WorldWideScience

Sample records for system-based radiation alert

  1. Flood alert system based on bayesian techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Z.; Herrero, J.; Viesca, C.; Polo, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    analyzed, where the water level, with time lags of 12 hours related to the concentration time, was found to be most significant. In short, the fits to the different distribution functions of extremes were unsatisfactory, as the data were of poor quality and scant. This problem with data is not unusual in small and medium sized Mediterranean basins and becomes the real challenge to any prediction system based only on statistical methods. The aim of the resulting tool is to develop and maintain a numerical short-range weather forecasting system for operational use by the regional water management entities. The development of this tool is also corroborated by recent survey results, which identify the need to develop site specific models for water management in these Mediterranean regions, so prone to flash flood events (NOVIWAM, 2011 Novel Integrated Water Management systems for Southern European Regions, Seventh Framework Programme, EC, 2010-2013).

  2. Radiation Alert Immediate Disclosure, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Invocon's Radiation Alert Immediate Disclosure (RAID) system is a miniature, low-power, real-time, active radiation badge. It is designed for monitoring personnel,...

  3. Solar radiation alert system : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The Solar Radiation Alert (SRA) system continuously evaluates measurements of high-energy protons made by instruments on GOES satellites. If the measurements indicate a substantial elevation of effective dose rates at aircraft flight altitudes, the C...

  4. Self-indicating radiation alert dosemeter (SIRAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riel, G. K.; Winters, P.; Patel, G.; Patel, P.

    2006-01-01

    In an event of a nuclear or dirty bomb explosion and a radiological accident, there is a need for self-indicating instant radiation dosemeter for monitoring radiation exposure. The self-indicating instant radiation alert dosemeter (SIRAD) is a credit card size radiation dosemeter for monitoring ionising radiation from a few hundredths of a Gray to a few Gray. It is always active and is ready to use. It needs no battery. The dosemeter develops colour instantly upon exposure, and the colour intensifies with dose. It has a colour chart so that the dose on the active element may be read by matching its colour with the chart that is printed next to it on the card. However, in this work, the dose is measured by the optical density of the element. The dosemeter cannot be reset. The response changes by 3 y at room temperature. It contains no hazardous materials. The dosemeter would meet the requirements of instantly monitoring high dose in an event of a nuclear or dirty bomb explosion or a radiation accident. (authors)

  5. An Unobtrusive Fall Detection and Alerting System Based on Kalman Filter and Bayes Network Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Bai, Shuang; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2017-06-16

    Falls are one of the main health risks among the elderly. A fall detection system based on inertial sensors can automatically detect fall event and alert a caregiver for immediate assistance, so as to reduce injuries causing by falls. Nevertheless, most inertial sensor-based fall detection technologies have focused on the accuracy of detection while neglecting quantization noise caused by inertial sensor. In this paper, an activity model based on tri-axial acceleration and gyroscope is proposed, and the difference between activities of daily living (ADLs) and falls is analyzed. Meanwhile, a Kalman filter is proposed to preprocess the raw data so as to reduce noise. A sliding window and Bayes network classifier are introduced to develop a wearable fall detection system, which is composed of a wearable motion sensor and a smart phone. The experiment shows that the proposed system distinguishes simulated falls from ADLs with a high accuracy of 95.67%, while sensitivity and specificity are 99.0% and 95.0%, respectively. Furthermore, the smart phone can issue an alarm to caregivers so as to provide timely and accurate help for the elderly, as soon as the system detects a fall.

  6. Radiation monitoring system based on EPICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weizhen; Li Jianmin; Wang Xiaobing; Hua Zhengdong; Xu Xunjiang

    2008-01-01

    Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF for short) is a third-generation light source building in China, including a 150 MeV injector, 3.5 GeV booster, 3.5 GeV storage ring and an amount of beam line stations. During operation, a mass of Synchrotron Radiation will be produced by electrons in the booster and the storage ring. Bremsstrahlung and neutrons will also be produced as a result of the interaction between the electrons, especially the beam loss, and the wall of the vacuum beam pipe. SSRF Radiation Monitoring System is established for monitoring the radiation dosage of working area and environment while SSRF operating. The system consists of detectors, intelligent data-collecting modules, monitoring computer, and managing computer. The software system is developed based on EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), implementing the collecting and monitoring the data output from intelligent modules, analyzing the data, and so on. (authors)

  7. Radiation monitoring system based on Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drndarevic, V.R.; Popovic, A.T; Bolic, M.D.; Pavlovic, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents concept and realization of the modern distributed radiation monitoring system. The system uses existing conventional computer network and it is based on the standard Internet technology. One personal computer (PC) serves as host and system server, while a number of client computers, link to the server computer via standard local area network (LAN), are used as distributed measurement nodes. The interconnection between the server and clients are based on Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). System software is based on server-client model. Based on this concept distributed system for gamma ray monitoring in the region of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca has been implemented. (author)

  8. Electromagnetic pulse measurement system based on optical fiber transmission under radiated-wave test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shunkun; Nie Xin; Chen Xiangyue; Xiang Hui

    2010-01-01

    Radiated-wave Electromagnetic Pulse Simulator is an important device used to study Electromagnetic Pulse effect of large electronic equipment in test. On the characteristic of radiated-EMP simulator test and the needs to measurement system, Electromagnetic Pulse measurement system based on optical fiber transmission and its composition are introduced in the paper. Sort of measurement system and Calibration method of its are present. The expression of uncertainty in Electromagnetic Pulse measurement system is discussed also. The measurement results are analyzed which be gained by radiated field test. (authors)

  9. Design of nuclear emergency decision-making support system based on the results of radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qiyan; Zhang Lijun; Huang Weiqi; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    For nuclear emergency decision-making support system based on the results of radiation monitoring, its main assignment is receiving radiation monitoring data and analyzing them, to accomplish some works such as environment influence evaluation, dose assessment for emergency responder, decision-making analyzing and effectiveness evaluation for emergency actions, etc.. This system is made up of server, communication terminal, data-analyzing terminal, GPRS modules, printer, and so on. The whole system make of a LAN. The system's software is made up of six subsystems: data-analyzing subsystem, reporting subsystem, GIS subsystem, communication subsystem, user-managing subsystem and data-base. (authors)

  10. Fundamental study of the radiation monitoring system based on evaluation of DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, K.; Matuo, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Ikeda, T.

    2011-01-01

    The biological dosemeter that measures biological responses to ionising radiation is useful for radiation protection. This paper presents the development and characterisation of a gamma ray irradiation dosimetry system based on real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) methodology. Real-time PCR is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. If there are no limitations due to limiting substrates or reagents, at each extension step, the amount of DNA target is doubled, leading to exponential (geometric) amplification of the specific DNA fragment. The essential point of this assay is that DNA lesions caused by ionising radiation block DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase, resulting in a decrease in the amplification of a damaged DNA template compared with that of non-damaged DNA templates. (authors)

  11. Development a high-resolution radiation dosimetry system based on Fricke solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedelago, J. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Mattea, F. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Valente, M., E-mail: josevedelago@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisica E. Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Due to the growing complexity of modern medical procedures involving the use of ionizing radiation, dosimetry by non-conventional techniques is one of the research areas in the field of greatest interest nowadays. Tissue-equivalent high-resolution dosimetry systems capable of attaining continuous dose mapping are required. In this scenario, Fricke gel dosimetry is a very promising option for in-phantom dose measurements in complex radiation techniques. Implementation of this technique requires dedicated instruments capable of measuring and performing the immediate in situ analysis of the acquired data at the radiation facility. The versatility of Fricke gel dosimetry in different applications depending on the chemical and isotopic composition of the dosimeter extends its application to different high performance conventional and non-conventional radiation procedures involving diverse types of radiation treatments and also radiation diagnosis procedures. This work presents an integral dosimetry system, based on Fricke gel solutions and their analysis by optical techniques, aiming for an increase in the precision on dose determinations. The chemical synthesis and dosimeter preparation were accomplished at LIIFAMIRx facilities, following the procedures and protocols described in previous works. Additionally, specific instrumentation for optical sample analysis was completely designed and constructed at LIIFAMIRx facilities. The main outcome of this work was the development of a methodology that improves the integral dose determination performance by the pre-irradiation of Fricke gel dosimeters. (author)

  12. Development a high-resolution radiation dosimetry system based on Fricke solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedelago, J.; Mattea, F.; Valente, M.

    2014-08-01

    Due to the growing complexity of modern medical procedures involving the use of ionizing radiation, dosimetry by non-conventional techniques is one of the research areas in the field of greatest interest nowadays. Tissue-equivalent high-resolution dosimetry systems capable of attaining continuous dose mapping are required. In this scenario, Fricke gel dosimetry is a very promising option for in-phantom dose measurements in complex radiation techniques. Implementation of this technique requires dedicated instruments capable of measuring and performing the immediate in situ analysis of the acquired data at the radiation facility. The versatility of Fricke gel dosimetry in different applications depending on the chemical and isotopic composition of the dosimeter extends its application to different high performance conventional and non-conventional radiation procedures involving diverse types of radiation treatments and also radiation diagnosis procedures. This work presents an integral dosimetry system, based on Fricke gel solutions and their analysis by optical techniques, aiming for an increase in the precision on dose determinations. The chemical synthesis and dosimeter preparation were accomplished at LIIFAMIRx facilities, following the procedures and protocols described in previous works. Additionally, specific instrumentation for optical sample analysis was completely designed and constructed at LIIFAMIRx facilities. The main outcome of this work was the development of a methodology that improves the integral dose determination performance by the pre-irradiation of Fricke gel dosimeters. (author)

  13. The Martin Marietta Energy Systems Associated Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, J.S.; Casson, W.H. Sr.; Bauer, M.L.; Gregory, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    The excellence and uniqueness of radiation technology expertise at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was recognized during a review by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office prior to a 1990 Tiger Team review, and the Laboratory was encouraged at that time to explore ways of sharing this expertise with other DOE facilities. The subsequent evolution of DOE Laboratory Accreditation Programs, with their challenging performance requirements, and of program guidance such as that contained in the DOE Radiation Control Manual, which requires improved radiological instrument services and encourages standardization, reemphasizes the importance of sharing ORNL's extensive capabilities for supporting improved radiological safety and health programs

  14. Decreased alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alertness, including: Chronic kidney disease Extreme tiredness or lack of sleep High blood sugar or low blood sugar High or low blood sodium concentration Infection that is severe or involves the brain ...

  15. Radiation Accident Dosimetry System Based on Chemical Dosimetry and an Optoelectronic Reader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilijas, B.; Razem, D.; Miljanic, S.; Cerovac, Z.; Orehovec, Z.

    2003-01-01

    There are many potential sources of mass irradiation in today's world. Threats of a classic nuclear encounter or of an accident of some nuclear facility are now accompanied with a real possibility of nuclear terrorism, in context of which a threat of radiological emergency is very probable. Mass irradiation and radiological contamination of large areas and structures pose great problems to medical and emergency staff in the peacetime or to army troops in a war. The only reliable and sufficiently rapidly accessible data about the dose absorbed by any person can be achieved by means of personal dosimetry. These data are of the utmost importance for medical treatment and triage, as well as for determining the capability of military troops. Personal dosimetry system for this purpose must fulfill some specific requirements on reliability, dose range and cost. Chemical radiation dosimetry system based on the chemical CET dosimeter and an optoelectronic reader is designed primarily for this purpose. Its characteristics are, among others, nearly equal sensitivity to gamma and neutron irradiation, dose range between 0.2 and 14.0 Gy, the possibility of electronic processing of data and a low cost. It is intended for a large number of persons and therefore can give enough data for statistical analysis, yet the separate data for any single person can give a reliable basis for the individual medical treatment. The possibility of connection with a PC enables the formation of large data bases for further processing and analysis. (author)

  16. Forecasting of radiation fog with a new decision support system based on automatic LIDAR-ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffineur, Quentin; Haeffelin, Martial; Bravo-Aranda, Juan-Antonio; Drouin, Marc-Antoine; Casquero-Vera, Juan-Andrés; Dupont, Jean-Charles; De Backer, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    support of their fog forecast, minutes to hours prior to formation of radiation fog. In this presentation, we will describe the methodology used in PARAFOG to derive pre-fog formation alerts and we will show a selection of several radiation fog events observed on two different sites to illustrate the efficiency of PARAFOG to detect radiation fog events. Citation: Haeffelin, M., Laffineur, Q., Bravo-Aranda, J.-A., Drouin, M.-A., Casquero-Vera, J.-A., Dupont, J.-C., and De Backer, H.: Radiation fog formation alerts using attenuated backscatter power from automatic lidars and ceilometers, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 5347-5365, doi:10.5194/amt-9-5347-2016, 2016.

  17. A study on the real-time radiation dosimetry measurement system based on optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanping; Du Yanzhao; Chen Zhaoyang; Ba Weizhen; Fan Yanwei; Pan Shilie; Guo Qi

    2008-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) radiation dosimeter technically surveys a wide dynamic measurement range and a high sensitivity. Optical fiber dosimeters provide capability for remote monitoring of the radiation in the locations which are difficult-to-access and hazardous. In addition, optical fiber dosimeters are immune to electrical and radio-frequency interference. In this paper, a novel remote optical fiber radiation dosimeter is described. The optical fiber dosimeter takes advantage of the charge trapping materials CaS:Ce, Sm that exhibit OSL. The measuring range of the dosimeter is from 0.1 to 100 Gy. The equipment is relatively simple and small in size, and has low power consumption. This device is suitable for measuring the space radiation dose and also can be used in high radiation dose condition and other dangerous radiation occasions. (authors)

  18. A first generation compact microbeam radiation therapy system based on carbon nanotube X-ray technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadsell, M.; Shan, J.; Burk, L.; Zhang, J.; Chang, S.; Laganis, P.; Sprenger, F.; Zhang, L.; Yuan, H.; Lu, J.; Zhou, O.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a compact microbeam radiation therapy device using carbon nanotube cathodes to create a linear array of narrow focal line segments on a tungsten anode and a custom collimator assembly to select a slice of the resulting wedge-shaped radiation pattern. Effective focal line width was measured to be 131 μm, resulting in a microbeam width of ∼300 μm. The instantaneous dose rate was projected to be 2 Gy/s at full-power. Peak to valley dose ratio was measured to be >17 when a 1.4 mm microbeam separation was employed. Finally, multiple microbeams were delivered to a mouse with beam paths verified through histology

  19. Lightning VHF radiation location system based on short-baseline TDOA technique — Validation in rocket-triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuling; Qie, Xiushu; Liu, Mingyuan; Cao, Dongjie; Wang, Dongfang

    2013-07-01

    A lightning VHF radiation location system based on short-baseline time-difference of arrival (TDOA) technology is newly developed. Based on the orthogonal 10 m-baseline antenna array with four identical broadband flat plane antennas, this system receives the lightning broadband VHF radiation signals and calculates TDOA between antennas in order to determine the location of lightning radiation sources in two dimensions (elevation and azimuth). To reduce noise and improve estimation accuracy of time delay, a general correlation time delay estimation algorithm based on direct correlation method and wavelet transform is proposed. Moreover, parabolic interpolation algorithm is used in the fractional delay estimation to improve the time resolution of the positioning system. In this paper, a rocket-triggered lightning discharge and a cloud lightning discharge are analyzed respectively, combining with simultaneous observations of high-speed camera and fast/slow electric field changes. The results indicate that the TDOA location system could effectively map the lightning radiation sources in 2 dimensions and are in a good agreement with the high-speed video camera images.

  20. Very High Radiation Detector for the LHC BLM System Based on Secondary Electron Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Holzer, EB; Kramer, D

    2007-01-01

    Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system plays a vital role in the active protection of the LHC accelerators elements. It should provide the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. The LHC BLM system will use ionization chambers as standard detectors but in the areas where very high dose rates are expected, the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) chambers will be employed because of their high linearity, low sensitivity and fast response. The SEM needs a high vacuum for proper operation and has to be functional for up to 20 years, therefore all the components were designed according to the UHV requirements and a getter pump was included. The SEM electrodes are made of Ti because of its Secondary Emission Yield (SEY) stability. The sensitivity of the SEM was modeled in Geant4 via the Photo-Absorption Ionization module together with custom parameterization of the very low energy secondary electron production...

  1. Personalized Medical Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Suarez Coloma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increasing needs in telemedicine and healthcare, accentuate the need of well-adapted medical alert systems. Such alert systems may be used by a variety of patients and medical actors, and should allow monitoring a wide range of medical variables. This paper proposes Tempas, a personalized temporal alert system. It facilitates customized alert configuration by using linguistic trends. The trend detection algorithm is based on data normalization, time series segmentation, and segment classification. It improves state of the art by treating irregular and regular time series in an appropriate way, thanks to the introduction of an observation variable valid time. Alert detection is enriched with quality and applicability measures. They allow a personalized tuning of the system to help reducing false negatives and false positives alerts.

  2. Radiation Alert Immediate Disclosure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent testing involving Hyper Velocity Impacts has resulted in the capture of broad band high frequency energy resulting from the impact of projectiles onto...

  3. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  4. Alert Display Distribution (ADD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Repository that contains alerts that will be sent to SSA employees when certain conditions exist, to inform them of work that needs to be done, is being reviewed, or...

  5. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will be able to find. Medical identification products can help ensure proper treatment in an ...

  6. DDBS DB Alert

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Data store used by the database area for monitoring of database objects. It is used to generate alerts that the DBAs investigate to determine if any action needs to...

  7. Lower alert rates by clustering of related drug interaction alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.; Siderius, H.; Floor-Schreudering, A.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Bouvy, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate to what extent clustering of related drug interaction alerts (drug-drug and drug-disease interaction alerts) would decrease the alert rate in clinical decision support systems (CDSSs). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of drug interaction alerts

  8. Lower alert rates by clustering of related drug interaction alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.; Siderius, Hidde; Schreudering, A.; De Smet, Peter Agm; Bouvy, M.L.

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate to what extent clustering of related drug interaction alerts (drug-drug and drug-disease interaction alerts) would decrease the alert rate in clinical decision support systems (CDSSs). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of drug interaction alerts

  9. Global Environmental Alert Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, V. F.; Cervone, G.; Singh, A.; Kafatos, M.

    2006-12-01

    Every year natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis, etc. occur around the world, causing hundreds of thousands of deaths and injuries, billions of dollars in economic losses, and destroying natural landmarks and adveresely affecting ecosystems. Due to increasing urbanization, and increasingly higher percentage of the world's population living in megacities, the existence of nuclear power plants and other facilities whose potential destruction poses unacceptable high risks, natural hazards represent an increasing threat for economic losses, as well as risk to people and property. Warning systems represent an innovative and effective approach to mitigate the risks associated with natural hazards. Several state-of-the-art analyses show that early warning technologies are now available for most natural hazards and systems are already in operation in some parts of the world. Nevertheless, recent disasters such as the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2005 Katrina hurricane, highlighted inadequacies in early warning system technologies. Furthermore, not all available technologies are deployed in every part of the world, due to the lack of awareness and resources in the poorer countries, leaving very large and densely populated areas at risk. Efforts towards the development of a global warning system are necessary for filling the gaps of existing technologies. A globally comprehensive early warning system based on existing technologies will be a means to consolidate scientific knowledge, package it in a form usable to international and national decision makers and actively disseminate this information to protect people and properties. There is not a single information broker who searches and packages the policy relevant material and delivers it in an understandable format to the public and decision makers. A critical review of existing systems reveals the need for the innovative service. We propose here a Global

  10. Lower alert rates by clustering of related drug interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heringa, Mette; Siderius, Hidde; Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; de Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate to what extent clustering of related drug interaction alerts (drug-drug and drug-disease interaction alerts) would decrease the alert rate in clinical decision support systems (CDSSs). We conducted a retrospective analysis of drug interaction alerts generated by CDSSs in community pharmacies. Frequently generated combinations of alerts were analyzed for associations in a 5% random data sample (dataset 1). Alert combinations with similar management recommendations were defined as clusters. The alert rate was assessed by simulating a CDSS generating 1 alert per cluster per patient instead of separate alerts. The simulation was performed in dataset 1 and replicated in another 5% data sample (dataset 2). Data were extracted from the CDSSs of 123 community pharmacies. Dataset 1 consisted of 841 572 dispensed prescriptions and 298 261 drug interaction alerts. Dataset 2 was comparable. Twenty-two frequently occurring alert combinations were identified. Analysis of these associated alert combinations for similar management recommendations resulted in 3 clusters (related to renal function, electrolytes, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases). Using the clusters in alert generation reduced the alert rate within these clusters by 53-70%. The overall number of drug interaction alerts was reduced by 11% in dataset 1 and by 12% in dataset 2. This corresponds to a decrease of 21 alerts per pharmacy per day. Using clusters of drug interaction alerts with similar management recommendations in CDSSs can substantially decrease the overall alert rate. Further research is needed to establish the applicability of this concept in daily practice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Alert status of nuclear weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear Alert Forces. Four nuclear-armed states deploy nuclear warheads on alert, ready to be used on relatively short notice: United States, Russia, France and Britain. Combined, the four countries deploy an estimated 1,869 nuclear alert warheads. Russia and the United States deploy 1,749 alert warheads combined, or 94% of all alert warheads. Despite some debate about possible need to increase readiness of nuclear forces (China, Pakistan), the five other nuclear-armed states (China, Pakistan, India, Israel and North Korea) are thought to store their warheads separate from launchers under normal circumstances. The overall number of alert warheads has remained relatively stable during the past five years.

  12. Sky alert! when satellites fail

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Les

    2013-01-01

    How much do we depend on space satellites? Defense, travel, agriculture, weather forecasting, mobile phones and broadband, commerce...the list seems endless. But what would our live be like if the unimaginable happened and, by accident or design, those space assets disappeared? Sky Alert! explores what our world would be like, looking in turn at areas where the loss could have catastrophic effects. The book - demonstrates our dependence on space technology and satellites; - outlines the effect on our economy, defense, and daily lives if satellites and orbiting spacecraft were destroyed; - illustrates the danger of dead satellites, spent rocket stages, and space debris colliding with a functioning satellites; - demonstrates the threat of dramatically increased radiation levels associated with geomagnetic storms; - introduces space as a potential area of conflict between nations.

  13. Modernizing emergency alerts poses challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2010-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, OUT OF THE CLASSROOM Download the paper: Paper: IPAWS (Integrated Public Alert and Warning System)” Modernizing emergency alerts poses challenges Anthony Cox is interested in the next generation of emergency alert systems.Any television viewer...

  14. 75 FR 67201 - Flightcrew Alerting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... flightcrew alerts. The flightcrew should not become desensitized to the meaning and importance of color... pilots to the urgency that should be associated with the meaning of these colors, which could increase... airplanes concerning flightcrew alerting. These standards update definitions, prioritization, color...

  15. A new CERN Alerter mechanism

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new version of the CERN Alerter used for sending urgent messages was installed in July on all centrally managed NICE computers. This latest version is based on RSS (Really Simple Syndication) and all alerts are now displayed in an Internet Explorer window (see picture). You can print the window by right-clicking on the alert background and selecting the Print option from the menu. If the message is not urgent, the alert will only appear as a "balloon" window the following morning or at next log-on. Non-Windows computers can also subscribe to this service by using their browser as an RSS reader. All recent web browsers can act as RSS readers, including Firefox and Safari. Simply subscribe to the following RSS feed: http://cern.ch/cernalerts/alerts.aspx to see all messages sent by the central services. More information on the CERN Alerter is available at: https://cern.ch/winservices/Help/?kbid=060810. Documentation on reading RSS fee...

  16. A new CERN Alerter mechanism

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new version of the CERN Alerter used for sending urgent messages was installed in July on all centrally managed NICE computers. This latest version is based on RSS (Really Simple Syndication) and all alerts are now displayed in an Internet Explorer window (see the picture). You can print the window by right-clicking on the alert background and selecting the Print option from the menu. If the message is not urgent, then the alert will only appear as a "balloon" window the following morning or at next logon. Non-Windows computers can also subscribe to this service by using their browser as an RSS reader (Really Simple Syndication). All recent web browsers can act as RSS readers, including Firefox and Safari. Simply subscribe to the following RSS feed: http://cern.ch/cernalerts/alerts.aspx to see all messages sent by the central services. More information on the CERN Alerter is available at: https://cern.ch/winservices/Help/?kbid=060810. Documentation on reading RSS feeds fr...

  17. Radiation Alert Immediate Disclosure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent testing involving Hyper Velocity Impacts has resulted in the capture of broad band high frequency energy resulting from the impact of projectiles onto...

  18. Reader Survey for INSECT ALERTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mason E.; Sauer, Richard J.

    To determine what might be done to improve "Insect Alerts," which is a newsletter that carries "information on insect biology, abundance, activity and interpretation of control need," put out through the Michigan Cooperative Extension Service 26 weeks a year, a survey was conducted. A mail questionnaire was sent to all 120 county extension…

  19. Aircraft Alerting Systems Standardization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    designation. The loss of information was the biggest drawback to this concept. The second and slightly more popular alternative was to store the excess...Instructions: For this section use the following code to rate alternativa c*ncepts for the memgo for’,at. Candidate concepts .o be evaluated: (A) All alerts

  20. 77 FR 41331 - Commercial Mobile Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Requirements for the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS). Form No.: Not applicable. Respondents: Business or... Alert System (CMAS), under which the Commercial Mobile Service (CMS) providers may elect to transmit... Mobile Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; announcement of...

  1. The Relationship between Alertness and Executive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbach, Noam; Henik, Avishai

    2012-01-01

    The current study focuses on the relationship between alerting and executive attention. Previous studies reported an increased flanker congruency effect following alerting cues. In the first two experiments, we found that the alertness-congruency interaction did not exist for all executive tasks (it appeared for a flanker task but not for a Stroop…

  2. Impact of alert specifications on clinicians' adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langemeijer, M. M.; Peute, L. W.; Jaspers, M. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Computerized alerts provided by health care information systems have been shown to enhance clinical practice. However, clinicians still override more than half of the alerts. This indicates that certain aspects of alerts need improvement to fulfill their purpose of supporting clinicians in decision

  3. Les lanceurs d’alerte

    OpenAIRE

    Foegle, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Le lanceur ou « donneur » d'alerte, ou, en langue anglaise, whistleblower est défini par l'assemblée parlementaire du conseil de l'Europe (Résolution 1729 (2010), §1) comme « toute personne soucieuse qui tire la sonnette d’alarme afin de faire cesser des agissements pouvant représenter un risque pour autrui ». Le présent mémoire vise, en menant une étude comparée France-Etats-Unis du droit encadrant le phénomène du « lancement d'alerte », à cerner les éléments principaux de la notion. Le prem...

  4. Usability of Smartphones for dose alerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaireit, T.; Stamm, G.; Wacker, F.K.; Hoeschen, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Smartphone apps for measuring ionizing radiation use the capability of (CMOS) camera chips to detect not only perceivable light but also electromagnetic wave radiation. The present study evaluates the accuracy of hardware and software and defines possible applications for the detection of X-ray radiation fields. Materials and Methods: 2 apps and 2 different devices were tested in comparison with a calibrated ionization chamber and a personal electronic dosimeter. A calibration curve was determined for dose rates between 12 700 μSv/h and 5.7 μSv/h generated by a C-arm system. Results: The measured scattered radiation produced by an Alderson-Rando phantom ranged from 117 μSv/h (at a distance of 2 m) to 5910 μSv/h (at a distance of 0.3 m) and was 1.4 times less than the values of the ionization chamber. The exposure rate for the operator's thyroid was within 4200 - 4400 μSv/h. We found a strong dependence of the measurements on the angulation of the Smartphone, especially for short distances from the phantom (at a distance of 0.3 m, a 45 rotation downwards in a vertical direction caused a decrease from 3000 μSv/h to 972 μSv/h, while an upwards rotation resulted in an increase to 5000 μSv/h). For a distance of 1 m, this effect was remarkably smaller. Conclusion: Smartphones can be used to detect ionizing radiation but showed limited accuracy and are heavily dependent on the angulation of the device. Qualitative measurements and utilization for dose alerts are possible. (orig.)

  5. Development of a nano structured system based on zirconia and Co nanoparticles for thermoluminescent applications: sensor of gamma and UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa S, G.

    2014-01-01

    Powders of zirconium IV oxide as well as systems composed of zirconia nano crystals and cobalt nanoparticles (ZrO 2 :NPCo) with dimensions of nanometers were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Zirconia and ZrO 2 :NPCo systems have crystalline structure tetragonal or monoclinic is the heat treatment was to 500 and 1000 degrees Celsius respectively. The characterization of the synthesized materials consisted of a morphological and structural analysis, the information obtained was correlated to its thermoluminescent response induced by gamma and ultraviolet radiation. Thermoluminescent behavior was analyzed on different concentrations of cobalt nanoparticles incorporated during the synthesis process of the zirconium oxide. The monoclinic structure has the highest sensitivity thermoluminescent induced by ultraviolet and gamma radiation. Moreover, the thermoluminescence intensity decreased considerably in ZrO 2 :NPCo systems and was induced the growth of a glow peak at 280 degrees Celsius. In most of the materials analyzed the relation of the thermoluminescence intensity depending the time of irradiation with ultraviolet light showed the saturation of the traps in the material after 60 s of irradiation. Using gamma radiation is observed a behavior linear in the applied dose range between 0.25 Gy and 450 Gy. The growth of a glow peak at 280 degrees Celsius is the most important change in the thermoluminescence characteristics of zirconia. The ZrO 2 :NPCo systems can be used in the development of thermoluminescent dosimeters for detecting gamma radiation fields mainly. (Author)

  6. Alert Triage v 0.1 beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-06

    In the cyber security operations of a typical organization, data from multiple sources are monitored, and when certain conditions in the data are met, an alert is generated in an alert management system. Analysts inspect these alerts to decide if any deserve promotion to an event requiring further scrutiny. This triage process is manual, time-consuming, and detracts from the in-depth investigation of events. We have created a software system that uses supervised machine learning to automatically prioritize these alerts. In particular we utilize active learning to make efficient use of the pool of unlabeled alerts, thereby improving the performance of our ranking models over passive learning. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of our system on a large, real-world dataset of cyber security alerts.

  7. Dose linearity and uniformity of a linear accelerator designed for implementation of multileaf collimation system-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Li Sicong; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Yoe-Sein, Maung; Pillai, Susha; Enke, Charles A.; Celi, Juan C.

    2003-01-01

    The dose linearity and uniformity of a linear accelerator designed for multileaf collimation system- (MLC) based IMRT was studied as a part of commissioning and also in response to recently published data. The linear accelerator is equipped with a PRIMEVIEW, a graphical interface and a SIMTEC IM-MAXX, which is an enhanced autofield sequencer. The SIMTEC IM-MAXX sequencer permits the radiation beam to be 'ON' continuously while delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy subfields at a defined gantry angle. The dose delivery is inhibited when the electron beam in the linear accelerator is forced out of phase with the microwave power while the MLC configures the field shape of a subfield. This beam switching mechanism reduces the overhead time and hence shortens the patient treatment time. The dose linearity, reproducibility, and uniformity were assessed for this type of dose delivery mechanism. The subfields with monitor units ranged from 1 MU to 100 MU were delivered using 6 MV and 23 MV photon beams. The doses were computed and converted to dose per monitor unit. The dose linearity was found to vary within 2% for both 6 MV and 23 MV photon beam using high dose rate setting (300 MU/min) except below 2 MU. The dose uniformity was assessed by delivering 4 subfields to a Kodak X-OMAT TL film using identical low monitor units. The optical density was converted to dose and found to show small variation within 3%. Our results indicate that this linear accelerator with SIMTEC IM-MAXX sequencer has better dose linearity, reproducibility, and uniformity than had been reported

  8. Drug safety alerting in computerized physician order entry: Unraveling and counteracting alert fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H. van der Sijs (Heleen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractComputerized physician order entry systems (CPOEs) usually generate drug safety alerts to remind physicians to potentially unsafe situations. However, physicians may feel overwhelmed by high numbers of alerts that are not patient-tailored and they may consequently suffer from alert

  9. A Multimodal Biomicroscopic System based on High-frequency Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse and Multispectral Imaging Techniques for Tumor Characterization Ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihun; Seo, Anna; Kim, Jun-Young; Choi, Sung Hyouk; Yoon, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Eunjoo; Hwang, Jae Youn

    2017-12-13

    We report a multimodal biomicroscopic system which offers high-frequency ultrasound B-mode, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI), and multispectral imaging for qualitative tumor characterization ex vivo. Examinations of resected tissues from diseased regions such as tumors are crucial procedures during surgical operations to treat cancer. Particularly, if tiny tumors remain at surgical sites after tumor resection, such tumors can result in unwanted outcomes, such as cancer recurrence or metastasis to other organs. To avoid this, accurate characterizations of tumors resected during surgery are necessary. To this end, we devised a multimodal biomicroscopic system including high-frequency ultrasound B-mode, ARFI, and multispectral imaging modalities to examine resected tumors with high levels of accuracy. This system was evaluated with tissue-mimicking phantoms with different mechanical properties. In addition, colorectal tumors excised from cancer patients were examined. The proposed system offers highly resolved anatomical, mechanical, chemical information pertaining to tumors, thus allowing the detection of tumor regions from the surface to deep inside tissues. These results therefore suggest that the multimodal biomicroscopic system has the potential to undertake qualitative characterizations of excised tumors ex vivo.

  10. Evaluation of accuracy about 2D vs 3D real-time position management system based on couch rotation when non-coplanar respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung Tae; Kim, Jung Soo [Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Hyun Sun [College of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Shingu University College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Dong Kyoon [College of Health Sciences, EulJi University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Because of non-coplanar therapy with couch rotation in respiratory gated radiation therapy, the recognition of marker movement due to the change in the distance between the infrared camera and the marker due to the rotation of the couch is called RPM (Real-time The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of motion reflections (baseline changes) of 2D gating configuration (two dot marker block) and 3D gating configuration (six dot marker block). The motion was measured by varying the couch angle in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions by 10° in the 2D gating configuration. In the 3D gating configuration, the couch angle was changed by 10° in the clockwise direction and compared with the baseline at the reference 0°. The reference amplitude was 1.173 to 1.165, the couch angle at 20° was 1.132, and the couch angle at 1.0° was 1.083. At 350° counterclockwise, the reference amplitude was 1.168 to 1.157, the couch angle at 340° was 1.124, and the couch angle at 330° was 1.079. In this study, the phantom is used to quantitatively evaluate the value of the amplitude according to couch change.

  11. Development of patient-controlled respiratory gating system based on visual guidance for magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-In; Lee, Hanyoung; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jong Min

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a visual guidance patient-controlled (VG-PC) respiratory gating system for respiratory-gated magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) and to evaluate the performance of the developed system. The near-real-time cine planar MR image of a patient acquired during treatment was transmitted to a beam projector in the treatment room through an optical fiber cable. The beam projector projected the cine MR images inside the bore of the ViewRay system in order to be visible to a patient during treatment. With this visual information, patients voluntarily controlled their respiration to put the target volume into the gating boundary (gating window). The effect of the presence of the beam projector in the treatment room on the image quality of the MRI was investigated by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity with the VG-PC gating system. To evaluate the performance of the developed system, we applied the VG-PC gating system to a total of seven patients; six patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and one patient received conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The projected cine MR images were visible even when the room light was on. No image data loss or additional time delay during delivery of image data were observed. Every indicator representing MRI quality, including SNR, uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity exhibited values higher than the tolerance levels of the manufacturer with the VG-PC gating system; therefore, the presence of the VG-PC gating system in the treatment room did not degrade the MR image quality. The average beam-off times due to respiratory gating with and without the VG-PC gating system were 830.3 ± 278.2 s and 1264.2 ± 302.1 s respectively (P = 0.005). Consequently, the total treatment times excluding

  12. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1111 Distress alerting. (a) The transmission of a distress alert indicates...

