDa band, along with the 90 kDa native RRM1 band, appeared in immunoblots. This 110 kDa band was identified as RRM1 by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and represented a conformational change resulting from covalent labeling by gemcitabine. It is specific to gemcitabine/NEM, among 11 other chemotherapy drugs tested. It was also detectable in human tumor xenografts in mice treated with gemcitabine. Among mutations of seven residues essential for RRM1 function, C218A, C429A, and E431A abolished the conformational change, while N427A, C787A, and C790A diminished it. C444A was unique since it was able to alter the conformation even in absence of gemcitabine treatment. We conclude that the thiol alkylator NEM can stabilize the gemcitabine-induced conformational change of RRM1, and this stabilized RRM1

  18. Modulation of the ribonucleotide reductase M1-gemcitabine interaction in vivo by N-ethylmaleimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yingtao; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Gemcitabine induces a RRM1 conformational change in tumor cell lines and xenografts. → The 110 kDa RRM1 is unique to gemcitabine interaction among 12 cytotoxic agents. → The 110 kDa RRM1 can be stabilized by the thiol alkylator N-ethylmaleimide. → C218A, C429A, and E431A mutations in RRM1 abolished the conformational change. → The 110 kDa RRM1 may be a specific biomarker of gemcitabine's therapeutic efficacy. -- Abstract: Ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) is the regulatory subunit of the holoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides. Its function is indispensible in cell proliferation and DNA repair. It also serves as a biomarker of therapeutic efficacy of the antimetabolite drug gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) in various malignancies. However, a mechanistic explanation remains to be determined. This study investigated how the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) interacts with the inhibitory activity of gemcitabine on its target protein RRM1 in vivo. We found, when cells were treated with gemcitabine in the presence of NEM, a novel 110 kDa band, along with the 90 kDa native RRM1 band, appeared in immunoblots. This 110 kDa band was identified as RRM1 by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and represented a conformational change resulting from covalent labeling by gemcitabine. It is specific to gemcitabine/NEM, among 11 other chemotherapy drugs tested. It was also detectable in human tumor xenografts in mice treated with gemcitabine. Among mutations of seven residues essential for RRM1 function, C218A, C429A, and E431A abolished the conformational change, while N427A, C787A, and C790A diminished it. C444A was unique since it was able to alter the conformation even in absence of gemcitabine treatment. We conclude that the thiol alkylator NEM can stabilize the gemcitabine-induced conformational change of RRM1, and this stabilized RRM1 conformation has the potential to serve as a specific

  19. Peripheral neuropathy due to therapy with paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and cisplatin in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, C.C.P.; Postma, T.J.; Hoekman, K.; Heimans, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the peripheral neuropathic changes induced by combination chemotherapy including paclitaxel (taxol), gemcitabine and cisplatin (TGC regimen). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with primary or recurrent ovarian cancer were treated with paclitaxel 150 or 110 mg/m2,

  20. Photodynamic Therapy Plus Chemotherapy Compared with Photodynamic Therapy Alone in Hilar Nonresectable Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentrup, Robert; Winkelmann, Nicola; Mitroshkin, Andrey; Prager, Matthias; Voderholzer, Winfried; Schachschal, Guido; Jürgensen, Christian; Büning, Carsten

    2016-05-23

    Standard treatments are not available for hilar nonresectable cholangiocarcinoma (NCC). It is unknown whether combination therapy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) plus systemic chemotherapy is superior to PDT alone. We retrospectively reviewed 68 patients with hilar NCC treated with either PDT plus chemotherapy (PTD-C) or PDT monotherapy (PDT-M). The primary endpoint was the mean overall survival rate. Secondary endpoints included the 1-year survival rate, risk of cholangitic complications, and outcomes, which were evaluated according to the chemotherapy protocol. More than 90% of the study population had advanced hilar NCC Bismuth type III or IV. In the PDT-M group (n=35), the mean survival time was 374 days compared with 520 days in the PDT-C group (n=33, p=0.021). The 1-year survival rate was significantly higher in the PDT-C group compared with the PDT-M group (88% vs 58%, p=0.001) with a significant reduction of mortality (hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.07 to 0.58; p=0.003). Gemcitabine monotherapy resulted in a shorter survival time compared with the gemcitabine combination therapy (mean, 395 days vs 566 days; p=0.09). Cholangitic complications were observed at a similar frequency in the PDT-C and PDT-M groups. Combining repeated PDT with a gemcitabine-based combination therapy might offer a significant survival benefit in patients with hilar NCC.

  1. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Wolfgang [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Mikkelsen, Nils Egil [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Clausen, Anders Ranegaard [Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden); Willer, Mette [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Gojkovic, Zoran [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Piskur, Jure, E-mail: Jure.Piskur@cob.lu.se [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  2. Super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of postoperative gliomas:a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Hu Qinglei; Sun Yanchun; Feng Lei; Liu Yunzhen; Liu Ju; Kong Ruifen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy in treating postoperative gliomas. Methods: During the period of 2005-2009, a total of 46 patients with glioma were encountered in our hospital. According to the principle of patient's free will the involved patients were divided into two groups. Study group (n = 25): after operation the patients received routine radiotherapy, which was followed by super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined simultaneously with systemic chemotherapy. Control group (n = 21): after operation the patients received routine radiotherapy, which was followed by systemic chemotherapy only. The patients were regularly followed up. Cranial CT checkups were made to determine the tumor size, and the results were evaluated with Karnofsky scores. The clinical data were analyzed and compared between two groups. Results: In the study group, the side-effects and complications included epileptic seizures (n = 3), eye pain (n = 5), headache (n = 9), nausea and vomiting (n = 8) and thrombopenia (n = 1). In the control group,the side-effects and complications were as follows: epileptic seizures (n = 1), headache (n = 7), nausea and vomiting (n = 6) and thrombopenia(n = 3). No death occurred in either of the two groups. The patients were followed up for an average period of 2.3 years. Before chemotherapy no statistically significant difference in tumor size existed between two groups (P > 0.05). One year after the chemotherapy, the tumor volume in study group was reduced by 67.11%, while it was 45.79% in control group. By using independent sample t test analysis, the difference between two groups was of statistical significance (P < 0.05). Wilcoxon rank sum test and Karnofsky prognostic score analysis indicated that the prognosis of study group was much better than that of control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In comparison with routine radiotherapy plus simple systemic chemotherapy, routine

  3. Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas responsive to combination therapy with gemcitabine and S-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mitsuyoshi; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Hiura, Masaaki; Taguchi, Masashi; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Abe, Shintaro; Shimajiri, Shohei; Harada, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma is a very rare malignancy, but it is characterized by agressive histological features and a poor clinical prognosis. We report a 42-year-old man who had poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with multiple liver metastases. We administrated combined chemotherapy with S-1 and gemcitabine. This treatment was efficacious and well tolerated, and then this patient obtained objective partial response for 7 months and survived for 13 months after the diagnosis. This case suggests that S-1 and gemcitabine combination produce beneficial responses for patients with this disease.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Platinum Plus Gemcitabine or Vinorelbine for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui GAO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Platinum plus the third-generation agent doublet chemotherapy is the standard regimens and first line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study is to determine the benefits and harms of platinum plus gemcitabine or vinorelbine for advanced NSCLC. Methods Thedatabases PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE and Chinese Biomedical Literature database were retrieved by using the key words "non small cell lung cancer" or "Carcinoma, Non Small Cell Lung" so as to search the studies about the randomized controlled clinical trials (RCT that had compared the gemcitabine plus platinum versus vinorelbine plus platinum for advanced NSCLC. A meta-analysis was conducted. Results Nine randomized controlled trials, with total 2 186 patients,were included. The overall response rate and one-year survival rate of the gemcitabine group were not significantly different from that of vinorelbine regimen (RR=0.91, 95%CI: 0.81-1.03, P =0.15; RR=1.06, 95%CI: 0.96-1.18, P =0.27, respectively. The incidence rate of grade 3-4 netropenia, constipation, phlebitis and grade 1-4 neuropathy were higher in vinorelbine group, just like higher incidence rate of grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in the gemcitabine group. Conclusion The curative effects of the gemcitabine or vinorelbine plus platinum regimens are similar. The choice of gemcitabine or vinorelbine depends on the toxicity of the drugs and patients' tolerance.

  5. Safety and feasibility of pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) associated with systemic chemotherapy: an innovative approach to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robella, Manuela; Vaira, Marco; De Simone, Michele

    2016-04-29

    Pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) is a new treatment that applies chemotherapeutic drugs into the peritoneal cavity as an aerosol under pressure. It improves local bioavailability of chemotherapeutic drugs as compared with conventional intraperitoneal chemotherapy. It has been proved to be safe and feasible if performed as an exclusive treatment in patients affected by peritoneal carcinomatosis. The first results in patients treated with PIPAC associated with systemic chemotherapy are presented. Between June 2015 and February 2016, 57 PIPAC applications with oxaliplatin or cisplatin + doxorubicin every 6 weeks at 37 °C and 12 mmHg for 30 min were performed. Forty PIPAC procedures performed in 14 patients were included in this study; thirteen patients were undergoing systemic chemotherapy with a wash-out interval of at least 2 weeks before and 1 week after each PIPAC. Safety, tolerability, and postoperative complications were assessed by collection of adverse events according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) 2. Forty PIPAC administrations were performed in 14 patients with no major perioperative complications. CTCAE grades 1 and 2 were observed after six and eight procedures, respectively, for abdominal pain and nausea. Renal and hepatic functions were not impaired; no cumulative renal toxicity was observed after repeated PIPAC procedures in association with systemic chemotherapy. These preliminary data show that the association of PIPAC and systemic chemotherapy does not induce significant hepatic and renal toxicity. It allows inclusion of patients with extraperitoneal disease or at a high risk of developing it. Further studies are needed to assess whether this combination therapy could become part of the standard treatment for peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  6. Vitamins C and K3 sensitize human urothelial tumors to gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassouf, Wassim; Highshaw, Ralph; Nelkin, Gina M; Dinney, Colin P; Kamat, Ashish M

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the antitumor effects of vitamins C and K3 for human urothelial carcinoma and the potential use of the combination of vitamins C plus K3 as a sensitizing agent for conventional chemotherapy for urothelial carcinoma. The antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of vitamin C alone, vitamin K3 alone, vitamins C plus K3, gemcitabine alone and gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3 were assessed in vitro by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. For in vivo studies we implanted UMUC-14 tumorigenic urothelial carcinoma cells into the subcutis of nude mice. One week later we treated 10 mice each with saline (control), vitamins C plus K3, gemcitabine or gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3. Treatment was continued for 4 weeks, followed by necropsy. Tumor volume was measured and tumor kinetics were established. Apoptosis and proliferation were evaluated in tumor sections using immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay. Vitamins C plus K3 induced cytostasis and caused apoptosis to a greater degree than either vitamin alone (p Vitamins C plus K3 also substantially augmented the effects of gemcitabine in vitro. There were 32.3% apoptosis with gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3, 5.3% with gemcitabine alone and 15.8% with vitamins C plus K3 alone (p vitamins C plus K3 compared with that in the control or for either agent alone. Mean tumor weight and growth rate in the gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3 group (237 mg and 11.3 mm3 daily) were decreased compared with those in the control (530 mg and 34.3 mm3 daily), and those for vitamins C plus K3 alone (490 mg and 25.2 mm3 daily) and gemcitabine alone (400 mg and 21.3 mm3 daily) (p Vitamins C and K3 have significant antiproliferative and apoptotic effects when used in combination. This combination enhances the efficacy of gemcitabine against bladder cancer in vivo.

  7. Combination therapy versus gemcitabine monotherapy in the treatment of elderly pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin JM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Jiamin Jin, Chunbo Teng, Tao Li College of Life Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China Purpose: We aimed to compare the efficacy of combination therapy versus gemcitabine monotherapy in the treatment of elderly pancreatic cancer (PC by using a meta-analysis.Materials and methods: Databases were searched to identify relevant clinical trials. Hazard ratios (HRs were used to estimate overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Statistical analyses were conducted by using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software (version 2.0.Results: A total of 3,401 elderly PC patients from six randomized controlled trials were included for analysis. In comparison with gemcitabine alone, combination therapy in elderly PC patients did not significantly improve OS (HR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.82–1.06, p=0.29. Sub-group analysis according to treatment regimens showed that combined chemotherapy significantly improved OS in comparison with gemcitabine alone (HR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56–0.94, p=0.016, while gemcitabine plus targeted agents did not improve OS (HR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.87–1.19, p=0.83. Additionally, gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel significantly improved PFS in elderly PC patients (HR 0.69, 95% CI: 0.52–0.91, p=0.009 in comparison with gemcitabine alone. No publication bias was detected by Begg’s and Egger’s tests for OS.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that combined chemotherapy, but not for gemcitabine plus targeted agents, could be recommended for elderly PC patients due to its survival benefits. Further studies are still needed to assess the treatment tolerance of combination chemotherapy in these patient populations. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, elderly, randomized controlled trials, meta-analysis, targeted agents

  8. Randomize Trial of Cisplatin plus Gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or Placebo as First-line Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yan WANG; Lin WANG; Yutao LIU; Shufei YU; Xiangru ZHANG; Yuankai SHI; Yan SUN

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective Platinum-based chemotherapy doublets reached an efficacy plateau in nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This randomized controlled study prospectively assessed the efficacy and safety of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or placebo as first-line therapy for NSCLC. Methods Thirty patients, which were confirmed advanced NSCLC histologically or cytologically, were randomly assigned to receive up to six cycles of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with sorafenib or ...

  9. Duodenal Hemorrhage from Pancreatic Cancer Infiltration Controlled through Combination Therapy with Gemcitabine and S-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoji Takada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 2.6% of pancreatic cancer patients have the primary manifestation of gastrointestinal bleeding. It is not feasible to stop the duodenal hemorrhage caused by the pancreatic cancer infiltration. A 43-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer with multiple hepatic metastases and duodenal infiltration was administered gemcitabine and S-1 combination therapy. During the chemotherapy, initially, bleeding occurred due to duodenal infiltration. However, we continued the chemotherapy and duodenal infiltration was markedly reduced in size and did not rebleed. Aggressive chemotherapy contributed to maintenance of performance status as well as improvement of quality of life for the patient.

  10. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution...

  11. Efficacy of Systemic Chemotherapy Plus Radical Nephroureterectomy for Metastatic Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisen, Thomas; Jindal, Tarun; Karabon, Patrick; Sood, Akshay; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Rouprêt, Morgan; Leow, Jeffrey J; Vetterlein, Malte W; Sun, Maxine; Alanee, Shaheen; Choueiri, Toni K; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Menon, Mani; Abdollah, Firas

    2017-05-01

    Given the growing body of evidence supporting the benefit of primary tumor control for a wide range of metastatic malignancies, we hypothesized that chemotherapy plus radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is associated with an overall survival (OS) benefit compared to chemotherapy alone for metastatic upper tract urothelial carcinoma (mUTUC). Within the National Cancer Data Base (2004-2012), we identified 398 (38.4%) and 637 (61.6%) patients who received chemotherapy plus RNU and chemotherapy alone, respectively. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW)-adjusted Kaplan-Meier curves showed that 3-yr OS was 16.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.1-20.3) for chemotherapy plus RNU and 6.4% (95%CI 4.1-8.7) for chemotherapy alone (pchemotherapy plus RNU was associated with a significant OS benefit (hazard ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.61-0.80; pbenefit for fit patients who received chemotherapy plus RNU for mUTUC relative to their counterparts treated with chemotherapy alone. We examined the role of radical nephroureterectomy in addition to systemic chemotherapy for metastatic upper tract urothelial carcinoma. We found that such treatment may be associated with an overall survival benefit compared to chemotherapy alone in fit patients. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomic signatures for paclitaxel and gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer derived by machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Stephanie N; Baranova, Katherina; Knoll, Joan H M; Urquhart, Brad L; Mariani, Gabriella; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy agents for breast cancer has been related to changes in the genomic profile of tumors. We investigated correspondence between growth inhibitory concentrations of paclitaxel and gemcitabine (GI50) and gene copy number, mutation, and expression first in breast cancer cell lines and then in patients. Genes encoding direct targets of these drugs, metabolizing enzymes, transporters, and those previously associated with chemoresistance to paclitaxel (n = 31 genes) or gemcitabine (n = 18) were analyzed. A multi-factorial, principal component analysis (MFA) indicated expression was the strongest indicator of sensitivity for paclitaxel, and copy number and expression were informative for gemcitabine. The factors were combined using support vector machines (SVM). Expression of 15 genes (ABCC10, BCL2, BCL2L1, BIRC5, BMF, FGF2, FN1, MAP4, MAPT, NFKB2, SLCO1B3, TLR6, TMEM243, TWIST1, and CSAG2) predicted cell line sensitivity to paclitaxel with 82% accuracy. Copy number profiles of 3 genes (ABCC10, NT5C, TYMS) together with expression of 7 genes (ABCB1, ABCC10, CMPK1, DCTD, NME1, RRM1, RRM2B), predicted gemcitabine response with 85% accuracy. Expression and copy number studies of two independent sets of patients with known responses were then analyzed with these models. These included tumor blocks from 21 patients that were treated with both paclitaxel and gemcitabine, and 319 patients on paclitaxel and anthracycline therapy. A new paclitaxel SVM was derived from an 11-gene subset since data for 4 of the original genes was unavailable. The accuracy of this SVM was similar in cell lines and tumor blocks (70-71%). The gemcitabine SVM exhibited 62% prediction accuracy for the tumor blocks due to the presence of samples with poor nucleic acid integrity. Nevertheless, the paclitaxel SVM predicted sensitivity in 84% of patients with no or minimal residual disease. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies

  13. [Development and application of information management system for advanced schistosomiasis chemotherapy and assistance in Jiangxi Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuan-Hua; Li, Dong; Ning, An; Qiu, Ling; Xiong, Ji-Jie

    2011-04-01

    To develop the information management system for advanced schistosomiasis chemotherapy and assistance in Jiangxi Province. Based on Access 2003, the system was programmed by Visual Basic 6.0 and packaged by Setup Factory 8.0. In the system, advanced schistosomiasis data were able to be input, printed, indexed, and statistically analyzed. The system could be operated and maintained easily and timely. The information management system for advanced schistosomiasis chemotherapy and assistance in Jiangxi Province is successfully developed.

  14. Randomized Phase IIA Trial of Gemcitabine Compared With Bleomycin Plus Vincristine for Treatment of Kaposi’s Sarcoma in Patients on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naftali W. Busakhala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is a spindle cell tumor resulting from growth dysregulation in the setting of infection with human herpes virus-8 (also called KS herpes virus. Advanced KS is characterized by poor responses to antiretroviral therapy and some of the chemotherapy readily accessible to patients in low-resource areas. Gemcitabine induced partial and complete regression of AIDS-associated KS (AIDS-KS in 11 of 24 patients in a pilot study. The current study compares the antimetabolite gemcitabine with the standard care bleomycin and vincristine (BV in the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with AIDS-KS in a resource-limited setting. Patients and Methods: Patients with persistent or progressive KS despite treatment with combined antiretroviral therapy were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 or bleomycin 15 IU/ m2 and vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 given twice weekly. The main end point was objective response by bidirectional measurement, adverse events, and quality of life after three cycles of chemotherapy. Results: Of 70 participants enrolled, 36 received gemcitabine and 34 received BV. Complete response was achieved in 12 patients (33.3% in the gemcitabine arm and six (17.6% in the BV arm (P = .175. The partial response rate was 52.8% (n = 19 in the gemcitabine arm and 58.8% (n = 20 in the BV arm. Both study arms reported similar neurologic and hematologic adverse events; there was statistically significant baseline to post-treatment improvement in health-related quality-of-life scores. Conclusion: The results of this randomized, phase IIA trial demonstrate gemcitabine activity in chemotherapy-naïve patients with AIDS-KS, on the basis of response rates, adverse events, and health-related quality-of-life scores.

  15. Randomized Phase II trial of paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by gemcitabine switch-maintenance therapy versus gemcitabine and carboplatin followed by gemcitabine continuation-maintenance therapy in previously untreated advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, maintenance chemotherapy is increasingly being recognized as a new treatment strategy to improve the outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, the optimal maintenance strategy is still controversial. Gemcitabine is a promising candidate for single-agent maintenance therapy because of little toxicity and good tolerability. We have conducted a randomized phase II study to evaluate the validity of single-agent maintenance chemotherapy of gemcitabine and to compare continuation- and switch-maintenance. Methods Chemonaïve patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC were randomly assigned 1:1 to either arm A or B. Patients received paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, day 1 plus carboplatin (AUC 6 mg/mL/min, day 1 every 3 weeks in arm A, or gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2, days 1 and 8 plus carboplatin (AUC 5 mg/mL/min, day1 every 3 weeks in arm B. Non-progressive patients following 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy received maintenance gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2, days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks. (Trial registration: UMIN000008252 Results The study was stopped because of delayed accrual at interim analysis. Of the randomly assigned 50 patients, 49 except for one in arm B were evaluable. Median progression-free survival (PFS was 4.6 months for arm A vs. 3.5 months for arm B (HR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.45–2.27; p = 0.95 and median overall survival (OS was 15.0 months for arm A vs. 14.8 months for arm B (HR = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.40–1.51; p = 0.60, showing no difference between the two arms. The response rate, disease control rate, and the transit rate to maintenance phase were 36.0% (9/25, 64.0% (16/25, and 48% (12/25 for arm A vs. 16.7% (4/24, 50.0% (12/24, and 33% (8/24 for arm B, which were also statistically similar between the two arms (p = 0.13, p = 0.32, and p = 0.30, respectively. Both induction regimens were tolerable, except that more patients experienced peripheral neuropathy in arm A. Toxicities during

  16. [Gemcitabine-induced thrombotic microangiopathy: Can we improve screening and treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmetant, Xavier; Jolivot, Anne; Fournier, Thomas; Puthet, Jean-Charles; Cassier, Philippe; Lemoine, Sandrine; Juillard, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy is a rare but severe complication of treatment with gemcitabine. Its prevalence increases because gemcitabine's indications are growing. We report four cases, which presented with common clinical and biological manifestations, i.e. high blood pressure, proteinuria and increasing plasmatic creatinine level. However, severity was not similar, hemodialysis was inconstant. There is no consensus on treatment for this condition. Stopping gemcitabine is essential. Treatment was dispensed considering the severity of the presentation: plasma exchange therapy of variable outcome, and eculizumab, which was efficient when used. It's important to note that this syndrome includes common and frequent signs in patients receiving chemotherapies. But they must encourage the research of most specific signs, such as hypertension, mechanic hemolysis signs, proteinuria or hematuria, in order to recognize thrombotic microangiopathy as early as possible to treat it precociously, and to prevent additional gemcitabine injections. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Fasting cycles potentiate the efficacy of gemcitabine treatment in in vitro and in vivo pancreatic cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Panebianco, Concetta; Saracino, Chiara; Pereira, Stephen P.; Graziano, Paolo; Pazienza, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Pancreatic cancer (PC) is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in treatment options, a modest impact on the outcome of the disease is observed so far. Short-term fasting cycles have been shown to potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapy against glioma. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of fasting cycles on the efficacy of gemcitabine, a standard treatment for PC patients, in vitro and in an in vivo pancreatic cancer mouse xenograft model. Materials and Methods BxPC-3, MiaPaca-2 and Panc-1 cells were cultured in standard and fasting mimicking culturing condition to evaluate the effects of gemcitabine. Pancreatic cancer xenograft mice were subjected to 24h starvation prior to gemcitabine injection to assess the tumor volume and weight as compared to mice fed ad libitum. Results Fasted pancreatic cancer cells showed increased levels of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1), the transporter of gemcitabine across the cell membrane, and decreased ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) levels as compared to those cultured in standard medium. Gemcitabine was more effective in inducing cell death on fasted cells as compared to controls. Consistently, xenograft pancreatic cancer mice subjected to fasting cycles prior to gemcitabine injection displayed a decrease of more than 40% in tumor growth. Conclusion Fasting cycles enhance gemcitabine effect in vitro and in the in vivo PC xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that restrictive dietary interventions could enhance the efficacy of existing cancer treatments in pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26176887

  18. Carboxylic acid-functionalized SBA-15 nanorods for gemcitabine delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, Zohreh; Badiei, Alireza; Ziarani, Ghodsi Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the functionalization of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug delivery systems. Mono, di, and tri amino-functionalized SBA-15 nanorods were synthesized by post-grafting method using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane, N-(2-aminoethyl-)3- aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, and 3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino) ethylamino] propyl trimethoxysilane, respectively. The carboxylic acid derivatives of the amino-functionalized samples were obtained using succinic anhydride. Tminopropyltrimethoxysilanehe obtained modified materials were investigated as matrixes for the anticancer drug (gemcitabine) delivery. The prepared samples were characterized by SAXS, N 2 adsorption/desorption, SEM, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR and UV spectroscopies. The adsorption and release properties of all samples were studied. It was revealed that the adsorption capacity and release behavior of gemcitabine were highly dependent on the type of the introduced functional groups. The carboxylic acid-modified samples have higher loading content, due to the strong interaction with gemcitabine. The maximum content of deposited drug in the modified SBA-15 nanorods is close to 40 wt%. It was found that the surface functionalization leads toward significant decrease of the drug release rate. The carboxylic acid-functionalized samples have slower release rate in contrast with the amino-functionalized samples

  19. Effects of multidose combination chemotherapy on the humoral immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, A; Lodewijk, ME; Klok, PA; Timens, W

    Patients receiving multidose combination chemotherapy are at risk for severe, life-threatening infections, caused by among others encapsulated bacteria like Streptococcus pneumoniae. The splenic marginal zone is essential in the initiation of immune responses to S. pneumoniae. We analyzed effects of

  20. [The system design of an intraperitoneal perfusion machine for hyperthermic chemotherapy based on single chip microcomputer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Xuandong; Li, Kaiyang

    2005-06-01

    A new kind of method for intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy has been proved to be very effective for the therapy of gastrointestinal cancer. In this article is reported an intraperitoneal perfusion machine which is designed for instituting the treatment. The liquor of the chemotherapy drug is infused into the abdomen after being heated by heating system; the liquor flows out of the abdomen is abandoned. The temperature of heating and the velocity of flow are controlled by MCU, thus the temperature of the liquor of the chemotherapy drug in the abdomen can be adjusted to the most favarable temperature.

  1. Dramatic Response of a Case ofRecurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma toSystemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer among humans, and the standard treatment is surgery. Other modalities are reserved as a second line of treatment. Topical chemotherapy may be used in primary BCC. Systemic chemotherapy has no role in the primary treatment of BCC, although it may be efficacious in metastatic cases. We report the case of a patient with persistent recurrent BCC following multiple surgeries and radiotherapy, who achieved a dramatic response with a cisplatinand 5-flourouracil chemotherapy regimen.

  2. PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic subtypes and effect of gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte Levin Tykjær; Nielsen, Torsten O; Bjerre, Karsten D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro studies suggest basal breast cancers are more sensitive to gemcitabine relative to other intrinsic subtypes. The main objective of this study was to use specimens from a randomized clinical trial to evaluate whether the basal-like subtype identifies patients with advanced...... breast cancer who benefit from gemcitabine plus docetaxel (GD) compared to single agent docetaxel (D). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From patients randomly assigned to GD or D, RNA was isolated from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary breast tumor tissue and used for PAM50 intrinsic subtyping...... chemotherapy were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox proportional hazards regression models. Data analysis was performed independently by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) statistical core and all statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: RNA from 270 patients was evaluable; 84...

  3. Systemic chemotherapy induces microsatellite instability in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Fernando LA; Sant Ana, Aleksandra VL; Bendit, Israel; Arias, Vitor; Costa, Luciano J; Pinhal, Aparecida A; Giglio, Auro del

    2005-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is an important part of treatment for breast cancer. We conducted the present study to evaluate whether systemic chemotherapy could produce microsatellite instability (MSI) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction of breast cancer patients. We studied 119 sequential blood samples from 30 previously untreated breast cancer patients before, during and after chemotherapy. For comparison, we also evaluated 20 women who had no relevant medical history (control group). In 27 out of 30 patients we observed MSI in at least one sample, and six patients had loss of heterozygosity. We found a significant correlation between the number of MSI events per sample and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (P < 0.0001). We also observed an inverse correlation between the percentage of cells positive for hMSH2 and the number of MSI events per sample (P = 0.00019) and use of alkylating agents (P = 0.019). We conclude that systemic chemotherapy may induce MSI and loss of heterozygosity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients receiving alkylating agents, possibly mediated by a chemotherapy-induced decrease in the expression of hMSH2. These effects may be related to the generation of secondary leukaemia in some patients, and may also intensify the genetic instability of tumours and increase resistance to treatment

  4. Schedule dependent synergy of gemcitabine and doxorubicin: Improvement of in vitro efficacy and lack of in vitro-in vivo correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogus, Douglas R; Pusuluri, Anusha; Chen, Renwei; Mitragotri, Samir

    2018-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is commonly used to treat late stage cancer; however, treatment is often limited by systemic toxicity. Optimizing drug ratio and schedule can improve drug combination activity and reduce dose to lower toxicity. Here, we identify gemcitabine (GEM) and doxorubicin (DOX) as a synergistic drug pair in vitro for the triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Drug synergy and caspase activity were increased the most by exposing cells to GEM prior to DOX in vitro. While the combination was more effective than the single drugs at inhibiting MDA-MB-231 growth in vivo, the clear schedule dependence observed in vitro was not observed in vivo. Differences in drug exposure and cellular behavior in vivo compared to in vitro are likely responsible. This study emphasizes the importance in understanding how schedule impacts drug synergy and the need to develop more advanced strategies to translate synergy to the clinic.

  5. Layer-by-layer nanoparticles co-loading gemcitabine and platinum (IV prodrugs for synergistic combination therapy of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rongrong Zhang, Yun Ru, Yiping Gao, Jinyin Li, Shilong Mao Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Xuhui District Central Hospital, Zhongshan Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University Xuhui Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Cisplatin plus gemcitabine (GEM is a standard regimen for the first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to prepare biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric prodrugs and construct nanoparticles (NPs with layer-by-layer (LbL technique. Methods: Platinum (Pt (IV complex with a carboxyl group was conjugated to the amino group of chitosan (CH, resulting in a CH-Pt conjugation with positive charge. GEM with amino group was conjugated to the carboxyl group of hyaluronic acid (HA, resulting in a HA-GEM conjugation with negative charge. Novel LbL NPs consisting of the CH-Pt core and the HA-GEM layer, named as HA-GEM/CH-Pt NPs, were constructed. The physicochemical properties of the HA-GEM/CH-Pt NPs were investigated. In vitro cytotoxicity against human non-small lung cancer cells (NCl-H460 cells was investigated, and in vivo antitumor efficiency was evaluated on mice bearing NCl-H460 cells xenografts. Results: HA-GEM/CH-Pt NPs have a size of about 187 nm, a zeta potential value of -21 mV and high drug encapsulation efficiency of 90%. The drug release of HA-GEM/CH-Pt NPs exhibited a sustained behavior. HA-GEM/CH-Pt NPs could significantly enhance in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor effect against lung cancer animal model compared to the single-drug-loaded NPs and free drug solutions. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the HA-GEM/CH-Pt NPs might be a promising system for the synergetic treatment of lung carcinoma. Keywords: lung cancer, combination chemotherapy, cisplatin, gemcitabine, layer-by-layer technology

  6. 1,25D3 enhances antitumor activity of gemcitabine and cisplatin in human bladder cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Background 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) potentiates the cytotoxic effects of several common chemotherapeutic agents. The combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) is a current standard chemotherapy regimen for bladder cancer. We investigated whether 1,25D3 could enhance the antitumor activity of GC in bladder cancer model systems. Methods Human bladder cancer T24 and UMUC3 cells were pretreated with 1,25D3 followed by GC. Apoptosis were assessed by annexin V staining. Caspase activation was examined by immunoblot analysis and substrate-based caspase activity assay. The cytotoxic effects were examined using MTT and in vitro clonogenic assay. p73 protein levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Knockdown of p73 was achieved by siRNA. The in vivo antitumor activity was assessed by in vivo excision clonogenic assay and tumor regrowth delay in the T24 xenograft model. Results 1,25D3 pretreatment enhanced GC-induced apoptosis and the activities of caspases- 8, 9 and 3 in T24 and UMUC3 cells. 1,25D3 synergistically reduced GC-suppressed surviving fraction in T24 cells. 1,25D3, gemcitabine, or cisplatin induced p73 accumulation, which was enhanced by GC or 1,25D3 and GC. p73 expression was lower in human primary bladder tumor tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Knockdown of p73 increased clonogenic capacity of T24 cells treated with 1,25D3, GC or 1,25D3 and GC. 1,25D3 and GC combination enhanced tumor regression compared with 1,25D3 or GC alone. Conclusions 1,25D3 potentiates GC-mediated growth inhibition in human bladder cancer models in vitro and in vivo, which involves p73 induction and apoptosis. PMID:20564622

  7. Mismatch repair proficiency is not required for radioenhancement by gemcitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bree, Chris van; Rodermond, Hans M.; Vos, Judith de; Haveman, Jaap; Franken, Nicolaas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Mismatch repair (MMR) proficiency has been reported to either increase or decrease radioenhancement by 24-h incubations with gemcitabine. This study aimed to establish the importance of MMR for radioenhancement by gemcitabine after short-exposure, high-dose treatment and long-exposure, low-dose treatment. Methods and Materials: Survival of MMR-deficient HCT116 and MMR-proficient HCT116 + 3 cells was analyzed by clonogenic assays. Mild, equitoxic gemcitabine treatments (4 h, 0.1 μM vs. 24 h, 6 nM) were combined with γ-irradiation to determine the radioenhancement with or without recovery. Gemcitabine metabolism and cell-cycle effects were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis and bivariate flow cytometry. Results: Radioenhancement after 4 h of 0.1 μM of gemcitabine was similar in both cell lines, but the radioenhancement after 24 h of 6 nM of gemcitabine was reduced in MMR-proficient cells. No significant differences between both cell lines were observed in the gemcitabine metabolism or cell-cycle effects after these treatments. Gemcitabine radioenhancement after recovery was also lower in MMR-proficient cells than in MMR-deficient cells. Conclusion: Mismatch repair proficiency decreases radioenhancement by long incubations of gemcitabine but does not affect radioenhancement by short exposures to a clinically relevant gemcitabine dose. Our data suggest that MMR contributes to the recovery from gemcitabine treatment

  8. A prospective randomized study of gemcitabine with doxifluridine versus paclitaxel with doxifluridine in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Bang, Seung Min; Park, Seung Woo; Chung, Jae Bock; Kang, Jin Kyung; Kim, Ju Won; Seong, Jin Sil; Lee, Woo Jung; Song, Si Young

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with paclitaxel-based CCRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 48 patients who had received no prior therapy were enrolled. The patients were treated with 4500 cGy radiation in 25 fractions over 5 weeks concomitant with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 /week/intravenously (IV) and doxifluridine 600 mg/m 2 /day/by mouth (PO), or paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2 /week/IV and doxifluridine 600 mg/m 2 /day/PO. After a 4-week rest, the responses were evaluated and maintenance therapies (operation or chemotherapy) (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 /week/IV and doxifluridine 600 mg/m 2 /day/PO) were conducted. Results: The median survival was 12 months in the gemcitabine group vs. 14 months in the paclitaxel group. The response rate was 13.6% vs. 25%, and the median time to progression was 12 months vs. 12.5 months, respectively. The positive rate of the clinical benefit response was 59.1% vs. 41.7%, respectively. Toxicities were acceptable in both groups. Conclusion: In this trial, we demonstrated that the gemcitabine-based CCRT and the paclitaxel-based CCRT in combination of doxifluridine are clearly acceptable treatment strategy, and appear more effective than the 5 fluorouracil-based CCRT for locally advanced pancreatic cancer with comparable tolerability. Furthermore, the paclitaxel-based CCRT showed similar efficacy and toxicities to the gemcitabine-based treatment when it was combined with 5-fluorouracil

  9. Global stability and tumor clearance conditions for a cancer chemotherapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Paul A.; Starkov, Konstantin E.; Coria, Luis N.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we study the global dynamics of a cancer chemotherapy system presented by de Pillis et al. (2007). This mathematical model describes the interaction between tumor cells, effector-immune cells, circulating lymphocytes and chemotherapy treatment. By applying the localization method of compact invariant sets, we find lower and upper bounds for these three cells populations. Further, we define a bounded domain in R+,04 where all compact invariant sets of the system are located and provide conditions under which this domain is positively invariant. We apply LaSalle's invariance principle and one result concerning two-dimensional competitive systems in order to derive sufficient conditions for tumor clearance and global asymptotic stability of the tumor-free equilibrium point. These conditions are computed by using bounds of the localization domain and they are given in terms of the chemotherapy treatment. Finally, we perform numerical simulations in order to illustrate our results.

  10. Progression following neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy may not be a contraindication to a curative approach for colorectal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, Guillaume; Vaudoyer, Delphine; Cotte, Eddy; You, Benoit; Isaac, Sylvie; Noël Gilly, François; Mohamed, Faheez; Glehen, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy on patients with colorectal carcinomatosis before a curative procedure. Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) from colorectal cancer may be treated with a curative intent by cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). The role of perioperative systemic chemotherapy for this particular metastatic disease remains unclear. One hundred twenty patients with PC from colorectal cancer were consecutively treated by 131 procedures combining CRS with HIPEC. The response to neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy was assessed on data from previous explorative surgery and/or radiological imaging. Ninety patients (75%) were treated with neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy in whom 32 (36%) were considered to have responded, 19 (21%) had stable disease, and 19 (21%) developed diseases progression. Response could not be evaluated in 20 patients (22%). On univariate analysis, the use of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy had a significant positive prognostic influence (P = 0.042). On multivariate analysis, the completeness of CRS and the use of adjuvant systemic chemotherapy were the only significant prognostic factors (P systemic chemotherapy had no significant prognostic impact with median survival of 31.4 months in patients showing disease progression. In patients with PC from colorectal cancer without extraperitoneal metastases, failure of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy should not constitute an absolute contraindication to a curative procedure combining CRS and HIPEC.

  11. Inhibitory effect of ginsenoside Rg3 combined with gemcitabine on angiogenesis and growth of lung cancer in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tai-Guo; Huang, Ying; Cui, Dan-Dan; Huang, Xiao-Bing; Mao, Shu-Hua; Ji, Ling-Ling; Song, Hai-Bo; Yi, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, inhibits angiogenesis. The combination of low-dose chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic inhibitors suppresses growth of experimental tumors more effectively than conventional therapy or anti-angiogenic agent alone. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose gemcitabine combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on angiogenesis and growth of established Lewis lung carcinoma in mice. C57L/6 mice implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma were randomized into the control, ginsenoside Rg3, gemcitabine and combination group. The quality of life and survival of mice were recorded. Tumor volume, inhibitive rate and necrosis rate were estimated. Necrosis of tumor and signals of blood flow as well as dynamic parameters of arterial blood flow in tumors such as peak systolic velocity (PSV) and resistive index (RI) were detected by color Doppler ultrasound. In addition, expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and CD31 were observed by immunohistochemstry, and microvessel density (MVD) of the tumor tissues was assessed by CD31 immunohistochemical analysis. Quality of life of mice in the ginsenoside Rg3 and combination group were better than in the control and gemcitabine group. Combined therapy with ginsenoside Rg3 and gemcitabine not only enhanced efficacy on suppression of tumor growth and prolongation of the survival, but also increased necrosis rate of tumor significantly. In addition, the combination treatment could obviously decrease VEGF expression and MVD as well as signals of blood flow and PSV in tumors. Ginsenoside Rg3 combined with gemcitabine may significantly inhibit angiogenesis and growth of lung cancer and improve survival and quality of life of tumor-bearing mice. The combination of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic drugs may be an innovative and promising therapeutic strategy in the experimental treatment of human lung cancer

  12. Phase III study of iniparib plus gemcitabine and carboplatin versus gemcitabine and carboplatin in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Schwartzberg, Lee; Danso, Michael A; Miller, Kathy D; Rugo, Hope S; Neubauer, Marcus; Robert, Nicholas; Hellerstedt, Beth; Saleh, Mansoor; Richards, Paul; Specht, Jennifer M; Yardley, Denise A; Carlson, Robert W; Finn, Richard S; Charpentier, Eric; Garcia-Ribas, Ignacio; Winer, Eric P

    2014-12-01

    There is a lack of treatments providing survival benefit for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC), with no standard of care. A randomized phase II trial showed significant benefit for gemcitabine, carboplatin, and iniparib (GCI) over gemcitabine and carboplatin (GC) in clinical benefit rate, response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Here, we formally compare the efficacy of these regimens in a phase III trial. Patients with stage IV/locally recurrent TNBC who had received no more than two previous chemotherapy regimens for mTNBC were randomly allocated to gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) and carboplatin area under the curve 2 (days 1 and 8) alone or GC plus iniparib 5.6 mg/kg (days 1, 4, 8, and 11) every 3 weeks. Random assignment was stratified by the number of prior chemotherapies. The coprimary end points were OS and PFS. Patients receiving GC could cross over to iniparib on progression. Five hundred nineteen patients were randomly assigned (261 GCI; 258 GC). In the primary analysis, no statistically significant difference was observed for OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.12; P = .28) nor PFS (HR = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98; P = .027). An exploratory analysis showed that patients in the second-/third-line had improved OS (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.91) and PFS (HR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.92) with GCI. The safety profile for GCI was similar to GC. The trial did not meet the prespecified criteria for the coprimary end points of PFS and OS in the ITT population. The potential benefit with iniparib observed in second-/third-line subgroup warrants further evaluation. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Long-Term Complete Remission with nab-Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Gemcitabine Combination Therapy in a Patient with Triple-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Montero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of a 52-year-old female patient diagnosed in June 2007 with primary metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast and synchronous metastases in the bone, lymph nodes, and lung. Biopsy results of the tumor tissue were negative for the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. In November 2007, she participated in a phase II study of metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer. Treatment consisted of systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine 1,500 mg/m2, nab-paclitaxel 150 mg/m2, and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg once every other week. The patient experienced pain relief in her sternum after 5 weeks of chemotherapy, and her analgesic therapy was discontinued. After 7 months, the patient achieved a complete radiographic response, which was maintained for nearly 2 additional years. She continued receiving treatment throughout this period, requiring 1 dose reduction due to fatigue. The patient experienced no other adverse events, including neuropathy, and continued working uninterrupted throughout her treatment. The patient was discontinued from the study in May 2010 after disease progression, almost a full 3 years after diagnosis. The patient showed minimal response to subsequent therapies but had disease stabilization and died from her disease in April 2012. Median overall survival for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer is between 12 and 13.3 months. This patient survived nearly 5 years following diagnosis. This case exemplifies how therapy with nab-paclitaxel, bevacizumab, and gemcitabine may prolong survival, with minimal toxicity, in select patients with triple-negative metastatic breast cancer.

  14. Effects of Neoadjuvant Intraperitoneal/Systemic Chemotherapy (Bidirectional Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Patients with Peritoneal Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Yonemura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel multidisciplinary treatment combined with neoadjuvant intraperitoneal-systemic chemotherapy protocol (NIPS and peritonectomy was developed. Ninety-six patients were enrolled. Peritoneal wash cytology was performed before and after NIPS through a port system. Patients were treated with 60 mg/m2 of oral S-1 for 21 days, followed by a 1-week rest. On days 1, 8, and 15, 30 mg/m2 of Taxotere and 30 mg/m2 of cisplatin with 500 mL of saline were introduced through the port. NIPS is done 2 cycles before surgery. Three weeks after NIPS, 82 patients were eligible to intend cytoreductive surgery (CRS by gastrectomy + D2 dissection + periotnectomy to achieve complete cytoreduction. Sixty-eight patients showed positice cytology before NIPS, and the positive cytology results became negative in 47 (69% patients after NIPS. Complete pathologic response on PC after NIPS was experienced in 30 (36.8% patients. Stage migration was experienced in 12 patients (14.6%. Complete cytoreduction was achieved in 58 patients (70.7%. By the multivariate analysis, complete cytoreduction and pathologic response became a significantly good survival. However the high morbidity and mortality, stringent patient selection is important. The best indications of the therapy are patients with good pathologic response and PCI≤6, which are supposed to be removed completely by peritonectomy.

  15. Phase II study of neoadjuvant gemcitabine, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, and docetaxel in locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Grazia; Grazia, Artioli; Mocellin, Simone; Simone, Mocellin; Borgato, Lucia; Lucia, Borgato; Cappetta, Alessandro; Alessandro, Cappetta; Bozza, Fernando; Fernando, Bozza; Zavagno, Giorgio; Giorgio, Zavagno; Zovato, Stefania; Stefania, Zovato; Marchet, Alberto; Alberto, Marchet; Pastorelli, Davide; Davide, Pastorelli

    2010-09-01

    This was a phase II study to assess the activity of a novel neoadjuvant regimen in locally-advanced breast cancer. Fifty patients with histological confirmation of locally advanced breast cancer received treatment with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) (day 1) followed by gemcitabine 800 mg/m(2) plus docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) 30 mg/m(2) (day 8) every 3 weeks for at least 4 cycles, plus a final 2 additional cycles. Tumour size was T1 (n=2), T2 (n=32), T3 (n=14), T4 (n=2). All 50 patients underwent surgery. Clinical complete, partial and no response were observed in 13 (26%), 24 (48%) and 11 (22%) patients, respectively (overall response rate: 74%). The number of chemotherapy cycles was found to be an independent predictor of a pathologic complete response. The combination of gemcitabine-docetaxel-PLD can yield high tumour response rates in patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who undergo a full treatment of 6 cycles.

  16. Radiochemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in pancreatic cancer - feasible and effective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkowski, R.; Thoma, M.; Duehmke, E.; Heinemann, V.; Rau, H.G.; Wagner, A.; Stoffregen, C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Concomittant radiotherapy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine appears to be a promising tool for the treatment of pancreatic cancer since gemcitabine - applied as single or combination therapy - proved to have better efficacy in pancreatic cancer than 5-FU containing schemes and furthermore offers radiosensitizing potential. In the present paper our pilot data of concomittant and sequential chemoradiation with gemcitabine and cisplatin are presented. Patients and Methods: A total of 57 patients (f/m 23/34) with pancreatic cancer was treated, of whom 33 patients had irresectable tumors, 19 patients following resection (R1 and/or pN+) and five patients with local recurrent disease. Radiotherapy was delivered in 25 fractions up to a total dose of 45.0 Gy specified according to ICRU reference point (50 patients, 1.8 Gy/fraction) respectively 50.0 Gy to gross tumor volume (seven patients; 45.0 Gy in locoregional lymphatic pathways; 2.0/ 1.8 Gy/fraction). Concomittant with radiotherapy cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 ) and gemcitabine (300 mg/m 2 ) were applied on days 1, 8, 22 and 29. After simultaneous chemoradiation two sequential cycles gemcitabine and cisplatin (1000 mg/m 2 and 50 mg/m 2 d 1, 15) were applied. Results: With a median follow-up of 8.2 months the median survival time was 14.8 months (irresectable patients: 10.3 months, postoperative patients 15.1 months). Within 33 irresectable patients 19 and four partial and complete remissions, respectively, were observed. In 14 patients a secondary resection was possible. Using leveled antiemetics with ondansetron and dexamethasone no gastrointestinal toxicities grade III or IV were observed. Hematologic toxicities were the most grave side effects (leukocytopenia III/IV in 29/Five patients and thrombocytopenia III/IV in 21/eight patients), however with minor clinical relevancy (one neutropenic infection, one thrombopenic epistaxis). Conclusion: The presented treatment scheme using concomittant and sequential

  17. Gemcitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer; 3- or 4-week schedule?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Anne Birgitte; Sengeløv, Lisa; Von Der Maase, Hans

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) is an active regimen in advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Traditionally, GC has been administered as a 4-week schedule. However, an alternative 3-week schedule may be more feasible. Long-term survival data for the alternative 3......-week schedule and comparisons of the feasibility and toxicity between the two schedules have not previously been published. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with stage IV TCC, treated with GC by a standard 4-week or by an alternative 3-week schedule. RESULTS...

  18. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  19. A deterministic and stochastic model for the system dynamics of tumor-immune responses to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Qingze; Pan, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Modern medical studies show that chemotherapy can help most cancer patients, especially for those diagnosed early, to stabilize their disease conditions from months to years, which means the population of tumor cells remained nearly unchanged in quite a long time after fighting against immune system and drugs. In order to better understand the dynamics of tumor-immune responses under chemotherapy, deterministic and stochastic differential equation models are constructed to characterize the dynamical change of tumor cells and immune cells in this paper. The basic dynamical properties, such as boundedness, existence and stability of equilibrium points, are investigated in the deterministic model. Extended stochastic models include stochastic differential equations (SDEs) model and continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model, which accounts for the variability in cellular reproduction, growth and death, interspecific competitions, and immune response to chemotherapy. The CTMC model is harnessed to estimate the extinction probability of tumor cells. Numerical simulations are performed, which confirms the obtained theoretical results.

  20. Randomize Trial of Cisplatin plus Gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or Placebo as First-line Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Platinum-based chemotherapy doublets reached an efficacy plateau in nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This randomized controlled study prospectively assessed the efficacy and safety of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or placebo as first-line therapy for NSCLC. Methods Thirty patients, which were confirmed advanced NSCLC histologically or cytologically, were randomly assigned to receive up to six cycles of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with sorafenib or placebo. The maintenance of sorafenib or placebo after chemotherapy will continued in patients with response or stable disease until disease progression or unacceptable adverse events. Results Overall demographics were balanced between experimental group (sorafenib+chemotherapy and controlled group (chemotherapy only. Overall response (OS rate was 55.6% and 41.7% in experimental arm and controlled arm, respectively (P=0.905. Median progressivefree survival (PFS and median overall survial were similar (5 months vs 4 months, P=0.75; 18 months vs 18 months, P=0.68. Adverse events were tolerable, though the risk of hypertension and diarrhea was increase in experimental arm. Since patients with ECOG PS 0, stage IIIb, no liver metastasis and tyrasine kinasis inhibitor treatment after study had longer survive, these factors seemed to be predictive factors favor of survival in Cox regression analyses. Conclusion No additional benefit of response rate, PFS or OS were observed from adding targeted agent-sorafenib to regular cisplatin plus gemcitabine chemotherapy. Selecting aproper patients is needed in further study.