  13. Evaluation of Visual Alerts in the Maritime Domain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Shelley; Foster-Hunt, Tara

    2008-01-01

    .... As the auditory modality is overloaded in the current alerting system, one method of potentially reducing perceptual overload is to replace auditory alerts with alerts presented in the visual domain...

  14. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  15. Reducing prescribing errors through creatinine clearance alert redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Brittany L; Zillich, Alan J; Russell, Scott A; Weiner, Michael; McManus, M Sue; Spina, Jeffrey R; Russ, Alissa L

    2015-10-01

    Literature has shown that computerized creatinine clearance alerts reduce errors during prescribing, and applying human factors principles may further reduce errors. Our objective was to apply human factors principles to creatinine clearance alert design and assess whether the redesigned alerts increase usability and reduce prescribing errors compared with the original alerts. Twenty Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient providers (14 physicians, 2 nurse practitioners, and 4 clinical pharmacists) completed 2 usability sessions in a counterbalanced study to evaluate original and redesigned alerts. Each session consisted of fictional patient scenarios with 3 medications that warranted prescribing changes because of renal impairment, each associated with creatinine clearance alerts. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to assess alert usability and the occurrence of prescribing errors. There were 43% fewer prescribing errors with the redesigned alerts compared with the original alerts (P = .001). Compared with the original alerts, redesigned alerts significantly reduced prescribing errors for allopurinol and ibuprofen (85% vs 40% and 65% vs 25%, P = .012 and P = .008, respectively), but not for spironolactone (85% vs 65%). Nine providers (45%) voiced confusion about why the alert was appearing when they encountered the original alert design. When laboratory links were presented on the redesigned alert, laboratory information was accessed 3.5 times more frequently. Although prescribing errors were high with both alert designs, the redesigned alerts significantly improved prescribing outcomes. This investigation provides some of the first evidence on how alerts may be designed to support safer prescribing for patients with renal impairment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Alertness management : strategic naps in operational settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Managing fatigue in complex operational settings requires attention to multiple factors, including hours of service, scheduling, education and training, countermeasures, technology, and research. Alertness-management strategies can be used to promote...

  17. Chemical Safety Alert: Safer Technology and Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    This alert is intended to introduce safer technology concepts and general approaches, explains the concepts and principles, and gives brief examples of the integration of safer technologies into facility risk management activities.

  18. Fire alerts on the geospatial semantic web

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mcferren, GA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available conceptbased queries of data and knowledge repositories. Future AFIS versions would supply highly tuned, meaningful and customised fire alerts to users based on an open framework of geospatial Web services, ontologies and software agents. Other Webbased...

  19. Gérer et alerter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie November

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sur la base de deux événements d’inondation ayant touché récemment, dans des contextes politiques, organisationnels et hydrologiques bien différents, de nouveaux quartiers d’habitation, cet article rend compte des pratiques des acteurs impliqués dans des situations d’alerte et de crise en Suisse. Le recensement des acteurs – à travers leur rôle et leur place dans les mécanismes de préparation, d’alerte et de gestion –, ainsi que l’inventaire des documents mobilisés par ceux-ci, ont été réalisés dans les deux cas. Cette analyse a permis d’évaluer la gestion des événements, de déceler les changements organisationnels qui ont suivi les crises et de connaître la conception et le degré de formalisation du risque dont étaient dotés les différents acteurs avant et après les inondations. Plus encore, l’analyse a documenté les nouveaux processus d’alerte et de prévision qui ont été mis en place suite aux événements. Il s’avère ainsi que les épisodes d’inondation agissent de façon décisive sur la production de connaissances, à un degré variable selon les acteurs. Ces épisodes révèlent aussi parfois l’existence de connaissances « en attente » qui ne sont pas encore intégrées dans les procédures institutionnelles. Tant du point de vue de la prévision que de la gestion de la crise, ils permettent aussi de tester les canaux de l’information et de combler les déficits d’organisation, de collaboration et de sécurisation des dispositifs de communication. En outre, les risques et les crises liés aux inondations modifient les dynamiques et les politiques territoriales, conséquences du réajustement des réseaux d’acteurs. La mise en place de dispositifs d’intervention et de gestion de crise se montre cependant plus efficace que la refonte des dispositifs d’aménagement, généralement longue. Toutefois, la mémoire des événements se dégradant avec le temps, une inscription

  20. Technologic Distractions (Part 1): Summary of Approaches to Manage Alert Quantity With Intent to Reduce Alert Fatigue and Suggestions for Alert Fatigue Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane-Gill, Sandra L; O'Connor, Michael F; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Selby, Nicholas M; McLean, Barbara; Bonafide, Christopher P; Cvach, Maria M; Hu, Xiao; Konkani, Avinash; Pelter, Michele M; Winters, Bradford D

    2017-09-01

    To provide ICU clinicians with evidence-based guidance on tested interventions that reduce or prevent alert fatigue within clinical decision support systems. Systematic review of PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, and CINAHL for relevant literature from 1966 to February 2017. Focus on critically ill patients and included evaluations in other patient care settings, as well. Identified interventions designed to reduce or prevent alert fatigue within clinical decision support systems. Study selection was based on one primary key question to identify effective interventions that attempted to reduce alert fatigue and three secondary key questions that covered the negative effects of alert fatigue, potential unintended consequences of efforts to reduce alert fatigue, and ideal alert quantity. Data were abstracted by two reviewers independently using a standardized abstraction tool. Surveys, meeting abstracts, "gray" literature, studies not available in English, and studies with non-original data were excluded. For the primary key question, articles were excluded if they did not provide a comparator as key question 1 was designed as a problem, intervention, comparison, and outcome question. We anticipated that reduction in alert fatigue, including the concept of desensitization may not be directly measured and thus considered interventions that reduced alert quantity as a surrogate marker for alert fatigue. Twenty-six articles met the inclusion criteria. Approaches for managing alert fatigue in the ICU are provided as a result of reviewing tested interventions that reduced alert quantity with the anticipated effect of reducing fatigue. Suggested alert management strategies include prioritizing alerts, developing sophisticated alerts, customizing commercially available alerts, and including end user opinion in alert selection. Alert fatigue itself is studied less frequently, as an outcome, and there is a need for more precise evaluation. Standardized metrics for alert fatigue is

  1. The Seismic Alert System of Mexico and their automatic Alert Signals broadcast improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Aranda, J.; Cuellar Martinez, A.; Garcia, A.; Ibarrola, G.; Islas, R.; Maldonado, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Mexican Seismic Alert System (SASMEX), is integrated by the Seismic Alert System of Mexico City (SAS), in continuous operation since 1991, and the Seismic Alert System of Oaxaca City (SASO) that started its service in 2003. The SAS generates automatic broadcast of Public and Preventive Alert Signals to the cities of Mexico, Toluca, Acapulco and Chilpancingo, and SASO by now only to Oaxaca City. Two types of SASMEX Seismic Alert Signal ranges were determinated in accordance with each local Civil Protection Authorities: Public Alert if they expect strong earthquake effects and Preventive Alert Signal, for moderated once. SAS has 12 field sensor stations covering partial segment of the Guerrero coast, and the SASO has 35 field sensor stations operating in the coast, central and north of the Oaxaca, covering the seismic danger territory. Since 1993, the SAS is pioneer in the automatic public alert broadcast services, thanks to the support of the Asociación de Radiodifusores del Valle de México, A.C. (ARVM). Historically in Mexico City, due to their great distance to the coast of Guerrero, the SAS has been issued its Alert Signals with an opportunity average of 60 seconds. In Oaxaca City the SASO gives 30 seconds time opportunity, if the earthquake detected is occurring in the Oaxaca coast region, or less time, if the seismic event hits near of this town. Also the SASO has been supported since its implementation for local commercial radio stations. Today the SAS and SASO have been generated respectively 13 and 3 Public Alert signals, also 63 and 5 Preventive Alerts ones. Nevertheless, the final effectiveness of the SASMEX Alert Signal services is sensible to the particular conditions of the user in risk, they must have their radio receiver or TV set turned on, also they must know what to do if the seismic warning is issued, other way they do not have opportunity to react reducing their vulnerability, mainly at night. These reason justify the support of the

  2. Integrated nuclear radiation detector and monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehl, B.L.; Lieberman, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    A battery powered device which can continuously monitor and detect nuclear radiation utilizing fully integrated circuitry and which is provided with an alarm which alerts persons when the radiation level exceeds a predetermined threshold

  3. Automated attendance management and alert system | Rahim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Automated Attendance Management and Alert System (AAMAS)” was developed to help UiTM lecturers and Academic Affairs Department in monitoring students' absenteeism and improving the absenteeism record management. AAMAS provides various functions, from managing and recording students' attendance record ...

  4. Innovative Software Tools Measure Behavioral Alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To monitor astronaut behavioral alertness in space, Johnson Space Center awarded Philadelphia-based Pulsar Informatics Inc. SBIR funding to develop software to be used onboard the International Space Station. Now used by the government and private companies, the technology has increased revenues for the firm by an average of 75 percent every year.

  5. Alerts of forest disturbance from MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Dan; Kraft, Robin; Wheeler, David

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the methodology and computational strategy for a forest cover disturbance alerting system. Analytical techniques from time series econometrics are applied to imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to detect temporal instability in vegetation indices. The characteristics from each MODIS pixel's spectral history are extracted and compared against historical data on forest cover loss to develop a geographically localized classification rule that can be applied across the humid tropical biome. The final output is a probability of forest disturbance for each 500 m pixel that is updated every 16 days. The primary objective is to provide high-confidence alerts of forest disturbance, while minimizing false positives. We find that the alerts serve this purpose exceedingly well in Pará, Brazil, with high probability alerts garnering a user accuracy of 98 percent over the training period and 93 percent after the training period (2000-2005) when compared against the PRODES deforestation data set, which is used to assess spatial accuracy. Implemented in Clojure and Java on the Hadoop distributed data processing platform, the algorithm is a fast, automated, and open source system for detecting forest disturbance. It is intended to be used in conjunction with higher-resolution imagery and data products that cannot be updated as quickly as MODIS-based data products. By highlighting hotspots of change, the algorithm and associated output can focus high-resolution data acquisition and aid in efforts to enforce local forest conservation efforts.

  6. Funding alert: unsubscribe | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Thank you. We have received your request to unsubscribe from IDRC funding alerts. A message will be sent to to confirm your request to unsubscribe. We fund researchers driving global change. Careers · Contact Us · Subscribe · Unsubscribe · Site map. Follow us; Facebook · Twitter · Youtube · Linked In · RSS Feed.

  7. Funding Alert Subscribe Confirmation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Thank you. Please check your email ( ) to confirm your subscription to the IDRC Funding Alerts. Please note: the link in your confirmation email is valid for 3 days, so please reply promptly. We fund researchers driving global change. Careers · Contact Us · Subscribe · Unsubscribe · Site map. Follow us; Facebook · Twitter ...

  8. Alerting or Somnogenic Light: Pick Your Color.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bourgin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, light exerts pervasive effects on physiology and behavior in two ways: indirectly through clock synchronization and the phase adjustment of circadian rhythms, and directly through the promotion of alertness and sleep, respectively, in diurnal and nocturnal species. A recent report by Pilorz and colleagues describes an even more complex role for the acute effects of light. In mice, blue light acutely causes behavioral arousal, whereas green wavelengths promote sleep. These opposing effects are mediated by melanopsin-based phototransduction through different neural pathways. These findings reconcile nocturnal and diurnal species through a common alerting response to blue light. One can hypothesize that the opposite responses to natural polychromatic light in night- or day-active animals may reflect higher sensitivity of nocturnal species to green, and diurnals to blue wavelengths, resulting in hypnogenic and alerting effects, respectively. Additional questions remain to be clarified. How do different light wavelengths affect other behaviors such as mood and cognition? How do those results apply to humans? How does light pose either a risk or benefit, depending on whether one needs to be asleep or alert? Indeed, in addition to timing, luminance levels, and light exposure duration, these findings stress the need to understand how best to adapt the color spectrum of light to our needs and to take this into account for the design of daily lighting concepts-a key challenge for today's society, especially with the emergence of LED light technology.

  9. Alerting or Somnogenic Light: Pick Your Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgin, Patrice; Hubbard, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, light exerts pervasive effects on physiology and behavior in two ways: indirectly through clock synchronization and the phase adjustment of circadian rhythms, and directly through the promotion of alertness and sleep, respectively, in diurnal and nocturnal species. A recent report by Pilorz and colleagues describes an even more complex role for the acute effects of light. In mice, blue light acutely causes behavioral arousal, whereas green wavelengths promote sleep. These opposing effects are mediated by melanopsin-based phototransduction through different neural pathways. These findings reconcile nocturnal and diurnal species through a common alerting response to blue light. One can hypothesize that the opposite responses to natural polychromatic light in night- or day-active animals may reflect higher sensitivity of nocturnal species to green, and diurnals to blue wavelengths, resulting in hypnogenic and alerting effects, respectively. Additional questions remain to be clarified. How do different light wavelengths affect other behaviors such as mood and cognition? How do those results apply to humans? How does light pose either a risk or benefit, depending on whether one needs to be asleep or alert? Indeed, in addition to timing, luminance levels, and light exposure duration, these findings stress the need to understand how best to adapt the color spectrum of light to our needs and to take this into account for the design of daily lighting concepts—a key challenge for today’s society, especially with the emergence of LED light technology. PMID:27525420

  10. IR panoramic alerting sensor concepts and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Schwering, Piet B. W.

    2003-09-01

    During the last decade, protection of military and civilian operational platforms against weapons like guns, grenades, missiles, Unmanned Combat Aerial (and surface) Vehicles (UCAV's) and mines, has been an issue of increased importance due to the improved kill-probability of these threats. The standard countermeasure package of armour, guns, decoys, jammers, camouflage nets and smokes is inadequate when not accompanied by a suitable sensor package, primarily consisting of an alerting device, triggering consecutive steps in the countermeasure-chain. In this process of alert four different detection techniques are considered: pre-alert, giving the directions of possible attack, detection of an action of attack, identification of the threat and finally the precise localization (3-D). The design of the alerting device is greatly depending on the platform, on which it will be used, the associated and affordable cost and the nature of the threat. A number of sensor packages, considered, developed and evaluated at TNO-FEL is presented for simple, medium size and large and expensive platforms. In recent years the requirements for these sensors have become more and more strigent due to the growing number of scenarios. The attack can practically be from any direction, implying the need for a large Field of Regard (FOR), the attack range can vary considerably and the type of threat can be very diverse, implying great flexibility and dynamic range and rapid response of the sensor. Especially the localization at short ranges is a challenging issue. Various configurations including advantages and drawbacks are discussed.

  11. Physicians' responses to computerized drug interaction alerts with password overrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Sakushima, Ken; Endoh, Akira; Umeki, Reona; Oki, Hiromitsu; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2015-08-28

    Although evidence has suggested that computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems may reduce the occurrence of drug-drug interactions, the numerous reminders and alerts generated by such systems could represent an excessive burden for clinicians, resulting in a high override rate of not only unimportant, but also important alerts. We analyzed physicians' responses to alerts of relative contraindications and contraindications for coadministration in a computerized drug-drug interaction alert system at Hokkaido University Hospital. In this system, the physician must enter a password to override an alert and continue an order. All of the drug-drug interaction alerts generated between December 2011 and November 2012 at Hokkaido University Hospital were included in this study. The system generated a total of 170 alerts of relative contraindications and contraindication for coadministration; 59 (34.7 %) of the corresponding orders were cancelled after the alert was accepted, and 111 (65.3 %) were overridden. The most frequent contraindication alert was for the combination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and fibrates. No incidents involving drug-drug interactions were reported among patients who were prescribed contraindicated drug pairs after an override. Although computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems that require password overrides appear useful for promoting medication safety, having to enter passwords to override alerts may represent an excessive burden for the prescribing physician. Therefore, both patient safety and physicians' workloads should be taken into consideration in future designs of computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems.

  12. Medication-related clinical decision support alert overrides in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanji, Karen C; Seger, Diane L; Slight, Sarah P; Amato, Mary G; Beeler, Patrick E; Her, Qoua L; Dalleur, Olivia; Eguale, Tewodros; Wong, Adrian; Silvers, Elizabeth R; Swerdloff, Michael; Hussain, Salman T; Maniam, Nivethietha; Fiskio, Julie M; Dykes, Patricia C; Bates, David W

    2018-05-01

    To define the types and numbers of inpatient clinical decision support alerts, measure the frequency with which they are overridden, and describe providers' reasons for overriding them and the appropriateness of those reasons. We conducted a cross-sectional study of medication-related clinical decision support alerts over a 3-year period at a 793-bed tertiary-care teaching institution. We measured the rate of alert overrides, the rate of overrides by alert type, the reasons cited for overrides, and the appropriateness of those reasons. Overall, 73.3% of patient allergy, drug-drug interaction, and duplicate drug alerts were overridden, though the rate of overrides varied by alert type (P 75% of the time. The vast majority of duplicate drug, patient allergy, and formulary substitution alerts were appropriate, suggesting that these categories of alerts might be good targets for refinement to reduce alert fatigue. Almost three-quarters of alerts were overridden, and 40% of the overrides were not appropriate. Future research should optimize alert types and frequencies to increase their clinical relevance, reducing alert fatigue so that important alerts are not inappropriately overridden.

  13. Space Debris Alert System for Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgobba, Tommaso

    2013-09-01

    Despite increasing efforts to accurately predict space debris re-entry, the exact time and location of re-entry is still very uncertain. Partially, this is due to a skipping effect uncontrolled spacecraft may experience as they enter the atmosphere at a shallow angle. Such effect difficult to model depends on atmospheric variations of density. When the bouncing off ends and atmospheric re-entry starts, the trajectory and the overall location of surviving fragments can be precisely predicted but the time to impact with ground, or to reach the airspace, becomes very short.Different is the case of a functional space system performing controlled re-entry. Suitable forecasts methods are available to clear air and maritime traffic from hazard areas (so-called traffic segregation).In US, following the Space Shuttle Columbia accident in 2003, a re-entry hazard areas location forecast system was putted in place for the specific case of major malfunction of a Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) at re-entry. The Shuttle Hazard Area to Aircraft Calculator (SHAAC) is a system based on ground equipment and software analyses and prediction tools, which require trained personnel and close coordination between the organization responsible for RLV operation (NASA for Shuttle) and the Federal Aviation Administration. The system very much relies on the operator's capability to determine that a major malfunction has occurred.This paper presents a US pending patent by the European Space Agency, which consists of a "smart fragment" using a GPS localizer together with pre- computed debris footprint area and direct broadcasting of such hazard areas.The risk for aviation from falling debris is very remote but catastrophic. Suspending flight over vast swath of airspace for every re-entering spacecraft or rocket upper stage, which is a weekly occurrence, would be extremely costly and disruptive.The Re-entry Direct Broadcasting Alert System (R- DBAS) is an original merging and evolution of the Re

  14. Aircraft Alerting Systems Criteria Study. Volume 1. Collation and Analysis of Aircraft Alerting Systems Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    22161. C-) Prepared for U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION Systems Research & Development Service SWashington, D.C. 20590...of information exchange. The United StateR Government assumes no liability for its contents or use thereof. 𔃻 *port No. 2 Government Accesilon No. 3...study was ini. tiated to estublish an alerting philosophy for aircraft cockpit alerting systems. The contract sponsor was FAA Systems Research and

  15. Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) Cybersecurity Risk Management Strategy for Alert Originators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    code that is intended to cause undesired effects, security breaches, or dam- age to a system (e.g., scripts, viruses , worms, Trojan horses , backdoors...latest version of software but is redirected to a malicious site that installs malware (e.g., a virus , Trojan , worm, or key logger...appropriate.  The alert originator should run virus scans on its AOS periodically. The alert originator should respond to viruses found on its systems as

  16. MedWatch Safety Alerts for Human Medical Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MedWatch alerts provide timely new safety information on human drugs, medical devices, vaccines and other biologics, dietary supplements, and cosmetics. The alerts...

  17. Prescription order risk factors for pediatric dosing alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, J S; Porter, K; Nahata, M C

    2015-02-01

    To determine dosing alert rates based on prescription order characteristics and identify prescription order risk factors for the occurrence of dosing alerts. A retrospective analysis of inpatient medication orders and dosing alerts occurring during October 2011 and January, April, and July 2012 at a pediatric institution. Prescription orders and alerts were categorized by: medication class, patient age, route of administration, and month of the year. There were 228,259 orders during the studied period, with 11,072 alerted orders (4.9%). The most frequently alerted medication class was the non-analgesic central nervous system agent class (14% of alerts). Age, route, medication class, and month all independently affected dosing alert rates. The alert rate was highest for immunosuppressive agents (54%), neonates (6.7%), and orders for rectal administration (9.5%). The alert rate was higher in adult patients receiving their care at a pediatric institution (5.7%) compared to children (4.7%), but after multivariate analysis, pediatric orders had higher odds for an alert (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.05-1.16). Mercaptopurine had the highest alert rate when categorized by active ingredient (73.9%). Albuterol 2.5mg/mL continuous aerosol and heparin 1000 units in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were the unique medications with the highest alert rates (100.0% and 97.7%, respectively). Certain types of prescription orders have a higher risk for causing dosing alerts than others. Patient age, medication class, route of administration, and the month of year can affect dosing alert rates. Design and customization efforts should focus on these medications and prescription order characteristics that increase the risk for dosing alerts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of an integrated campus security alerting system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of an integrated campus security alerting system. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... work presents an integrated alerting system which uses both the Internet Protocol (IP) cameras and micro-switches for monitoring security situations thereby providing an immediate alerting signal to the security personnel.

  19. 76 FR 35810 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 11-82] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... changes to its rules governing the Emergency Alert System (EAS) to codify the obligation to process alert...

  20. 77 FR 16688 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 12-7] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this... System (EAS) to codify the obligation to process alert messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  1. Wireless Emergency Alerts Commercial Mobile Service Provider (CMSP) Cybersecurity Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-16

    Wireless Emergency Alerts Commercial Mobile Service Provider (CMSP) Cybersecurity Guidelines Christopher Alberts Audrey Dorofee Carol Woody...Technology Direc- torate. The WEA capability provides a valuable service , disseminating emergency alerts to users of capable mobile devices if they are... mobile service providers (CMSPs)—commercial wireless carriers that broadcast WEA messages to a designated geographic area 4. Alert recipients—the

  2. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. [Reserved] 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway. [Reserved] ...

  3. 78 FR 16806 - The Commercial Mobile Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ...) to Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA). This is intended to conform the name used for the wireless alert...: Lisa Fowlkes, Deputy Bureau Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, at (202) 418-7452, or by... providers that participate in the system are referring to it as Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) in the...

  4. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  5. From Demonstration System to Prototype: ShakeAlert Beta Users Provide Feedback to Improve Alert Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J. A.; Vinci, M.; Steele, W. P.; Allen, R. M.; Hellweg, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) is a system that can provide a few to tens of seconds to minutes of warning prior to ground shaking at a given location. The goal and purpose of such a system is to reduce the damage, costs, and casualties resulting from an earthquake. A prototype earthquake early warning system (ShakeAlert) is in development by the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, ETH Zurich, University of Washington, and the USGS. Events are published to the UserDisplay--ShakeAlert's Java based graphical interface, which is being tested by a small group of beta users throughout California. The beta users receive earthquake alerts in real-time and are providing feedback on their experiences. For early warning alerts to be useful, people, companies, and institutions must know beforehand what actions they will perform when they receive the information. Beta user interactions allow the ShakeAlert team to discern: which alert delivery options are most effective, what changes would make the UserDisplay more useful in a pre-disaster situation, and most importantly, what actions users plan to take for various scenarios. We also collect feedback detailing costs of implementing actions and challenges within the beta user organizations, as well as anticipated benefits and savings. Thus, creating a blueprint for a fully operational system that will meet the needs of the public. New California users as well as the first group of Pacific Northwest users are slated to join the ShakeAlert beta test group in the fall of 2013.

  6. Telephone Voice Alert :system planning and design

    OpenAIRE

    Finch, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    The Telephone Voice Alert is divided into six parts: the ring detector, controller, voice memory, synthesizer, speaker, and power supply subsystems. These all interact together to produce a voice signal whenever a ring signal is detected. By beginning from the system function and analyzing the components as we break the system into subsystems, we find that the trade-off between system cost and system "effectiveness" minimizes to prove Configuration A (digital voice reproduction) a...

  7. Static Analysis Alert Audits: Lexicon and Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    1 Codebase 2 Codebase 3 Training Data Use the training data to build machine learning classifiers that predict TRUE and FALSE determinations...consistency of audit data for the purpose of building machine learning classifiers Help organizations make better-informed decisions about bug-fixes...values. • Unless they have a strong guarantee to the contrary Example from recent history: Java Deserialization • Suppose an alert is raised for a

  8. Feasibility of seismic alert systems in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, P.K.S.; Pandey, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters like flood, earthquakes and cyclones are very frequent in India since historical times. As far as the casualties are concerned, globally earthquakes are second in the list after the flood. The loss of property due to these earthquakes is huge and enormous. In the light of the present knowledge base, earthquake prediction is far from being a reality. An early earthquake warning has potential to save the precious human lives. In the present day scenario seismic instrumentation and telecommunication permits the implementation of seismic alert system (SAS) based on the real-time measurement of ground motions near the source. SAS is capable of providing a warning of several seconds before the arrival of destructive seismic waves caused by a large earthquake. SAS is successfully operational in many countries of the world. In a country, like India where earthquakes are taking heavy toll on the human lives and property, seismic alert system may prove to be very important step in natural hazard mitigation strategy. In this paper, an attempt has been made to compute the available alarm time before the destructive earthquake waves reaches to the cities like Delhi, Lucknow, Patna and Kolkata taking Himalaya as the source and feasibility of seismic alert system in Indian scenario. (author)

  9. Alerts Visualization and Clustering in Network-based Intrusion Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dr. Li [University of Tennessee; Gasior, Wade C [ORNL; Dasireddy, Swetha [University of Tennessee

    2010-04-01

    Today's Intrusion detection systems when deployed on a busy network overload the network with huge number of alerts. This behavior of producing too much raw information makes it less effective. We propose a system which takes both raw data and Snort alerts to visualize and analyze possible intrusions in a network. Then we present with two models for the visualization of clustered alerts. Our first model gives the network administrator with the logical topology of the network and detailed information of each node that involves its associated alerts and connections. In the second model, flocking model, presents the network administrator with the visual representation of IDS data in which each alert is represented in different color and the alerts with maximum similarity move together. This gives network administrator with the idea of detecting various of intrusions through visualizing the alert patterns.

  10. A process-based model for the definition of hydrological alert systems in landslide risk mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Floris

    2012-11-01

    Depth-Duration-Frequency (DDF curves, which allow one to determine rainfall depth (or intensity as a function of duration for given return periods or probabilities of exceedance (frequencies. Physically-based modelling was performed through coupled seepage and slope stability analyses.

    Combining results from empirical and physically-based modelling, the minimum alert threshold for a reactivation of the phenomenon was found in rainfall cumulated up to 60 days with a return period of 2 yr. These results were used to set up a hydrological alert system based on the calibration of DDF curves which can be used as a sort of abacus to plot in real time rainfall depths and to set increasing levels of alert on the basis of the degree of exceptionality of rainfall.

    The alert system for Val di Maso was successfully tested by the rainfall events that produced displacements which have been recorded by extensometers placed in the crown area after the November 2010 landslide. However, further tests are recommendable to improve the process-based model that led to the implementation of the alert system. To this end, a monitoring system is currently being realized. In the near future, monitoring data will help in testing and improving landslide evolution and alert models.

    The proposed hydrological alert system proves to be effective mainly because it can be applied to different scales of investigation and geological and geomorphological contexts. In fact, it might also be applicable to territorial scale analyses, as showed by the brief example provided in this paper on how the alert system could be used for landslide early warning in the area surrounding Val di Maso. Furthermore, it is easy to set up. The needed components are a rain gauge station, a software that compares rainfall data to rainfall events with different return periods and degree of alert, and a transmission system of the warning levels to authorities.

  11. A process-based model for the definition of hydrological alert systems in landslide risk mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; De Agostini, A.; Stevan, G.; Tessari, G.; Genevois, R.

    2012-11-01

    , which allow one to determine rainfall depth (or intensity) as a function of duration for given return periods or probabilities of exceedance (frequencies). Physically-based modelling was performed through coupled seepage and slope stability analyses. Combining results from empirical and physically-based modelling, the minimum alert threshold for a reactivation of the phenomenon was found in rainfall cumulated up to 60 days with a return period of 2 yr. These results were used to set up a hydrological alert system based on the calibration of DDF curves which can be used as a sort of abacus to plot in real time rainfall depths and to set increasing levels of alert on the basis of the degree of exceptionality of rainfall. The alert system for Val di Maso was successfully tested by the rainfall events that produced displacements which have been recorded by extensometers placed in the crown area after the November 2010 landslide. However, further tests are recommendable to improve the process-based model that led to the implementation of the alert system. To this end, a monitoring system is currently being realized. In the near future, monitoring data will help in testing and improving landslide evolution and alert models. The proposed hydrological alert system proves to be effective mainly because it can be applied to different scales of investigation and geological and geomorphological contexts. In fact, it might also be applicable to territorial scale analyses, as showed by the brief example provided in this paper on how the alert system could be used for landslide early warning in the area surrounding Val di Maso. Furthermore, it is easy to set up. The needed components are a rain gauge station, a software that compares rainfall data to rainfall events with different return periods and degree of alert, and a transmission system of the warning levels to authorities.

  12. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  13. Alertness and Cognitive Control: Testing the Early Onset Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Darryl W

    2017-11-20

    Previous research has revealed a peculiar interaction between alertness and cognitive control in selective-attention tasks: Congruency effects are larger on alert trials (on which an alerting cue is presented briefly in advance of the imperative stimulus) than on no-alert trials, despite shorter response times (RTs) on alert trials. One explanation for this finding is the early onset hypothesis, which is based on the assumptions that increased alertness shortens stimulus-encoding time and that cognitive control involves gradually focusing attention during a trial. The author tested the hypothesis in 3 experiments by manipulating alertness and stimulus quality (which were intended to shorten and lengthen stimulus-encoding time, respectively) in an arrow-based flanker task involving congruent and incongruent stimuli. Replicating past findings, the alerting manipulation led to shorter RTs but larger congruency effects on alert trials than on no-alert trials. The stimulus-quality manipulation led to longer RTs and larger congruency effects for degraded stimuli than for intact stimuli. These results provide mixed support for the early onset hypothesis, but the author discusses how data and theory might be reconciled if stimulus quality affects stimulus-encoding time and the rate of evidence accumulation in the decision process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Public health communications and alert fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseman, Janet G; Revere, Debra; Painter, Ian; Toyoji, Mariko; Thiede, Hanne; Duchin, Jeffrey

    2013-08-05

    Health care providers play a significant role in large scale health emergency planning, detection, response, recovery and communication with the public. The effectiveness of health care providers in emergency preparedness and response roles depends, in part, on public health agencies communicating information in a way that maximizes the likelihood that the message is delivered, received, deemed credible and, when appropriate, acted on. However, during an emergency, health care providers can become inundated with alerts and advisories through numerous national, state, local and professional communication channels. We conducted an alert fatigue study as a sub-study of a larger randomized controlled trial which aimed to identify the most effective methods of communicating public health messages between public health agencies and providers. We report an analysis of the effects of public health message volume/frequency on recall of specific message content and effect of rate of message communications on health care provider alert fatigue. Health care providers enrolled in the larger study (n=528) were randomized to receive public health messages via email, fax, short message service (SMS or cell phone text messaging) or to a control group that did not receive messages. For 12 months, study messages based on real events of public health significance were sent quarterly with follow-up telephone interviews regarding message receipt and topic recall conducted 5-10 days after the message delivery date. During a pandemic when numerous messages are sent, alert fatigue may impact ability to recall whether a specific message has been received due to the "noise" created by the higher number of messages. To determine the impact of "noise" when study messages were sent, we compared health care provider recall of the study message topic to the number of local public health messages sent to health care providers. We calculated the mean number of messages that each provider received

  15. The ANTARES telescope neutrino alert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-03-01

    The ANTARES telescope has the capability to detect neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources. Potential sources include gamma-ray bursts, core collapse supernovae, and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a new detection method based on coincident observations of neutrinos and optical signals has been developed. A fast online muon track reconstruction is used to trigger a network of small automatic optical telescopes. Such alerts are generated for special events, such as two or more neutrinos, coincident in time and direction, or single neutrinos of very high energy.

  16. Implementation of 'early alert system' area detector at patient from entrance in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videla Valdebenito, R.

    2001-01-01

    A system of area monitors to detect the involuntary exit of the radiation sources used in low dose rate deferred brachytherapy treatment is being implemented in all facilities in Chile. The first implementation of this system, named 'Early Alert', was 5 years ago as a complement to the administrative procedures and verification measures by the medical physics carried out through visual verifications and by means of portable radiation detectors. This detector of the system should be located preferentially at the exit of the treatment room at a height not smaller than two meters. This has resulted in an increase of facilities safety in this practice. (author) [es

  17. The Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) adaption in National Early Warning Alerting Systems of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao

    2017-04-01

    The Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) [1] is an XML-based data format for exchanging public warnings and emergencies between alerting technologies. In China, from local communities to entire nations, there was a patchwork of specialized hazard public alerting systems. And each system was often designed just for certain emergency situations and for certain communications media. Application took place in the NEWAS (National Early Warning Alerting Systems) [2]project where CAP serves as central message to integrate all kind of hazard situations, including the natural calamity, accident disaster, public health emergency , social safety etc. Officially operated on May 2015, NEWAS now has completed docking work with 14 departments including civil administration, safety supervision, forestry, land, water conservancy, earthquake, traffic, meteorology, agriculture, tourism, food and drug supervision, public security and oceanic administration. Thus, several items in CAP has been modified, redefined and extended according to the various grading standards and publishing strategies, as well as the characteristics of Chinese Geocoding. NEWAS successfully delivers information to end users through 4 levels (i.e. State, province, prefecture and county) structure and by various means. [1] CAP, http://www.oasis-emergency.org/cap [2] http://www.12379.cn/

  18. Alert Messaging in the CMS Distributed Workflow System

    OpenAIRE

    Maxa, Zdenek

    2012-01-01

    WMAgent is the core component of the CMS workload management system. One of the features of this job managing platform is a configurable messaging system aimed at generating, distributing and processing alerts: short messages describing a given alert-worthy informational or pathological condition. Apart from the framework's sub-components running within the WMAgent instances, there is a stand-alone application collecting alerts from all WMAgent instances running across the C...

  19. Sleepiness and alertness in American industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.M.; Dillingham, J.; Dement, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent evidence that industrial accidents may be caused in part by shiftworkers' lack of alertness has caused growing concern at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and within the scientific community. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was threefold: (1) Is sleepiness on the job specific to utility plants? (2) Are performance and safety problems caused by sleepiness specific to utility plants? (3) Are specific shift schedules associated with a higher prevalence of sleepiness? Findings indicate sleepiness on the job among shiftworkers is a widespread problem, not limited to the nuclear power industry. The most common solution in American industry is to overstaff each shift and discipline sleeping employees. Results show this is not effective. A more proactive solution is recommended including some of the following: (1) Provide employees education to assist adjustment to shiftwork. (2) Design and implement shift schedules that are more compatible with human physiological capabilities. (3) Allow officially sanctioned napping on shift as is done in Japan. (4) Divide 6-, 8-, or 12-h shifts into smaller blocks of 2 to 3 h of primary duty. (5) make the environment where employees work more conductive to alertness. (6) Develop a firehouse type of schedule where some employees sleep throughout the night, but are awakened if operational problems arise. (7) Provide incentives to employees to adjust their life style to the night shift and reward them with time off

  20. Radiation area monitor device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencelj, Matjaz; Stowe, Ashley C.; Petrovic, Toni; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Kosicek, Andrej

    2018-01-30

    A radiation area monitor device/method, utilizing: a radiation sensor; a rotating radiation shield disposed about the radiation sensor, wherein the rotating radiation shield defines one or more ports that are transparent to radiation; and a processor operable for analyzing and storing a radiation fingerprint acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor. Optionally, the radiation sensor includes a gamma and/or neutron radiation sensor. The device/method selectively operates in: a first supervised mode during which a baseline radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor; and a second unsupervised mode during which a subsequent radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor, wherein the subsequent radiation fingerprint is compared to the baseline radiation fingerprint and, if a predetermined difference threshold is exceeded, an alert is issued.

  1. Design of a general clinical notification system based on the publish-subscribe paradigm.

    OpenAIRE

    Geissbühler, A.; Grande, J. F.; Bates, R. A.; Miller, R. A.; Stead, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the design and initial implementation of a notification sub-system, as a component of a modern information management architecture. The system, based on the publish-subscribe paradigm, provides a framework of event-based communications for the implementation of various important clinical applications including the notification of alerts and reminders with escalation algorithms, the reliable distribution of documents, and the implementation of intelligent patient-specific monitorin...

  2. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies

  3. NAPS as an Alertness Management Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Smith, Roy M.; Miller, Donna L.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Gander, Philippa H.; Lebacqz, J. Victor

    2001-01-01

    Today, 24-hour operations are necessary to meet the demands of our society and the requirements of our industrialized global economy. These around-the-clock demands pose unique physiological challenges for the humans who remain central to safe and productive operations. Optimal alertness and performance are critical factors that are increasingly challenged by unusual, extended, or changing work/rest schedules. Technological advancements and automated systems can exacerbate the challenges faced by the human factor in these environments. Shift work, transportation demands, and continuous operations engender sleep loss and circadian disruption. Both of these physiological factors can lead to increased sleepiness, decreased performance, and a reduced margin of safety. These factors can increase vulnerability to incidents and accidents in operational settings. The consequences can have both societal effects (e.g., major destructive accidents such as Three Mile Island, Exxon Valdez, Bhopal) and personal effects (e.g., an accident driving home after a night shift).

  4. 75 FR 4760 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 10-11] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Commission's rules governing the Emergency Alert System (EAS) rules to provide for national EAS testing and...

  5. 76 FR 80780 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 11-136] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Commission amends its rules governing the Emergency Alert System (EAS) rules to extend the...

  6. 77 FR 33661 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... Commission's Review of the Emergency Alert System, Fifth Report and Order (Order). This document is... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 12-7] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; announcement of...

  7. A new method for determining a sector alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-29

    The Traffic Flow Management System (TFMS) currently declares an alert for any 15-minute interval in which the predicted demand exceeds the Monitor/Alert Parameter (MAP) for any airport, sector, or fix. For a sector, TFMS predicts the demand for each ...

  8. 47 CFR 10.320 - Provider alert gateway requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provider alert gateway requirements. 10.320... System Architecture § 10.320 Provider alert gateway requirements. This section specifies the functions... CMS provider gateways. (a) General. The CMS provider gateway must provide secure, redundant, and...

  9. Silver Alerts and the Problem of Missing Adults with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Dawn; Muschert, Glenn W.; Kinney, Jennifer; Robbins, Emily; Petonito, Gina; Manning, Lydia; Brown, J. Scott

    2010-01-01

    In the months following the introduction of the National AMBER (America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alert plan used to locate missing and abducted children, Silver Alert programs began to emerge. These programs use the same infrastructure and approach to find a different missing population, cognitively impaired older adults. By late…

  10. Sleep and Alertness Management IV: Effects of Alertness Enhancers Caffeine and Modafinil on Performance in Marmosets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    cafeine of modafinil beeft geen nadelig effect op de prestaties en de activiteit overdag en leidt tot vergelijkbare resultaten als na de eenmalige...IV: Effects of F +31 15 284 39 91 Info-DenV@tno.nl alertness enhancers caffeine and modafinil on performance in marmosets Date March 2007 Author(s...Public Release Distribution Unlimited 20070813218 2/30 Slaap- en Alertheidsmanagement IV: Effect van de alertheidsverhogende middelen caffemfne en

  11. Alert Messaging in the CMS Distributed Workflow System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxa, Zdenek

    2012-01-01

    WMAgent is the core component of the CMS workload management system. One of the features of this job managing platform is a configurable messaging system aimed at generating, distributing and processing alerts: short messages describing a given alert-worthy information or pathological condition. Apart from the framework's sub-components running within the WMAgent instances, there is a stand-alone application collecting alerts from all WMAgent instances running across the CMS distributed computing environment. The alert framework has a versatile design that allows for receiving alert messages also from other CMS production applications, such as PhEDEx data transfer manager. We present implementation details of the system, including its Python implementation using ZeroMQ, CouchDB message storage and future visions as well as operational experiences. Inter-operation with monitoring platforms such as Dashboard or Lemon is described.

  12. Alert Messaging in the CMS Distributed Workflow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxa, Zdenek

    2012-12-01

    WMAgent is the core component of the CMS workload management system. One of the features of this job managing platform is a configurable messaging system aimed at generating, distributing and processing alerts: short messages describing a given alert-worthy information or pathological condition. Apart from the framework's sub-components running within the WMAgent instances, there is a stand-alone application collecting alerts from all WMAgent instances running across the CMS distributed computing environment. The alert framework has a versatile design that allows for receiving alert messages also from other CMS production applications, such as PhEDEx data transfer manager. We present implementation details of the system, including its Python implementation using ZeroMQ, CouchDB message storage and future visions as well as operational experiences. Inter-operation with monitoring platforms such as Dashboard or Lemon is described.

  13. Appropriateness of commercially available and partially customized medication dosing alerts among pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Nahata, Milap C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate dosing alert appropriateness, categorize orders with alerts, and compare the appropriateness of alerts due to customized and non-customized dose ranges at a pediatric hospital. This was a retrospective analysis of medication orders causing dosing alerts. Orders for outpatient prescriptions, patients ≥18 years of age, and research protocols were excluded. Patient medical records were reviewed and ordered doses compared with a widely used pediatric reference (Lexi-Comp) and institutional recommendations. The alerted orders were categorized and the occurrence of appropriate alerts was compared. There were 47 181 inpatient orders during the studied period; 1935 orders caused 3774 dosing alerts for 369 medications in 573 patients (median age 6.1 years). All alerted orders had an alert overridden by the prescriber. The majority (86.2%) of alerted orders inappropriately caused alerts; 58.0% were justifiable doses and 28.2% were within Lexi-Comp. However, 13.8% of alerted orders appropriately caused alerts; 8.0% were incorrect doses and 5.8% had no dosing recommendations available. Appropriately alerted orders occurred in 19.7% of alerted orders due to customized ranges compared to 12.8% due to non-customized ranges (p=0.002). Preterm and term neonates, infants, and children (2-5 years) had higher proportions of inappropriate alerts compared to appropriate alerts (all pMedications requiring dosing adjustments based on clinical parameters must be taken into account when designing and evaluating dosing alerts.

  14. Gaia Science Alerts: Early Validation Phase Data from Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Nicholas; Hodgkin, Simon; van Leeuwen, Floor

    2015-08-01

    The ESA Gaia satellite launched Dec 2013, and after successful completion of its in orbit commissioning in July 2014, begun routine operations, with the aim to accurately measure the astrometric and astrophysical properties of more than a billion stars in our Milky Way.As a significant by product of its observational scanning law, where each point on the sky is observed multiple times (~80 revisits on average) over the nominal 5 year mission, Gaia has significant utility in detecting new transients, both flux (e.g. Supernovae, Flare stars) and positional (e.g. Asteroids).We will present the current status of the Gaia Photometric Science Alerts (PSA) system that has been developed within the Gaia DPAC. The PSA pipeline provides a quick look analysis of the daily data stream from Gaia, and identifies new photometric alerts, from analysis of the object photometric and the low resolution spectro-photometric data. Via a set of filters, those identified as astrophysical in nature, are published to the community. The information provided currently includes positional and flux information.The Gaia Alerts working group has organised a significant early stage followup campaign, providing access to a wide variety of followup facilities. These have been used to provide classification spectra of the Gaia alert candidates, with the early phase data confirming that the alerts issued are indeed largely astrophysical transients, with only a small contamination rate.The presentation will address the early phase issues that have been addressed in localising and classifying alerts in the early phase of Gaia observations (for instance, how lack of early knowledge of the sky as seen by Gaia was mitigated by reference to external image data), and how the alert rate published by the PSA will ramp up towards the end of 2015, with the availability of more Gaia sky data.Information concerning the Gaia alerts system can be found at http://gaia.ac.uk/selected-gaia-science-alerts

  15. MAGIC electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lotto, Barbara; Ansoldi, Stefano; Antonelli, Angelo; Berti, Alessio; Carosi, Alessandro; Longo, Francesco; Stamerra, Antonio

    The year 2015 witnessed the first direct observations of a transient gravitational-wave (GW) signal from binary black hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) Collaboration with the Virgo Collaboration. The MAGIC two 17m diameter Cherenkov telescopes system joined since 2014 the vast collaboration of electromagnetic facilities for follow-up of gravitational wave alerts. During the 2015 LIGO-Virgo science run we set up the procedure for GW alerts follow-up and took data following the last GW alert. MAGIC results on the data analysis and prospects for the forthcoming run are presented.

  16. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaš, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Klotz, A.; Boer, M.; Le Van Suu, A.; Akerlof, C.; Zheng, W.; Evans, P.; Gehrels, N.; Kennea, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Coward, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  17. Optical and X-ray early follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Ageron, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Aubert, J.-J.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrino source has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifying a neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT and ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or X-ray counterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations are analysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analysed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert

  18. Optical and X-Ray Early Follow-Up of ANTARES Neutrino Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ageron, M.; Albert, A.; Samarai, I. Al; Andre, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos could be produced in the interaction of charged cosmic rays with matter or radiation surrounding astrophysical sources. Even with the recent detection of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube experiment, no astrophysical neutrinosource has yet been discovered. Transient sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, or active galactic nuclei are promising candidates. Multi-messenger programs offer a unique opportunity to detect these transient sources. By combining the information provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope with information coming from other observatories, the probability of detecting a source is enhanced, allowing the possibility of identifyinga neutrino progenitor from a single detected event. A method based on optical and X-ray follow-ups of high-energy neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This method does not require any assumptions on the relation between neutrino and photon spectra other than time-correlation. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROTand ROTSE) and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection, and is therefore well-suited to search for fast transient sources. To identify an optical or Xraycounterpart to a neutrino signal, the images provided by the follow-up observations areanalysed with dedicated pipelines. A total of 42 alerts with optical and 7 alerts with X-ray images taken with a maximum delay of 24 hours after the neutrino trigger have been analyzed. No optical or X-ray counterparts associated to the neutrino triggers have been found, and upper limits on transient source magnitudes have been derived. The probability to reject the gamma-ray burst origin hypothesis has been computed for each alert.

  19. Provider and pharmacist responses to warfarin drug–drug interaction alerts: a study of healthcare downstream of CPOE alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boro, Maureen S; Korman, Nancy E; Davoren, J Ben

    2011-01-01

    Objective To categorize the appropriateness of provider and pharmacist responses to warfarin critical drug–drug interaction (cDDI) alerts, assess responses and actions to the cDDI, and determine the occurrence of warfarin adverse drug events (ADE) after alerts. Design An 18-month, retrospective study of acute care admissions at a single Veterans Affairs medical center using computerized provider order entry (CPOE). Measurements Patients included had at least one warfarin cDDI alert. Chart reviews included baseline laboratory values and demographics, provider actions, patient outcomes, and associated factors, including other interacting medications and number of simultaneously processed alerts. Results 137 admissions were included (133 unique patients). Amiodarone, vitamin E in a multivitamin, sulfamethoxazole, and levothyroxine accounted for 75% of warfarin cDDI. Provider responses were clinically appropriate in 19.7% of admissions and pharmacist responses were appropriate in 9.5% of admissions. There were 50 ADE (36.6% of admissions) with warfarin; 80% were rated as having no or mild clinical effect. An increased number of non-critical alerts at the time of the reference cDDI alert was the only variable associated with an inappropriate provider response (p=0.01). Limitations This study was limited by being a retrospective review and the possibility of confounding variables, such as other interacting medications. Conclusion The large number of CPOE alerts may lead to inappropriate responses by providers and pharmacists. The high rate of ADE suggests a need for improved medication management systems for patients on warfarin. This study highlights the possibility of alert fatigue contributing to the high prevalence of inappropriate alert over-ride text responses. PMID:22037888

  20. Chemical Safety Alert: Hazards of Delayed Coker Unit (DCU) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and OSHA jointly publish this Chemical Safety Alert/Safety and Health Information Bulletin (CSA/SHIB) to increase awareness. DCU is a severe form of thermal cracking requiring high temperatures for long periods, for refining crude oils.

  1. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system.

  2. Siren system installed to alert campus community to emergency events

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech is installing a system of warning sirens to alert the campus community to emergency events. The first test of the siren system is scheduled to occur on Wednesday, April 19, at 12:10 p.m.

  3. Office of Child Support and Enforcement (OCSE) State Wage Alerts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The OCSE State Wage Alert is a quarterly match which detects SSI overpayments by identifying unreported wage and unemployment data provided to the Office of Child...

  4. Physicians' response to computerised alerts for psychotropic drugs in older persons: a multilevel analysis of the associated alert, patient and physician characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamblyn, Robyn; Reidel, Kristen; Patel, Vaishali

    2012-01-01

    Computerised drug alerts are expected to reduce patients' risk of adverse drug events. However, physicians over-ride most drug alerts, because they believe that the benefit exceeds the risk. The purpose of this study was to determine the drug alert, patient and physician characteristics associated with the: (1) occurrence of psychotropic drug alerts for elderly patients and the (2) response to these alerts by their primary care physicians. Primary care, Quebec, Canada. Prospective cohort study. Sixty-one physicians using an electronic prescribing and drug alert decision-support system in their practice, and 3413 elderly patients using psychotropic drugs. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY MEASURES: Psychotropic drug class, alert severity, patient risk for fall injuries and physician experience, practice volume and computer use were evaluated in relationship to the likelihood of having: (1) a psychotropic drug alert, (2) the prescription revised in response to an alert. Cluster-adjusted alternating logistic regression was used to assess multilevel predictors of alert occurrence and response. In total 13 080 psychotropic drug alerts were generated in 8931 visits. Alerts were more likely to be generated for male patients at higher risk of fall-related injury and for physicians who established the highest alert threshold. In 9.9% of alerts seen, the prescription was revised. The highest revision rate was for antipsychotic alerts (22.6%). Physicians were more likely to revise prescriptions for severe alerts (OR 2.03; 95%CI 1.39 to 2.98), if patients had cognitive impairment (OR 1.95; 95%CI 1.13 to 3.36), and if they made more visits to their physician (OR 1.05 per 5 visits; 95%CI 1 to 1.09). Physicians view and respond to a small proportion of alerts, mainly for higher-risk patients. To reduce the risk of psychotropic drug-related fall injuries, a new generation of evidence-based drug alerts should be developed.

  5. The Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX): Performance and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Aranda, J.

    2013-05-01

    Originally the Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX) was proposed to integrate the Seismic Alert System of Mexico City (SAS), operating since 1991, with the Seismic Alert System of Oaxaca City (SASO), in services since 2003. And today, after the intense big earthquake activity observed in our world during 2010 and 2011, local governments of Mexico City, Oaxaca Estate, and the Mexican Ministry of the Interior have been promoting the expansion of this technological EEW development. Until 2012 SASMEX better coverage includes 48 new field seismic sensors (FS) deployed over the seismic region of Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan and Puebla, with someone enhancements over Guerrero and Oaxaca, to reach 97 FS. During 2013, 35 new FS has been proposed to SASMEX enhancements covering the Chiapas and Veracruz seismic regions. The SASMEX, with the support of the Mexico Valley Broadcasters Association (ARVM) since 1993, automatically issue Public and Preventive earthquake early warning signals in the Cities of Mexico, Toluca, Acapulco, Chilpancingo, and Oaxaca. The seismic warning range in each case is seated in accordance with local Civil Protection Authorities: Public Alert, if they expect strong earthquake effects, and Preventive Alert one, the effect could be moderated. Now the SASMEX warning time opportunity could be different to the 60 sec. average typically generated when SAS warned earthquake effects coming from Guerrero to Mexico City valley. Mexican EEW issued today reach: 16 Public and 62 Preventive Alert in Mexico City; 25 Public and 19 Preventive Alerts in Oaxaca City; also 14 Public and 4 Preventive Alerts in Acapulco; 14 Public and 5 Preventive Alerts in Chilpancingo. The earthquakes events registered by SASMEX FS until now reach 3448. With the support of private and Federal telecommunications infrastructure like, TELMEX, Federal Electric Commission, and the Mexican Security Ministry, it was developed a redundant communication system with pads to link the different

  6. Acute alerting effects of light: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souman, Jan L; Tinga, Angelica M; Te Pas, Susan F; van Ee, Raymond; Vlaskamp, Björn N S

    2018-01-30

    Periodic, well timed exposure to light is important for our health and wellbeing. Light, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum, is thought to affect alertness both indirectly, by modifying circadian rhythms, and directly, giving rise to acute effects. We performed a systematic review of empirical studies on direct, acute effects of light on alertness to evaluate the reliability of these effects. In total, we identified 68 studies in which either light intensity, spectral distribution, or both were manipulated, and evaluated the effects on behavioral measures of alertness, either subjectively or measured in reaction time performance tasks. The results show that increasing the intensity of polychromatic white light has been found to increase subjective ratings of alertness in a majority of studies, though a substantial proportion of studies failed to find significant effects, possibly due to small sample sizes or high baseline light intensities. The effect of the color temperature of white light on subjective alertness is less clear. Some studies found increased alertness with higher color temperatures, but other studies reported no detrimental effects of filtering out the short wavelengths from the spectrum. Similarly, studies that used monochromatic light exposure showed no systematic pattern for the effects of blue light compared to longer wavelengths. Far fewer studies investigated the effects of light intensity or spectrum on alertness as measured with reaction time tasks and of those, very few reported significant effects. In general, the small sample sizes used in studies on acute alerting effects of light make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions and better powered studies are needed, especially studies that allow for the construction of dose-response curves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Monitoring alert and drowsy states by modeling EEG source nonstationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2017-10-01

    Objective. As a human brain performs various cognitive functions within ever-changing environments, states of the brain characterized by recorded brain activities such as electroencephalogram (EEG) are inevitably nonstationary. The challenges of analyzing the nonstationary EEG signals include finding neurocognitive sources that underlie different brain states and using EEG data to quantitatively assess the state changes. Approach. This study hypothesizes that brain activities under different states, e.g. levels of alertness, can be modeled as distinct compositions of statistically independent sources using independent component analysis (ICA). This study presents a framework to quantitatively assess the EEG source nonstationarity and estimate levels of alertness. The framework was tested against EEG data collected from 10 subjects performing a sustained-attention task in a driving simulator. Main results. Empirical results illustrate that EEG signals under alert versus drowsy states, indexed by reaction speeds to driving challenges, can be characterized by distinct ICA models. By quantifying the goodness-of-fit of each ICA model to the EEG data using the model deviation index (MDI), we found that MDIs were significantly correlated with the reaction speeds (r  =  ‑0.390 with alertness models and r  =  0.449 with drowsiness models) and the opposite correlations indicated that the two models accounted for sources in the alert and drowsy states, respectively. Based on the observed source nonstationarity, this study also proposes an online framework using a subject-specific ICA model trained with an initial (alert) state to track the level of alertness. For classification of alert against drowsy states, the proposed online framework achieved an averaged area-under-curve of 0.745 and compared favorably with a classic power-based approach. Significance. This ICA-based framework provides a new way to study changes of brain states and can be applied to

  8. Alert management for home healthcare based on home automation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, T T; de Lamotte, F; Diguet, J-Ph; Said-Hocine, F

    2010-01-01

    Rising healthcare for elder and disabled people can be controlled by offering people autonomy at home by means of information technology. In this paper, we present an original and sensorless alert management solution which performs multimedia and home automation service discrimination and extracts highly regular home activities as sensors for alert management. The results of simulation data, based on real context, allow us to evaluate our approach before application to real data.

  9. Federal technology alert. Parabolic-trough solar water heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Parabolic-trough solar water heating is a well-proven renewable energy technology with considerable potential for application at Federal facilities. For the US, parabolic-trough water-heating systems are most cost effective in the Southwest where direct solar radiation is high. Jails, hospitals, barracks, and other facilities that consistently use large volumes of hot water are particularly good candidates, as are facilities with central plants for district heating. As with any renewable energy or energy efficiency technology requiring significant initial capital investment, the primary condition that will make a parabolic-trough system economically viable is if it is replacing expensive conventional water heating. In combination with absorption cooling systems, parabolic-trough collectors can also be used for air-conditioning. Industrial Solar Technology (IST) of Golden, Colorado, is the sole current manufacturer of parabolic-trough solar water heating systems. IST has an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract with the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance and install parabolic-trough solar water heating on an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) basis for any Federal facility that requests it and for which it proves viable. For an ESPC project, the facility does not pay for design, capital equipment, or installation. Instead, it pays only for guaranteed energy savings. Preparing and implementing delivery or task orders against the IDIQ is much simpler than the standard procurement process. This Federal Technology Alert (FTA) of the New Technology Demonstration Program is one of a series of guides to renewable energy and new energy-efficient technologies.

  10. Modafinil enhances alerting-related brain activity in attention networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yumiko; Funayama, Takuya; Tateno, Amane; Fukayama, Haruhisa; Okubo, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-07-01

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting agent and has been reported to be effective in improving attention in patients with attentional disturbance. However, neural substrates underlying the modafinil effects on attention are not fully understood. We employed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with the attention network test (ANT) task in healthy adults and examined which networks of attention are mainly affected by modafinil and which neural substrates are responsible for the drug effects. We used a randomized placebo-controlled within-subjects cross-over design. Twenty-three healthy adults participated in two series of an fMRI study, taking either a placebo or modafinil. The participants performed the ANT task, which is designed to measure three distinct attentional networks, alerting, orienting, and executive control, during the fMRI scanning. The effects of modafinil on behavioral performance and regional brain activity were analyzed. We found that modafinil enhanced alerting performance and showed greater alerting network activity in the left middle and inferior occipital gyri as compared with the placebo. The brain activations in the occipital regions were positively correlated with alerting performance. Modafinil enhanced alerting performance and increased activation in the occipital lobe in the alerting network possibly relevant to noradrenergic activity during the ANT task. The present study may provide a rationale for the treatment of patients with distinct symptoms of impaired attention.

  11. Real-time monitoring of the human alertness level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Robin; del Pozo, Francisco; Hernando, Elena; Gomez, Eduardo; Jimenez, Antonio

    2003-04-01

    Many accidents are associated with a driver or machine operator's alertness level. Drowsiness often develops as a result of repetitive or monotonous tasks, uninterrupted by external stimuli. In order to enhance safety levels, it would be most desirable to monitor the individual's level of attention. In this work, changes in the power spectrum of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) are associated with the subject's level of attention. This study reports on the initial research carried out in order to answer the following important questions: (i) Does a trend exist in the shape of the power spectrum, which will indicate the state of a subject's alertness state (drowsy, relaxed or alert)? (ii) What points on the cortex are most suitable to detect drowsiness and/or high alertness? (iii) What parameters in the power spectrum are most suitable to establish a workable alertness classification in human subjects? In this work, we answer these questions and combine power spectrum estimation and artificial neural network techniques to create a non-invasive and real - time system able to classify EEG into three levels of attention: High, Relaxed and Drowsiness. The classification is made every 10 seconds o more, a suitable time span for giving an alarm signal if the individual is with insufficient level of alertness. This time span is set by the user. The system was tested on twenty subjects. High and relaxed attention levels were measured in randomise hours of the day and drowsiness attention level was measured in the morning after one night of sleep deprivation.

  12. Speech Auditory Alerts Promote Memory for Alerted Events in a Video-Simulated Self-Driving Car Ride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Michael A; Helbein, Benji; Porter, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Auditory displays could be essential to helping drivers maintain situation awareness in autonomous vehicles, but to date, few or no studies have examined the effectiveness of different types of auditory displays for this application scenario. Recent advances in the development of autonomous vehicles (i.e., self-driving cars) have suggested that widespread automation of driving may be tenable in the near future. Drivers may be required to monitor the status of automation programs and vehicle conditions as they engage in secondary leisure or work tasks (entertainment, communication, etc.) in autonomous vehicles. An experiment compared memory for alerted events-a component of Level 1 situation awareness-using speech alerts, auditory icons, and a visual control condition during a video-simulated self-driving car ride with a visual secondary task. The alerts gave information about the vehicle's operating status and the driving scenario. Speech alerts resulted in better memory for alerted events. Both auditory display types resulted in less perceived effort devoted toward the study tasks but also greater perceived annoyance with the alerts. Speech auditory displays promoted Level 1 situation awareness during a simulation of a ride in a self-driving vehicle under routine conditions, but annoyance remains a concern with auditory displays. Speech auditory displays showed promise as a means of increasing Level 1 situation awareness of routine scenarios during an autonomous vehicle ride with an unrelated secondary task. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  13. The ALERT-ES Project for earthquakes in Cape San Vicente region, SW Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buforn, E.; Mattesini, M.; Martin Davila, J.; Goula, X.; Colom, Y.; Zollo, A.; Udias, A.; Pazos, A.; Roca, A. M.; Lozano, L.; Carrilho, F.; Hanka, W.; Madariaga, R. I.; Bezzeghoud, M.

    2011-12-01

    The main goal of the ALERT-ES project ("Sistema de Alerta Sismica Temprana: Aplicacion al Sur de España" ) is to study the feasibility of an Earthquake Early Warning System (EEWS) for the potentially damaging earthquakes that occur in the zone Cape S. Vicente-Gulf of Cadiz (S. Spain). This area is characterized by the occurrence of large and damaging earthquakes such as the 1755 Lisbon (Imax=X) or 1969 S. Vicente Cape (Ms=8,1) events. Most earthquakes in this area have their epicenters offshore at epicentral distances between 150 and 250 kms off the coast line, so a feasibility study is needed before an EEWS system implementation. The project has two different parts: the development of algorithms for the rapid estimation of the magnitude for South Spain earthquakes from the very beginning of P-waves and the development of the corresponding new software modules and their implementation in the EarthWorm and SeisComP systems. A pilot experience will be carried out during the project, using observations from coastal stations and OBS. Broadband records from a selection of 19 earthquakes (M≥4.0) occurred in the period 2006 to 2010 in Cape S. Vicente and Gulf of Cadiz have been used for an off line testing of PRESTO methodology developed at Naples University (Italy). Preliminary results show that for a Mw 6.1 shock with epicenter 200 km SW of Cape of S. Vicente the blind area has a radius of 227 km, providing with a lead-time of 28s in Huelva, 36s in Cadiz and 47s in Seville.

  14. Consumer use of fraud alerts and credit freezes: an empirical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheney, Julia S.; Hunt, Robert M.; Mikhed, Vyacheslav; Ritter, Dubravka; Vogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Fraud alerts — initial fraud alerts, extended fraud alerts, and credit freezes — help protect consumers from the consequences of identity theft. At the same time, they may impose costs on lenders, credit bureaus, and, in some instances, consumers. We analyze a unique data set of anonymized credit bureau files to understand how consumers use these alerts. We document the frequency and persistence of fraud alerts and credit freezes. Using the experience of the data breach at the South Carolina ...

  15. Drug interaction alert override rates in the Meaningful Use era: no evidence of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, A D; Fletcher, G S; Payne, T H

    2014-01-01

    Interruptive drug interaction alerts may reduce adverse drug events and are required for Stage I Meaningful Use attestation. For the last decade override rates have been very high. Despite their widespread use in commercial EHR systems, previously described interventions to improve alert frequency and acceptance have not been well studied. (1) To measure override rates of inpatient medication alerts within a commercial clinical decision support system, and assess the impact of local customization efforts. (2) To compare override rates between drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy interaction alerts, between attending and resident physicians, and between public and academic hospitals. (3) To measure the correlation between physicians' individual alert quantities and override rates as an indicator of potential alert fatigue. We retrospectively analyzed physician responses to drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction alerts, as generated by a common decision support product in a large teaching hospital system. (1) Over four days, 461 different physicians entered 18,354 medication orders, resulting in 2,455 visible alerts; 2,280 alerts (93%) were overridden. (2) The drug-drug alert override rate was 95.1%, statistically higher than the rate for drug-allergy alerts (90.9%) (p drug interaction alert system and to reduce alerting, override rates remain as high as reported over a decade ago. Alert fatigue does not seem to contribute. The results suggest the need to fundamentally question the premises of drug interaction alert systems.

  16. Comparison of methods of alert acknowledgement by critical care clinicians in the ICU setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Harrison

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Electronic Health Record (EHR-based sepsis alert systems have failed to demonstrate improvements in clinically meaningful endpoints. However, the effect of implementation barriers on the success of new sepsis alert systems is rarely explored. Objective To test the hypothesis time to severe sepsis alert acknowledgement by critical care clinicians in the ICU setting would be reduced using an EHR-based alert acknowledgement system compared to a text paging-based system. Study Design In one arm of this simulation study, real alerts for patients in the medical ICU were delivered to critical care clinicians through the EHR. In the other arm, simulated alerts were delivered through text paging. The primary outcome was time to alert acknowledgement. The secondary outcomes were a structured, mixed quantitative/qualitative survey and informal group interview. Results The alert acknowledgement rate from the severe sepsis alert system was 3% (N = 148 and 51% (N = 156 from simulated severe sepsis alerts through traditional text paging. Time to alert acknowledgement from the severe sepsis alert system was median 274 min (N = 5 and median 2 min (N = 80 from text paging. The response rate from the EHR-based alert system was insufficient to compare primary measures. However, secondary measures revealed important barriers. Conclusion Alert fatigue, interruption, human error, and information overload are barriers to alert and simulation studies in the ICU setting.

  17. Solar combi system based on a mantle tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon

    2007-01-01

    A solar combisystem based on a mantle tank is investigated numerically and experimentally. Three different houses with four different radiator systems are considered for the simulations. The needed temperature for the auxiliary heater is determined for different houses and radiator systems....... The thermal performance of the solar combisystem is compared to the thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water system based on a mantle tank. In the experimental study, tank temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient for the top mantle for a discharge test is determined. The investigations showed...

  18. Maintaining alertness and performance during sleep deprivation: modafinil versus caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesensten, Nancy Jo; Belenky, Gregory; Kautz, Mary A; Thorne, David R; Reichardt, Rebecca M; Balkin, Thomas J

    2002-01-01

    The performance and alertness effects of modafinil were evaluated to determine whether modafinil should replace caffeine for restoring performance and alertness during total sleep deprivation in otherwise healthy adults. Study objectives were to determine (a) the relative efficacy of three doses of modafinil versus an active control dose of caffeine 600 mg; (b) whether modafinil effects are dose-dependent; and (c) the extent to which both agents maintain performance and alertness during the circadian trough. Fifty healthy young adults remained awake for 54.5 h (from 6:30 a.m. day 1 to 1:00 p.m. on day 3) and performance and alertness tests were administered bi-hourly from 8:00 a.m. day 1 until 10:00 p.m. day 2. At 11:55 p.m. on day 2 (after 41.5 h awake), subjects received double blind administration of one of five drug doses: placebo; modafinil 100, 200, or 400 mg; or caffeine 600 mg ( n=10 per group), followed by hourly testing from midnight through 12:00 p.m. on day 3. Performance and alertness were significantly improved by modafinil 200 and 400 mg relative to placebo, and effects were comparable to those obtained with caffeine 600 mg. Although a trend toward better performance at higher modafinil doses suggested a dose-dependent effect, differences between modafinil doses were not significant. Performance enhancing effects were especially salient during the circadian nadir (6:00 a.m. through 10:00 a.m.). Few instances of adverse subjective side effects (nausea, heart pounding) were reported. Like caffeine, modafinil maintained performance and alertness during the early morning hours, when the combined effects of sleep loss and the circadian trough of performance and alertness trough were manifest. Thus, equivalent performance- and alertness-enhancing effects were obtained with drugs possessing different mechanisms of action. However, modafinil does not appear to offer advantages over caffeine (which is more readily available and less expensive) for improving

  19. Humid tropical forest disturbance alerts using Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew C.; Krylov, Alexander; Tyukavina, Alexandra; Potapov, Peter V.; Turubanova, Svetlana; Zutta, Bryan; Ifo, Suspense; Margono, Belinda; Stolle, Fred; Moore, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    A Landsat-based humid tropical forest disturbance alert was implemented for Peru, the Republic of Congo and Kalimantan, Indonesia. Alerts were mapped on a weekly basis as new terrain-corrected Landsat 7 and 8 images were made available; results are presented for all of 2014 and through September 2015. The three study areas represent different stages of the forest land use transition, with all featuring a variety of disturbance dynamics including logging, smallholder agriculture, and agroindustrial development. Results for Peru were formally validated and alerts found to have very high user’s accuracies and moderately high producer’s accuracies, indicating an appropriately conservative product suitable for supporting land management and enforcement activities. Complete pan-tropical coverage will be implemented during 2016 in support of the Global Forest Watch initiative. To date, Global Forest Watch produces annual global forest loss area estimates using a comparatively richer set of Landsat inputs. The alert product is presented as an interim update of forest disturbance events between comprehensive annual updates. Results from this study are available for viewing and download at http://glad.geog.umd.edu/forest-alerts and www.globalforestwatch.org.

  20. Optimizing the response to surveillance alerts in automated surveillance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Masoumeh; Buckeridge, David L

    2011-02-28

    Although much research effort has been directed toward refining algorithms for disease outbreak alerting, considerably less attention has been given to the response to alerts generated from statistical detection algorithms. Given the inherent inaccuracy in alerting, it is imperative to develop methods that help public health personnel identify optimal policies in response to alerts. This study evaluates the application of dynamic decision making models to the problem of responding to outbreak detection methods, using anthrax surveillance as an example. Adaptive optimization through approximate dynamic programming is used to generate a policy for decision making following outbreak detection. We investigate the degree to which the model can tolerate noise theoretically, in order to keep near optimal behavior. We also evaluate the policy from our model empirically and compare it with current approaches in routine public health practice for investigating alerts. Timeliness of outbreak confirmation and total costs associated with the decisions made are used as performance measures. Using our approach, on average, 80 per cent of outbreaks were confirmed prior to the fifth day of post-attack with considerably less cost compared to response strategies currently in use. Experimental results are also provided to illustrate the robustness of the adaptive optimization approach and to show the realization of the derived error bounds in practice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dynamic malware containment under an epidemic model with alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianrui; Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan; Wu, Yingbo; Tang, Yuan Yan

    2017-03-01

    Alerting at the early stage of malware invasion turns out to be an important complement to malware detection and elimination. This paper addresses the issue of how to dynamically contain the prevalence of malware at a lower cost, provided alerting is feasible. A controlled epidemic model with alert is established, and an optimal control problem based on the epidemic model is formulated. The optimality system for the optimal control problem is derived. The structure of an optimal control for the proposed optimal control problem is characterized under some conditions. Numerical examples show that the cost-efficiency of an optimal control strategy can be enhanced by adjusting the upper and lower bounds on admissible controls.