  1. [Randomize trial of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with either sorafenib or placebo as first-line therapy for non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Lin; Liu, Yutao; Yu, Shufei; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai; Sun, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy doublets reached an efficacy plateau in nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This randomized controlled study prospectively assessed the efficacy and safety of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or placebo as first-line therapy for NSCLC. Thirty patients, which were confirmed advanced NSCLC histologically or cytologically, were randomly assigned to receive up to six cycles of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with sorafenib or placebo. The maintenance of sorafenib or placebo after chemotherapy will continued in patients with response or stable disease until disease progression or unacceptable adverse events. Overall demographics were balanced between experimental group (sorafenib+chemotherapy) and controlled group (chemotherapy only). Overall response (OS) rate was 55.6% and 41.7% in experimental arm and controlled arm, respectively (P=0.905). Median progressive-free survival (PFS) and median overall survival were similar (5 months vs 4 months, P=0.75; 18 months vs 18 months, P=0.68). Adverse events were tolerable, though the risk of hypertension and diarrhea was increase in experimental arm. Since patients with ECOG PS 0, stage IIIb, no liver metastasis and tyrasine kinasis inhibitor treatment after study had longer survive, these factors seemed to be predictive factors favor of survival in Cox regression analyses. No additional benefit of response rate, PFS or OS were observed from adding targeted agent-sorafenib to regular cisplatin plus gemcitabine chemotherapy. Selecting aproper patients is needed in further study.

  2. Delivery of Gemcitabine Prodrugs Employing Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

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    Alessio Malfanti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs were studied as vehicles for the delivery of the antitumoral drug gemcitabine (GEM and of its 4-(N-acyl derivatives, (4-(N-valeroyl-(C5GEM, 4-(N-lauroyl-(C12GEM and 4-(N-stearoyl-gemcitabine (C18GEM. The loading of the GEM lipophilic prodrugs on MSNs was explored with the aim to obtain both a physical and a chemical protection of GEM from rapid plasmatic metabolization. For this purpose, MSNs as such or with grafted aminopropyl and carboxyethyl groups were prepared and characterized. Then, their different drug loading capacity in relation to the nature of the functional group was evaluated. In our experimental conditions, GEM was not loaded in any MSNs, while C12GEM was the most efficiently encapsulated and employed for further evaluation. The results showed that loading capacity increased with the presence of functional groups on the nanoparticles; similarly, the presence of functional groups on MSNs’ surface influenced the drug release profile. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the different preparations was evaluated and data showed that C12GEM loaded MSNs are less cytotoxic than the free drug with an activity that increased with the incubating time, indicating that all these systems are able to release the drug in a controlled manner. Altogether, the results demonstrate that these MSNs could be an interesting system for the delivery of anticancer drugs.

  3. Fluoropyrimidines plus cisplatin versus gemcitabine/gemcitabine plus cisplatin in locally advanced and metastatic biliary tract carcinoma - a retrospective study.

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    Croitoru, Adina; Gramaticu, Iulia; Dinu, Ioana; Gheorghe, Liana; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Buica, Florina; Luca, Ioana; Becheanu, Gabriel; Herlea, Vlad; Simionov, Iulia; Hrehoret, Doina; Lupescu, Ioana; Popescu, Irinel; Diculescu, Mircea

    2012-09-01

    This is a retrospective study of patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma (BTC), who were treated with different regimens of chemotherapy. We studied patients with advanced BTC registered at the Department of Oncology at the Fundeni Clinical Institute between 2004 and 2008. The following data were analyzed: rate of response, progression free survival (PFS) to first and second line of chemotherapy, overall survival (OS) and drug toxicity. Ninety-six patients were eligible having either advanced intra or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, or gallbladder cancer with no prior chemotherapy. Out of 96 patients, 57 (59.4%) received fluoropyrimidines (FP)+cisplatin and 39 (40.6%) gemcitabine (Gem)+/-cisplatin. The median PFS for FP+cisplatin was 5.9 months (95%CI 5-6.9) and for Gem+/-cisplatin 6.3 months (95%CI 5.4-7.1), p=0.661. Median OS for FP+cisplatin was 10.3 months (95%CI 7.5-13.1) and for Gem+/-cisplatin 9.1 months (95%CI 7.0-11.2), p=0.098. On disease progression, 46 patients received second line CT (Gem or FP+/-platinum compounds). Median OS for patients with FP based first line and Gem+/-cisplatin in second line was 19 months (95%CI 8.9-29) higher than for the reverse sequence: 13.2 months (95%CI 12-14.4), but not statistically significant (p=0.830). All patients were evaluated for toxicities. Most patients (75.5%) reported at least one adverse event. Our results through direct comparison of FP+cisplatin with Gem+/-cisplatin as first line treatment did not show any statistical differences in terms of rate of response, PFS and OS. However, our study showed that FP+cisplatin as first line and Gem based second line therapy gave a better OS rate.

  4. Radiochemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in pancreatic cancer - feasible and effective; Radiochemotherapie mit Gemcitabin und Cisplatin bei Pankreaskarzinom - durchfuehrbar und effektiv

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    Wilkowski, R.; Thoma, M.; Duehmke, E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Heinemann, V. [Medizinische Klinik III, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Rau, H.G. [Abt. fuer Viszeralchirurgie, Klinikum Dachau (Germany); Wagner, A. [Medizinische Klinik II, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Stoffregen, C. [Lilly Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Background: Concomittant radiotherapy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine appears to be a promising tool for the treatment of pancreatic cancer since gemcitabine - applied as single or combination therapy - proved to have better efficacy in pancreatic cancer than 5-FU containing schemes and furthermore offers radiosensitizing potential. In the present paper our pilot data of concomittant and sequential chemoradiation with gemcitabine and cisplatin are presented. Patients and Methods: A total of 57 patients (f/m 23/34) with pancreatic cancer was treated, of whom 33 patients had irresectable tumors, 19 patients following resection (R1 and/or pN+) and five patients with local recurrent disease. Radiotherapy was delivered in 25 fractions up to a total dose of 45.0 Gy specified according to ICRU reference point (50 patients, 1.8 Gy/fraction) respectively 50.0 Gy to gross tumor volume (seven patients; 45.0 Gy in locoregional lymphatic pathways; 2.0/ 1.8 Gy/fraction). Concomittant with radiotherapy cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}) and gemcitabine (300 mg/m{sup 2}) were applied on days 1, 8, 22 and 29. After simultaneous chemoradiation two sequential cycles gemcitabine and cisplatin (1000 mg/m{sup 2} and 50 mg/m{sup 2} d 1, 15) were applied. Results: With a median follow-up of 8.2 months the median survival time was 14.8 months (irresectable patients: 10.3 months, postoperative patients 15.1 months). Within 33 irresectable patients 19 and four partial and complete remissions, respectively, were observed. In 14 patients a secondary resection was possible. Using leveled antiemetics with ondansetron and dexamethasone no gastrointestinal toxicities grade III or IV were observed. Hematologic toxicities were the most grave side effects (leukocytopenia III/IV in 29/Five patients and thrombocytopenia III/IV in 21/eight patients), however with minor clinical relevancy (one neutropenic infection, one thrombopenic epistaxis). Conclusion: The presented treatment scheme using concomittant and

  5. Assessment of a Chemotherapy Response Score (CRS) System for Tubo-Ovarian High-Grade Serous Carcinoma (HGSC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Helena M; Strickland, Kyle C; Meserve, Emily E

    2018-01-01

    A chemotherapy response score (CRS) system was recently described to assess the histopathologic response and prognosis of patients with tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The current study was performed as an independent assessment of this CRS syst...

  6. Cytomegalovirus colitis after systemic chemotherapy in a patient with recurrent colon cancer: A case report

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    Teraishi Fuminori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The occurrence of cytomegalovirus colitis is well known in immunosuppressed patients, such as neoplastic patients following chemotherapy, although its exact etiology remains unclear. Case presentation We present a case of cytomegalovirus colitis occurring in a 77-year-old man with vomiting and diarrhea 2 weeks after initial systemic chemotherapy consisting of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan for a recurrent colorectal cancer. Initial colonoscopy revealed multiple punched-out ulcers in the transverse colon and the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus was based on positive cytomegalovirus antigen detected by indirect enzyme antibody method, although immunohistological examination of tissues biopsied at colonoscopy was negative. The symptoms ceased under ganciclovir and octreotide treatment, and the patient recovered gradually. Conclusion The most probable cause of the cytomegalovirus colitis in this case was impaired immunity following chemotherapy. Cytomegalovirus infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in colorectal cancer patients after chemotherapy and, when suspected, the clinician should pursue appropriate diagnostic interventions including colonoscopy.

  7. Systemic chemotherapy with doxorubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine for metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Soo-Mee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous chemotherapeutic agents have been tested, the role of systemic chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has not been clarified. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed to improve outcomes, and we designed this study with new effective drug combination. Methods Twenty-nine patients with histologically-confirmed, metastatic HCC received a combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on day 1, plus capecitabine 2000 mg/m2/day as an intermittent regimen of 2 weeks of treatment followed by a 1-week rest. Results The median age was 49 years (range, 32–64 and 19 patients were hepatitis B virus seropositive. Child-Pugh class was A in all patients and 4 had Zubrod performance status of 2. The objective response rate was 24% (95% CI 9–40 with 6 stable diseases. The chemotherapy was generally well tolerated despite one treatment-related death. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine produced modest antitumor activity with tolerable adverse effects in patients with metastatic HCC.

  8. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Osama; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median ± SD, 16.0 ± 3.7 vs. 8.0 ± 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced pancreatic

  9. [The estimation of systemic chemotherapy treatment administered in breast cancer on lysozyme activity in tears--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Jurowski, Piotr; Wieckowska-Szakiel, Marzena; Rózalska, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of cytostatics influence used in breast cancer treatment on lysozyme activity in human tears depend on time of treatment. 8 women were treated at the base of chemotherapy schema: docetaxel with doxorubicin and 4 women treated with schema CMF: cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil. Lysozyme activity in tears was assessed by measurement of diameter zone of Micrococcus lysodeicticus growth inhibition. It was revealed that both chemotherapy schema caused statistically significant reduction of diameter zone of M. lysodeicticus growth inhibition, after first and second course of chemotherapy treatment. After second chemotherapy course CMF schema induced loss of lysozyme activity in patient's tears (zero mm of M. lysodeicticus diameter zone growth inhibition). Systemic chemotherapy administered in breast cancer induce reduction of lysozyme activity in tears, that may cause higher morbidity of ocular surface infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. OPTIMAL and ENSURE trials-based combined cost-effectiveness analysis of erlotinib versus chemotherapy for the first-line treatment of Asian patients with non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Hutton, David; Li, Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Erlotinib, the first generation of epidermoid growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), has been recommended as an essential treatment in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutation. Although it has improved progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) was limited and erlotinib can be expensive. This cost-effectiveness analysis compares erlotinib monotherapy with gemcitabine-included doublet chemotherapy. Setting First-line treatment of Asian patients with NSCLC with EGFR mutation. Methods A Markov model was created based on the results of the ENSURE (NCT01342965) and OPTIMAL (CTONG-0802) trials which evaluated erlotinib and chemotherapy. The model simulates cancer progression and all causes of death. All medical costs were calculated from the perspective of the Chinese healthcare system. Main outcome measures The primary outcomes are costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Results The combined PFS was 11.81 months and 5.1 months for erlotinib and chemotherapy, respectively, while the OS was reversed at 24.68 months for erlotinib and 26.16 months for chemotherapy. The chemotherapy arm gained 0.13 QALYs compared with erlotinib monotherapy (1.17 QALYs vs 1.04 QALYs), while erlotinib had lower costs ($55 230 vs $77 669), resulting in an ICER of $174 808 per QALY for the chemotherapy arm, which exceeds three times the Chinese GDP per capita. The most influential factors were the health utility of PFS, the cost of erlotinib and the health utility of progressed disease. Conclusion Erlotinib monotherapy may be acceptable as a cost-effective first-line treatment for NSCLC compared with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. The results were robust to changes in assumptions. Trial registration number NCT01342965 and CTONG-0802. PMID:29654023

  11. Radiotherapy Does Not Influence the Severe Pulmonary Toxicity Observed With the Administration of Gemcitabine and Bleomycin in Patients With Advanced-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With the BAGCOPP Regimen: A Report by the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macann, Andrew; Bredenfeld, Henning; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on the severe pulmonary toxicity observed in the pilot study of BAGCOPP (bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, and gemcitabine) for advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV Hodgkin's lymphoma or Stage IIB with risk factors participated in this single-arm, multicenter pilot study. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled on the study before its premature closure as a result of the development of serious pulmonary toxicity in 8 patients. The pulmonary toxicity occurred either during or immediately after the BAGCOPP chemotherapy course. Pulmonary toxicity contributed to one early fatality but resolved in the other 7 patients after cessation of gemcitabine and bleomycin, allowing continuation of therapy. Fifteen patients received consolidative radiotherapy, including 4 who previously had pulmonary toxicity. There were no reported cases of radiation pneumonitis and no exacerbation of pulmonary symptoms in the 4 patients who had had previous pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: The severe pulmonary toxicity observed in this study has been attributed to an interaction between gemcitabine and bleomycin. Gemcitabine (when administered without bleomycin) remains of interest in Hodgkin's lymphoma and is being incorporated into a new German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group protocol that also includes consolidative radiotherapy. This study supports the concept of the integration of radiotherapy in gemcitabine-containing regimens in Hodgkin's lymphoma if there is an interval of at least 4 weeks between the two modalities and with a schedule whereby radiotherapy follows the chemotherapy

  12. Bladder preservation for locally advanced bladder cancer by transurethral resection, systemic chemotherapy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Masahito; Satoh, Mototaka; Tujimoto, Yuichi; Takada, Tuyoshi; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Fujioka, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-three out of 31 patients with clinical T2-4a N0 M0 bladder cancer and given a trial of trimodality therapy including transurethral resection (TUR), systemic chemotherapy and radiation between 1991 and 2002 completed this therapy. The other 8 dropped out because of insufficient clinical effect. Local bladder recurrence was seen in 3 patients and the bladder preservation rate was 64.5%. Nineteen of the 23 patients showed a complete histological response on a subsequent TUR specimen, the other 4 were not examined for histological response. Thirteen of the 19 patients showed a complete histological response after maximal TUR and systemic chemotherapy, while 6 did after TUR, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Bladder cancer was T2 in, 15, T3 in 1, and T4a in 3 patients. The CR rate for T2 cancer was significantly higher than that for T3-4a cancer. The 5-year disease-specific survival of the 23 patients treated with preservation therapy was 67.1%. Some of the patients with locally advanced bladder cancer may benefit from this preservation therapy. (author)

  13. Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin or alkylating agents for neuroendocrine tumors: Comparison of efficacy and search for predictive factors guiding treatment choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussol, Anne-Sophie; Joly, Marie-Odile; Vercherat, Cecile; Forestier, Julien; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Walter, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The alkylating agents (ALKYs) streptozotocin, dacarbazine, and temozolomide currently are the main drugs used in systemic chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The promising activity shown by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX) in previous studies prompted this study 1) to confirm the use of GEMOX in a larger population of NET patients, 2) to compare its efficacy with that of ALKYs, and 3) to explore whether the O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status could help in selecting the chemotherapy regimen. One hundred four patients with metastatic NETs (37 pancreatic NETs, 33 gastrointestinal NETs, 23 bronchial NETs, and 11 NETs of other/unknown origin) were treated with GEMOX between 2004 and 2014. Among these patients, 63 also received ALKYs. MGMT promoter gene methylation was assessed via pyrosequencing in 42 patients. Patients received a median of 6 courses of GEMOX. Twenty-four (23%) had an objective response (OR). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 7.8 and 31.6 months, respectively. In the 63 patients treated with both ALKYs and GEMOX, the ORs (22% and 22%) and the PFSs (7.5 and 7.3 months) were similar. The response was concordant in 53% of the patients. Promoter gene methylation of MGMT was associated with better outcomes with ALKYs (P = .03 for OR and P = .04 for PFS) but not GEMOX. GEMOX is effective against NETs; its activity is comparable to that of ALKYs, and it is not influenced by the MGMT status. Our data suggest that GEMOX might be preferred for patients with unmethylated MGMT tumors. Cancer 2015;121:3435-43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  14. Gemcitabine, cisplatin, and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitter, Matjaz; Kovac, Viljem; Smrdel, Uros; Strojan, Primoz

    2006-09-01

    Due to potent radiosensitization and potential serious or fatal toxicity, concurrent gemcitabine and irradiation should only be applied within clinical trials. We here present experience from a phase I-II clinical trial for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent low-dose gemcitabine. Eligible patients had locally advanced inoperable NSCLC without pleural effusion, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, were chemotherapy naïve and had no previous radiotherapy to the chest, and had adequate hematopoietic, liver, and kidney function. Routine brain computed tomography was not performed, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography was not available. Treatment consisted of three parts: induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in standard doses, local treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Patients were irradiated with opposed AP-PA and oblique fields, using 2.5-D treatment planning. Although corrections for inhomogeneous tissue were made, volume of total lung receiving > or =20 Gy (V20) could not be determined. The trial started as phase I, aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity and maximal tolerated dose (MTD) for concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.4 Gy twice daily) and gemcitabine 55 mg/m twice weekly as a radiosensitizer. Phase II of the trial then continued at the level of MTD. Twenty-eight patients with NSCLC, nine patients with stage IIIA, 16 patients with IIIB, and three patients with an inoperable recurrence after previous surgery, entered the trial. The first 12 patients entered Phase I of the trial at the initial level of 42 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity was acute esophagitis; 47.6 Gy in 34 fractions in 3.5 weeks was the MTD for this regimen of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In phase II of the trial, this dose was applied

  15. Enhanced efficacy of gemcitabine in combination with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody against CD20+ non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines in vitro and in scid mice

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    Jin Fang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite exciting new targeted therapeutics against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, chemotherapy remains a cornerstone of therapy. While purine nucleoside analogs have significant activity in low grade NHL, the pyrimidine nucleoside analog gemcitabine has been less extensively studied, but has important activity. Use of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with chemotherapy for B-NHL is becoming prevalent in clinical practice, but has not been extensively studied in pre-clinical models. Methods We have tested the activity of gemcitabine ± rituximab in vitro and in scid/human NHL xenograft models. We used two t(14;18+, CD20+ follicular B cell NHL cell lines, DoHH2 a transformed NHL line and WSU-FSCCL isolated from pleural fluid of a patient with indolent NHL. Results Gemcitabine is cytotoxic to DoHH2 and WSU-FSCCL cells in vitro, and the IC50 is 2–3 fold lower in the presence of rituximab. Apoptosis is also enhanced in the presence of rituximab. Clearance of NHL cells from ascites in scid mice is prolonged by the combination, as compared with either agent alone. Most importantly, survival of scid mice bearing human NHL cells is significantly prolonged by the combination of gemcitabine + rituximab. Conclusion Based on our pre-clinical data showing prolonged survival of mice bearing human lymphoma cell line xenografts after treatment with gemcitabine + anti-CD20 antibody, this combination, expected to have non-overlapping toxicity profiles, should be explored in clinical trials.

  16. Clinical nursing of pelvic neoplasm treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical nursing care for patients with pelvic neoplasm who were treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system. Methods: After the implantation of an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system was successfully completed, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy was carried out in 17 patients with pelvic neoplasm and the infusion chemotherapy was repeated for several times. The pre-procedural clinical nursing care was well done and the technique of proper placement was well grasped. The side effects of chemotherapy drugs and complications were dealt with in time. Medical orientation at discharge time included the protection methods for port-catheter system. Results: Seventeen patients received infusion chemotherapy successfully several times (ranged from 3 to 8 times) with a scheduled regular interval time. No severe complications occurred. No catheter leakage nor obvious irritation and compression symptoms of local skin developed during infusion period. Of the 17 patients, 6 had a complete response, 9 achieved a partial response, while the remaining 2 failed to respond. Conclusion: In accordance with characteristics of infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system, the reasonable and effective nursing care is important to guarantee the achievement of a successful performance and a satisfactory therapeutic result. (authors)

  17. Different impact of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 on survival in male and female patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer treated with carboplatin and gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) status was assessed in patients receiving carboplatin and gemcitabine for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the association between the ERCC1 status and the overall survival after the chemotherapy. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: We retrospectively identified 163 patients with inoperable NSCLC and sufficient tumor tissue for ERCC1 analysis, who had received carboplatin and gemcitabine as first-line treatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of ERCC1. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-three patients were...

  18. Tumor blood flow and systemic shunting in patients receiving intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, R.H.; Ziessman, H.A.; Medvec, B.R.; Juni, J.E.; Thrall, J.H.; Keyes, J.W.; Pitt, S.R.; Baker, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide techniques have been used to estimate the systemic shunt and to quantitate blood flow to the tumor and a reference normal tissue in nine patients undergoing intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The systemic shunt was calculated as the percentage of pulmonary trapping of intraarterially injected /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean systemic shunt in the 12 separate arteries studied was 23 +/- 13% (SE) (range 8-43%). Quantitative blood flow was determined from the slope of the washout curve of intraarterially injected 133 Xe. The mean tumor blood flow was 13.6 +/- 6.7 ml/100 g/min, while the mean blood flow to the scalp was 4.2 +/- 2.1 ml/100 g/min providing a mean tumor/normal tissue ratio of 3.9 +/- 2.7. An estimate of blood flow distribution was obtained by calculating the ratio of counts/pixel in the tumor mass versus the remainder of the head as determined by single photon emission computed tomography following an intraarterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean ratio of tumor to normal tissue perfusion by this technique was 5.6 +/- 3.7. These techniques have allowed noninvasive determination of the blood flow parameters associated with intraarterial chemotherapy. At least part of the therapeutic advantage of regional chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer is due to a tumor/normal tissue blood flow ratio that favors drug delivery to the tumor contained within the infused volume

  19. A phase I/II study of gemcitabine-concurrent proton radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer without distant metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Kazuki; Demizu, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Fujii, Osamu; Niwa, Yasue; Takatori, Kento; Kitajima, Naoto; Sirakawa, Sachiyo; Yonson, Ku; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Sugimura, Kazuro; Murakami, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted the study to assess the feasibility and efficacy of gemcitabine-concurrent proton radiotherapy (GPT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: Of all 50 patients who participated in the study, 5 patients with gastrointestinal (GI)-adjacent LAPC were enrolled in P-1 (50 Gy equivalent [GyE] in 25 fractions) and 5 patients with non-GI-adjacent LAPC in P-2 (70.2 GyE in 26 fractions), and 40 patients with LAPC regardless of GI-adjacency in P-3 (67.5 GyE in 25 fractions using the field-within-a-field technique). In every protocol, gemcitabine (800 mg/m 2 /week for 3 weeks) was administered concurrently. Every patient received adjuvant chemotherapy including gemcitabine after GPT within the tolerable limit. Results: The median follow-up period was 12.5 months. The scheduled GPT was feasible for all except 6 patients (12%) due to acute hematologic or GI toxicities. Grade 3 or greater late gastric ulcer and hemorrhage were seen in 5 patients (10%) in P-2 and P-3. The one-year freedom from local-progression, progression-free, and overall survival rates were 81.7%, 64.3%, and 76.8%, respectively. Conclusion: GPT was feasible and showed high efficacy. Although the number of patients and the follow-up periods are insufficient, the clinical results seem very encouraging.

  20. Phase I evaluation of intravenous ascorbic acid in combination with gemcitabine and erlotinib in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Monti

    Full Text Available Preclinical data support further investigation of ascorbic acid in pancreatic cancer. There are currently insufficient safety data in human subjects, particularly when ascorbic acid is combined with chemotherapy.14 subjects with metastatic stage IV pancreatic cancer were recruited to receive an eight week cycle of intravenous ascorbic acid (three infusions per week, using a dose escalation design, along with standard treatment of gemcitabine and erlotinib. Of 14 recruited subjects enrolled, nine completed the study (three in each dosage tier. There were fifteen non-serious adverse events and eight serious adverse events, all likely related to progression of disease or treatment with gemcitabine or erlotinib. Applying RECIST 1.0 criteria, seven of the nine subjects had stable disease while the other two had progressive disease.These initial safety data do not reveal increased toxicity with the addition of ascorbic acid to gemcitabine and erlotinib in pancreatic cancer patients. This, combined with the observed response to treatment, suggests the need for a phase II study of longer duration.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00954525.

  1. YAP Inhibition by Resveratrol via Activation of AMPK Enhances the Sensitivity of Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengdong Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol present in most plants, inhibits the growth of numerous cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Aberrant expression of YAP has been reported to activate multiple growth-regulatory pathways and confer anti-apoptotic abilities to many cancer cells. However, the role of resveratrol in YES-activated protein (YAP expression and that of YAP in pancreatic cancer cells’ response to gemcitabine resistance remain elusive. In this study, we found that resveratrol suppressed the proliferation and cloning ability and induced the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. These multiple biological effects might result from the activation of AMP-activation protein kinase (AMPK (Thr172 and, thus, the induction of YAP cytoplasmic retention, Ser127 phosphorylation, and the inhibition of YAP transcriptional activity by resveratrol. YAP silencing by siRNA or resveratrol enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that resveratrol could increase the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine by inhibiting YAP expression. More importantly, our work reveals that resveratrol is a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and YAP may serve as a promising target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  2. Stabilization of a percutaneously implanted port catheter system for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindoh, Noboru; Ozaki, Yutaka; Kyogoku, Shinsuke; Yamana, Daigo; Sumi, Yukiharu; Katayama, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    A port catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy was implanted percutaneously via the left subclavian artery in 41 patients for treatment of unresectable liver metastases. The catheter tip was inserted into the gastroduodenal artery (GDA), the end hole was occluded with a guidewire fragment, and a side-hole for infusion was positioned at the bifurcation of the proper hepatic artery and the GDA. The GDA was embolized with steel coils around the infusion catheter tip via a transfemoral catheter. This procedure is designed to reduce the incidence of hepatic artery occlusion and infusion catheter dislocation.

  3. Results from a Phase I Study of Lapatinib with Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerbone, L; Sternberg, C N; Sengeløv, L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Lapatinib is a potent HER1 and HER2 inhibitor. Gemcitabine-cisplatin (GC) is a standard chemotherapy regimen for advanced/metastatic bladder cancer. This phase I study examined the safety of lapatinib in combination with GC in patients with bladder cancer. The primary aim...... × 3 patients), 1 of the 6 patients presented DLTs (grade 4, treatment-related febrile neutropenia and renal failure). Twelve patients received 6 cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Lapatinib at 750-1,250 mg combined with GC appears safe and tolerable. The MTD of lapatinib combined with GC in bladder cancer was 1...

  4. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells. (author)

  5. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells. (author)

  6. Influence of physical activity on the immune system in breast cancer patients during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thorsten; Jonat, Walter; Wesch, Daniela; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Keller, Lisa; Röcken, Christoph; Mundhenke, Christoph

    2018-03-01

    Physical activity can impact the immune system in different ways, e.g. by alteration of the humoral and cellular immune response. Physical activity at medium intensity enhances numbers of cytotoxic T cells, NK cells and macrophages in healthy people. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of endurance and resistance training on the immune system in breast cancer patients during adjuvant chemotherapy. In a prospective, controlled and randomized intervention exploratory trial, 12-week supervised endurance or resistance training were compared with usual care twice a week. Endpoints were the absolute numbers of the immune cells such as CD3 + T lymphocytes including CD4 + - and CD8 + , αβ T cells, γδT cells, CD3 - /CD16 + /56 + NK cells and CD19 + B cells, before and after 12 weeks of treatment. Cell numbers were analyzed using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Despite different physical interventions in all groups immune cell count decreased in CD3 T cells including TCR αβ and CD4 T cells, NK cells and CD19 B cells 12 weeks after initiation of chemotherapy and start of the physical intervention program, while the reduction of γδ T cells and CD8 T cells is less prominent in the RT and UC group. Chemotherapy led to a decrease in nearly all measured immune cells. In this study, physical intervention with endurance or resistance training did not suppress cellular immunity any further. Larger multicenter trials are needed to evaluate the exact impact of sports intervention on immune cell subpopulations.

  7. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  8. Phase II trial of weekly 24-hour infusion of gemcitabine in patients with advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delius, Stefan von; Lersch, Christian; Schulte-Frohlinde, Ewert; Mayr, Martina; Schmid, Roland M; Eckel, Florian

    2005-01-01

    Patients with advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma face a dismal prognosis, as no effective palliative chemotherapy exists. The antitumor effect of gemcitabine is schedule-dependent rather than dose-dependent. We evaluated the activity of a prolonged infusion of gemcitabine in advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinomas. Nineteen consecutive eligible patients were enrolled. All patients were required to have histologically confirmed diagnosis and measurable disease. Gemcitabine was infused over 24 hours at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 on days 1, 8, and 15. Treatment was repeated every 28 days until progression of disease or limiting toxicity. Tumor response was evaluated every second course by computed tomography (CT) scans. Eighteen patients were evaluable for response. A total of 89 cycles of therapy were administered. One partial response was observed (6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0–27%) and ten additional patients had stable disease for at least two months (disease control rate 61%; 95% CI: 36–83%). The therapy was well tolerated, with moderate myelosuppression as the main toxicity. The median time to tumor progression and median overall survival was 3.6 months (95% CI 2.6–4.6 months) and 7.5 months (95% CI 6.5–8.5 months), respectively. Weekly 24-hour gemcitabine at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 is well tolerated. There was a relatively high rate of disease control for a median duration of 5.3 months (range 2.8–18.8 months). However, the objective response rate of this regimen in gallbladder and biliary tract carcinomas was limited

  9. Mechanistic Distinctions between CHK1 and WEE1 Inhibition Guide the Scheduling of Triple Therapy with Gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Siang-Boon; Wallez, Yann; Dunlop, Charles R; Bernaldo de Quirós Fernández, Sandra; Bapiro, Tashinga E; Richards, Frances M; Jodrell, Duncan I

    2018-06-01

    Combination of cytotoxic therapy with emerging DNA damage response inhibitors (DDRi) has been limited by tolerability issues. However, the goal of most combination trials has been to administer DDRi with standard-of-care doses of chemotherapy. We hypothesized that mechanism-guided treatment scheduling could reduce the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities and enable tolerable multitherapeutic regimens. Integrative analyses of mathematical modeling and single-cell assays distinguished the synergy kinetics of WEE1 inhibitor (WEE1i) from CHEK1 inhibitor (CHK1i) by potency, spatiotemporal perturbation, and mitotic effects when combined with gemcitabine. These divergent properties collectively supported a triple-agent strategy, whereby a pulse of gemcitabine and CHK1i followed by WEE1i durably suppressed tumor cell growth. In xenografts, CHK1i exaggerated replication stress without mitotic CDK hyperactivation, enriching a geminin-positive subpopulation and intratumoral gemcitabine metabolite. Without overt toxicity, addition of WEE1i to low-dose gemcitabine and CHK1i was most effective in tumor control compared with single and double agents. Overall, our work provides quantitative insights into the mechanisms of DDRi chemosensitization, leading to the rational development of a tolerable multitherapeutic regimen. Significance: Multiple lines of mechanistic insight regarding DNA damage response inhibitors rationally guide the preclinical development of a tolerable multitherapeutic regimen. Graphical Abstract: http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/canres/78/11/3054/F1.large.jpg Cancer Res; 78(11); 3054-66. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Phase I trial of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine in patients with thoracic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Socinski, Mark A; Lee, Carrie B; Hayes, D Neil; Moore, Dominic T; Goldberg, Richard M; Dees, E Claire

    2008-05-01

    Nab-paclitaxel has a different toxicity profile than solvent-based paclitaxel including a lower rate of severe neutropenia. This trial was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine. Patients were required to have a performance status of 0 to 1, < or = three prior cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens, and preserved renal, hepatic, and bone marrow function. Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m on days 1, 8 in all cohorts, and nab-paclitaxel at doses of 260, 300, 340 mg/m every 21 days depending on the treatment cohort (1 cycle = 21 days). DLT were assessed after the first cycle, and doses were escalated in cohorts of 3 to 6 patients. Eighteen patients were consented and 15 patients are evaluable [median age 62 years (range, 35-75); median number of prior treatments 3 (range, 1-4); tumor types: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (n = 8), small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (n = 6), and esophageal cancer (n = 1)]. At a nab-paclitaxel dose of 300 mg/m, 1 of 6 pts experienced a DLT (omission of day 8 gemcitabine due to absolute neutrophil count < 500), and at an nab-paclitaxel dose of 340 mg/m 2 of 3 patients experienced a DLT (1 pt grade 3 rash and pruritus; 1 pt grade 3 fatigue and anorexia). Responses were observed in NSCLC and SCLC. The maximum tolerated dose of nab-paclitaxel is 300 mg/m in combination with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m on days 1, 8 every 21 days. This combination demonstrated activity in previously treated NSCLC and SCLC patients.

  11. Effects of intra-arterial infusion therapy or systemic chemotherapy with docetaxel for VX2 tumor in rabbit hind limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yuanxin; Wu Xiaomei; He Miao; Liu Tao; Deng Duo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel. Methods: Animal model of VX2 tumor in rabbit hind limb was set up. Intra-arterial infusion therapy or systemic chemotherapy with docetaxel was performed. Concentrations of docetaxel in VX2 tumor, wall of stomach, liver, kidney and plasma of rabbits with VX2 tumors in hind limbs were determined. Difference of drug concentrations between intra-arterial infusion therapy and systemic chemotherapy was compared using Student t-test. Results: Concentrations of docetaxel in VX2 tumor and wall of stomach of rabbits with intra-arterial infusion therapy were significantly higher than those with systemic chemotherapy (p<0.05). The drug concentration in VX2 tumor of rabbits with intra-arterial infusion was 14 times higher than that with systemic chemotherapy. Concentration of docetaxel in plasma of rabbits with intra-arterial infusion therapy was not significantly lower than that with systemic chemotherapy (P<0.05). Conclusion: Intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel for tumor is effective. However, there is increased risk of toxicity and the dose should adjusted accordingly. (authors)

  12. Systemic Chemotherapy as Salvage Treatment for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Who Fail to Respond to Standard Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Francesco; Brown, Gina; Cunningham, David; Rao, Sheela; Tekkis, Paris; Tait, Diana; Morano, Federica; Baratelli, Chiara; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Chau, Ian

    2017-06-01

    The potential of chemotherapy as salvage treatment after failure of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has never been explored. We conducted a single-center, retrospective analysis to address this question. Patients with newly diagnosed LARC who were inoperable or candidates for extensive (i.e., beyond total mesorectal excision [TME]) surgery after long-course chemoradiotherapy and who received salvage chemotherapy were included. The primary objective was to estimate the proportion of patients who became suitable for TME after chemotherapy. Forty-five patients were eligible (39 candidates for extensive surgery and 6 unresectable). Previous radiotherapy was given concurrently with chemotherapy in 43 cases (median dose: 54.0 Gy). Oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based salvage chemotherapy was administered in 40 (88.9%) and 5 (11.1%) cases, respectively. Eight patients (17.8%) became suitable for TME after chemotherapy, 10 (22.2%) ultimately underwent TME with clear margins, and 2 (4.4%) were managed with a watch and wait approach. Additionally, 13 patients had extensive surgery with curative intent. Three-year progression-free survival and 5-year overall survival in the entire population were 30.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.0-46.0) and 44.0% (95% CI: 26.0-61.0), respectively. For the curatively resected and "watch and wait" patients, these figures were 52.0% (95% CI: 27.0-73.0) and 67.0% (95% CI: 40.0-84.0), respectively. Systemic chemotherapy may be an effective salvage strategy for LARC patients who fail to respond to chemoradiotherapy and are inoperable or candidates for beyond TME surgery. According to our study, one out of five patients may become resectable or be spared from an extensive surgery after systemic chemotherapy. High-quality evidence to inform the optimal management of rectal cancer patients who are inoperable or candidates for beyond total mesorectal excision surgery following standard chemoradiotherapy is

  13. Self-assembled gemcitabine-gadolinium nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lele; Tong, Rong; Li, Mengyuan; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles with combined diagnostic and therapeutic functions are promising tools for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here, we demonstrate a theranostic nanoparticle that integrates an active gemcitabine metabolite and a gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging agent via a facile supramolecular self-assembly synthesis, where the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine-5'-monophosphate (a phosphorylated active metabolite of the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine) was used to coordinate with Gd(III) to self-assemble into theranostic nanoparticles. The formulation exhibits a strong T1 contrast signal for magnetic resonance imaging of tumors in vivo, with enhanced retention time. Furthermore, the nanoparticles did not require other inert nanocarriers or excipients and thus had an exceptionally high drug loading (55 wt%), resulting in the inhibition of MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in mice. Recent advances in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems have spurred the development of "theranostic" multifunctional nanoparticles, which combine therapeutic and diagnostic functionalities in a single formulation. Developing simple and efficient synthetic strategies for the construction of nanotheranostics with high drug loading remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate a theranostic nanoparticle that integrates high loadings of an active gemcitabine metabolite and a gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging agent via a facile synthesis. The nanoparticles were better T1 contrast agents than currently used Gd-DTPA and had prolonged retention in tumor. Moreover they exhibited enhanced in vivo antitumor activity compared to free drug in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The strategy provides a scalable way to fabricate nanoparticles that enables enhancement of both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Retrospective analysis of systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition for the treatment of malignant small bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouhan, Jay; Gupta, Rohan; Ensor, Joe; Raghav, Kanwal; Fogelman, David; Wolff, Robert A.; Fisch, Michael; Overman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant small bowel obstruction (MSBO) that does not resolve with conservative measures frequently leaves few treatment options other than palliative care. This single-institution retrospective study assesses the outcomes of a more aggressive approach—concurrent systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN)—in the treatment of MSBO. The MD Anderson pharmacy database was queried to identify patients who received concurrent systemic chemotherapy and TPN between 2005 and 2013. Only patients with MSBO secondary to peritoneal carcinomatosis requiring TPN for ≥8 days were included. Survival and multivariate analyses were performed using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models. The study included 82 patients. MSBO resolution was observed in 10 patients. Radiographic assessments showed a response to chemotherapy in 19 patients; 6 of these patients experienced MSBO resolution. Patients spent an average of 38% of their remaining lives hospitalized, and 28% of patients required admission to the intensive care unit. In multivariate modeling, radiographic response to chemotherapy correlated with MSBO resolution (odds ratio [OR] 6.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68–27.85, P = 0.007). Median overall survival (OS) was 3.1 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 12.6%. Radiographic response to chemotherapy (HR 0.30; 95% CI, 0.16–0.56, P < 0.001), and initiation of new chemotherapy during TPN (HR 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33–0.94, P = 0.026) independently predicted for longer OS. Concurrent treatment with systemic chemotherapy and TPN for persistent MSBO results in low efficacy and a high morbidity and mortality, and thus should not represent a standard approach

  15. Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borad, Mitesh J; Reddy, Shantan G; Bahary, Nathan; Uronis, Hope E; Sigal, Darren; Cohn, Allen L; Schelman, William R; Stephenson, Joe; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Rosen, Peter J; Ulrich, Brian; Dragovich, Tomislav; Del Prete, Salvatore A; Rarick, Mark; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Ryan, David P

    2015-05-01

    TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m(2) (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m(2) (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (-5,398 v -549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302-related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study (NCT01746979). © 2014 by American Society of

  16. A systemic literature review of neuroimaging studies in women with breast cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Andryszak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits in patients with breast cancer, predominantly in attention and verbal memory, have been observed in numerous studies. These neuropsychological findings are corroborated by the results of neuroimaging studies. The aim of this paper was to survey the reports on cerebral structural and functional alterations in women with breast cancer treated with chemotherapy (CTx. First, we discuss the host-related and disease-related mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment after CTx. We point out the direct and indirect neurotoxic effect of cytostatics, which may cause: a damage to neurons or glial cells, changes in neurotransmitter levels, deregulation of the immune system and/or cytokine release. Second, we focus on the results of neuroimaging studies on brain structure and function that revealed decreased: density of grey matter, integrity of white matter and volume of multiple brain regions, as well as their lower activation during cognitive task performance. Finally, we concentrate on compensatory mechanisms, which activate additional brain areas or neural connection to reach the premorbid cognitive efficiency.

  17. Effect of regional and systemic fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapy on quality of life in colorectal liver metastasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlam, S; Glover, C; Davies, M; Fordy, C; Allen-Mersh, T G

    1997-05-01

    Since systemic and regional (HAI) fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapies offer similar survival benefit in treatment of colorectal liver metastases (CLM), we sought to identify their impact on quality of life (QoL), which might be a useful indicator of treatment preference. We compared QoL in 135 CLM patients managed by symptom control (n = 49 patients), systemic fluorouracil (5FU)/folinic acid (n = 35), or hepatic arterial floxuridine (FUDR) (n = 51). Full blood count and liver function tests, World Health Organization (WHO) toxicity criteria, and QoL (Rotterdam Symptom Checklist [RSC], the Sickness Impact Profile [SIP], and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale [HAD]) were measured monthly in all patients. The HAD anxiety score was significantly increased in symptom control compared with chemotherapy patients 1 month after randomization. There was a significant increase in RSC physical score (repeated measures, P = .05), and in scores for sore mouth (P < .01), dry mouth (P < .01), and tingling hands and feet (P < .01) in systemic chemotherapy compared with symptom control patients. Significant QoL differences (repeated measures and Mann-Whitney U [MWU]) between HAI and symptom control patients were not detected. Systemic chemotherapy patients lived for significantly longer (log-rank test, P < or = .0001) with abnormal HAD anxiety, RSC psychosocial, or RSC sore mouth scores compared with HAI patients, but there were no overall survival differences. Randomization to symptom control only was associated with increased anxiety. QoL with systemic chemotherapy was impaired by side effects. HAI was associated with similar survival to systemic chemotherapy but with better sustained QoL.

  18. Eligibility of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients for First-Line Palliative Intent nab-Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine Versus FOLFIRINOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Renata D; Ho, Maria; Renouf, Daniel J; Lim, Howard J; Gill, Sharlene; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-10-01

    The PRODIGE and MPACT trials showed superiority of FOLFIRINOX and nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (NG) over gemcitabine alone, respectively. However, both had strict inclusion criteria. We sought to determine the characteristics of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) which inform the appropriateness of first-line chemotherapy FOLFIRINOX and NG in routine practice. Patients with MPC who initiated palliative chemotherapy with gemcitabine from 2000 to 2011 at the British Columbia Cancer Agency were identified. Clinicopathologic variables and outcomes were retrospectively collected and compared among groups. Eligibility criteria for each regimen were in accordance with the respective pivotal phase III trials. A total of 473 patients were included: 25% of the patients were eligible for FOLFIRINOX versus 45% for NG. Main reasons for FOLFIRINOX ineligibility were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS)≥2 (56.5%), age older than 75 years (19.0%), and bilirubin>1.5× upper limit of normal (18.6%), whereas those for NG ineligibility were bilirubin > upper limit of normal (24.5%), ECOG PS≥3 (14.6%), and cardiac dysfunction (13.8%). Univariate analyses revealed that FOLFIRINOX and NG-eligible patients had longer median overall survival than their respective ineligible group (8.6 vs. 4.7 mo, Paccounting for ECOG PS in the multivariate model, however, eligibility for either FOLFIRINOX or NG no longer predicted for better overall survival. The majority of patients with MPC are not candidates to either NG or FOLFIRINOX due to restrictive eligibility requirements. Specific trials addressing the unmet needs of protocol ineligible patients are warranted.

  19. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gemcitabine plus Cisplatin Versus Gemcitabine Alone for Treatment of Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Ejiri, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakao, Haruhisa; Yoneda, Masashi; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Arakawa, Ichiro; Saito, Hiroko; Inoue, Tadao

    2017-12-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of combination treatment with gemcitabine and cisplatin compared to treatment with gemcitabine alone for advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) in Japan. A monthly transmitted Markov model of three states was constructed based on the Japan BT-22 trial. Transition probabilities among the health states were derived from a trial conducted in Japan and converted to appropriate parameters for our model. The associated cost components, obtained from a receipt-based survey undertaken at the Aichi Medical University Hospital, were those related to inpatient care, outpatient care, and treatment for BTC. Costs for palliative care and treatment of adverse events were obtained from the National Health Insurance price list. We estimated cost-effectiveness per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) at a time horizon of 36 months. An annual discount of 3 % for both cost and outcome was considered. The base case outcomes indicated that combination therapy was less cost-effective than monotherapy when the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was approximately 14 million yen per QALY gained. The deterministic sensitivity analysis of the ICER revealed that the ICER of the base case was robust. A probabilistic analysis conducted with 10,000-time Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated efficacy at the willingness to pay threshold of 6 million yen per QALY gained for approximately 33 % of the population. In Japan, combination therapy is less cost-effective than monotherapy for treating advanced BTC, regardless of the statistical significance of the two therapies. Useful information on the cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy is much needed for the treatment of advanced BTC in Japan.

  20. SymptomCare@Home: Developing an Integrated Symptom Monitoring and Management System for Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L; Eaton, Linda H; Echeverria, Christina; Mooney, Kathi H

    2017-10-01

    SymptomCare@Home, an integrated symptom monitoring and management system, was designed as part of randomized clinical trials to help patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy in ambulatory clinics and often experience significant symptoms at home. An iterative design process was informed by chronic disease management theory and features of assessment and clinical decision support systems used in other diseases. Key stakeholders participated in the design process: nurse scientists, clinical experts, bioinformatics experts, and computer programmers. Especially important was input from end users, patients, and nurse practitioners participating in a series of studies testing the system. The system includes both a patient and clinician interface and fully integrates two electronic subsystems: a telephone computer-linked interactive voice response system and a Web-based Decision Support-Symptom Management System. Key features include (1) daily symptom monitoring, (2) self-management coaching, (3) alerting, and (4) nurse practitioner follow-up. The nurse practitioner is distinctively positioned to provide assessment, education, support, and pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions to intensify management of poorly controlled symptoms at home. SymptomCare@Home is a model for providing telehealth. The system facilitates using evidence-based guidelines as part of a comprehensive symptom management approach. The design process and system features can be applied to other diseases and conditions.

  1. Combining biological agents and chemotherapy in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Jakobsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    is not always possible. Chemotherapy is effective and the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine is considered a standard treatment of inoperable cholangiocarcinoma. Biological targeted treatment to date has minor effect when given as monotherapy, but some of the drugs hold promise as an adjunct...... to chemotherapy. It should, however, be noted that most of the trials are based on few patients, and thus far the literature does not allow for a conclusion as to the role of biological treatment on cholangiocarcinoma. This situation calls for well-designed randomized trials, and international cooperation as well...

  2. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Andrew H.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Venook, Alan P.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Dito, Elizabeth R.N.; Schillinger, Brian R.N.; Tempero, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m 2 at 10 mg/m 2 /min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m 2 orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation

  3. A novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and overcomes gemcitabine resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Sun A; Kwon, Sool Ki; Cha, Hyunju; Lee, Do Young; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, Joong Myung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is predominantly lethal, and is primarily treated using gemcitabine, with increasing resistance. Therefore, novel agents that increase tumor sensitivity to gemcitabine are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging therapeutic agents, since HDAC plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib on pancreatic cancer cells and gemcitabine-resis...

  4. Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder successfully managed with cisplatin and gemcitabine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ammari Jalal Eddine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare variant of mucus-producing adenocarcinoma constituting approximately 0.5% to 2.0% of all primary carcinomas of the bladder. This tumor initially presents as a high-grade, high-stage lesion and diffusely invades the bladder wall without forming intraluminal growth. The patients have no specific symptoms, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 51-year-old Moroccan Berber man consulting for gross hematuria. Ultrasonography and a computed tomography scan found a bladder tumor diffusely invading the bladder wall. A histopathological examination of the tumor chips from a transurethral resection of the bladder revealed signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma. The gastrointestinal tract exploration did not reveal any other tumor localization. A radical cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy were therefore performed resulting in 18 months of survival without metastasis and a good quality of life within that time. Conclusion The rarity and the successful management with carboplatin and gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy of this entity, which is rarely reported in the literature, are two remarkable characteristics described in this case report.

  5. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  6. A novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and overcomes gemcitabine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Sun A; Kwon, Sool Ki; Cha, Hyunju; Lee, Do Young; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, Joong Myung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-30

    Pancreatic cancer is predominantly lethal, and is primarily treated using gemcitabine, with increasing resistance. Therefore, novel agents that increase tumor sensitivity to gemcitabine are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging therapeutic agents, since HDAC plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib on pancreatic cancer cells and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Three pancreatic cancer-cell lines were used to evaluate the antitumor effect of CG200745 combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib. CG200745 induced the expression of apoptotic proteins (PARP and caspase-3) and increased the levels of acetylated histone H3. CG200745 with gemcitabine/erlotinib showed significant growth inhibition and synergistic antitumor effects in vitro. In vivo, gemcitabine/erlotinib and CG200745 reduced tumor size up to 50%. CG200745 enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, and decreased the level of ATP-binding cassette-transporter genes, especially multidrug resistance protein 3 (MRP3) and MRP4. The novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, with gemcitabine/erlotinib had a synergistic anti-tumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells. CG200745 significantly improved pancreatic cancer sensitivity to gemcitabine, with a prominent antitumor effect on gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, improved clinical outcome is expected in the future.