  2. Agricultural machinery safety alert system using ultrasonic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L; Zhang, Q; Han, S

    2002-11-01

    This article introduces a conceptual safety alert system using ultrasonic sensors. The safety alert system was designed to detect moving objects in the vicinity of agricultural machinery. This system uses two ultrasonic sensors to detect the distances between the sensors and the moving object and a position detection algorithm to determine the moving object's position relative to the machinery. A stationary test bench was built to prove the concept of the safety sensing system. Validation tests in an outdoor environment indicated that the conceptual safety alert system was capable of detecting the position of a moving object in the vicinity of agricultural machinery in real time, and generating a timely warning signal to raise the attention of the operator for ensuring safe operations. This result proved that the conceptual system has tremendous potential for agricultural machinery applications.

  3. Wireless alerting system using vibration for vehicles dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sweta; Rai, Shweta; Magaramagara, Wilbert; Sivacoumar, R.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims at improving the engine life of any vehicle through a continuous measurement and monitoring of vital engine operational parameters and providing an effective alerting to drivers for any abnormality. Vehicles currently are using audio and visible alerting signals through alarms and light as a warning to the driver but these are not effective in noisy environments and during daylight. Through the use of the sense of feeling a driver can be alerted effectively. The need to no other vehicle parameter needs to be aided through the mobile display (phone).Thus a system is designed and implements to measure engine temperature, RPM, Oil level and Coolant level using appropriate sensors and a wireless communication (Bluetooth) is established to actuate a portable vibration control device and to read the different vehicle sensor readings through an android application for display and diagnosis.

  4. CISN ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System Monitoring Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, I. H.; Allen, R. M.; Neuhauser, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    CISN ShakeAlert is a prototype earthquake early warning system being developed and tested by the California Integrated Seismic Network. The system has recently been expanded to support redundant data processing and communications. It now runs on six machines at three locations with ten Apache ActiveMQ message brokers linking together 18 waveform processors, 12 event association processes and 4 Decision Module alert processes. The system ingests waveform data from about 500 stations and generates many thousands of triggers per day, from which a small portion produce earthquake alerts. We have developed interactive web browser system-monitoring tools that display near real time state-of-health and performance information. This includes station availability, trigger statistics, communication and alert latencies. Connections to regional earthquake catalogs provide a rapid assessment of the Decision Module hypocenter accuracy. Historical performance can be evaluated, including statistics for hypocenter and origin time accuracy and alert time latencies for different time periods, magnitude ranges and geographic regions. For the ElarmS event associator, individual earthquake processing histories can be examined, including details of the transmission and processing latencies associated with individual P-wave triggers. Individual station trigger and latency statistics are available. Detailed information about the ElarmS trigger association process for both alerted events and rejected events is also available. The Google Web Toolkit and Map API have been used to develop interactive web pages that link tabular and geographic information. Statistical analysis is provided by the R-Statistics System linked to a PostgreSQL database.

  5. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Parmiggiani, N.; Beneventano, D.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  6. The AGILE Alert System for Gamma-Ray Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Beneventano, D.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pucella, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conforti, V.; Tempesta, P.; Cerone, M.; Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Valentini, G.; Salotti, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  7. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V. [INAF/IASF-Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E. [INAF/IASF-Roma, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Parmiggiani, N.; Beneventano, D. [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Science e Metodi dell' Ingegneria (Italy); Chen, A. W. [INAF/IASF-Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Vercellone, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg Wits 2050 (South Africa); Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P. [INAF/IASF-Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Longo, F. [ASI-ASDC, Via G. Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Pellizzoni, A. [INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  8. ALERT-ES EEWS in Southwest Iberia: feasibility and lead-time estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Colom, Yolanda; Lozano, Lucía; Romeu, Nuria; Matín Davila, José; Carranza, Marta; Zollo, Aldo; Buforn, Elisa; Goula, Xavier; Carrilho, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) should provide quick earthquake information and predict ground motion prior to the destructive S-waves arrive. One objective of the Spanish ALERT-ES project (CGL2010-19803-C03) is to study the feasibility of an EEWS for the SW of Iberian Peninsula, selecting two test sites (the S. Vicente cape area and the Gulf of Cádiz). These regions are characterized by the occurrence of large and damaging earthquakes such as the 1755 Lisbon (Imax=X) or 1969 S. Vicente Cape (Ms=8,1) shocks. In this work, we have used three different software packages (Earthworm, SeiscomP3 and PRESTo) to compare the efficiency of their different modules (picking, binder and location modules) in order to be used as an EEWS (new modules for Earthworms and SeiscomP3 are being developed, mainly a quick magnitude estimation module based in the analysis of the first few seconds of the the P-wave arrival). This pilot experience was carried out on four previously selected events (two in each test site). We analyse the origin time and location error using several software and seismic net configurations. A study about the blind zone and the available lead-time to selected targets (Huelva, Seville, Cádiz in Spain and Faro and Portimao in Portugal) was also performed. The results, using the existing seismic BB stations in the area, shown a blind zone in SW Portugal for earthquakes in S. Vicente and a blind zone in the Huelva and Cádiz (SW Spain) region for earthquakes in the Gulf of Cádiz. A 6 station binder provided the best compromise between the location error and available lead- time to targets, mainly due to the bad azimuthal coverage. For S. Vicente earthquakes, the lead-time time is 30/40 seconds for Huelva, 50/60 seconds for Cádiz, 60/70 seconds for Seville, about 10 seconds for Faro and Portimao follows inside the blind zone. For the Gulf of Cádiz earthquakes, Huelva, Cádiz and Faro are inside the blind zone, and lead-time is around 10/15 seconds for

  9. Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System siren testing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, L.B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effective coverage of the proposed upgrades to the existing Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System (HSEAS). The upgrades are to enhance the existing HSEAS along the Columbia River from the Vernita Bridge to the White Bluffs Boat Launch as well as install a new alerting system in the 400 Area on the Hanford Site. Five siren sites along the Columbia River and two sites in the 400 Area were tested to determine the site locations that will provide the desired coverage

  10. Patient Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Monitoring With an Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... A smart phone is used to initiate a connection with the computer using a. Bluetooth. Therefore the port number used to establish this connection must be stated. (the port number assigned to the smart phone I am using is com port 5). If the patient is only uploading his data without sending an alert, he will ...

  11. 47 CFR 80.1114 - False distress alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1114 False distress alerts. The provisions of §§ 80.334 and 80.335 apply to...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 80.1113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a) The...

  13. 77 FR 26701 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 12-41] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this... System (EAS) rules so that EAS Participants may, but are not required to, employ the text-to-speech (TTS...

  14. 76 FR 12600 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 [EB Docket No. 04-296; FCC 11-12] Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this... System (EAS) to provide for national EAS testing and collection of data from such tests. This will help...

  15. Design and Construction of a Car Immobiliser with SMS Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work bridges this gap using a common and handy everyday communication tool, the mobile phone. With the very wide GSM coverage, one of its products, the Short Message Service (SMS) can be employed to send an alert to a vehicle owner who in turn sends an instruction to the car, to initiate safe and remote vehicle ...

  16. RSS based CERN Alerter. Information broadcast to all CERN offices.

    CERN Multimedia

    Otto, R

    2007-01-01

    Nearly every large organization uses a tool to broadcast messages and information across the internal campus (messages like alerts announcing interruption in services or just information about upcoming events). These tools typically allow administrators (operators) to send "targeted" messages which are sent only to specific groups of users or computers, e/g only those located in a specified building or connected to a particular computing service. CERN has a long history of such tools: CERNVMS€™s SPM_quotMESSAGE command, Zephyr and the most recent the NICE Alerter based on the NNTP protocol. The NICE Alerter used on all Windows-based computers had to be phased out as a consequence of phasing out NNTP at CERN. The new solution to broadcast information messages on the CERN campus continues to provide the service based on cross-platform technologies, hence minimizing custom developments and relying on commercial software as much as possible. The new system, called CERN Alerter, is based on RSS (Really Simpl...

  17. Public Health Measures: Alerts and Early Warning Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marvin, H.J.P.; Kleter, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews various reactive and proactive alert and early warning systems that can be used for the identification of emerging risks to food safety, both within the European Union and at the global level. Recent developments include the establishment of a unit dedicated to emerging risks at

  18. Comparing alertness and injury severity following motor vehicular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: From casual observation of injury patterns in Motor Vehicular Accidents (MVAs), it was sometimes observed that if the victim had been more alert and reacts protectively, injury severity might be reduced. Protective response is often expected to minimize the severity of injuries. Objective: To determine the ...

  19. Alerting, Orienting, and Executive Attention in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Jennifer C.; Corkum, Penny V.; Klein, Raymond M.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth N.; Lawrence, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the alerting, orienting, and executive attention abilities of children with ADHD and their typically developing (TD) peers using a modified version of the adult attention network test (ANT-I). Method: A total of 25 children with ADHD, Combined Type (ADHD-C, mean age = 9.20 years), 20 children with ADHD,…

  20. New research and tools lead to improved earthquake alerting protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David J.

    2009-01-01

    What’s the best way to get alerted about the occurrence and potential impact of an earthquake? The answer to that question has changed dramatically of late, in part due to improvements in earthquake science, and in part by the implementation of new research in the delivery of earthquake information

  1. Abonnez-vous aux alertes de financement | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Afrique subsaharienne. Si vous ne voulez plus recevoir les alertes de financement, vous pouvez toujours vous désabonner. Ce que nous faisons · Financement · Ressources · À propos du CRDI. Savoir. Innovation. Solutions. Carrières · Communiquez avec nous · Plan du site. Abonnez-vous à notre bulletin pour recevoir les ...

  2. Acute alerting effects of light : A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souman, Jan L.; Tinga, Angelica M.; te Pas, Susan F.; van Ee, Raymond; Vlaskamp, Björn N.S.

    2018-01-01

    Periodic, well timed exposure to light is important for our health and wellbeing. Light, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum, is thought to affect alertness both indirectly, by modifying circadian rhythms, and directly, giving rise to acute effects. We performed a systematic review of

  3. Acute alerting effects of light : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souman, Jan L; Tinga, Angelica M; Te Pas, Susan F; van Ee, Raymond; Vlaskamp, Björn N S

    2018-01-01

    Periodic, well timed exposure to light is important for our health and wellbeing. Light, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum, is thought to affect alertness both indirectly, by modifying circadian rhythms, and directly, giving rise to acute effects. We performed a systematic review of

  4. Towards a wide area alerting and notification system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McFerren, G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available for notifying users about phenomena or events occurring at geographical scales. Furthermore, events that could trigger alerts or notifications may be fast-moving or slow to unfold – even over a period of hours or days. This paper describes the functional and non...

  5. Evaluation of health alerts from an early illness warning system in independent living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Scott, Susan D; Miller, Steven J; Skubic, Marjorie; Phillips, Lorraine; Alexander, Greg; Koopman, Richelle J; Musterman, Katy; Back, Jessica

    2013-06-01

    Passive sensor networks were deployed in independent living apartments to monitor older adults in their home environments to detect signs of impending illness and alert clinicians so they can intervene and prevent or delay significant changes in health or functional status. A retrospective qualitative deductive content analysis was undertaken to refine health alerts to improve clinical relevance to clinicians as they use alerts in their normal workflow of routine care delivery to older adults. Clinicians completed written free-text boxes to describe actions taken (or not) as a result of each alert; they also rated the clinical significance (relevance) of each health alert on a scale of 1 to 5. Two samples of the clinician's written responses to the health alerts were analyzed after alert algorithms had been adjusted based on results of a pilot study using health alerts to enhance clinical decision-making. In the first sample, a total of 663 comments were generated by seven clinicians in response to 385 unique alerts; there are more comments than alerts because more than one clinician rated the same alert. The second sample had a total of 142 comments produced by three clinicians in response to 88 distinct alerts. The overall clinical relevance of the alerts, as judged by the content of the qualitative comments by clinicians for each alert, improved from 33.3% of the alerts in the first sample classified as clinically relevant to 43.2% in the second. The goal is to produce clinically relevant alerts that clinicians find useful in daily practice. The evaluation methods used are described to assist others as they consider building and iteratively refining health alerts to enhance clinical decision making.

  6. ShakeAlert Users Transition to the Production Prototype System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J. A.; Vinci, M.; Steele, W. P.; Hellweg, M.; Allen, R. M.; DeGroot, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning system transitioned from the demonstration system into the fully-fledged production prototype system this year. Users were migrated over to the new system concurrent with the release of the ShakeAlert UserDisplay Version 2.5.0. The production prototype system provides robust connectivity, fail-over mechanisms to ensure that alarms are deliverd even if one connection fails, and provides a framework to connect future stations, participants, and other sources as the project expands to the full public system. We will present an overview of key user sectors that are either testing or launching pilot projects for the system within their organizations. We will outline the implementation of certain actions, and highlight accomplishments and challenges the Beta Users encounter in fully implementing ShakeAlert within their organizations. By better studying these issues, project partners can better assist the users in incorporating early warning in their operations. Opening up the system to allow for pilot projects enables ShakeAlert users to develop hardware, software, and policy solutions for actions in response to early warning alerts in a controlled environment. This is the first step on the path toward limited rollouts. The pilot groups leverage the expertise of our stakeholders to develop the `last mile' alert distribution and responses. The transition went smoothly in February 2015, for users in California, and we expect to connect with more beta users and pilot groups in this next phase. User transition is planned for Fall 2016 for users in the Pacific Northwest. Beta Users, such as municipalities, emergency response groups, and county officials, lifelines, schools, and private industry continue to meet with ShakeAlert partners to 1) further education and training on both benefits and limitations 2) strategize on implementation actions, such as opening fire house bay doors in response to an alarm, and 3) coordinate continued

  7. Detection Algorithms of the Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar Martinez, A.; Espinosa Aranda, J.; Ramos Perez, S.; Ibarrola Alvarez, G.; Zavala Guerrero, M.; Sasmex

    2013-05-01

    The importance of a rapid and reliable detection of an earthquake, allows taking advantage with more opportunity time of any possible opportunity warnings to the population. Thus detection algorithms in the sensing field station (FS) of an earthquake early earning system, must have a high rate of correct detection; this condition lets perform numerical processes to obtain appropriate parameters for the alert activation. During the evolution and continuous service of the Mexican Seismic Alert System (SASMEX) in more than 23 operation years, it has used various methodologies in the detection process to get the largest opportunity time when an earthquake occurs and it is alerted. In addition to the characteristics of the acceleration signal observed in sensing field stations, it is necessary the site conditions reducing urban noise, but sometimes it is not present through of the first operation years, however, urban growth near to FS cause urban noise, which should be tolerated while carrying out the relocation process of the station, and in the algorithm design should be contemplating the robustness to reduce possible errors and false detections. This work presents some results on detection algorithms used in Mexico for early warning systems for earthquakes considering recent events and different opportunity times obtained depending of the detections on P and S phases of the earthquake detected in the station. Some methodologies are reviewed and described in detail in this work and the main features implemented in The Seismic Alert System of Mexico City (SAS), in continuous operation since 1991, and the Seismic Alert System of Oaxaca City (SASO), today both comprise the SASMEX.

  8. V-Alert: Description and Validation of a Vulnerable Road User Alert System in the Framework of a Smart City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; De-la-Iglesia, Idoia; Perez, Jagoba

    2015-07-29

    V-Alert is a cooperative application to be deployed in the frame of Smart Cities with the aim of reducing the probability of accidents involving Vulnerable Road Users (VRU) and vehicles. The architecture of V-Alert combines short- and long-range communication technologies in order to provide more time to the drivers and VRU to take the appropriate maneuver and avoid a possible collision. The information generated by mobile sensors (vehicles and cyclists) is sent over this heterogeneous communication architecture and processed in a central server, the Drivers Cloud, which is in charge of generating the messages that are shown on the drivers' and cyclists' Human Machine Interface (HMI). First of all, V-Alert has been tested in a simulated scenario to check the communications architecture in a complex scenario and, once it was validated, all the elements of V-Alert have been moved to a real scenario to check the application reliability. All the results are shown along the length of this paper.

  9. 78 FR 42818 - SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With Liquid Petroleum (LP) Gas Odor Fade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... automated system. However, the NPGA also noted there are situations where the odorization process is... situations where the injection process is not fully automated, the potential for human error may increase the... in the HMR for rail tank car tanks and cylinders. Therefore, in this safety alert, PHMSA recommends...

  10. V-Alert: Description and Validation of a Vulnerable Road User Alert System in the Framework of a Smart City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unai Hernandez-Jayo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available V-Alert is a cooperative application to be deployed in the frame of Smart Cities with the aim of reducing the probability of accidents involving Vulnerable Road Users (VRU and vehicles. The architecture of V-Alert combines short- and long-range communication technologies in order to provide more time to the drivers and VRU to take the appropriate maneuver and avoid a possible collision. The information generated by mobile sensors (vehicles and cyclists is sent over this heterogeneous communication architecture and processed in a central server, the Drivers Cloud, which is in charge of generating the messages that are shown on the drivers’ and cyclists’ Human Machine Interface (HMI. First of all, V-Alert has been tested in a simulated scenario to check the communications architecture in a complex scenario and, once it was validated, all the elements of V-Alert have been moved to a real scenario to check the application reliability. All the results are shown along the length of this paper.

  11. The relations between de-alerting nuclear force and nuclear strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhimin

    2001-01-01

    De-alerting nuclear force is a hot-point issue in recent years. The relations between de-alerting and strategy (including nuclear force, target doctrine and use principle et al.), stability, advanced conventional force and NMD of the United States are analyzed, the impact of de-alerting on Chinese nuclear force were discussed and the proposal of de-alerting by stages is presented

  12. Discriminating between true-positive and false-positive clinical mastitis alerts from automatic milking systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, W.; Gaag, van der L.C.; Ouweltjes, W.; Mollenhorst, H.; Hogeveen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) generate alert lists reporting cows likely to have clinical mastitis (CM). Dutch farmers indicated that they use non-AMS cow information or the detailed alert information from the AMS to decide whether to check an alerted cow for CM. However, it is not yet known to

  13. Reduction in alert fatigue in an assisted electronic prescribing system, through the Lean Six Sigma methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuéllar Monreal, Mª Jesús; Reig Aguado, Jorge; Font Noguera, Isabel; Poveda Andrés, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the alert fatigue in our Assisted Electronic Prescribing System (AEPS), through the Lean Six Sigma (LSS) methodology. An observational (transversal) and retrospective study, in a general hospital with 850 beds and AEPS. The LSS methodology was followed in order to evaluate the alert fatigue situation in the AEPS system, to implement improvements, and to assess outcomes. The alerts generated during two trimesters studied (before and after the intervention) were analyzed. In order to measure the qualitative indicators, the most frequent alert types were analyzed, as well as the molecules responsible for over 50% of each type of alert. The action by the prescriber was analyzed in a sample of 496 prescriptions that generated such alerts. For each type of alert and molecule, there was a prioritization of the improvements to be implemented according to the alert generated and its quality. A second survey evaluated the pharmacist action for the alerts most highly valued by physicians. The problem, the objective, the work team and the project schedule were defined. A survey was designed in order to understand the opinion of the client about the alert system in the program. Based on the surveys collected (n = 136), the critical characteristics and the quanti/qualitative indicators were defined. Sixty (60) fields in the alert system were modified, corresponding to 32 molecules, and this led to a 28% reduction in the total number of alerts. Regarding quality indicators, false po sitive results were reduced by 25% (p < 0.05), 100% of those alerts ignored with justification were sustained, and there were no significant differences in user adherence to the system. The project improvements and outcomes were reviewed by the work team. LSS methodology has demonstrated being a valid tool for the quantitative and qualitative improvement of the alert system in an Assisted Electronic Prescription Program, thus reducing alert fatigue. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014

  14. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  15. A deep-learning-based emergency alert system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byungseok Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency alert systems serve as a critical link in the chain of crisis communication, and they are essential to minimize loss during emergencies. Acts of terrorism and violence, chemical spills, amber alerts, nuclear facility problems, weather-related emergencies, flu pandemics, and other emergencies all require those responsible such as government officials, building managers, and university administrators to be able to quickly and reliably distribute emergency information to the public. This paper presents our design of a deep-learning-based emergency warning system. The proposed system is considered suitable for application in existing infrastructure such as closed-circuit television and other monitoring devices. The experimental results show that in most cases, our system immediately detects emergencies such as car accidents and natural disasters.

  16. SC-228 Inclusion of DAA Warning Alert for TCAS Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This white paper summarizes NASA research results that have informed Special Committee 228 (SC-228) discussions and decisions regarding the inclusion of a warning-level alert within the detect and avoid (DAA) alerting structure for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). For UAS, the removal of the pilot from onboard the aircraft has eliminated the ability of the ground-based pilot in command (PIC) to use out-the-window visual information to make judgments about a potential threat of a loss of well clear with another aircraft. As a result, the DAA traffic display will be the primary source of information that the PIC can use to execute the three primary well clear functions: 1) detect a potential loss of well clear, 2) determine a resolution maneuver, and 3) upload that maneuver to the aircraft via the ground control station (GCS). In addition, pilots are required to coordinate with air traffic control (ATC) prior to maneuvering off of their approved flight plan. In determining an appropriate resolution maneuver to avoid a loss of well clear, the PIC must decide both when and how to maneuver, and both the timeliness and the accuracy (i.e., correctness) of the maneuver are critical to reducing the likelihood and/or severity of a loss of well clear. Alerting information is one of three critical components of the DAA display, along with traffic information elements (e.g., relative heading, speed and altitude) and maneuver guidance. Alerting information and maneuver guidance, in particular, have been found to have a significant impact, both statistically and practically, on pilots' ability to avoid and minimize the severity of losses of well clear While all three display components are key to pilots performing the traffic avoidance task of remaining well clear, in general, alerting information provides crucial information about when a resolution maneuver is required while maneuver guidance assists the pilot in determining how best to maneuver. A fundamental task of the DAA

  17. Textual summarization of events leading to health alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akshay; Keller, James M

    2015-01-01

    Extracting information from the sensors installed in the homes of elderly pose a unique set of challenges. Add to it the short amount of time the clinicians and nurses have to analyze this data, and the problem becomes more complicated. A system already in place at an "Aging in Place" facility monitors the activities of residents through multiple non-intrusive sensors and sends alerts on detecting an unusual event. We present an approach to generate textual summaries of events leading to the alerts. We analyze our system using four case studies and also list the comments provided by collaborators in healthcare domain. The system was then iterated to take some of those suggestions into account to give a glimpse of what an ideal system should look like.

  18. DAIDALUS: Detect and Avoid Alerting Logic for Unmanned Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar; Narkawicz, Anthony; Hagen, George; Upchurch, Jason; Dutle, Aaron; Consiglio, Maria; Chamberlain, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DAIDALUS (Detect and Avoid Alerting Logic for Unmanned Systems), a reference implementation of a detect and avoid concept intended to support the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems into civil airspace. DAIDALUS consists of self-separation and alerting algorithms that provide situational awareness to UAS remote pilots. These algorithms have been formally specified in a mathematical notation and verified for correctness in an interactive theorem prover. The software implementation has been verified against the formal models and validated against multiple stressing cases jointly developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, and NASA. The DAIDALUS reference implementation is currently under consideration for inclusion in the appendices to the Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Unmanned Aircraft Systems presently being developed by RTCA Special Committee 228.

  19. Design of a probabilistic wildfire alert system for Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ben; Dacre, Helen; Lopez Saldana, Gerardo; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    During the past 50 years over 200,000 wildfires have burned nearly 2.3 million hectares in Chile, leading to significant economic consequences. To improve wildfire warning capabilities, statistical models have been developed by the University of Chile for 15 different geographic regions of the country to quantify wildfire risk based on a set of specific meteorological variables (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, accumulated precipitation, and time of year). Currently, the warning system uses data input from ground-based weather stations and alerts are issued one day ahead. This project improves upon the current system by using variables from ensemble weather prediction datasets (TIGGE archive from ECMWF) as input to the wildfire risk model. This allows development of a probabilistic alert system that takes into account uncertainties in the specific meteorological forecast variables used in the wildfire risk model. This also allows the wildfire risk index to be calculated up to seven days ahead. The integration of the statistical wildfire risk model with the ensemble weather prediction system provides additional information about uncertainty to improve resource allocation decisions. The new system is evaluated using MODIS satellite wildfire detection datasets from 2008-2015 for each of the 15 geographic wildfire risk regions. The prototype alert system is then compared to alerts made using forecast variables from the operational ensemble weather prediction system used by the Chilean Meteorological Service. Finally, a novel method to update the wildfire risk statistical model parameters in real time based on observed spatial and temporal wildfire patterns will be presented.

  20. Universal Safety Distance Alert Device for Road Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Matic Virant; Miha Ambrož

    2016-01-01

    Driving with too short of a safety distance is a common problem in road traffic, often with traffic accidents as a consequence. Research has identified a lack of vehicle-mountable devices for alerting the drivers of trailing vehicles about keeping a sufficient safe distance. The principal requirements for such a device were defined. A conceptual study was performed in order to select the components for the integration of the device. Based on the results of this study, a working prototype of a...

  1. Experience with alert and evacuation, Tarsiut Island, summer 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, D.L.; Myers, R.M.; Stewart, H.R.

    1983-11-01

    The original concept for Tarsiut Island considered that drilling operations in the Beaufort Sea would be done under ice covered conditions. Extension of drilling to summer open water conditions necessitated two major changes. Upgrading construction would be required to reduce the potential for scour at the base of the concrete caissons, and to increase freeboard protection from waves and spray. The Island Alert and Evacuation Manual also had to be changed. Depending upon the position of the permanent ice pack, the fetch for waves can change drastically. Weather changes are sudden. The principal changes in the alert system had to recognize that local direct decisions as well as short term forecasts would be needed. Warning was needed which recognized the influence of high winds upon helicopter operations. During the summer of 1982, two total evacuations of the Island were necessary due to the forecasted and observed weather conditions. There was minimal damage and no personal injury. The paper indicates the role of the Island Design Engineer in the co-ordination of monitoring activities, the various alert levels which were established for summer conditions, and summarizes the procedures carried out for the two successful operations.

  2. [Impact of media alerts on contraceptive pills medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi-Gaudin, S; Deffieux, X; Davitian, C; Guerre, N; Faucher, P; Bacle, F; Teboul, M; Larmignat, P; Hatchuel, M; Benachi, A

    2015-09-01

    The end of 2012 was marked by some media alerts regarding combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC) and lawsuit against pharmaceutical companies selling these birth control pills. In this study, we analyzed whether these information had an impact on the number of abortion. Prospective study determining the number of women asking for abortion and who spontaneously declare that the contraception defect was due to an abandon of their oral contraception as they were scared of some information they received from media about the medication. Eleven centers out of 16 did participate to the study, allowing the study of 2300 abortion during this time frame. Ninety-eight of these pregnancies (4.2%) were due to an interruption of the contraceptive treatment as a consequence of media alerts. Average age was 26 years old. Within these pregnancies, 4 (6%) started in December 2012, 3 months after the beginning of the alerts, 11 (16%) in January, 24 (36%) in February and 18 (27%) in March 2013 (4-6 months later). In 7 cases (10%) CHC stopped by fear of information reported by media were of 2nd generation, in 17 cases (25%) of 3rd generation, in 32 cases (48%) of 4th generation and microprogestative in 2 cases (3%). Women who declared that they stopped their birth control medication by fear of information reported in media, represented 4% of the number of abortions performed between 2013 February 18th and 2013 April 30th. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. IP telephony based danger alert communication system and its implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezac, Filip; Safarik, Jakub; Voznak, Miroslav; Tomala, Karel; Partila, Pavol

    2013-05-01

    This article discusses a danger alert system created as a part of the research project at Department of Telecommunications of Technical University of Ostrava. The aim of the system is to distribute pre-recorded voice messages in order to alert the called party in danger. This article describes individual technologies, which the application uses for its operation as well as issues relating to hardware requirements and transfer line bandwidth load. The article also describes new algorithms, which had to be developed in order to ensure the reliability of the system. Our intent is focused on disaster management, the message, which should be delivered within specified time span, is typed in the application and text-to-speech module ensures its transformation to a speech format, after that a particular scenario or warned area is selected and a target group is automatically unloaded. For this purpose, we have defined XML format for delivery of phone numbers which are located in the target area and these numbers are obtained from mobile BTS's (Base transmission stations). The benefit of such communication compared to others, is the fact, that it uses a phone call and, therefore, it is possible to get feedback who accepted the message and to improve efficiency of alert system. Finally, the list of unanswered calls is exported and these users can be informed via SMS.

  4. Diabetes Alert Dogs (DADs): An assessment of accuracy and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonder-Frederick, Linda A; Grabman, Jesse H; Shepard, Jaclyn A

    2017-12-01

    To test the accuracy of Diabetes Alert Dogs (DADs) by comparing recorded alerts to continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device readings during waking and sleeping hours. 14 individuals (7 adults with type 1 diabetes and 7 youth with type 1 diabetes/parents) who owned DADs for ≥6 mos wore masked CGM devices over a several-week period while recording DAD alerts electronically and in paper diaries. During waking hours, sensitivity scores across participants were 35.9% for low BG events and 26.2% for high BG events. DAD accuracy was highly variable with 3/14 individual dogs performing statistically higher than chance. Sensitivity scores were lower during sleep hours of the person with diabetes (22.2% for low BG events and 8.4% for high BG events). DAD accuracy during sleeping hours was also highly variable, with 1/11 individual dogs performing statistically better than chance. Rate of change analyses indicated that DADs were responding to absolute BG level, rather than rapid shifts in glucose levels. In this study the majority of DADs did not demonstrate accurate detection of low and high BG events. However, performance varied greatly across DADs and additional studies are needed to examine factors contributing to this variability. Additionally, more research is needed to investigate the significant gap between the positive experiences and clinical outcomes reported by DAD owners and the mixed research findings on DAD accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Generic Model to Send Secure Alerts for Utility Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez–Díaz J.A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In some industries such as logistics services, bank services, and others, the use of automated systems that deliver critical business information anytime and anywhere play an important role in the decision making process. This paper introduces a "Generic model to send secure alerts and notifications", which operates as a middleware between enterprise data sources and its mobile users. This model uses Short Message Service (SMS as its main mobile messaging technology, however is open to use new types of messaging technologies. Our model is interoperable with existing information systems, it can store any kind of information about alerts or notifications at different levels of granularity, it offers different types of notifications (as analert when critical business problems occur,asanotificationina periodical basis or as 2 way query. Notification rules can be customized by final users according to their preferences. The model provides a security framework in the cases where information requires confidentiality, it is extensible to existing and new messaging technologies (like e–mail, MMS, etc. It is a platform, mobile operator and hardware independent. Currently, our solution is being used at the Comisión Federal de Electricidad (Mexico's utility company to deliver secure alerts related to critical events registered in the main power generation plants of our country.

  6. AN AUTOMATED NETWORK SECURITYCHECKING AND ALERT SYSTEM: A NEW FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Yadav

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Network security checking is a vital process to assess and to identify weaknesses in network for management of security. Insecure entry points of a network provide attackers an easy target to access and compromise. Open ports of network components such as firewalls, gateways and end systems are analogues to open gates of a building through which any one can get into. Network scanning is performed to identify insecure entry points in the network components. To find out vulnerabilities on these points vulnerability assessment is performed. So security checking consists of both activities- network scanning as well as vulnerability assessment. A single tool used for the security checking may not give reliable results. This paper presents a framework for assessing the security of a network using multiple Network Scanning and Vulnerability Assessment tools. The proposed framework is an extension of the framework given by Jun Yoon and Wontae Sim [1] which performs vulnerability scanning only. The framework presented here adds network scanning, alerting and reporting system to their framework. Network scanning and vulnerability tools together complement each other and make it amenable for centralized control and management. The reporting system of framework sends an email to the network administrator which contains detailed report (as attachment of security checking process. Alerting system sends a SMS message as an alert to the network administrator in case of severe threats found in the network. Initial results of the framework are encouraging and further work is in progress.

  7. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Seheult

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia. The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose.

  8. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seheult, J N; Pazderska, A; Gaffney, P; Fogarty, J; Sherlock, M; Gibney, J; Boran, G

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose.

  9. Organization Workflow System Based on Multiagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Hung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the universities, and in the VSTU as well, a lot of contracts, and other documents are signed every day. The authors of the article have designed a model system based on multiagent.

  10. Time to Detection with BacT/Alert FA Plus Compared to BacT/Alert FA Blood Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, A; Fisher Even-Tsur, S; Shapiro, G; Braun, T; Schwartz, D; Carmeli, Y

    2016-09-01

    Rapid identification of the causative pathogen in patients with bacteremia allows adjustment of antibiotic therapy and improves patient outcomes. We compared in vitro and real-life time to detection (TTD) of two blood culture media, BacT/Alert FA (FA) and BacT/Alert FA Plus (FA Plus), for the nine most common species of bacterial pathogens recovered from blood samples. Experimental data from simulated cultures was compared with microbiology records of TTD for both culture media with growth of the species of interest in clinical blood cultures. In the experimental conditions, median TTD was 3.8 hours (23.9 %) shorter using FA Plus media. The magnitude of reduction differed between species. Similarly, in real life data, FA Plus had shorter TTD than FA media; however, the difference between culture media was smaller, and median TTD was only 1 hour (8.5 %) less. We found shorter TTD with BacT/Alert FA Plus culture media, both experimentally and in real-life conditions and unrelated to antibiotic neutralization, highlighting the importance of appropriate blood culture media selection.

  11. Radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID and GPRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haiyang; Zhou Hongliang; Zhang Hongjian; Zhang Sheng; Zhou Junru; Weng Guojie

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produced by radioactive source is harmful to the health of human body, and the lost and theft of radioactive source will cause environmental pollution and social panic. In order to solve the abnormal leaks, accidental loss, theft and other problems of the radioactive source, a radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID, GPS, GPRS and GSM technology is put forward. Radiation dose detector and GPS wireless location module are used to obtain the information of radiation dose and location respectively, RFID reader reads the status of a tag fixed on the bottom of the radioactive source. All information is transmitted to the remote monitoring center via GPRS wireless transmission. There will be an audible and visual alarm when radiation dose is out of limits or the state of radioactive source is abnormal, and the monitoring center will send alarming text messages to the managers through GSM Modem at the same time. Thus, the functions of monitoring and alarming are achieved. The system has already been put into operation and is being kept in functional order. It can provide stable statistics as well as accurate alarm, improving the supervision of radioactive source effectively. (authors)

  12. Electronic Health Record Alert-Related Workload as a Predictor of Burnout in Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Megan E; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-05

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been shown to increase physician workload. One EHR feature that contributes to increased workload is asynchronous alerts (also known as inbox notifications) related to test results, referral responses, medication refill requests, and messages from physicians and other health care professionals. This alert-related workload results in negative cognitive outcomes, but its effect on affective outcomes, such as burnout, has been understudied. To examine EHR alert-related workload (both objective and subjective) as a predictor of burnout in primary care providers (PCPs), in order to ultimately inform interventions aimed at reducing burnout due to alert workload. A cross-sectional questionnaire and focus group of 16 PCPs at a large medical center in the southern United States. Subjective, but not objective, alert workload was related to two of the three dimensions of burnout, including physical fatigue (p = 0.02) and cognitive weariness (p = 0.04), when controlling for organizational tenure. To reduce alert workload and subsequent burnout, participants indicated a desire to have protected time for alert management, fewer unnecessary alerts, and improvements to the EHR system. Burnout associated with alert workload may be in part due to subjective differences at an individual level, and not solely a function of the objective work environment. This suggests the need for both individual and organizational-level interventions to improve alert workload and subsequent burnout. Additional research should confirm these findings in larger, more representative samples.