  7. In vitro evaluation of photon and raster-scanned carbon ion radiotherapy in combination with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafie, Rami A. El; Habermehl, Daniel; Rieken, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, being responsible for 6% of all cancer-related deaths. Conventional radiotherapy with or without additional chemotherapy has been applied in the past in the context of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy concepts with only modest results, however new radiation modalities, such as particle therapy with promising physical and biological characteristics, present an alternative treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer. Up until now the raster scanning technique employed at our institution for the application of carbon ions has been unique, and no radiobiological data using pancreatic cancer cells has been available yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects that can be achieved by treating pancreatic cancer cell lines with combinations of X-rays and gemcitabine, or alternatively with carbon ion irradiation and gemcitabine, respectively. Human pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and Panc-1 were irradiated with photons and carbon ions at various doses and treated with gemcitabine. Photon irradiation was applied with a biological cabin X-ray irradiator, and carbon ion irradiation was applied with an extended Bragg peak (linear energy transfer (LET) 103 keV/μm) using the raster scanning technique at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Responsiveness of pancreatic cancer cells to the treatment was measured by clonogenic survival. Clonogenic survival curves were then compared to predicted curves that were calculated employing the local effect model (LEM). Cell survival curves were calculated from the surviving fractions of each combination experiment and compared to a drug control that was only irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions, without application of gemcitabine. In terms of cytotoxicity, additive effects were achieved for the cell lines Panc-1 and BxPC-3, and a slight radiosensitizing effect was observed for AsPC-1. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon

  8. Phase I study of combination of vorinostat, carboplatin, and gemcitabine in women with recurrent, platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulonis, Ursula; Berlin, Suzanne; Lee, Hang; Whalen, Christin; Obermayer, Elizabeth; Penson, Richard; Liu, Joyce; Campos, Susana; Krasner, Carolyn; Horowitz, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Combining histone deacetylase inhibitors and chemotherapy is synergistic. This phase I study combined escalating vorinostat doses with constant doses of carboplatin and gemcitabine for the treatment of recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the maximally tolerated dose of this combination; secondary objectives included preliminary response rate of this regimen and toxicity profile. Fifteen patients with relapsed ovarian cancer were enrolled into this phase I study. Doses of carboplatin and gemcitabine were AUC 4 on day 1 and 1000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8, respectively; cycles were administered every 21 days. Vorinostat was tested using four different schedules. The first dose level (DL A) tested vorinostat as daily oral dosing from days 1 to 14. DL B tested twice daily (BID) vorinostat dosing on days 1-3 and 8-10. DL C tested BID vorinostat dosing on days 1, 2, 8, and 9, starting vorinostat 1 day prior to initiation of carboplatin and gemcitabine, and DL D tested vorinostat on days 1 and 2 with chemotherapy starting on day 2. All four DLs tested resulted in dose-limiting toxicities, and no MTD was determined. Toxicities were mostly hematologic. Seven patients were evaluable for RECIST assessment, and six of them had partial responses (PR) via RECIST. Combination of carboplatin, gemcitabine, and vorinostat has activity in relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, but was difficult to combine because of hematologic toxicities in this phase I study. No maximally tolerated dose was found, and the study was terminated early.

  9. Systemic Chemotherapy using FLOT - Regimen Combined with Cytoreductive Surgery plus HIPEC for Treatment of Peritoneal Metastasized Gastric Cancer. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H; Hotopp, Th; Tofeili, A; Wutke, K

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy using FLOT - protocol followed by cytoreductive surgery (CRS), hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) followed by systemic chemotherapyand in patients with peritoneal carciriomatosis (PC) from gastric cancer. Twenty six (median age 53 years, range 39 - 71) were scheduled for three cycles of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy using bi-weekly FLOT - protocol followed by CRS + HIPEC. Thereafter 3 additional cycles of FLOT were given. During HIPEC in Colliseum technique Oxaliplatin was given in a dosage of 200 mg/m2 and Docetaxel in a dosage of 80 mg/m2. All patients underwent cytoreductive surgery plus HIPEC. Peritoneal Cancer index was > 15 in 3 cases only. Complete resection could be carried out in all cases (CC-O 18, CC-18). Postoperative complication rate was 23% with no mortality within 30 days. Anastomotic leakage rate was 3.2%. Overall survival was 19.0 months with a 2-year survival rate 38%. Regression analysis demonstrated a Peritoneal Cancer Index PCI > 12 as negative factor for survival. Neoadju- vant chemotherapy using FLOT - protocol followed by CRS + HIPEC seems to be associated with prolonged OS in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric cancer. This treatment is not recommended for patients with extensive peritoneal involvement and PCI > 12.

  10. Colon Carcinoma with Unusual Metastasis to the Esophagus Manifesting as Multiple Nodules and Dysphagia: Management with Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj G. Vashi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the rare clinical case of a 44-year-old gentleman with metastasis from colon carcinoma to the esophagus presenting with multiple nodules and dysphagia, which was successfully managed with systemic chemotherapy. The patient presented at our institution with 3-month history of dysphagia almost 4 years after being operated for stage III carcinoma in the sigmoid colon. Endoscopic findings showed multiple nodules at the gastroesophageal junction and mid esophagus. Histological features and immunostains confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic colon carcinoma. Because of evidence of extensive metastatic disease in the spine and liver requiring systemic therapy, the patient was treated with chemotherapy with irinotecan and cetuximab, with subsequent improvement in tumor markers, liver metastasis and symptoms of dysphagia. Even though repeat endoscopy showed no improvement in esophageal nodules, the overall response to chemotherapy was positive. In conclusion, we present a very rare, previously unreported case of metastases from colon cancer to the esophagus presenting as non-obstructive nodules and dysphagia that responded to systemic chemotherapy.

  11. Vorinostat Combined with High-Dose Gemcitabine, Busulfan, and Melphalan with Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Refractory Lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Yago; Valdez, Benigno C; Thall, Peter F; Ahmed, Sairah; Jones, Roy B; Hosing, Chitra; Popat, Uday; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Gulbis, Alison; Anderlini, Paolo; Alousi, Amin; Shah, Nina; Bashir, Qaiser; Liu, Yan; Oki, Yasuhiro; Hagemeister, Frederick; Fanale, Michelle; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Pinnix, Chelsea; Champlin, Richard; Andersson, Borje S

    2015-11-01

    More active high-dose regimens are needed for refractory/poor-risk relapsed lymphomas. We previously developed a regimen of infusional gemcitabine/busulfan/melphalan, exploiting the synergistic interaction. Its encouraging activity in refractory lymphomas led us to further enhance its use as a platform for epigenetic modulation. We previously observed increased cytotoxicity in refractory lymphoma cell lines when the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat was added to gemcitabine/busulfan/melphalan, which prompted us to clinically study this four-drug combination. Patients ages 12 to 65 with refractory diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL), Hodgkin (HL), or T lymphoma were eligible. Vorinostat was given at 200 mg/day to 1000 mg/day (days -8 to -3). Gemcitabine was infused continuously at 10 mg/m(2)/minute over 4.5 hours (days -8 and -3). Busulfan dosing targeted 4000 μM-minute/day (days -8 to -5). Melphalan was infused at 60 mg/m(2)/day (days -3 and -2). Patients with CD20(+) tumors received rituximab (375 mg/m(2), days +1 and +8). We enrolled 78 patients: 52 DLCL, 20 HL, and 6 T lymphoma; median age 44 years (range, 15 to 65); median 3 prior chemotherapy lines (range, 2 to 7); and 48% of patients had positron emission tomography-positive tumors at high-dose chemotherapy (29% unresponsive). The vorinostat dose was safely escalated up to 1000 mg/day, with no treatment-related deaths. Toxicities included mucositis and dermatitis. Neutrophils and platelets engrafted promptly. At median follow-up of 25 (range, 16 to 41) months, event-free and overall survival were 61.5% and 73%, respectively (DLCL) and 45% and 80%, respectively (HL). In conclusion, vorinostat/gemcitabine/busulfan/melphalan is safe and highly active in refractory/poor-risk relapsed lymphomas, warranting further evaluation. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCI-2011-02891). Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Maximizing therapeutic gain with gemcitabine and fractionated radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka; Hunter, Nancy R.; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Buchmiller, Lara; Kishi, Kazushi; Hittelman, K. Walter; Ang, K. Kian

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The nucleoside analogue gemcitabine inhibits cellular repair and repopulation, induces apoptosis, causes tumor growth delay, and enhances radiation-induced growth delay. After single doses of drug and radiation, maximum enhancement of tumor response was obtained when gemcitabine preceded radiation by at least 24 h. Conversely, the cellular radioresponse of the normal gastrointestinal epithelium was slightly protected when gemcitabine and radiation were separated by 24 h. This differential response created a time frame within which therapeutic gain could be maximized. In our present investigation, we sought to define the most therapeutically beneficial scheme of gemcitabine administration when combined with fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: C3Hf/Kam mice were given identical drug and radiation schedules of administration, and both normal tissue (jejunal mucosa) and tumor (Sa-NH) responses were measured. Irradiation was given once per day for 5 days in normal tissue and tumor growth delay studies and twice per day for the tumor cure endpoint. A total dose of 25 mg/kg gemcitabine was given i.p. in 1 of 3 schedules: a single dose of 25 mg/kg 24 h before the start of fractionated irradiation, 12.5 mg/kg 24 h before the first and third radiation doses, or 24 h before each of 5 radiation doses. Groups of mice bearing 7- or 8-mm diameter tumors were treated with gemcitabine alone or in combination with fractionated irradiation under ambient or hypoxic conditions. The survival response of the jejunal mucosa was quantified by the microcolony assay and histologically by quantifying apoptosis, mitosis, S-phase fraction, and crypt cellularity. Results: For tumor growth delay, dose-modifying factors (DMFs) were similar (1.34-1.46) for all 3 schedules of drug administration. In contrast, the response of the jejunum was strongly dependent on the schedule of gemcitabine administration. A single dose of gemcitabine before the start of fractionated

  13. Ku70 inhibits gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Jiali; Hui, Pingping; Meng, Wenying; Wang, Na; Xiang, Shihao

    2017-01-01

    The current study focused on the role of Ku70, a DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex protein, in pancreatic cancer cell resistance to gemcitabine. In both established cell lines (Mia-PaCa-2 and PANC-1) and primary human pancreatic cancer cells, shRNA/siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ku70 significantly sensitized gemcitabine-induced cell death and proliferation inhibition. Meanwhile, gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and subsequent pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis were also potentiated with Ku70 knockdown. On the other hand, exogenous overexpression of Ku70 in Mia-PaCa-2 cells suppressed gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and subsequent cell apoptosis. In a severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice Mia-PaCa-2 xenograft model, gemcitabine-induced anti-tumor activity was remarkably pontificated when combined with Ku70 shRNA knockdown in the xenografts. The results of this preclinical study imply that Ku70 might be a primary resistance factor of gemcitabine, and Ku70 silence could significantly chemo-sensitize gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • Ku70 knockdown sensitizes gemcitabine-induced killing of pancreatic cancer cells. • Ku70 knockdown facilitates gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis. • Ku70 overexpression deceases gemcitabine's sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells. • Ku70 knockdown sensitizes gemcitabine-induced anti-tumor activity in vivo.

  14. Patterns of Chemotherapy Use in a U.S.-Based Cohort of Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Thomas A; Meyer, Gary; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Wolpin, Brian M; Schrag, Deborah; Fuchs, Charles S

    2017-08-01

    Few population studies have examined patterns of systemic therapy administration in metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) or the predictors associated with specific treatment choices. We assessed 4,011 consecutive MPC patients who received chemotherapy between January 2005 and December 2015 at academic, private, and community-based oncology practices subscribing to a U.S.-wide chemotherapy order entry system capturing disease, patient, provider, and treatment data. Multivariate analyses of these prospectively recorded characteristics identified significant predictors of specific therapeutic choices. Overall, 100 different regimens were used in first-line treatment of MPC. First-line gemcitabine monotherapy usage fell steadily from 72% in 2006 to 16% in 2015. This steep decline mirrored increases in first-line usage of both 5 fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel. Younger male patients were more likely to receive FOLFIRINOX as first-line treatment, whereas patients treated at community practices and by oncologists with lower MPC patient volume were more likely to receive gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel (all p  ≤ .05). Among all patients receiving first-line chemotherapy for MPC, 49% went on to receive second-line therapy and 19% received third-line therapy; administration of second- and third-line therapies increased steadily over the time course of follow-up. Younger patients and those treated by oncologists with higher MPC patient volume were more likely to receive second- and third-line therapies. This population-based study provides insight into treatment patterns of MPC in the U.S. Usage patterns varied greatly according to patient and provider characteristics. This study examined real world metastatic pancreatic cancer treatment patterns in the United States with the goals of understanding changes in chemotherapy treatment frequencies over time and determining the individual predictors that

  15. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azria, David, E-mail: david.azria@icm.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); INSERM, U896, IRCM, Montpellier (France); Riou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Rebillard, Xavier [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Thezenas, Simon [Biostatistics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Thuret, Rodolphe [Department of Urology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane [Department of Medical Oncology, AP-HP Saint-Louis, Paris (France)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  16. Multimodality therapy approaches, local and systemic treatment, compared with chemotherapy alone in recurrent glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Navarria, Pierina; Pessina, Federico; Ascolese, Anna Maria; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Tomatis, Stefano; De Rose, Fiorenza; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Simonelli, Matteo; Clerici, Elena; Soffietti, Riccardo; Santoro, Armando; Cozzi, Luca; Bello, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Long-term local control in Glioblastoma is rarely achieved and nearly all patients relapse. In this study we evaluated the clinical effect of different treatment approaches in recurrent patients. Forty-three patients, with median age of 51 years were evaluated for salvage treatment: re-resection and/or re-irradiation plus chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone. Response was recorded using the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0. Twenty-one patients underwent chemotherapy combined with local treatment, surgery and/or radiation therapy, and 22 underwent chemotherapy only. The median follow up was 7 months (range 3–28 months). The 1 and 2-years Progression Free Survival was 65 and 10 % for combined treatment and 22 and 0 % for chemotherapy alone (p < 0.01). The 1 and 2-years overall survival was 69 and 29 % for combined and 26 and 0 % for chemotherapy alone (p < 0.01). No toxicity greater than grade 2 was recorded. These data showed that in glioblastoma recurrence the combination of several approaches in a limited group of patients is more effective than a single treatment alone. This stress the importance of multimodality treatment whenever clinically feasible

  17. Metastatic Angiosarcoma with Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome Responsive to Gemcitabine and Vinorelbine after Failure of Liposomal Doxorubicin and Paclitaxel: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Read

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS describes a consumptive coagulopathy associated with certain vascular tumors. It is thought that platelets are destroyed as they circulate through the aberrant endothelial surfaces associated with these tumors. Most published literature describes infants with kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, but a similar syndrome can complicate angiosarcoma in adults. This report describes a man with metastatic angiosarcoma arising in the scalp in whom disease progression was complicated by profound thrombocytopenia consistent with KMS. His disease and associated KMS had progressed previously through paclitaxel and then through liposomal doxorubicin. It did not respond to paclitaxel and bevacizumab, but responded almost completely to chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine. Six months later, progression through ongoing chemotherapy then responded to chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and sirolimus.

  18. Phase I trial of gefitinib with concurrent radiotherapy and fixed 2-h gemcitabine infusion, in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Joan; Martin-Richard, Marta; Conill, Carlos; Sanchez, Marcelo; Petriz, Lourdes; Gines, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Gallego, Rosa; Cajal, Rosana; Ayuso, Carmen; Navarro, Salvador; Marmol, Maribel; Nadal, Cristina; Auge, Josep Maria; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano; Gascon, Pere

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancers are resistant to radiotherapy (RT) and current chemotherapy agents. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and in vitro studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors can overcome radio- and chemoresistance. The aim of the study was to determine whether the addition of gefitinib to RT and gemcitabine for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) was feasible and safe. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with pathologically proven LAPC, based on major vascular invasion based on helical computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, were entered into the study. The targeted irradiated volume included the tumor and 2-cm margin. Prophylactic irradiation of regional nodes was not allowed. Patients with >500 cm 3 of planning tumor volume were excluded. An initial cohort of 6 patients was treated with RT (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) plus concomitant gefitinib (250 mg/day). Successive cohorts of patients received 100, 150, and 200 mg/m 2 /day of gemcitabine in a 2-h infusion over Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 with gefitinib (250 mg/day) and RT. Gefitinib was continued after RT until progression. A pharmacodynamic study of angiogenic markers was also performed to evaluate a possible antiangiogenic effect. Results: There were no dose-limiting toxicities. Common toxicities were mild neutropenia, asthenia, diarrhea, cutaneous rash and nausea/vomiting. The median (95% confidence interval [CI]) progression-free survival was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9-5.5) months, and the median overall survival was 7.5 (95% CI 5.2-9.9) months. No significant reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was observed after treatment. Conclusion: Our results support that the combination of gefitinib, RT, and gemcitabine has an acceptable toxicity but with modest activity in LAPC

  19. Complete response in gallbladder cancer to erlotinib plus gemcitabine does not require mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincer Robert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gallbladder cancer typically follows an aggressive course, with chemotherapy the standard of care for advanced disease; complete remissions are rarely encountered. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a promising therapeutic target but the activity of single agent oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors is low. There have been no previous reports of chemotherapy plus an EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI to treat gallbladder cancer or correlations of response with the mutation status of the tyrosine kinase domain of the EGFR gene. Case presentation A 67 year old man with metastatic gallbladder cancer involving the liver and abdominal lymph nodes was treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 every 21 days as well as daily erlotinib (100 mg. After four cycles of therapy, the CA 19-9 normalized and a PET/CT showed a complete remission; this response was maintained by the end of 12 cycles of therapy. Gemcitabine was then discontinued and single agent erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The disease remains in good control 18 months after initiation of therapy, including 6 months on maintenance erlotinib. The only grade 3 toxicity was a typical EGFR-related skin rash. Because of the remarkable response to erlotinib plus gemcitabine, we performed tumor genotyping of the EGFR gene for response predicting mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21. This disclosed the wild-type genotype with no mutations found. Conclusion This case report demonstrates a patient with stage IV gallbladder cancer who experienced a rarely encountered complete, prolonged response after treatment with an oral EGFR-TKI plus chemotherapy. This response occurred in the absence of an EGFR gene mutation. These observations should inform the design of clinical trials using EGFR-TKIs to treat gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; such trials should not select patients based on EGFR mutation status.

  20. Complete response in gallbladder cancer to erlotinib plus gemcitabine does not require mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mody, Kabir; Strauss, Edward; Lincer, Robert; Frank, Richard C

    2010-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer typically follows an aggressive course, with chemotherapy the standard of care for advanced disease; complete remissions are rarely encountered. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising therapeutic target but the activity of single agent oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors is low. There have been no previous reports of chemotherapy plus an EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to treat gallbladder cancer or correlations of response with the mutation status of the tyrosine kinase domain of the EGFR gene. A 67 year old man with metastatic gallbladder cancer involving the liver and abdominal lymph nodes was treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on day 1 and 8 every 21 days as well as daily erlotinib (100 mg). After four cycles of therapy, the CA 19-9 normalized and a PET/CT showed a complete remission; this response was maintained by the end of 12 cycles of therapy. Gemcitabine was then discontinued and single agent erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The disease remains in good control 18 months after initiation of therapy, including 6 months on maintenance erlotinib. The only grade 3 toxicity was a typical EGFR-related skin rash. Because of the remarkable response to erlotinib plus gemcitabine, we performed tumor genotyping of the EGFR gene for response predicting mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21. This disclosed the wild-type genotype with no mutations found. This case report demonstrates a patient with stage IV gallbladder cancer who experienced a rarely encountered complete, prolonged response after treatment with an oral EGFR-TKI plus chemotherapy. This response occurred in the absence of an EGFR gene mutation. These observations should inform the design of clinical trials using EGFR-TKIs to treat gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; such trials should not select patients based on EGFR mutation status

  1. Complete response in gallbladder cancer to erlotinib plus gemcitabine does not require mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Kabir; Strauss, Edward; Lincer, Robert; Frank, Richard C

    2010-10-20

    Gallbladder cancer typically follows an aggressive course, with chemotherapy the standard of care for advanced disease; complete remissions are rarely encountered. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising therapeutic target but the activity of single agent oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors is low. There have been no previous reports of chemotherapy plus an EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to treat gallbladder cancer or correlations of response with the mutation status of the tyrosine kinase domain of the EGFR gene. A 67 year old man with metastatic gallbladder cancer involving the liver and abdominal lymph nodes was treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on day 1 and 8 every 21 days as well as daily erlotinib (100 mg). After four cycles of therapy, the CA 19-9 normalized and a PET/CT showed a complete remission; this response was maintained by the end of 12 cycles of therapy. Gemcitabine was then discontinued and single agent erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The disease remains in good control 18 months after initiation of therapy, including 6 months on maintenance erlotinib. The only grade 3 toxicity was a typical EGFR-related skin rash. Because of the remarkable response to erlotinib plus gemcitabine, we performed tumor genotyping of the EGFR gene for response predicting mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21. This disclosed the wild-type genotype with no mutations found. This case report demonstrates a patient with stage IV gallbladder cancer who experienced a rarely encountered complete, prolonged response after treatment with an oral EGFR-TKI plus chemotherapy. This response occurred in the absence of an EGFR gene mutation. These observations should inform the design of clinical trials using EGFR-TKIs to treat gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; such trials should not select patients based on EGFR mutation status.

  2. Original article Intravesical Gemcitabine for Treatment of Super ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    and prophylaxis in superficial bladder cancer (SBC) as it reduces tumor recurrence and disease progression. About one-third of patients ... Key Words: Superficial bladder cancer, BCG, gemcitabine, intravesical. Corresponding Author: Dr. Mohamed .... immunotherapy has become the standard treatment for high-risk SBC, ...

  3. Cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine-Loaded-Microemulsions in Breast and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of gemcitabine (GEM), incorporated in microemulsions with varying surfactant-to-oil (S/O) ratio, against MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HCT 116 colon cancer cells. Methods: The microemulsion formulations consisted of Tween 80, Span 20, isopropyl myristate (IPM) and aqueous ...

  4. PEG Grafted-Nanodiamonds for the Delivery of Gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingxia; Wang, Yu-Kai; Zhao, Jiacheng; Lu, Hongxu; Stenzel, Martina H; Xiao, Pu

    2016-12-01

    Carboxyl end-functionalized poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] [P(PEGMEMA)] and its block copolymer with gemcitabine substituted poly(N-hydroxysuccinimide methacrylate) [PGem-block-P(PEGMEMA)] are synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Then, two polymers are grafted onto the surface of amine-functionalized nanodiamonds to obtain [P(PEGMEMA)]-grafted nanodiamonds (ND-PEG) and [PGem-block-P(PEGMEMA)]-grafted nanodiamonds (ND-PF). Gemcitabine is physically absorbed to ND-PEG to produce ND-PEG (Gem). Two polymer-grafted nanodiamonds (i.e., with physically absorbed gemcitabine ND-PEG (Gem) and with chemically conjugated gemcitabine ND-PF) are characterized using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analysis. The drug release, cytotoxicity (to seed human pancreatic carcinoma AsPC-1 cells), and cellular uptake of ND-PEG (Gem) and ND-PF are also investigated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-Eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug

  6. Clinical effect of systemic chemotherapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization in treatment of breast cancer with liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Liye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical effect of systemic chemotherapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE in the treatment of breast cancer with liver metastases. MethodsA total of 86 female breast cancer patients with liver metastases who were treated in the Affiliated Hospital of Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences from December 2012 to December 2014 were selected and equally divided into experimental group and control group. The patients in the control group received systemic chemotherapy, and those in the experimental group received systemic chemotherapy combined with TACE. The clinical effect, changes in lesions, and patients′ quality of life (QOL scores after treatment were compared between two groups. The t-test was applied for comparison of continuous data between the two groups, and the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between the two groups. ResultsThe experimental group had a significantly higher overall response rate than the control group (90.70% vs 58.14%, χ2=13.07, P=0.001. Compared with the control group, the experimental group had significantly smaller diameters of tumors and lymph nodes after treatment (t=4.26 and 4.63, both P<0.001, as well as significantly higher QOL scores at 3 and 6 months after treatment (t=6.30 and 3.89, both P<0001. ConclusionSystemic chemotherapy combined with TACE has a significant therapeutic effect in breast cancer patients with liver metastases, and can improve patients′ symptoms, reduce adverse drug reactions, and improve QOL. As a safe and reliable therapeutic method, it is worthy of clinical application.

  7. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer: utility and experience from the clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundranda MN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Madappa N Kundranda, Tomislav Dragovich Division of Hematology and Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest epithelial cancers, primarily due to late diagnosis, early metastasis and the lack of effective treatments. With recent advances in systemic therapies, the median survival for metastatic disease has essentially doubled to approximately 1 year, and a significant number of patients are receiving multiple lines of therapy. One such first-line therapy is the combination of gemcitabine with nab-paclitaxel, which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. This standard option is now serving as a backbone to other novel combinations. In this review, we focus on the development of this combination, its clinical utility, and real-life experiences of managing patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma receiving gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. Keywords: pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, nab-paclitaxel, MPACT trial, PRODIGE 4/ACCORD 11 trial

  8. Disorders of the endocrine system due to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalet, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Panhypopituitarism, infertility, gynaecomastia, impaired growth leading to short stature, failure to undergo normal pubertal development, hyperparathyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid tumours may complicate the treatment of malignant disease. The complexity of modern anti-cancer treatment has made it more difficult to delineate the exact aetiological role of radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy as many patients receive both modalities of therapy. In addition, combination chemotherapy has largely replaced treatment with a single cytotoxic drug, which means that it is often impossible to estimate the contribution of any one single drug to the adverse side effects of chemotherapy. The biological effect of a given radiation treatment regime depends not only on the total radiation dose received but also the method of irradiation, number of fractions, fraction size and duration of irradiation. Only a limited amount of information is available on dose-time relationships for radiation-induced damage to endocrine glands. (author)

  9. Brain damage in relation to irradiation and chemotherapy of central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Similae, S; Heikkinen, E; Blanco, G; Taskinen, P J; Kouvalainen, K; Lanning, M; Saukkonen, A -L [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    1977-05-07

    Measurements have been made of the concentrations of 3',5'-mono-phosphate, protein and sugar, and of the activities of lactic dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate aminotransferase (AsAT), creatine kinase (CK), and acid phosphatase (AcPhos) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during /sup 60/Co CNS radiotherapy and chemotherapy in eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (A.L.L.). The CSF white-blood-cell count of the A.L.L. patients did not differ significantly from that of the controls, but protein content rose and sugar content fell during CNS irradiation and chemotherapy (intrathecal methotrexate). LD and AsAT activities were significantly higher during CNS treatment, and a similar tendency was seen for AcPhos and CK activities. The results provide clear biochemical signs of brain injury caused by prophylactic CNS irradiation and chemotherapy.

  10. Disorders of the endocrine system due to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalet, S M [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK)

    1983-11-01

    Panhypopituitarism, infertility, gynaecomastia, impaired growth leading to short stature, failure to undergo normal pubertal development, hyperparathyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid tumours may complicate the treatment of malignant disease. The complexity of modern anti-cancer treatment has made it more difficult to delineate the exact aetiological role of radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy as many patients receive both modalities of therapy. In addition, combination chemotherapy has largely replaced treatment with a single cytotoxic drug, which means that it is often impossible to estimate the contribution of any one single drug to the adverse side effects of chemotherapy. The biological effect of a given radiation treatment regime depends not only on the total radiation dose received but also the method of irradiation, number of fractions, fraction size and duration of irradiation. Only a limited amount of information is available on dose-time relationships for radiation-induced damage to endocrine glands.

  11. Vinorelbine/carboplatin vs gemcitabine/carboplatin in advanced NSCLC shows similar efficacy, but different impact of toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, N; Sundstrøm, S H; Aasebø, U

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase III study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was conducted to compare vinorelbine/carboplatin (VC) and gemcitabine/carboplatin (GC) regarding efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and toxicity. Chemonaive patients with NSCLC stage IIIB....../IV and WHO performance status 0-2 were eligible. No upper age limit was defined. Patients received vinorelbine 25 mg m(-2) or gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin AUC4 on day 1 and three courses with 3-week cycles. HRQOL questionnaires were completed at baseline, before chemotherapy...... and every 8 weeks until 49 weeks. During 14 months, 432 patients were included (VC, n=218; GC, n=214). Median survival was 7.3 vs 6.4 months, 1-year survival 28 vs 30% and 2-year survival 7 vs 7% in the VC and GC arm, respectively (P=0.89). HRQOL, represented by global QOL, nausea/vomiting, dyspnoea...

  12. Mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Ikenaga, Naoki; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Setoyama, Daiki; Irie, Miho; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Masaharu; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Hashizume, Makoto; Tanaka, Masao

    2014-03-01

    Gemcitabine resistance (GR) is one of the critical issues for therapy for pancreatic cancer, but the mechanism still remains unclear. Our aim was to increase the understanding of GR by metabolic profiling approach. To establish GR cells, 2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and CAPAN-1, were exposed to increasing concentration of gemcitabine. Both parental and chemoresistant cells obtained by this treatment were subjected to metabolic profiling based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistical analyses, both principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, distinguished metabolic signature of responsiveness and resistance to gemcitabine in both SUIT-2 and CAPAN-1 cells. Among significantly different (P metabolic pathways such as amino acid, nucleotide, energy, cofactor, and vitamin pathways. Decreases in glutamine and proline levels as well as increases in aspartate, hydroxyproline, creatine, and creatinine levels were observed in chemoresistant cells from both cell lines. These results suggest that metabolic profiling can isolate distinct features of pancreatic cancer in the metabolome of gemcitabine-sensitive and GR cells. These findings may contribute to the biomarker discovery and an enhanced understanding of GR in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Enhancing chemosensitivity to gemcitabine via RNA interference targeting the catalytic subunits of protein kinase CK2 in human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreutzer, Jan N; Ruzzene, Maria; Guerra, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a complex genetic disorder that is characterized by rapid progression, invasiveness, resistance to treatment and high molecular heterogeneity. Various agents have been used in clinical trials showing only modest improvements with respect to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, which continues to be the standard first-line treatment for this disease. However, owing to the overwhelming molecular alterations that have been reported in pancreatic cancer, there is increasing focus on targeting molecular pathways and networks, rather than individual genes or gene-products with a combination of novel chemotherapeutic agents. Cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the individual CK2 subunits. The CK2 protein expression levels were determined and the effect of its down-regulation on chemosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells was investigated. The present study examined the impact on cell death following depletion of the individual protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunits alone or in combination with gemcitabine and the molecular mechanisms by which this effect is achieved. Depletion of the CK2α or -α' subunits in combination with gemcitabine resulted in marked apoptotic and necrotic cell death in PANC-1 cells. We show that the mechanism of cell death is associated with deregulation of distinct survival signaling pathways. Cellular depletion of CK2α leads to phosphorylation and activation of MKK4/JNK while down-regulation of CK2α' exerts major effects on the PI3K/AKT pathway. Results reported here show that the two catalytic subunits of CK2 contribute differently to enhance gemcitabine-induced cell death, the reduced level of CK2α' being the most effective and that simultaneous reduction in the expression of CK2 and other survival factors might be an effective therapeutic strategy for enhancing the sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer towards chemotherapeutic agents

  14. The effect of chemotherapy on nutritional status and weakness in geriatric gastrointestinal system cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicakli, Derya Hopanci; Ozveren, Ahmet; Uslu, Ruchan; Dalak, Reci Meseri; Cehreli, Ruksan; Uyar, Mehmet; Karabulut, Bulent; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2018-03-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with geriatric gastrointestinal system (GIS) cancer. This study aimed to evaluate patients with geriatric GIS cancer in terms of nutritional status and weakness and determine the changes caused by chemotherapy (CT). Patients with geriatric GIS cancer who received CT were included in the study. Their nutritional status was assessed with the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and weakness was assessed with the handgrip strength/body mass index ratio. After CT (minimum 4 wk and maximum 6 wk later), patients were assessed for the same parameters. A total of 153 patients aged ≥65 y (mean age, 70.5 ± 5.6 y; 44 female and 109 male) were evaluated. The population consisted of patients who were diagnosed with colorectal (51.6%), gastric (26.8%), pancreatic (11.8%), hepatic (7.2%), biliary tract (2%), and esophageal (0.7%) cancer. Of these patients, 37.9% were malnourished, 34.6% were at risk of malnutrition, and 27.5% were well nourished. After one course of CT, the frequency of malnutrition increased to 46.4% (P = 0.001). The patient groups with the highest rates of weakness were those who were diagnosed with biliary tract, hepatic, and colorectal cancer (33.3%, 27.3%, and 20%, respectively). Weakness was significantly increased after one course of CT in patients who received CT before (P = 0.039). Malnutrition and weakness were common in patients with geriatric GIS cancer, and even one course of CT worsened the nutritional status of the patients. Patients who have received CT previously should be carefully monitored for weakness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of isolated nonresectable liver metastases in colorectal cancer patients: a case-control study of isolated hepatic perfusion with melphalan versus systemic chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, L. B. J.; Koopman, M.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Mol, L.; van Persijn van Meerten, E. L.; Hartgrink, H. H.; Kuppen, P. J. K.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Nortier, J. W. R.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Punt, C.; Gelderblom, H.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the median overall survival of patients with isolated nonresectable liver metastases in comparable groups of patients treated with either isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP) with melphalan or systemic chemotherapy. Colorectal cancer patients with isolated liver metastases, who underwent IHP,

  16. Non-cross resistant sequential single agent chemotherapy in first-line advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients: Results of a phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Surmont; J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim); K.Y. Tan; F.M.N.H. Schramel (Franz); R. Vernhout (Rene); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. sequential chemotherapy can maintain dose intensity and preclude cumulative toxicity by increasing drug diversity. Purpose. to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of the sequential regimen of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line advanced stage non-small cell

  17. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kitabayashi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ando, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas and esophageal cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas and esophageal cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells and also taxotel for esophageal cancer. (author)

  18. Flow confirmation study for central venous port in oncologic outpatient undergoing chemotherapy: Evaluation of suspected system-related mechanical complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Arai, Yasuaki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and outcome of a flow confirmation study (FCS) in oncologic outpatients undergoing chemotherapy suspected of a central venous port (CVP) system-related mechanical complication. Materials and methods: A total of 66 patients (27 men, 39 women; mean age, 60 years) received FCS for the following reasons: prolonged infusion time during chemotherapy (n = 32), inability to inject saline fluid (n = 15), lateral neck and/or back pain (n = 6), subcutaneous extravasation of anticancer drug (n = 5), arm swelling (n = 4), and inability to puncture the port (n = 4). FCS consisted of examining the position of CVP, potential secondary shifts or fractures, and integrity of the system using contrast material through the port. Results: Of the 66 patients, 43 had an abnormal finding uncovered by FCS. The most frequent abnormal findings was catheter kinking (n = 22). Explantation and reimplantation of the CVP system was required in 21 of the 66 patients. Remaining 45 patients were able continue using the CVP system after the FCS without any system malfunction. Conclusion: FCS was effective for evaluating CVP system-related mechanical complications and was useful for deciding whether CVP system explantation and reimplantation was required

  19. Flow confirmation study for central venous port in oncologic outpatient undergoing chemotherapy: Evaluation of suspected system-related mechanical complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofue, Keitaro, E-mail: ksofue@ncc.go.jp [Divisions of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki; Takeuchi, Yoshito [Divisions of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and outcome of a flow confirmation study (FCS) in oncologic outpatients undergoing chemotherapy suspected of a central venous port (CVP) system-related mechanical complication. Materials and methods: A total of 66 patients (27 men, 39 women; mean age, 60 years) received FCS for the following reasons: prolonged infusion time during chemotherapy (n = 32), inability to inject saline fluid (n = 15), lateral neck and/or back pain (n = 6), subcutaneous extravasation of anticancer drug (n = 5), arm swelling (n = 4), and inability to puncture the port (n = 4). FCS consisted of examining the position of CVP, potential secondary shifts or fractures, and integrity of the system using contrast material through the port. Results: Of the 66 patients, 43 had an abnormal finding uncovered by FCS. The most frequent abnormal findings was catheter kinking (n = 22). Explantation and reimplantation of the CVP system was required in 21 of the 66 patients. Remaining 45 patients were able continue using the CVP system after the FCS without any system malfunction. Conclusion: FCS was effective for evaluating CVP system-related mechanical complications and was useful for deciding whether CVP system explantation and reimplantation was required.

  20. Use of granisetron transdermal system in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tuca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Albert TucaPalliative Care Hospital Team, Palliative Care Department, Institut Català d’Oncologia, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Until now only intravenous and oral formulations of 5HT3 receptor antagonists have been available. Recently a new formulation of a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, transdermal granisetron, has been developed, and approved by the FDA. Three phase I studies to evaluate its pharmacokinetic profile have shown that granisetron administered by a transdermal delivery system is absorbed by passive diffusion and maximal concentration is reached 48 hours after patch application. The patch of 52 cm2, which contains 34.3 mg of granisetron, releases 3.3 mg of the drug every day and maintains a stable average plasma concentration of 2.2 ng/mL over 6 days, similar to levels obtained with 2 mg of oral granisetron, administered every day during the same period of time. Two randomized as yet unpublished clinical trials (phase II/III have been conducted to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of transdermal granisetron in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy, compared with 2 mg of oral granisetron. More than 800 cancer patients were included in the trials. The rate of complete control of acute emesis was 49% for the phase II trial and 60% for the phase III trial. Neither trial showed a statistically significant difference between transdermal and oral granisetron. The control of delayed emesis was observed in 46% of patients, and there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. The most common adverse effects in both trials were constipation (<7% and headache (<1%; there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. These data show that transdermal granisetron is effective and safe in controlling acute emesis induced by chemotherapy with both moderate and high

  1. Regional intra-arterial vs. systemic chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghua Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of regional intra-arterial chemotherapy (RIAC versus systemic chemotherapy for stage III/IV pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated by regional intra-arterial or systemic chemotherapy were identified using PubMed, ISI, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google, Chinese Scientific Journals Database (VIP, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI electronic databases, for all publications dated between 1960 and December 31, 2010. Data was independently extracted by two reviewers. Odds ratios and relative risks were pooled using either fixed- or random-effects models, depending on I(2 statistic and Q test assessments of heterogeneity. Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan 5.0. RESULTS: Six randomized controlled trials comprised of 298 patients met the standards for inclusion in the meta-analysis, among 492 articles that were identified. Eight patients achieved complete remission (CR with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy (RIAC, whereas no patients achieved CR with systemic chemotherapy. Compared with systemic chemotherapy, patients receiving RIAC had superior partial remissions (RR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.50, 2.65; 58.06% with RIAC and 29.37% with systemic treatment, clinical benefits (RR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.84, 2.97; 78.06% with RAIC and 29.37% with systemic treatment, total complication rates (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.87; 49.03% with RIAC and 71.33% with systemic treatment, and hematological side effects (RR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.63, 0.91; 60.87% with RIAC and 85.71% with systemic treatment. The median survival time with RIAC (5-21 months was longer than for systemic chemotherapy (2.7-14 months. Similarly, one year survival rates with RIAC (28.6%-41.2% were higher than with systemic chemotherapy (0%-12.9%.. CONCLUSION: Regional intra-arterial chemotherapy is more effective and has fewer complications than

  2. Regional intra-arterial vs. systemic chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenghua; Tang, Yong; Sun, Junwei; Yuan, Zhanna; Li, Shasha; Sheng, Jun; Ren, He; Hao, Jihui

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of regional intra-arterial chemotherapy (RIAC) versus systemic chemotherapy for stage III/IV pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated by regional intra-arterial or systemic chemotherapy were identified using PubMed, ISI, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google, Chinese Scientific Journals Database (VIP), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) electronic databases, for all publications dated between 1960 and December 31, 2010. Data was independently extracted by two reviewers. Odds ratios and relative risks were pooled using either fixed- or random-effects models, depending on I(2) statistic and Q test assessments of heterogeneity. Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan 5.0. Six randomized controlled trials comprised of 298 patients met the standards for inclusion in the meta-analysis, among 492 articles that were identified. Eight patients achieved complete remission (CR) with regional intra-arterial chemotherapy (RIAC), whereas no patients achieved CR with systemic chemotherapy. Compared with systemic chemotherapy, patients receiving RIAC had superior partial remissions (RR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.50, 2.65; 58.06% with RIAC and 29.37% with systemic treatment), clinical benefits (RR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.84, 2.97; 78.06% with RAIC and 29.37% with systemic treatment), total complication rates (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.87; 49.03% with RIAC and 71.33% with systemic treatment), and hematological side effects (RR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.63, 0.91; 60.87% with RIAC and 85.71% with systemic treatment). The median survival time with RIAC (5-21 months) was longer than for systemic chemotherapy (2.7-14 months). Similarly, one year survival rates with RIAC (28.6%-41.2%) were higher than with systemic chemotherapy (0%-12.9%.). Regional intra-arterial chemotherapy is more effective and has fewer complications than systemic chemotherapy for treating advanced

  3. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  4. Icotinib plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Shen, Hong; Hu, Han-Guang; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2015-03-21

    A large majority of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have advanced metastatic disease with unresectable malignancies. Despite treatment advances, the survival benefit from chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted drugs is limited. Moreover, their application is limited in China because of high toxicity and cost. Recently, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor activity have shown promise for the treatment of solid cancers when used in combination with standard therapy. However, these drugs have not been evaluated extensively for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report the treatment of a 64-year-old male with metastatic pancreatic cancer using a novel regimen of icotinib with gemcitabine. Marked shrinkage of the mass was observed after two treatment cycles, and partial remission was achieved. The abdominal pain was relieved. The adverse effects were tolerable and treatment cost was acceptable. This is the first reported case for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with icotinib plus gemcitabine and demonstrates a promising therapeutic alternative.

  5. Adjuvant Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy After Resection for Pancreatic Cancer Using Coaxial Catheter-Port System Compared with Conventional System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Sho, Masayuki; Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Masada, Tetsuya; Sato, Takeshi; Marugami, Nagaaki; Anai, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Kanno, Masatoshi; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2016-01-01

    PurposePrevious reports have shown the effectiveness of adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) in pancreatic cancer. However, percutaneous catheter placement is technically difficult after pancreatic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of HAIC using a coaxial technique compared with conventional technique for postoperative pancreatic cancer.Materials and Methods93 consecutive patients who received percutaneous catheter-port system placement after pancreatectomy were enrolled. In 58 patients from March 2006 to August 2010 (Group A), a conventional technique with a 5-Fr indwelling catheter was used and in 35 patients from September 2010 to September 2012 (Group B), a coaxial technique with a 2.7-Fr coaxial catheter was used.ResultsThe overall technical success rates were 97.1 % in Group B and 86.2 % in Group A. In cases with arterial tortuousness and stenosis, the success rate was significantly higher in Group B (91.7 vs. 53.8 %; P = 0.046). Fluoroscopic and total procedure times were significantly shorter in Group B: 14.7 versus 26.7 min (P = 0.001) and 64.8 versus 80.7 min (P = 0.0051), respectively. No differences were seen in the complication rate. The 1 year liver metastasis rates were 9.9 % using the conventional system and 9.1 % using the coaxial system (P = 0.678). The overall median survival time was 44 months. There was no difference in the survival period between two systems (P = 0.312).ConclusionsThe coaxial technique is useful for catheter placement after pancreatectomy, achieving a high success rate and reducing fluoroscopic and procedure times, while maintaining the safety and efficacy for adjuvant HAIC in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Adjuvant Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy After Resection for Pancreatic Cancer Using Coaxial Catheter-Port System Compared with Conventional System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sho, Masayuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Surgery (Japan); Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Masada, Tetsuya; Sato, Takeshi; Marugami, Nagaaki [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Anai, Hiroshi [Nara City Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakaguchi, Hiroshi [Nara Prefectural Western Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kanno, Masatoshi [Nara Medical University, Oncology Center (Japan); Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology (Japan); Nakajima, Yoshiyuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Surgery (Japan); Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    PurposePrevious reports have shown the effectiveness of adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) in pancreatic cancer. However, percutaneous catheter placement is technically difficult after pancreatic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of HAIC using a coaxial technique compared with conventional technique for postoperative pancreatic cancer.Materials and Methods93 consecutive patients who received percutaneous catheter-port system placement after pancreatectomy were enrolled. In 58 patients from March 2006 to August 2010 (Group A), a conventional technique with a 5-Fr indwelling catheter was used and in 35 patients from September 2010 to September 2012 (Group B), a coaxial technique with a 2.7-Fr coaxial catheter was used.ResultsThe overall technical success rates were 97.1 % in Group B and 86.2 % in Group A. In cases with arterial tortuousness and stenosis, the success rate was significantly higher in Group B (91.7 vs. 53.8 %; P = 0.046). Fluoroscopic and total procedure times were significantly shorter in Group B: 14.7 versus 26.7 min (P = 0.001) and 64.8 versus 80.7 min (P = 0.0051), respectively. No differences were seen in the complication rate. The 1 year liver metastasis rates were 9.9 % using the conventional system and 9.1 % using the coaxial system (P = 0.678). The overall median survival time was 44 months. There was no difference in the survival period between two systems (P = 0.312).ConclusionsThe coaxial technique is useful for catheter placement after pancreatectomy, achieving a high success rate and reducing fluoroscopic and procedure times, while maintaining the safety and efficacy for adjuvant HAIC in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes: rationale, potentialities and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cinzia Federico, Valeria M Morittu, Domenico Britti, Elena Trapasso, Donato CoscoDepartment of Health Sciences, Building of BioSciences, University “Magna Græcia” of Catanzaro, Campus Universitario “S Venuta”, Germaneto, ItalyAbstract: This review describes the strategies used in recent years to improve the biopharmaceutical properties of gemcitabine, a nucleoside analog deoxycytidine antimetabolite characterized by activity against many kinds of tumors, by means of liposomal devices. The main limitation of using this active compound is the rapid inactivation of deoxycytidine deaminase following administration in vivo. Consequently, different strategies based on its encapsulation/complexation in innovative vesicular colloidal carriers have been investigated, with interesting results in terms of increased pharmacological activity, plasma half-life, and tumor localization, in addition to decreased side effects. This review focuses on the specific approaches used, based on the encapsulation of gemcitabine in liposomes, with particular attention to the results obtained during the last 5 years. These approaches represent a valid starting point in the attempt to obtain a novel, commercializable drug formulation as already achieved for liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil®, Caelyx®.Keywords: gemcitabine, liposomes, multidrug, poly(ethylene glycol, tumors

  8. Gemcitabine: Selective cytotoxicity, induction of inflammation and effects on urothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farr, Stefanie E; Chess-Williams, Russ; McDermott, Catherine M, E-mail: camcderm@bond.edu.au

    2017-02-01

    Intravesical gemcitabine has recently been introduced for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer and has a favourable efficacy and toxicity profile in comparison to mitomycin c (MMC), the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxic potency of gemcitabine in comparison to MMC in urothelial cell lines derived from non-malignant (UROtsa) and malignant (RT4 and T24) tissues to assess selectivity. Cells were treated with gemcitabine or mitomycin C at concentrations up to the clinical doses for 1 or 2 h respectively (clinical duration). Treatment combined with hyperthermia was also examined. Cell viability, ROS formation, urothelial function (ATP, acetylcholine and PGE2 release) and secretion of inflammatory cytokines were assessed. Gemcitabine displayed a high cytotoxic selectivity for the two malignant cell lines (RT4, T24) compared to the non-malignant urothelial cells (UROtsa, proliferative and non-proliferative). In contrast, the cytotoxic effects of MMC were non-selective with equivalent potency in each of the cell lines. The cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine in the malignant cell lines was associated with an elevation in free radical formation and was significantly decreased in the presence of an equilibrative nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Transient changes in urothelial ATP and PGE{sub 2} release were observed, with significant increase in release of interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and interleukin-1β from urothelial cells treated with gemcitabine. The selectivity of gemcitabine for malignant urothelial cells may account for the less frequent adverse urological effects with comparison to other commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. - Highlights: • Intravesical gemcitabine has recently been introduced to treat bladder cancer. • Gemcitabine is selectively toxic for malignant urothelial cells. • Urothelial ATP, PGE{sub 2} and inflammatory cytokines were altered by gemcitabine. • Selectivity of gemcitabine

  9. Gene aberrations of RRM1 and RRM2B and outcome of advanced breast cancer after treatment with docetaxel with or without gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte Lt; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjerre, Karsten D

    2013-01-01

    according to gene status were investigated by subgroup analyses, and the Wald test was applied. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results FISH analysis for both RRM1 and RRM2B was successful in 251 patients. RRM1 and RRM2B aberrations (deletions and amplifications) were observed in 15.9% and 13...... was not different by gene status. No significant differences were detected in TTP or OS within subgroups according to gene status and chemotherapy regimen. Conclusions This study demonstrated the presence of RRM1 and RRM2B copy number changes in primary breast tumor specimens. Nevertheless, we found no support...... of the hypothesis that aberrations of RRM1 or RRM2B, neither individually nor in combination, are associated with an altered clinical outcome following chemotherapy with gemcitabine in combination with docetaxel compared to docetaxel alone in advanced breast cancer patients....

  10. Transarterial chemoperfusion with gemcitabine and mitomycin C in pancreatic carcinoma: Results in locally recurrent tumors and advanced tumor stages; Transarterielle Chemoperfusion mit Gemcitabine und Mitomycin C bei Pankreaskarzinom: Ergebnisse bei Rezidivtumoren und fortgeschrittenen Tumorstadien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Heller, M.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Bauer, R.W. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, J. W. Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Boecher, E. [Klinik Paradise, Medizinische Klinik, Soest (Germany); Jacob, U. [Leonardisklinik, Onkologische Fachklinik, Bad Heilbrunn (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate local transarterial chemoperfusion (TACP) in locally recurrent pancreatic carcinoma and advanced tumor stages which did not respond to prior systemic chemotherapy. The tumor response, survival, and pain response were retrospectively analyzed. Materials and method: Forty outpatients (median age 62 years, range 36 - 79) were treated with a minimum of 3 (mean 6, range 3 - 12) applications per patient in four-week intervals. Twenty-eight patients were in advanced tumor stages, and 12 patients had locally recurrent tumors. Gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) and mitomycin C (8.5 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered within 1 hour through a celiac trunk catheter. The tumor response (diameter, volume) was measured using MRI or CT and classified according to RECIST. The pain response was defined as a reduction of pain intensity of more than 50% on a visual analog scale, or a reduction of more than 50% in analgesics consumption, or a switch to a less potent analgesic agent. Results: The treatment was tolerated well by all patients. No clinically relevant problems or grade III or IV toxicity according to CTC (Common Toxicity Criteria) were observed. Tumor-related pain was relieved in 20/32 (62.5%) cases. Radiologically, 'complete response' was found in 3/40 (7.5%), 'partial response' in 9/40 (22.5%), 'stable disease' in 16/40 (40%), and 'progressive disease' in 12/40 (30%) of the patients. The median survival period since initial diagnosis and first TACP was 16.4 months and 8.1 months, respectively. Locally recurrent tumors showed better, but still not significant results regarding tumor response (41.7% vs. 25%) as well as survival (14.4 vs. 7 months) compared to advanced tumor stages. Responders (CR + PR) showed a significant survival advantage compared to patients with tumor progression (13.0 vs. 6.0 months; p = 0.013). (orig.)

  11. Modulation of chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by caffeine and chlorogenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susan; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Grant, Gary D; Desbrow, Ben; Lai, Richard; Arora, Devinder; Hong, Yinna

    2017-06-01

    Chemotherapy is an important treatment modality for malignancy but is limited by significant toxicity and it susceptibility to numerous drug interactions. While the interacting effects with medications are well known, there is limited evidence on the interaction with commonly consumed food and natural products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioactive constituents of coffee (caffeine and chlorogenic acid) on the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel in vitro. Pretreatment with caffeine (100 nM and 10 μM) sensitized SH-SY5Y cells to doxorubicin-induced toxicity and increased apoptosis and sensitized PC3 cells to gemcitabine-induced toxicity. Pretreatment with 10 μM caffeine decreased total cell reactive oxygen species (ROS) production but increased mitochondrial ROS production. In contrast, caffeine (10 nM and 10 μM) protected cells against gemcitabine-induced toxicity and apoptosis. Similarly, 1 μM and 10 μM caffeine protected cells against paclitaxel-induced toxicity and mitochondrial ROS production. Chlorogenic acid had no effect on chemotherapy-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, this study provides preliminary evidence that caffeine, not chlorogenic acid, modulates the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel in SH-SY5Y cells via different mechanisms.

  12. A case of progressive hypertension preceding gemcitabine-associated thrombotic microangiopathy complicated by acute kidney injury and stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Gemcitabine-associated thrombotic microangiopathy is being increasingly recognized as a serious complication of treatment. We report a normotensive patient who developed progressive hypertension after commencing gemcitabine therapy. She also developed subtle changes in her platelet count and serum creatinine months before her emergent presentation. Clinicians should be aware of new onset or worsening hypertension and \\'mild\\' biochemical changes in gemcitabine-treated patients.

  13. Comparative effectiveness and safety of nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin vs gemcitabine plus carboplatin in first-line treatment of advanced squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer in a US community oncology setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudad R

    2017-10-01

    nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin than the gemcitabine plus carboplatin group. No differences in supportive care use were observed between the cohorts.Conclusion: These real-world data support the effectiveness and safety of nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin for first-line treatment of advanced squamous cell NSCLC. Keywords: chemotherapy, doublet treatment options, electronic medical records, NSCLC, real-world evidence, retrospective analysis

  14. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  15. Synergistic interaction between cisplatin and gemcitabine in neuroblastoma cell lines and multicellular tumor spheroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besançon, Odette G.; Tytgat, Godelieve A. M.; Meinsma, Rutger; Leen, René; Hoebink, Jerry; Kalayda, Ganna V.; Jaehde, Ulrich; Caron, Huib N.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and mechanism of action of cisplatin and gemcitabine were investigated in a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines and multicellular tumor spheroids. In neuroblastoma spheroids, the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine induced a complete cytostasis at clinical relevant concentrations. A

  16. An overview of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the multimodality treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasello, G; Ceresoli, G L; Favaretto, A

    2013-02-01

    Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour with poor prognosis and increasing incidence in industrialized countries because of the previous widespread exposure to asbestos fibres and to the long lag period from time of exposure and the diagnosis of the disease. MPM shows high refractoriety to systemic treatment, single-modality treatment was generally ineffective and did not achieve higher results than supportive care. The incidence of local and distant recurrences after surgery remains high and that was the reason for many centres to perform combined treatments. In the attempt of reducing the incidence of local recurrences, a multimodality approach with surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy was explored. Extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) allows higher doses of radiotherapy to the whole hemithorax by avoiding pulmonary toxicity and the results of this approach is a significant reduction of loco-regional relapses; although, extrathoracic metastasis represent a major problem in the management of the disease because of the impact on overall survival. The success with surgical resection after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage IIIA lung cancer has been the impetus for several groups to apply this strategy in MPM aiming at reducing the incidence of distant relapse after surgery. Platinum-based chemotherapy plus gemcitabine or pemetrexed for 3-4 cycles followed by surgery and postoperative high-dose radiotherapy showed the best results in terms of overall and progression free survival. This review will focus on the main clinical studies and overview the results of different chemotherapy regimens in the neoadjuvant treatment of MPM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fatal Candida septic shock during systemic chemotherapy in lung cancer patient receiving corticosteroid replacement therapy for hypopituitarism. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morichika, Daisuke; Sato-Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis has increased as nosocomial infection recently in cancer patients who receive systemic chemotherapy, and the timely risk assessment for developing such specific infection is crucial. Especially in those concomitantly with hypopituitarism, febrile neutropenia with candidiasis can cause severe stress and lead potentially to sudden fatal outcome when the temporal steroid coverage for the adrenal insufficiency is not fully administered. We report a 72-year-old male case diagnosed as non-small-cell lung cancer, Stage 3A. He had received a steroid replacement therapy for the prior history of hypophysectomy due to pituitary adenoma with hydrocortisone of 3.3 mg/day, equivalent to prednisolone of 0.8 mg/day. This very small dosage of steroid was hardly supposed to weaken his immune system, but rather potentially led to an inappropriate supplementation of his adrenal function, assuming that the serum sodium and chlorine levels decreased. On Day 6 of second cycle of chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, he developed sudden febrile neutropenia, septic shock and ileus, leading to death. After his death, the venous blood culture on Day 7 detected Candida albicans. Autopsy findings showed a massive necrotizing enterocolitis with extensive Candida invasion into submucous tissue. In conclusion, this case may suggest that (1) immediate initiation of antifungal therapy soon after the careful risk assessment of Candida infection and (2) adequate administration of both basal steroid replacement therapy and temporal steroid coverage for febrile neutropenia might have improved his fatal outcome. (author)

  18. PET in patients with advanced hypopharynx carcinoma and undergoing systemic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, U.A.; Strauss, L.G.; Dimitrakopoulou, A.; Knopp, M.V.; Schadel, A.; Helus, F.; Doll, J.K.; van Kaick, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how they have preformed 10 double examinations with positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 deoxyglucose (FDG) before and after one chemotherapeutic cycle with cisplatin and fluorouracil (5-FU). Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 12 mCi of FDG, three PET images of the tumor region were acquired. The volume of the tumor and/or involved lymph nodes was calculated from CT cross sections. The standardized FDG uptake was increased in all tumors prior to chemotherapeutic treatment (range, 1.28-2.97 DAR). After chemotherapy, the authors notes a decrease in tumor metabolism and tumor volume in eight patients (range, 1.4-2.32 DAR), while in two patients the FDG uptake was unchanged. A correlation coefficient of r =.78 was found for the change in FDG uptake and tumor growth rate. As results demonstrated, PET offers the possibility to study changes of tumor metabolism during chemotherapy and therefore may be used to optimize therapy regimens

  19. Targeting the Warburg effect with a novel glucose transporter inhibitor to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, I-Lu; Chou, Chih-Chien; Lai, Po-Ting; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Shirley, Lawrence A.; Yan, Ribai; Mo, Xiaokui; Bloomston, Mark; Kulp, Samuel K.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Gemcitabine resistance remains a significant clinical challenge. Here, we used a novel glucose transporter (Glut) inhibitor, CG-5, as a proof-of-concept compound to investigate the therapeutic utility of targeting the Warburg effect to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer. The effects of gemcitabine and/or CG-5 on viability, survival, glucose uptake and DNA damage were evaluated in gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis of gemcitabine resistance and the mechanism of CG-5-induced sensitization to gemcitabine. The effects of CG-5 on gemcitabine sensitivity were investigated in a xenograft tumor model of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer. In contrast to gemcitabine-sensitive pancreatic cancer cells, the resistant Panc-1 and Panc-1GemR cells responded to gemcitabine by increasing the expression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 catalytic subunit (RRM2) through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation. Acting as a pan-Glut inhibitor, CG-5 abrogated this gemcitabine-induced upregulation of RRM2 through decreased E2F1 expression, thereby enhancing gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and inhibition of cell survival. This CG-5-induced inhibition of E2F1 expression was mediated by the induction of a previously unreported E2F1-targeted microRNA, miR-520f. The addition of oral CG-5 to gemcitabine therapy caused greater suppression of Panc-1GemR xenograft tumor growth in vivo than either drug alone. Glut inhibition may be an effective strategy to enhance gemcitabine activity for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24879635

  20. Use of granisetron transdermal system in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuca, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Until now only intravenous and oral formulations of 5HT 3 receptor antagonists have been available. Recently a new formulation of a 5HT 3 receptor antagonist, transdermal granisetron, has been developed, and approved by the FDA. Three phase I studies to evaluate its pharmacokinetic profile have shown that granisetron administered by a transdermal delivery system is absorbed by passive diffusion and maximal concentration is reached 48 hours after patch application. The patch of 52 cm 2 , which contains 34.3 mg of granisetron, releases 3.3 mg of the drug every day and maintains a stable average plasma concentration of 2.2 ng/mL over 6 days, similar to levels obtained with 2 mg of oral granisetron, administered every day during the same period of time. Two randomized as yet unpublished clinical trials (phase II/III) have been conducted to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of transdermal granisetron in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy, compared with 2 mg of oral granisetron. More than 800 cancer patients were included in the trials. The rate of complete control of acute emesis was 49% for the phase II trial and 60% for the phase III trial. Neither trial showed a statistically significant difference between transdermal and oral granisetron. The control of delayed emesis was observed in 46% of patients, and there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. The most common adverse effects in both trials were constipation (<7%) and headache (<1%); there were no statistically significant differences between transdermal and oral granisetron. These data show that transdermal granisetron is effective and safe in controlling acute emesis induced by chemotherapy with both moderate and high emetogenic potential. Efficacy and safety of transdermal granisetron are fully comparable with that of oral granisetron. More clinical trials using regimens of 2 or 3 drugs

  1. Feasibility and safety of transfemoral intra-arterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer using a 3-French catheter system: comparison with a 4-French catheter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Akira; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Kanki, Akihiko; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    To assess the technical feasibility of transfemoral intra-arterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer using a 3-French catheter system (3-Fr). Sixty-two patients with head and neck cancer who underwent transfemoral intra-arterial chemotherapy were included in this study. Thirty-three patients underwent treatment using a 3-Fr (group 3-Fr). Twenty-nine patients underwent treatment using a 4-French catheter system (group 4-Fr). The technical success rate, duration of the procedure with fluoroscopy, and rate of procedure-related complications were compared between group 3-Fr and group 4-Fr. In addition, in group 3-Fr, bleeding at the puncture site after 1.5 h of bed rest was evaluated. The technical success rate was 100% in both groups. The duration of the procedure with fluoroscopy didn't differ between group 3-Fr (mean 28.0 min) and group 4-Fr (mean 30.2 min) (p = 0.524). There was no procedure-related complication in either group. In group 3-Fr, no hemorrhagic complication was observed. A 3-French catheter system can be used to perform transfemoral intra-arterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer and is technically feasible with approximately the same duration of the procedure with fluoroscopy. Furthermore, this method may shorten the bed rest time without hemorrhagic complication, and may reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism.

  2. Immediate versus deferred chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (EORTC 30994)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Skoneczna, Iwona; Kerst, J Martijn

    2015-01-01

    and bilateral lymphadenectomy, with no evidence of any microscopic residual disease. Within 90 days of cystectomy, patients were centrally randomly assigned (1:1) by minimisation to either immediate adjuvant chemotherapy (four cycles of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, high-dose methotrexate, vinblastine...

  3. Complications in the central nervous system during chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. JACLS ALL-02 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Katsutsugu; Yoshida, Makoto; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated central nervous system (CNS) complications treated under the ALL-02 protocol of the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) from April 2002 to March 2005. According to National Cancer Institute (NCI) Toxicity Criteria, 17 events of grade 3 and 4 CNS complications were reported in 15 out of 541 patients. Out of these CNS complications, leukoencephalopathy was seen in 5 patients; seizure in 5; cerebrovascular disease in 3; conscious disturbance in 2; and hypertensive encephalopathy and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in one patient each. The complications were intensively observed during induction therapy and the last of the early phase chemotherapy. The protocol treatment was stopped or modified in most patients after CNS complications. MRI imaging demonstrated no improvement in one patient with leukoencephalopathy who developed an isolated CNS relapse, while other patients were alive and remain in their first complete remission without any neurological sequelae. Further studies will be required to analyze risk factors for CNS complications during chemotherapy not accompanied by irradiation and to establish alternative treatments after the appearance of such CNS complications. (author)

  4. Chemotherapy in conjoint aging-tumor systems: some simple models for addressing coupled aging-cancer dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witten Tarynn M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we consider two approaches to examining the complex dynamics of conjoint aging-cancer cellular systems undergoing chemotherapeutic intervention. In particular, we focus on the effect of cells growing conjointly in a culture plate as a precursor to considering the larger multi-dimensional models of such systems. Tumor cell growth is considered from both the logistic and the Gompertzian case, while normal cell growth of fibroblasts (WI-38 human diploid fibroblasts is considered as logistic only. Results We demonstrate, in a simple approach, how the interdependency of different cell types in a tumor, together with specifications of for treatment, can lead to different evolutionary patterns for normal and tumor cells during a course of therapy. Conclusions These results have significance for understanding appropriate pharmacotherapy for elderly patients who are also undergoing chemotherapy.

  5. The development of orally administrable gemcitabine prodrugs with D-enantiomer amino acids: enhanced membrane permeability and enzymatic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Incecayir, Tuba; Song, Xueqin; Hilfinger, John M; Amidon, Gordon L

    2014-04-01

    Gemcitabine prodrugs with D- and L-configuration amino acids were synthesized and their chemical stability in buffers, resistance to glycosidic bond metabolism, enzymatic activation, permeability in Caco-2 cells and mouse intestinal membrane, anti-proliferation activity in cancer cell were determined and compared to that of parent drug, gemcitabine. Prodrugs containing D-configuration amino acids were enzymatically more stable than ones with L-configuration amino acids. The activation of all gemcitabine prodrugs was 1.3-17.6-fold faster in cancer cell homogenate than their hydrolysis in buffer, suggesting enzymatic action. The enzymatic activation of amino acid monoester prodrugs containing D-configuration amino acids in cell homogenates was 2.2-10.9-fold slower than one of amino acid monoester prodrugs with L-configuration amino acids. All prodrugs exhibited enhanced resistance to glycosidic bond metabolism by thymidine phosphorylase compared to parent gemcitabine. Gemcitabine prodrugs showed superior the effective permeability in mouse jejunum to gemcitabine. More importantly, the high plasma concentration of d-amino acid gemcitabine prodrugs was observed more than one of L-amino acid gemcitabine prodrugs. In general, the 5'-mono-amino acid monoester gemcitabine prodrugs exhibited higher permeability and uptake than their parent drug, gemcitabine. Cell proliferation assays in AsPC-1 pancreatic ductal cell line indicated that gemcitabine prodrugs were more potent than their parent drug, gemcitabine. The transport and enzymatic profiles of 5'-D-valyl-gemcitabine and 5'-D-phenylalanyl-gemcitabine suggest their potential for increased oral uptake and delayed enzymatic bioconversion as well as enhanced uptake and cytotoxic activity in cancer cells, would facilitate the development of oral dosage form for anti-cancer agents and, hence, improve the quality of life for the cancer patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. [The efficacy of large spot indirect ophthalmoscopy laser alone or combined with systemic chemotherapy in retinoblastoma therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J H; Cheng, Y; Deng, X; Yu, Y Y; Li, X X

    2016-10-11

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of large spot indirect ophthalmoscopy laser alone or combined with systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of early and middle stage retinoblastoma. Methods: Retrospective series case study. Clinical data of 21 patients (22 eyes) who were diagnosed as retinoblastoma (RB) in Peking University People's Hospital from March 2009 to August 2014 were collected. Medical and family history, ocular ultrasound, orbital and cranial MRI or CT examination of RB Children were detailed recorded. Ocular examination and laser treatment were performed under general anesthesia, once every 3-4 weeks until the tumor was under control. The observation period was at least 3 months after the last treatment. The ocular examination included intraocular pressure measurement, anterior segment and fundus examination and the fundus photography with Retcam. Laser therapeutic instrument was large spot indirect ophthalmoscopy laser of 810nm wavelength. Results: Of the 21 children, 16 were male and 5 were female. The range of age was 3 to 82 months averaged 17.3 months. Among 22 eyes, four with small tumor, eight with medium tumor, and ten with large tumor. Two eyes underwent laser treatment only and 20 eyes underwent laser treatment combined with systemic chemotherapy. During the average observation period of 33.9 months, 15 tumors were treated successfully, but 7 failed. The total success rate was 68.2%. The number and success rate of small, medium and large tumor eyes were 4 (100%), 5 (62.5%) and 5 (50%), respectively. There was one case of tumor brain metastases, and the classification of contralateral eye of the child was E phase. Iris burns happened in one eye, obvious vitreous proliferation in one eye and mild vitreous hemorrhage occurred in two eyes, which did not affect the treatment of laser. However, obvious tumor hemorrhage happened in two eyes and affected laser therapy. There was no complicated cataract, iatrogenic retinal hole and tumor intravitreal

  7. Effect of pretreatment psoas muscle mass on survival for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer undergoing systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Noriko; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Akio; Miyamoto, Yuho; Yuri, Yukihisa; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Takata, Ryo; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2017-11-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there are few previous studies that have investigated the effect of decreased skeletal muscle mass (DSMM) on survival in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) who are undergoing systemic chemotherapy. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the impact of DSMM, as determined by the psoas muscle index (PMI) following computed tomography and prior to systemic chemotherapy, on the outcomes of patients with unresectable APC (n=61). The primary endpoint used was the overall survival (OS) rate. The OS rates in the PMI-High group (exceeds the median PMI value in each gender) were retrospectively compared with those in the PMI-Low group (below the median PMI value in each gender), and factors associated with OS were investigated using univariate and multivariate analyses. The study cohort included 31 male and 30 female patients with a median age of 72 years, 13 of whom were stage IVA, and 48 were stage IVB. The median PMI in males was 4.3 cm 2 /m 2 (range, 1.6-8.2 cm 2 /m 2 ), while that in females was 2.3 cm 2 /m 2 (range, 0.7-6.1 cm 2 /m 2 ). The proportion of patients with performance status 0 in the PMI-High group was significantly high, compared with that in the PMI-Low group [83.3% (25/30) vs. 58.1% (18/31); P=0.0486]. Body mass index in the PMI-High group was significantly higher compared with that in the PMI-Low group (P=0.0154). The 1-year cumulative survival rate was 43.3% in the PMI-High group and 12.9% in the PMI-Low group (P=0.0027). Following multivariate analysis, PMI (P=0.0036), prothrombin time (P=0.0044) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (P=0.0451) were identified to be significant predictors of OS. In conclusion, DSMM, as determined by the PMI, could be a significant predictor of prognosis in patients with unresectable APC who are receiving systemic chemotherapy.

  8. TIMP-1 and responsiveness to gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte Levin Tykjær; Bjerre, Christina Annette; Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen

    2014-01-01

    receiving GD. CONCLUSIONS: TIMP-1 status was an independent prognostic factor for OS but not TTP in patients with advanced breast cancer receiving either D or GD. There was no statistically significant interaction between TIMP-1 status and treatment, but a trend towards an incremental OS from the addition...... and predictive marker in advanced breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel (D) or gemcitabine plus docetaxel (GD). METHODS: Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who were assigned to D or GD by participation in a randomized phase III trial were included in the study. Assessment of TIMP-1...

  9. Evaluation of a mobile phone-based, advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) in the management of chemotherapy-related toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, N; McCann, L; Norrie, J; Taylor, L; Gray, P; McGee-Lennon, M; Sage, M; Miller, M; Maguire, R

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a mobile phone-based, remote monitoring, advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) on the incidence, severity and distress of six chemotherapy-related symptoms (nausea, vomiting, fatigue, mucositis, hand-foot syndrome and diarrhoea) in patients with lung, breast or colorectal cancer. A two group (intervention and control) by five time points (baseline, pre-cycle 2, pre-cycle 3, pre-cycle 4 and pre-cycle 5) randomised controlled trial. Seven clinical sites in the UK; five specialist cancer centres and two local district hospitals. One hundred and twelve people with breast, lung or colorectal cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy. A mobile phone-based, remote monitoring, advanced symptom management system (ASyMS). Chemotherapy-related morbidity of six common chemotherapy-related symptoms (nausea, vomiting, fatigue, mucositis, hand-foot syndrome and diarrhoea). There were significantly higher reports of fatigue in the control group compared to the intervention group (odds ratio = 2.29, 95%CI = 1.04 to 5.05, P = 0.040) and reports of hand-foot syndrome were on average lower in the control group (odds ratio control/intervention = 0.39, 95%CI = 0.17 to 0.92, P = 0.031). The study demonstrates that ASyMS can support the management of symptoms in patients with lung, breast and colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy.

  10. Zielgerichtete Chemotherapie solider Tumoren durch thermosensitive Liposomen in Kombination mit Doxorubicin, Gemcitabin und Mitomycin C

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Auf DPPG2 basierende thermosensitive Liposomen (TSL) mit Hyperthermie (HT) induzierter zielgerichteter Wirkstofffreisetzung sind eine viel-versprechende Behandlungsstrategie in der Krebstherapie. TSL können als Wirkstoffträgersysteme die Zirkulationszeit und Anreicherung von Wirkstoffen im Zielgewebe erhöhen. Die vielfältigen Krebserkrankungen zeigen unterschiedliches Tumoransprechen auf die routinemäßig eingesetzten Zytostatika. Daher wäre es vorteilhaft, verschiedene Wirkstoffe in TSL e...

  11. A phase II trial of Cremorphor EL-free paclitaxel (Genexol-PM) and gemcitabine in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hee Kyung; Jung, Minkyu; Sym, Sun Jin; Shin, Dong Bok; Kang, Shin Myung; Kyung, Sun Young; Park, Jeong-Woong; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Cho, Eun Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Genexol-PM is a Cremorphor EL (CrEL)-free polymeric micelle formulation of paclitaxel that allows higher-dose administration with less hypersensitivity. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Genexol-PM and gemcitabine combination in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients as a first-line treatment. This is a prospective, single-arm, single-center phase II study. Patients with advanced NSCLC received Genexol-PM at 230 mg/m(2) on day 1 and gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on day 1 and day 8 of a 3-week cycle. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned unless there was disease progression. The primary endpoint was overall response rate. Forty-three patients received the study drugs with a median of 4 cycles per patient (range 1-6). The overall response rate was 46.5%. The median progression-free survival was 4.0 months (95% CI 2.0-6.0 months), and median overall survival was 14.8 months (95% CI 9.1-20.5 months). The most common toxicities were anemia (n = 29, 67%), asthenia (n = 17, 40%), myalgia (n = 16, 37%), peripheral neuropathy (n = 15, 35 %), and diarrhea (n = 12, 30%). The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (n = 7, 16%) and pneumonia (n = 5, 12%). Two patients died of pneumonia and dyspnea. CrEL-free paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine demonstrated favorable antitumor activity with little emetogenicities in non-small cell lung cancer patients. However, frequent grade 3/4 toxicities were observed, and safety should be evaluated thoroughly in future studies.

  12. Three-dimensional collagen I promotes gemcitabine resistance in vitro in pancreatic cancer cells through HMGA2-dependent histone acetyltransferase expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Dangi-Garimella

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is associated with a pronounced collagen-rich stromal reaction that has been shown to contribute to chemo-resistance. We have previously shown that PDAC cells are resistant to gemcitabine chemotherapy in the collagen microenvironment because of increased expression of the chromatin remodeling protein high mobility group A2 (HMGA2. We have now found that human PDAC tumors display higher levels of histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation in fibrotic regions. We show that relative to cells grown on tissue culture plastic, PDAC cells grown in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation, along with increased expression of p300, PCAF and GCN5 histone acetyltransferases (HATs. Knocking down HMGA2 attenuates the effect of collagen on histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and on collagen-induced p300, PCAF and GCN5 expression. We also show that human PDAC tumors with HMGA2 demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation. Additionally, we show that cells in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased protection against gemcitabine. Significantly, down-regulation of HMGA2 or p300, PCAF and GCN5 HATs sensitizes the cells to gemcitabine in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, our results increase our understanding of how the collagen microenvironment contributes to chemo-resistance in vitro and identify HATs as potential therapeutic targets against this deadly cancer.

  13. Asymptotic analysis and optimal control of an integro-differential system modelling healthy and cancer cells exposed to chemotherapy

    KAUST Repository

    Pouchol, Camille

    2017-10-27

    We consider a system of two coupled integro-differential equations modelling populations of healthy and cancer cells under chemotherapy. Both populations are structured by a phenotypic variable, representing their level of resistance to the treatment. We analyse the asymptotic behaviour of the model under constant infusion of drugs. By designing an appropriate Lyapunov function, we prove that both cell densities converge to Dirac masses. We then define an optimal control problem, by considering all possible infusion protocols and minimising the number of cancer cells over a prescribed time frame. We provide a quasi-optimal strategy and prove that it solves this problem for large final times. For this modelling framework, we illustrate our results with numerical simulations, and compare our optimal strategy with periodic treatment schedules.

  14. Gemcitabine treatment of rat soft tissue sarcoma with phosphatidyldiglycerol-based thermosensitive liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Simone; Hahn, Jasmin; Schmidt, Rebecca; Wachholz, Kirsten; Zengerle, Anja; Lechner, Katharina; Eibl, Hansjörg; Issels, Rolf D; Hossann, Martin; Lindner, Lars H

    2014-09-01

    The pyrimidine analogue gemcitabine (dFdC) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with solid tumors. However, after i.v. application dFdC is rapidly inactivated by metabolization. Here, the potential of thermosensitive liposomes based on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphodiglycerol (DPPG2-TSL) were investigated as carrier and targeting system for delivery of dFdC in combination with local hyperthermia (HT). DPPG2-TSL were prepared by the lipid film hydration and extrusion method and characterized by dynamic light scattering, thin layer chromatography, phosphate assay and HPLC. In vivo experiments were performed in Brown Norway rats with a syngeneic soft tissue sarcoma. Local HT treatment was performed by light exposure. DPPG2-TSL were stable at 37°C in serum and showed a temperature dependent dFdC release >40°C. Plasma half-life of dFdC was strongly increased from 0.07 h (non-liposomal) to 0.53 h (liposomal, vesicle size 105 nm) or 2.59 h (liposomal, 129 nm). Therapy of BN175 tumors with dFdC encapsulated in DPPG2-TSL + HT showed significant improvement in tumor growth delay compared to non-liposomal dFdC without HT (p < 0.05), non-liposomal dFdC with HT (p < 0.01), and liposomal dFdC without HT (p < 0.05), respectively. Gemcitabine encapsulated in DPPG2-TSL in combination with local HT is a promising tool for the treatment of solid tumors. Therefore, these encouraging results ask for further investigation and evaluation.

  15. Preliminary Experience with Locoregional Intraarterial Chemotherapy of Uterine Cervical or Endometrial Cancer Using the Peripheral Implantable Port System (PIPSTM): A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Heber, Ralf; Boos, Irene; Goettmann, Dieter; Heinrich, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of a percutaneously implantable catheter port system (PIPS)for repeated intraarterial locoregional chemotherapy (ILC) for cervical and endometrial carcinoma. In 30 patients with advanced, recurrent, or high-risk cervical (n 23) or endometrial(n = 7) carcinoma, PIPS for ILC was implanted via a femoral access, the catheter localized in the infrarenal abdominal aorta. Chemotherapy was performed adjuvantly after surgery(n = 14) or neo-adjuvantly to enable surgery, or for palliation (n = 16). Port implantation, catheter placement, and repeated port puncture was uneventful in all patients.Complications included catheter dislocation (n = 1),catheter thrombosis (n = 2), subcutaneous infection(n = 1), port-bed skin atrophy (n = 1),requiring port explantation in 3 patients. At 2 years follow-up,complete remission was observed in 7/14 patients with adjuvant chemotherapy, partial remission in 3/14. Successful down-staging could be achieved in 4/8 patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. The PIPS is suitable for repeated ILC which may be a valuable method for pre- and post-surgical therapy of advanced or high-risk cervical and endometrial cancer, for adjuvant chemotherapy as well as neo-adjuvantly for down-staging, or for palliation

  16. Inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong DJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dao-Jun Gong,1 Jia-Min Zhang,1 Min Yu,1 Bo Zhuang,1 Qing-Qu Guo21Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Pancreatic carcinoma possesses one of the highest lethality rates, highest drug-resistance, and highest incidence rates. The objective of this research was to enhance the efficacy and drug-resistance for pancreatic carcinoma by using inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy methods.Methods: Three pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1 cells, BxPC-3 cells, and SW1990 cells received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vitro; then BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice also received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo.Results: The cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP-1 effect of drug in pancreatic carcinoma cells was significantly different (P < 0.05 and the efficacy in descending order was the combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine, inhibition of SIRT1, and gemcitabine. The BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo and the results showed that the tumor volumes decreased and the survival rate within 45 days increased according to the order of the given drugs and the difference was significant (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine could improve efficacy and survival time in a BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model, compared with single inhibition of SIRT1, or single

  17. Gemcitabine radiosensitizes multiple myeloma cells to low let, but not high let, irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, Stephane; Thillays, Francois; Rio, Emmanuel; Gouard, Sebastien; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Mahe, Marc-Andre; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Davodeau, Francois; Cherel, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The radiosensitizing properties of gemcitabine in relation to low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) particles (Cobalt 60) and high-LET particles (alpha-RIT 213 Bi-radiolabeled CHX-DTPA-B-B4) were analyzed. Three multiple myeloma cell lines (LP1, RPMI 8226, U266) were irradiated with or without 10 nM gemcitabine 24 h prior to radiation. Gemcitabine led to radiosensitization of LP1 and U266 cells with low-LET (Radiation Enhancement Ratio: 1.55 and 1.49, respectively) but did not radiosensitize any cell line when combined with high-LET

  18. Stability-Indicating HPLC Determination of Gemcitabine in Pharmaceutical Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shakya, Ashok K.; Naik, Rajashri; Shalan, Naeem

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, inexpensive, and rapid stability indicating high performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for determination of gemcitabine in injectable dosage forms using theophylline as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Luna C-18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 5μ) with a mobile phase consisting of 90% water and 10% acetonitrile (pH 7.00 ± 0.05). The signals of gemcitabine and theophylline were recorded at 275 nm. Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 0.5–50 μg/mL. The correlation coefficient was 0.999 or higher. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.1498 and 0.4541 μg/mL, respectively. The inter- and intraday precision were less than 2%. Accuracy of the method ranged from 100.2% to 100.4%. Stability studies indicate that the drug was stable to sunlight and UV light. The drug gives 6 different hydrolytic products under alkaline stress and 3 in acidic condition. Aqueous and oxidative stress conditions also degrade the drug. Degradation was higher in the alkaline condition compared to other stress conditions. The robustness of the methods was evaluated using design of experiments. Validation reveals that the proposed method is specific, accurate, precise, reliable, robust, reproducible, and suitable for the quantitative analysis. PMID:25838825

  19. An Intergroup Randomized Phase II Study of Bevacizumab or Cetuximab in Combination with Gemcitabine and in Combination with Chemoradiation in Patients with Resected Pancreatic Carcinoma: A Trial of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E2204).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Jordan D; Feng, Yang; Catalano, Paul; Abbruzzese, James L; Philip, Philip A; McWilliams, Robert R; Lowy, Andrew M; Benson, Al B; Blackstock, A William

    2018-01-01

    Evaluate toxicity of two treatment arms, A (cetuximab) and B (bevacizumab), when combined with gemcitabine, and chemoradiation in patients with completely resected pancreatic carcinoma. Secondary objectives included overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Patients with R0/R1 resection were randomized 1:1 to cetuximab or bevacizumab administered in combination with gemcitabine for two treatment cycles. Next three cycles included concurrent cetuximab/bevacizumab plus chemoradiation, followed by one cycle of cetuximab/bevacizumab. Cycles 7-12 included cetuximab/bevacizumab with gemcitabine. Cycles were 2 weeks. Frequency of specific toxicities was summarized for each treatment arm at two times during the study, after chemotherapy but prior to chemoradiation and after all therapy. A total of 127 patients were randomized (A, n = 65; B, n = 62). Prior to chemoradiation, the overall rate for toxicities of interest was 10% for arm A and 2% for arm B. After all therapy, the overall rates for toxicities of interest were 30 and 25% for arms A and B, respectively. Overall median OS and DFS were 17 and 11 months, respectively, which is not a significant improvement over expected survival rates for historical controls. Both treatments were tolerable with manageable toxicities, and were safe enough for a phase III trial had this been indicated. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Combined CT-guided radiofrequency ablation with systemic chemotherapy improves the survival for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with oligometastasis in liver: Propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wang; Bai, Yutong; Wu, Ming; Shen, Lujun; Shi, Feng; Sun, Xuqi; Lin, Caijin; Chang, Boyang; Pan, Changchuan; Li, Zhiwen; Wu, Peihong

    2017-08-08

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the treatment efficacy of systemic chemotherapy combined with sequential CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (Chemo-RFA) to chemotherapy alone (Chemo-only) in the management of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with liver metastasis. Between 2003 and 2011, 328 NPC patients diagnosed with liver metastasis at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were enrolled. One-to-one matched pairs between Chemo-RFA group with the Chemo-only group were generated using propensity score matching. The associations of treatment modality with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were determined by Cox regression. Of the patients enrolled, 37 patients (11.8 %) received combined treatment, 291 (82.2) received chemotherapy alone. The patients in Chemo-RFA group were more frequently classified as lower number (≤3) of liver metastatic lesions (Poligometastasis in liver, and should be considered if the ablation is technically feasible.

  1. The effectiveness and safety of platinum-based pemetrexed and platinum-based gemcitabine treatment in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Guntulu; Metintas, Selma; Akarsu, Muhittin; Metintas, Muzaffer

    2015-07-09

    We aimed to evaluate the efficiency and safety of cis/carboplatin plus gemcitabine, which was previously used for mesothelioma but with no recorded proof of its efficiency, compared with cis/carboplatin plus pemetrexed, which is known to be effective in mesothelioma, in comparable historical groups of malignant pleural mesothelioma. One hundred and sixteen patients received cis/carboplatin plus pemetrexed (group 1), while 30 patients received cis/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (group 2) between June 1999 and June 2012. The two groups were compared in terms of median survival and adverse events to chemotherapy. The mean ages of groups 1 and 2 were 60.7 and 60.8 years, respectively. Most of the patients (78.1%) had epithelial type tumors, and 47% of the patients had stage IV disease. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, asbestos exposure, histology, stage, Karnofsky performance status, presence of pleurodesis, prophylactic radiotherapy, second-line chemotherapy and median hemoglobin and serum albumin levels. The median survival time from diagnosis to death or the last day of follow up with a 95% confidence interval was 12 ± 0.95 months (95% CI: 10.15-13.85) for group 1 and 11.0 ± 1.09 months (95% CI: 8.85-13.15) for group 2 (Log-Rank: 0.142; p = 0.706). The median survival time from treatment to death or the last day of follow-up with a 95% confidence interval was 11.0 ± 0.99 months (95% CI: 9.06-12.94) for group 1 and 11.0 ± 1.52 months (95% CI: 8.02-13.97) for group 2 (Log-Rank: 0.584; p = 0.445). The stage and Karnofsky performance status were found to be significant variables on median survival time by univariate analysis. After adjusting for the stage and Karnofsky performance status, the chemotherapy schema was not impressive on median survival time (OR: 0.837; 95% CI: 0.548-1.277; p = 0.409). The progression free survival was 7.0 ± 0.61 months for group I and 6.0 ± 1.56 months for group II (Log-Rank: 0.522; p = 0

  2. Gemcitabine and treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in relapsed or refractory elderly patients: A prospective randomized trial in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aribi Mourad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Support for non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL with large cells that is refractory or relapsed after first-line chemotherapy poses a greater therapeutic problem with bone marrow transplant therapy or when old age is a contra-indication for high-dose chemotherapy, especially among developing countries such as Algeria. Aim: To show that the regimen, including gemcitabine, could be more effective in treating elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL in relapse / refractory, without complete remission, when compared with the ESHAP (etoposide, cisplatine, solumedrol, aracytine regimen. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six patients in the age group of 60-70 years were volunteers for a prospective randomized single-blind study, carried out for three years. Patients were divided into two groups by the drawing of lots. The first group (GA, n = 48, relapse; n = 27 [56.3%], refractory; n = 21 [43.7%] received treatment with ESHAP protocol and the second one (GB, n = 48, relapse; n = 28 [58%], refractory; n = 20 [42%] with GPD (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, cisplatine protocol. Results: The overall response rates and mean survival at three years were significantly higher among patients subjected to GPD treatment compared with those subjected to ESHAP treatment (63% vs. 55%, P = 0.01 and 20.5% [95% CI 16.5-24.5] vs. 11.8% [8.9-14.6], respectively. Additionally, three-year progression-free and event-free survival rates were 20.5% (16.3-24 and 19.7% (15.9-23.5, respectively, for the GPD regimen and 10.9% (8.2-13.7 and 11.1% (95% CI 8.5-13.7, respectively, for the ESHAP regimen. Moreover, the GPD regimen was associated with improving overall survival (RR=2.02, 95% CI 1.59-2.56; P = 0.000, event-free survival (2.03, 1.64-2.52; P < 0.001 and progression-free survival (1.86, 1.46-2.37; P < 0.001. Conclusion: In cases of contra-indication for high-dose chemotherapy for elderly patients with DLBCL, without complete remission, the Gemcitabine

  3. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for primary adenocarcinomas of the urinary bladder: a single-site experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Zhou, Jin; Cai, Hongzhou; Xu, Ting; Xu, Zicheng; Zou, Qing; Gu, Min

    2015-01-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare malignancy. Radical surgery is suggested as the best available treatment for early-stage disease, but there is currently no consensus on standard chemotherapy regimen for advanced stage. We assessed the feasibility and effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) plus S-1 for patients with locally advanced primary adenocarcinomas of the urinary bladder. Six patients with locally advanced urachal or non-urachal (n = 3, each) primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder were treated from October 2010 to October 2013 at a single center. All the patients were treated with 3 cycles (21d, each) of GC plus S-1 (gemcitabine, 1000 mg/m2, days 1 and 8; cisplatin, 70 mg/m2, day 2; and S-1, 50 mg bid, day 1-14). After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, patients with urachal cancer were treated with en bloc radical cystectomy and umbilectomy; the remaining 3 patients were treated with cystectomy. All patients successfully completed the neoadjuvant chemotherapy without serious side effects. Two patients were assessed as complete response, 2 as partial response, 1 as stable disease and 1 as progressive disease. Despite the limitations of a small study population, the GC plus S-1 regimen for locally advanced primary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder was effective, and facilitated the success of surgery to a certain extent. Short follow-up time was also a limitation of our study. More studies are needed to evaluate the results.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of a granisetron transdermal system for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Julian; Smeets, Jean; Drenth, Henk-Jan; Gill, David

    2009-12-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of granisetron transdermal formulation and examine its possible relationship with age, gender, and renal function. This article describes a Phase I PK study and a post hoc pooled population PK analysis. The Phase I study was a randomized, cross-over study that assessed PK parameters of three granisetron patch sizes and oral granisetron. The pooled population PK analysis included data from three trials in healthy subjects (n = 48) and from Phase II and III studies in patients with cancer (n = 793). The population PK model was used to investigate granisetron exposure and its possible relationship with age, gender, and renal function. Following oral dosing, plasma granisetron concentration was quantifiable at 1 h, and maximal mean concentration (4.7 ng/mL) was reached 2 h after administration. With transdermal application, maximal concentration was reached 48 h post-application; t(1/2) was 36 h. With oral dosing, overall exposure after 5 days was 306 ng/mL.h, and C(avg) 2.6 ng/mL. This corresponded to an AUC(0-infinity) for the 52 cm(2) patch of 420 ng/mL.h and C(avg) 2.2 ng/mL over 6 days. Clearance was not affected by age, gender, weight, or renal function. The 52 cm( 2) granisetron patch achieves a similar exposure to that of a 2 mg oral dose and provides continuous delivery of granisetron over 6 days. The patch may have utility in treating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting where prolonged drug delivery is advantageous. No dose adjustments would be needed based on age or renal function.

  5. Health Resource Utilization in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the preferred treatment regimen for advanced lung cancer patients. This study investigated the health resources utilized by and medical expenses of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as the influence of various chemotherapy regimens on the final medical costs in China. The aim of this study was to provide physicians with a reference to use as the basis for their choice of treatment. Data were collected from the Shanghai Chest Hospital's medical charts and billing database. The collected patient information included the baseline characteristics, medical history, chemotherapy regimens, and medical costs, which were used to estimate the health resources utilized by patients and the cost of treatment. This study included 328 patients, and the average total medical cost was $US14,165. This cost included drugs, which accounted for as much as 78.91% of the total cost, and chemotherapy drugs, which accounted for 51.58% of total drug expenses. The most frequently utilized chemotherapy drug was carboplatin, and the most expensive chemotherapy drug was erlotinib. In drug combinations, gemcitabine was utilized most frequently, the combination of gemcitabine and paclitaxel was the most expensive, and cisplatin was the least expensive drug. Epidermal growth factor receptor-positive patients were treated with targeted drug therapy (icotinib, erlotinib, and gefitinib). The use of recombinant human endostatin was often combined with a vinorelbine plus cisplatin regimen. Traditional Chinese medicines were the most frequently utilized non-chemotherapy drugs, and these drugs were also the most expensive. The final cost significantly depended on the specific chemotherapy regimen; thus, the rationale and cost of the chemotherapy regimen and adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  6. Development of self-forming doxorubicin-loaded polymeric depots as an injectable drug delivery system for liver cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayacharn, Pinunta; Nasongkla, Norased

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this work was to develop self-forming doxorubicin-loaded polymeric depots as an injectable drug delivery system for liver cancer chemotherapy and studied the release profiles of doxorubicin (Dox) from different depot formulations. Tri-block copolymers of poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(D,L-lactide) and poly(ethylene glycol) named PLECs were successfully used as a biodegradable material to encapsulate Dox as the injectable local drug delivery system. Depot formation and encapsulation efficiency of these depots were evaluated. Results show that depots could be formed and encapsulate Dox with high drug loading content. For the release study, drug loading content (10, 15 and 20% w/w) and polymer concentration (25, 30, and 35% w/v) were varied. It could be observed that the burst release occurred within 1-2 days and this burst release could be reduced by physical mixing of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) into the depot system. The degradation at the surface and cross-section of the depots were examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). In addition, cytotoxicity of Dox-loaded depots and blank depots were tested against human liver cancer cell lines (HepG2). Dox released from depots significantly exhibited potent cytotoxic effect against HepG2 cell line compared to that of blank depots. Results from this study reveals an important insight in the development of injectable drug delivery system for liver cancer chemotherapy. Schematic diagram of self-forming doxorubicin-loaded polymeric depots as an injectable drug delivery system and in vitro characterizations. (a) Dox-loaded PLEC depots could be formed with more than 90% of sustained-release Dox at 25% polymer concentration and 20% Dox-loading content. The burst release occurred within 1-2 days and could be reduced by physical mixing of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) into the depot system. (b) Dox released from depots significantly exhibited potent cytotoxic effect against human

  7. Types of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000910.htm Types of chemotherapy To use the sharing features on this page, ... cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/treatment-types/chemotherapy/how-chemotherapy-drugs-work.html . Updated February 15, ...

  8. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Brullé

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  9. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  10. Concurrent gemcitabine and radiotherapy with and without neoadjuvant gemcitabine for locally advanced unresectable or resected pancreatic cancer: A phase I-II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brade, Anthony; Brierley, James; Oza, Amit; Gallinger, Steven; Cummings, Bernard; MacLean, Martha; Pond, Gregory R.; Hedley, David; Wong Shun; Townsley, Carol; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Moore, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of biweekly gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for resected and locally advanced (LA) pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had either LA or resected pancreatic cancer. Between March 1999 and July 2001, 63 patients (31 with LA and 32 with resected disease) were treated. Of the 63 patients, 28 were enrolled in a Phase I study of increasing radiation doses (35 Gy [n = 7], 43.75 Gy [n = 11], and 52.5 Gy [n = 10] given within 4, 5, or 6 weeks, respectively, in 1.75-Gy fractions) concurrently with 40 mg/m 2 gemcitabine biweekly. Subsequently, 35 were enrolled in a Phase II study with the addition of induction gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 within 7 or 8 weeks to concurrent biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m 2 ) and 52.5 Gy RT within 6 weeks. Results: In the LA population, the best response observed was a complete response in 1, partial response in 3, stable disease in 10, and progressive disease in 17. In the phase II trial, gemcitabine plus RT was not delivered to 8 patients because of progression with induction gemcitabine alone (n = 5) or by patient request (n = 3). On intent-to-treat analysis, the median survival in the LA patients was 13.9 months and the 2-year survival rate was 16.1%. In the resected population, the median progression-free survival was 8.3 months, the median survival was 18.4 months, and the 2- and 5-year survival rate was 36% and 19.4%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated; the median gemcitabine dose intensity was 96% of the planned dose in the neoadjuvant and concurrent portions of the Phase II study. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusion: Biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m 2 ) concurrently with RT (52.5 Gy in 30 fractions of 1.75 Gy) with or without induction gemcitabine is safe and tolerable and shows efficacy in patients with LA and resected pancreatic cancer

  11. The combined effect of thermal and chemotherapy on HeLa cells using magnetically actuated smart textured fibrous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pranav; Agarwal, Sakshi; Srivastava, Sachchidanand; Jain, Shilpee

    2018-01-01

    Thermal therapy combined with chemotherapy is one of the advanced and efficient methods to eradicate cancer. In this work, we fabricated magnetically actuated smart textured (MAST) fibrous systems and studied their candidacy for cancer treatment. The polycaprolactone-Fe 3 O 4 based MAST fibers were fabricated using electrospinning technique. These MAST fibrous systems contained carbogenic quantum dots as a tracking agent and doxorubicin hydrochloride anticancer drug. Additionally, as fabricated MAST fibrous systems were able to deliver anticancer drug and heat energy simultaneously to kill HeLa cells in a 10 min period in vitro. After treatment, the metabolic activity and morphology of HeLa cells were analyzed. In addition, the mechanism of cell death was studied using flow cytometry. Interestingly, the navigation of these systems in the fluid can be controlled with the application of gradient magnetic field. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 40-51, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Sriuranpong, Virote; Suwanvecho, Suthida

    2014-09-01

    Currently, the only standard systemic treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is sorafenib monotherapy. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of the novel combination of sorafenib and gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Between March 2008 and October 2010, patients with advanced pathologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma who had not received previous systemic therapy and had Child-Pugh liver function class A or B received sorafenib plus gemcitabine. Treatment included 4-week cycle of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, 15) to the maximum of six cycles together with sorafenib (400 mg twice daily). Patient continued sorafenib until disease progression or withdrawal from other reasons. The primary end point is progression-free survival. Forty-five patients were enrolled in this study. The median progression-free survival was 3.7 months (95% CI 3.5-3.8). The overall response rate was 4% with no complete responses and the disease control rate was 66%. The median overall survival (OS) was 11.6 months (95% CI 7.4-15.9). The median time to progression was 3.6 months (95% CI 3.4-3.7). The most frequently reported grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events included thrombocytopenia 33%, neutropenia 16% and hand-foot skin reaction 13%. The study regimen was well tolerated. The combination of sorafenib and gemcitabine in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is generally well tolerated and has modest clinical efficacy. The median OS is up to 1 year. However, well-designed randomized controlled trials with a sorafenib alone comparator arm are needed to confirm this finding. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. chemotherapy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Augustyniuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background . Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practices for cancer have become popular among oncology patients. An increasing interest in alternative medicine can be explained by the inefficiency of conventional treatment, dissatisfaction with treating patients like objects, and the will to use all available treatment methods. Objectives . The authors assessed how often patients use CAM methods, and which of them are most popular. Material and methods . The study was conducted in Military Hospital no. 109 and the Independent Public Clinical Hospital no. 1 in Szczecin among 100 chemotherapy patients. This survey-based study was performed using an original questionnaire. Results. Most respondents (68% did not use alternative methods to fight the disease. The most popular treatment methods were: herbal medicine (50%, alternative medicine preparations (38% and diet (25%, and the least common: hypnosis (3% and aromatherapy (3%. Analyzed sociodemographic factors had no effects on a choice of a CAM method. Patients obtained information about CAM methods mainly from the Internet (40%, medical staff (37% and literature (31%. Conclusions . 1. Using CAM by patients receiving chemotherapy for neoplasms is quite a common phenomenon. 2. CAM were more often chosen by women. Neither the duration of the disease nor sociodemographic data had effects on making the decision to use CAM methods. 3. The most popular CAM were: herbal medicine, alternative medicine preparations, and diet. 4. Cancer patients should receive special support from nurses and doctors as well as other members of the therapeutic team. Oncology patients should never be left on their own so that they were forced to seek help and support in therapies unconfirmed by scientific investigation.