  13. Building a Communication, Education, an Outreach Program for the ShakeAlert National Earthquake Early Warning Program - Recommendations for Public Alerts Via Cell Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, R. M.; Long, K.; Strauss, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners are developing the ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System for the West Coast of the United States. To be an integral part of successful implementation, ShakeAlert engagement programs and materials must integrate with and leverage broader earthquake risk programs. New methods and products for dissemination must be multidisciplinary, cost effective, and consistent with existing hazards education and communication efforts. The ShakeAlert Joint Committee for Communication, Education, and Outreach (JCCEO), is identifying, developing, and cultivating partnerships with ShakeAlert stakeholders including Federal, State, academic partners, private companies, policy makers, and local organizations. Efforts include developing materials, methods for delivery, and reaching stakeholders with information on ShakeAlert, earthquake preparedness, and emergency protective actions. It is essential to develop standards to ensure information communicated via the alerts is consistent across the public and private sector and achieving a common understanding of what actions users take when they receive a ShakeAlert warning. In February 2017, the JCCEO convened the Warning Message Focus Group (WMFG) to provide findings and recommendations to the Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions on the use of earthquake early warning message content standards for public alerts via cell phones. The WMFG represents communications, education, and outreach stakeholders from various sectors including ShakeAlert regional coordinators, industry, emergency managers, and subject matter experts from the social sciences. The group knowledge was combined with an in-depth literature review to ensure that all groups who could receive the message would be taken into account. The USGS and the participating states and agencies acknowledge that the implementation of ShakeAlert is a collective effort requiring the participation of hundreds of

  14. Better specification of triggers to reduce the number of drug interaction alerts in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heringa, Mette; van der Heide, Annet; Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; De Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2018-01-01

    Drug interaction alerts (drug-drug and drug-disease interaction alerts) for chronic medications substantially contribute to alert fatigue in primary care. The aim of this study was to determine which events require (re)assessment of a drug interaction and whether using these events as triggers in clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) would affect the alert rate. Two random 5% data samples from the CDSSs of 123 community pharmacies were used: dataset 1 and 2. The top 10 of most frequent drug interaction alerts not involving laboratory values were selected. To reach consensus on events that should trigger alerts (e.g. first time dispensing, dose modification) for these drug interactions, a two-step consensus process was used. An expert panel of community pharmacists participated in an online survey and a subsequent consensus meeting. A CDSS with alerts based on the consensus was simulated in both datasets. Dataset 1 and 2 together contained 1,672,169 prescriptions which led to 591,073 alerts. Consensus on events requiring alerts was reached for the ten selected drug interactions. The simulation showed a reduction of the alert rate of 93.0% for the ten selected drug interactions (comparable for dataset 1 and 2), corresponding with a 28.3% decrease of the overall drug interaction alert rate. By consensus-based better specification of the events that trigger drug interaction alerts in primary care, the alert rate for these drug interactions was reduced by over 90%. This promising approach deserves further investigation to assess its consequences and applicability in daily practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CISN Earthquake Early Warning: ShakeAlert Hybrid Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H.; Lim, I.; Allen, R. M.; Böse, M.; Cua, G. B.; Heaton, T. H.; Cisn Earthquake Early Warning Project Team

    2010-12-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) is developing an integrated, statewide earthquake early warning (EEW) system for California. In summer 2009 the CISN completed a three-year proof-of-concept study, analyzing three EEW algorithms for viability in California: (1) Onsite, run by the California Institute of Technology, (2) Virtual Seismologist, run by the Swiss Seismological Service, and (3) ElarmS, run by the University of California at Berkeley. The study successfully detected earthquakes and accurately predicted the resulting ground shaking. As of December 2010 the CISN EEW team is halfway through a second three-year project to build an end-to-end prototype early warning system capable of delivering warning to a small group of test users. This new system is called CISN ShakeAlert. An area of ongoing research is the Hybrid Branch: a new, integrated algorithm to calculate event magnitude and location in realtime. The Hybrid Branch takes advantage of the best aspects of each of the original test algorithms. The Hybrid Branch will be able to rapidly recognize and assess an event using only a single station’s P-wave data, as OnSite does, but it will also combine data from multiple stations in a network-based approach, as Virtual Seismologist and ElarmS do. This will give the Hybrid Branch the speed of a single-station EEW method with the reliability of a multi-station method. One of the challenges of the Hybrid Branch is how to progress from a single station description of a given event to a multi-station view of the same event. The authors use a Bayesian approach to combine event information and adapt to changing data availability. Output from the Hybrid Branch will be sent to the ShakeAlert Decision Module, which consolidates event information from a variety of sources and generates earthquake alerts.

  16. Personalized Alert Notifications and Evacuation Routes in Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Onorati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparedness phase is crucial in the emergency management process for reaching an adequate level of readiness to react to potential threats and hazards. During this phase, emergency plans are developed to establish, among other procedures, evacuation and emergency escape routes. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT can support and improve these procedures providing appropriate, updated and accessible information to all people in the affected zone. Current emergency management and evacuation systems do not adapt information to the context and the profile of each person, so messages received in the emergency might be useless. In this paper, we propose a set of criteria that ICT-based systems could achieve in order to avoid this problem adapting emergency alerts and evacuation routes to different situations and people. Moreover, in order to prove the applicability of such criteria, we define a mechanism that can be used as a complement of traditional evacuation systems to provide personalized alerts and evacuation routes to all kinds of people during emergency situations in working places. This mechanism is composed by three main components: CAP-ONES for notifying emergency alerts, NERES for defining emergency plans and generating personalized evacuation routes, and iNeres as the interface to receive and visualize these routes on smartphones. The usability and understandability of proposed interface has been assessed through a user study performed in a fire simulation in an indoor environment. This evaluation demonstrated that users considered iNeres easy to understand, to learn and to use, and they also found very innovative the idea to use smartphones as a support for escaping instead of static signals on walls and doors.

  17. Simulation and Proposed Handover Alert Algorithm for Mobile Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzhir Shaban Al-Ani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available this paper deals with the simulation and presentation of a novel approach to design and implementation of algorithm to realize hand over process for a mobile communication system during mobile network. This algorithm performs the ability of the system to extract important information features about the received signal. When the strength of the received signal is dropped below a certain threshold value then an alert process is activated to achieve the continuity of the transmission due to a ready scan which is existed on time.

  18. Sporotrichosis with Bone Involvement: An Alert to an Occupational Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Carvalho Aguinaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic mycosis caused by a fungus of the genus Sporothrix, which is found in soil. It can be acquired by trauma to the skin. Bone and joint lesions are very rare. The city of Rio de Janeiro is undergoing an epidemic transmitted by cats, and this should be an alert for the risk to professionals in contact with these animals. The patient was a veterinarian who developed occupational sporotrichosis with osteoarticular involvement transmitted by a cat during a consultation.

  19. Study on the possibility of assessment of alertness using subsidiary behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Ayako; Nagasaka, Akihiko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the possibility of assessment of alertness using subsidiary behaviors. Using the previous experimental data, 8 subjects' subsidiary behaviors, which appeared during 3 monotonous VDU tasks, were picked up by 3 experimenters. These behaviors were classified into 13 categories according to their similarity. As a physiological index, electroencephalogram (EEG), which was known as the most sensitive index for measuring alertness, was measured. To investigate whether the number of these behaviors could be utilized for assessment of alertness, the following studies were carried out: 1) the relationships among the task performance, categorized behaviors and EEG were analyzed to make sure whether alertness had an impact on the task performance and the behaviors, 2) using the task performance, the level of alertness was classified tentatively, then the behaviors that were changed by the classified level of alertness were specified, 3) to testify the possibility of assessment of alertness, discriminant analysis was conducted using the behaviors which were specified above, and 4) quantification analysis III and cross correlation analysis were carried out to explore if the behaviors could estimate a decline in alertness before the performance deteriorated. As the results of the above 4 points, the followings were suggested: 1) some subsidiary behaviors were influenced by alertness, to say nothing of performance, 2) regardless of individual differences, there were some behaviors that were changed by the level of alertness which was tentatively classified in this study, 3) the level of alertness at the point could assess using some behaviors, such as 'rub, pinch, and scratch', 'ease the stiffness', 'postural adjustments', 'movement of eye's and mouth', 'action of low alertness', and 4) some behaviors indicated the premonitory sign of a decline in alertness, the other increased when a decline in alertness had been observed. Also, depends on

  20. Bar Code Medication Administration Technology: Characterization of High-Alert Medication Triggers and Clinician Workarounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel F; Fortier, Christopher R; Garrison, Kelli L

    2011-02-01

    Bar code medication administration (BCMA) technology is gaining acceptance for its ability to prevent medication administration errors. However, studies suggest that improper use of BCMA technology can yield unsatisfactory error prevention and introduction of new potential medication errors. To evaluate the incidence of high-alert medication BCMA triggers and alert types and discuss the type of nursing and pharmacy workarounds occurring with the use of BCMA technology and the electronic medication administration record (eMAR). Medication scanning and override reports from January 1, 2008, through November 30, 2008, for all adult medical/surgical units were retrospectively evaluated for high-alert medication system triggers, alert types, and override reason documentation. An observational study of nursing workarounds on an adult medicine step-down unit was performed and an analysis of potential pharmacy workarounds affecting BCMA and the eMAR was also conducted. Seventeen percent of scanned medications triggered an error alert of which 55% were for high-alert medications. Insulin aspart, NPH insulin, hydromorphone, potassium chloride, and morphine were the top 5 high-alert medications that generated alert messages. Clinician override reasons for alerts were documented in only 23% of administrations. Observational studies assessing for nursing workarounds revealed a median of 3 clinician workarounds per administration. Specific nursing workarounds included a failure to scan medications/patient armband and scanning the bar code once the dosage has been removed from the unit-dose packaging. Analysis of pharmacy order entry process workarounds revealed the potential for missed doses, duplicate doses, and doses being scheduled at the wrong time. BCMA has the potential to prevent high-alert medication errors by alerting clinicians through alert messages. Nursing and pharmacy workarounds can limit the recognition of optimal safety outcomes and therefore workflow processes

  1. Regulatory alerts for dietary supplements in Canada and the United States, 2005-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Andrew M; Hein, Darren J; Gregory, Philip J

    2015-06-01

    Dietary supplement regulatory alerts published by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada were evaluated and characterized. FDA MedWatch and Health Canada websites were reviewed to identify regulatory alerts regarding dietary supplements from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2013. Alerts were analyzed to identify product characteristics that may be predictive of product quality issues and potential patient harm. A total of 1560 dietary supplement-related regulatory alerts were identified. Of those, 1287 (83%) were identified through Health Canada, and 273 (18%) were identified through FDA MedWatch. The country of origin of dietary supplements associated with regulatory alerts was not provided in most regulatory alerts; however, when their origin was provided, the United States was the most common. Dietary supplements intended for sexual enhancement were the subject of 33% of all regulatory alerts identified. Products purchased online were the most likely to be associated with a regulatory alert. Dietary supplements intended for sexual enhancement, weight loss, and bodybuilding or athletic performance appeared to pose the greatest risk for patient harm due to product contamination with a pharmaceutical such as a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor or sibutramine. Analysis of Canadian and U.S. regulatory alerts concerning dietary supplements revealed that more than 80% of the composite alerts were issued by Health Canada. The most common intended uses of supplements for which alerts were issued were sexual enhancement, weight loss, and bodybuilding or athletic performance. The most common reason for alerts was the presence of a pharmaceutical contaminant. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Entrepreneurial Alertness and Spontaneous Learning in the Market Process: the Case of Mama Moon in China

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Fu-Lai Yu

    2011-01-01

    Israel M. Kirzner’s theory of entrepreneurial alertness follows closely with Mises’ praxeology and argues that the entire role of entrepreneurs lies in their alertness to profit opportunity hitherto unnoticed in the market. In Kirzner’s subjectivist theory of knowledge, alertness to opportunity is subconscious learning. Once subconscious hunch is known, it becomes a resource (knowledge) for the entrepreneur to be utilized to exploit profit. Moreover, in Kirzner’s view, entrepreneurship means ...

  3. Investigating Driver Fatigue versus Alertness Using the Granger Causality Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanzeng Kong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Driving fatigue has been identified as one of the main factors affecting drivers’ safety. The aim of this study was to analyze drivers’ different mental states, such as alertness and drowsiness, and find out a neurometric indicator able to detect drivers’ fatigue level in terms of brain networks. Twelve young, healthy subjects were recruited to take part in a driver fatigue experiment under different simulated driving conditions. The Electroencephalogram (EEG signals of the subjects were recorded during the whole experiment and analyzed by using Granger-Causality-based brain effective networks. It was that the topology of the brain networks and the brain’s ability to integrate information changed when subjects shifted from the alert to the drowsy stage. In particular, there was a significant difference in terms of strength of Granger causality (GC in the frequency domain and the properties of the brain effective network i.e., causal flow, global efficiency and characteristic path length between such conditions. Also, some changes were more significant over the frontal brain lobes for the alpha frequency band. These findings might be used to detect drivers’ fatigue levels, and as reference work for future studies.

  4. Emerging Infectious Diseases-Global Alert-Global Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASIFUZZAMAN KHAN

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available "Emerging Infectious Diseases-Global Alert-Global Response". When the term 'alert' is used it indicates an emergency and if we do not respond adeptly, catastrophe becomes imminent. The World Health Day theme of 1997 very aptly draws the attention of both, the providers as well as the consumers of health care facilities, to gear up and engage the entire health machinary to combat these emerging infectious diseases. The problem with which we are confronted is not only the emergence of nearly 30 or more infectious diseases, which have surfaced in the recent past but also the resurfacing or re-emergence of certain diseases, which were believed to have declined or been eliminated.Some of these new diseases, which have emerged in many parts of the world can be short listed as: --     Fatal respiratory viral disease-A variant of Creutzfeldt Jacob Disease (CJD resembling Bovine Spongioform Encephalopathy (BSE-HIV infections/AIDS-     Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever-     Legionnaires' disease-Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome by E. Coli 0157 - H7-     Lyme disease-     Hepatitis C and E-     New form of Cholera by Vibrio Cholera 0139-     Emerging food borne diseases-     Emerging zoonosesOther sexually transmitted diseases.'

  5. Alert system for students with visual disabilities at the UTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marely del Rosario Cruz Felipe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the transfer of students with visual disabilities at the Technical University of Manabí (UTM accidents have been reported when going through some ramps and other obstacles, especially on rainy days. This article belongs to an investigation into the realization of an alert system for students with visual disabilities. The objective of the implementation of this system is to guide students with visual disabilities on different obstacles that exist in their transfer through the university. To carry out the implementation of this system, the alert systems and the technologies that are currently used as a result of a recording studio in the national and international scope were analyzed, the tools and technologies used in the developed solution are described. (Definition, technologies for the change of people, software, programming languages, etc. that allowed an efficient implementation in a short time of the proposed system by means of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification technology. The above is reflected in the positive orientation for the transfer of 32 students with visual disabilities through the university and by those who have contributed to improving their quality of life.

  6. Towards cross-lingual alerting for bursty epidemic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Nigel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online news reports are increasingly becoming a source for event-based early warning systems that detect natural disasters. Harnessing the massive volume of information available from multilingual newswire presents as many challanges as opportunities due to the patterns of reporting complex spatio-temporal events. Results In this article we study the problem of utilising correlated event reports across languages. We track the evolution of 16 disease outbreaks using 5 temporal aberration detection algorithms on text-mined events classified according to disease and outbreak country. Using ProMED reports as a silver standard, comparative analysis of news data for 13 languages over a 129 day trial period showed improved sensitivity, F1 and timeliness across most models using cross-lingual events. We report a detailed case study analysis for Cholera in Angola 2010 which highlights the challenges faced in correlating news events with the silver standard. Conclusions The results show that automated health surveillance using multilingual text mining has the potential to turn low value news into high value alerts if informed choices are used to govern the selection of models and data sources. An implementation of the C2 alerting algorithm using multilingual news is available at the BioCaster portal http://born.nii.ac.jp/?page=globalroundup.

  7. Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth P Jr; Hull, Joseph T.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Body temperature has been reported to influence human performance. Performance is reported to be better when body temperature is high/near its circadian peak and worse when body temperature is low/near its circadian minimum. We assessed whether this relationship between performance and body temperature reflects the regulation of both the internal biological timekeeping system and/or the influence of body temperature on performance independent of circadian phase. Fourteen subjects participated in a forced desynchrony protocol allowing assessment of the relationship between body temperature and performance while controlling for circadian phase and hours awake. Most neurobehavioral measures varied as a function of internal biological time and duration of wakefulness. A number of performance measures were better when body temperature was elevated, including working memory, subjective alertness, visual attention, and the slowest 10% of reaction times. These findings demonstrate that an increased body temperature, associated with and independent of internal biological time, is correlated with improved performance and alertness. These results support the hypothesis that body temperature modulates neurobehavioral function in humans.

  8. Universal Safety Distance Alert Device for Road Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matic Virant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Driving with too short of a safety distance is a common problem in road traffic, often with traffic accidents as a consequence. Research has identified a lack of vehicle-mountable devices for alerting the drivers of trailing vehicles about keeping a sufficient safe distance. The principal requirements for such a device were defined. A conceptual study was performed in order to select the components for the integration of the device. Based on the results of this study, a working prototype of a flexible, self-contained device was designed, built and tested. The device is intended to be mounted on the rear of a vehicle. It uses radar as the primary distance sensor, assisted with a GPS receiver for velocity measurement. A Raspberry Pi single-board computer is used for data acquisition and processing. The alerts are shown on an LED-matrix display mounted on the rear of the host vehicle. The device software is written in Python and provides automatic operation without requiring any user intervention. The tests have shown that the device is usable on almost any motor vehicle and performs reliably in simulated and real traffic. The open issues and possibilities for future improvements are presented in the Discussion.

  9. Assessment of exposure to ionizing radiation at selected mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the levels of ionizing radiation at selected mining sites in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Inspector alert nuclear radiation meter (S.E. International, USA SN: 35440) was used for these assessments. The meter was held at the abdominal level (about 1 m above ground level) and readings were taken in ...

  10. Measurement of environmental radiation levels and contour map ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurement of environmental radiation levels and contour map development for the northern zone of Adamawa state, Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Physics ... Mubi North, Mubi South, Michika and Madagali, all in the northern zone of Adamawa State, Nigeria was measured using a Radiation Alert Monitor 4 solid state ...

  11. Radioisotope power system based on derivative of existing Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T.; Kumar, V.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper, the authors presented the results of a system design study of a 75-watt(c) RSG (Radioisotope Stirling Generator) for possible application to the Pluto Fast Flyby mission. That study was based on a Stirling engine design generated by MTI (Mechanical Technology, Inc.). The MTI design was a derivative of a much larger (13 kwe) engine that they had developed and tested for NASA's LERC. Clearly, such a derivative would be a major extrapolation (downsizing) from what has actually been built and tested. To avoid that, the present paper describes a design for a 75-watt RSG system based on derivatives of a small (11-watt) engine and linear alternator system that has been under development by STC (Stirling Technology Company) for over three years and that has operated successfully for over 15,000 hours as of March 1995. Thus, the STC engines would require much less extrapolation from proven designs. The design employs a heat source consisting of two standard General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules, coupled to four Stirling engines with linear alternators, any three of which could deliver the desired 75-watt(e) output if the fourth should fail. The four engines are coupled to four common radiators with redundant heatpipes for rejecting the engines' waste heat to space. The above engine and radiator redundancies promote system reliability. The paper describes detailed analyses to determine the effect of radiator geometry on system mass and performance, before and after an engine or heatpipe failure

  12. The construction of distant total distributed measuring and controlling system based on RS-232 communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengying; Li Tiantuo; Zhu Wenkai; Zhang Quanhu

    1999-01-01

    The author discusses the construction of distant total distributed measuring and controlling system based on RS-232 communication. The merits of this system are simple construction, reliable performance, big communication distance, and wide covering range. The system fits in with application in radiation environment. The author also discusses the system's hardware equipment and communication protocol

  13. Green Roofs: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz-Barth, K.; Tanner, S.

    2004-09-01

    In a ''green roof,'' a layer of vegetation (e.g., a roof garden) covers the surface of a roof to provide shade, cooler indoor and outdoor temperatures, and effective storm-water management to reduce runoff. The main components are waterproofing, soil, and plants. There are two basic kinds: intensive and extensive. An intensive green roof often features large shrubs and trees, and it can be expensive to install and maintain. An extensive green roof features shallow soil and low-growing, horizontally spreading plants that can thrive in the alpine conditions of many rooftops. These plants do not require a lot of water or soil, and they can tolerate a significant amount of exposure to the sun and wind. This Federal Technology Alert focuses on the benefits, design, and implementation of extensive green roofs and includes criteria for their use on federal facilities.

  14. Improving patient identification in an ophthalmology clinic using name alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarali, Samir; Mathura, Pamela; Harris, Karen; Damji, Karim F

    2017-12-01

    To develop a standardized process for reviewing daily patient lists and identifying potential risks of misidentification. Our goal was to develop a proactive approach to identify and eliminate risks of patient misidentification. Assessment of current patient identification practices took place over a period of 4 weeks. Using a process map, a patient survey was developed to determine the encounter points when patient identification was confirmed. This information was used to develop a standardized protocol for review of daily appointment lists. Review of daily appointment lists was completed to identify potential similar/same name risks. A standardized manual process of chart review, flagging, and tracking was developed. The name alert process resulted in a simple manual process for identifying which patients have a higher name risk and allowed care providers to take preventative action to decrease potential risk of incorrect diagnostic testing, procedure, or medication administration. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated detection of structural alerts (chemical fragments in (ecotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Bureau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  16. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF STRUCTURAL ALERTS (CHEMICAL FRAGMENTS IN (ECOTOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Lepailleur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  17. Media alert in an SIS epidemic model with logistic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianwen; Zhou, Da; Liu, Zhijun; Xu, Dashun; Zhang, Xinan

    2017-03-01

    In general, media coverage would not be implemented unless the number of infected cases reaches some critical number. To reflect this feature, we incorporate the media effect and a critical number of infected cases into the disease transmission rate and consider an susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model with logistic growth. Our model analysis shows that early media alert and strong media effects are preferable to decrease the numbers of infected cases at endemic equilibria. Furthermore, we noticed that the model may have up to three endemic equilibria and bi-stability can occur in a threshold interval for the critical number. Note that the interval depends on parameters for the focal disease and the media effect. It is possible to roughly estimate the interval for re-emerging diseases in a given region. Therefore, the result could be useful to health policymakers. Global stability is also obtained when the model admits a unique endemic equilibrium.

  18. Assuring human operator alertness at night in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore-Ede, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The human body is not designed for peak alertness and performance at night, nor is it well-equipped to cope with the frequent day-night inversions required by rotating shift work schedules. As a result, the human operator can become the weak link in a complex technological operation such as a nuclear power plant. The high degree of dependence on human operator vigilance, decision-making ability and performance that is required in nuclear power plant operations can conflict with the human sleepiness and error-proneness which naturally occur during the night shift or after extended periods without adequate sleep. An opportunity to address these problems has come from a series of major research advances in basic circadian physiology

  19. Real Time Flood Alert System (RTFAS) for Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Trujillo, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The Real Time Flood Alert System is a web-based computer program, developed as a data integration tool, and designed to increase the ability of emergency managers to rapidly and accurately predict flooding conditions of streams in Puerto Rico. The system includes software and a relational database to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, water levels in streams and reservoirs, and associated storms to determine hazardous and potential flood conditions. The computer program was developed as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey Caribbean Water Science Center and the Puerto Rico Emergency Management Agency, and integrates information collected and processed by these two agencies and the National Weather Service.

  20. Professional responsibility and patient retention: alerts for the new dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Getting to know your patients, well beyond recognition of their specific chief dental complaint, is most important in operating a successful and satisfying practice. In addition to the clinical findings and pertinent history alerts, a good understanding of the person being treated can go a long way toward cementing lasting and rewarding doctor-patient relationships. Almost all new patients to the practice are welcome. However, an occasional "difficult" patient can be identified. This is the patient who you will not be able to satisfy, who cultivates misunderstandings, is unfairly over demanding, wastes office time in innumerable ways and eventually causes great frustration for the dentist. These patients may leave the practice in an unpleasant termination. Concerns of litigation arise, and one must also consider the waste of economic and emotional currency, as well as any other negative repercussions that may result. The dentist should become skilled at early identification of potentially risky, disruptive and problematic persons seeking treatment.

  1. OBS FOMAR POOL: Gibraltar and ALERTES-RIM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Martín Davila, Jose; Buforn, Elisa; Cabieces, Roberto; Santos, Jose; Sandoval, Nicolas; Roca, Antoni; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    The Eurasian-African plate boundary crosses the called "Ibero-Maghrebian" region from the San Vicente Cape (SW Portugal) to Tunisia including the south Iberia, Alboran Sea, and northern of Morocco and Algeria. The low convergence rate at this plate boundary produces a continuous moderate seismic activity of low magnitude and shallow depth, where the occurrence of large earthquakes is separated by long time intervals, even with associated tsunamis, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In this region, there are also intermediate and very deep earthquakes. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) acquired three "LOSTERN" broad band (CMG-40T sensors) OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), and, more recently (2014), the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) acquired another three with Trillium 120 sensors. All of them conform the OBS FOMAR pool. Since January to November 2014, the FOMAR pool has been deployed along the Gibraltar strait (Gibraltar experiment), in collaboration with SECEGSA (Spanish society to study the fix communication through the Gibraltar Strait), to study the local microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. Also, since September 2015, the FOMAR pool has been deployed for 8 months in SW of the San Vicente Cape with an hexagonal array configuration as a part of ALERTES-RIM project. In this work the some preliminary results of the Gibraltar strait and ALERTES-RIM OBS experiment are shown.

  2. Workplace lighting for improving alertness and mood in daytime workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachito, Daniela V; Eckeli, Alan L; Desouky, Ahmed S; Corbett, Mark A; Partonen, Timo; Rajaratnam, Shantha Mw; Riera, Rachel

    2018-03-02

    Exposure to light plays a crucial role in biological processes, influencing mood and alertness. Daytime workers may be exposed to insufficient or inappropriate light during daytime, leading to mood disturbances and decreases in levels of alertness. To assess the effectiveness and safety of lighting interventions to improve alertness and mood in daytime workers. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, seven other databases; ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization trials portal up to January 2018. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and non-randomised controlled before-after trials (CBAs) that employed a cross-over or parallel-group design, focusing on any type of lighting interventions applied for daytime workers. Two review authors independently screened references in two stages, extracted outcome data and assessed risk of bias. We used standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to pool data from different questionnaires and scales assessing the same outcome across different studies. We combined clinically homogeneous studies in a meta-analysis. We used the GRADE system to rate quality of evidence. The search yielded 2844 references. After screening titles and abstracts, we considered 34 full text articles for inclusion. We scrutinised reports against the eligibility criteria, resulting in the inclusion of five studies (three RCTs and two CBAs) with 282 participants altogether. These studies evaluated four types of comparisons: cool-white light, technically known as high correlated colour temperature (CCT) light versus standard illumination; different proportions of indirect and direct light; individually applied blue-enriched light versus no treatment; and individually applied morning bright light versus afternoon bright light for subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder.We found no studies comparing one level of illuminance versus another.We found two CBA

  3. Correlating intrusion detection alerts on bot malware infections using neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, Egon; Stevanovic, Matija; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2016-01-01

    part, as such knowledge is inferred by Neural Networks. Evaluation has been performed with traffic traces of real bot binaries executed in a lab setup. The method is trained on labelled Intrusion Detection System alerts and is capable of correctly predicting which of seven incidents an alert pertains...

  4. Winter Weather Tips: Understanding Alerts and Staying Safe this Season | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Jenna Seiss and Kylie Tomlin, Guest Writers, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Maryland residents face the possibility of dangerous winter weather each year—from icy conditions to frigid temperatures. You may be familiar with the different types of winter weather alerts issued by the National Weather Service (NWS), but do you know what each alert means?  

  5. Energy Drink vs. Coffee: The Effects on Levels of Alertness in Fatigued Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    supplements, and energy drinks . Multiple studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of caffeine to increase alertness and improve cognitive...performance in sleep-deprived individuals. Energy drinks contain caffeine and sugar, similar to a soft drink , but there are additional nonregulated...TERMS Fatigue, alertness, stimulant, caffeine , energy drinks , coffee, aviation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  6. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/9: De-Alerting Strategic Ballistic Missiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, Leonard W.; Edenburn, Michael W.; Fraley, Stanley K.; Trost, Lawrence C.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a framework for evaluating the technical merits of strategic ballistic missile de-alerting measures, and it uses the framework to evaluate a variety of possible measures for silo-based, land-mobile, and submarine-based missiles. De-alerting measures are defined for the purpose of this paper as reversible actions taken to increase the time or effort required to launch a strategic ballistic missile. The paper does not assess the desirability of pursuing a de-alerting program. Such an assessment is highly context dependent. The paper postulates that if de-alerting is desirable and is used as an arms control mechanism, de-alerting measures should satisfy specific cirteria relating to force security, practicality, effectiveness, significant delay, and verifiability. Silo-launched missiles lend themselves most readily to de-alerting verification, because communications necessary for monitoring do not increase the vulnerabilty of the weapons by a significant amount. Land-mobile missile de-alerting measures would be more challenging to verify, because monitoring measures that disclose the launcher's location would potentially increase their vulnerability. Submarine-launched missile de-alerting measures would be extremely challlenging if not impossible to monitor without increasing the submarine's vulnerability.

  7. Vibration Signaling in Mobile Devices for Emergency Alerting: A Study with Deaf Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Judith; Tucker, Paula E.; Williams, Norman; Sauro, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, a nationwide Commercial Mobile Alert Service (CMAS) is being planned to alert cellular mobile device subscribers to emergencies occurring near the location of the mobile device. The plan specifies a unique audio attention signal as well as a unique vibration attention signal (for mobile devices set to vibrate) to identify…

  8. School-Based Drug Prevention among At-Risk Adolescents: Effects of ALERT Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshore, Douglas; Ellickson, Phyllis L.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; St. Clair, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    In a recent randomized field trial, Ellickson et al. found the Project ALERT drug prevention curriculum curbed alcohol misuse and tobacco and marijuana use among eighth-grade adolescents. This article reports effects among ninth-grade at-risk adolescents. Comparisons between at-risk girls in ALERT Plus schools (basic curriculum extended to ninth…

  9. 21 CFR 26.50 - Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICE PRODUCT EVALUATION REPORTS: UNITED STATES AND THE... postmarket vigilance reports. (a) An alert system will be set up during the transition period and maintained... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance...

  10. Advanced LED warning system for rural intersections : phase 2 (ALERT-2) : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report presents findings of the second phase of the Advanced LED Warning System for Rural : Intersections (ALERT) project. Since it is the next generation of the same system, the second phase : system is referred to as the ALERT-2 system while t...

  11. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  12. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  13. Using capacity alert calls to reduce overcrowding in a major public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Sankalp; Boyle, Justin; Zeitz, Kathryn

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of capacity alert calls in reducing acute hospital overcrowding through addressing rising occupancy, high patient throughput and increased access block. Retrospective analysis of 24 months of in-patient, emergency department, and capacity alert call log data from a large metropolitan public hospital in Australia. The analysis explored statistical differences in patient flow parameters between capacity alert call days and other days including a control case set of days with statistically similar levels of occupancy. The study identified a significant (Povercrowding can successfully deliver sustained improvements in occupancy, patient throughput and access block. The findings support and validate the use of capacity alert escalation calls to manage overcrowding, but suggest the need to improve the consistency of trigger mechanisms and the efficiency of the processes initiated by the capacity alert call.

  14. A Model for the Effectiveness of Aircraft Alerting and Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, R. E.; Neu, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of an alerting system with a single alert was analyzed. The pilot's decision behavior is modeled by the theory of signal detection and therefore accounts for different strengths of cross check information and different pilot criteria. The model includes the effects of the alerting and warning system (CAWS) error rate; the pilot's past experience with the CAWS accuracy; his reliance on the CAWS rather than independent monitoring; missed alerts; and adoption of a minimum error or Neyman-Pearson objective rather than minimum cost objective. It is showwn that for rare events: (1) the expected cost is greatly increased if the pilot ignores the a posteriori information in the existence of an alert; (2) the expected cost is insensitive to CAWS Type 1 errors; and (3) the expected cost is sensitive to CAWS type 2 errors only when the cross check information is ambiguous.

  15. Radiation hormesis in higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Sung

    1996-03-01

    The most remarkable aspect in the hormesis law is that low dose of harmful agents can produce effect that are diametrically opposite to the effect found with high doses of the same agent. Minute quantities of a harmful agent bring about very small change in the organism and control mechanisms appear to subjugate normal processes to place the organism in a state of alert and repair. The stimulated organism is more responsive to changes in environmental factors than it did before being alerted. Routine functions, including repair and defense, have priority for available energy and material. The alerted organism utilizes nutrients more efficiently, grows faster, shows improved defense reactions, matures faster, reproduces more effectively, has less disease, and lives longer. Accelerated germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and ripening, and increased crop yield and resistance to disease are found in plants. Another concept supported by the data is that low doses of ionizing radiation provide increased resistance to subsequent high doses of radiation. The hormesis varies with subject plant, variety, state of seed, environmental and cultural conditions, physiologic function measured, dose rate and total exposure. The results of hormesis are less consistently found, probably due to the great number of uncontrolled variables in the experiments. The general dosage for radiation hormesis in about 100 (10 to 1,000) times ambient or 100 (10 to 1,000) times less than a definitely harmful dose, but these must be modified to the occasion. Although little is known about most mechanisms of hormesis reaction, overcompensation of repair mechanism is offered as on mechanism. Radiation hormesis can provide more efficient use of resources, maximum production of foods, and increased health by the use of ionizing radiation as a useful tool in our technologic society. Efficient utilization of nature's resources demands support to explore the practical application of

  16. Radiation hormesis in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    The most remarkable aspect in the hormesis law is that low dose of harmful agents can produce effect that are diametrically opposite to the effect found with high doses of the same agent. Minute quantities of a harmful agent bring about very small change in the organism and control mechanisms appear to subjugate normal processes to place the organism in a state of alert and repair. The stimulated organism is more responsive to changes in environmental factors than it did before being alerted. Routine functions, including repair and defense, have priority for available energy and material. The alerted organism utilizes nutrients more efficiently, grows faster, shows improved defense reactions, matures faster, reproduces more effectively, has less disease, and lives longer. Accelerated germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and ripening, and increased crop yield and resistance to disease are found in plants. Another concept supported by the data is that low doses of ionizing radiation provide increased resistance to subsequent high doses of radiation. The hormesis varies with subject plant, variety, state of seed, environmental and cultural conditions, physiologic function measured, dose rate and total exposure. The results of hormesis are less consistently found, probably due to the great number of uncontrolled variables in the experiments. The general dosage for radiation hormesis in about 100 times ambient or 100 times less than a definitely harmful dose, but these must be modified to the occasion. Although little is known about most mechanisms of hormesis reaction, overcompensation of repair mechanism is offered as on mechanism. Radiation hormesis can provide more efficient use of resources, maximum production of foods, and increased health by the use of ionizing radiation as a useful tool in our technologic society. Efficient utilization of nature`s resources demands support to explore the practical application of radiation hormesis.