  14. ERCC1 as a biomarker for bladder cancer patients likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jong-Mu; Choi, Han Yong; Lim, Ho Yeong; Sung, Ji-Youn; Park, Se Hoon; Kwon, Ghee Young; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jo, Jisuk

    2012-01-01

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy and the value of molecular biomarkers in bladder cancer have not been determined. We aimed to assess the predictive and prognostic values of excision repair cross-complementation 1 (ERCC1) in identifying appropriate patients who may potentially benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 93 patients with completely resected transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. ERCC1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. ERCC1 expression was analyzed in 57 patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy and 36 who were not treated. Among 93 patients, ERCC1 expression was positive in 54 (58.1%) and negative in 39 (41.9%). ERCC1 positivity was significantly associated with longer survival (adjusted hazard ratio for death, 0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.014-0.99; P = 0.049) in the group without adjuvant chemotherapy while ERCC1 positivity was associated with shorter survival among patients who have received adjuvant chemotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio for death, 2.64; 95% CI 1.01-6.85; P = 0.047). Therefore, clinical benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with ERCC1 negativity as measured by overall survival (test for interaction, P = 0.034) and by disease-free survival (test for interaction, P = 0.20). Among patients with completely resected transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, those with ERCC1-negative tumors seemed to benefit more from adjuvant gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy than those with ERCC1-positive tumors. Future prospective, randomized studies are warranted to confirm our findings

  15. A PHASE II STUDY OF GEMCITABINE AND CAPECITABINE IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CANCER (RCC): SOUTHWEST ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY S0312

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Hussey, Michael; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Clark, Joseph I.; Lange, Marianne K.; Crawford, E. David

    2010-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine plus capecitabine has modest efficacy in patients with advanced RCC but has considerable toxicity. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a modified dose-schedule of this doublet in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic RCC. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients were treated with gemcitabine at 900mg/m2 on days 1,8,15 and capecitabine at 625mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 through 21, every 28 days. Eligible patients must have adequate performance status and end-organ function. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate (RR). No further evaluation of this regimen would be pursued if the RR was ≤ 5%. In an exploratory manner using archival specimens, we also evaluated potential markers of prognosis and treatment response including thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms and tumor expression of p53, PTEN, pAKT, pmTOR, and ERCC1. Results Of 43 patients registered, 1 was ineligible and 2 were not analyzable. There was 1 confirmed complete response (CR) and three unconfirmed partial responses (PR), for an overall response rate of 10% (95% CI: 3, 24). Nineteen patients (48%) had stable disease (SD). The six-month freedom-from-treatment-failure and overall survival rates were 20% (95% CI: 8, 32) and 75% (95% CI: 62, 88), respectively. Median survival time was 23 months (95% CI: 10, 37). One patient each experienced Grade 4 neutropenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia and hemolysis with renal failure. The most common Grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (12 patients), fatigue (5), and leucopenia (4). Patients with a best response of stable disease or better were more likely to have a decrease in expression of PTEN and an increased expression of pmTOR. Conclusions Gemcitabine plus capecitabine at this reduced dose-schedule benefits a small percentage of patients with RCC with an acceptable toxicity profile. The combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine may serve as a base regimen for combination therapy with targeted agents in select RCC

  16. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Different Management Strategies between Best Supportive Care and Second-line Chemotherapy for Platinum-resistant or Refractory Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealon, Phanida; Khempech, Nipon; Vasuratna, Apichai; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Havanond, Piyalamporn

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard treatment for patients with platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer. Single agent chemotherapies have evidence of more efficacy and less toxicity than combination therapy. Most are very expensive, with appreciable toxicity and minimal survival. Since it is difficult to make comparison between outcomes, economic analysis of single-agent chemotherapy regimens and best supportive care may help to make decisions about an appropriate management for the affected patients. To evaluate the cost effectiveness of second-line chemotherapy compared with best supportive care for patients with platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer. A Markov model was used to estimate the effectiveness and total costs associated with treatments. The hypothetical patient population comprised women aged 55 with platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer. Four types of alternative treatment options were evaluated: 1) gemcitabine followed by BSC; 2) pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) followed by BSC; 3) gemcitabine followed by topotecan; and 4) PLD followed by topotecan. Baseline comparator of alternative treatments was BSC. Time horizon of the analysis was 2 years. Health care provider perspective and 3% discount rate were used to determine the costs of medical treatment in this study. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) were used to measure the treatment effectiveness. Treatment effectiveness data were derived from the literature. Costs were calculated from unit cost treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients at various stages of disease in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital (KCMH) in the year 2011. Parameter uncertainty was tested in probabilistic sensitivity analysis by using Monte Carlo simulation. One-way sensitivity analysis was used to explore each variable's impact on the uncertainty of the results. Approximated life expectancy of best supportive care was 0.182 years and its total cost was 26,862 Baht. All

  17. SL-01, an oral derivative of gemcitabine, inhibited human breast cancer growth through induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Qin, Yi-Zhuo; Wang, Rui-Qi; Li, Wen-Bao; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •SL-01 is an oral derivative of gemcitabine. •SL-01 possessed activity against human breast cancer growth via apoptotic induction. •SL-01’s activity was more potently than that of gemcitabine. •SL-01 inhibited cancer growth without toxicity to mice. -- Abstract: SL-01 is an oral derivative of gemcitabine that was synthesized by introducing the moiety of 3-(dodecyloxycarbonyl) pyrazine-2-carbonyl at N4-position on cytidine ring of gemcitabine. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of SL-01 on human breast cancer growth. SL-01 significantly inhibited MCF-7 proliferation as estimated by colorimetric assay. Flow cytometry assay indicated the apoptotic induction and cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. SL-01 modulated the expressions of p-ATM, p53 and p21 and decrease of cyclin D1 in MCF-7 cells. Further experiments were performed in a MCF-7 xenografts mouse model. SL-01 by oral administration strongly inhibited MCF-7 xenografts growth. This effect of SL-01 might arise from its roles in the induction of apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry assay showed the increase of TUNEL staining cells. Western blotting indicated the modulation of apoptotic proteins in SL-01-treated xenografts. During the course of study, there was no evidence of toxicity to mice. In contrast, the decrease of neutrophil cells in peripheral and increase of AST and ALT levels in serum were observed in the gemcitabine-treated mice. Conclusion: SL-01 possessed similar activity against human breast cancer growth with gemcitabine, whereas, with lower toxicity to gemcitabine. SL-01 is a potent oral agent that may supplant the use of gemcitabine

  18. The combination of i-leader truncation and gemcitabine improves oncolytic adenovirus efficacy in an immunocompetent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Saus, C; Laborda, E; Rodríguez-García, A; Cascalló, M; Moreno, R; Alemany, R

    2014-02-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) i-leader protein is a small protein of unknown function. The C-terminus truncation of the i-leader protein increases Ad release from infected cells and cytotoxicity. In the current study, we use the i-leader truncation to enhance the potency of an oncolytic Ad. In vitro, an i-leader truncated oncolytic Ad is released faster to the supernatant of infected cells, generates larger plaques, and is more cytotoxic in both human and Syrian hamster cell lines. In mice bearing human tumor xenografts, the i-leader truncation enhances oncolytic efficacy. However, in a Syrian hamster pancreatic tumor model, which is immunocompetent and less permissive to human Ad, antitumor efficacy is only observed when the i-leader truncated oncolytic Ad, but not the non-truncated version, is combined with gemcitabine. This synergistic effect observed in the Syrian hamster model was not seen in vitro or in immunodeficient mice bearing the same pancreatic hamster tumors, suggesting a role of the immune system in this synergism. These results highlight the interest of the i-leader C-terminus truncation because it enhances the antitumor potency of an oncolytic Ad and provides synergistic effects with gemcitabine in the presence of an immune competent system.

  19. Nurse's perceptions and experiences of using of a mobile-phone-based Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) to monitor and manage chemotherapy-related toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, R; McCann, L; Miller, M; Kearney, N

    2008-09-01

    Many people diagnosed with cancer will receive chemotherapy as a core component of their care. Recent changes in the delivery of cancer services mean that patients frequently receive care on an out-patient basis and are therefore often required to manage related side effects at home without direct support from oncology health professionals. The use of information and communications technology may be seen as a means of supporting patients receiving chemotherapy in the home care setting. This mixed methods study, reports on the perceptions of nurses (n=35) who participated in a randomised controlled trial of a mobile phone based, Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS), in the management of chemotherapy-related toxicity in patients with breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Nurses' perceptions of ASyMS were evaluated at the start and the end of the study. Overall, they could see the benefits of ASyMS in the remote monitoring of chemotherapy toxicity and its role in facilitating early intervention and subsequent management, demonstrating the potential utility of the system within clinical practice.

  20. The dipeptide monoester prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine-feasibility of orally administrable nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Borras Bermejo, Blanca; Amidon, Gordon L

    2014-01-27

    Dipeptide monoester prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine were synthesized. Their chemical stability in buffers, enzymatic stability in cell homogenates, permeability in mouse intestinal membrane along with drug concentration in mouse plasma, and anti-proliferative activity in cancer cells were determined and compared to their parent drugs. Floxuridine prodrug was more enzymatically stable than floxuridine and the degradation from prodrug to parent drug works as the rate-limiting step. On the other hand, gemcitabine prodrug was less enzymatically stable than gemcitabine. Those dipeptide monoester prodrugs exhibited 2.4- to 48.7-fold higher uptake than their parent drugs in Caco-2, Panc-1, and AsPC-1 cells. Floxuridine and gemcitabine prodrugs showed superior permeability in mouse jejunum to their parent drugs and exhibited the higher drug concentration in plasma after in situ mouse perfusion. Cell proliferation assays in ductal pancreatic cancer cells, AsPC-1 and Panc-1, indicated that dipeptide prodrugs of floxuridine and gemcitabine were more potent than their parent drugs. The enhanced potency of nucleoside analogs was attributed to their improved membrane permeability. The prodrug forms of 5¢-L-phenylalanyl-l-tyrosyl-floxuridine and 5¢-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-gemcitabine appeared in mouse plasma after the permeation of intestinal membrane and the first-pass effect, suggesting their potential for the development of oral dosage form for anti-cancer agents.

  1. Histotype-tailored neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus standard chemotherapy in patients with high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas (ISG-STS 1001): an international, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronchi, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Quagliuolo, Vittorio; Broto, Javier Martin; Pousa, Antonio Lopez; Grignani, Giovanni; Basso, Umberto; Blay, Jean-Yves; Tendero, Oscar; Beveridge, Robert Diaz; Ferraresi, Virginia; Lugowska, Iwona; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Fontana, Valeria; Marchesi, Emanuela; Donati, Davide Maria; Palassini, Elena; Palmerini, Emanuela; De Sanctis, Rita; Morosi, Carlo; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Bagué, Silvia; Coindre, Jean Michelle; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Picci, Piero; Bruzzi, Paolo; Casali, Paolo Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Previous trials from our group suggested an overall survival benefit with five cycles of adjuvant full-dose epirubicin plus ifosfamide in localised high-risk soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities or trunk wall, and no difference in overall survival benefit between three cycles versus five cycles of the same neoadjuvant regimen. We aimed to show the superiority of the neoadjuvant administration of histotype-tailored regimen to standard chemotherapy. For this international, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3, multicentre trial, patients were enrolled from 32 hospitals in Italy, Spain, France, and Poland. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older with localised, high-risk (high malignancy grade, 5 cm or longer in diameter, and deeply located according to the investing fascia), soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities or trunk wall and belonging to one of five histological subtypes: high-grade myxoid liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour, and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive three cycles of full-dose standard chemotherapy (epirubicin 60 mg/m 2 per day [short infusion, days 1 and 2] plus ifosfamide 3 g/m 2 per day [days 1, 2, and 3], repeated every 21 days) or histotype-tailored chemotherapy: for high-grade myxoid liposarcoma, trabectedin 1·3 mg/m 2 via 24-h continuous infusion, repeated every 21 days; for leiomyosarcoma, gemcitabine 1800 mg/m 2 on day 1 intravenously over 180 min plus dacarbazine 500 mg/m 2 on day 1 intravenously over 20 min, repeated every 14 days; for synovial sarcoma, high-dose ifosfamide 14 g/m 2 , given over 14 days via an external infusion pump, every 28 days; for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour, intravenous etoposide 150 mg/m 2 per day (days 1, 2, and 3) plus intravenous ifosfamide 3 g/m 2 per day (days 1, 2, and 3), repeated every 21 days; and for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, gemcitabine 900 mg/m 2 on days 1 and

  2. ESHAP chemotherapy is efficient in refractory/relapsed primary central nervous system lymphoma: report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungur R

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rodica Ungur,1,2 Adrian Tempescul,3 Christian Berthou,3 Cristina Bagacean,1,2 Doinel Radeanu,1 Adriana Muresan,1 Mihnea Zdrenghea1,21Department of Hematology, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj, 2Department of Hematology, Ion Chiricuta Oncology Institute, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; 3Department of Clinical Hematology, Institute of Cancerology and Hematology, Brest Teaching Hospital, Brest, FranceAbstract: Primary central nervous system non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a rare presentation, almost always of diffuse large B-cell type. Although there is no consensus regarding therapy for this condition, induction regimens are based on high-dose methotrexate and consolidation whole-brain radiotherapy, or, more preferred recently, blood–brain barrier penetrating drugs such as etoposide, cytarabine, and alkylating agents like temozolomide, ifosfamide, and lomustine. We present here four cases of relapsed/refractory primary central nervous system lymphoma treated with ESHAP (etoposide, solumedrol, high-dose cytarabine, and platinum chemotherapy to complete remission, with the eligible patients proceeding to autologous transplantation. We want to draw attention to this interesting, relatively well tolerated, underused therapeutic option, in a setting where treatment options are scarce and evidence-based recommendations are lacking.Keywords: cerebral lymphoma, PCNSL, refractory, relapsed, platinum

  3. A Novel External Carotid Arterial Sheath System for Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Noriko; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Takada, Akinori; Nomura, Miwako; Kawamura, Tomoko; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomoto, Yoshihito

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a novel system for treating advanced head and neck cancer consisting of an external carotid arterial sheath (ECAS) and a microcatheter to inject drugs retrogradely into multiple feeding arteries through the superficial temporal artery (STA). Four consecutive patients with head and neck cancer that had more than one feeding artery were enrolled in this study. The ECAS was made of polyurethane and surface-coated with heparin resin to prevent thrombus formation, allowing it to remain in place for a prolonged period of time. The ECAS was inserted through the STA, and its tip was placed between the maxillary artery and facial artery. The tumor-feeding arteries were selected using a hooked-shaped microcatheter through the ECAS. A total of 13 target arteries were selected in the four patients. The microcatheter inserted via the ECAS was used to catheterize ten arteries (five lingual arteries and five facial arteries). The remaining three lingual arteries were directly selected by the catheter without ECAS. All of the target arteries were able to be catheterized superselectively. The technical success rate was 100%. Vascular occlusion, which might have been caused by the ECAS, was observed in one patient. No neurologic toxicities occurred. This ECAS system is a new approach for retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy that covers the entire tumor with anticancer drugs. It has the potential to increase the effectiveness of therapy for advanced head and neck cancer. Level 4, Case Series.

  4. Malaria chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Peter; Ward, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Most malaria control strategies today depend on safe and effective drugs, as they have done for decades. But sensitivity to chloroquine, hitherto the workhorse of malaria chemotherapy, has rapidly declined throughout the tropics since the 1980s, and this drug is now useless in many high-transmission areas. New options for resource-constrained governments are few, and there is growing evidence that the burden from malaria has been increasing, as has malaria mortality in Africa. In this chapter, we have tried to outline the main pharmacological properties of current drugs, and their therapeutic uses and limitations. We have summarised the ways in which these drugs are employed, both in the formal health sector and in self-medication. We have briefly touched on the limitations of current drug development, but have tried to pick out a few promising drugs that are under development. Given that Plasmodium falciparum is the organism that kills, and that has developed multi-drug resistance, we have tended to focus upon it. Similarly, given that around 90% of global mortality from malaria occurs in Africa, there is the tendency to dwell on this continent. We give no apology for placing our emphasis upon the use of antimalarial drugs in endemic populations rather than their use for prophylaxis in travellers.

  5. Economic burden related to chemotherapy-related adverse events in patients with metastatic breast cancer in an integrated health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nazia Rashid,1 Han A Koh,2 Hilda C Baca,3 Kathy J Lin,1 Susan E Malecha,4 Anthony Masaquel5 1Drug Information Services, Kaiser Permanente, Downey, 2Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente, Bellflower, 3Pharmacy Analytical Services, Kaiser Permanente, Downey, 4US Medical Affairs, Genetech Inc., San Francisco, 5Health Economics and Outcomes, Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Breast cancer is treated with many different modalities, including chemotherapy that can be given as a single agent or in combination. Patients often experience adverse events from chemotherapy during the cycles of treatment which can lead to economic burden.Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate costs related to chemotherapy-related adverse events in patients with metastatic breast cancer (mBC in an integrated health care delivery system.Methods: Patients with mBC newly initiated on chemotherapy were identified and the first infusion was defined as the index date. Patients were ≥18 years old at time of index date, had at least 6 months of health plan membership and drug eligibility prior to their index date. The chemotherapy adverse events were identified after the index date and during first line of chemotherapy. Episodes of care (EOC were created using healthcare visits. Chart review was conducted to establish whether the adverse events were related to chemotherapy. Costs were calculated for each visit, including medications related to the adverse events, and aggregated to calculate the total EOC cost.Results: A total of 1,682 patients with mBC were identified after applying study criteria; 54% of these patients had one or more adverse events related to chemotherapy. After applying the EOC method, there were a total of 5,475 episodes (4,185 single episodes [76.4%] and 1,290 multiple episodes [23.6%] related to chemotherapy-related adverse events. Within single episodes, hematological (1,387 EOC, 33

  6. Patients' perceptions and experiences of using a mobile phone-based advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) to monitor and manage chemotherapy related toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, L; Maguire, R; Miller, M; Kearney, N

    2009-03-01

    Chemotherapy forms a core component of treatment for the majority patients with cancer. Recent changes in cancer services mean patients frequently receive such treatment as outpatients and are often required to manage side effects at home without direct support from oncology health professionals. Information technology continues to develop to support patients in the community; this study evaluated the impact of a mobile phone-based advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) on chemotherapy related toxicity in patients with lung, breast or colorectal cancer. One hundred and twelve patients were randomized from seven clinical sites across the UK; 56 patients used the mobile phone to record their symptoms, sending their reports directly to the nurses at their clinical site; 56 control group patients received standard care. Health professionals were alerted about any severe or life-threatening symptoms through the development of a chemotherapy symptom risk model. Patients' perceptions of ASyMS were evaluated pre and post participation. Patients reported many benefits of using ASyMS including improved communication with health professionals, improvements in the management of their symptoms, and feeling reassured their symptoms were being monitored while at home. ASyMS has the potential to positively impact on the management of symptoms in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment.

  7. A case of remnant pancreatic cancer after pancreatoduodenectomy successfully treated using chemotherapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuhito; Tokunou, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Hisato; Kamei, Ryoji; Kitamura, Yoshinori; Ando, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of remnant pancreatic cancer after pancreatoduodenectomy that was successfully treated using chemotherapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy. A 68-year-old woman received SSPPD for pancreatic head cancer. Gemcitabine (GEM) was administered for a year as postoperative chemotherapy. One year 8 months after surgery, abdominal CT showed a 20 mm solid mass in the stump of the remnant pancreas and dilation of the distal pancreatic duct. FDG-PET revealed a solitary tumor without any recurrence. We diagnosed the patient with a solitary recurrence of pancreatic cancer. Chemotherapy (GEM) and carbon-ion radiotherapy were performed. After treatment, the lesion was not detected on CT or FDG-PET. Chemotherapy (GEM) and carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer seems to be effective and there might result in a survival benefit. (author)

  8. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Dept. of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  9. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Department of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung 25457 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul 06973 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  10. A retrospective evaluation of activity of gemcitabine/platinum regimens in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran N. Le

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many of these agents have been compared in prospective clinical trials, the gemcitabine/platinumbased regimens have not been compared in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. While bothgemcitabine/carboplatin and gemcitabine/cisplatin have a similar ORR in separate clinical trials, the tworegimens have never been directly been compared. With overlapping dose-limiting toxicity of thrombocytopenia, the gemcitabine/carboplatin regimen has been challenging to employ in the clinical setting in previously treated ovarian cancer patients and is often associated with treatment delays and/or dose reductions. Gemcitabine/cisplatin can also be a challenge due to its dose limiting neuropathy and renal toxicity, especially in previously treated patients. In the absence of any prospective, head to head comparison this retrospective study was embarked upon to compare the response rate and toxicity profiles of gemcitabine/cisplatin verses gemcitabine/carboplatin for the treatment of platinum-sensitive verses platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study that identified patients that had received either gemcitabine/cisplatin or gemcitabine/carboplatin for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer and compared documented hematological and non-hematological toxicity and response based on RECIST (v1.1. Data was evaluated based upon platinum sensitivity/resistance as well. Results A total of 93 patients were identified that had received a gemcitabine/platinum regimen with 48 with recurrent ovarian cancer that were included in the study. There were 21 patients in the gemcitabine/cisplatin arm and 27 patients identified in the gemcitabine/carboplatin arm. Objective response rate (ORR was greater in platinum-sensitive patients that received gemcitabine/carboplatin compared to gemcitabine/cisplatin (8 (67% vs 2 (25%, p < 0.05. Conversely, ORR was greater in platinum-resistant patients treated

  11. The impact of stage, grade, and mucinous histology on the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy in adenocarcinomas of the appendix: Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Elliot A; Compton, Carolyn C; Hanna, Nader N; Kosinski, Lauren A; Washington, Mary Kay; Kakar, Sanjay; Weiser, Martin R; Overman, Michael J

    2016-01-15

    Adenocarcinomas of the appendix represent a heterogeneous disease depending on the presence of mucinous histology, histologic grade, and stage. In the current study, the authors sought to explore the interplay of these factors with systemic chemotherapy in a large population data set. Patients in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) who were diagnosed with mucinous, nonmucinous, and signet ring cell-type appendiceal neoplasms from 1985 through 2006 were selected. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were developed. A total of 11,871 patients met the inclusion criteria for the current study: 50.3% had mucinous neoplasms, 40.5% had nonmucinous neoplasms, and 9.2% had signet ring cell-type neoplasms. The 5-year overall survival (OS) stratified by grade was similar among patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I to stage III disease but not for those with stage IV disease. The median OS for patients with stage IV mucinous and nonmucinous tumors was 6.4 years and 2.3 years, respectively, for those with well differentiated histology (Pchemotherapy improved OS for both mucinous and nonmucinous histologies, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.78 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68-0.89 [P = .0002]) and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.74-0.94 [P = .002]), respectively. For patients with stage IV disease, systemic chemotherapy significantly improved OS for those with nonmucinous (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.64-0.82 [Pchemotherapy versus no chemotherapy was 6.4 years versus 6.5 years (P value not significant) for patients with mucinous, well-differentiated tumors and 1.6 years versus 1.0 years (P = .0007) for patients with mucinous, poorly differentiated tumors. Adjuvant chemotherapy demonstrated a significant OS benefit regardless of histology. However, for patients with stage IV disease, the benefit of systemic chemotherapy varied by tumor histology and grade, with patients with well-differentiated, mucinous, appendiceal adenocarcinomas deriving no

  12. A bioengineered murine model using CD24+CD44+ pancreatic cancer stem cells for chemotherapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Shengqi; Li, Jianshe; Zhang, Zhongtao; Deng, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first developed a murine pancreatic tumor model using CD24 + CD44 + pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) supported by an electrospun scaffold. Unlike conventional models, the use of CSC and the scaffold, which were biologically and chemically defined, afforded scientists a reliable platform to evaluate novel chemotherapy regimens. CD24 + CD44 + CSC successfully initiated tumorigenesis in vitro on the scaffold without suffering apoptosis, evidencing the lack of cytotoxicity of scaffolding materials. Also, the scaffold contributed to the acceleration of in vivo tumorigenesis and increased the likelihood of tumor formation. Using this model, we set out to explore the effectiveness of irinotecan/gemcitabine (IRIN-GEM), a chemotherapy regimen, for pancreatic cancer. Our study showed that IRIN-GEM induced a tumor regression whereas gemcitabine alone could only arrest the tumor growth. Further study suggested that the superior performance of IRIN-GEM could be attributed to its capacity to demolish the CD24 + CD44 + CSC sub-population by inducing a large-scale apoptosis. The use of highly proliferative yet homogenous CD24 + CD44 + CSC along with a chemically defined scaffold accelerated the tumor formation and significantly reduced the variability associated with conventional murine models. Armed with this new model, we discovered that IRIN-GEM would be a promising chemotherapy candidate for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. (paper)

  13. Gemcitabine intercellular diffusion mediated by gap junctions: new implications for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruso Manuel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumors are often poorly vascularized, with cells that can be 100 μm away from blood vessels. These distant cells get less oxygen and nutrients and are exposed to lower doses of chemotherapeutic agents. As gap junctions allow the passage of small molecules between cells, we tested the possibility that the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine can diffuse through gap junctions in solid tumors. Results We first showed with a dye transfer assay that the glioblastoma and the osteosarcoma cells used in this study have functional gap junctions. These cells were genetically engineered to express the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK, and induced a "bystander effect" as demonstrated by the killing of TK-negative cells in presence of the nucleoside analogue ganciclovir (GCV. The ability of gemcitabine to induce a similar bystander effect was then tested by mixing cells treated with 3 μM gemcitabine for 24 hours with untreated cells at different ratios. In all cell lines tested, bystander cells were killed with ratios containing as low as 5% treated cells, and this toxic effect was reduced in presence of α-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA, a specific gap junction inhibitor. We also showed that a 2- or a 24-hour gemcitabine treatment was more efficient to inhibit the growth of spheroids with functional gap junctions as compared to the same treatment made in presence of AGA. Finally, after a 24-hour gemcitabine treatment, the cell viability in spheroids was reduced by 92% as opposed to 51% in presence of AGA. Conclusion These results indicate that gemcitabine-mediated toxicity can diffuse through gap junctions, and they suggest that gemcitabine treatment could be more efficient for treating solid tumors that display gap junctions. The presence of these cellular channels could be used to predict the responsiveness to this nucleoside analogue therapy.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles for a new drug delivery system to control quercetin releasing for cancer chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, A. C. H.; Santiago, V. R.; Mazzetto, S. E.; Denardin, J. C.; Lavín, R.; Mele, Giuseppe; Ribeiro, M. E. N. P.; Vieira, Icaro G. P.; Gonçalves, Tamara; Ricardo, N. M. P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Quercetin belongs to the chemical class of flavonoids and can be found in many common foods, such as apples, nuts, berries, etc. It has been demonstrated that quercetin has a wide array of biological effects that are considered beneficial to health treatment, mainly as anticancer. However, therapeutic applications of quercetin have been restricted to oral administration due to its sparing solubility in water and instability in physiological medium. A drug delivery methodology was proposed in this work to study a new quercetin release system in the form of magnetite–quercetin–copolymer (MQC). These materials were characterized through XRD, TEM, IR, and Thermal analysis. In addition, the magnetization curves and quercetin releasing experiments were performed. It was observed a nanoparticle average diameter of 11.5 and 32.5 nm at Fe 3 O 4 and MQC, respectively. The presence of magnetic nanoparticles in this system offers the promise of targeting specific organs within the body. These results indicate the great potential for future applications of the MQC to be used as a new quercetin release system.

  15. Measuring Chemotherapy Appointment Duration and Variation Using Real-Time Location Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barysauskas, Constance M; Hudgins, Gina; Gill, Katie Kupferberg; Camuso, Kristen M; Bagley, Janet; Rozanski, Sheila; Kadish, Sarah

    Clinical schedules drive resource utilization, cost, and patient wait time. Accurate appointment duration allocation ensures appropriate staffing ratios to daily caseloads and maximizes scarce resources. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) infusion appointment duration is adjusted by regimen using a consensus method of experts including pharmacists, nurses, and administrators. Using real-time location system (RTLS), we examined the accuracy of observed appointment duration compared with the scheduled duration. Appointment duration was calculated using RTLS at DFCI between August 1, 2013, and September 30, 2013. Duration was defined as the total time a patient occupied an infusion chair. The top 10 administered infusion regimens were investigated (n = 805). Median observed appointment durations were statistically different than the scheduled durations. Appointment durations were shorter than scheduled 98% (C), 95% (I), and 75% (F) of the time and longer than scheduled 77% (A) and 76% (G) of the time. Fifty-six percent of the longer than scheduled (A) appointments were at least 30 minute longer. RTLS provides reliable and unbiased data to improve schedule accuracy. Replacing consensus with system-based data may improve clinic flow, relieve staff stress, and increase patient satisfaction. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate factors that impact variation in appointment duration.

  16. Systemic immune–inflammation index as a useful prognostic indicator predicts survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Chen,1,* Ying Yan,2,* Lihua Zhu,3 Xiliang Cong,1 Sen Li,1 Shubin Song,1 Hongjiang Song,1 Yingwei Xue1 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 2Department of Internal Oncology, Harbin The First Hospital, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 3Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, Hebei, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objective: A novel systemic immune–inflammation index named SII (SII=N×P/L, which is based on neutrophil (N, platelet (P and lymphocyte (L counts, has emerged and reflects comprehensively the balance of host inflammatory and immune status. We aimed to evaluate the potential prognostic significance of SII in patients with advanced gastric cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy.Subjects and methods: The retrospective analysis included data from 107 patients with advanced gastric cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 185 patients with pathology-proven gastric cancer. The optimal cutoff value of SII by receiver operating characteristic curve stratified patients into low SII (<600×109/L and high SII (SII ≥600×109/L groups. The clinical outcomes of disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS were calculated by Kaplan–Meier survival curves and compared using log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the prognostic value of SII.Results: The results indicated that SII had prognostic significance using the cutoff value of 600×109/L on DFS and OS in univariate and multivariate Cox regression survival analyses. Low SII was associated with prolonged DFS and OS, and the mean DFS and OS for patients with low SII were longer than for those with high SII (57.22 vs 41.56 months and 62.25 vs 45.60 months, respectively. Furthermore, we found that patients

  17. Cisplatin and gemcitabine in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (ABC) and persistent jaundice despite optimal stenting: Effective intervention in patients with luminal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarca, Angela; Benafif, Sarah; Ross, Paul; Bridgewater, John; Valle, Juan W

    2015-09-01

    The advanced biliary tract cancer (ABC)-02 study established cisplatin and gemcitabine (CisGem) as a reference 1(st)-line regimen for patients with advanced/metastatic biliary tract cancer; patients with bilirubin ⩾ 1.5 × upper limit of normal (ULN) were excluded and there are few extant data for systemic treatment in the context of elevated bilirubin. Patients with ABC, receiving CisGem with a baseline bilirubin of ⩾ 1.5 × ULN were eligible for this retrospective analysis; response, toxicity and survival data were collected. Thirty-three patients of 545 screened; median age 59 years, range 23-79; 58% male, 58% with metastases (79% in the liver) of performance status (PS) 0 (33%), 1 (64%) or 2 (3%) were eligible. The median baseline bilirubin was 55 μmol/L (range 32-286); due to biliary tract obstruction (BTO, 76%) or liver metastases (LM, 24%). Toxicity was comparable to the ABC-02 study; bilirubin normalised in 64% during chemotherapy/follow-up. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-9.0) and median overall survival (OS) 9.5 months (95% CI: 5.7-12.8). Patients with BTO had a longer PFS and OS than those with LM (7.0 versus 2.6 months; p = 0.1633 and 9.8 versus 4.4 months, hazard ratio (HR) 0.74; p = 0.465, respectively); not statistically significant (due to small sample size). Normalisation of bilirubin and completion of eight CisGem cycles were associated with longer OS (11.4 versus 2.9 months, HR 0.49; p = 0.08 and 15.2 versus 5.4 months, HR 0.12 p < 0.001, respectively). No difference in OS was shown between the bilirubin percentiles (for either PFS or OS). For PS 0-1 patients with ABC and high bilirubin due to luminal disease despite optimal stenting CisGem can be used safely with results similar to those in patients with normal bilirubin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in the relative risk and sites of central nervous system metastasis with effective combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, R.; Cox, J.D.; Holoye, P.Y.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Prolongation of survival of patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung with current effective systemic therapy has been accompanied by a marked increase in the frequency of relapse in the central nervous system (CNS). Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was shown to reduce the frequency of brain metastasis, but there was no increased short-term survival. Therefore, the necessity for PCI early in the course of treatment has been questioned, especially for patients with extensive disease. From January 1974 through March 1982, 205 patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated at the Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals. None had clinical, radioisotopic, or computed tomographic evidence of brain metastasis. Eighty-two patients received radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but no PCI; 123 patients received combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy with PCI. The cumulative probability of brain metastasis without PCI was 36% at 12 months and 47% at 24 months; the probabilities were 6 and 10%, respectively with PCI. The 24-month probability of brain metastasis in patients with limited disease and no PCI was 45%; for those with extensive disease, it was 47%. No patient presented with extracranial central nervous system (ECNS) metastasis and no one without PCI developed it. Twelve patients who received PCI developed ECNS metastasis; the cumulative probabilities rose to 14% at 12 months and 22% at 24 months. The increased frequency of ECNS involvement has led to a phase I trial of PCI followed by six cycles of combination chemotherapy, without maintenance chemotherapy, followed by irradiation of the chest and spinal cord for patients with complete response

  19. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48% showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5–6% concentration used alone and 2 (7% revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias.

  20. Hepatitis B infection reported with cancer chemotherapy: analyzing the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagawa, Akimasa; Hotta, Yuji; Kataoka, Tomoya; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Masahiro; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nishikawa, Ryohei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Kimura, Kazunori

    2018-04-16

    We conducted data mining using the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database on spontaneously reported adverse events to evaluate the association between anticancer drug therapy and hepatitis B infection. Reports of hepatitis B infection were retrieved from the FAERS database. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) was used to estimate the association between hepatitis B infection and various anticancer agents and drug combinations. We detected statistically significant risk signals of hepatitis B for 33 of 64 anticancer agents by ROR (26 cytotoxicity drugs and seven molecular-targeted drugs). We focused on molecular-targeted drugs and assessed the risk of hepatitis B from specific anticancer drug combinations. The frequency of hepatitis B infection was significantly high for drugs such as rituximab, bortezomib, imatinib, and everolimus. The addition of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and fludarabine to drug combinations additively enhanced the frequency of hepatitis B infection. There were no reports on hepatitis B infection associated with trastuzumab or azacitidine monotherapy. However, trastuzumab-containing regimens (e.g., combinations with docetaxel or paclitaxel) were correlated with the incidence of hepatitis B infection, similar to azacitidine monotherapy. Our findings suggest that the concomitant use of anticancer drugs, such as trastuzumab, taxane, and azacitidine, may contribute to the risk of hepatitis B infection. The unique signals detected from the public database might provide clues to eliminate the threat of HBV in oncology. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Combination of systemic chemotherapy with local stem cell delivered S-TRAIL in resected brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redjal, Navid; Zhu, Yanni; Shah, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in standard therapies, the survival of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients has not improved. Limitations to successful translation of new therapies include poor delivery of systemic therapies and use of simplified preclinical models which fail to reflect the clinical complexity of GBMs. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis specifically in tumor cells and we have tested its efficacy by on-site delivery via engineered stem cells (SC) in mouse models of GBM that mimic the clinical scenario of tumor aggressiveness and resection. However, about half of tumor lines are resistant to TRAIL and overcoming TRAIL-resistance in GBM by combining therapeutic agents that are currently in clinical trials with SC-TRAIL and understanding the molecular dynamics of these combination therapies are critical to the broad use of TRAIL as a therapeutic agent in clinics. In this study, we screened clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents for their ability to sensitize resistant GBM cell lines to TRAIL induced apoptosis. We show that low dose cisplatin increases surface receptor expression of death receptor 4/5 post G2 cycle arrest and sensitizes GBM cells to TRAIL induced apoptosis. In vivo, using an intracranial resection model of resistant primary human-derived GBM and real-time optical imaging, we show that a low dose of cisplatin in combination with synthetic extracellular matrix encapsulated SC-TRAIL significantly decreases tumor regrowth and increases survival in mice bearing GBM. This study has the potential to help expedite effective translation of local stem cell-based delivery of TRAIL into the clinical setting to target a broad spectrum of GBMs. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Dose-finding and pharmacokinetic study of cisplatin, gemcitabine, and SU5416 in patients with solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuenen, Bart C.; Rosen, Lee; Smit, Egbert F.; Parson, Mandy R. N.; Levi, Marcel; Ruijter, Rita; Huisman, Holger; Kedde, Marc A.; Noordhuis, Paul; van der Vijgh, Wim J. F.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Cropp, Gillian F.; Scigalla, Paul; Hoekman, Klaus; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and pharmacokinetics of the combination cisplatin, gemcitabine, and SU5416. Patients and Methods: Patients received cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) on day 1, gemcitabine 1,250 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8, repeated every 3 weeks, and SU5416 (85 and 145 mg/m(2)) intravenously

  3. Activity of gemcitabine in patients with non-small cell lung cancer : A multicentre, extended phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, FA; LeChevalier, T; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Gottfried, M; Voi, M

    Gemcitabine is a novel nucleoside analogue with activity in solid tumours. This study assessed the objective response rate to gemcitabine given weekly intravenously at a dose of 1250 mg/m(2) for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest (one cycle) in chemonaive patients with inoperable non-small cell lung

  4. Apoptosis and changes in glucose transport early after treatment of Morris hepatoma with gemcitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, U.; Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Kamencic, H.; Traut, U.; Kinscherf, R.; Doll, J.; Blatter, J.

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis has been described as an energy-consuming process. This combined in vivo/in vitro study investigated the effects of the antineoplastic agent gemcitabine on tumour metabolism and on the induction of apoptosis. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake were done in rats bearing Morris hepatoma prior to and after therapy with 90 mg gemcitabine/kg b.w. Furthermore, thymidine (TdR) incorporation into the DNA of these tumours was determined. In vitro measurements of FDG and TdR uptake were performed immediately and 24 h after the end of gemcitabine treatment, and the amount of apoptotic cells was determined using the TUNEL reaction. In vivo an increase in FDG transport and phosphorylation occurred early after gemcitabine treatment, although TdR incorporation into the DNA of the tumours declined. In vitro, an enhanced glucose transport, an increase in TdR uptake in the cytoplasm and a decrease in TdR incorporation in the nucleic acid fraction early after treatment occurred. Inhibition of glucose transport caused an increase in the amount of apoptotic cells. The increase in glucose uptake and TdR metabolism early after therapy is interpreted as a stress reaction of the tumour cells, protecting the cells from apoptosis during this early period after exposure to cytotoxic drugs like gemcitabine. (orig.)

  5. Apoptosis and changes in glucose transport early after treatment of Morris hepatoma with gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Nuklearmedizin; Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bellemann, M.E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Jena (Germany); Brix, G. [Department of Medical Radiation Hygiene, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Kamencic, H.; Traut, U.; Kinscherf, R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Zellbiologie; Morr, I.; Altmann, A. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Doll, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Blatter, J. [Lilly GmbH Germany, Bad Homburg (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    Apoptosis has been described as an energy-consuming process. This combined in vivo/in vitro study investigated the effects of the antineoplastic agent gemcitabine on tumour metabolism and on the induction of apoptosis. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake were done in rats bearing Morris hepatoma prior to and after therapy with 90 mg gemcitabine/kg b.w. Furthermore, thymidine (TdR) incorporation into the DNA of these tumours was determined. In vitro measurements of FDG and TdR uptake were performed immediately and 24 h after the end of gemcitabine treatment, and the amount of apoptotic cells was determined using the TUNEL reaction. In vivo an increase in FDG transport and phosphorylation occurred early after gemcitabine treatment, although TdR incorporation into the DNA of the tumours declined. In vitro, an enhanced glucose transport, an increase in TdR uptake in the cytoplasm and a decrease in TdR incorporation in the nucleic acid fraction early after treatment occurred. Inhibition of glucose transport caused an increase in the amount of apoptotic cells. The increase in glucose uptake and TdR metabolism early after therapy is interpreted as a stress reaction of the tumour cells, protecting the cells from apoptosis during this early period after exposure to cytotoxic drugs like gemcitabine. (orig.)

  6. Nab-Paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma: experience of use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ferris Villanueva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the results obtained with the combined use of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine in the treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Retrospective observational study. Patients treated with nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine between January of 2013 and January of 2014 were selected. Demographical and clinical data were gathered. Results: 15 patients (mean age 59,4 ± 10,3 years were included. All patients received the combination of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine in first-line metastatic disease. Nine received adjuvant treatment before the disease was metastatic. The median progression-free survival rate with combined nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine was 5,6 months (95% CI: 4,44 - 8,03. In two patients the treatment was stopped due to toxicity. Conclusions: The treatment with nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine in our patients resulted in progression-free survival rates similar to those published in clinical trials with good treatment tolerability

  7. CHOD/BVAM Chemotherapy and Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laack, Nadia N.; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Ballman, Karla V.; O'Fallon, Judith Rich; Carrero, Xiomara W.; Kurtin, Paul J.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Brown, Paul D.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Hawkins, Roland B.; Morton, Roscoe F.; Windschitl, Harry E.; Fitch, Tom R.; Pajon, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine, and dexamethasone (CHOD) plus bis-chloronitrosourea (BCNU), cytosine arabinoside, and methotrexate (BVAM) followed by whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) for patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients 70 years old and younger with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven PCNSL received one cycle of CHOD followed by two cycles of BVAM. Patients then received WBRT, 30.6 Gy, if a complete response was evoked, or 50.4 Gy if the response was less than complete; both doses were given in 1.8-Gy daily fractions. The primary efficacy endpoint was 1-year survival. Results: Thirty-six patients (19 men, 17 women) enrolled between 1995 and 2000. Median age was 60.5 years (range, 34 to 69 years). Thirty (83%) patients had baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scores of 0 to 1. All 36 patients were eligible for survival and response evaluations. Median time to progression was 12.3 months, and median survival was 18.5 months. The percentages of patients alive at 1, 2, and 3 years were 64%, 36%, and 33%, respectively. The best response was complete response in 10 patients and immediate progression in 7 patients. Ten (28%) patients had at least one grade 3 or higher neurologic toxicity. Conclusions: This regimen did improve the survival of PCNSL patients but also caused substantial toxicity. The improvement in survival is less than that reported with high-dose methotrexate-based therapies.

  8. Acridine Orange Conjugated Polymersomes for Simultaneous Nuclear Delivery of Gemcitabine and Doxorubicin to Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anajafi, Tayebeh; Scott, Michael D; You, Seungyong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Choi, Yongki; Qian, Steven Y; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-03-16

    Considering the systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents, there is an urgent need to develop new targeted drug delivery systems. Herein, we have developed a new nuclear targeted, redox sensitive, drug delivery vehicle to simultaneously deliver the anticancer drugs gemcitabine and doxorubicin to the nuclei of pancreatic cancer cells. We prepared polymeric bilayer vesicles (polymersomes), and actively encapsulated the drug combination by the pH gradient method. A redox-sensitive polymer (PEG-S-S-PLA) was incorporated to sensitize the formulation to reducing agent concentration. Acridine orange (AO) was conjugated to the surface of the polymersomes imparting nuclear localizing property. The polymersomes' toxicity and efficacy were compared with those of a free drug combination using monolayer and three-dimensional spheroid cultures of pancreatic cancer cells. We observed that the redox sensitive, nuclear-targeted polymersomes released more than 60% of their encapsulated contents in response to 50 mM glutathione. The nanoparticles are nontoxic; however, the drug encapsulated vesicles have significant toxicity. The prepared formulation can increase the drug's therapeutic index by delivering the drugs directly to the cells' nuclei, one of the key organelles in the cells. This study is likely to initiate research in targeted nuclear delivery using other drug formulations in other types of cancers.

  9. A combined modality therapeutic approach to metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma with systemic chemotherapy and local therapy to sites of disease: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanajothy, Rosana; Warren, Graham W; Okun, Sherry; Peterson, Lindsay L

    2016-06-01

    Cases of metastatic anal carcinoma managed with a combination of systemic chemotherapy and local therapies to both solitary sites of metastases and the primary site have been reported in the literature. We present a case of a 55-year-old male with metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma to the liver treated with induction chemotherapy with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) followed by liver resection and radiation to the anal primary with concurrent 5FU and mitomycin. This approach resulted in control of disease without evidence of recurrence, and no increased toxicities now 19 months from initial diagnosis to time of reporting. This novel approach resulted in a good treatment response as documented by imaging and symptom improvement and a long disease free interval.

  10. Intraarterial Chemotherapy or Chemoembolization for Locally Advanced and/or Recurrent Hepatic Tumors: Evaluation of the Feeding Artery with an Interventional CT System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Toshinori; Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Maruoka, Kousei; Harada, Kazunori; Aridomi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an interventional CT system for intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization for locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.Methods: Thirty-eight patients with locally advanced or recurrent hepatic tumors underwent 73 intraarterial contrast-enhanced CT (IA-CECT) examinations immediately before chemotherapy or chemoembolization. The degree of tumor vascularity on angiography and enhancement on IA-CECT was classified into three grades: no, mild, or marked vascularity. The IA-CECT grades were compared with the angiographic grades.Results: Twenty-nine (69%) of 42 examinations that were interpreted as having no or mild vascularity on angiography were classified as marked enhancement on IA-CECT. Based on IA-CECT findings, the position of the catheter was changed in 14 (19%) of 73 CT examinations. The reasons for the reposition were as follows: weak or no enhancement of the tumor (n = 11) or strong enhancement of the gallbladder wall (n = 3). The treatment strategy was changed in three patients (8%). No major complications relating to the interventional procedures were observed.Conclusions: IA-CECT is a reliable method when evaluating the perfusion of the tumor and adjacent normal tissues. The interventional CT system is useful for performing safe and effective intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization in patients with locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors

  11. Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  12. Gemcitabine-loaded magnetic albumin nanospheres for cancer chemohyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongbo; Ke Fei; An Yanli; Hou Xinxin; Zhang Hao; Lin Mei; Zhang Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Eliminating cancer without harming normal body tissue remains a longstanding challenge in medicine. Toward this goal, we prepared nanosized magnetic albumin nanospheres encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 ) and antitumor drugs (Gemcitabine, GEM). Magnetic albumin nanospheres (average size ≈ 224 nm) had good magnetic responsiveness upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field even though Fe 3 O 4 was encased in nanospheres. Thermodynamic test showed that Fe 3 O 4 could serve as a heating source under AMF and lead the nanospheres to reach their steady temperature (45 °C). The release results in vitro indicated that nanospheres had an obvious effect of sustained release of GEM. The result of cytotoxicity assay showed that the toxicity of this material was classified as grade 1, which belongs to no cytotoxicity. The antitumor efficacy of the GEM/Fe 3 O 4 albumin nanospheres combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia on non-small lung cancer cell line GlC-82 was examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry assay. Compared with nanospheres entrapping GEM group, nanospheres entrapping Fe 3 O 4 combined with MFH group, and GEM/Fe 3 O 4 albumin nanospheres without MFH group, the GEM/Fe 3 O 4 albumin nanospheres exhibited enhanced antitumor efficacy. Thus, the GEM/Fe 3 O 4 albumin nanospheres have promising applications in cancer treatment.

  13. Suppression of IL-6 Gene by shRNA Augments Gemcitabine Chemosensitization in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bo Xing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has an exceedingly poor prognosis, accounting for five-year survival of less than 5%. Presently, improving the efficacy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma treatment has been the focus of medical researchers worldwide. Recently, it has been suggested that deregulation of interleukin- (IL- 6 is caused by a key gene involved in the beginning and development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Herein, we investigated whether suppression of IL-6 could augment gemcitabine sensitivity in the PANC-1 cells. We found considerably higher expression of IL-6 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues than that in the adjacent nontumorous tissues. Suppression of IL-6 by shRNA resulted in apoptosis as well as inhibition of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. In addition, suppression of IL-6 remarkably promoted antitumor effect of gemcitabine, indicating that the combination of shRNA targeting IL-6 with gemcitabine may provide a potential clinical approach for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  14. High Incidences of Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy without Systemic Antifungal Prophylaxis: A Prospective Observational Study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Luh Tang

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFIs is an important complication for acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy. However, the epidemiological information is not clear in Southeastern Asia, an area of potential high incidences of IFIs. To clarify it, we enrolled 298 non-M3 adult AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy without systemic anti-fungal prophylaxis from Jan 2004 to Dec 2009, when we applied a prospective diagnostic and treatment algorithm for IFIs. Their demographic parameters, IFI characters, and treatment outcome were collected for analysis. The median age of these patients was 51 years. Standard induction chemotherapy was used for 246 (82.6% patients, and 66.8% of patients achieved complete remission (CR or partial remission. The incidence of all-category IFIs was 34.6% (5.7% proven IFIs, 5.0% probable IFIs and 23.8% possible IFIs. Candida tropicalis was the leading pathogen among yeast, and lower respiratory tract was the most common site for IFIs (75.4%, 80/106. Standard induction chemotherapy and failure to CR were identified as risk factors for IFIs. The presence of IFI in induction independently predicted worse survival (hazard ratio 1.536 (1.100-2.141, p value = 0.012. Even in those who survived from the initial IFI insults after 3 months, the presence of IFIs in induction still predicted a poor long-term survival. This study confirms high incidences of IFIs in Southeastern Asia, and illustrates potential risk factors; poor short-term and long-term outcomes are also demonstrated. This epidemiological information will provide useful perspectives for anti-fungal prophylaxis and treatment for AML patients during induction, so that best chances of cure and survival can be provided.

  15. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gemcitabine for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoto, Makoto, E-mail: shinoto@saga-himat.jp [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Shigeo [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saisho, Hiromitsu [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Kaken Hospital, Chemotherapy Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Asano, Takehide; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Amano, Hodaka; Ishihara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Matsuda, Masamichi; Kainuma, Osamu; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Furuse, Junji; Nakagori, Toshio; Okusaka, Takuji; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the maximum tolerated dose of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) and gemcitabine dose delivered concurrently and to estimate local effect and survival. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of pancreatic invasive ductal carcinomas and radiographically unresectable disease without metastasis. Concurrent gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15, and the dose levels were escalated from 400 to 1000 mg/m{sup 2} under the starting dose level (43.2 GyE) of C-ion RT. The dose levels of C-ion RT were escalated from 43.2 to 55.2 GyE at 12 fractions under the fixed recommended gemcitabine dose determined. Results: Seventy-six patients were enrolled. Among the 72 treated patients, dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 3 patients: grade 3 infection in 1 patient and grade 4 neutropenia in 2 patients. Only 1 patient experienced a late grade 3 gastric ulcer and bleeding 10 months after C-ion RT. The recommended dose of gemcitabine with C-ion RT was found to be 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of C-ion RT with the full dose of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) was safely increased to 55.2 GyE. The freedom from local progression rate was 83% at 2 years using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The 2-year overall survival rates in all patients and in the high-dose group with stage III (≥45.6 GyE) were 35% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine was well tolerated and effective in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  16. Fluoropyrimidine-HAI (hepatic arterial infusion) versus systemic chemotherapy (SCT) for unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Pasquali, Sandro; Nitti, Donato

    2009-07-08

    Although locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) claim the advantage of delivering higher doses of anticancer agents directly into the metastatic organ as compared to systemic chemotherapy (SCT), the benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) is unclear. We quantitatively summarized the results of randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable liver metastatic disease from colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this work is to quantitatively summarize the results of RCT comparing HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from CRC. A systematic review of reports published until September 2008 on the findings of RCT that compared HAI to SCT for the treatment of unresectable CRC liver metastases was performed by searching the MEDLINE, Embase, Cancerlit, Cochrane and GoogleScholar electronic databases as well as other databanks collecting information on clinical trials. Inclusion criteria were patients with unresectable CRC liver metastases enrolled in RCT comparing HAI to SCT. The outcome measures were tumor response rate and overall survival. Two authors independently carried out study selection and assessment of methodological quality. A third author performed a concordance analysis in order to unravel potential systematic biases. Ten RCT were identified that met the eligibility criteria. HAI regimens were based on floxuridine (FUDR), 5-fluorouracil or either one of these two fluoropyrimidines in eight and one RCT, respectively. SCT consisted of FUDR or 5-fluorouracil in three and seven RCT, respectively. By pooling the summary data, tumor response rate resulted 42.9% and 18.4% for HAI and SCT, respectively (RR = 2.26; 95% CI, 1.80 to 2.84; P < 0.0001). Mean weighted median OS times were 15.9 and 12.4 months for HAI and SCT, respectively: the meta-risk of death was not statistically different between the two treatment groups (HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = 0.24). Currently

  17. Intra-arterial port implantation for intra-arterial chemotherapy : comparison between PIPS(Percutaneously Implantable Port System) and port system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Jin; Shim, Hyung Jin; Jung, Hun Young; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Song, In Sup; Kwak, Byung Kook

    1999-01-01

    To compare the techniques and complications of intra-arterial port implantation for intra-arterial chemotherapy between PIPS and the port system. For intra-arterial port implantation, 27 cases in 27 patients were retrospectively evaluated using PIPS(PIPS-200, William Cook Europe, Denmark) while for 21 cases in 19 patients a pediatric venous port system(Port-A-Cath, 5.8F, SIMS Deltec, U. S. A.) was used. All intra-arterial port implantation was performed percuteneously in an angiographic ward. Hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed in 18 patients and hepatic metastasis in 16. Peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, and pancreatic gastric, ovarian, renal cell and colon carcinoma were included. We compared the techniques and complications between PIPS and the port system. The follow up period ranged from 23 to 494(mean, 163) days in PIPS and from 12 to 431(mean, 150) days in the port system. In all cases, intra-arterial port implantations were technically successful. Port catheter tips were located in the common hepatic artery(n=8), proper hepatic artery(n=7), right hepatic artery(n=5), gastroduodenal artery(n=2), left hepatic artery(n=1), pancreaticoduodenal artery(n=1), inferior mesenteric artery(n=1), lumbar artery(n=1), and renal artery(n=1) in PIPS, and in the proper hepatic artery(n=6), gastroduodenal artery(n=6), common hepatic artery(n=3), right hepatic artery(n=4), inferior mesenteric artery(n=1), and internal iliac artery(n=1) in the port system. Port chambers were buried in infrainguinal subcutaneous tissue. Using PIPS, complications developed in seven cases(25.9%) and of these, four (57.1%) were catheter or chamber related. In the port system, catheter or chamber related complications developed in four cases(19.0%). Because PIPS and the port system have relative merits and demetrits, successful intra-arterial port implantation is possible if equipment is properly selected

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy and cancer cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertino, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of chemotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery and/or radiotherapy is well founded in experimental tumor systems and appears to be effective in patients in some circumstances. It is clear from both clinical and experimental studies that (1) the dose is important, (2) the earlier chemotherapy is started after primary therapy the better, and (3) combination chemotherapy may be more effective than single-agent treatment. The better the estimation of risk of recurrence, the better the assessment of the risk-benefit ratio with adjuvant therapy. Salvage therapy as well as relative risk of recurrence are considerations in the choice of patients to be treated. Finally, some evidence is presented to indicate that alkylating agents may not be necessary in combination regimens for adjuvant therapy if effective antimetabolite combinations are available

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilber, F R; Rosen, G

    1989-08-01

    present to minimally include high-dose methotrexate, Adriamycin, and cisplatin. It would also appear from several of these reports that not only is the adjuvant use of these chemotherapeutic agents indicated, but that the preoperative use of these agents has had significant advantages. The neoadjuvant chemotherapy begins the essential systemic chemotherapy at a very early stage, allows histologic assessment of treatment effect, permits altering drug regimens postoperative, and in many reported trials has allowed less than amputative surgery (limb salvage) to be performed. Finally, close follow-up of patients with osteosarcoma has therapeutic value.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  20. A pilot study: sequential gemcitabine/cisplatin and icotinib as induction therapy for stage IIB to IIIA non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A phase II clinical trial previously evaluated the sequential administration of erlotinib after chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This current pilot study assessed the feasibility of sequential induction therapy in patients with stage IIB to IIIA NSCLC adenocarcinoma. Methods Patients received gemcitabine 1,250 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1, followed by oral icotinib (125 mg, three times a day) on days 15 to 28. A repeatcomputed tomography(CT) scan evaluated the response to the induction treatment after two 4-week cycles and eligible patients underwent surgical resection. The primary objective was to assess the objective response rate (ORR), while EGFR and KRAS mutations and mRNA and protein expression levels of ERCC1 and RRM1 were analyzed in tumor tissues and blood samples. Results Eleven patients, most with stage IIIA disease, completed preoperative treatment. Five patients achieved partial response according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria (ORR=45%) and six patients underwent resection. Common toxicities included neutropenia, alanine transaminase (ALT) elevation, fatigue, dry skin, rash, nausea, alopecia and anorexia. No serious complications were recorded perioperatively. Three patients had exon 19 deletions and those with EGFR mutations were more likely to achieve a clinical response (P= 0.083). Furthermore, most cases who achieved a clinical response had low levels of ERCC1 expression and high levels of RRM1. Conclusions Two cycles of sequentially administered gemcitabine/cisplatin with icotinib as an induction treatment is a feasible and efficacious approach for stage IIB to IIIA NSCLC adenocarcinoma, which provides evidence for the further investigation of these chemotherapeutic and molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:23621919

  1. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved

  2. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esnaola, Nestor F. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O' Brien, Paul [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Camp, E. Ramsay [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Thomas, Melanie B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Cole, David J. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Montero, Alberto J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Orwat, Kelly P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  3. A NOTCH-sensitive uPAR-regulated oncolytic adenovirus effectively suppresses pancreatic tumor growth and triggers synergistic anticancer effects with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato-Berciano, Ana; Raimondi, Giulia; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Alemany, Ramon; Montoliu, Lluis; Fillat, Cristina

    2017-04-04

    Notch signaling pathway is an embryonic program that becomes reactivated in pancreatic cancer and contributes to cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance. We explored the concept of oncolytic adenoviral activity in response to Notch activation signaling, in the context of a chimeric promoter with uPAR regulatory sequences, as a strategy to drive its activity in neoplastic and CSC. We explored the advantages of a chemo-virotherapy approach based on synergistic combinations. Regulatory sequences recognized by the transcriptional factor CSL upstream a minimal uPAR promoter were engineered in adenoviral vectors and in the oncolytic adenovirus AdNuPARmE1A. Viral response to Notch signaling, and viral potency in cell lines and pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSC) was tested. Preclinical toxicity and antitumor efficacy in xenografts and Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) mouse models was evaluated, as unimodal or in combination with gemcitabine+nab-paclitaxel. Mechanistic studies were conducted to explore the synergism of combined therapies.We demonstrate that CSL-binding site optimized-engineered sequences respond to Notch activation in AdNuPARmLuc and AdNuPARmE1A. AdNuPARmE1A showed strong lytic effects in pancreatic cancer cell lines and PCSC. AdNuPARmE1A displayed attenuated activity in normal tissues, but robust antitumor effects in xenograft and PDX models, leading to a reduced capacity of treated tumors to form tumorspheres. Chemo-virotherapy treatment enlarged therapeutic response in both tumor models. Synergistic effects of the combination resulted from viral sensitization of apoptotic cell death triggered by chemotherapy.In summary we present a novel effective oncolytic adenovirus, AdNuPARmE1A that reduces PCSC and presents synergistic effects with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, supporting further clinical development.

  4. [Clinical efficacy and adverse effects of taxol plus carboplatin or gemcitabine plus carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Yu-Liang

    2010-12-21

    To observe the clinical efficacy and adverse effects of taxol plus carboplatin (TP) or gemcitabine plus carboplatin (GP) in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma. A total of 86 patients with advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma with a histologically confirmed diagnosis at our department were treated with at least two cycles of drug therapy according to the WHO standard. There were 43 cases in TP group and 43 cases in GP group. TP group: taxol 150 mg/m(2), d1, carboplatin 300 mg/m(2) in d1; GP group: gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2), 30 min, d1, 8, carboplatin 300 mg/m(2) in d1, 3 weeks a cycle. The efficacy and side effects were analyzed after two cycles of chemotherapy. When TP and GP groups were compared, the effective rate was 44.2% vs 39.5%; disease control rate (CR + PR + SD): 81.4% vs 74.4%; median time to progress (TTP): 4.6 vs 4.5 months; medium survivals: 8.6 vs 8.8 months; 1-year survival rates: 17.2% vs 18.1%; 2-year survival rates: 8% vs 10%. The statistic analysis showed that the two groups had no significant difference. The main cytotoxicities of GP and TP groups were predominantly thrombocytopenia and leucopenia respectively. The two groups had no significant statistical difference. The incidences of allergen, alopecia and peripheral neurotoxicity were higher in the TP group. The two groups had statistical difference. Tolerance was excellent in both groups. The therapeutic effect and tolerance are excellent for advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma. The efficacy and survival rate of two groups show no statistical difference.

  5. Impact of cancer and chemotherapy on autonomic nervous system function and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults with cancer: a case-controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott C; Schondorf, Ronald; Benoit, Julie; Kilgour, Robert D

    2015-05-18

    Preliminary evidence suggests cancer- and chemotherapy-related autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction may contribute to the increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity- and mortality-risks in cancer survivors. However, the reliability of these findings may have been jeopardized by inconsistent participant screening and assessment methods. Therefore, good laboratory practices must be established before the presence and nature of cancer-related autonomic dysfunction can be characterized. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting concurrent ANS and cardiovascular evaluations in young adult cancer patients, according to the following criteria: i) identifying methodological pitfalls and proposing good laboratory practice criteria for ANS testing in cancer, and ii) providing initial physiologic evidence of autonomic perturbations in cancer patients using the composite autonomic scoring scale (CASS). Thirteen patients (mixed diagnoses) were assessed immediately before and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Their results were compared to 12 sex- and age-matched controls. ANS function was assessed using standardized tests of resting CV (tilt-table, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and Valsalva maneuver) and sudomotor (quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test) reactivity. Cardiovascular reactivity during exercise was assessed using a modified Astrand-Ryhming cycle ergometer protocol. Our feasibility criteria addressed: i) recruitment potential, ii) retention rates, iii) pre-chemotherapy assessment potential, iv) test performance/tolerability, and v) identification and minimizing the influence of potentially confounding medication. T-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess between- and within-group differences at baseline and follow-up. The overall success rate in achieving our feasibility criteria was 98.4 %. According to the CASS, there was evidence of ANS impairment at baseline in 30.8 % of patients, which persisted in 18.2 % of patients

  6. Impact of cancer and chemotherapy on autonomic nervous system function and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults with cancer: a case-controlled feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Scott C.; Schondorf, Ronald; Benoit, Julie; Kilgour, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests cancer- and chemotherapy-related autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction may contribute to the increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity- and mortality-risks in cancer survivors. However, the reliability of these findings may have been jeopardized by inconsistent participant screening and assessment methods. Therefore, good laboratory practices must be established before the presence and nature of cancer-related autonomic dysfunction can be characterized. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting concurrent ANS and cardiovascular evaluations in young adult cancer patients, according to the following criteria: i) identifying methodological pitfalls and proposing good laboratory practice criteria for ANS testing in cancer, and ii) providing initial physiologic evidence of autonomic perturbations in cancer patients using the composite autonomic scoring scale (CASS). Thirteen patients (mixed diagnoses) were assessed immediately before and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Their results were compared to 12 sex- and age-matched controls. ANS function was assessed using standardized tests of resting CV (tilt-table, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and Valsalva maneuver) and sudomotor (quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test) reactivity. Cardiovascular reactivity during exercise was assessed using a modified Astrand-Ryhming cycle ergometer protocol. Our feasibility criteria addressed: i) recruitment potential, ii) retention rates, iii) pre-chemotherapy assessment potential, iv) test performance/tolerability, and v) identification and minimizing the influence of potentially confounding medication. T-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess between- and within-group differences at baseline and follow-up. The overall success rate in achieving our feasibility criteria was 98.4 %. According to the CASS, there was evidence of ANS impairment at baseline in 30.8 % of patients, which persisted in 18.2 % of patients

  7. Results of primary central nervous system lymphoma treated by radiation and chemotherapy. Retrospective analysis of twelve institutions in the Tokai district of Japan, 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the therapeutic results and prognostic factors of 46 primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) patients who were treated at twelve institutions in the Tokai district of Japan between 1995 and 1999. We compared the results with those of a Japanese nationwide survey performed in the past. We sent each institution a questionnaire about the state of patients' disease, pathological type, method and doses of radiotherapy, regimen and intensity of chemotherapy, and patients' prognoses. The range of patients' ages was 33 to 93 years (median, 61 years). Thirty-one were men and 15 were women. The most prevalent histology was diffuse large B cell type (33 patients). We used the Kaplan-Meier method to calculate the survival rate and Cox's proportional hazards model to analyze the prognostic factors. The five-year cumulative survival rate was 25%, and the median survival time was 22.7 months. The five-year disease-free survival rate was 23%. In monovariate analysis, patients who were both younger than 60 years old and had a World Health Organization (WHO) performance status (PS) score equal to or less than 2 showed a better survival rate. Furthermore, the patients receiving systemic chemotherapy showed a significantly better local control rate. In addition, patients who received systemic chemotherapy achieved a higher complete remission rate than those not receiving it. However, no factors that significantly influenced survival rate were identified in multivariate analysis. We demonstrated that the therapeutic outcome of PCNSL patients has recently improved. In particular, patients with good PS showed better local control than those with poor PS. However, we could not identify any significant prognostic factors in PCNSL patients. (author)

  8. Chemotherapy and Radiofrequency-Induced Mild Hyperthermia Combined Treatment of Orthotopic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Agha, Mahdi S; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J; Law, Justin J; Newton, Jared M; Nguyen, Lam; Curley, Steven A; Corr, Stuart J

    2018-04-02

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) have one of the poorest survival rates of all cancers. The main reason for this is related to the unique tumor stroma and poor vascularization of PDAC. As a consequence, chemotherapeutic drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine, cannot efficiently penetrate into the tumor tissue. Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) mild hyperthermia treatment was proposed as a synergistic therapy to enhance drug uptake into the tumor by increasing tumor vascular inflow and perfusion, thus, increasing the effect of chemotherapy. RF-induced hyperthermia is a safer and non-invasive technique of tumor heating compared to conventional contact heating procedures. In this study, we investigated the short- and long-term effects (~20 days and 65 days, respectively) of combination chemotherapy and RF hyperthermia in an orthotopic PDAC model in mice. The benefit of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine treatment was confirmed in mice; however, the effect of treatment was statistically insignificant in comparison to saline treated mice during long-term observation. The benefit of RF was minimal in the short-term and completely insignificant during long-term observation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemotherapy Agents: A Primer for the Interventional Radiologist

    OpenAIRE

    Mihlon, Frank; Ray, Charles E.; Messersmith, Wells

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the basic principles of cancer chemotherapy and provide an overview of each of the general classes of chemotherapeutic agents with a target audience of interventional radiologists in mind. Special attention is paid to agents used in regional chemotherapy as well as agents commonly included in systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for patients who also require regional chemotherapy.

  10. Cannabidiol inhibits paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain through 5-HT(1A) receptors without diminishing nervous system function or chemotherapy efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sara Jane; McAllister, Sean D; Kawamura, Rumi; Murase, Ryuchi; Neelakantan, Harshini; Walker, Ellen A

    2014-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PAC) is associated with chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CIPN) that can lead to the cessation of treatment in cancer patients even in the absence of alternate therapies. We previously reported that chronic administration of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) prevents PAC-induced mechanical and thermal sensitivity in mice. Hence, we sought to determine receptor mechanisms by which CBD inhibits CIPN and whether CBD negatively effects nervous system function or chemotherapy efficacy. The ability of acute CBD pretreatment to prevent PAC-induced mechanical sensitivity was assessed, as was the effect of CBD on place conditioning and on an operant-conditioned learning and memory task. The potential interaction of CBD and PAC on breast cancer cell viability was determined using the MTT assay. PAC-induced mechanical sensitivity was prevented by administration of CBD (2.5 - 10 mg·kg⁻¹) in female C57Bl/6 mice. This effect was reversed by co-administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY 100635, but not the CB₁ antagonist SR141716 or the CB₂ antagonist SR144528. CBD produced no conditioned rewarding effects and did not affect conditioned learning and memory. Also, CBD + PAC combinations produce additive to synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell viability. Our data suggest that CBD is protective against PAC-induced neurotoxicity mediated in part by the 5-HT(1A) receptor system. Furthermore, CBD treatment was devoid of conditioned rewarding effects or cognitive impairment and did not attenuate PAC-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell viability. Hence, adjunct treatment with CBD during PAC chemotherapy may be safe and effective in the prevention or attenuation of CIPN. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Cannabidiol inhibits paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain through 5-HT1A receptors without diminishing nervous system function or chemotherapy efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sara Jane; McAllister, Sean D; Kawamura, Rumi; Murase, Ryuchi; Neelakantan, Harshini; Walker, Ellen A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Paclitaxel (PAC) is associated with chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CIPN) that can lead to the cessation of treatment in cancer patients even in the absence of alternate therapies. We previously reported that chronic administration of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) prevents PAC-induced mechanical and thermal sensitivity in mice. Hence, we sought to determine receptor mechanisms by which CBD inhibits CIPN and whether CBD negatively effects nervous system function or chemotherapy efficacy. Experimental Approach The ability of acute CBD pretreatment to prevent PAC-induced mechanical sensitivity was assessed, as was the effect of CBD on place conditioning and on an operant-conditioned learning and memory task. The potential interaction of CBD and PAC on breast cancer cell viability was determined using the MTT assay. Key Results PAC-induced mechanical sensitivity was prevented by administration of CBD (2.5 – 10 mg·kg−1) in female C57Bl/6 mice. This effect was reversed by co-administration of the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635, but not the CB1 antagonist SR141716 or the CB2 antagonist SR144528. CBD produced no conditioned rewarding effects and did not affect conditioned learning and memory. Also, CBD + PAC combinations produce additive to synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell viability. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that CBD is protective against PAC-induced neurotoxicity mediated in part by the 5-HT1A receptor system. Furthermore, CBD treatment was devoid of conditioned rewarding effects or cognitive impairment and did not attenuate PAC-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell viability. Hence, adjunct treatment with CBD during PAC chemotherapy may be safe and effective in the prevention or attenuation of CIPN. PMID:24117398

  12. Gold Core Mesoporous Organosilica Shell Degradable Nanoparticles for Two-Photon Imaging and Gemcitabine Monophosphate Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Rhamani, Saher; Chaix, Arnaud; Aggad, Dina; Hoang, Phuong Mai; Moosa, Basem; Garcia, Marcel; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Charnay, Clarence; Almalik, Abdulaziz; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of gold core degradable mesoporous organosilica shell nanoparticles is described. The nanopaticles were very efficient for two-photon luminescence imaging of cancer cells and for in vitro gemcitabine monophosphate delivery, allowing promising theranostic applications in the nanomedicine field.

  13. Gold Core Mesoporous Organosilica Shell Degradable Nanoparticles for Two-Photon Imaging and Gemcitabine Monophosphate Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Rhamani, Saher

    2017-09-12

    The synthesis of gold core degradable mesoporous organosilica shell nanoparticles is described. The nanopaticles were very efficient for two-photon luminescence imaging of cancer cells and for in vitro gemcitabine monophosphate delivery, allowing promising theranostic applications in the nanomedicine field.

  14. Effects of gemcitabine on renal function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, JA; Groen, HJM; Meijer, S; Smit, EF

    Gemcitabine is a novel fluorine-substituted cytarabine (Ara-C) analogue with activity against a range of solid tumours. Besides dose-limiting haematological toxicity, renal side-effects were observed from phase I and II studies concerning elevations of serum creatinine, proteinuria and

  15. Gemcitabine and capecitabine for heavily pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and gemcitabin (GemCap) in heavily pre-treated, therapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and the clinical importance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) measurement. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients' inclusion criteria included...

  16. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern

    2010-01-01

    DGP, maximum of eight courses, until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously day 1, gemcitabine was given day 1 and 8 in doses increasing from 600 to 1,000 mg/m(2) every third week. Patients had castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRMPC......), adequate function of liver, kidney and bone marrow; ECOG performance status...

  17. A phase II study of gemcitabine in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meerbeeck, JP; Bass, P; Debruyne, C; Groen, HJ; Manegold, C; Ardizzoni, A; Gridelli, C; van Marck, EA; Lentz, M; Giaccone, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND, Gemcitabine has shown activity in patients with less chemosensitive solid tumors. Phase II screening of novel drugs is an accepted method with which to investigate new therapies in malignant mesothelioma. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Lung Cancer

  18. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, Chris; Castro Kreder, Natasja; Loves, Willem J. P.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel,

  19. Retinoblastoma: Achieving new standards with methods of chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kaliki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of retinoblastoma (RB has dramatically changed over the past two decades from previous radiotherapy methods to current chemotherapy strategies. RB is a remarkably chemotherapy-sensitive tumor. Chemotherapy is currently used as a first-line approach for children with this malignancy and can be delivered by intravenous, intra-arterial, periocular, and intravitreal routes. The choice of route for chemotherapy administration depends upon the tumor laterality and tumor staging. Intravenous chemotherapy (IVC is used most often in bilateral cases, orbital RB, and as an adjuvant treatment in high-risk RB. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC is used in cases with group C or D RB and selected cases of group E tumor. Periocular chemotherapy is used as an adjunct treatment in eyes with group D and E RB and those with persistent/recurrent vitreous seeds. Intravitreal chemotherapy is reserved for eyes with persistent/recurrent vitreous seeds. In this review, we describe the various forms of chemotherapy used in the management of RB. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms "RB," and "treatment," "chemotherapy," "systemic chemotherapy," "IVC," "IAC," "periocular chemotherapy," or "intravitreal chemotherapy." Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately.

  20. Radiosensitizing potential of gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) within the cell cycle in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, Detlev; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Eble, Michael; Blatter, Johannes; Wannenmacher, Michael; Weber, Klaus J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine; dFdCyd) is a new deoxycitidine analog which exhibits substantial activity against solid tumors and radiosensitizing properties in vitro. To examine cell cycle-specific effects of a combined treatment with gemcitabine and radiation, the in vitro clonogenic survival of two different cell lines was measured for cells from log-phase culture, G1 and S-phase cells. Methods and Materials: Chinese hamster (V79) and human colon carcinoma (Widr) cells were exposed to different radiation doses and for different points of time relative to gemcitabine treatment (2 h). Experiments were also carried out with different cell-cycle populations obtained after mitotic selection (V79) or after serum stimulation of plateau-phase cells (Widr). The resulting survival curves were analyzed according to the LQ model, and mean inactivation doses (MID) and the cell cycle-specific enhancement ratios (ER) were calculated from the survival curve parameters. Results: Effectiveness of combined treatment of log-phase cells was greatest when cells were irradiated at the end of the gemcitabine exposure [ER: 1.28 (V79), 1.24 (Widr)]. For later times after the removal of the drug, radiosensitization declined, approaching independent toxicity. From the time course of interactive-type damage decay half-life values of 75 min (V79) and 92 min (Widr) were derived. Gemcitabine did not radiosensitize G1 Widr cells or V79 cells from the G1/S border, but substantial radiosensitization was observed for the S-phase cell preparations [ER: 1.45 (V79-lateS), 1.57 (Widr)]. Conclusions: Treatment of cells with gemcitabine immediately before irradiation eliminates, or at least greatly reduces, the variation in radiosensitivity during the cell cycle that is manifested by radioresistance during S phase. This reversal of S-phase radioresistance could imply that gemcitabine interferes with the potentially lethal damage repair/fixation pathway. Other approaches have been

  1. Paradox of Prescribing Late Chemotherapy: Oncologists Explain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Minnie; Connell, Cathleen M; De Vries, Raymond G; Janz, Nancy K; Bickel, Kathleen E; Silveira, Maria J

    2016-12-01

    The value of chemotherapy for patients with cancer in the last weeks of life warrants examination. Late chemotherapy may not improve survival or quality of life but typically precludes hospice enrollment and may result in additional symptoms, increased use of other aggressive treatments, and worsening quality of life. Few studies have explored oncologists' rationales for administering chemotherapy near death. This study examines the self-reported factors that influence oncologists' decisions about late chemotherapy. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 17 oncologists through a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using conventional content analysis, a qualitative method that allows the detection and analysis of patterns in the data. Clinical factors take priority in determining late chemotherapy decisions when clear treatment choices exist. When clinical factors are ambiguous, emotion becomes a highly salient influence. Oncologists view late chemotherapy to be patient driven and use it to palliate emotional distress and maintain patient hope even when physical benefit is unexpected. Oncologists experience unique and difficult challenges when caring for dying patients, including emotionally draining communication, overwhelming responsibility for life/death, limitations of oncology to heal, and prognostic uncertainty. These challenges are also eased by offering late chemotherapy. The findings reveal a nuanced understanding of why oncologists find it difficult to refuse chemotherapy treatment for patients near death. Optimal end-of-life treatment decisions require supportive interventions and system change, both of which must take into account the challenges oncologists face.

  2. Mechanistic studies of Gemcitabine-loaded nanoplatforms in resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papa, Anne-Laure; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Poulomi; Banerjee, Deboshri; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Harfouche, Rania

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the deadliest of all cancers, with a mortality rate of 91%. Gemcitabine is considered the gold chemotherapeutic standard, but only marginally improves life-span due to its chemical instability and low cell penetrance. A new paradigm to improve Gemcitabine’s therapeutic index is to administer it in nanoparticles, which favour its delivery to cells when under 500 nm in diameter. Although promising, this approach still suffers from major limitations, as the choice of nanovector used as well as its effects on Gemcitabine intracellular trafficking inside pancreatic cancer cells remain unknown. A proper elucidation of these mechanisms would allow for the elaboration of better strategies to engineer more potent Gemcitabine nanotherapeutics against pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine was encapsulated in two types of commonly used nanovectors, namely poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and cholesterol-based liposomes, and their physico-chemical parameters assessed in vitro. Their mechanisms of action in human pancreatic cells were compared with those of the free drug, and with each others, using cytotoxity, apoptosis and ultrastructural analyses. Physico-chemical analyses of both drugs showed high loading efficiencies and sizes of less than 200 nm, as assessed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with a drug release profile of at least one week. These profiles translated to significant cytotoxicity and apoptosis, as well as distinct intracellular trafficking mechanisms, which were most pronounced in the case of PLGem showing significant mitochondrial, cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum stresses. Our study demonstrates how the choice of nanovector affects the mechanisms of drug action and is a crucial determinant of Gemcitabine intracellular trafficking and potency in pancreatic cancer settings

  3. Phase I study of conformal radiotherapy with concurrent gemcitabine in locally advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangar, Vijay K.; McBain, Catherine A.; Lyons, Jeanette; Ramani, Vijay; Logue, John; Wylie, James; Clarke, Noel W.; Cowan, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase I trial was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose of gemcitabine given once weekly during hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy to patients with locally advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Eight male patients, median age 69 years, with Stage T2 (n = 4) or T3 (n = 4) N0M0, were enrolled in cohorts of 3. Treatment comprised conformal radiotherapy (52.5 Gy in 20 fractions) within 4 weeks, with concurrent gemcitabine once weekly for four cycles. The weekly gemcitabine dose was escalated from 100 mg/m 2 in increments of 50 mg/m 2 per cohort. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity Grade 3 or greater arising in >1 of 3 patients in each cohort. Tumor response was assessed cystoscopically and radiologically at 3 months. Results: All 8 patients completed radiotherapy, and 6 of 8 completed chemoradiotherapy. No acute toxicity greater than RTOG Grade 1 was seen with gemcitabine at 100 mg/m 2 . Dose-limiting toxicity was observed at 150 mg/m 2 with Grade 3 toxicity seen in 2 of 2 patients (one bladder, one bowel). An additional 3 patients received 100 mg/m 2 with minimal toxicity. No hematologic toxicity was encountered. A complete response was seen in 7 (87.5%) of 8 patients, all of whom were disease free at a median follow-up of 19.5 months (range, 14-23 months). No late toxicity (greater than RTOG Grade 0) has been observed. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose for gemcitabine given once weekly with concurrent hypofractionated conformal bladder radiotherapy was 150 mg/m 2 , with a maximal recommended dose of 100 mg/m 2 . This dose regimen has now entered Phase II clinical trials

  4. Enzalutamide inhibits proliferation of gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells with increased androgen receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Koji; Horie, Kengo; Mizutani, Kosuke; Kato, Taku; Fujita, Yasunori; Kawakami, Kyojiro; Kojima, Toshio; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    Advanced bladder cancer is treated mainly with gemcitabine and cisplatin, but most patients eventually become resistance. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been implicated in bladder cancer as well as other types of cancer including prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of AR in gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells and also the potential of enzalutamide, an AR inhibitor, as a therapeutic for the chemoresistance. First of all, we established gemcitabine-resistant T24 cells (T24GR) from T24 bladder cancer cells and performed gene expression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed upregulation of AR expression in T24GR cells compared with T24 cells. AR mRNA and protein expression was confirmed to be increased in T24GR cells, respectively, by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, which was associated with more potent AR transcriptional activity as measured by luciferase reporter assay. The copy number of AR gene in T24GR cells determined by PCR was twice as many as that of T24 cells. AR silencing by siRNA transfection resulted in inhibition of proliferation of T24GR cells. Cell culture in charcoal-stripped serum and treatment with enzalutamide inhibited growth of T24GR cells, which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest. AR transcriptional activity was found to be reduced in T24GR cells by enzalutamide treatment. Lastly, enzalutamide also inhibited cell proliferation of HTB5 bladder cancer cells that express AR and possess intrinsic resistance to gemcitabine. Our results suggest that enzalutamide may have the potential to treat patients with advanced gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer with increased AR expression.

  5. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy by bronchial arterial infusion in patients with unresectable stage III squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Jiang, Sen; Ni, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy administered via bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) on unresectable stage III lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This was a single-arm retrospective study of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GP) administered via BAI to patients with unresectable lung SCC. Data regarding the post-treatment response rate, downstage rate, and surgery rate, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), quality of life, and post-BAI side effects were collected. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and May 2014. The response rate was 72.2%, and the downstage rate was 22.2%. Among the patients who were downstaged, 16 (44.4%) patients were because of their T stage, and 5 (13.9%) patients were downstaged due to to their N stage. The surgery rate was 52.8%, the 1-year survival rate was 75.4%, and the 2-year survival rate was 52.1%. The median PFS was 14.0 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.4], and the median OS was 25.0 months (95% CI: 19.1-30.9). The quality of life was significantly improved, and the chemotherapy was well tolerated. Compared with intravenous neoadjuvant chemotherapy, BAI chemotherapy significantly improved the surgery rate, prolonged PFS and OS, and improved the quality of life in patients with unresectable stage III lung SCC.

  6. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  7. Diagnosis of central nervous system relapse of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Impact of routine cytological CSF analysis at the time of intrathecal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassas, Adam; Krueger, Joerg; Alvi, Saima; Sung, Lillian; Hitzler, Johanne; Lieberman, Lani

    2014-12-01

    Despite the success of central nervous system (CNS) directed therapy in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapse involving the CNS continues to be observed in 5-10% of children when utilizing standard intrathecal prophylactic chemotherapy. While most pediatric ALL treatment protocols mandate regular lumbar punctures (LP) for the intrathecal injection of chemotherapy, the value of routine cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during therapy is unknown. Our objective was to assess the diagnostic value of routine CSF analysis during ALL therapy. To allow for at least 10 years of follow up from ALL diagnosis, children (0-18 years) with ALL diagnosed and treated at SickKids, Toronto, Canada between 1994-2004 were studied. Medical records of patients with CNS relapse were examined to determine whether CNS relapse was diagnosed based on cytology of a routinely obtained CSF sample, a CSF sample obtained because of signs and symptoms or a CSF sample obtained after the diagnosis of a bone marrow relapse. Of 494 children treated for ALL, 31 (6.6%) developed a relapse of ALL involving the CNS. Twenty-two had an isolated CNS relapse and nine had a combined bone marrow and CNS relapse. Among patients with isolated CNS relapse, 73% (16/22) were diagnosed based on routine CSF samples obtained from asymptomatic children. Conversely, 89% (8/9) of children with combined bone marrow and CNS relapse presented with symptoms and signs that prompted CSF examination. Routine CSF examination at the time of LP for intrathecal chemotherapy is useful in detecting CNS relapse. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses ≥40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose ≥40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  9. The histone methyltransferase G9a as a therapeutic target to override gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer

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    Pan, Mei-Ren; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Luo, Chi-Wen; Chen, Li-Tzong; Shan, Yan-Shen; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) resistance is a critical issue for pancreatic cancer treatment. The involvement of epigenetic modification in GEM resistance is still unclear. We established a GEM-resistant subline PANC-1-R from the parental PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells and found the elevation of various chromatin-modifying enzymes including G9a in GEM-resistant cells. Ectopic expression of G9a in PANC-1 cells increased GEM resistance while inactivation of G9a in PANC-1-R cells reduced it. Challenge of PANC-1 cells with GEM increased the expression of stemness markers including CD133, nestin and Lgr5 and promoted sphere forming activity suggesting chemotherapy enriched cancer cells with stem-like properties. Inhibition of G9a in PANC-1-R cells reduced stemness and invasiveness and sensitized the cells to GEM. We revealed interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a downstream effector of G9a to increase GEM resistance. G9a-overexpressing PANC-1-R cells exhibited autocrine IL-8/CXCR1/2 stimulation to increase GEM resistance which could be decreased by anti-IL-8 antibody and G9a inhibitor. IL-8 released by cancer cells also activated pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) to increase GEM resistance. In orthotopic animal model, GEM could not suppress tumor growth of PANC-1-R cells and eventually promoted tumor metastasis. Combination with G9a inhibitor and GEM reduced tumor growth, metastasis, IL-8 expression and PSC activation in animals. Finally, we showed that overexpression of G9a correlated with poor survival and early recurrence in pancreatic cancer patients. Collectively, our results suggest G9a is a therapeutic target to override GEM resistance in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27531902

  10. Surface-Modification of Carbonate Apatite Nanoparticles Enhances Delivery and Cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine and Anastrozole in Breast Cancer Cells

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    Fitya Syarifa Mozar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available pH sensitive nanoparticles of carbonate apatite (CA have been proven to be effective delivery vehicles for DNA, siRNAs and proteins. More recently, conventional anti-cancer drugs, such as doxorubicin, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide have been successfully incorporated into CA for intracellular delivery to breast cancer cells. However, physical and chemical properties of drug molecules appeared to affect their interactions with CA, with hydrophillic drug so far exhibiting better binding affinity and cellular uptakes compared to hydrophobic drugs. In this study, anastrozole, a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor which is largely hydrophobic, and gemcitabine, a hydrophilic nucleoside inhibitor were used as solubility models of chemotherapy drug. Aggregation tendency of poorly soluble drugs resulting in larger particle-drug complex size might be the main factor hindering their delivery effectiveness. For the first time, surface modification of CA with poly(ethylene glycol (PEG has shown promising result to drastically reduce anastrozole- loaded CA particle size, from approximately 1000 to 500 nm based on zeta sizer analysis. Besides PEG, a cell specific ligand, in this case fibronectin, was attached to the particles in order to facilitate receptor mediated endocytosis based on fibronectin–integrin interaction. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was performed to measure uptake of the drugs by breast cancer cells, revealing that surface modification increased the drug uptake, especially for the hydrophobic drug, compared to the uncoated particles and the free drug. In vitro chemosensitivity assay and in vivo tumor regression study also showed that coated apatite/drug nanoparticle complexes presented higher cytotoxicity and tumor regression effects than uncoated apatite/drug nanoparticles and free drugs, indicating that surface modification successfully created optimum particles size with the consequence of more effective uptake along with

  11. A prospective neurocognitive evaluation of children treated with additional chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation following isolated central nervous system relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Parvesh; Mulhern, Raymond K.; Regine, William F.; Rivera, Gaston K.; Kun, Larry E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective assessment of neurocognitive performance was conducted in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) following isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse to evaluate the impact of additional systemic/intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation (CSI) upon long-term intellectual function. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one children with ALL manifesting an isolated CNS relapse between 1984 through 1989 underwent serial evaluations of intellectual function. Neurocognitive function was measured by the full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) as determined by the age-appropriate Wechsler Intelligence Scale and by achievement in reading, math, and spelling as assessed by the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT). Intelligence testing was initiated following isolated CNS relapse after clearance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology but prior to CSI and continued at annual intervals for a minimum of 4 years postmeningeal failure. Protocol treatment for isolated CNS relapse consisted of reinduction and maintenance systemic therapy, intrathecal (IT) triple-agent chemotherapy, and early CSI (cranium to 24 Gy and spine to 15 Gy at 1.5 Gy/fraction) as outlined on the institutional 'Total XI' trial. Results: All 21 children attained secondary CNS remission and underwent the planned additional systemic/IT chemotherapy and CSI. Fourteen of the 21 children remain in secondary continuous remission, while the remaining 7 experienced a second relapse and were removed from further neurocognitive assessment. For the eight female and six male long-term survivors, mean ages at original diagnosis and at CSI were 5.7 years (range = 0.6-16.2) and 7.0 years (range = 1.8-17.0), respectively. At a median follow-up interval of 4.6 years (ranges 1.7-6.8) post-CNS relapse, comparison of group mean initial to final FSIQs revealed no statistically significant difference between the two measures (94.5 vs. 95.9, respectively, n = 11, p = 0.52). None of the

  12. Molecular Subgroup Analysis of Clinical Outcomes in a Phase 3 Study of Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin with or without Erlotinib in Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer

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    Seung Tae Kim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the addition of erlotinib to gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX resulted in greater antitumor activity and might be a treatment option for patients with biliary tract cancers (BTCs. Molecular subgroup analysis of treatment outcomes in patients who had specimens available for analysis was undertaken. METHODS: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA mutations were evaluated using peptide nucleic acid–locked nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction clamp reactions. Survival and response rates (RRs were analyzed according to the mutational status. Sixty-four patients (48.1% were available for mutational analysis in the chemotherapy alone group and 61 (45.1% in the chemotherapy plus erlotinib group. RESULTS: 1.6% (2/116 harbored an EGFR mutation (2 patients; exon 20, 9.6% (12/121 harbored a KRAS mutation (12 patients; exon 2, and 9.6% (12/118 harbored a PIK3CA mutation (10 patients, exon 9 and 2 patients, exon 20. The addition of erlotinib to GEMOX in patients with KRAS wild-type disease (n = 109 resulted in significant improvements in overall response compared with GEMOX alone (30.2% vs 12.5%, P = .024. In 95 patients with both wild-type KRAS and PIK3CA, there was evidence of a benefit associated with the addition of erlotinib to GEMOX with respect to RR as compared with GEMOX alone (P = .04. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that KRAS mutational status might be considered a predictive biomarker for the response to erlotinib in BTCs. Additionally, the mutation status of PIK3CA may be a determinant for adding erlotinib to chemotherapy in KRAS wild-type BTCs.

  13. Comparison of clinical outcome after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in different types of KRAS mutated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

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    Mellema, Wouter W; Masen-Poos, Lucie; Smit, Egbert F; Hendriks, Lizza E L; Aerts, Joachim G; Termeer, Arien; Goosens, Martijn J; Smit, Hans J M; van den Heuvel, Michel M; van der Wekken, Anthonie J; Herder, Gerarda J M; Krouwels, Frans H; Stigt, Jos A; van den Borne, Ben E E M; Haitjema, Tjeerd J; Staal-Van den Brekel, Agnes J; van Heemst, Robbert C; Pouw, Ellen; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C

    2015-11-01

    As suggested by in-vitro data, we hypothesize that subtypes of KRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) respond differently to chemotherapy regimens. Patients with advanced NSCLC and known KRAS mutation, treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, were retrieved from hospital databases. to investigate overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between different types of platinum-based chemotherapy per type of KRAS mutation. 464 patients from 17 hospitals, treated between 2000 and 2013, were included. The majority of patients had stage IV disease (93%), had a history of smoking (98%) and known with an adenocarcinoma (91%). Most common types of KRAS mutation were G12C (46%), G12V (20%) and G12D (10%). Platinum was combined with pemetrexed (n=334), taxanes (n=68) or gemcitabine (n=62). Patients treated with taxanes had a significant improved ORR (50%) compared to pemetrexed (21%) or gemcitabine (25%; pchemotherapy had best ORR. Response to chemotherapy regimens was different in types of KRAS mutation. Especially patients with G12V had better response to taxane treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tissue distribution of crizotinib and gemcitabine combination in a patient-derived orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

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    Richard J. Honeywell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetics focuses on the question whether a drug actually reaches its target in therapeutic concentrations or accumulates elsewhere, potentially causing toxicological or unpredictable side effects. We determined tissue distribution of gemcitabine, an antimetabolite, and crizotinib, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor targeted against the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK and mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met receptors, in a validated orthotopic mouse model for pancreatic cancer. Mice with pancreatic cancer were treated with either oral crizotinib at 25 mg/kg, gemcitabine at 100 mg/kg or with their combination. Two hours after the last gemcitabine dose mice were sacrificed and all available blood/organs/tissues were sampled. Tissue was subsequently analyzed for drug concentrations using a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS technique. In whole blood gemcitabine was about 1.0 µM and crizotinib 2.4 µM in the single treatment, whereas in the combination crizotinib increased the levels of gemcitabine. Crizotinib was found in all major tissues, being highest in the intestine. Comparison of crizotinib alone to the gemcitabine-crizotinib combination showed that crizotinib tissue concentrations were 3-6 fold lower in liver, lung, kidney and spleen, 30-fold lower in the skin, heart and pancreas and 200-fold lower in the brain. Tissue gemcitabine was highest in spleen and skin, being about 5-10 fold higher than in the other tissues, including brain, which still had a relatively high accumulation. In conclusion, both gemcitabine and crizotinib accumulate at clinically active but variable levels in tissues, possibly relating to the effects exerted by these drugs.

  15. Gut microbiota modulation of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, James L; Wilson, Ian D; Teare, Julian; Marchesi, Julian R; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Kinross, James M

    2017-06-01

    Evidence is growing that the gut microbiota modulates the host response to chemotherapeutic drugs, with three main clinical outcomes: facilitation of drug efficacy; abrogation and compromise of anticancer effects; and mediation of toxicity. The implication is that gut microbiota are critical to the development of personalized cancer treatment strategies and, therefore, a greater insight into prokaryotic co-metabolism of chemotherapeutic drugs is now required. This thinking is based on evidence from human, animal and in vitro studies that gut bacteria are intimately linked to the pharmacological effects of chemotherapies (5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, gemcitabine, methotrexate) and novel targeted immunotherapies such as anti-PD-L1 and anti-CLTA-4 therapies. The gut microbiota modulate these agents through key mechanisms, structured as the 'TIMER' mechanistic framework: Translocation, Immunomodulation, Metabolism, Enzymatic degradation, and Reduced diversity and ecological variation. The gut microbiota can now, therefore, be targeted to improve efficacy and reduce the toxicity of current chemotherapy agents. In this Review, we outline the implications of pharmacomicrobiomics in cancer therapeutics and define how the microbiota might be modified in clinical practice to improve efficacy and reduce the toxic burden of these compounds.

  16. Postoperative Chemotherapy for Medulloblastoma

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate and cognitive function of 43 children, age <3 years, with medulloblastoma treated with intensive postoperative chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy, were determined at the University of Wurzburg and other centers in Germany Chemotherapy consisted of three two-month cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, carboplatin, and etoposide.

  17. An Immune-Modulating Diet in Combination with Chemotherapy Prevents Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice.

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    Nakamura, Kentaro; Sasayama, Akina; Takahashi, Takeshi; Yamaji, Taketo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by muscle wasting caused partly by systemic inflammation. We previously demonstrated an immune-modulating diet (IMD), an enteral diet enriched with immunonutrition and whey-hydrolyzed peptides, to have antiinflammatory effects in some experimental models. Here, we investigated whether the IMD in combination with chemotherapy could prevent cancer cachexia in colon 26 tumor-bearing mice. Forty tumor-bearing mice were randomized into 5 groups: tumor-bearing control (TB), low dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and standard diet (LF/ST), low dose 5-FU and IMD (LF/IMD), high dose 5-FU and standard diet (HF/ST) and high dose 5-FU and IMD (HF/IMD). The ST and IMD mice received a standard diet or the IMD ad libitum for 21 days. Muscle mass in the IMD mice was significantly higher than that in the ST mice. The LF/IMD in addition to the HF/ST and HF/IMD mice preserved their body and carcass weights. Plasma prostaglandin E2 levels were significantly lower in the IMD mice than in the ST mice. A combined effect was also observed in plasma interleukin-6, glucose, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. Tumor weight was not affected by different diets. In conclusion, the IMD in combination with chemotherapy prevented cancer cachexia without suppressing chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  18. Imaging of hepatic toxicity of systemic therapy in a tertiary cancer centre: chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, molecular targeted therapies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrino, F; Tirumani, S H; Krajewski, K M; Shinagare, A B; Jagannathan, J P; Ramaiya, N H; Di Salvo, D N

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the spectrum of hepatic toxicity seen in the oncology setting, in view of the different systemic therapies used in cancer patients. Drug-induced liver injury can manifest in various forms, and anti-neoplastic agents are associated with different types of hepatotoxicity. Although chemotherapy-induced liver injury can present as hepatitis, steatosis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, and chronic parenchymal damages, molecular targeted therapy-associated liver toxicity ranges from mild liver function test elevation to fulminant life-threatening acute liver failure. The recent arrival of immune checkpoint inhibitors in oncology has introduced a new range of immune-related adverse events, with differing mechanisms of liver toxicity and varied imaging presentation of liver injury. High-dose chemotherapy regimens for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation are associated with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Management of hepatic toxicity depends on the clinical scenario, the drug in use, and the severity of the findings. In this article, we will (1) present the most common types of oncological drugs associated with hepatic toxicity and associated liver injuries; (2) illustrate imaging findings of hepatic toxicities and the possible differential diagnosis; and (3) provide a guide for management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on effectiveness of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

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    Zhong, Dong Ta; Shi, Chun Mei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Jing Ze; Liang, Jian Gang

    2012-11-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) remains the second most common malignant complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Even though NHL is commonly chemosensitive to primary treatment, failure or relapse still occurs in a large number of patients. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related NHL (AIDS-NHL). Forty-eight patients with relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL were treated with intravenous combination chemotherapy with GDP. The overall objective response rate was 54.1% (95% confidence interval, CI, 40.1-68.3%), with 10 complete responses and 16 partial responses. The 2-year overall survival rate (OS) was 70.8% (95% CI 58.0-83.7%), and the 5-year OS was 41.7% (95% CI 27.7-55.6%). The 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) was 37.5% (95% CI 23.8-51.2%), and the 5-year PFS was 25.0% (95% CI 12.8-37.3%). The median progression-free survival was 8.8 months (95% CI 0-20.3 months), and the median overall survival was 40.6 months (95% CI 22.6-58.6 months). Patients with B cell tumors who relapsed but had no B symptoms were clinical stage I/II, had infiltration fewer than two extranodal sites, had CD4⁺ counts >200 cells/μL, and had lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) less than the upper limit of normal benefited from GDP. The level of LDH had a significant impact on the response rate to chemotherapy with GDP (P = 0.015). Myelosuppression was the main side effect; the incidence of grade 3-4 anemia was 8.3%; leukopenia, 37.5%; and thrombocytopenia, 48.3%. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables for OS and PFS. This study confirms that GDP is an effective and safe salvage regimen in relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL, was associated with modest declines in CD4⁺ lymphocyte counts, and did not promote HIV-1 viral replication.

  20. Combination phenylbutyrate/gemcitabine therapy effectively inhibits in vitro and in vivo growth of NSCLC by intrinsic apoptotic pathways

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    Schniewind Bodo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard chemotherapy protocols in NSCLC are of limited clinical benefit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors represent a new strategy in human cancer therapy. In this study the combination of the HDAC inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB and the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (GEM was evaluated and the mechanisms underlying increased cell death were analyzed. Methods Dose escalation studies evaluating the cytotoxicity of PB (0.01–100 mM, GEM (0.01–100 μg/ml and a combination of the two were performed on two NSCLC cell lines (BEN and KNS62. Apoptotic cell death was quantified. The involvement of caspase-dependent cell death and MAP-kinase activation was analyzed. Additionally, mitochondrial damage was determined. In an orthotopic animal model the combined effect of PB and GEM on therapy was analyzed. Results Applied as a single drug both GEM and PB revealed limited potential to induce apoptosis in KNS62 and Ben cells. Combination therapy was 50–80% (p = 0.012 more effective than either agent alone. On the caspase level, combination therapy significantly increased cleavage of the pro-forms compared to single chemotherapy. The broad spectrum caspase-inhibitor zVAD was able to inhibit caspase cleavage completely, but reduced the frequency of apoptotic cells only by 30%. Combination therapy significantly increased changes in MTP and the release of cyto-c, AIF and Smac/Diabolo into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the inhibitors of apoptosis c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 were downregulated and it was shown that in combination therapy JNK activation contributed significantly to induction of apoptosis. The size of the primary tumors growing orthotopically in SCID mice treated for 4 weeks with GEM and PB was significantly reduced (2.2–2.7 fold compared to GEM therapy alone. The Ki-67 (KNS62: p = 0.015; Ben: p = 0.093 and topoisomerase IIα (KNS62: p = 0.008; Ben: p = 0.064 proliferation indices were clearly reduced in tumors treated by combination

  1. Chemotherapy-related neuropathic symptom management: a randomized trial of an automated symptom-monitoring system paired with nurse practitioner follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Noah Allan; Smith, Albert Gordon; Singleton, John Robinson; Beck, Susan L; Howard, Diantha; Dittus, Kim; Karafiath, Summer; Mooney, Kathi

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new care model to reduce chemotherapy-induced neuropathic symptoms. Neuropathic symptom usual care was prospectively compared to an automated symptom-monitoring and coaching system, SymptomCare@Home (SCH), which included nurse practitioner follow-up triggered by moderate to severe symptoms. Patients beginning chemotherapy were randomized to usual care (UC) or to the SCH intervention. This sub-analysis included only taxane/platin therapies. Participants called the automated telephone symptom-monitoring system daily to report numbness and tingling. The monitoring system recorded patient-reported neuropathic symptom severity, distress, and activity interference on a 0-10 scale. UC participants were instructed to call their oncologist for symptom management. SCH participants with symptom severity of ≥ 4 received automated self-care strategies, and a nurse practitioner (NP) provided guideline-based care. There were 252 participants, 78.6% of which were female. Mean age was 55.1 years. Mean follow-up was 90.2 ± 39.9 days (81.1 ± 40.3 calls). SCH participants had fewer days of moderate (1.8 ± 4.0 vs. 8.6 ± 17.3, p < 0.001) and severe chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy symptoms (0.3 ± 1.0 vs. 1.1 ± 5.2, p = 0.006). SCH participants had fewer days with moderate and severe symptom-related distress (1.4 ± 3.7 vs. 6.9 ± 15.0, p < 0.001; 0.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.5 ± 6.1, p = 0.001) and trended towards less activity interference (3.3 ± 1.9 vs. 3.8 ± 2.1, p = 0.08). Other neuropathic symptoms were addressed in 5.8-15.4% of SCH follow-up calls. The SCH system effectively identified neuropathic symptoms and their severity and, paired with NP follow-up, reduced symptom prevalence, severity, and distress compared to usual care.