  17. Adoption of medication alert systems in hospital outpatient departments in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chun; Cheng, Shou-Hsia

    2017-06-01

    The adoption of medication alert systems in the health care sector varies among regions. In Taiwan, the health authority introduced policies in 2005 to encourage the adoption of medication alert systems in hospitals. This study aimed to understand the adoption of medication alert systems in the outpatient departments of hospitals in Taiwan using a nationwide survey. A questionnaire was developed and mailed to 380 accredited general hospitals in Taiwan in 2013. The information collected from the questionnaire concerning the outpatient department included (1) the time of adoption of a medication alert system; (2) the operation of individual alert functions: availability, management, and stability; and (3) hospital characteristics: accreditation level, teaching status, ownership, and number of beds. A total of 216 hospitals completed and returned the questionnaire, corresponding to a response rate of 56.8%. The adoption rate of medication alert systems in hospital outpatient departments increased from less than 10% in 1997-95.83% in 2012. Approximately two-thirds of the hospitals developed and maintained the alert systems independently or collaboratively with vendors. Teaching and large hospitals tended to develop more advanced alert functions such as drug-drug interaction functions. Improving the safety and quality of pharmaceutical services and meeting the policy requirements are reasons for hospitals to establish medication alert systems. The adoption rate of medication alert systems reached 95% in accredited general hospitals in Taiwan. Government policy and available health information professionals and vendors may somewhat contribute to the high adoption rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of National Weather Service heat alerts in preventing mortality in 20 US cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Kate R; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel; Wellenius, Gregory A

    2018-04-09

    Extreme heat is a well-documented public health threat. The US National Weather Service (NWS) issues heat advisories and warnings (collectively, "heat alerts") in advance of forecast extreme heat events. The effectiveness of these alerts in preventing deaths remains largely unknown. To quantify the change in mortality rates associated with heat alerts in 20 US cities between 2001 and 2006. Because NWS heat alerts are issued based on forecast weather and these forecasts are imperfect, in any given location there exists a set of days of similar observed heat index in which heat alerts have been issued for some days but not others. We used a case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression to compare mortality rates on days with versus without heat alerts among such eligible days, adjusting for maximum daily heat index and temporal factors. We combined city-specific estimates into a summary measure using standard random-effects meta-analytic techniques. Overall, NWS heat alerts were not associated with lower mortality rates (percent change in rate: -0.5% [95% CI: -2.8, 1.9]). In Philadelphia, heat alerts were associated with a 4.4% (95% CI: -8.3, -0.3) lower mortality rate or an estimated 45.1 (95% empirical CI: 3.1, 84.1) deaths averted per year if this association is assumed to be causal. No statistically significant beneficial association was observed in other individual cities. Our results suggest that between 2001 and 2006, NWS heat alerts were not associated with lower mortality in most cities studied, potentially missing a valuable opportunity to avert a substantial number of heat-related deaths. These results highlight the need to better link alerts to effective communication and intervention strategies to reduce heat-related mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Design and Implementation of a Prototype Web-Portal for the Integrated Mobile Alerting System (IMAS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le, Phong D; Hsu, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Integrated Mobile Alert System (IMAS) is a mobile device message alerting system that provides a means for people to stay connected and receive information in a modality that is constantly available...

  20. Information retrieval system based on INIS tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pultorak, G.

    1976-01-01

    An information retrieval system based on the INIS computer tapes is described. It includes the three main elements of a computerized information system: a data base on a machine -readable medium, a collection of queries which represent the information needs from the data - base, and a set of programs by which the actual retrieval is done, according to the user's queries. The system is built for the center's computer, a CDC 3600, and its special features characterize, to a certain degree, the structure of the programs. (author)

  1. A novel strategy for evaluating the effects of an electronic test ordering alert message: Optimizing cardiac marker use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jason M; Lewandrowski, Kent B; Kamis, Irina K; Singh, Balaji; Belkziz, Sidi M; Dighe, Anand S

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory ordering functions within computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems typically support the display of electronic alert messages to improve test utilization or implement new ordering policies. However, alert strategies have been shown to vary considerably in their success and the characteristics contributing to an alert's success are poorly understood. Improved methodologies are needed to evaluate alerts and their mechanisms of action. Clinicians order inpatient and emergency department laboratory tests using our institutional CPOE system. We analyzed user interaction data captured by our CPOE system to evaluate how clinicians responded to an alert. We evaluated an alert designed to implement an institutional policy restricting the indications for ordering creatine kinase-MB (CKMB). Within 2 months of alert implementation, CKMB-associated searches declined by 79% with a corresponding decline in CKMB orders. Furthermore, while prior to alert implementation, clinicians searching for CKMB ultimately ordered this test 99% of the time, following implementation, only 60% of CKMB searches ultimately led to CKMB test orders. This difference presumably represents clinicians who reconsidered the need for CKMB in response to the alert, demonstrating the alert's just-in-time advisory capability. In addition, as clinicians repeatedly viewed the alert, there was a "dose-dependant" decrease in the fraction of searches without orders. This presumably reflects the alerting strategy's long-term educational component, as clinicians aware of the new policy will not search for CKMB when not indicated. Our analytic approach provides insight into the mechanism of a CPOE alert and demonstrates that alerts may act through a combination of just-in-time advice and longer term education. Use of this approach when implementing alerts may prove useful to improve the success of a given alerting strategy.

  2. Generating precipitation ensembles for flood alert and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseri, Angelica; Javelle, Pierre; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Leblois, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Floods represent one of the major natural disasters that are often responsible for fatalities and economic losses. Flood warning systems are needed to anticipate the arrival of severe events and mitigate their impacts. Flood alerts are particularly important for risk management and response in the nowcasting of flash floods. In this case, precipitation fields observed in real time play a crucial role and observational uncertainties must be taken into account. In this study, we investigate the potential of a framework which combines a geostatistical conditional simulation method that considers information from precipitation radar and rain gauges, and a distributed rainfall-runoff model to generate an ensemble of precipitation fields and produce probabilistic flood alert maps. We adapted the simulation method proposed by Leblois and Creutin (2013), based on the Turning Band Method (TBM) and a conditional simulation approach, to consider the temporal and spatial characteristics of radar data and rain gauge measurements altogether and generate precipitation ensembles. The AIGA system developed by Irstea and Météo-France for predicting flash floods in the French Mediterranean region (Javelle et al., 2014) was used to transform the generated precipitation ensembles into ensembles of discharge at the outlet of the studied catchments. Finally, discharge ensembles were translated into maps providing information on the probability of exceeding a given flood threshold. A total of 19 events that occurred between 2009 and 2013 in the Var region (southeastern France), a region prone to flash floods, was used to illustrate the approach. Results show that the proposed method is able to simulate an ensemble of realistic precipitation fields and capture peak flows of flash floods. This was shown to be particularly useful at ungauged catchments, where uncertainties on the evaluation of flood peaks are high. The results obtained also show that the approach developed can be used to

  3. Does applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduce cervical spine radiography rates in alert patients with blunt trauma to the neck? A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesupalan Rajam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cautious outlook towards neck injuries has been the norm to avoid missing cervical spine injuries. Consequently there has been an increased use of cervical spine radiography. The Canadian Cervical Spine rule was proposed to reduce unnecessary use of cervical spine radiography in alert and stable patients. Our aim was to see whether applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduced the need for cervical spine radiography without missing significant cervical spine injuries. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted in 2 hospitals. 114 alert and stable patients who had cervical spine radiographs for suspected neck injuries were included in the study. Data on patient demographics, high risk & low risk factors as per the Canadian Cervical Spine rule and cervical spine radiography results were collected and analysed. Results 28 patients were included in the high risk category according to the Canadian Cervical Spine rule. 86 patients fell into the low risk category. If the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied, there would have been a significant reduction in cervical spine radiographs as 86/114 patients (75.4% would not have needed cervical spine radiograph. 2/114 patients who had significant cervical spine injuries would have been identified when the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied. Conclusion Applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule for neck injuries in alert and stable patients would have reduced the use of cervical spine radiographs without missing out significant cervical spine injuries. This relates to reduction in radiation exposure to patients and health care costs.

  4. A CCTV system with SMS alert (CMDSA): An implementation of pixel processing algorithm for motion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Hidayah Ab; Abdullah, Nurul Azma; Hamid, Isredza Rahmi A.; Wen, Chuah Chai; Jelani, Mohamad Shafiqur Rahman Mohd

    2017-10-01

    Closed-Circuit TV (CCTV) system is one of the technologies in surveillance field to solve the problem of detection and monitoring by providing extra features such as email alert or motion detection. However, detecting and alerting the admin on CCTV system may complicate due to the complexity to integrate the main program with an external Application Programming Interface (API). In this study, pixel processing algorithm is applied due to its efficiency and SMS alert is added as an alternative solution for users who opted out email alert system or have no Internet connection. A CCTV system with SMS alert (CMDSA) was developed using evolutionary prototyping methodology. The system interface was implemented using Microsoft Visual Studio while the backend components, which are database and coding, were implemented on SQLite database and C# programming language, respectively. The main modules of CMDSA are motion detection, capturing and saving video, image processing and Short Message Service (SMS) alert functions. Subsequently, the system is able to reduce the processing time making the detection process become faster, reduce the space and memory used to run the program and alerting the system admin instantly.

  5. A clinical data warehouse-based process for refining medication orders alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussadi, Abdelali; Caruba, Thibaut; Zapletal, Eric; Sabatier, Brigitte; Durieux, Pierre; Degoulet, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to evaluate the use of a clinical data warehouse coupled with a clinical information system to test and refine alerts for medication orders control before they were fully implemented. A clinical decision rule refinement process was used to assess alerts. The criteria assessed were the frequencies of alerts for initial prescriptions of 10 medications whose dosage levels depend on renal function thresholds. In the first iteration of the process, the frequency of the 'exceeds maximum daily dose' alerts was 7.10% (617/8692), while that of the 'under dose' alerts was 3.14% (273/8692). Indicators were presented to the experts. During the different iterations of the process, 45 (16.07%) decision rules were removed, 105 (37.5%) were changed and 136 new rules were introduced. Extensive retrospective analysis of physicians' medication orders stored in a clinical data warehouse facilitates alert optimization toward the goal of maximizing the safety of the patient and minimizing overridden alerts.

  6. Advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts for family physicians: viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hani; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland

    2015-02-27

    Electronic knowledge resources constitute an important channel for accredited Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. However, email usage for educational purposes is controversial. On the one hand, family physicians become aware of new information, confirm what they already know, and obtain reassurance by reading educational email alerts. Email alerts can also encourage physicians to search Web-based resources. On the other hand, technical difficulties and privacy issues are common obstacles. The purpose of this discussion paper, informed by a literature review and a small qualitative study, was to understand family physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in regard to email in general and educational emails in particular, and to explore the advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts. In addition, we documented participants' suggestions to improve email alert services for CME. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using the "Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior" model. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 15 family physicians. We analyzed the collected data using inductive-deductive thematic qualitative data analysis. All 15 participants scanned and prioritized their email, and 13 of them checked their email daily. Participants mentioned (1) advantages of educational email alerts such as saving time, convenience and valid information, and (2) disadvantages such as an overwhelming number of emails and irrelevance. They offered suggestions to improve educational email. The advantages of email alerts seem to compensate for their disadvantages. Suggestions proposed by family physicians can help to improve educational email alerts.

  7. [Detection of Brucella with an automatic hemoculture system: Bact/Alert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, J; Partal, Y; Llosá, J; Leiva, J; Navarro, J M; de la Rosa, M

    1994-12-01

    The ability of in vitro and in vivo detection of Brucella spp. with the Bact/Alert system was studied. Three strains of Brucella melitensis and two of Brucella abortus were used. Different dilutions of the five strains were performed in trypticase soy broth (TSB), achieving concentrations of 1 cfu/ml, 5 cfu/ml, 10 cfu/ml and 100 cfu/ml. Ten ml of each dilution and strain were inoculated into 5 aerobic bottles Bact/Alert and 5 biphasic Hemóline bottles. Furthermore, over a 9 month period, 8,216 bottles of Bact/Alert bottles from hospitalized patients and from the emergency department were processed in the authors' laboratory. The mean detection time for Brucella growth was from 2 to 3 days with the Bact/Alert system, and 14 days in the biphasic bottles. Former bottles processed in the authors' laboratory, 11 aerobic bottles belonged to 5 patients in whom brucelosis was confirmed by bloodculture. The Bact/Alert system detected Brucella melitensis in only on bottle at 2.9 days of incubation. In 7 bottles Bact/Alert detected B. melitensis by a blind pass of these bottles at 10 to 20 days of incubation. These results suggest that the Bact/Alert system does not totally solve the diagnosis of brucellosis. Blind passes of the bloodcultures are required.

  8. Generalized Philosophy of Alerting with Applications for Parallel Approach Collision Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Lee F.; Kuchar, James K.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the research was to develop formal guidelines for the design of hazard avoidance systems. An alerting system is automation designed to reduce the likelihood of undesirable outcomes that are due to rare failures in a human-controlled system. It accomplishes this by monitoring the system, and issuing warning messages to the human operators when thought necessary to head off a problem. On examination of existing and recently proposed logics for alerting it appears that few commonly accepted principles guide the design process. Different logics intended to address the same hazards may take disparate forms and emphasize different aspects of performance, because each reflects the intuitive priorities of a different designer. Because performance must be satisfactory to all users of an alerting system (implying a universal meaning of acceptable performance) and not just one designer, a proposed logic often undergoes significant piecemeal modification before gamma general acceptance. This report is an initial attempt to clarify the common performance goals by which an alerting system is ultimately judged. A better understanding of these goals will hopefully allow designers to reach the final logic in a quicker, more direct and repeatable manner. As a case study, this report compares three alerting logics for collision prevention during independent approaches to parallel runways, and outlines a fourth alternative incorporating elements of the first three, but satisfying stated requirements. Three existing logics for parallel approach alerting are described. Each follows from different intuitive principles. The logics are presented as examples of three "philosophies" of alerting system design.

  9. Promoting Safety in Hypnosis: A Clinical Instrument for the Assessment of Alertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Hedy A

    2017-04-01

    Hypnosis has long demonstrated its power to facilitate various approaches to psychotherapy. Like other potent modalities, hypnosis may produce unwanted effects. Although its negative sequelae are usually mild and transient, more serious complications may occur. Recently, attention has been drawn to the powerful role of failures of dehypnosis or alerting/realerting in producing unwanted effects. Traditionally, alerting has been viewed as a relatively uncomplicated process that requires little more than the simple suggestion that the subject will return or awaken from trance, and exiting from trance has generally been considered the cessation of the phenomena suggested during induction and thereafter. Newer findings challenge these assumptions and suggest that restoring the subject to a prehypnotic baseline level of alertness is of equal or greater importance. Here, I describe the Howard Alertness Scale (HAS), with which subjects can be made aware of their baseline levels of alertness to help them understand the unique ways that their trance states differ from their normal alert states, and assess and measure their subjective perception of alertness before and after hypnosis. Furthermore, regular use of the HAS holds potential to enhance both the therapeutic alliance and the patient's sense of safety and mastery. The development and use of the HAS is discussed along with three vignettes illustrating its clinical application.

  10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Educational Email Alerts for Family Physicians: Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hani; Grad, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic knowledge resources constitute an important channel for accredited Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. However, email usage for educational purposes is controversial. On the one hand, family physicians become aware of new information, confirm what they already know, and obtain reassurance by reading educational email alerts. Email alerts can also encourage physicians to search Web-based resources. On the other hand, technical difficulties and privacy issues are common obstacles. Objective The purpose of this discussion paper, informed by a literature review and a small qualitative study, was to understand family physicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in regard to email in general and educational emails in particular, and to explore the advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts. In addition, we documented participants’ suggestions to improve email alert services for CME. Methods We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using the “Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior” model. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 15 family physicians. We analyzed the collected data using inductive-deductive thematic qualitative data analysis. Results All 15 participants scanned and prioritized their email, and 13 of them checked their email daily. Participants mentioned (1) advantages of educational email alerts such as saving time, convenience and valid information, and (2) disadvantages such as an overwhelming number of emails and irrelevance. They offered suggestions to improve educational email. Conclusions The advantages of email alerts seem to compensate for their disadvantages. Suggestions proposed by family physicians can help to improve educational email alerts. PMID:25803184

  11. Technical features of a low-cost earthquake alert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harben, P.

    1991-01-01

    The concept and features of an Earthquake Alert System (EAS) involving a distributed network of strong motion sensors is discussed. The EAS analyzes real-time data telemetered to a central facility and issues an areawide warning of a large earthquake in advance of the spreading elastic wave energy. A low-cost solution to high-cost estimates for installation and maintenance of a dedicated EAS is presented that makes use of existing microseismic stations. Using the San Francisco Bay area as an example, we show that existing US Geological Survey microseismic monitoring stations are of sufficient density to form the elements of a prototype EAS. By installing strong motion instrumentation and a specially developed switching device, strong ground motion can be telemetered in real-time to the central microseismic station on the existing communication channels. When a large earthquake occurs, a dedicated real-time central processing unit at the central microseismic station digitizes and analyzes the incoming data and issues a warning containing location and magnitude estimations. A 50-station EAS of this type in the San Francisco Bay area should cost under $70,000 to install and less than $5,000 annually to maintain

  12. IP Telephony Based Danger Alert Communication System and Its Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Rezac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with development of a web application allowing to deliver pre-recorded voice messages by using SIP generator. The developed application is a part of complex system, which has been evolved in Dpt. of Telecommunications, Technical University of Ostrava for last three years. Our intent is focused on disaster management, the message, which should be delivered within specified time span, is typed in the application and text-to-speech module ensures its transormation to a speech format, after that a particular scenario or warned area is selected and a target group is automatically unloaded. For this purpose, we have defined XML format for delivery of phone numbers which are located in the target area and these numbers are obtained from mobile BTS's (Base transmission stations. The advantage of this aproach lies in controlled delivery and finally the list of unanswered calls is exported and these users are informed via SMS. In the paper, the core of the danger alert system is described including algorithms of the voice message delivery.

  13. Alternative Opportunistic Alert Diffusion to Support Infrastructure Failure during Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farouk Mezghani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic communications present a promising solution for disaster network recovery in emergency situations such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods, where infrastructure might be destroyed. Some recent works in the literature have proposed opportunistic-based disaster recovery solutions, but they have omitted the consideration of mobile devices that come with different network technologies and various initial energy levels. This work presents COPE, an energy-aware Cooperative OPportunistic alErt diffusion scheme for trapped survivors to use during disaster scenarios to report their position and ease their rescue operation. It aims to maintain mobile devices functional for as long as possible for maximum network coverage until reaching proximate rescuers. COPE deals with mobile devices that come with an assortment of networks and aims to perform systematic network interface selection. Furthermore, it considers mobile devices with various energy levels and allows low-energy nodes to hold their charge for longer time with the support of high-energy nodes. A proof-of-concept implementation has been performed to study the doability and efficiency of COPE, and to highlight the lessons learned.

  14. Swift Burst Alert Telescope Data Products and Analysis Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimm, Hans A.; Barbier, Louis M.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cummings, Jay R.; Gehrels, Neil; Parsons, Ann M.; Tueller, Jack; Fenimore, Edward E.; Palmer, David M.; Hullinger, Derek D.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift gamma-ray burst mission serves as the GRB trigger for Swift as well as a sensitive imaging telescope for the energy range of 15-150 keV. All BAT data products will be available to the astronomical community along with a complete set of analysis tools. Gamma-ray burst data products include rapid discovery messages delivered immediately via the GRB Coordinates Network, and event-by-event data from which light curves and spectra of the burst are generated. During nominal operations, the instrument provides accumulated survey histograms with 5-minute time sampling and appropriate energy resolution. These survey accumulations are analyzed in a pipeline to detect new sources and derive light curves of known sources. The 5-minute surveys will also be combined to produce the BAT all sky hard X-ray survey. In addition, the instrument accumulates high time resolution light curves of the brightest BAT sources in multiple energy bands, which are merged into a source light curve database on the ground. The BAT science data products and analysis tools will be described in this paper

  15. DRY TAP: A DIAGNOSTIC ALERT FOR UNDERLYING BONE MARROW PATHOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saqib Qayyum; Yusuf, Rizwan; Zafar, Nadeem; Ali, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Dry tap is an annoying experience in bone marrow (BM) findings, especially in cases where the diagnosis may hinge on BM findings. This study was conducted to determine, on, the basis of bone marrow (BM) trephine biopsy, the frequency of various underlying conditions causing a dry tap, among different age groups. It was a descriptive study carried out at PAF hospital Mianwali, Pakistan from 1" Jan 2009 to 31 Dec 2012. Record of all BM aspirations and trephine biopsies performed during 4 years was retrieved from hospital's laboratory. Total number of BM aspirations and trephines were counted and the subject's ages and genders recorded. Frequencies and percentages of patients with dry tap, in paediatric group ( or = 60 years) were calculated. Diagnoses of patients with dry tap made on BM biopsy were noted for each group and their frequencies calculated. Of 548 BM aspirations, dry tap was encountered in 52 (9.5%) cases. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was the commonest cause of dry tap in paediatric age, seen in 6 (60%) of 10 children. In young to middle-aged group, non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was the commonest cause, found in 6 (30%) of 20 cases. NHL and metastatic tumours, seen in 8 (36.4%) and 6 (27.3%) of 22 patients respectively, were the most frequent causes of dry tap in the elderly. Dry tap, in most of the cases, is like a diagnostic alert for the presence of an underlying BM pathology, nature of which depends upon age group.

  16. Implementation Of CAN Based Intelligent Driver Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Mar Win Kyaw Myo Maung Maung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This system is an attempt to analyze Intelligent Driver Alert System Using CAN Protocol. CAN Controller Area Network offer an efficient communication protocol among sensors actuators controllers and other nodes in real-time applications and is known for its simplicity reliability and high performance. It has given an effective way by which can increase the car and driver safety. This system presents the development and implementation of a digital driving system for a semi-autonomous vehicle to improve the driver-vehicle interface using microcontroller based data acquisition system that uses ADC to bring all control data from analog to digital format. In this system the signal information like temperature LM35 sensor if the temperature increase above the 60 o C and ultrasonic sensor is adapted to measure the distance between the object and vehicle if obstacle is detected within 75cm from the vehicle the controller gives buzzer to the driver speed measure using RPM sensor if revolution increase up to 1200 per minute controller act and to avoid the maximum revolution and to check the fuel level continuously and display in the percentage if fuel level below 20 percent the controller also gives buzzer to the driver and distance fuel level and temperature continuously display on the LCD.

  17. SAFETY ALERT: Electrical insulation defect on safety helmets

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    Contrarily to the information provided until 31 May 2013, some “Euro Protection” safety helmets do not respect any of the requirements for electrical insulation.   This alert concerns the safety helmets identified under the following SCEM numbers: 50.43.30.050.4 white 50.43.30.060.2 yellow 50.43.30.070.0 blue This amounts up to several hundreds of helmets on the CERN site. People who need to wear an electrically insulated safety helmet for their activities, must from now on acquire a duly insulated item to be found on the CERN store under the following SCEM numbers: 50.43.30.210.6: Petzl Vertex ST Helmet (without vent) 50.43.30.300.1: IDRA Helmet with a visor for electrical work As for the people who do not need to wear an electrically insulated helmet for their activities, they can continue working with the aforementioned helmets. For your information, please take note of the maximum use limit of each helmet: “Euro Protection” Safety Helme...

  18. Quality of drug interaction alerts in prescribing and dispensing software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweidan, Michelle; Reeve, James F; Brien, Jo-anne E; Jayasuriya, Pradeep; Martin, Jennifer H; Vernon, Graeme M

    2009-03-02

    To investigate the quality of drug interaction decision support in selected prescribing and dispensing software systems, and to compare this information with that found in a range of reference sources. A comparative study, conducted between June 2006 and February 2007, of the support provided for making decisions about 20 major and 20 minor drug interactions in six prescribing and three dispensing software systems used in primary care in Australia. Five electronic reference sources were evaluated for comparison. Sensitivity, specificity and quality of information; for major interactions: whether information on clinical effects, timeframe and pharmacological mechanism was included, whether management advice was helpful, and succinctness. Six of the nine software systems had a sensitivity rate > or = 90%, detecting most of the major interactions. Only 3/9 systems had a specificity rate of > or = 80%, with other systems providing inappropriate or unhelpful alerts for many minor interactions. Only 2/9 systems provided adequate information about clinical effects for more than half the major drug interactions, and 1/9 provided useful management advice for more than half of these. The reference sources had high sensitivity and in general provided more comprehensive clinical information than the software systems. Drug interaction decision support in commonly used prescribing and dispensing software has significant shortcomings.

  19. Electromagnetic fields in neonatal incubators: the reasons for an alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieni, Carlo Valerio; Nardi, Valentina; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Di Fabio, Sandra; Pinto, Iole; Verrotti, Alberto

    2017-10-23

    Neonatal incubators are important tools for sick newborns in the first few days of life. Nevertheless, their electric engine, often very close to the newborn's body, emits electromagnetic fields (EMF) to which newborns are exposed. Aim of this paper is to review the available literature on EMF exposure in incubators, and the effects of such exposures on newborns that have been investigated. We carried out a systematic review of studies about EMF emissions produced by incubators, using Medline and Embase databases from 1993 to 2017. We retrieved 15 papers that described the EMF exposure in incubators and their biological effects on babies. EMF levels in incubators appear to be between 2 and 100 mG, depending on the distance of the mattress from the electric engine. In some cases, they exceed this range. These values interfere with melatonin production or with vagal tone. Even caregivers are exposed to high EMF, above 200 mG, when working at close contact with the incubators. EMF have been described as potentially hazardous for human health, and values reported in this review are an alert to prevent babies' and caregivers' exposure when close to the incubators. A precautionary approach should be adopted in future incubator design, to prevent high exposures of newborns in incubators and of caregivers as well.

  20. Alert Hypnotic Inductions: Use in Treating Combat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, Bruce; Wark, David M

    2015-10-01

    Alert hypnosis can be a valuable part of the treatment protocol for the resolution of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research indicates that combat veterans with PTSD are more hypnotically susceptible than the general population. For that reason, it is hypothesized that they should be better able to use hypnosis in treatment. As opposed to the traditional modality, eyes-open alert hypnosis allows the patient to take advantage of hypnotic phenomena while participating responsibly in work, social life, and recreation. Three case studies are reported on combat veterans with PTSD who learned to overcome their symptoms using alert hypnosis.

  1. Catch the wave! Time-window sequential analysis of alertness stimulation in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, V S; Vlaskamp, C; Maes, B; Ruijssenaars, A J J M

    2014-01-01

    While optimally activities are provided at those moments when the individual with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is 'focused on the environment' or 'alert', detailed information about the impact that the design and timing of the activity has on alertness is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to shed light on the sequential relationship between different stimuli and alertness levels in individuals with PIMD. Video observations were conducted for 24 participants during one-on-one interactions with a direct support person in multisensory environments. Time-window sequential analyses were conducted for the 120 s following four different stimuli. For the different stimuli, different patterns in terms of alertness became apparent. Following visual stimuli, the alertness levels of the individuals with PIMD changed in waves of about 20 s from 'active alert' to 'passive alert'. While auditory and tactile stimuli led to 'alert' reactions shortly after the stimulation, alertness levels decreased between seconds 20 and 120. Reactions to vestibular stimuli were only visible after 60 s; these were 'active alert' or 'withdrawn'. The results of the present study show that individuals with PIMD show their reactions to stimuli only slightly, so that 'waves' might reflect the optimal alertness pattern for learning and development. Consequently, it is especially important that direct support persons follow and stimulate these individual 'waves' in the activities they provide to their clients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carry a medical ID card and wear a Medic-Alert bracelet to tell emergency workers that you ... For Health Professionals Diabetes Discoveries & Practice Blog Health Communication Programs FAQs About NIDDK Meet the Director Offices & ...

  3. Space Environment Automated Alerts and Anomaly Analysis Assistant (SEA^5) for NASA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a comprehensive analysis and dissemination system (Space Environment Automated Alerts  & Anomaly Analysis Assistant: SEA5) that will...

  4. Algorthms and Regolith Erosion Models for the Alert Code, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC and Duke University have teamed on this STTR to develop the ALERT (Advanced Lunar Exhaust-Regolith Transport) code which will include new developments in...

  5. Electronic Alerts with Automated Consultations Promote Appropriate Antimicrobial Prescriptions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonsuk Kim

    Full Text Available To promote appropriate antimicrobial use in bloodstream infections (BSIs, we initiated an intervention program consisting of electronic alerts and automated infectious diseases consultations in which the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test (ID/AST results were reported.We compared the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescriptions and clinical outcomes in BSIs before and after initiation of the program. Appropriateness was assessed in terms of effective therapy, optimal therapy, de-escalation therapy, and intravenous to oral switch therapy.There were 648 BSI episodes in the pre-program period and 678 in the program period. The proportion of effective, optimal, and de-escalation therapies assessed 24 hours after the reporting of the ID/AST results increased from 87.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 85.5-90.5, 64.4% (95% CI 60.8-68.1, and 10.0% (95% CI 7.5-12.6 in the pre-program period, respectively, to 94.4% (95% CI 92.7-96.1, 81.4% (95% CI 78.4-84.3, and 18.6% (95% CI 15.3-21.9 in the program period, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analyses and log-rank tests revealed that the time to effective (p<0.001, optimal (p<0.001, and de-escalation (p = 0.017 therapies were significantly different in the two periods. Segmented linear regression analysis showed the increase in the proportion of effective (p = 0.015, optimal (p<0.001, and de-escalation (p = 0.010 therapies at 24 hours after reporting, immediately after program initiation. No significant baseline trends or changes in trends were identified. There were no significant differences in time to intravenous to oral switch therapy, length of stay, and 30-day mortality rate.This novel form of stewardship program based on intervention by infectious disease specialists and information technology improved antimicrobial prescriptions in BSIs.

  6. [Importance of health CRM in pandemics and health alerts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillas, Juan José; Ramos, María Isabel; Feito, Francisco R; González, José María; Gersol, Rafael; Ramos, María Belén

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate the importance of the role a health CRM can play in a pandemic or health alert. During the influenza-A pandemic, Salud Responde played a very important role. Its main objective was to establish protocols and citizens advice lines that would avoid patients with mild influenza-A symptoms going to health centre. A triage system was developed around the Siebel CRM (software tool) to achieve this objective. This allowed the Salud Responde staff to establish the severity of the patient depending on the symptoms and the risk factors of the patient, as well as being able to inform, give health advice or refer the patient to medical centres if necessary. All patients (a total of 56,497) who were attended by Salud Responde within its influenza-A service portfolio have been included. Patients who were attended by Salud Responde. The data have been extracted from the Salud Responde data base. Salud Responde attended to 56,497 patients during the influenza-A pandemic, of whom 48,287 patients did not require health care. Salud Responde attended to 56,497 patients, of whom 48,287 patients did not require health care. Apart from any financial savings that this could entail, it contributed to minimising the pandemic, avoiding the patient having to go to a health centre to receive medical care or information, and prevented, to a great extent, the flooding of casualty departments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Should people be physically active outdoors on smog alert days?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Monica E; Li, Qian; Gingrich, Sarah E; Macfarlane, Ronald G; Cheng, Shouquan

    2005-01-01

    Given the importance of physical activity to well-being, there is a need to encourage people to be physically active year-round. At the same time, many people are vulnerable to adverse health effects from air pollution, especially on smog alert days. This study was undertaken to determine when air pollution levels tend to be lowest so that the public can modify strenuous outdoor activity accordingly. Existing hourly air pollution data for Toronto were analyzed to determine how pollutant levels varied from hour to hour throughout each 24-hour day, to identify the times when pollution levels are at their lowest on average. Pollutant levels vary throughout the day, with concentrations of some pollutants (such as ozone, particles and sulphur dioxide) being highest during mid-day, and others (such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide) being highest with morning rush hour. Overall, pollutant concentrations tend to be lowest before seven a.m. and after eight p.m. The public should be encouraged to maintain regular physical activity outdoors while monitoring any air pollution-related symptoms. The intensity of outdoor activity should be reduced, or activities replaced with indoor exercise, at those Air Quality Index (AQI) levels that trigger individual symptoms and when AQI values exceed 50. Where possible, strenuous activity should be taken when and where air pollution levels tend to be lowest, namely early in the morning and in low-traffic areas. More research is required to guide development of health protective advice on exercising when air quality is poor.

  8. Development and Validation of the Air Force Cyber Intruder Alert Testbed (CIAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Airman Systems Directorate Warfighter Interface Division Applied Neuroscience Branch Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 AGENCY...Typically, an automated , algorithmic computer program known as an Intrusion Detection System (IDS) is responsible for the initial inspection of network data...rates were varied from 1 to 10 alerts per minute. A SME-provided severity distribution was explored, within which 25 % of alerts were classified as

  9. Strengthening Laboratory Capacity for Early Warning Alert and Response System (EWARS) in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kandel, Nirmal; Hapsari, Ratna Budi; Riana, Dyah Armi; Setiawaty, Vivi; Larasati, Wita; Wulandari, Endang; Purwanto, Edy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Establishment of Early Warning Alert and Response System (EWARS) in Indonesia was initiated since 2009 in few selected provinces and government was planning to roll out in other provinces. Before initiating this roll out the assessment of performance of EWARS in 2012 was conducted. The aim of the assessment is to strengthen laboratory for supporting to EWARS for alerts testing. Methods: Laboratory capacity mapping tool and laboratory algorithm for twenty two priority diseases of ...

  10. Sleep and Alertness Management during Military Operations: Review and Plan of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    sleep periods and strategic naps, inducing sleep at times when the body clock dictates wakefulness, stimulating performance and alertness at times when... sleep periods and mission effectiveness Operations during late evening or night require an adequate amount of sleep prior to the mission. Crew has to...administration. For shorter sleep periods (naps) Sleep and alertness management during military operations I^L Aeromedical Institute Report number

  11. MedicAlert Foundation turns 35, issues warning to MDs about lookalike bracelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Wharry, S

    1996-01-01

    As it celebrates the 35th anniversary of its founding, the Canadian MedicAlert Foundation wants to educate patients about the importance of using genuine MedicAlert bracelets, or idents, that give physicians access to medical information in emergency situations through a toll-free hot line. The foundation also wants physicians to ensure that patients' medical records contain accurate and up-to-date information.

  12. Assigning a volcano alert level: negotiating uncertainty, risk, and complexity in decision-making processes

    OpenAIRE

    Carina J Fearnley

    2013-01-01

    A volcano alert level system (VALS) is used to communicate warning information from scientists to civil authorities managing volcanic hazards. This paper provides the first evaluation of how the decision-making process behind the assignation of an alert level, using forecasts of volcanic behaviour, operates in practice . Using interviews conducted from 2007 to 2009 at five USGS-managed (US Geological Survey) volcano observatories (Alaska, Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley, and Yellowstone), two k...

  13. Usability flaws of medication-related alerting functions: A systematic qualitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcilly, Romaric; Ammenwerth, Elske; Vasseur, Francis; Roehrer, Erin; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Medication-related alerting functions may include usability flaws that limit their optimal use. A first step on the way to preventing usability flaws is to understand the characteristics of these usability flaws. This systematic qualitative review aims to analyze the type of usability flaws found in medication-related alerting functions. Papers were searched via PubMed, Scopus and Ergonomics Abstracts databases, along with references lists. Paper selection, data extraction and data analysis was performed by two to three Human Factors experts. Meaningful semantic units representing instances of usability flaws were the main data extracted. They were analyzed through qualitative methods: categorization following general usability heuristics and through an inductive process for the flaws specific to medication-related alerting functions. From the 6380 papers initially identified, 26 met all eligibility criteria. The analysis of the papers identified a total of 168 instances of usability flaws that could be classified into 13 categories of usability flaws representing either violations of general usability principles (i.e. they could be found in any system, e.g. guidance and workload issues) or infractions specific to medication-related alerting functions. The latter refer to issues of low signal-to-noise ratio, incomplete content of alerts, transparency, presentation mode and timing, missing alert features, tasks and control distribution. The list of 168 instances of usability flaws of medication-related alerting functions provides a source of knowledge for checking the usability of medication-related alerting functions during their design and evaluation process and ultimately constructs evidence-based usability design principles for these functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Morning Sleep Inertia in Alertness and Performance: Effect of Cognitive Domain and White Light Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Santhi, Nayantara; Groeger, John A.; Archer, Simon N.; Gimenez, Marina; Schlangen, Luc J. M.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at r...

  15. Initiation of activities and alertness in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, V; Vlaskamp, C

    2015-03-01

    When providing activities to individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), direct support persons (DSPs) often face questions that are, among other things, related to the alertness of the person with PIMD. While previous studies have revealed that stimulation might have a greater impact on levels of alertness than the internal conditions of the individual, they have also emphasized the importance of interaction in order to influence the level of alertness. Because the initiation of this interaction has been described as one of its core components, the present study has focused on the relationship between the stimuli presented, the initiation of the activity (by the person with PIMD or the DSP), and the level of alertness of the person with PIMD. Videotapes of the one-to-one interactions of 24 individuals with PIMD and their DSPs in multisensory environments have been scored using the Alertness Observation List. In a sequential analysis, the percentages of stimuli presented were related to the percentages of initiation. Furthermore, two other analyses focused on the relationship between the level of alertness and the preceding and subsequent percentages of initiation respectively. The results show that high percentages of the activities are initiated by the DSPs. In addition, activities that were initiated by the individual with PIMD were preceded and followed by higher percentages of alert behaviour than those initiated by the DSP. Outcomes differed for the different types of stimuli. These results have striking implications for the lives of individuals with PIMD. It is quite possible that DSPs often act too quickly, whereas they would be better off waiting for a reaction on the part of their client. In general, DSPs need to find a balance between being passive themselves and promoting in the individual with PIMD a state of being as active and alert as possible. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of

  16. Development of a nano structured system based on zirconia and Co nanoparticles for thermoluminescent applications: sensor of gamma and UV radiation; Desarrollo de un sistema nanoestructurado a base de zirconia y nanoparticulas de Co para aplicaciones termoluminiscentes: sensor de radiacion gamma y UV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa S, G.

    2014-07-01

    Powders of zirconium IV oxide as well as systems composed of zirconia nano crystals and cobalt nanoparticles (ZrO{sub 2}:NPCo) with dimensions of nanometers were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Zirconia and ZrO{sub 2}:NPCo systems have crystalline structure tetragonal or monoclinic is the heat treatment was to 500 and 1000 degrees Celsius respectively. The characterization of the synthesized materials consisted of a morphological and structural analysis, the information obtained was correlated to its thermoluminescent response induced by gamma and ultraviolet radiation. Thermoluminescent behavior was analyzed on different concentrations of cobalt nanoparticles incorporated during the synthesis process of the zirconium oxide. The monoclinic structure has the highest sensitivity thermoluminescent induced by ultraviolet and gamma radiation. Moreover, the thermoluminescence intensity decreased considerably in ZrO{sub 2}:NPCo systems and was induced the growth of a glow peak at 280 degrees Celsius. In most of the materials analyzed the relation of the thermoluminescence intensity depending the time of irradiation with ultraviolet light showed the saturation of the traps in the material after 60 s of irradiation. Using gamma radiation is observed a behavior linear in the applied dose range between 0.25 Gy and 450 Gy. The growth of a glow peak at 280 degrees Celsius is the most important change in the thermoluminescence characteristics of zirconia. The ZrO{sub 2}:NPCo systems can be used in the development of thermoluminescent dosimeters for detecting gamma radiation fields mainly. (Author)

  17. A novel strategy for evaluating the effects of an electronic test ordering alert message: Optimizing cardiac marker use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Baron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory ordering functions within computerized provider order entry (CPOE systems typically support the display of electronic alert messages to improve test utilization or implement new ordering policies. However, alert strategies have been shown to vary considerably in their success and the characteristics contributing to an alert′s success are poorly understood. Improved methodologies are needed to evaluate alerts and their mechanisms of action. Materials and Methods: Clinicians order inpatient and emergency department laboratory tests using our institutional CPOE system. We analyzed user interaction data captured by our CPOE system to evaluate how clinicians responded to an alert. We evaluated an alert designed to implement an institutional policy restricting the indications for ordering creatine kinase-MB (CKMB. Results: Within 2 months of alert implementation, CKMB-associated searches declined by 79% with a corresponding decline in CKMB orders. Furthermore, while prior to alert implementation, clinicians searching for CKMB ultimately ordered this test 99% of the time, following implementation, only 60% of CKMB searches ultimately led to CKMB test orders. This difference presumably represents clinicians who reconsidered the need for CKMB in response to the alert, demonstrating the alert′s just-in-time advisory capability. In addition, as clinicians repeatedly viewed the alert, there was a "dose-dependant" decrease in the fraction of searches without orders. This presumably reflects the alerting strategy′s long-term educational component, as clinicians aware of the new policy will not search for CKMB when not indicated. Conclusions: Our analytic approach provides insight into the mechanism of a CPOE alert and demonstrates that alerts may act through a combination of just-in-time advice and longer term education. Use of this approach when implementing alerts may prove useful to improve the success of a given alerting

  18. Are we heeding the warning signs? Examining providers' overrides of computerized drug-drug interaction alerts in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slight, Sarah P; Seger, Diane L; Nanji, Karen C; Cho, Insook; Maniam, Nivethietha; Dykes, Patricia C; Bates, David W

    2013-01-01

    Health IT can play a major role in improving patient safety. Computerized physician order entry with decision support can alert providers to potential prescribing errors. However, too many alerts can result in providers ignoring and overriding clinically important ones. To evaluate the appropriateness of providers' drug-drug interaction (DDI) alert overrides, the reasons why they chose to override these alerts, and what actions they took as a consequence of the alert. A cross-sectional, observational study of DDI alerts generated over a three-year period between January 1st, 2009, and December 31st, 2011. Primary care practices affiliated with two Harvard teaching hospitals. The DDI alerts were screened to minimize the number of clinically unimportant warnings. A total of 24,849 DDI alerts were generated in the study period, with 40% accepted. The top 62 providers with the highest override rate were identified and eight overrides randomly selected for each (a total of 496 alert overrides for 438 patients, 3.3% of the sample). Overall, 68.2% (338/496) of the DDI alert overrides were considered appropriate. Among inappropriate overrides, the therapeutic combinations put patients at increased risk of several specific conditions including: serotonin syndrome (21.5%, n=34), cardiotoxicity (16.5%, n=26), or sharp falls in blood pressure or significant hypotension (28.5%, n=45). A small number of drugs and DDIs accounted for a disproportionate share of alert overrides. Of the 121 appropriate alert overrides where the provider indicated they would "monitor as recommended", a detailed chart review revealed that only 35.5% (n=43) actually did. Providers sometimes reported that patients had already taken interacting medications together (15.7%, n=78), despite no evidence to confirm this. We found that providers continue to override important and useful alerts that are likely to cause serious patient injuries, even when relatively few false positive alerts are displayed.

  19. Are we heeding the warning signs? Examining providers' overrides of computerized drug-drug interaction alerts in primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah P Slight

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health IT can play a major role in improving patient safety. Computerized physician order entry with decision support can alert providers to potential prescribing errors. However, too many alerts can result in providers ignoring and overriding clinically important ones. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the appropriateness of providers' drug-drug interaction (DDI alert overrides, the reasons why they chose to override these alerts, and what actions they took as a consequence of the alert. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, observational study of DDI alerts generated over a three-year period between January 1st, 2009, and December 31st, 2011. SETTING: Primary care practices affiliated with two Harvard teaching hospitals. The DDI alerts were screened to minimize the number of clinically unimportant warnings. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 24,849 DDI alerts were generated in the study period, with 40% accepted. The top 62 providers with the highest override rate were identified and eight overrides randomly selected for each (a total of 496 alert overrides for 438 patients, 3.3% of the sample. RESULTS: Overall, 68.2% (338/496 of the DDI alert overrides were considered appropriate. Among inappropriate overrides, the therapeutic combinations put patients at increased risk of several specific conditions including: serotonin syndrome (21.5%, n=34, cardiotoxicity (16.5%, n=26, or sharp falls in blood pressure or significant hypotension (28.5%, n=45. A small number of drugs and DDIs accounted for a disproportionate share of alert overrides. Of the 121 appropriate alert overrides where the provider indicated they would "monitor as recommended", a detailed chart review revealed that only 35.5% (n=43 actually did. Providers sometimes reported that patients had already taken interacting medications together (15.7%, n=78, despite no evidence to confirm this. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: We found that providers continue to override important and useful alerts that are likely

  20. Complex monitoring and alert network for electromagnetic, infrasound, acoustic seismotectonic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Constantin, Ionescu

    2014-05-01

    The Romanian seismicity recorded in 2013 three important events: the largest seismic "silence", the shortest sequence of two earthquakes greater than 4.8R in less than 14 days after the "Romanian National Institute for Earth Physics" (NIEP) developed a digital network, and a very high crustal activity in Galati area. We analyze the variations of the telluric currents and local magnetic field, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, infrasound, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers and animal behavior. The general effect is the first high seismic energy discontinuity that could be a precursor factor. Since 1977 Romania did not register any important earthquake that would generate a sense of fear among the population. In parallel with the seismic network NIEP developed a magneto-telluric, bioseismic, VLF and acoustic network. A large frequency spectrum is covered for mechanical vibration, magnetic and electric field with ground and air sensors. Special software was designed for acquisition, analysis and real time alert using internet direct connection, web page, email and SMS. Many examples show the sensitivity of telluric current, infrasound, acoustic records (from air-ground), and the effect of tectonic stress on the magnetic field or ground deformation. The next update of the multidisciplinary monitoring network will include measurement of ionization, radon emission, sky color, solar radiation and extension of infrasound and VL/LF equipment. NOAA Space Weather satellites transmit solar activity magnetic field data, X ray flux, electron, and proton flux information useful for complex analysis.

  1. Evaluation of alert-based monitoring in a computerised blood transfusion management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabestari, Omid; Gooch, Philip; Goddard, Kate; Golchin, Kamran; Kay, Jonathan; Roudsari, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Blood transfusion is a critical and multi-step process that can be lifesaving. At the same time, any mistakes can be life threatening. An electronic blood transfusion system has been designed to ensure the correctness and safety of the blood transfusion process. The standards for the system include notification mechanisms to inform system managers of any errors in the process. Analysis of system alerts has been used to evaluate the performance of the system. The majority of alerts were classified as 'moderate' in terms of risk (i.e. operational rather than affecting clinical safety) and tended to result from user error. The process of alert acknowledgement and resolution by the system administrator acted as a bottleneck whenever the alerts increased above 100 items per month. Although there was no statistically significant correlation between the number of alerts and the number of transfusions or number of the new users of the system, relatively similar patterns were observable in their charts. A major benefit is that the alerts automatically provided information that would not be captured in a manual transfusion process.

  2. Control-room operator alertness and performance in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, T.l.; Campbell, S.C.; Linder, K.D.; Moore-Ede, M.C

    1990-02-01

    All industries requiring round-the-clock operation must deal with the potential problem of impaired alertness, especially among those who work night shifts. In the nuclear power industry, maintaining optimal alertness and performance of control room operators at all times of day is critical. Many of the toot causes of reduced alertness are straightforward and can be easily remedied with tangible solutions; this manual both discusses the reasons for the problem and suggests solutions. The manual surveys factors that influence operator alertness and performance, including shift schedules, caffeine and alcohol use, diet and family lifestyle factors, the control room enviornment, staffing and overtime practices, and work task design. Specific recommendations are made in each of these areas. The project team, consisting of experts on managing round-the-clock operations and scientists who study human alertness and performance, prepared this manual using the latest scientific research and direct input from shift supervisors and operators via interviews, on-site observation, and questionnaires distributed to every nuclear power station. The material contained within is relevant to shiftwork managers, shift supervisors, and operators, each of whom plays a vital role in maintaining optimal alertness and performance on the job. 90 refs., 35 figs

  3. Entrepreneurial alertness: Study of the Influence of Individual Characteristics and Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilka Pelizza Vier Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research tried to understand which statistical variables associated to the individual and the company influence the entrepreneurial alertness. The sample was constituted by 180 entrepreneurs. The entrepreneurial alertness was measured in agreement with the model of Tang, Kacmar and Busenitz (2012. Descriptive statistical tests and normality exam were developed; as well as checked the validity and reliability of the scale through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA. In order to identify the factors that influenced the alertness we developed multiple linear regression and the ANOVA test to determine possible differences among groups (gender, education. The results showed the negative influence of the educational level and the size of enterprises on alertness level; as well as the negative relationship between age and entrepreneurial experience, furthermore, shows that alert level is not determined by gender difference. One of the main implications of this research is to present factors that can potentiate the effects of the entrepreneurial alertness, enlarging the possibilities of identification of opportunities for individuals.

  4. Design Scheme of Remote Monitoring System Based on Qt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a design scheme of remote monitoring system based on Qt, the scheme of remote monitoring system based on S3C2410 and Qt, with the aid of cross platform development tools Qt and powerful ARM platform design and implementation. The development of remote video surveillance system based on embedded terminal has practical significance and value.

  5. On the alert: Future priorities for alerts in clinical decision support for computerized physician order entry identified from a European workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Coleman (Jamie); I.H. van der Sijs (Heleen); W.E. Haefeli (Walter); S.P. Slight (Sarah); S.E. McDowell (Sarah); H.M. Seidling (Hanna); B. Eiermann (Birgit); J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos); E. Ammenwerth (Elske); R.E. Ferner (Robin); A. Slee (Ann)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Clinical decision support (CDS) for electronic prescribing systems (computerized physician order entry) should help prescribers in the safe and rational use of medicines. However, the best ways to alert users to unsafe or irrational prescribing are uncertain. Specifically,

  6. EEG quantification of alertness: methods for early identification of individuals most susceptible to sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berka, Chris; Levendowski, Daniel J.; Westbrook, Philip; Davis, Gene; Lumicao, Michelle N.; Olmstead, Richard E.; Popovic, Miodrag; Zivkovic, Vladimir T.; Ramsey, Caitlin K.

    2005-05-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) and neurocognitive measures were simultaneously acquired to quantify alertness from 24 participants during 44-hours of sleep deprivation. Performance on a three-choice vigilance task (3C-VT), paired-associate learning/memory task (PAL) and modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT), and sleep technician-observed drowsiness (eye-closures, head-nods, EEG slowing) were quantified. The B-Alert system automatically classifies each second of EEG on an alertness/drowsiness continuum. B-Alert classifications were significantly correlated with technician-observations, visually scored EEG and performance measures. B-Alert classifications during 3C-VT, and technician observations and performance during the 3C-VT and PAL evidenced progressively increasing drowsiness as a result of sleep deprivation with a stabilizing effect observed at the batteries occurring between 0600 and 1100 suggesting a possible circadian effect similar to those reported in previous sleep deprivation studies. Participants were given an opportunity to take a 40-minute nap approximately 24-hours into the sleep deprivation portion of the study (i.e., 7 PM on Saturday). The nap was followed by a transient period of increased alertness. Approximately 8 hours after the nap, behavioral and physiological measures of drowsiness returned to levels prior to the nap. Cluster analysis was used to stratify individuals into three groups based on their level of impairment as a result of sleep deprivation. The combination of B-Alert and neuro-behavioral measures may identify individuals whose performance is most susceptible to sleep deprivation. These objective measures could be applied in an operational setting to provide a "biobehavioral assay" to determine vulnerability to sleep deprivation.

  7. Generator replacement is associated with an increased rate of ICD lead alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Joshua D; Cruz, Cesar; Hoskins, Michael H; Jones, Paul; El-Chami, Mikhael F; Lloyd, Michael S; Leon, Angel; DeLurgio, David B; Langberg, Jonathan J

    2014-10-01

    Lead malfunction is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We have shown that the failure of recalled high-voltage leads significantly increases after ICD generator replacement. However, generator replacement has not been recognized as a predictor of lead failure in general. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of ICD generator exchange on the rate of ICD lead alerts. A time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze a database of remotely monitored ICDs. The model assessed the impact of generator exchange on the rate of lead alerts after ICD generator replacement. The analysis included 60,219 patients followed for 37 ± 19 months. The 5-year lead survival was 99.3% (95% confidence interval 99.2%-99.4%). Of 60,219 patients, 7458 patients (12.9%) underwent ICD generator exchange without lead replacement. After generator replacement, the rate of lead alerts was more than 5-fold higher than in controls with leads of the same age without generator replacement (hazard ratio 5.19; 95% confidence interval 3.45-7.84). A large number of lead alerted within 3 months of generator replacement. Lead alerts were more common in patients with single- vs dual-chamber ICDs and in younger patients. Sex was not associated with lead alerts. Routine generator replacement is associated with a 5-fold higher risk of lead alert compared to age-matched leads without generator replacement. This suggests the need for intense surveillance after generator replacement and the development of techniques to minimize the risk of lead damage during generator replacement. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental verification, and domain definition, of structural alerts for protein binding: epoxides, lactones, nitroso, nitros, aldehydes and ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, M D; Cronin, M T D; Schultz, T W; Enoch, S J

    2013-01-01

    This study outlines how a combination of in chemico and Tetrahymena pyriformis data can be used to define the applicability domain of selected structural alerts within the profilers of the OECD QSAR Toolbox. Thirty-three chemicals were profiled using the OECD and OASIS profilers, enabling the applicability domain of six structural alerts to be defined, the alerts being: epoxides, lactones, nitrosos, nitros, aldehydes and ketones. Analysis of the experimental data showed the applicability domains for the epoxide, nitroso, aldehyde and ketone structural alerts to be well defined. In contrast, the data showed the applicability domains for the lactone and nitro structural alerts needed modifying. The accurate definition of the applicability domain for structural alerts within in silico profilers is important due to their use in the chemical category in predictive and regulatory toxicology. This study highlights the importance of utilizing multiple profilers in category formation.

  9. Seismic Activity: Public Alert and Warning: Legal Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocchetti, D.

    2007-12-01

    As science and technology evolve in ways that increase our ability to inform the public of potentially destructive seismic activity, there are significant legal issues for consideration. Even though countries and even states within the United States have differing legal tenets that could either change or at least re-shape the outcome of specific legal questions that this session will be pondering, there are fundamental legal principals that will permeate. It is often said that the law lags behind society and in particular its technological developments. No doubt in the area of warning the public of impending destructive forces of nature or society, the law will need to do some catching up. The law is probably adequately developed for at least some preliminary discussion of the key issues. No matter the legal scheme, if there is a failure or perceived failure in the system to warn people of a pending emergencies, albeit an earthquake, tsunami, or other predictable event, those who are harmed or believe they are harmed will seek relief under the law. Every day there are situations wherein the failure to warn or to adequately warn is key, such as with faulty or defective consumer products, escaped prisoners, and police high-speed vehicle chases. With alert and warning systems for disaster, however, we have a unique set of facts. Generally, the systems and their failures occur during emergencies or at least during situations under apparently exigent circumstances when the disaster's predictability is widely recognized as less than 100 percent. The law, in particular United States tort law, has been particularly lenient when people and organizations are operating during compressed timeframes and their actions are generally considered necessary to address circumstances relative to public safety. The legal system has been forgiving when the actor that failed or appeared to fail was government. The courts have liberally applied the principal of sovereign immunity to

  10. Neuropatia auditiva: alerta aos pediatras Auditory neuropathy: alert to pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Varela Capone

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Alertar os pediatras sobre a neuropatia auditiva, doença descrita recentemente e ainda desconhecida por muitos médicos. Descrever seus fatores de risco, características clínicas e diagnósticas, com a finalidade de possibilitar uma intervenção terapêutica precoce e eficaz. FONTES DE DADOS: Realizada pesquisa nas bases de dados PubMed, Lilacs e SciELO utilizando os descritores "neuropatia auditiva" e "auditory neuropathy", entre os anos de 1996 e 2010. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A neuropatia auditiva, também conhecida como dessincronia auditiva, descrita em 1996, caracteriza-se clinicamente pela dificuldade na compreensão das palavras, mesmo em casos de perdas auditivas leves ou moderadas. Foi relacionada a diversas neuropatias generalizadas e fatores de risco neonatais, como internação em terapia intensiva, hiperbilirrubinemia, sepse e hipóxia. Após suspeita clínica, o diagnóstico é confirmado pela presença das emissões otoacústicas associada a um potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico ausente ou alterado. Sua terapêutica permanece controversa, tendo como opções a protetização auditiva, o acompanhamento fonoterápico para habilitação ou reabilitação da linguagem e, em casos de insucesso, há relatos de resultados satisfatórios com o implante coclear. CONCLUSÕES: Enfatiza-se a importância do reconhecimento pelo pediatra da neuropatia auditiva, entidade ainda pouco citada na literatura latino-americana da especialidade.OBJECTIVE: To alert pediatricians about the auditory neuropathy, a disease that has been only recently described and is still unknown by many physicians, and to describe its risk factors, clinical and diagnostic features in order to enable an early and effective therapeutic intervention. DATA SOURCE: A literature search using terms such as "auditory neuropathy" and "neuropatia auditiva" has been conducted in the PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO databases between 1996 and 2010. DATA SYNTHESIS

  11. Foodborne Norovirus State of Affairs in the EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapanagiotou, Elias P

    2017-11-25

    The European Union Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (EU RASFF) database is an invaluable instrument for analyzing notifications involving norovirus in food. The aim of this work was to carry out a thorough research of the alert and border rejection notifications submitted in the RASFF database from its onset until 31 August 2017. Some conclusions of interest were: (i) Denmark, France, Italy, the Netherlands and Norway have contributed the majority of alert notifications as notifying countries, (ii) France and Serbia have been cited more often in alert notifications as countries of origin, (iii) Italy and Spain have submitted the majority of border rejection notifications, (iv) Third Countries implicated more frequently in border rejection notifications for norovirus in bivalve molluscs were Vietnam and Tunisia, whereas in fruits and vegetables were China and Serbia, (v) "risk dispersion" from norovirus-contaminated food was narrow since, in just over half of all alert notifications and all of the border rejection notifications, only up to three countries were involved, and (vi) both raw (oysters and berries) and cooked (mussels) food products can present a health risk to consumers. The information retrieved from the RASFF database on norovirus-contaminated food could prove helpful in the planning of future norovirus risk analysis endeavors.

  12. Alertness management in two-person long-haul flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, M. R.; Gander, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    Long-haul flight operations involve cumulative sleep loss, circadian disruption, and extended and irregular duty schedules. These factors reduce pilot alertness and performance on the flightdeck. Conceptually and operationally, alertness management in flight operations can be divided into preventive strategies and operational countermeasures. Preventive strategies are utilized prior to a duty period to mitigate or reduce the effects of sleep loss, circadian disruption and fatigue during subsequent flight operations. Operational countermeasures are used during operations as acute techniques for maintaining performance and alertness. Results from previous NASA Ames field studies document the sleep loss and circadian disruption in three-person long-haul flying and illustrate the application of preventive strategies and operational countermeasures. One strategy that can be used in both a preventive and operational manner is strategic napping. The application and effectiveness of strategic napping in long-haul operations will be discussed. Finally, long-haul flying in two-person highly automated aircraft capable of extended range operations will create new challenges to maintaining pilot alertness and performance. Alertness management issues in this flight environment will be explored.

  13. The role of clinical decision support in pharmacist response to drug-interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke; Steinmetz Pater, Karen; Corman, Shelby

    2015-01-01

    With over 100,000 different types of drug-drug interactions health care professionals rely heavily on automated drug-interaction alerts. Substantial variance in drug-interaction alerts yields opportunities for the use of clinical decision support (CDS) as a potential benefit to pharmacists. The purpose of this research was to determine whether decision support during dispensing impacts pharmacist response to drug-interaction alerts. A brief survey was administered to pharmacists in the community consisting of three patient cases, each containing three drug-drug interactions of varying severity. For each interaction, pharmacists were asked how they would respond, one group of pharmacists was randomly assigned to receive CDS while the other group did not. There were no significant differences in pharmacist response to alerts between the two groups. The control group did appear to be more likely to consult a drug reference, but this difference was not significant. While this study did not demonstrate a significant difference, drug-interaction alerts are still an area where improvements could be made. Advancements have the potential to reduce risk to patients and limit unnecessary hospital admissions. This study suggests that this level of clinical decision support has limited impact, but may prove beneficial by reducing the need to consult additional references. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alert: An Adaptive Low-Latency Event-Driven MAC Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Namboodiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Collection of rare but delay-critical messages from a group of sensor nodes is a key process in many wireless sensor network applications. This is particularly important for security-related applications like intrusion detection and fire alarm systems. An event sensed by multiple sensor nodes in the network can trigger many messages to be sent simultaneously. We present Alert, a MAC protocol for collecting event-triggered urgent messages from a group of sensor nodes with minimum latency and without requiring any cooperation or prescheduling among the senders or between senders and receiver during protocol execution. Alert is designed to handle multiple simultaneous messages from different nodes efficiently and reliably, minimizing the overall delay to collect all messages along with the delay to get the first message. Moreover, the ability of the network to handle a large number of simultaneous messages does not come at the cost of excessive delays when only a few messages need to be handled. We analyze Alert and evaluate its feasibility and performance with an implementation on commodity hardware. We further compare Alert with existing approaches through simulations and show the performance improvement possible through Alert.

  15. A Logic Architecture for 360 ADAS-Alerts for Hazards Detection Based in Driver Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izquierdo-Reyes Javier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work is presented a novel approach for passive safety in vehicles by Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS alert emission in 360° around driver to notify about hazards nearby the vehicle depending on the actions taken by driver per the context. This proposal would create a more robust system compared to current passive ADAS systems since the feedback to driver is in the same direction that hazard is detected (Punctual Sound Source Alert, compared with most assistance systems that emits sounds from the monitor or from the dashboard provoking distractions when emits alerts unnecessarily. The increase of security by this method will allow the driver to be aware of their surroundings even in a very quiet cabin or in a noisy environment. Also, it would detect the steering wheel angle, speed of movement and the activation of turning lights among other alerts, which would allow us to define a critical action during driving; apart from using sensors and cameras aimed at the driver to detect patterns of movement during these critical actions and have a prediction of a possible turn or manoeuvre when driving, refer to Figure 1. It will be necessary a reconfiguration of the alert in frequency, time of action depending upon the level of risk to prevent an accident or to reduce the consequences in an imminent accident.

  16. Improving Radiology Workflow with Automated Examination Tracking and Alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianykh, Oleg S; Jaworsky, Christina; Shore, M T; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2017-07-01

    The modern radiology workflow is a production line where imaging examinations pass in sequence through many steps. In busy clinical environments, even a minor delay in any step can propagate through the system and significantly lengthen the examination process. This is particularly true for the tasks delegated to the human operators, who may be distracted or stressed. We have developed an application to track examinations through a critical part of the workflow, from the image-acquisition scanners to the PACS archive. Our application identifies outliers and actively alerts radiology managers about the need to resolve these problems as soon as they happen. In this study, we investigate how this real-time tracking and alerting affected the speed of examination delivery to the radiologist. We demonstrate that active alerting produced a 3-fold reduction of examination-to-PACS delays. Additionally, we discover an overall improvement in examination-to-PACS delivery, evidence that the tracking and alerts instill a culture where timely processing is essential. By providing supervisors with information about exactly where delays emerge in their workflow and alerting the correct staff to take action, applications like ours create more robust radiology workflow with predictable, timely outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alerting, Orienting or Executive Attention Networks: Differential Patters of Pupil Dilations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny eGeva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Attention capacities, alerting responses, orienting to sensory stimulation, and executive monitoring of performance are considered independent yet interrelated systems. These operations play integral roles in regulating the behavior of diverse species along the evolutionary ladder. Each of the primary attention constructs—alerting, orienting, and executive monitoring— involves salient autonomic correlates as evidenced by changes in reactive pupil dilation (PD, heart rate, and skin conductance. Recent technological advances that use remote high-resolution recording may allow the discernment of temporo-spatial attributes of autonomic responses that characterize the alerting, orienting, and executive monitoring networks during free viewing, irrespective of voluntary performance. This may deepen the understanding of the roles of autonomic regulation in these mental operations and may deepen our understanding of behavioral changes in verbal as well as in non-verbal species.The aim of this study was to explore differences between psychosensory pupil dilation responses in alerting, orienting, and executive conflict monitoring tasks to generate estimates of concurrent locus coeruleus (LC noradrenergic input trajectories in healthy human adults using the attention networks test (ANT. The analysis revealed a construct-specific pattern of pupil responses: alerting is characterized by an early component (Pa, its acceleration enables covert orienting, and executive control is evidenced by a prominent late component (Pe. Pupil dilation characteristics seem to be task-sensitive, allowing exploration of mental operations irrespective of conscious voluntary responses. These data may facilitate development of studies designed to assess mental operations in diverse species using autonomic responses.

  18. The Acute Effects of Intermittent Light Exposure in the Evening on Alertness and Subsequent Sleep Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minqi Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to bright light is typically intermittent in our daily life. However, the acute effects of intermittent light on alertness and sleep have seldom been explored. To investigate this issue, we employed within-subject design and compared the effects of three light conditions: intermittent bright light (30-min pulse of blue-enriched bright light (~1000 lux, ~6000 K alternating with 30-min dim normal light (~5 lux, ~3600 K three times; continuous bright light; and continuous dim light on subjective and objective alertness and subsequent sleep structure. Each light exposure was conducted during the three hours before bedtime. Fifteen healthy volunteers (20 ± 3.4 years; seven males were scheduled to stay in the sleep laboratory for four separated nights (one for adaptation and the others for the light exposures with a period of at least one week between nights. The results showed that when compared with dim light, both intermittent light and continuous bright light significantly increased subjective alertness and decreased sleep efficiency (SE and total sleep time (TST. Intermittent light significantly increased objective alertness than dim light did during the second half of the light-exposure period. Our results suggested that intermittent light was as effective as continuous bright light in their acute effects in enhancing subjective and objective alertness and in negatively impacting subsequent sleep.

  19. Self-awakening improves alertness in the morning and during the day after partial sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroki; Kubo, Tomohide; Kuriyama, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masaya

    2014-12-01

    The ability to awaken at a predetermined time without an alarm is known as self-awakening. Self-awakening improves morning alertness by eliminating sleep inertia; however, the effects of self-awakening on daytime alertness and alertness that has deteriorated as a result of sleep loss are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of self-awakening on both morning and daytime alertness after partial sleep deprivation. Fifteen healthy males without the habit of self-awakening participated in a cross-over trial including forced awakening and self-awakening conditions. In each condition, participants' sleep was restricted to 5 h per night in their homes for 4 consecutive days. They completed a psychomotor vigilance task and subjective ratings of sleepiness immediately upon awakening each morning. On the fourth day, participants completed subjective ratings of sleepiness, a psychomotor vigilance task and sleep latency tests in the laboratory seven times at 1-h intervals during the day. The response speed on the psychomotor vigilance task, in the morning and during the day, was higher in the self-awakening than the forced awakening condition. Our results showed that self-awakening improved alertness (assessed by response speeds) by reducing sleep inertia and alleviated daytime sleepiness heightened by partial sleep deprivation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Alerts Analysis and Visualization in Network-based Intrusion Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dr. Li [University of Tennessee

    2010-08-01

    The alerts produced by network-based intrusion detection systems, e.g. Snort, can be difficult for network administrators to efficiently review and respond to due to the enormous number of alerts generated in a short time frame. This work describes how the visualization of raw IDS alert data assists network administrators in understanding the current state of a network and quickens the process of reviewing and responding to intrusion attempts. The project presented in this work consists of three primary components. The first component provides a visual mapping of the network topology that allows the end-user to easily browse clustered alerts. The second component is based on the flocking behavior of birds such that birds tend to follow other birds with similar behaviors. This component allows the end-user to see the clustering process and provides an efficient means for reviewing alert data. The third component discovers and visualizes patterns of multistage attacks by profiling the attacker s behaviors.

  1. Real time alert system: a disease management system leveraging health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vibha; Sheley, Meena E; Xu, Shawn; Downs, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Rates of preventive and disease management services can be improved by providing automated alerts and reminders to primary care providers (PCPs) using of health information technology (HIT) tools. Using Adaptive Turnaround Documents (ATAD), an existing Health Information Exchange (HIE) infrastructure and office fax machines, we developed a Real Time Alert (RTA) system. RTA is a computerized decision support system (CDSS) that is able to deliver alerts to PCPs statewide for recommended services around the time of the patient visit. RTA is also able to capture structured clinical data from providers using existing fax technology. In this study, we evaluate RTA's performance for alerting PCPs when their patients with asthma have an emergency room visit anywhere in the state. Our results show that RTA was successfully able to deliver "just in time" patient-relevant alerts to PCPs across the state. Furthermore, of those ATADs faxed back and automatically interpreted by the RTA system, 35% reported finding the provided information helpful. The PCPs who reported finding information helpful also reported making a phone call, sending a letter or seeing the patient for follow up care. We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of electronically exchanging important patient related information with the PCPs statewide. This is despite a lack of a link with their electronic health records. We have shown that using our ATAD technology, a PCP can be notified quickly of an important event such as a patient's asthma related emergency room admission so further follow up can happen in near real time.

  2. NDSI products system based on Hadoop platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Jiang, He; Yang, Xiaoxia; Geng, Erhui

    2015-12-01

    Snow is solid state of water resources on earth, and plays an important role in human life. Satellite remote sensing is significant in snow extraction with the advantages of cyclical, macro, comprehensiveness, objectivity, timeliness. With the continuous development of remote sensing technology, remote sensing data access to the trend of multiple platforms, multiple sensors and multiple perspectives. At the same time, in view of the remote sensing data of compute-intensive applications demand increase gradually. However, current the producing system of remote sensing products is in a serial mode, and this kind of production system is used for professional remote sensing researchers mostly, and production systems achieving automatic or semi-automatic production are relatively less. Facing massive remote sensing data, the traditional serial mode producing system with its low efficiency has been difficult to meet the requirements of mass data timely and efficient processing. In order to effectively improve the production efficiency of NDSI products, meet the demand of large-scale remote sensing data processed timely and efficiently, this paper build NDSI products production system based on Hadoop platform, and the system mainly includes the remote sensing image management module, NDSI production module, and system service module. Main research contents and results including: (1)The remote sensing image management module: includes image import and image metadata management two parts. Import mass basis IRS images and NDSI product images (the system performing the production task output) into HDFS file system; At the same time, read the corresponding orbit ranks number, maximum/minimum longitude and latitude, product date, HDFS storage path, Hadoop task ID (NDSI products), and other metadata information, and then create thumbnails, and unique ID number for each record distribution, import it into base/product image metadata database. (2)NDSI production module: includes

  3. Testing and Performance of UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rípa, Jakub; Bin Kim, Min; Lee, Jik

    2014-01-01

    setting, the pixel-to-pixel response to X-rays of different energies, the imaging capability for X-rays, the localization accuracy measurements, and the combined test with the Block for X-ray and Gamma-Radiation Detection (BDRG) scintillator detector to check the efficiency of UBAT are all...... telescope (UBAT) employing the coded mask imaging technique and the detector combination of Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate (YSO) scintillating crystals and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. The results of the laboratory tests of UBAT’s functionality and performance are described in this article. The detector...

  4. Modeling Pilot Behavior for Assessing Integrated Alert and Notification Systems on Flight Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Mathew; Schnell, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Numerous new flight deck configurations for caution, warning, and alerts can be conceived; yet testing them with human-in-the-Ioop experiments to evaluate each one would not be practical. New sensors, instruments, and displays are being put into cockpits every day and this is particularly true as we enter the dawn of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). By modeling pilot behavior in a computer simulation, an unlimited number of unique caution, warning, and alert configurations can be evaluated 24/7 by a computer. These computer simulations can then identify the most promising candidate formats to further evaluate in higher fidelity, but more costly, Human-in-the-Ioop (HITL) simulations. Evaluations using batch simulations with human performance models saves time, money, and enables a broader consideration of possible caution, warning, and alerting configurations for future flight decks.

  5. When endogenous spatial attention improves conscious perception: effects of alerting and bottom-up activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Fabiano; Lupiáñez, Juan; Chica, Ana B

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have consistently demonstrated that conscious perception interacts with exogenous attentional orienting, but it can be dissociated from endogenous attentional orienting (Chica Lasaponara, et al., 2011; Wyart & Tallon-Baudry, 2008). It has been hypothesized that enhanced conscious processing at exogenously attended locations results from a synergistic action of spatial orienting, bottom-up activation, and phasic alerting induced by the abrupt onset of the exogenous cue (Chica, Lasaponara, et al., 2011). Instead, as endogenous cues need more time to be interpreted, the phasic alerting they produce may have dissipated when the target appears. Furthermore, endogenous cues presumably elicit a weak bottom-up activation at the cued location. Consistent with these hypotheses, we observed that endogenous attention modulated conscious perception, but only when phasic alerting or bottom-up activation was increased. Results are discussed in the context of recent theoretical models of consciousness (Dehaene, Changeux, Naccache, Sackur, & Sergent, 2006). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Feature-based alert correlation in security systems using self organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munesh; Siddique, Shoaib; Noor, Humera

    2009-04-01

    The security of the networks has been an important concern for any organization. This is especially important for the defense sector as to get unauthorized access to the sensitive information of an organization has been the prime desire for cyber criminals. Many network security techniques like Firewall, VPN Concentrator etc. are deployed at the perimeter of network to deal with attack(s) that occur(s) from exterior of network. But any vulnerability that causes to penetrate the network's perimeter of defense, can exploit the entire network. To deal with such vulnerabilities a system has been evolved with the purpose of generating an alert for any malicious activity triggered against the network and its resources, termed as Intrusion Detection System (IDS). The traditional IDS have still some deficiencies like generating large number of alerts, containing both true and false one etc. By automatically classifying (correlating) various alerts, the high-level analysis of the security status of network can be identified and the job of network security administrator becomes much easier. In this paper we propose to utilize Self Organizing Maps (SOM); an Artificial Neural Network for correlating large amount of logged intrusion alerts based on generic features such as Source/Destination IP Addresses, Port No, Signature ID etc. The different ways in which alerts can be correlated by Artificial Intelligence techniques are also discussed. . We've shown that the strategy described in the paper improves the efficiency of IDS by better correlating the alerts, leading to reduced false positives and increased competence of network administrator.

  7. Operator alertness and performance on 8-hour and 12-hour work shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, T.L.; Campbell, S.S.; Dawson, D.; Moore-Ede, M.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to the alertness and performance problems of rotational shiftworkers in the nuclear power industry. Growing awareness of higher rates of human errors and accidents on night shifts and reports of operations personnel falling asleep on the job have contributed to the heightened interest in this subject. The industry is now considering the effects of different shift rotation systems, including evaluation of the most recent of industry trends in shift scheduling-schedules that include 12 hour work shifts. Surveys show that within the past 5 years about 20% of commercially operational nuclear power plants have instituted schedules that use only 12 hour shifts, or schedules using a combination of 8-hour and 12-hour shifts. Many more plants routinely use 12-hour work shifts during plant outages and refueling operations. In response to this growing trend, the NRC has funded research which is a first attempt to compare alertness, operator performance, and sleep-wake patterns in subjects working simulated 8-hour and 12-hour shifts at the Human Alertness Research Center (HARC), located at the Institute of Circadian Physiology in Boston, MA. This paper will describe in greater detail the design of the study, measurement techniques for alertness and sleep, work routine, work task performance measures, and cognitive performance test protocols. It will review the role of circadian factors in human alertness and performance, and discuss previous research findings in this area. It will discuss other variables that are known to influence human alertness in the workplace, such as caffeine, alcohol, and working environment. The physiological basis for shift worker sleep problems will be explained in the context of the ongoing research project at HARC. Finally, the paper presents previous research on shift work and fatigue which may be relevant to a comparison of 8-hour and 12-hour shifts

  8. Performance and alertness effects of caffeine, dextroamphetamine, and modafinil during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesensten, Nancy J; Killgore, William D S; Balkin, Thomas J

    2005-09-01

    Stimulants may provide short-term performance and alertness enhancement during sleep loss. Caffeine 600 mg, d-amphetamine 20 mg, and modafinil 400 mg were compared during 85 h of total sleep deprivation to determine the extent to which the three agents restored performance on simple psychomotor tasks, objective alertness and tasks of executive functions. Forty-eight healthy young adults remained awake for 85 h. Performance and alertness tests were administered bi-hourly from 8:00 hours day 2 to 19:00 hours day 5. At 23:50 hours on day 4 (after 64 h awake), subjects ingested placebo, caffeine 600 mg, dextroamphetamine 20 mg, or modafinil 400 mg (n=12 per group). Performance and alertness testing continued, and probe tasks of executive function were administered intermittently until the recovery sleep period (20:00 hours day 5 to 8:00 hours day 5). Bi-hourly postrecovery sleep testing occurred from 10:00 hours to 16:00 hours day 6. All three agents improved psychomotor vigilance speed and objectively measured alertness relative to placebo. Drugs did not affect recovery sleep, and postrecovery sleep performance for all drug groups was at presleep deprivation levels. Effects on executive function tasks were mixed, with improvement on some tasks with caffeine and modafinil, and apparent decrements with dextroamphetamine on others. At the doses tested, caffeine, dextroamphetamine, and modafinil are equally effective for approximately 2-4 h in restoring simple psychomotor performance and objective alertness. The duration of these benefits vary in accordance with the different elimination rates of the drugs. Whether caffeine, dextroamphetamine, and modafinil differentially restore executive functions during sleep deprivation remains unclear.

  9. Using NicAlert strips to verify smoking status among pregnant cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaalema, Diann E; Higgins, Stephen T; Bradstreet, Matthew P; Heil, Sarah H; Bernstein, Ira M

    2011-12-01

    Decreasing smoking during pregnancy is an important public health priority. An important step towards decreasing smoking during pregnancy is wider dissemination of evidence-based smoking cessation interventions. One such intervention is contingency management wherein mothers earn vouchers exchangeable for retail items contingent on biochemically verified smoking abstinence. Wider dissemination may be possible by using smoking verification methods that require minimal training and equipment. One possibility is to use a cotinine-sensitive dipstick (NicAlert) rather than a bench-top cotinine analyzer, which is expensive and requires relatively extensive technician expertise, or breath carbon monoxide analysis, which is relatively nonspecific. The present study was conducted to begin examining the utility of cotinine-sensitive dipsticks for this purpose. Fifty urine samples from pregnant women enrolled in a smoking cessation program were analyzed to compare three different methods for verifying smoking status: NicAlert strips, a bench-top enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) analyzer, and gas chromatography (GC), the current gold standard for determining cotinine levels in urine. Agreement between GC and NicAlert results were high (96%) and comparable to agreement between GC and EMIT results (94%). Semi-quantitative measurements using NicAlert were low with only 30% of samples in agreement between GC and specific ranges given on the strips. NicAlert strips appear to be a valid measure of determining smoking status among pregnant smokers although not of absolute cotinine concentration. With minimal training and equipment required, NicAlert strips provide a potentially practical method for using urine cotinine to verify smoking status in community treatment settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of caffeine on skin and core temperatures, alertness, and recovery sleep during circadian misalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHill, Andrew W; Smith, Benjamin J; Wright, Kenneth P

    2014-04-01

    Caffeine promotes wakefulness during night shift work, although it also disturbs subsequent daytime sleep. Increased alertness by caffeine is associated with a higher core body temperature (CBT). A lower CBT and a narrow distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG) have been reported to be associated with improved sleep, yet whether caffeine influences the DPG is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the use caffeine during nighttime total sleep deprivation would reduce the DPG, increase CBT and alertness, and disturb subsequent daytime recovery sleep. We also expected that a greater widening of the DPG prior to sleep would be associated with a greater degree of sleep disturbance. Thirty healthy adults (9 females) aged 21.6 ± 3.5 years participated in a double-blind, 28-h modified constant routine protocol. At 23 h of wakefulness, participants in the treatment condition (n = 10) were given 2.9 mg/kg caffeine, equivalent to ~200 mg (or 2 espressos) for a 70-kg adult, 5 h before a daytime recovery sleep episode. Throughout the protocol, core and skin body temperatures, DPG, sleep architecture, and subjective alertness and mood were measured. Prior to sleep, caffeine significantly widened the DPG and increased CBT, alertness, and clear-headedness (p Caffeine also disturbed daytime recovery sleep (p sleep were associated with a longer latency to sleep, and a wider DPG was associated with disturbed recovery sleep (i.e., increased wakefulness after sleep onset, increased stage 1 sleep, decreased sleep efficiency, and decreased slow wave sleep) (p caffeine may represent a component of the integrated physiological response by which caffeine improves alertness and disturbs subsequent daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, our findings highlight that sleep disturbances associated with caffeine consumed near the circadian trough of alertness are still present when daytime recovery sleep occurs 5 h or approximately 1 half-life later.

  11. RED Alert – Early warning or detection of global re-emerging infectious disease (RED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Alina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This is the PDF of a presentation for a webinar given by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the early warning or detection of global re-emerging infectious disease (RED). First, there is an overview of LANL biosurveillance tools. Then, information is given about RED Alert. Next, a demonstration is given of a component prototype. RED Alert is an analysis tool that can provide early warning or detection of the re-emergence of an infectious disease at the global level, but through a local lens.

  12. Developing Network Situational Awareness through Visualizations of Fused Intrusion Detection System Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Phishing with Plug and Play Exploit. In this attack, the at- tacker sets up a website offering the visitor free “ porn ” if they sign up. The user is allowed... porn alert so its unclear at the moment if 100.20.3.127 is compromised and if so, how it is compromised because there are no other alerts at this time...unauthorized porn website. The investigation would conclude that the attacker at 51.251.22.183 used the information gained from the website to open an

  13. Detection and Alert of muscle fatigue considering a Surface Electromyography Chaotic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, V; Romero, J F; Amestegui, M

    2011-01-01

    This work propose a detection and alert algorithm for muscle fatigue in paraplegic patients undergoing electro-therapy sessions. The procedure is based on a mathematical chaotic model emulating physiological signals and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). The chaotic model developed is based on a logistic map that provides suitable data accomplishing some physiological signal class patterns. The CWT was applied to signals generated by the model and the resulting vector was obtained through Total Wavelet Entropy (TWE). In this sense, the presented work propose a viable and practical alert and detection algorithm for muscle fatigue.

  14. Detection and Alert of muscle fatigue considering a Surface Electromyography Chaotic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, V; Romero, J F [Engineering, Modeling and Applied Social Sciences Center, ABC Federal University, Santo Andr - SP (Brazil); Amestegui, M, E-mail: victoria.herrera@ufabc.edu.br [Engineering Faculty, Electronics Engineering, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2011-03-01

    This work propose a detection and alert algorithm for muscle fatigue in paraplegic patients undergoing electro-therapy sessions. The procedure is based on a mathematical chaotic model emulating physiological signals and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). The chaotic model developed is based on a logistic map that provides suitable data accomplishing some physiological signal class patterns. The CWT was applied to signals generated by the model and the resulting vector was obtained through Total Wavelet Entropy (TWE). In this sense, the presented work propose a viable and practical alert and detection algorithm for muscle fatigue.

  15. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  16. Tattoos: could they be used to advantage as a medical alert in oral and maxillofacial surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, S D; Brennan, P A

    2017-04-01

    Many publications have addressed the medical complications of tattoos, but to our knowledge there are no reports of their use to alert people in our field of potentially dangerous conditions. We present a new way to inform oral and maxillofacial colleagues about patients with a history of malignant hyperthermia (or any other life-threatening medical problem) and discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of medical alert tattoos. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Taking up national safety alerts to improve patient safety in hospitals: The perspective of healthcare quality and risk managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Schwappach, David

    2016-01-01

    National safety alert systems publish relevant information to improve patient safety in hospitals. However, the information has to be transformed into local action to have an effect on patient safety. We studied three research questions: How do Swiss healthcare quality and risk managers (qm/rm(1)) see their own role in learning from safety alerts issued by the Swiss national voluntary reporting and analysis system? What are their attitudes towards and evaluations of the alerts, and which types of improvement actions were fostered by the safety alerts? A survey was developed and applied to Swiss healthcare risk and quality managers, with a response rate of 39 % (n=116). Descriptive statistics are presented. The qm/rm disseminate and communicate with a broad variety of professional groups about the alerts. While most respondents felt that they should know the alerts and their contents, only a part of them felt responsible for driving organizational change based on the recommendations. However, most respondents used safety alerts to back up their own patient safety goals. The alerts were evaluated positively on various dimensions such as usefulness and were considered as standards of good practice by the majority of the respondents. A range of organizational responses was applied, with disseminating information being the most common. An active role is related to using safety alerts for backing up own patient safety goals. To support an active role of qm/rm in their hospital's learning from safety alerts, appropriate organizational structures should be developed. Furthermore, they could be given special information or training to act as an information hub on the issues discussed in the alerts. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Validation of Test Performance and Clinical Time Zero for an Electronic Health Record Embedded Severe Sepsis Alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolnick, Joshua; Downing, N Lance; Shepard, John; Chu, Weihan; Tam, Julia; Wessels, Alexander; Li, Ron; Dietrich, Brian; Rudy, Michael; Castaneda, Leon; Shieh, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Increasing use of EHRs has generated interest in the potential of computerized clinical decision support to improve treatment of sepsis. Electronic sepsis alerts have had mixed results due to poor test characteristics, the inability to detect sepsis in a timely fashion and the use of outside software limiting widespread adoption. We describe the development, evaluation and validation of an accurate and timely severe sepsis alert with the potential to impact sepsis management. To develop, evaluate, and validate an accurate and timely severe sepsis alert embedded in a commercial EHR. The sepsis alert was developed by identifying the most common severe sepsis criteria among a cohort of patients with ICD 9 codes indicating a diagnosis of sepsis. This alert requires criteria in three categories: indicators of a systemic inflammatory response, evidence of suspected infection from physician orders, and markers of organ dysfunction. Chart review was used to evaluate test performance and the ability to detect clinical time zero, the point in time when a patient develops severe sepsis. Two physicians reviewed 100 positive cases and 75 negative cases. Based on this review, sensitivity was 74.5%, specificity was 86.0%, the positive predictive value was 50.3%, and the negative predictive value was 94.7%. The most common source of end-organ dysfunction was MAP less than 70 mm/Hg (59%). The alert was triggered at clinical time zero in 41% of cases and within three hours in 53.6% of cases. 96% of alerts triggered before a manual nurse screen. We are the first to report the time between a sepsis alert and physician chart-review clinical time zero. Incorporating physician orders in the alert criteria improves specificity while maintaining sensitivity, which is important to reduce alert fatigue. By leveraging standard EHR functionality, this alert could be implemented by other healthcare systems.

  19. Stimulated reporting: the impact of US food and drug administration-issued alerts on the adverse event reporting system (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Keith B; Demakas, Andrea R; Dimbil, Mo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Erdman, Colin B

    2014-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses the Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to support post-marketing safety surveillance programs. Currently, almost one million case reports are submitted to FAERS each year, making it a vast repository of drug safety information. Sometimes cited as a limitation of FAERS, however, is the assumption that "stimulated reporting" of adverse events (AEs) occurs in response to warnings, alerts, and label changes that are issued by the FDA. To determine the extent of "stimulated reporting" in the modern-day FAERS database. One hundred drugs approved by the FDA between 2001 and 2010 were included in this analysis. FDA alerts were obtained by a comprehensive search of the FDA's MedWatch and main websites. Publicly available FAERS data were used to assess the "primary suspect" AE reporting pattern for up to four quarters before, and after, the issuance of an FDA alert. A few drugs did demonstrate "stimulated reporting" trends. A majority of the drugs, however, showed little evidence for significant reporting changes associated with the issuance of alerts. When we compared the percentage changes in reporting after an FDA alert with those after a sham "control alert", the overall reporting trends appeared to be quite similar. Of 100 drugs analyzed for short-term reporting trends, 21 real alerts and 25 sham alerts demonstrated an increase (greater than or equal to 1 %) in reporting. The long-term analysis of 91 drugs showed that 24 real alerts and 28 sham alerts demonstrated a greater than or equal to 1 % increase. Our results suggest that most of modern day FAERS reporting is not significantly affected by the issuance of FDA alerts.

  20. A data acquisition system based on Windows for Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Ge; Wang Jian; Nie Jimin

    2000-01-01

    As a new operating system, Windows is becoming a leading operating system in PC world. The authors will describe a new data acquisition system based on Windows for Moessbauer spectroscopy. Compared with the old data acquisition system based on MS-DOS, new system is easier in the man-machine interaction, runs in multi-process way and uses more resources of Windows

  1. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  2. Development of case-based medication alerting and recommender system: a new approach to prevention for medication error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyo, Kengo; Nittami, Yuki S; Kitagawa, Yoichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new alerting and recommender system for preventing medication errors. In recent years, alerting systems have been widely implemented, but because these systems apply a same static threshold for all patients in all cases, they produce excessive alerts and subject physicians to "alert fatigue". We believe that the most commonly-written prescription for a patient's status is the safest one. From this standpoint, we developed a real-time case-based medication alerting and recommender system linked to a database of past prescriptions. When a physician issues his or her prescription, our system dynamically compares it with past ones for similar patients in the database. An analysis of the 10 most frequently-used drugs in the University of Tokyo Hospital revealed that our system reduced the number of false alerts compared to the traditional static alert method. Our system contributes to the creation of alerts that are appropriate for patients' clinical conditions and based on physicians' empirical discretion.

  3. Catch the wave! Time-window sequential analysis of alertness stimulation in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munde, V. S.; Vlaskamp, C.; Maes, B.; Ruijssenaars, A. J. J. M.

    BackgroundWhile optimally activities are provided at those moments when the individual with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is focused on the environment' or alert', detailed information about the impact that the design and timing of the activity has on alertness is lacking.

  4. Medical diagnostic system based on image receivers of various spectral ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniakova, Olga G.; Ishmuhametov, Airat I.

    1996-04-01

    The medical diagnostics is one of the most important spheres of application of measuring and diagnostic systems based on introscopy methods. The modern medical introscopy diagnostics has in its arsenal many various devices using x-ray radiation with energy from 10 to 100 keV (roentgenological diagnostics, x-ray computer tomography), gamma radiation of radionuclides with energy 10 - 300 keV (radionuclide diagnostics), infrared radiation of human body (thermovision), optical radiation range (endoscopic diagnostics). The application of high- frequency sound fluctuations (ultrasonography) is also effective for tasks of medical diagnostics. The microwave sources based on nuclear magnetic resonance (magnetic resonance imaging) are used for reception the images of internal structures of human body. The prompt development of modern medical introscopy diagnostics observable in last years is connected first of all with wide application of computer facilities for receiving, processing, restoration and analysis of images. It gives the additional opportunity to increase the reliability, accuracy, sensitivity and timeliness of diagnostic decisions. The images received both by scintillation gamma camera and by specialized x-ray or gamma radiation video camera based on charge- coupled devices can be used for evaluation of structural and functional state of vital organs and systems. One of the main tasks at development of medical diagnostic systems is the reduction of optical image to form that maximally facilitates its analysis to the doctor. The article considers the diagnostic system oriented on receiving, processing and evaluating data of radionuclide imaging studies.

  5. USGS earthquake hazards program (EHP) GPS use case : earthquake early warning (EEW) and shake alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    GPS Adjacent Band Workshop VI RTCA Inc., Washington D.C., 30 March 2017. USGS GPS receiver use case - Real-Time GPS for EEW -Continued: CRITICAL EFFECT - The GNSS component of the Shake Alert system augments the inertial sensors and is especial...

  6. Earthquake early Warning ShakeAlert system: West coast wide production prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Monica D.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Given, Douglas; Guiwits, Stephen; Neuhauser, Doug; Hensen, Ivan; Hartog, Renate; Bodin, Paul; Kress, Victor; Thompson, Stephen; Felizardo, Claude; Brody, Jeff; Bhadha, Rayo; Schwarz, Stan

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) is an application of seismological science that can give people, as well as mechanical and electrical systems, up to tens of seconds to take protective actions before peak earthquake shaking arrives at a location. Since 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey has been working in collaboration with several partners to develop EEW for the United States. The goal is to create and operate an EEW system, called ShakeAlert, for the highest risk areas of the United States, starting with the West Coast states of California, Oregon, and Washington. In early 2016, the Production Prototype v.1.0 was established for California; then, in early 2017, v.1.2 was established for the West Coast, with earthquake notifications being distributed to a group of beta users in California, Oregon, and Washington. The new ShakeAlert Production Prototype was an outgrowth from an earlier demonstration EEW system that began sending test notifications to selected users in California in January 2012. ShakeAlert leverages the considerable physical, technical, and organizational earthquake monitoring infrastructure of the Advanced National Seismic System, a nationwide federation of cooperating seismic networks. When fully implemented, the ShakeAlert system may reduce damage and injury caused by large earthquakes, improve the nation’s resilience, and speed recovery.

  7. The Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach With the ALAS Alerting Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Raleigh B.; Madden, Michael M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Butler, Ricky W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of a proposed concept for closely spaced parallel runways called the Simplified Aircraft-based Paired Approach (SAPA). This procedure depends upon a new alerting algorithm called the Adjacent Landing Alerting System (ALAS). This study used both low fidelity and high fidelity simulations to validate the SAPA procedure and test the performance of the new alerting algorithm. The low fidelity simulation enabled a determination of minimum approach distance for the worst case over millions of scenarios. The high fidelity simulation enabled an accurate determination of timings and minimum approach distance in the presence of realistic trajectories, communication latencies, and total system error for 108 test cases. The SAPA procedure and the ALAS alerting algorithm were applied to the 750-ft parallel spacing (e.g., SFO 28L/28R) approach problem. With the SAPA procedure as defined in this paper, this study concludes that a 750-ft application does not appear to be feasible, but preliminary results for 1000-ft parallel runways look promising.

  8. Communication of Unexpected and Significant Findings on Chest Radiographs With an Automated PACS Alert System.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Sara A

    2014-08-01

    An integral part of realizing the enormous potential of imaging in patient care is close communication between radiologists and referring physicians. One key element of this process is the communication of unexpected significant findings. The authors examined the performance of a PACS-based alert system in the appropriate communication of reports containing unexpected significant findings to referring physicians.

  9. Non-visual biological effects of light on human cognition, alertness, and mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaye; Wang, Huihui; Shen, Junfei; Sun, Peng; Xie, Ting; Zhang, Siman; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2017-09-01

    Light exerts non-visual effects on a wide range of biological functions and behavior apart from the visual effect. Light can regulate human circadian rhythms, like the secretion of melatonin and cortisol. Light also has influence on body's physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature. However, human cognitive performance, alertness and mood under different lighting conditions have not been considered thoroughly especially for the complicated visual task like surgical operating procedure. In this paper, an experiment was conducted to investigate the cognition, alertness and mood of healthy participants in a simulated operating room (OR) in the hospital. A LED surgical lamp was used as the light source, which is mixed by three color LEDs (amber, green and blue). The surgical lamp is flexible on both spectrum and intensity. Exposed to different light settings, which are varied from color temperature and luminance, participants were asked to take psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) for alertness measurement, alphabet test for cognitive performance measurement, positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS) for mood measurement. The result showed the participants' cognitive performance, alertness and mood are related to the color temperature and luminance of the LED light. This research will have a guidance for the surgical lighting environment, which can not only enhance doctors' efficiency during the operations, but also create a positive and peaceful surgical lighting environment.

  10. 0011-0030.Content Alerts in IEEE XploreLearn.pdf | 01 | 021 | reso ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; public; Volumes; reso; 021; 01; 0011-0030.Content Alerts in IEEE XploreLearn.pdf. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ...

  11. Global Trade Alert (GTA) - Phase II: Year 2 - Monitoring and Analysis ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Global Trade Alert (GTA), funded under project 105821, endeavors to provide information in real time on national measures that are likely to discriminate against foreign commerce. Building on inputs supplied by regional institutional partners and international experts, suspected protectionist measures are identified, ...

  12. Visual perception affected by motivation and alertness controlled by a noninvasive brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Maksimenko

    Full Text Available The influence of motivation and alertness on brain activity associated with visual perception was studied experimentally using the Necker cube, which ambiguity was controlled by the contrast of its ribs. The wavelet analysis of recorded multichannel electroencephalograms (EEG allowed us to distinguish two different scenarios while the brain processed the ambiguous stimulus. The first scenario is characterized by a particular destruction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz with a simultaneous increase in beta-wave activity (20-30 Hz, whereas in the second scenario, the beta rhythm is not well pronounced while the alpha-wave energy remains unchanged. The experiments were carried out with a group of financially motivated subjects and another group of unpaid volunteers. It was found that the first scenario occurred mainly in the motivated group. This can be explained by the increased alertness of the motivated subjects. The prevalence of the first scenario was also observed in a group of subjects to whom images with higher ambiguity were presented. We believe that the revealed scenarios can occur not only during the perception of bistable images, but also in other perceptual tasks requiring decision making. The obtained results may have important applications for monitoring and controlling human alertness in situations which need substantial attention. On the base of the obtained results we built a brain-computer interface to estimate and control the degree of alertness in real time.

  13. Impact of Entrepreneurship Training on Entrepreneurial Efficacy and Alertness among Adolescent Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Ho Ringo Ho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Our study focuses on the impact of systematic entrepreneurship training comprising both active and passive learning activities on entrepreneurial alertness and efficacy among adolescent youth. Reports from a two-wave online survey among 328 students from five secondary schools (aged 13–16 years; 34.8% male and 65.2% female reveal that those who went through entrepreneurship training (treatment group, N = 142 had significantly higher entrepreneurial alertness and efficacy levels compared to those who did not go through training (control group, N = 186. We also find that even with gender effects accounted for, the higher entrepreneurial alertness and efficacy levels in the treatment group are due in part to both passive and active/hands-on elements of the program. Our study offers direct evidence that conducting entrepreneurship training programs among secondary school students could be an effective means to enhance entrepreneurial competencies among the youth. Specifically, our findings highlight the value of entrepreneurial training in improving age-appropriate competencies of entrepreneurial alertness and efficacy.

  14. Discussion of “Attitude of Physicians Towards Automatic Alerting in Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, D. W.; Baysari, M. T.; Dugas, M.

    2013-01-01

    With these comments on the paper “Attitude of Physicians Towards Automatic Alerting in Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems”, written by Martin Jung and coauthors, with Dr. Elske Ammenwerth as senior author, the journal wants to stimulate a broad discussion on computerized physician order e...

  15. 78 FR 49292 - American Medical Alert Corporation, DBA Tunstall, Clovis, New Mexico; Amended Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Corporation, DBA Tunstall, Clovis, New Mexico; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker... reports that the information supplied during the investigation pertains to the location in Clovis, New... follows: All workers of American Medical Alert Corporation, doing business as Tunstall, Clovis, New Mexico...

  16. Alertness in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munde, V. S.; Vlaskamp, C.; Ruijssenaars, A. J. J. M.; Nakken, H.

    2009-01-01

    Direct Support persons (DSPs) often face problems in observing and determining alertness in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). A literature study was carried out to gather information about the problems just described. A search of two electronic databases and

  17. ATLANTIDES: An Architecture for Alert Verification in Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Crispo, Bruno; Etalle, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    We present an architecture designed for alert verification (i.e., to reduce false positives) in network intrusion-detection systems. Our technique is based on a systematic (and automatic) anomaly-based analysis of the system output, which provides useful context information regarding the network

  18. 14 CFR 121.360 - Ground proximity warning-glide slope deviation alerting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground proximity warning-glide slope... Equipment Requirements § 121.360 Ground proximity warning-glide slope deviation alerting system. (a) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane unless it is equipped with a ground proximity warning...

  19. Response of wind shear warning systems to turbulence with implication of nuisance alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Roland L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to predict the inherent turbulence response characteristics of candidate wind shear warning system concepts and to assess the potential for nuisance alerts. Information on the detection system and associated signal processing, physical and mathematical models, wind shear factor root mean square turbulence response and the standard deviation of the wind shear factor due to turbulence is given in vugraph form.

  20. FloodAlert: a simplified radar-based EWS for urban flood warning

    OpenAIRE

    Llort Pavon, Xavier; Sánchez-Diezma Guijarro, Rafael; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Sancho, David; Berenguer Ferrer, Marc; Sempere Torres, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present FloodAlert, a simplified flood Early Warning System [EWS] based on the use of radar observations and radar nowcasting to issue local flood warnings. It is a web-based platform and it is complemented with a flexible and powerful dissemination module.

  1. The initial development and assessment of an automatic alert warning of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark; Sitch, Alice; Dowswell, George

    2011-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) recognition by clinicians has been shown to be suboptimal. Little work has focused on the use of an automated warning of a rise in a patient's creatinine, indicating AKI. Over 3 months in 2008 we ran a prospective observational study of 'alerts' sent by our Integrated Clinical Environment pathology system, identifying all patients with a ≥ 75% rise in their creatinine from its previous value. Information was collected on subsequent renal function, comorbidities and other potential predictors of survival. In the 3-month period 463 adults with a first episode of AKI were identified by an alert; 87% were hospital inpatients. Median follow-up was 404 days. In-hospital mortality was 36% for those who were admitted. After performing Weibull survival analysis, significant predictors of poorer survival were the presence of metastatic, haematological or lower risk malignancy, a residential or nursing home address and higher age, number of non-malignant comorbidities or C-reactive protein level. Predictors of better survival were higher serum albumin level or nadir GFR during the episode and Indian subcontinent ethnicity. A receiver-operator curve for a prognostic score developed from the analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.84. The alerts identified a group of AKI patients who are at moderately high risk of death. The prognostic score using a combination of covariates shows early promise. Both the alerts and the score warrant further development as tools for earlier intervention in AKI.

  2. ATLANTIDES: Automatic Configuration for Alert Verification in Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Crispo, B.; Etalle, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    We present an architecture designed for alert verification (i.e., to reduce false positives) in network intrusion-detection systems. Our technique is based on a systematic (and automatic) anomaly-based analysis of the system output, which provides useful context information regarding the network

  3. ATLANTIDES: An Architecture for Alert Verification in Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Crispo, Bruno; Etalle, Sandro

    We present an architecture designed for alert verification (i.e., to reduce false positives) in network intrusion-detection systems. Our technique is based on a systematic (and automatic) anomaly-based analysis of the system output, which provides useful context information regarding the network

  4. Smartwatch-based driver alertness monitoring with wearable motion and physiological sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boon-Giin; Lee, Boon-Leng; Chung, Wan-Young

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that a high precision driver alertness monitoring system is an essential and a monetary countermeasure to reduce the road accidents. This paper presents a novel approach to measure the driver alertness, evaluated by a smartwatch device based on fusion of direct and indirect method. The driver chronic physiological state is monitor by adopting a photoplethysmography sensor on the driver finger that is connected to a wrist-type wearable device. A Bluetooth Low Energy module connected to the wearable device transmits the PPG data to the smartwatch in real-time. Meanwhile, the indirect method, driver steering wheel movement can be derived by utilizing the motion sensors integrated in the smartwatch which include a tri-axis accelerometer and a gyroscope sensors. The respiration signals can be derived from the PPG time- and frequency-domains attributes. The data obtained from both methods aforementioned are subsequently decomposed into relevant features in time, spectral context and phase space domain, and thus computes the alertness index. Here, the correlations between the extracted features and the subjective Koralinska Sleepiness Scale are studied as well along with the recorded experimental videos. This study reveals that the alertness index prediction accuracy can be reached up to 96.3% based on the descriptive extracted features.

  5. Design and implementation of the UFFO burst alert and trigger telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, J.E.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultra Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder (UFFO-p) is a telescope system designed for the detection of the prompt optical/UV photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), and it will be launched onboard the Lomonosov spacecraft in 2012. The UFFO-p consists of two instruments: the UFFO Burst Alert and T...

  6. Evaluation of the alert line of partogram in recognizing the need for neonatal resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Bolbol-Haghighi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In mothers who had normal vaginal delivery, with normal fetal heart rate, and with no oxytocin administration or omniotomy, the alert line showed appropriate sensitivity, specificity, and negative prediction value. So, it can assist in predicting the necessity of action for neonatal resuscitation 20–30 s after delivery.

  7. Correlation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and electronic medical record alerts with incidence among surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Lee, Nathaniel; Duane, Therese M; Gu, Zirui; Nguyen, Natalie; Potter, Teresa; Rensing, Edna; Sampson, Renata; Burrows, Mandy; Banas, Colin; Hartigan, Sarah; Grover, Amelia

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism events are potentially preventable adverse events. We investigated the effect of interruptions and delays in pharmacologic prophylaxis on venous thromboembolism incidence. Additionally, we evaluated the utility of electronic medical record alerts for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Venous thromboembolisms were identified in surgical patients retrospectively through Core Measure Venous ThromboEmbolism-6-6 and Patient Safety Indicator 12 between November 2013 and March 2015. Venous thromboembolism pharmacologic prophylaxis and prescriber response to electronic medical record alerts were recorded prospectively. Prophylaxis was categorized as continuous, delayed, interrupted, other, and none. Among 10,318 surgical admissions, there were 131 venous thromboembolisms; 23.7% of the venous thromboembolisms occurred with optimal continuous prophylaxis. Prophylaxis, length of stay, age, and transfer from another hospital were associated with increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Compared with continuous prophylaxis, interruptions were associated with 3 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Delays were associated with 2 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Electronic medical record alerts occurred in 45.7% of the encounters and were associated with a 2-fold increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Focus groups revealed procedures as the main contributor to interruptions, and workflow disruption as the main limitation of the electronic medical record alerts. Multidisciplinary strategies to decrease delays and interruptions in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and optimization of electronic medical record tools for prophylaxis may help decrease rates of preventable venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlated colour temperature of morning light influences alertness and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Kulve, Marije; Schlangen, Luc; Schellen, Lisje; Souman, Jan L; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter

    2018-03-01

    Though several studies have reported human alertness to be affected by the intensity and spectral composition of ambient light, the mechanism behind this effect is still largely unclear, especially for daytime exposure. Alerting effects of nocturnal light exposure are correlated with melatonin suppression, but melatonin levels are generally low during the day. The aim of this study was to explore the alerting effect of light in the morning for different correlated colour temperature (CCT) values, as well as its interaction with ambient temperature. Body temperature and perceived comfort were included in the study as possible mediating factors. In a randomized crossover design, 16 healthy females participated in two sessions, once under 2700K and once under 6500K light (both 55lx). Each session consisted of a baseline, a cool, a neutral and a warm thermal environment. Alertness as measured in a reaction time task was lower for the 6500K exposure, while subjective sleepiness was not affected by CCT. Also, core body temperature was higher under 6500K. Skin temperature parameters and perceived comfort were positively correlated with subjective sleepiness. Reaction time correlated with heat loss, but this association did not explain why the reaction time was