  2. Exercise and chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Katlynn M; Sturgeon, Kathleen M; Winkels, Renate M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Williams, Nancy I; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2018-07-01

    Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) is the temporary or permanent loss of menses experienced by premenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Two possible mechanisms through which chemotherapy induces CIA have been identified: systemic endothelial dysfunction, resulting in decreased blood flow to the ovaries, and increased oxidative stress within the ovaries, both of which are proposed to lead to apoptosis of follicles. Endothelial dysfunction in ovarian arteries in women undergoing or who have undergone chemotherapy treatment is characterized by prothrombotic changes and thickening of the vascular wall. These changes result in occlusion of the blood vessels. Oxidative stress is increased and antioxidants decreased in the ovaries secondary to chemotherapy drugs, specifically cyclophosphamide. It is hypothesized that low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise during chemotherapy may prevent these changes and lessen the risk for developing CIA in premenopausal women. Low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to improve endothelial function and blood flow in patients with cardiovascular disease-a disease state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and for which patients who have undergone chemotherapy are at increased risk. In mice, moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to decrease the amount of oxidative stress within the ovaries, and in humans, chronic aerobic exercise has been shown to increase antioxidant production systemically. This hypothesis should be tested in both a mouse model, using sedentary and exercising mice treated with chemotherapy drugs that commonly result in CIA, as well as a human model to determine the effects of low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise on ovarian function in premenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of small-cell lung cancer cell-based sensor and its applications in chemotherapy effects rapid evaluation for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guohua, Hui; Hongyang, Lu; Zhiming, Jiang; Danhua, Zhu; Haifang, Wan

    2017-11-15

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-related cancer disease. Despite improvement in clinical survival, SCLC outcome remains extremely poor. Cisplatin (DDP) is the first-line chemotherapy drug for SCLC, but the choice of second-line chemotherapy drugs is not clear. In this paper, a SCLC cell-based sensor was proposed, and its applications in chemotherapy effects rapid evaluation for anticancer drugs were investigated. SCLC cell lines lung adenocarcinoma cell (LTEP-P) and DDP-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell (LTEP-P/DDP-1.0) are cultured on carbon screen-printed electrode (CSPE) to fabricate integrated cell-based sensor. Several chemotherapy anticancer drugs, including cisplatin, ifosmamide, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, docetaxel, vinorelbine, etoposide, camptothecin, and topotecan, are selected as experimental chemicals. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) tests are conducted to evaluate chemotherapy drug effects on LTEP-P and LTEP-P/DDP-1.0 cell lines. Electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) responses to anti-tumor chemicals are measured and processed by double-layered cascaded stochastic resonance (DCSR). Cisplatin solutions in different concentrations measurement results demonstrate that LTEP-P cell-based sensor presents quantitative analysis abilities for cisplatin and topotecan. Cisplatin and its mixtures can also be discriminated. Results demonstrate that LTEP-P cell-based sensor sensitively evaluates chemotherapy drugs' apoptosis function to SCLC cells. LTEP-P/DDP-1.0 cell-based sensor responses demonstrate that gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and camptothecin are ideal second-line drugs for clinical post-cisplatin therapy than other drugs according to MTT test results. This work provides a novel way for SCLC second-line clinical chemotherapy drug screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy

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    Elie Chahla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  5. The role of chemotherapy in brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohori, Hisatsugu; Takahashi, Shin; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors and their incidence is increasing. Untreated brain metastases have a very poor prognosis with a median survival of 1-2 months. Despite the use of surgery and radiotherapy including whole-brain radiation and stereotactic radiosurgery to locally control brain metastases, survival times for those patients has not improved. Although chemotherapy plays a limited role in the treatment of brain metastases, metastases from lung or breast cancer are often well-controlled by chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggest that brain metastases are equally sensitive to chemotherapy as are metastases elsewhere in the body in particular chemotherapy-naive cases. Finally, since nearly a half of patients with brain metastases die from progression of systemic disease, control of systemic disease as well as intracranial disease are both important. (author)

  6. Recent advances in mechanism-based chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs in co-delivery systems for cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingfang; Wang, Jinyu; Li, Bingcheng; Meng, Lingxin; Tian, Zhaoxing

    2017-09-01

    Co-delivery of chemotherapy drugs and siRNA for cancer therapy has achieved remarkable results according to synergistic/combined antitumor effects, and is recognized as a promising therapeutic modality. However, little attention has been paid to the extremely complex mechanisms of chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs during co-delivery process. Proper selection of chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs is beneficial for achieving desirable cancer therapeutic effects. Exploring the inherent principles during chemotherapy drug-siRNA pair selection for co-delivery would greatly enhanced therapeutic efficiency. To achieve ideal results, this article will systematically review current different mechanism-based chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs for co-delivery in cancer treatment. Large-scale library screening of recent different chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs for co-delivery would help to establish the chemotherapy drug-siRNA pair selection principle, which could pave the way for co-delivery of chemotherapy drugs and siRNA for cancer treatment in clinic. Following the inherent principle of chemotherapy drug-siRNA pair, more effective co-delivery vectors can be designed in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Relations between the distribution of signal strength on dynamic MRI imaging and the effect of primary systemic chemotherapy on breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Koji; Endo, Naoki; Miyanaga, Tamon; Hosokawa, Osamu; Takeda, Takayuki; Kaizaki, Yasuharu

    2009-01-01

    The subjects were 24 patients in whom MRI was performed before and after primary system chemotherapy (PSC). We investigated the pattern of contrast enhancement with respect to treatment responses. We prepared the time-signal intensity in each region of interest (ROI) (small ROI), established by dividing the maximum cut surface of each tumor into 9, and then subdividing them, and examined the distribution of enhancement. We counted small ROIs showing early enhancement and late washout per lesion. Counts were plotted on the longitudinal axis, and the tumor reduction rate on the transverse axis based on data for all tumors. These were also evaluated with respect to subtypes. The complete response (CR) group showed early enhancement and late washout. In addition, the small ROI count was correlated with the tumor reduction rate only in the luminal group. In this group, treatment responses may have more strongly depended on the intra-tumoral vascular density and permeability, because anticancer agent sensitivity was low. (author)

  8. TM4SF1 Promotes Gemcitabine Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Cao

    Full Text Available TM4SF1 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and affects the development of this cancer. Also, multidrug resistance (MDR is generally associated with tumor chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. However, the correlation between TM4SF1 and MDR remains unknown. This research aims to investigate the effect of TM4SF1 on gemcitabine resistance in PDAC and explore the possible molecular mechanism between TM4SF1 and MDR.The expression of TM4SF1 was evaluated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. TM4SF1 siRNA transfection was carried out using Hiperfect transfection reagent to knock down TM4SF1. The transcripts were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting for further study. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were obtained to investigate the sensitivity to gemcitabine of pancreatic cancer cells after silencing TM4SF1 in vitro. We demonstrated that cell signaling of TM4SF1 mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells by assessing the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR genes using quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo, we used orthotopic pancreatic tumor models to investigate the effect of proliferation after silencing TM4SF1 by a lentivirus-mediated shRNA in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines.The mRNA expression of TM4SF1 was higher in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines than in HPDE cell lines. In three gemcitabine-sensitive cell lines (L3.6pl, BxPC-3, SU86.86, the expression of TM4SF1 was lower than that in four gemcitabine-resistant cell lines (MIA PaCa-2, PANC-1, Hs766T, AsPC-1. We evaluated that TM4SF1 was a putative target for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells. Using AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, we investigated that TM4SF1 silencing affected cell proliferation and increased the percentages of cell apoptosis mediated by treatment with gemcitabine compared with cells which were treated with negative control. This resistance was associated

  9. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death

  10. Hyaluronan-conjugated liposomes encapsulating gemcitabine for breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han NK

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Na-Kyung Han,1,* Dae Hwan Shin,1,* Jung Seok Kim,1 Kwon Yeon Weon,2 Chang-Young Jang,1 Jin-Seok Kim1 1Research Center for Cell Fate Control (RCCFC and College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, 2College of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk, Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Investigation of potential therapeutics for targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs is important because these cells are regarded as culprit of breast cancer relapse. Accomplishing this kind of strategy requires a specific drug-delivery system using the distinct features of liposomes. Studies on targeted liposomal delivery systems have indicated the conjugation of hyaluronan (HA, a primary ligand for CD44 surface markers, as an appropriate method for targeting BCSCs. For this study, enriched BCSCs were obtained by culturing MCF-7 breast cancer cells in nonadherent conditions. The enriched BCSCs were challenged with HA-conjugated liposomes encapsulating gemcitabine (2, 2-difluoro-2-deoxycytidine, GEM. In vitro study showed that the HA-conjugated liposomes significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity, anti-migration, and anti-colony formation abilities of GEM through targeting of CD44 expressed on BCSCs. In pharmacokinetic study, area under the drug concentration vs time curve (AUC of the immunoliposomal GEM was 3.5 times higher than that of free GEM, indicating that the HA-conjugated liposomes enhanced the stability of GEM in the bloodstream and therefore prolonged its half-life time. The antitumor effect of the immunoliposomal GEM was 3.3 times higher than that of free GEM in a xenograft mouse model, probably reflecting the unique targeting of the CD44 receptor by HA and the increased cytotoxicity and stability through the liposomal formulation. Furthermore, marginal change in body weight demonstrated that the use of liposomes considerably reduced the systemic toxicity of GEM on normal healthy cells. Taken together

  11. Chemotherapy in eye cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is a drug used in a wide range of cancers, which produces ... lesions. In a 10-year retrospective review of .... disease and focal chemotherapy for selected high-risk ... of focal drug delivery methods to reduce recurrence .... the protein tubulin.

  12. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.

  13. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine plus erlotinib: efficacy and safety results in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Beveridge, Robert; Alcolea, Vicent; Aparicio, Jorge; Segura, Ángel; García, Jose; Corbellas, Miguel; Fonfría, María; Giménez, Alejandra; Montalar, Joaquin

    2014-01-10

    The combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib is a standard first-line treatment for unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We reviewed our single centre experience to assess its efficacy and toxicity in clinical practice. Clinical records of patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer who were treated with the combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib were reviewed. Univariate survival analysis and multivariate analysis were carried out to indentify independent predictors factors of overall survival. Our series included 55 patients. Overall disease control rate was 47%: 5% of patients presented complete response, 20% partial response and 22% stable disease. Median overall survival was 8.3 months). Cox regression analysis indicated that performance status and locally advanced versus metastatic disease were independent factors of overall survival. Patients who developed acne-like rash toxicity, related to erlotinib administration, presented a higher survival than those patients who did not develop this toxicity. Gemcitabine plus erlotinib doublet is active in our series of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. This study provides efficacy and safety results similar to those of the pivotal phase III clinical trial that tested the same combination.

  14. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with gemcitabine plus regional hyperthermia for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Korogi, Yukunori; Narisada, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with gemcitabine plus regional hyperthermia (HT) for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). A total of 29 patients with LAPC treated with concurrent CRT using gemcitabine were retrospectively analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered with a median total dose of 61.2 Gy. Of the 29 patients, 20 (69%) also underwent regional HT during CRT (CRHT group). The remaining 9 patients did not receive regional HT (CRT group) because of a common bile duct stent placement, patient refusal, older age, or obesity. The efficacy and toxicity of the treatments and the predictors of good outcome were evaluated. The median disease progression-free and overall survival times were significantly better for the CRHT group than for the CRT group (8.8 vs. 4.9 months, P=0.02, and 18.6 vs. 9.6 months, P=0.01), respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicities for the CRHT group were detected in eight patients (40%) and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity in one (diarrhea). Concurrent CRT using gemcitabine with regional HT may be a feasible and promising regimen for LAPC, and the results justified further evaluation in a large number of patients to confirm its definite benefit. (author)

  15. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Laura; Zago, Giulia; Marulli, Giuseppe; Del Bianco, Paola; Schiavon, Marco; Pasello, Giulia; Polo, Valentina; Canova, Fabio; Tonetto, Fabrizio; Loreggian, Lucio; Rea, Federico; Conte, PierFranco; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1), paclitaxel (200 mg/m(2), d1), and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) d1, 8) for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors-7th edition staging system). A total of 36 (62%) patients achieved partial response (PR), and six (10%) progressions were recorded. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62%) cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64%) patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and two patients received radical-intent radiotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 11 months and 23 months, respectively. Both PFS and OS were significantly correlated to objective response (P<0.0001) and surgery (P<0.0001 and P=0.002). Patients obtaining PR and receiving local treatment achieved a median PFS and OS of 35 and 48 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS of patients not achieving PR or not receiving local treatment were 5-7 and 11-15 months, respectively. The extension of surgery did not affect the outcome. The multimodality treatment was feasible, and triple

  16. DNA-PKcs is important for Akt activation and gemcitabine resistance in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Gu, Yuanlong; Qian, Yi; Hu, Benshun; Zhu, Congyuan; Wang, Gaohe; Li, Jianping

    2014-09-12

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with extremely poor prognosis. The moderate activity of the current standard gemcitabine and gemcitabine-based regimens was due to pre-existing or acquired chemo-resistance of pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) in gemcitabine resistance, and studied the underlying mechanisms. We found that NU-7026 and NU-7441, two DNA-PKcs inhibitors, enhanced gemcitabine-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, PANC-1 cells with siRNA-knockdown of DNA-PKcs were more sensitive to gemcitabine than control PANC-1 cells. Through the co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay, we found that DNA-PKcs formed a complex with SIN1, the latter is an indispensable component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2). DNA-PKcs-SIN1 complexation was required for Akt activation in PANC-1 cells, while inhibition of this complex by siRNA knockdown of DNA-PKcs/SIN1, or by DNA-PKcs inhibitors, prevented Akt phosphorylation in PANC-1 cells. Further, SIN1 siRNA-knockdown also facilitated gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Finally, DNA-PKcs and p-Akt expression was significantly higher in human pancreatic cancer tissues than surrounding normal tissues. Together, these results show that DNA-PKcs is important for Akt activation and gemcitabine resistance in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gemcitabine enhances cell invasion via activating HAb18G/CD147-EGFR-pSTAT3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bao-Qing; Fu, Zhi-Guang; Meng, Yao; Wu, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Bo; Xu, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Li; Li, Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2016-09-20

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal cancers, has very poor 5-year survival partly due to gemcitabine resistance. Recently, it was reported that chemotherapeutic agents may act as stressors to induce adaptive responses and to promote chemoresistance in cancer cells. During long-term drug treatment, the minority of cancer cells survive and acquire an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype with increased chemo-resistance and metastasis. However, the short-term response of most cancer cells remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the short-term response of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine stress and to explore the corresponding mechanism. Our results showed that gemcitabine treatment for 24 hours enhanced pancreatic cancer cell invasion. In gemcitabine-treated cells, HAb18G/CD147 was up-regulated; and HAb18G/CD147 down-regulation or inhibition attenuated gemcitabine-enhanced invasion. Mechanistically, HAb18G/CD147 promoted gemcitabine-enhanced invasion by activating the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor)-STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) signaling pathway. Inhibition of EGFR-STAT3 signaling counteracted gemcitabine-enhanced invasion, and which relied on HAb18G/CD147 levels. In pancreatic cancer tissues, EGFR was highly expressed and positively correlated with HAb18G/CD147. These data indicate that pancreatic cancer cells enhance cell invasion via activating HAb18G/CD147-EGFR-pSTAT3 signaling. Our findings suggest that inhibiting HAb18G/CD147 is a potential strategy for overcoming drug stress-associated resistance in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Gemcitabine and dFdU in Pancreatic Cancer Patients Using an Optimal Design, Sparse Sampling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdjebi, Cindy; Gattacceca, Florence; Seitz, Jean-François; Fein, Francine; Gagnière, Johan; François, Eric; Abakar-Mahamat, Abakar; Deplanque, Gael; Rachid, Madani; Lacarelle, Bruno; Ciccolini, Joseph; Dahan, Laetitia

    2017-06-01

    Gemcitabine remains a pillar in pancreatic cancer treatment. However, toxicities are frequently observed. Dose adjustment based on therapeutic drug monitoring might help decrease the occurrence of toxicities. In this context, this work aims at describing the pharmacokinetics (PK) of gemcitabine and its metabolite dFdU in pancreatic cancer patients and at identifying the main sources of their PK variability using a population PK approach, despite a sparse sampled-population and heterogeneous administration and sampling protocols. Data from 38 patients were included in the analysis. The 3 optimal sampling times were determined using KineticPro and the population PK analysis was performed on Monolix. Available patient characteristics, including cytidine deaminase (CDA) status, were tested as covariates. Correlation between PK parameters and occurrence of severe hematological toxicities was also investigated. A two-compartment model best fitted the gemcitabine and dFdU PK data (volume of distribution and clearance for gemcitabine: V1 = 45 L and CL1 = 4.03 L/min; for dFdU: V2 = 36 L and CL2 = 0.226 L/min). Renal function was found to influence gemcitabine clearance, and body surface area to impact the volume of distribution of dFdU. However, neither CDA status nor the occurrence of toxicities was correlated to PK parameters. Despite sparse sampling and heterogeneous administration and sampling protocols, population and individual PK parameters of gemcitabine and dFdU were successfully estimated using Monolix population PK software. The estimated parameters were consistent with previously published results. Surprisingly, CDA activity did not influence gemcitabine PK, which was explained by the absence of CDA-deficient patients enrolled in the study. This work suggests that even sparse data are valuable to estimate population and individual PK parameters in patients, which will be usable to individualize the dose for an optimized benefit to risk ratio.

  19. A phase I study of imexon plus gemcitabine as first-line therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Steven J; Zalupski, Mark M; Modiano, Manuel R; Conkling, Paul; Patt, Yehuda Z; Davis, Peg; Dorr, Robert T; Boytim, Michelle L; Hersh, Evan M

    2010-07-01

    Imexon is an aziridine-derived iminopyrrolidone which has synergy with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Gemcitabine is a standard therapy for pancreatic cancer. We performed a phase I trial of imexon and gemcitabine to evaluate safety, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with untreated locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma received therapy in sequential cohorts on regimen A (n = 19; imexon 200 or 280 mg/m(2) intravenously (IV) over 30 min days 1-5, 15-19 and gemcitabine 800 or 1,000 mg/m(2) IV over 30 min on days 1,8,15 every 28 days) or regimen B (n = 86; imexon 280-1,300 mg/m(2) IV over 30-60 min days 1, 8, and 15 and gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) IV over 30 min on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). One hundred five patients received 340 treatment cycles (median 2, range 1-16). median age 63, 61% male, ECOG PS 0/1 50%/50%, 93% metastatic. DLT was abdominal cramping and pain, often with transient, acute diarrhea. Best response was confirmed partial response (PR) in 11.4%, 8.9% unconfirmed PR, and 48.1% with stable disease. There was a dose proportional increase in imexon AUC across the doses tested with terminal half life 69 min at the MTD and no alteration of gemcitabine pharmacokinetics. The recommended phase II dose of imexon is 875 mg/m(2) with gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2). DLT was acute abdominal pain and cramping. Encouraging antitumor responses support further evaluation of this combination in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  20. Gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency in populations of pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2017-03-01

    One molecular-based approach that increases potency and reduces dose-limited sequela is the implementation of selective 'targeted' delivery strategies for conventional small molecular weight chemotherapeutic agents. Descriptions of the molecular design and organic chemistry reactions that are applicable for synthesis of covalent gemcitabine-monophosphate immunochemotherapeutics have to date not been reported. The covalent immunopharmaceutical, gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R] was synthesized by reacting gemcitabine with a carbodiimide reagent to form a gemcitabine carbodiimide phosphate ester intermediate which was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create amine-reactive gemcitabine-(5'-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-IGF-1R immunoglobulin was combined with gemcitabine-(5'-phosphorylimidazolide) resulting in the synthetic formation of gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R]. The gemcitabine molar incorporation index for gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-R1] was 2.67:1. Cytotoxicity Analysis - dramatic increases in antineoplastic cytotoxicity were observed at and between the gemcitabine-equivalent concentrations of 10 -9  M and 10 -7  M where lethal cancer cell death increased from 0.0% to a 93.1% maximum (100.% to 6.93% residual survival), respectively. Advantages of the organic chemistry reactions in the multistage synthesis scheme for gemcitabine-(5'-phosphoramidate)-[anti-IGF-1R] include their capacity to achieve high chemotherapeutic molar incorporation ratios; option of producing an amine-reactive chemotherapeutic intermediate that can be preserved for future synthesis applications; and non-dedicated organic chemistry reaction scheme that allows substitutions of either or both therapeutic moieties, and molecular delivery platforms. © 2016 The Authors Chemical Biology & Drug Design Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vinorelbine and gemcitabine vs vinorelbine and carboplatin as first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. A phase III randomised controlled trial by the Norwegian Lung Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløtten, Ø; Grønberg, B H; Bremnes, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but earlier studies have suggested that non-platinum combinations are equally effective and better tolerated. We conducted a national, randomised study to compare...... a non-platinum with a platinum combination. METHODS: Eligible patients had stage IIIB/IV NSCLC and performance status (PS) 0-2. Patients received up to three cycles of vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o.+gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) i.v. day 1 and 8 (VG) or vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o. day 1 and 8+carboplatin...... was 65 years, 58% were men and 25% had PS 2. Median survival was VG: 6.3 months; VC: 7.0 months, P=0.802. Vinorelbine plus carboplatin patients had more grade III/IV nausea/vomiting (VG: 4%, VC: 12%, P=0.008) and grade IV neutropenia (VG: 7%, VC: 19%, P

  3. OSI-027 inhibits pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and enhances the therapeutic effect of gemcitabine both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiao; Chen, Wei; Xue, Fei; Liang, Chao; Chen, Bryan Wei; Zhou, Yue; Wen, Liang; Hu, Liqiang; Shen, Jian; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2015-09-22

    Despite its relative rarity, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounts for a large percentage of cancer deaths. In this study, we investigated the in vitro efficacy of OSI-027, a selective inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, to treat PDAC cell lines alone, and in combination with gemcitabine (GEM). Similarly, we tested the efficacy of these two compounds in a xenograft mouse model of PDAC. OSI-027 significantly arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase, inhibited the proliferation of Panc-1, BxPC-3, and CFPAC-1 cells, and downregulated mTORC1, mTORC2, phospho-Akt, phospho-p70S6K, phospho-4E-BP1, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in these cells. Moreover, OSI-027 also downregulated multidrug resistance (MDR)-1, which has been implicated in chemotherapy resistance in PDAC cells and enhanced apoptosis induced by GEM in the three PDAC cell lines. When combined, OSI-027 with GEM showed synergistic cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first evidence of the efficacy of OSI-027 in PDAC and may provide the groundwork for a new clinical PDAC therapy.

  4. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine can be administered using limited-field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Nishiyama, Kinji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Eiichi [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ioka, Tatsuya; Uehara, Hiroyuki; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Nakaizumi, Akihiko [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Surgery

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of concurrent use of full-dose gemcitabine (GEM) and radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Patient and Methods: 22 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were subjected to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (GEM 1,000 mg/m2 weekly, three times during 4 weeks). They received limited-field irradiation by three-dimensional radiotherapy planning. Results: Of the 22 patients, 16 (72%) completed the treatment (50 Gy irradiation and at least three times concurrent administration of 1 g/m{sup 2} GEM). One patient with unresectable tail cancer showed peritonitis carcinomatosa and both chemotherapy and radiotherapy had to be stopped. Dose reduction or omission of GEM was necessary in another four patients. In addition, radiotherapy was discontinued in one patient for fatigue. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was detected in eight patients (36%), and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity (anorexia) in one patient (5%). In total, the response rate amounted to 32% (seven partial responses), and the median survival time (MST) was 16 months. Among the twelve patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, nine underwent surgery and showed a survival rate of 78% at 1 year. Another 13 patients without surgery showed 14 months of MST. No regional lymph node failure has appeared so far. Conclusion: Limited-field radiotherapy enables the safe concurrent administration of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} GEM.

  5. Matched-pair analysis to compare the outcomes of a second salvage auto-SCT to systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with multiple myeloma who relapsed after front-line auto-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhim, H-Y; Kim, K; Kim, J S; Kang, H J; Kim, J-A; Min, C-K; Bae, S H; Park, E; Yang, D-H; Suh, C; Kim, M K; Mun, Y-C; Eom, H S; Shin, H J; Yoon, H-J; Kwon, J H; Lee, J H; Kim, Y S; Yoon, S-S; Kwak, J-Y

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the outcomes of second salvage auto-SCT and to identify the impacts of a second auto-SCT compared with systemic chemotherapy alone on disease outcome. Data from 48 patients who underwent second auto-SCT were matched to 144 patients (1:3) who received systemic chemotherapy alone from the Korean Myeloma Registry. Groups were matched for nine potential prognostic factors and compared for treatment outcomes. The median age of matching-pairs at relapse was 55.5 years. A total of 156 patients (81%) received vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone induction therapy before the first auto-SCT. Thirty-five patients (73%) in the second auto-SCT group received novel agent-based therapies before the second auto-SCT, and similar proportion in both groups received novel therapies after relapse of front-line auto-SCT. With a median follow-up of 55.3 months, patients who underwent a second auto-SCT had significantly better median OS (55.5 vs 25.4 months, P=0.035). In multivariate analysis for OS, SCT, International Staging System III and salvage chemotherapy alone were independent predictors for worse OS. The outcomes of second auto-SCT appear to be superior to those of systemic chemotherapy alone. A randomized trial comparing both treatment strategies is required.

  6. Doxorubicin-modified magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for magnetic resonance imaging-monitoring magnet-enhancing tumor chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Po-Chin; Chen, Yung-Chu; Chiang, Chi-Feng; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wei, Shwu-Yuan; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Win-Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles consisting of a magnetic Fe3O4 core and a shell of aqueous stable polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugated with doxorubicin (Dox) (SPIO-PEG-D) for tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement and chemotherapy. The size of SPIO nanoparticles was ~10 nm, which was visualized by transmission electron microscope. The hysteresis curve, generated with vibrating-sample magnetometer, showed that SPIO-PEG-D was superparamagnetic with an insignificant hysteresis. The transverse relaxivity (r 2) for SPIO-PEG-D was significantly higher than the longitudinal relaxivity (r 1) (r 2/r 1 >10). The half-life of Dox in blood circulation was prolonged by conjugating Dox on the surface of SPIO with PEG to reduce its degradation. The in vitro experiment showed that SPIO-PEG-D could cause DNA crosslink more serious, resulting in a lower DNA expression and a higher cell apoptosis for HT-29 cancer cells. The Prussian blue staining study showed that the tumors treated with SPIO-PEG-D under a magnetic field had a much higher intratumoral iron density than the tumors treated with SPIO-PEG-D alone. The in vivo MRI study showed that the T2-weighted signal enhancement was stronger for the group under a magnetic field, indicating that it had a better accumulation of SPIO-PEG-D in tumor tissues. In the anticancer efficiency study for SPIO-PEG-D, the results showed that there was a significantly smaller tumor size for the group with a magnetic field than the group without. The in vivo experiments also showed that this drug delivery system combined with a local magnetic field could reduce the side effects of cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The results showed that the developed SPIO-PEG-D nanoparticles own a great potential for MRI-monitoring magnet-enhancing tumor chemotherapy.

  7. Concurrent Chemo-Radiation With or Without Induction Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel: A Randomized, Phase 2/3 Trial in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Terence, E-mail: trdtwk@nccs.com.sg [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Lim, Wan-Teck [Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Fong, Kam-Weng; Cheah, Shie-Lee; Soong, Yoke-Lim [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Ang, Mei-Kim; Ng, Quan-Sing; Tan, Daniel [Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Ong, Whee-Sze; Tan, Sze-Huey [Division of Clinical Trial and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Yip, Connie; Quah, Daniel [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Soo, Khee-Chee [Division of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Wee, Joseph [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To compare survival, tumor control, toxicities, and quality of life of patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemo-radiation (CCRT), against CCRT alone. Patients and Methods: Patients were stratified by N stage and randomized to induction GCP (3 cycles of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2}, carboplatin area under the concentration-time-curve 2.5, and paclitaxel 70 mg/m{sup 2} given days 1 and 8 every 21 days) followed by CCRT (radiation therapy 69.96 Gy with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}), or CCRT alone. The accrual of 172 was planned to detect a 15% difference in 5-year overall survival (OS) with a 5% significance level and 80% power. Results: Between September 2004 and August 2012, 180 patients were accrued, and 172 (GCP 86, control 86) were analyzed by intention to treat. There was no significant difference in OS (3-year OS 94.3% [GCP] vs 92.3% [control]; hazard ratio 1.05; 1-sided P=.494]), disease-free survival (hazard ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.44-1.35, P=.362), and distant metastases–free survival (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.38-1.67, P=.547) between the 2 arms. Treatment compliance in the induction phase was good, but the relative dose intensity for concurrent cisplatin was significantly lower in the GCP arm. Overall, the GCP arm had higher rates of grades 3 and 4 leukopenia (52% vs 37%) and neutropenia (24% vs 12%), but grade 3 and 4 acute radiation toxicities were not statistically different between the 2 arms. The global quality of life scores were comparable in both arms. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy with GCP before concurrent chemo-irradiation did not improve survival in locally advanced NPC.

  8. A Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Clinical Trial Comparing Pemetrexed/Cisplatin and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin as First-line Treatment for Advanced Nonsquamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Yan HUANG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is still the standard first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Previous studies have demonstrated that pemetrexed combined with platinum had promising efficacy and safety profile in NSCLC, especially in patients with nonsquamous NSCLC. This trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed made in China as first-line treatment. Methods The present study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1 to receive cisplatin plus pemetrexed chemotherapy (PC group or gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC group every 3 weeks. The primary end point was progression free survival (PFS and the secondary end points included 1 year survival rate, objective response rate (ORR, survival without grade 3/4 toxicity (SWT3/4 and safety profile. Results A total of 288 patients from 20 institutions across China were enrolled into the study. Based on the Full Analyses Set (FAS, the PFS was 168 days (5.6 months vs 140 days (4.7 months (P=0.16, one year survival rate was 50.0% vs 54.9% (P=0.47, ORR was 24.4% vs 14.2% (P=0.06 in the PC group and the GC group, respectively; Survival without grade 3/4 toxicity was 11.3 months in GC group vs 8.1 months in PC group (P=0.23. In terms of the safety, side effects were less observed on the PC group (81.95% vs 93.75%, P=0.003. The main side effects included leukopenia, neutropenia, emesis, anemia, thrombopenia. Conclusion The both regimens have similar efficacy as the treatment for advanced nonsquamous NSCLC, but pemetrexed plus cisplatin regimen has better safety profile and seems to have longer PFS, which makes it a new option as the first line setting.

  9. Comparison of Pathologic Response Evaluation Systems after Anthracycline with/without Taxane-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy among Different Subtypes of Breast Cancers.

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    Hee Jin Lee

    Full Text Available Several methods are used to assess the pathologic response of breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC to predict clinical outcome. However, the clinical utility of these systems for each molecular subtype of breast cancer is unclear. Therefore, we applied six pathologic response assessment systems to specific subtypes of breast cancer and compared the results.Five hundred and eighty eight breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline with/without taxane-based NAC were retrospectively analyzed, and the ypTNM stage, residual cancer burden (RCB, residual disease in breast and nodes (RDBN, tumor response ratio, Sataloff's classification, and Miller-Payne grading system were evaluated. The results obtained for each assessment system were analyzed in terms of patient survival.In triple-negative tumors, all systems were significantly associated with disease-free survival and Kaplan-Meier survival curves for disease-free survival were clearly separated by all assessment methods. For HR+/HER2- tumors, systems assessing the residual tumor (ypTNM stage, RCB, and RDBN had prognostic significance. However, for HER2+ tumors, the association between patient survival and the pathologic response assessment results varied according to the system used, and none resulted in distinct Kaplan-Meier curves.Most of the currently available pathologic assessment systems used after anthracycline with/without taxane-based NAC effectively classified triple-negative breast cancers into groups showing different prognoses. The pathologic assessment systems evaluating residual tumors only also had prognostic significance in HR+/HER2- tumors. However, new assessment methods are required to effectively evaluate the pathologic response of HR+/HER2+ and HR-/HER2+ tumors to anthracycline with/without taxane-based NAC.

  10. A case report of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas treated with S-1 chemotherapy: Does it work or induce endocrine differentiation?

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    Yokode, Masataka; Itai, Ryosuke; Yamashita, Yukimasa; Zen, Yoh

    2017-11-01

    Acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) and mixed acinar-endocrine carcinomas (MAECs) of the pancreas are rare, accounting for only 1% of pancreatic tumors. Although both typically present at an advanced stage, chemotherapeutic regimes have not yet been standardized. A 65-year-old man presented with a large mass in the pancreatic tail with multiple liver metastases. He was initially treated with gemcitabine for suspected ductal carcinoma of the pancreas, but no response was observed. S-1, administered as second-line chemotherapy, showed an approximately 38% reduction in the size of the primary tumor and metastatic deposits with therapeutic effects being maintained for 12 months. When the tumor progressed again, he underwent a percutaneous liver biopsy, which led to the diagnosis of MAEC. Combination therapy with cisplatin and etoposide targeting the endocrine component was administered, and this was based on the endocrine component potentially being less sensitive to S-1 than the ACC element. However, therapy was stopped due to the development of neutropenia, and the patient is currently receiving best supportive care. Given the previous studies suggested that S-1 is more effective for ACCs than gemcitabine, MAECs may also respond to S-1 chemotherapy, similar to ACCs. Another potential interpretation is that S-1 was effective when the condition was ACC, and eventually showed decreased effectiveness when the condition shifted to MAEC. Future studies are needed to conclude whether S-1 chemotherapy truly works against MAECs or induces endocrine differentiation in ACCs as a part of the drug-resistance process.

  11. Concurrent radiotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidine versus gemcitabine in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Yang YF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Feng Yang,1 Xiao-Hui Cao,1 Chao-En Bao,1 Xin Wan2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China Background: Gemcitabine (GEM is the most widely utilized systemic agent in combination with radiation therapy (RT for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC in the concurrent setting. Despite recent interest in using two novel oral fluoropyrimidines (FUs, capecitabine and S-1, in this setting, there is a lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs to support this approach.Methods: Trials published between 1994 and 2014 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All prospective studies were independently identified by two authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment response, objective response rate (ORR, progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS, respectively, and toxicities were extracted and analyzed using comprehensive meta-analysis software (version 2.0.Results: Twenty-three cohorts with 843 patients were included: 497 patients were treated with GEM and 346 patients were treated with oral FU. Pooled OS was significantly higher at 1 and 2 years for S-1 plus RT than for GEM plus RT (relative risk [RR] 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–1.65; P=0.03; and RR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.18–2.60, P=0.002, respectively, while 1-year PFS and ORR were not significantly different between S-1 and GEM-based chemoradiotherapy (P=0.37 and P=0.06, respectively. Additionally, comparable efficacy was found between capecitabine and GEM-based chemoradiotherapy in terms of OS, PFS, and ORR. As for grade 3 and 4 acute toxicity, oral FU plus RT significantly reduced the risk of developing hematologic toxicities, nausea, and vomiting when compared to GEM plus RT (P<0.001.Conclusions

  12. Gemcitabine treatment causes resistance and malignancy of pancreatic cancer stem-like cells via induction of lncRNA HOTAIR

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    Wang, Li; Dong, Ping; Wang, Weiguo; Huang, Mingquan; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, despite the high risk of chemoresistance as a major disadvantage. In the past few years, significant advances have been made in the field of pancreatic cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and their critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis, which are tightly regulated by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The present study demonstrated that HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) is not different between the pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and its enriched CSC sub-population. However, after gemcitabine treatment, the expression levels of HOTAIR in CSCs were induced, but not in PANC-1 cells. HOTAIR induced by gemcitabine failed to cause chemoresistance, but promoted the clonogenicity, proliferation and migration of the cells. By introducing HOTAIR using lentivirus, chemoresistance was induced and the self-renewal capacity, proliferation and migration were significantly promoted. By contrast, HOTAIR knockdown in PANC-1 CSCs treated with or without gemcitabine decreased the cell proliferation, altered the cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis, demonstrating its critical roles in regulating the malignant character of PANC-1 CSCs. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HOTAIR may be induced by gemcitabine and acts as a tumor promoter by inhibiting the chemosensitivity, and promoting the self-renewal capacity, proliferation and migration of PANC-1 CSCs, which supports its potential application as a novel therapeutic approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:29201179

  13. Non-Cross Resistant Sequential Single Agent Chemotherapy in First-Line Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Results of a Phase II Study

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    V. Surmont

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. sequential chemotherapy can maintain dose intensity and preclude cumulative toxicity by increasing drug diversity. Purpose. to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of the sequential regimen of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with good performance status (PS. Patients and methods. gemcitabine 1250 mg/m2 was administered on day 1 and 8 of course 1 and 2; Paclitaxel 150 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 of course 3 and 4. Primary endpoint was response rate (RR, secondary endpoints toxicity and time to progression (TTP. Results. Of the 21 patients (median age 56, range 38–80 years; 62% males, 38% females 10% (2/21 had stage IIIB, 90% (19/21 stage IV, 15% PS 0, 85% PS 1. 20% of patients had a partial response, 30% stable disease, 50% progressive disease. Median TTP was 12 weeks (range 6–52 weeks, median overall survival (OS 8 months (range 1–27 months, 1-year survival was 33%. One patient had grade 3 hematological toxicity, 2 patients a grade 3 peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions. sequential administration of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line treatment of advanced NSCLC had a favourable toxicity profile, a median TTP and OS comparable with other sequential trials and might , therefore, be a treatment option for NSCLC patients with high ERCC1 expression.

  14. Chemotherapy for intracranial ependymoma in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramatzki, Dorothee; Roth, Patrick; Felsberg, Jörg; Hofer, Silvia; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Hentschel, Bettina; Westphal, Manfred; Krex, Dietmar; Simon, Matthias; Schnell, Oliver; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ependymal tumors in adults are rare, accounting for less than 4 % of primary tumors of the central nervous system in this age group. The low prevalence of intracranial ependymoma in adults limits the ability to perform clinical trials. Therefore, treatment decisions are based on small, mostly retrospective studies and the role of chemotherapy has remained unclear. We performed a retrospective study on 17 adult patients diagnosed with intracranial World Health Organisation grade II or III ependymoma, who were treated with chemotherapy at any time during the disease course. Benefit from chemotherapy was estimated by applying Macdonald criteria. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from start of chemotherapy, using the Kaplan-Meier method. Eleven patients had supratentorial and 6 infratentorial tumors. Ten patients were treated with temozolomide (TMZ), 3 with procarbazine/lomustine/vincristine (PCV), 3 with platinum-based chemotherapy and 1 patient received epirubicin/ifosfamide. Response rates were as follows: TMZ 8/10 stable disease; PCV 3/3 stable disease; platinum-based chemotherapy 1/3 partial response; epirubicin/ifosfamide 1/1 complete response. PFS rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 52.9, 35.3 and 23.5 %. OS rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 82.4, 82.4 and 70.1 %. There was no indication for a favourable prognostic role of O 6 -methylguanyl-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation which was detected in 3/12 investigated tumors. Survival outcomes in response to chemotherapy in adult intracranial ependymoma patients vary substantially, but individual patients may respond to any kind of chemotherapy. There were too few patients to compare survival data between chemotherapeutic subgroups. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2323-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  16. Accelerated proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells after induction chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.; Kal, H.B.

    2003-01-01

    Induction chemotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIB with gemcitabine and cisplatin for downstaging the tumour with the aim for further treatment with ionising radiation, is one of the treatments for lung cancer employed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the waiting time for radiotherapy, i.e. the interval between induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, on the rate of tumour growth. Interval times between end of chemotherapy and day of diagnostic CT, planning CT and first day of radiotherapy were determined. Increase in tumour volume was measured for 23 patients with NSCLC by measuring the primary tumour dimensions on the diagnostic CT made after induction chemotherapy and on the CT used for radiotherapy planning. Volume doubling times were calculated from the time interval between the two CTs and ratio of the volumes on CT planning and CT diagnostic. The mean time interval between end of chemotherapy and day of diagnostic CT was 16 days, till CT planning 66 days and till first day of radiotherapy 76 (29 - 108) days. Tumour doubling times ranged from 9 to 153 days with a mean of 47 days. This is far less than the mean doubling time of NSCL in untreated patients. This study shows that time interval between chemo- and start of radiotherapy varies between 29 to 108 days. The consequence is fast tumour progression as result of accelerated proliferation: mean tumour-doubling times are decreased by a factor of 2 to 4. The gain obtained with induction chemotherapy with regard to volume reduction was practically lost in the waiting time for radiotherapy. We recommend diminishing the time interval between chemo- and radiotherapy to as short as possible

  17. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  18. Combination Chemotherapy for Influenza

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    Robert G. Webster

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in April 2009 and the continuous evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses underscore the urgency of novel approaches to chemotherapy for human influenza infection. Anti-influenza drugs are currently limited to the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir and to M2 ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine, although resistance to the latter class develops rapidly. Potential targets for the development of new anti-influenza agents include the viral polymerase (and endonuclease, the hemagglutinin, and the non-structural protein NS1. The limitations of monotherapy and the emergence of drug-resistant variants make combination chemotherapy the logical therapeutic option. Here we review the experimental data on combination chemotherapy with currently available agents and the development of new agents and therapy targets.

  19. Type III radical hysterectomy after induction chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Graniel, C; Reyes, M; Chanona, G; Gonzalez, A; Robles, E; Mohar, A; Lopez-Basave, H; De La Garza, J G; Dueñas-Gonzalez, A

    2001-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery is a promising approach in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, technical aspects, and clinical results of surgery after induction chemotherapy in this patient population. Forty-one untreated cervical carcinoma patients staged as IB2 to IIIB received three 21-day courses of cisplatin 100mg/m2 on day 1 and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 followed by surgery or concomitant chemoradiation. The response to chemotherapy, operability, surgical/pathological findings, disease-free period, and survival of the surgically treated patients were evaluated. All 41 patients were evaluated for toxicity and 40 were evaluated for response. The overall objective response rate was 95% (95% confidence interval 88%-100%), and was complete in three patients (7.5%) and partial in 35 (87.5%). Granulocytopenia grades 3/4 occurred in 13.8% and 3.4% of the courses, respectively, whereas nonhematological toxicity was mild. Twenty-three patients underwent type III radical hysterectomy. Mean duration of surgery was 3.8 h (range 2:30-5:20), median estimated blood loss was 670 ml and median hospital stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative complications occurred in one case (venous injury). In all but one case the resection margins were negative. Four patients (17%) had positive nodes (one node each); six (26%) had complete pathologic response, three (13%) had microscopic; and 14 (60%) macroscopic residual disease. At 24 months of maximum follow-up (median 20), the disease-free and overall survival rates were 59% and 91%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy with cisplatin/gemcitabine produced a high response rate and did not increase the difficulty of surgery. Operating time, blood loss, intraoperative complications, and hospital stay were all within the range observed for type III hysterectomy in early stage patients. We therefore conclude that type III radical hysterectomy is feasible in locally

  20. Chemotherapy in thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chemotherapy alone, either as a single drug or a combination of drugs with or without external radiation (ER) is useful for treatment of locally advanced disease and non iodine concentrating metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC). The reported response is not encouraging, but the absence of better alternatives leave no choice for the treatment of such cases. However, for treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancers (ANC), chemotherapy (CT) in combination with ER results in local control. In medullary thyroid cancers (MTC), the results obtained with multimodal treatment are encouraging

  1. Extravasation of chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Seppo W

    2010-01-01

    Extravasation of chemotherapy is a feared complication of anticancer therapy. The accidental leakage of cytostatic agents into the perivascular tissues may have devastating short-term and long-term consequences for patients. In recent years, the increased focus on chemotherapy extravasation has led...... to the development of international guidelines that have proven useful tools in daily clinical practice. Moreover, the tissue destruction in one of the most dreaded types of extravasation (ie, anthracycline extravasation) now can effectively be prevented with a specific antidote, dexrazoxane....

  2. Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Vilholm, Ole Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy (CIPN) is a common, but underestimated, clinical challenge. Incidence varies depending on many factors that are equally as important as the type of chemotherapeutic agent itself. Moreover, the assessment of CIPN is still uncertain, as several of the most...... frequently used scales do not rely on a formal neurological evaluation and depend on patients' reports and examiners' interpretations. Therefore, the aim of this MiniReview was to introduce the most common chemotherapies that cause neuropathy, and in addition to this, highlight the most significant...

  3. Systemic Effects of Anti-Angiogenic Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starlinger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic cancer therapy has gained importance within the past decades. In this context, Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor, has been approved for clinical use. The combination of chemotherapy with Bevacizumab has shown a remarkable benefit in several neoplastic entities. However, a notable number of patients do not respond to this therapy. Furthermore, response to therapy seems to be short-lived. The primary topic of this PhD thesis was to characterize systemic effects of anti-angiogenic therapy to possibly identify mechanisms that could explain this heterogeneity in therapy response. To this end, a carefully selected subset of angiogenesis factors were monitored in detail in the course of a clinical study of pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine based anti-angiogenic therapy with Bevacizumab. To enable the reliable monitoring of angiogenesis parameters, we initially defined an optimized procedure to evaluate angiogenesis factors in blood. During these investigations a remarkable association of circulating angiogenic growth factors with platelet counts and activation was observed. Strikingly, we were able to confirm this association in the clinical setting. In particular, the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) correlated with platelet counts. We further showed that the highly myelosuppressive chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine resulted in a decrease of platelet counts and circulating TSP-1 levels. As a result, we hypothesized that the choice of chemotherapy might affect the angiogenic balance and counteract the therapeutic effect of bevacizumab. This notion was further supported by a careful evaluation of other studies reporting on the combination of Bevacizumab with thrombocytopenic chemotherapies which were generally of minor therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. To further focus on TSP-1 as an essential modulator of neovascularization and anti-angiogenic therapy we investigated TSP-1

  4. [A Case with Metastatic Huge Ovarian Tumor from Transverse Colon Cancer, Who Underwent Systemic Chemotherapy after Bilateral Oophorectomy and Right Hemi Colectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanari, Shun; Nagasaki, Toshiya; Minami, Hironori; Fukuoka, Hironori; Murahashi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ushigome, Hajime; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Ueno, Masashi

    2017-11-01

    Metastatic ovarian tumors from colon cancer would be resistant to chemotherapy, and compromising quality of life(QOL) of these patients was caused by acute enlargement of the tumors. A 37-year-old woman with abdominal distension was diagnosed with transverse colon cancer, bilateral ovarian metastases, liver metastases, and peritoneal dissemination at prior hospital. Two courses of chemotherapy(FOLFOX)were administered, but metastaticovarian tumors enlarged. Chemotherapy was discontinued and she was referred to our institution. To achieve symptom relief, improving QOL, and to resume chemotherapy, we planned bilateral oophorectomy and primary tumor resection if other stenotic lesion was not present. As a result, we safely performed open bilateral oophorectomy and right hemi colectomy, and the patient discharged on postoperative day 11 without complications. Chemotherapy was resumed and continued for 7 months up to this time. Even though, curative resection could not be achieved, oophorectomy should be performed in patients with enlarged metastatic ovarian tumor from colon cancer, in spite of administration of chemotherapy.

  5. Treatment of Children With Central Nervous System Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors/Pinealoblastomas in the Prospective Multicentric Trial HIT 2000 Using Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Chemotherapy

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    Gerber, Nicolas U., E-mail: nicolas.gerber@kispi.uzh.ch [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University Children' s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Hoff, Katja von; Resch, Anika [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ottensmeier, Holger [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kwiecien, Robert; Faldum, Andreas [Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Muenster (Germany); Matuschek, Christiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hornung, Dagmar [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Institute for Radiation Therapy and Special Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Benesch, Martin [Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Pietsch, Torsten [Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuehl, Joachim [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rutkowski, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kortmann, Rolf D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The prognosis for children with central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET) or pinealoblastoma is still unsatisfactory. Here we report the results of patients between 4 and 21 years of age with nonmetastatic CNS-PNET or pinealoblastoma diagnosed from January 2001 to December 2005 and treated in the prospective GPOH-trial P-HIT 2000-AB4. Methods and Materials: After surgery, children received hyperfractionated radiation therapy (36 Gy to the craniospinal axis, 68 Gy to the tumor region, and 72 Gy to any residual tumor, fractionated at 2 × 1 Gy per day 5 days per week) accompanied by weekly intravenous administration of vincristine and followed by 8 cycles of maintenance chemotherapy (lomustine, cisplatin, and vincristine). Results: Twenty-six patients (15 with CNS-PNET; 11 with pinealoblastoma) were included. Median age at diagnosis was 11.5 years old (range, 4.0-20.7 years). Gross total tumor resection was achieved in 6 and partial resection in 16 patients (indistinct, 4 patients). Median follow-up of the 15 surviving patients was 7.0 years (range, 5.2-10.0 years). The combined response rate to postoperative therapy was 17 of 20 (85%). Eleven of 26 patients (42%; 7 of 15 with CNS-PNET; 4 of 11 with pinealoblastoma) showed tumor progression or relapse at a median time of 1.3 years (range, 0.5-1.9 years). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates (±standard error [SE]) were each 58% (±10%) for the entire cohort: CNS-PNET was 53% (±13); pinealoblastoma was 64% (±15%; P=.524 and P=.627, respectively). Conclusions: Postoperative hyperfractionated radiation therapy with local dose escalation followed by maintenance chemotherapy was feasible without major acute toxicity. Survival rates are comparable to those of a few other recent studies but superior to those of most other series, including the previous trial, HIT 1991.

  6. Utility of the CPS+EG staging system in hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmé, Frederik; Lederer, Bianca; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Costa, Serban Dan; Denkert, Carsten; Eidtmann, Holger; Gerber, Bernd; Hanusch, Claus; Hilfrich, Jörn; Huober, Jens; Jackisch, Christian; Kümmel, Sherko; Loibl, Sibylle; Paepke, Stefan; Untch, Michael; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Schneeweiss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) correlates with overall survival (OS) in primary breast cancer. A recently described staging system based on pre-treatment clinical stage (CS), final pathological stage (PS), estrogen receptor (ER) status and nuclear grade (NG) leads to a refined estimation of prognosis in unselected patients. Its performance in luminal type breast cancers has not been determined. This study investigates the clinical utility of this CPS+EG score when restricted to hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) patients and compares the results to a cohort of unselected patients. The CPS+EG score was calculated for 6637 unselected patients and 2454 patients with HR+/HER2- tumours who received anthracycline/taxane-based NACT within 8 prospective German trials. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and OS were 75.6% and 84.1% for the unselected cohort and 80.6% and 87.8% for the HR+/HER2- subgroup, respectively. The CPS+EG system distinguished different prognostic groups with 5-year DFS ranging from 0% to 91%. The CPS+EG system leads to an improved categorisation of patients by outcome compared to CS, PS, ER or NG alone. When applying the CPS+EG score to the HR+/HER2- subgroup, a shift to lower scores was observed compared to the overall population, but 5-year DFS and OS for the individual scores were identical to that observed in the overall population. In HR+/HER2- patients, the CPS+EG staging system retains its ability to facilitate a refined stratification of patients according to outcome. It can help to select candidates for post-neoadjuvant clinical trials in luminal breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Contribution of FKBP5 genetic variation to gemcitabine treatment and survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A Ellsworth

    Full Text Available FKBP51, (FKBP5, is a negative regulator of Akt. Variability in FKBP5 expression level is a major factor contributing to variation in response to chemotherapeutic agents including gemcitabine, a first line treatment for pancreatic cancer. Genetic variation in FKBP5 could influence its function and, ultimately, treatment response of pancreatic cancer.We set out to comprehensively study the role of genetic variation in FKBP5 identified by Next Generation DNA resequencing on response to gemcitabine treatment of pancreatic cancer by utilizing both tumor and germline DNA samples from 43 pancreatic cancer patients, including 19 paired normal-tumor samples. Next, genotype-phenotype association studies were performed with overall survival as well as with FKBP5 gene expression in tumor using the same samples in which resequencing had been performed, followed by functional genomics studies.In-depth resequencing identified 404 FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in normal and tumor DNA. SNPs with the strongest associations with survival or FKBP5 expression were subjected to functional genomic study. Electromobility shift assay showed that the rs73748206 "A(T" SNP altered DNA-protein binding patterns, consistent with significantly increased reporter gene activity, possibly through its increased binding to Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR. The effect of rs73748206 was confirmed on the basis of its association with FKBP5 expression by affecting the binding to GR in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from the same patients for whom DNA was used for resequencing.This comprehensive FKBP5 resequencing study provides insights into the role of genetic variation in variation of gemcitabine response.

  8. Aspirin counteracts cancer stem cell features, desmoplasia and gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Liu, Li; Fan, Pei; Bauer, Nathalie; Gladkich, Jury; Ryschich, Eduard; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; Giese, Nathalia A.; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Hinz, Ulf; Gross, Wolfgang; Fortunato, Franco; Herr, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis. An inflammatory microenvironment triggers the pronounced desmoplasia, the selection of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and therapy resistance. The anti-inflammatory drug aspirin is suggested to lower the risk for PDA and to improve the treatment, although available results are conflicting and the effect of aspirin to CSC characteristics and desmoplasia in PDA has not yet been investigated. We characterized the influence of aspirin on CSC features, stromal reactions and gemcitabine resistance. Four established and 3 primary PDA cell lines, non-malignant cells, 3 patient tumor-derived CSC-enriched spheroidal cultures and tissues from patients who did or did not receive aspirin before surgery were analyzed using MTT assays, flow cytometry, colony and spheroid formation assays, Western blot analysis, antibody protein arrays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), immunohistochemistry and in vivo xenotransplantation. Aspirin significantly induced apoptosis and reduced the viability, self-renewal potential, and expression of proteins involved in inflammation and stem cell signaling. Aspirin also reduced the growth and invasion of tumors in vivo, and it significantly prolonged the survival of mice with orthotopic pancreatic xenografts in combination with gemcitabine. This was associated with a decreased expression of markers for progression, inflammation and desmoplasia. These findings were confirmed in tissue samples obtained from patients who had or had not taken aspirin before surgery. Importantly, aspirin sensitized cells that were resistant to gemcitabine and thereby enhanced the therapeutic efficacy. Aspirin showed no obvious toxic effects on normal cells, chick embryos or mice. These results highlight aspirin as an effective, inexpensive and well-tolerated co-treatment to target inflammation, desmoplasia and CSC features PDA. PMID:25846752

  9. Suppression of Reserve MCM Complexes Chemosensitizes to Gemcitabine and 5-Fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Victoria L; Elias, Roy M; McCarthy, Susan M; Yeatman, Timothy J; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest forms of cancer and is very difficult to treat with conventional chemotherapeutic regimens. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are used in the management of PDAC and act by indirectly blocking replicative forks. However, these drugs are not highly effective at suppressing disease progression, indicating a need for the development of innovative therapeutic approaches. Recent studies indicate that suppression of the MCM helicase may provide a novel means to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that inhibit replicative fork progression. Mammalian cells assemble more MCM complexes on DNA than are required to start S-phase. The excess MCM complexes function as backup initiation sites under conditions of replicative stress. The current study provides definitive evidence that cosuppression of the excess/backup MCM complexes sensitizes PDAC tumor lines to both gemcitabine and 5-FU, leading to increased loss of proliferative capacity compared with drugs alone. This occurs because reduced MCM levels prevent efficient recovery of DNA replication in tumor cells exposed to drug. PDAC tumor cells are more sensitive to MCM loss in the presence of gemcitabine than are nontumor, immortalized epithelial cells. Similarly, colon tumor cells are rendered less viable when cosuppression of MCM complexes occurs during exposure to the crosslinking agent oxaliplatin or topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide. These studies demonstrate that suppressing the backup complement of MCM complexes provides an effective sensitizing approach with the potential to increase the therapeutic index of drugs used in the clinical management of PDAC and other cancers. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Cisplatin, Gemcitabine, and Lapatinib as Neoadjuvant Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vivek; Mamtani, Ronac; Keefe, Stephen; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Vaughn, David J

    2016-07-01

    We sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine, cisplatin, and lapatinib (GCL) as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) planned for radical cystectomy. Four cycles of GCL were administered as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with MIBC. Although initially designed as a phase II efficacy study with a primary endpoint of pathologic complete response at the time of radical cystectomy, the dose selected for investigation proved excessively toxic. A total of six patients were enrolled. The initial four patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 70 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day treatment cycle. Lapatinib was administered as 1,000 mg orally daily starting one week prior to the initiation of cycle 1 of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) and continuing until the completion of cycle 4 of GC. These initial doses were poorly tolerated, and the final two enrolled patients received a reduced lapatinib dose of 750 mg orally daily. However, reduction of the lapatinib dose did not result in improved tolerance or drug-delivery, and the trial was terminated early due to excessive toxicity. Grade 3/4 toxicities included diarrhea (33%), nausea/vomiting (33%), and thrombocytopenia (33%). The addition of lapatinib to GC as neoadjuvant therapy for MIBC was limited by excessive treatment-related toxicity. These findings highlight the importance of thorough dose-escalation investigation of combination therapies prior to evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting, as well as the limitations of determination of maximum tolerated dose for novel targeted combination regimens.

  11. Gemcitabine and carboplatin in advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract: an alternative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogué-Aliguer, Miquel; Carles, Joan; Arrivi, Antonio; Juan, Oscar; Alonso, Lorenzo; Font, Albert; Mellado, Begoña; Garrido, Pilar; Sáenz, Alberto

    2003-05-01

    Cisplatin-based combinations are considered to be the standard treatment for advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urothelium. Many of the patients are elderly with concomitant diseases or impaired renal function. We studied the tolerance and activity of the gemcitabine/carboplatin combination as a therapeutic alternative. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic TCC of the urothelium were treated with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) on Days 1 and 8 and carboplatin area under the concentration-time curve 5 on Day 1 every 21 days. Patients with creatinine clearance of 30 mL/min or above and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores 60 or above were enrolled. A total of 227 cycles were administered to 41 patients, with an average of 5.5 cycles per patient (range, 1-8 cycles). Creatinine clearance was below 60 mL/min in 54% of patients, KPS was 70 or below in 37% of patients, and 37% of patients were 70 years old or older. Hematologic toxicity was mainly Grade 3/4 neutropenia in 63%, Grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia in 32%, and Grade 3/4 anemia in 54% of patients. There were only three episodes of febrile neutropenia and one death from neutropenic sepsis. Nonhematologic toxicity was mild, with asthenia as the most frequently reported event. We obtained 6 complete and 17 partial responses, for an overall response rate of 56.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.6-71.6%). Progression-free survival was 7.2 months (95% CI, 5.7-8.5) and median survival was 10.1 months (95% CI, 8.8-12.2). The combination of gemcitabine plus carboplatin achieves a similar result to doublets using cisplatin. It has an acceptable toxicity profile and enables patients with impaired renal function and/or poor performance status and elderly patients to be treated. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.DOI 10.1002/cncr.10990

  12. Chemotherapy-induced hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajero, Pia Marie E; Belsky, Joseph L; Prawius, Herbert D; Rella, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    To present a unique case of transient, asymptomatic chemotherapy-induced hypocalcemia not attributable to hypomagnesemia or tumor lysis syndrome and review causes of hypocalcemia related to cancer with and without use of chemotherapy. We present a case detailing the clinical and laboratory findings of a patient who had severe hypocalcemia during chemotherapy and discuss causes of hypocalcemia with an extensive literature review of chemotherapeutic agents associated with this biochemical abnormality. In a 90-year-old man, hypocalcemia developed during 2 courses of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma, with partial recovery between courses and normal serum calcium 10 months after completion of treatment. Magnesium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone levels were low normal. There was no evidence of tumor lysis syndrome. Of the various agents administered, vinca alkaloids seemed the most likely cause. Serial testing suggested that the underlying mechanism may have been acquired, reversible hypoparathyroidism. No other similar case was found in the published literature. The severe hypocalcemia in our patient could not be attributed to hypomagnesemia or tumor lysis syndrome, and it was clearly associated with the timing of his chemotherapeutic regimen. Possibilities include direct parathyroid hormone suppression or alteration of calcium sensing by the chemotherapeutic drugs. Serum calcium surveillance before and during chemotherapeutic management of cancer patients may reveal more instances and provide insight into the exact mechanism of this lesser known yet striking complication.

  13. After chemotherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    You had chemotherapy treatment for your cancer. Your risk of infection, bleeding, and skin problems may be high. You may have mouth sores, an upset stomach, and diarrhea. You will probably get tired easily. Your appetite may be poor, but you should be able ...

  14. Treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma with carboplatin, liposomized doxorubicin, and gemcitabine: a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerdal, G.; Sundstrom, S.; Riska, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma has a poor prognosis and there is limited effect of treatment. The Nordic Mesothelioma groups decided in the year 2000 to investigate a combination of liposomized doxorubicin, carboplatin, and gemcitabine for this disease in a phase II study. METHODS: From...... January 2001, to December 2003, 173 evaluable patients with biopsy-verified malignant mesothelioma were included. Two patients were lost to follow-up, but all the others were followed for at least 4 years or until death. RESULTS: Toxicity was fairly low. There were 56 responses (32.4%), of which 2 were...

  15. Microdose-Induced Drug-DNA Adducts as Biomarkers of Chemotherapy Resistance in Humans and Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Maike; Wang, Si-Si; Zhang, Hongyong; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Malfatti, Michael; Haack, Kurt; Ognibene, Ted; Yang, Hongyuan; Airhart, Susan; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Cimino, George D; Tepper, Clifford G; Drakaki, Alexandra; Chamie, Karim; de Vere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Henderson, Paul T

    2017-02-01

    We report progress on predicting tumor response to platinum-based chemotherapy with a novel mass spectrometry approach. Fourteen bladder cancer patients were administered one diagnostic microdose each of [ 14 C]carboplatin (1% of the therapeutic dose). Carboplatin-DNA adducts were quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry in blood and tumor samples collected within 24 hours, and compared with subsequent chemotherapy response. Patients with the highest adduct levels were responders, but not all responders had high adduct levels. Four patient-derived bladder cancer xenograft mouse models were used to test the possibility that another drug in the regimen could cause a response. The mice were dosed with [ 14 C]carboplatin or [ 14 C]gemcitabine and the resulting drug-DNA adduct levels were compared with tumor response to chemotherapy. At least one of the drugs had to induce high drug-DNA adduct levels or create a synergistic increase in overall adducts to prompt a corresponding therapeutic response, demonstrating proof-of-principle for drug-DNA adducts as predictive biomarkers. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 376-87. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: a pooled analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Florian; Schmid, Roland M

    2014-01-01

    In biliary tract cancer, gemcitabine platinum (GP) doublet palliative chemotherapy is the current standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze recent trials, even those small and nonrandomized, and identify superior new regimens. Trials published in English between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed, as well as ASCO abstracts from 2010 to 2013. In total, 161 trials comprising 6,337 patients were analyzed. The pooled results of standard therapy GP (no fluoropyrimidine, F, or other drug) were as follows: the median response rate (RR), tumor control rate (TCR), time to tumor progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 25.9 and 63.5%, and 5.3 and 9.5 months, respectively. GFP triplets as well as G-based chemotherapy plus targeted therapy were significantly superior to GP concerning tumor control (TCR, TTP) and OS, with no difference in RR. Triplet combinations of GFP as well as G-based chemotherapy with (predominantly EGFR) targeted therapy are most effective concerning tumor control and survival.

  17. Complication-related removal of totally implantable venous access port systems: Does the interval between placement and first use and the neutropenia-inducing potential of chemotherapy regimens influence their incidence? A four-year prospective study of 4045 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkos, A; Bresson, L; Hudry, D; Cousin, S; Lervat, C; Bogart, E; Meurant, J P; El Bedoui, S; Decanter, G; Hannebicque, K; Regis, C; Hamdani, A; Penel, N; Tresch-Bruneel, E; Narducci, F

    2017-04-01

    Totally implantable venous access port systems are widely used in oncology, with frequent complications that sometimes necessitate device removal. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the time interval between port placement and initiation of chemotherapy and the neutropenia-inducing potential of the chemotherapy administered upon complication-related port removal. Between January 2010 and December 2013, 4045 consecutive patients were included in this observational, single-center prospective study. The chemotherapy regimens were classified as having a low (20%) risk for inducing neutropenia. The overall removal rate due to complications was 7.2%. Among them, port-related infection (2.5%) and port expulsion (1%) were the most frequent. The interval between port insertion and its first use was shown to be a predictive factor for complication-related removal rates. A cut-off of 6 days was statistically significant (p = 0.008), as the removal rate for complications was 9.4% when this interval was 0-5 days and 5.7% when it was ≥6 days. Another factor associated with port complication rate was the neutropenia-inducing potential of the chemotherapy regimens used, with removal for complications involved in 5.5% of low-risk regimens versus 9.4% for the intermediate- and high-risk regimens (p = 0.003). An interval of 6 days between placement and first use of the port reduces the removal rate from complications. The intermediate- and high-risk for neutropenia chemotherapy regimens are related to higher port removal rates from complications than low-risk regimens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Prognostic impact of normalization of serum tumor markers following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sudo, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Naru; Nakagawa, Naoya; Okada, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2017-04-01

    The survival benefit of neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma has been reported recently. However, prognostic factors for this strategy have not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify prognostic factors for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Medical records of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact who intended to undergo tumor resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Prognostic factors were investigated by analyzing the clinicopathological factors with univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Gemcitabine plus S-1 was generally used as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The objective response rate was 24%, and normalization of serum tumor markers following neoadjuvant chemotherapy was achieved in 29 patients (44%). Of the 66 patients, 60 patients underwent tumor resection and the remaining six patients did not due to distant metastases following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For all 66 patients, overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 87.8, 54.5, and 20.5%, respectively (median survival time, 27.1 months) and multivariate analysis revealed that normalization of serum tumor markers was found to be an independent prognostic factor of better overall survival (P = 0.023). Moreover, for 60 patients who undergo tumor resection, normalization of serum tumor markers (P = 0.005) was independently associated with better overall survival by multivariate analysis. Patients with pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact who undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy and experience normalization of serum tumor markers thereafter may be good candidates for tumor resection.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced urothelial carcinoma: an overview of the USC experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorff, Tanya B; Tsao-Wei, Denice; Miranda, Gus; Skinner, Donald G; Stein, John P; Quinn, David I

    2009-02-01

    To describe the tolerability of two chemotherapy regimens, gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) and methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC) for adjuvant treatment of patients with locally advanced urothelial cancer after radical cystectomy. The USC Department of Urology bladder cancer database was searched for subjects who received adjuvant chemotherapy following cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma with extravesical and/or lymph node involvement, yielding 187 cases. Clinical details regarding toxicity, number of cycles administered, and cancer outcome were analyzed. The majority of subjects had lymph node involvement (70%). Sixty-eight percent of subjects received MVAC and 32% received GC, the latter regimen was predominant after 2000. Fifty-six percent of subjects received all four planned cycles (51% GC and 58% MVAC). With a median follow-up of 11.2 years (range 1.9-19.6), 96 patients (51%) have suffered a relapse, with no significant difference between chemotherapy regimens. Median time to recurrence for the population was 3.7 years and median overall survival is 4.6 years (3.0-9.3). The median time from recurrence to death was 6.7 months and was not significantly different between MVAC and GC. Both MVAC and GC are tolerated after cystectomy for advanced urothelial carcinoma. A significant proportion of high-risk patients survive, free of disease, beyond 10 years. At recurrence, patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy have a survival that appears much shorter than patients who develop metastases in the absence of this exposure, suggesting resistance to salvage chemotherapy.

  20. Gemcitabine-Based Chemogene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Using Ad-dCK::UMK GDEPT and TS/RR siRNA Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soukaina Réjiba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is a first-line agent for advanced pancreatic cancer therapy. However, its efficacy is often limited by its poor intracellular metabolism and chemoresistance. To exert its antitumor activity, gemcitabine requires to be converted to its active triphosphate form. Thus, our aim was to improve gemcitabine activation using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy based on gemcitabine association with the deoxycytidine kinase::uridine monophosphate kinase fusion gene (dCK::UMK and small interference RNA directed against ribonucleotide reductase (RRM2 and thymidylate synthase (TS. In vitro, cytotoxicity was assessed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-3,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and [3H]thymidine assays. Apoptosis-related gene expression and activity were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and ELISA. For in vivo studies, the treatment efficacy was evaluated on subcutaneous and orthotopic pancreatic tumor models. Our data indicated that cell exposure to gemcitabine induced a down-regulation of dCK expression and up-regulation of TS and RR expression in Panc1-resistant cells when compared with BxPc3- and HA-hpc2-sensitive cells. The combination of TS/RRM2 small interference RNA with Ad-dCK::UMK induced a 40-fold decrease of gemcitabine IC50 in Panc1 cells. This strong sensitization was associated to apoptosis induction with a remarkable increase in TRAIL expression and a diminution of gemcitabine-induced nuclear factor-κB activity. In vivo, the gemcitabine-based tritherapy strongly reduced tumor volumes and significantly prolonged mice survival. Moreover, we observed an obvious increase of apoptosis and decrease of cell proliferation in tumors receiving the tritherapy regimens. Together, these findings suggest that simultaneous TS/RRM2-gene silencing and dCK::UMK gene overexpression markedly improved gemcitabine's therapeutic activity. Clearly, this combined strategy warrants further investigation.

  1. Phase 2 Study of Erlotinib Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Joseph M.; Fan, Katherine Y.; Wild, Aaron T.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Wood, Laura D.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Ellsworth, Susannah; Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Hidalgo, Manuel; Donehower, Ross C.; Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H.; Choti, Michael A.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m 2 twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m 2 on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. Conclusion: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer

  2. Phase 2 Study of Erlotinib Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Fan, Katherine Y.; Wild, Aaron T.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wood, Laura D. [Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Blackford, Amanda L. [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ellsworth, Susannah [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hidalgo, Manuel [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas, Madrid (Spain); Donehower, Ross C. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H. [Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Choti, Michael A. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hruban, Ralph H. [Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. Conclusion: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.

  3. A multi-controlled drug delivery system based on magnetic mesoporous Fe3O4 nanopaticles and a phase change material for cancer thermo-chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jian; Yuan, Kunjie; Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhang, Xiaowen; Fang, Xiaoming

    2017-10-01

    Herein a novel multi-controlled drug release system for doxorubicin (DOX) was developed, in which monodisperse mesoporous Fe3O4 nanoparticles were combined with a phase change material (PCM) and polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG2000). It is found that the PCM/PEG/DOX mixture containing 20% PEG could be dissolved into water at 42 °C. The mesoporous Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by the solvothermal method had sizes of around 25 nm and exhibited a mesoporous microstructure. A simple solvent evaporation process was employed to load the PCM/PEG/DOX mixture on the mesoporous Fe3O4 nanoparticles completely. In the Fe3O4@PCM/PEG/DOX system, the pores of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were observed to be filled with the mixture of PCM/PEG/DOX. The Fe3O4@PCM/PEG/DOX system showed a saturation magnetization value of 50.0 emu g-1, lower than 71.1 emu g-1 of the mesoporous Fe3O4 nanoparticles, but it was still high enough for magnetic targeting and hyperthermia application. The evaluation on drug release performance indicated that the Fe3O4@PCM/PEG/DOX system achieved nearly zero release of DOX in vitro in body temperature, while around 80% of DOX could be released within 1.5 h at the therapeutic threshold of 42 °C or under the NIR laser irradiation for about 4 h. And a very rapid release of DOX was achieved by this system when applying an alternating magnetic field. By comparing the systems with and without PEG2000, it is revealed that the presence of PEG2000 makes DOX easy to be released from 1-tetradecanol to water, owing to its functions of increasing the solubility of DOX in 1-tetradecanol as well as decreasing the surface tension between water and 1-tetradecanol. The novel drug release system shows great potential for the development of thermo-chemotherapy of cancer treatment.

  4. Monitoring Oxygen Levels in Orthotopic Human Glioma Xenograft Following Carbogen Inhalation and Chemotherapy by Implantable Resonator Based Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huagang; Nemani, Venkata Krishnamurthy; Du, Gaixin; Montano, Ryan; Song, Rui; Gimi, Barjor; Swartz, Harold M.; Eastman, Alan; Khan, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical hallmark of glioma, and significantly compromises treatment efficacy. Unfortunately, techniques for monitoring glioma pO2 to facilitate translational research are lacking. Furthermore, poor prognoses of patients with malignant glioma, in particular glioblastoma multiforme, warrant effective strategies that can inhibit hypoxia and improve treatment outcome. EPR oximetry using implantable resonators was implemented for monitoring pO2 in normal cerebral tissue and U251 glioma in mice. Breathing carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2) was tested for hyperoxia in the normal brain and glioma xenografts. A new strategy to inhibit glioma growth by rationally combining gemcitabine and MK-8776, a cell cycle checkpoint inhibitor, was also investigated. The mean pO2 of left and right hemisphere were approximately 56 – 69 mmHg in the normal cerebral tissue of mice. The mean baseline pO2 of U251 glioma on the first and fifth day of measurement was 21.9 ± 3.7 and 14.1 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively. The mean brain pO2 including glioma increased by at least 100% on carbogen inhalation, although the response varied between the animals over days. Treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 significantly increased pO2 and inhibited glioma growth assessed by MRI. In conclusion, EPR oximetry with implantable resonators can be used to monitor the efficacy of carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy on orthotopic glioma in mice. The increase in glioma pO2 of mice breathing carbogen can be used to improve treatment outcome. The treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 is a promising strategy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25111969

  5. Monitoring oxygen levels in orthotopic human glioma xenograft following carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy by implantable resonator-based oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huagang; Krishnamurthy Nemani, Venkata; Du, Gaixin; Montano, Ryan; Song, Rui; Gimi, Barjor; Swartz, Harold M; Eastman, Alan; Khan, Nadeem

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxia is a critical hallmark of glioma, and significantly compromises treatment efficacy. Unfortunately, techniques for monitoring glioma pO2 to facilitate translational research are lacking. Furthermore, poor prognosis of patients with malignant glioma, in particular glioblastoma multiforme, warrant effective strategies that can inhibit hypoxia and improve treatment outcome. EPR oximetry using implantable resonators was implemented for monitoring pO2 in normal cerebral tissue and U251 glioma in mice. Breathing carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2 ) was tested for hyperoxia in the normal brain and glioma xenografts. A new strategy to inhibit glioma growth by rationally combining gemcitabine and MK-8776, a cell cycle checkpoint inhibitor, was also investigated. The mean pO2 of left and right hemisphere were ∼56-69 mmHg in the normal cerebral tissue of mice. The mean baseline pO2 of U251 glioma on the first and fifth day of measurement was 21.9 ± 3.7 and 14.1 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively. The mean brain pO2 including glioma increased by at least 100% on carbogen inhalation, although the response varied between the animals over days. Treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 significantly increased pO2 and inhibited glioma growth assessed by MRI. In conclusion, EPR oximetry with implantable resonators can be used to monitor the efficacy of carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy on orthotopic glioma in mice. The increase in glioma pO2 of mice breathing carbogen can be used to improve treatment outcome. The treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 is a promising strategy that warrants further investigation. © 2014 UICC.

  6. Adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy for unresectable nonsmall-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yong Wha; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Yong Tai; Sohn, Joo Hyuk; Chang, Joon; Kim, Se Kyu; Park, Moo Suk; Chung, Kyung Young; Lee, Hyoun Ju; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2007-05-01

    The study investigated correlations between adenosine triphosphate / chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) and clinical outcomes after ATP-CRA-guided platinum-based chemotherapy for unresectable nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The authors performed an in vitro chemosensitivity test, ATP-CRA, to evaluate the chemosensitivities of anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, carboplatin, paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine for chemonaive, unresectable NSCLC. The cell death rate was determined by measuring the intracellular ATP levels of drug-exposed cells compared with untreated controls. A sensitive drug was defined as a drug producing 30% or more reduction in ATP compared with untreated controls. Assay-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy was given to patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC. Thirty-four patients were enrolled. Thirty tumor specimens were obtained by bronchoscopic biopsies and 4 obtained surgically. The median age was 61 years and 27 patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1. The response rate was 43.8%. At a median follow-up period of 16.9 months, the median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.6 and 11.2 months, respectively. Patients were dichotomized into the platinum-sensitive (S; 20 patients) and resistant (R; 14 patients) groups. The positive/negative predictive values were 61.1% and 78.6% with a predictive accuracy of 68.8%. Although without significant differences in pretreatment parameters, the S-group showed better clinical response (P=.036), longer progression-free survival (P=.060), and longer overall survival (P=.025). Despite using bronchoscopic biopsied specimens, ATP-CRA and clinical outcomes correlated well after assay-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy for unresectable NSCLC. There was a favorable response and survival in the platinum-sensitive vs resistant groups. Copyright (c) 2007 American Cancer Society

  7. Intratumoral pharmacokinetic analysis by 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cytostatic in vivo activity of gemcitabine (dFdC) in two small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Quistorff, B; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine, 2'2'difluoro-deoxycytidine (dFdC), has shown activity in several preclinical models, and presently the compound is being clinically evaluated in patients with lung cancer and other solid tumors. DESIGN: The cytostatic in vivo activity of dFdC was tested in the two human.......p. every third day, four times were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Significant activity of gemcitabine was demonstrated in both SCLC tumor lines. The tumor line 54A is the most sensitive to radiotherapy, doxorubicin, and nitrosoureas; but in this case the 54B tumors were more sensitive to gemcitabine...

  8. miR-34 increases in vitro PANC-1 cell sensitivity to gemcitabine via targeting Slug/PUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-An; Yang, Xu-Hai; Chen, Dong; Yan, Xiang; Jing, Fu-Chun; Liu, Hong-Qian; Zhang, Ronghua

    2018-01-01

    miR-34 was deregulated in tumor tissues compared with corresponding noncancerous tissue samples. Furthermore, miR-34 may contribute to cancer-stromal interaction associated with cancer progression. However, whether miR-34 could decrease chemoresistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agent remains unclear. In our study, we examined whether overexpression of miR-34 could sensitize gemcitabine -mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. We found that miR-34 markedly induced gemcitabine -mediated apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. miR-34 induced down-regulation of Slug expression and upregulation of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression. The over-expression of Slug or downregulation of PUMA by Slug cDNA or PUMA siRNA transfection markedly blocked miR-34-induced gemcitabine sensitization. Furthermore, miR-34 induced PUMA expression by downregulation of Slug. Taken together, our study demonstrates that miR-34 enhances sensitization against gemcitabine-mediated apoptosis through the down-regulation of Slug expression, and up-regulation of Slug-dependent PUMA expression.

  9. Gemcitabine-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM-ANPs) inhibit PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Di, Yang; Jin, Chen; Fu, Deliang; Yang, Feng; Jiang, Yongjian; Yao, Lie; Hao, Sijie; Wang, Xiaoyi; Subedi, Sabin; Ni, Quanxing

    2013-04-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, special attention has been given to the nanomaterial application in tumor treatment. Here, a modified desolvation-cross-linking method was successfully applied to fabricate gemcitabine-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM-ANPs), with 110 and 406 nm of mean diameter, respectively. The aim of this study was to assess the drug distribution, side effects, and antitumor activity of GEM-ANPs in vivo. The metabolic viability and flow cytometry analysis revealed that both GEM-ANPs, especially 406-nm GEM-ANPs, could effectively inhibit the metabolism and proliferation and promote the apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma (PANC-1) in vitro. Intravenous injection of 406-nm GEM-ANPs exhibited a significant increase of gemcitabine in the pancreas, liver, and spleen of Sprague-Dawley rats ( p PANC-1-induced tumor mice, intravenous injection of 406-nm GEM-ANPs also could effectively reduce the tumor volume by comparison with free gemcitabine. With these findings, albumin nanosphere-loading approach might be efficacious to improve the antitumor activity of gemcitabine, and the efficacy is associated with the size of GEM-ANPs.

  10. A randomized phase II trial of first-line treatment with gemcitabine, erlotinib, or gemcitabine and erlotinib in elderly patients (age ≥70 years) with stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Peterman, Amy H; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Bradford, Daniel S; Bakri, Kamal; Taylor, Mark; Crane, Jeffrey M; Schwartz, Garry; Hensing, Thomas A; McElroy, Edwin; Niell, Harvey B; Harper, Harry D; Pal, Sridhar; Socinski, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Single-agent gemcitabine is a standard of care for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but novel therapies are needed for this patient population. We performed a noncomparative randomized phase II trial of gemcitabine, erlotinib, or the combination in elderly patients (age ≥70 years) with stage IIIB or IV non-small cell lung cancer. Patients were randomized to arms: A (gemcitabine 1200 mg/m on days 1 and 8 every 21 days), B (erlotinib 150 mg daily), or C (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m on days 1 and 8 every 21 days and erlotinib 100 mg daily). Arms B and C were considered investigational; the primary objective was 6-month progression-free survival. Between March 2006 and May 2010, 146 eligible patients received protocol therapy. The majority of the patients (82%) had stage IV disease, 64% reported adenocarcinoma histology, 90% reported current or previous tobacco use, and 28% had a performance status of 2. The 6-month progression-free survival rate observed in arms A, B, and C was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11-35), 24% (95% CI 13-36), and 25% (95% CI 15-38), respectively; the median overall survival observed was 6.8 months (95% CI 4.8-8.5), 5.8 months (95% CI 3.0-8.3), and 5.6 months (95% CI 3.5-8.4), respectively. The rate of grade ≥3 hematological and nonhematological toxicity observed was similar in all three arms. The best overall health-related quality of life response did not differ between treatment arms. Erlotinib or erlotinib and gemcitabine do not warrant further investigation in an unselected elderly patient population.

  11. Liposome-encapsulated chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, B.; Hansen, A. E.; Kjær, A.

    2018-01-01

    Cytotoxic drugs encapsulated into liposomes were originally designed to increase the anticancer response, while minimizing off-target adverse effects. The first liposomal chemotherapeutic drug was approved for use in humans more than 20years ago, and the first publication regarding its use...... to inherent issues with the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the tumour phenomenon which liposomal drugs exploit. This effect seems very heterogeneously distributed in the tumour. Also, it is potentially not as ubiquitously occurring as once thought, and it may prove important to select patients...... not resolve the other challenges that liposomal chemotherapy faces, and more work still needs to be done to determine which veterinary patients may benefit the most from liposomal chemotherapy....

  12. Combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the clinically confirmed benefits of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy. They have been found in a small group of diseases that respond to chemotherapy alone. According to the author, only when a drug or drug combination has the ability to eradicate occult disease or substantially to reduce the size of objectively measurable disease is there likely to be an demonstrable benefit from its use in conjunction with radiotherapy. It is the author's belief that the immediate future lies in selecting drugs and patients in which a good chemotherapeutic response can be expected, avoiding drugs that seriously enhance radiation damage to normal tissues and keeping drug and radiation treatments far enough apart in time to minimize interactions

  13. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  14. Targeting EGFR/HER2 pathways enhances the antiproliferative effect of gemcitabine in biliary tract and gallbladder carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignochino, Ymera; Bardelli, Alberto; Aglietta, Massimo; Leone, Francesco; Sarotto, Ivana; Peraldo-Neia, Caterina; Penachioni, Junia Y; Cavalloni, Giuliana; Migliardi, Giorgia; Casorzo, Laura; Chiorino, Giovanna; Risio, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Advanced biliary tract carcinomas (BTCs) have poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Therefore, it is crucial to combine standard therapies with molecular targeting. In this study EGFR, HER2, and their molecular transducers were analysed in terms of mutations, amplifications and over-expression in a BTC case series. Furthermore, we tested the efficacy of drugs targeting these molecules, as single agents or in combination with gemcitabine, the standard therapeutic agent against BTC. Immunohistochemistry, FISH and mutational analysis were performed on 49 BTC samples of intrahepatic (ICCs), extrahepatic (ECCs), and gallbladder (GBCs) origin. The effect on cell proliferation of different EGFR/HER2 pathway inhibitors as single agents or in combination with gemcitabine was investigated on BTC cell lines. Western blot analyses were performed to investigate molecular mechanisms of targeted drugs. EGFR is expressed in 100% of ICCs, 52.6% of ECCs, and in 38.5% of GBCs. P-MAPK and p-Akt are highly expressed in ICCs (>58% of samples), and to a lower extent in ECCs and GBCs (<46%), indicating EGFR pathway activation. HER2 is overexpressed in 10% of GBCs (with genomic amplification), and 26.3% of ECCs (half of which has genomic amplification). EGFR or its signal transducers are mutated in 26.5% of cases: 4 samples bear mutations of PI3K (8.2%), 3 cases (6.1%) in K-RAS, 4 (8.2%) in B-RAF, and 2 cases (4.1%) in PTEN, but no loss of PTEN expression is detected. EGI-1 cell line is highly sensitive to gemcitabine, TFK1 and TGBC1-TKB cell lines are responsive and HuH28 cell line is resistant. In EGI-1 cells, combination with gefitinib further increases the antiproliferative effect of gemcitabine. In TFK1 and TGBC1-TKB cells, the efficacy of gemcitabine is increased with addiction of sorafenib and everolimus. In TGBC1-TKB cells, lapatinib also has a synergic effect with gemcitabine. HuH28 becomes responsive if treated in combination with erlotinib. Moreover, HuH28 cells are

  15. Full dose CHOP chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shinichi; Kondo, Makoto; Ando, Yutaka; Yamashita, Shoji; Uematsu, Minoru; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishiguchi, Iku; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, we have performed 125 courses of CHOP chemotherapy for 27 patients of malignancy, adhering to the original regimen as strictly as possible. CHOP chemotherapy consisted of Cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Vincristine 1.4 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1 (maximum single dose 2.0 mg) and Prednisolone 50 mg/m 2 , po, day 1 through 5. The cycle was repeated every 21 days. As side effects, myelosuppression, hair loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, stomatitis, neuropathy, herpes zoster, arrhythmia and hemorrhagic cystitis were seen. Due to myelosuppression, twenty patients experienced febrile episodes at each nadir of WBC counts on 40 courses. However, any febrile patient did not have life threatening infection. Other side effects were also reversible. The radiotherapy of most patients was carried out as initially scheduled, except for 3 patients in whom irradiation was interrupted due to severe stomatitis or herpes zoster. We consider that CHOP chemotherapy is excellent in feasibility even when combined with radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  17. A phase 1b study of Selumetinib in combination with Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancer: the ABC-04 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgewater, John; Lopes, Andre; Beare, Sandra; Duggan, Marian; Lee, Dymphna; Ricamara, Maravic; McEntee, Delyth; Sukumaran, Ajithkumar; Wasan, Harpreet; Valle, Juan W.

    2016-01-01

    Combined treatment with cisplatin and gemcitabine (CisGem) is the standard of care for patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (ABC). Selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886) potently and selectively inhibits MEK1/2, an intracellular kinase and has shown activity in ABC. The objective of the ABC-04 trial was to establish the recommended dose of selumetinib in combination with CisGem in patients with ABC. Eligible patients were ≥ 18 years, had histologically or cytologically-confirmed unresectable recurrent or metastatic biliary tract, gallbladder or ampullary carcinoma, WHO performance status 0–2, and adequate major organ function. Patients may have had prior surgery, radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy, but no prior CisGem and no prior chemotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic disease. Patients received cisplatin 25 mg/m 2 plus gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 intravenously on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle. Selumetinib capsules were taken daily. Patients received up to 8 cycles of CisGem and could receive selumetinib until disease progression. A dose de-escalation scheme was used to determine the recommended dose of selumetinib. The first dose level was 75 mg bd. Patients were recruited in cohorts of 3 and assessed for dose limiting toxicity (DLT) during the first cycle of treatment. Thirteen patients were recruited, of whom 12 were evaluable for DLT (1 did not start treatment). All evaluable patients received the starting dose of selumetinib 75 mg bd and one patient experienced a DLT (cardiac chest pain). The median number of days selumetinib was taken (adjusted for the number of days of dose interruptions) was 171.5 (IQR: 75.5 to 344). Two patients remained on treatment at 14 and 19 months post registration. There were 3 temporary and 1 permanent interruptions of selumetinib in cycle 1. Eight patients were evaluable for objective response (RECIST v1.1): 3 had a partial response and 5 stable disease. The median PFS was 6.4 months (IQR 5.2 to 13.7). Toxicities

  18. Systemic co-delivery of doxorubicin and siRNA using nanoparticles conjugated with EGFR-specific targeting peptide to enhance chemotherapy in ovarian tumor bearing mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. W.; Lin, W. J., E-mail: wjlin@ntu.edu.tw [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy (China)

    2013-10-15

    This aim of this study was to develop peptide-conjugated nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic co-delivery of siRNA and doxorubicin to enhance chemotherapy in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) high-expressed ovarian tumor bearing mice. The active targeting NPs were prepared using heptapeptide-conjugated poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol). The particle sizes of peptide-free and peptide-conjugated NPs were 159.3 {+-} 32.5 and 184.0 {+-} 52.9 nm, respectively, with zeta potential -21.3 {+-} 3.8 and -15.3 {+-} 2.8 mV. The peptide-conjugated NPs uptake were more efficient in EGFR high-expressed SKOV3 cells than in EGFR low-expressed HepG2 cells due to heptapeptide specificity. The NPs were used to deliver small molecule anticancer drug (e.g., doxorubicin) and large molecule genetic agent (e.g., siRNA). The IC{sub 50} of doxorubicin-loaded peptide-conjugated NPs (0.09 {+-} 0.06 {mu}M) was significantly lower than peptide-free NPs (5.72 {+-} 2.64 {mu}M). The similar result was observed in siRNA-loaded NPs. The peptide-conjugated NPs not only served as a nanocarrier to efficiently deliver doxorubicin and siRNA to EGFR high-expressed ovarian cancer cells but also increased the intracellular accumulation of the therapeutic agents to induce assured anti-tumor growth effect in vivo.

  19. A phase I dose-escalation study of lenalidomide in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav J Ullenhag

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide have both immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic properties which could confer anti-cancer effects. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of combining lenalidomide with the standard treatment gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer patients with advanced disease.Eligible patients had locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients received lenalidomide days 1-21 orally and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 intravenously (days 1, 8 and 15, each 28 day cycle. Three cohorts of lenalidomide were examined (Cohort I = 15 mg, Cohort II = 20 mg and Cohort III = 25 mg daily. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of lenalidomide given in combination with gemcitabine was defined as the highest dose level at which no more than one out of four (25% subjects experiences a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Patients should also be able to receive daily low molecular weight heparin (LMWH (e.g. dalteparin 5000 IU s.c. daily as a prophylactic anticoagulant for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs. Twelve patients (n = 4, n = 3 and n = 5 in cohort I, II and III, respectively were enrolled in this study.Median duration of treatment was 11 weeks (range 1-66, and median number of treatment cycles were three (range 1-14. The only DLT was a cardiac failure grade 3 in cohort III. Frequent treatment-related adverse events (AEs (all grades included neutropenia, leucopenia and fatigue (83% each, but there was no febrile neutropenia; thrombocytopenia (75%; dermatological toxicity (75%; diarrhea and nausea (42% each; and neuropathy (42%.This phase I study demonstrates the feasibility of the combination of lenalidomide and gemcitabine as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The tolerability profile demonstrated in the dose escalation schedule of lenalidomide suggests the dosing of lenalidomide to be 25 mg daily on days 1-21 with standard dosing of gemcitabine and merits further evaluation in a phase II trial.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  20. Comparison of treatment patterns and economic outcomes among metastatic pancreatic cancer patients initiated on nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus FOLFIRINOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ali; Bonafede, Machaon; Cai, Qian; Princic, Nicole; Tran, Oth; Pelletier, Corey; Parisi, Monika; Patel, Manish

    2017-10-01

    The economic burden of metastatic pancreatic cancer (mPC) is substantial while treatment options are limited. Little is known about the treatment patterns and healthcare costs among mPC patients who initiated first-line gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-P + G) and FOLFIRINOX. The MarketScan® claims databases were used to identify adults with ≥2 claims for pancreatic cancer, 1 claim for a secondary malignancy, completed ≥1 cycle of nab-P + G or FOLFIRINOX during 4/1/2013 and 3/31/2015, and had continuous plan enrollment for ≥6 months pre- and 3 months after the first-line treatment. Duration of therapy, per patient per month (PPPM) costs of total healthcare, mPC-related treatment, and supportive care were measured during first-line therapy. 550 mPC patients met selection criteria (nab-P + G, n = 294; FOLFIRINOX, n = 256). There was no difference in duration of therapy (p = 0.60) between nab-P + G and FOLFIRINOX. Compared with FOLFIRINOX, patients with nab-P + G had higher chemotherapy drug costs but lower treatment administration costs and supportive care costs (all p < 0.01). Patients treated with nab-P + G (vs FOLFIRINOX) had similar treatment duration but lower costs of outpatient prescriptions, treatment administration and supportive care. Lower supportive care costs in the nab-P + G cohort were mainly driven by lower utilization of pegfilgrastim and anti-emetics.

  1. Hepatic vascular isolation and perfusion for patients with progressive unresectable liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma refractory to previous systemic and regional chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alexander, HR.; Libutti, S. K.; Barlett, D. L.; Pingpank, J. F.; Kranda, Karel; Helsabeck, C.; Beresnev, T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 4 (2002), s. 730-736 ISSN 0008-543X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : colorectal carcinoma * liver metastases * regional chemotherapy Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2002

  2. Supplementation of Magnolol Attenuates Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Bladder Cancer-Bearing Mice Undergoing Chemotherapy via Suppression of FoxO3 Activation and Induction of IGF-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Chen

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy, the most prominent phenotypic feature of cancer cachexia, is often observed in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Magnolol (M extracted from Magnolia officinalis exhibits several pharmacological effects including anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated whether magnolol supplementation protects against the development of cachexia symptoms in bladder cancer-bearing mice undergoing chemotherapy. Combined treatment of magnolol with chemotherapeutic drugs, such as gemcitabine and cisplatin (TGCM or gemcitabine (TGM, markedly attenuates the body weight loss and skeletal muscle atrophy compared with conventional chemotherapy (TGC. The antiatrophic effect of magnolol may be associated with inhibition of myostatin and activin A formation, as well as FoxO3 transcriptional activity resulting from Akt activation, thereby suppressing ubiquitin ligases MuRF-1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1 expression, as well as proteasomal enzyme activity. Notably, magnolol-induced insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 production and related protein synthesis may also contribute to its protective effects. The decreased food intake, and intestinal injury and dysfunction observed in the mice of TGC group were significantly improved in the TGCM and TGM groups. Moreover, the increased inflammatory responses evidenced by elevation of proinflammatory cytokine formation and NF-κB activation occurred in the atrophying muscle of TGC group were markedly inhibited in mice of combined treatment with magnolol. In summary, these findings support that magnolol is a promising chemopreventive supplement for preventing chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle atrophy associated with cancer cachexia by suppressing muscle protein degradation, and inflammatory responses, as well as increasing IGF-1-mediated protein synthesis.

  3. Early Relapse of Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer after Discontinuation of Gemcitabine Monotherapy Administered for 5 Years in a Patient Who Had Complete Response to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Suyama

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor shrinkage effect of gemcitabine is considered to be limited in cases of advanced gallbladder cancer, and there are few reports of complete response to gemcitabine therapy in patients with this cancer. Therefore, the treatment continuation strategy in these patients, after a complete response has been achieved, still remains to be established. Here, we present the case of a 77-year-old patient with unresectable gallbladder cancer, who after showing complete response to gemcitabine monotherapy administered for 5 years, showed early relapse within only 11 months of discontinuation of the drug. Thus, it is necessary to establish a suitable treatment continuation strategy for patients who show complete response to gemcitabine treatment.

  4. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  5. Relationships between hypoxia markers and the leptin system, estrogen receptors in human primary and metastatic breast cancer: effects of preoperative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Mariusz; Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Sulkowska, Mariola; Surmacz, Eva; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is marked by enhanced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-1α) and glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1). Hypoxic conditions have also been associated with overexpression of angiogenic factors, such as leptin. The aim of our study was to analyze the relationships between hypoxia markers HIF-1α, Glut-1, leptin, leptin receptor (ObR) and other breast cancer biomarkers in primary and metastatic breast cancer in patients treated or untreated with preoperative chemotherapy. The expression of different biomarkers was examined by immunohistochemistry in 116 primary breast cancers and 65 lymph node metastases. Forty five of these samples were obtained form patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and 71 from untreated patients. In primary tumors without preoperative chemotherapy, HIF-1α and Glut-1 were positively correlated (p = 0.02, r = 0.437). HIF-1α in primary and metastatic tumors without preoperative therapy positively correlated with leptin (p < 0.0001, r = 0.532; p = 0.013, r = 0.533, respectively) and ObR (p = 0.002, r = 0.319; p = 0.083, r = 0.387, respectively). Hypoxia markers HIF-1α and Glut-1 were negatively associated with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and positively correlated with estrogen receptor beta (ERβ). In this group of tumors, a positive correlation between Glut-1 and proliferation marker Ki-67 (p = 0.017, r = 0.433) was noted. The associations between HIF-1α and Glut-1, HIF-1α and leptin, HIF-1α and ERα as well as Glut-1 and ERβ were lost following preoperative chemotherapy. Intratumoral hypoxia in breast cancer is marked by coordinated expression of such markers as HIF-1α, Glut-1, leptin and ObR. The relationships among these proteins can be altered by preoperative chemotherapy

  6. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  7. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  8. Validation of the CPS + EG Staging System for Disease-Specific Survival in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsattar, Jad M; Al-Hilli, Zahraa; Hoskin, Tanya L; Heins, Courtney N; Boughey, Judy C

    2016-10-01

    CPS + EG staging, which incorporates estrogen receptor (ER) status and tumor grade with pretreatment clinical stage (CS) and post-treatment pathologic stage (PS), has been reported to have better correlation with outcome than classic TNM staging for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Our goal was to evaluate the performance of CPS + EG staging system in an external cohort treated with NAC. We reviewed patients with stages I-IIIC breast cancer treated with NAC and surgery at our institution between 1988 and 2014. ER status, Nottingham grade, treatment, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) CS before NAC and PS after NAC, and follow-up data were collected. The discrimination of CPS + EG and pathologic AJCC stage were assessed using area under the curve (AUC) for survival data. A total of 769 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up of 2.6 (range 0.0-19.4) years; 103 patients died of breast cancer. Overall, the 5-year breast cancer cause-specific survival was 81.5 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 77.6-85.5]. The 5-year, cause-specific survival by CPS + EG score was 93.8 % score 0, 89.9 % score 1, 90.7 % score 2, 84.8 % score 3, 67.7 % score 4, and 43.4 % score 5/6. CPS + EG score was significantly associated with cause-specific survival (p < 0.001) with an AUC of 0.69 (95 % CI 0.62-0.77) at 5 years. This was higher than the AUC of 0.63 (95 % CI 0.56-0.70) for AJCC PS (p = 0.10). This study validates the CPS + EG staging system using Nottingham grade in an external cohort. Addition of tumor biology and treatment response shows promise in improving survival estimates for patients treated with NAC.

  9. Electronic Chemotherapy Order Entry: A Major Cancer Center's Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklarin, Nancy T; Granovsky, Svetlana; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    Implementation of a computerized provider order entry system for complex chemotherapy regimens at a large cancer center required intense effort from a multidisciplinary team of clinical and systems experts with experience in all facets of the chemotherapy process. The online tools had to resemble the paper forms used at the time and parallel the successful established process as well as add new functionality. Close collaboration between the institution and the vendor was necessary. This article summarizes the institutional efforts, challenges, and collaborative processes that facilitated universal chemotherapy computerized electronic order entry across multiple sites during a period of several years.

  10. Sensitization of Tumor to {sup 212}Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E. [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Brechbiel, Martin W., E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling.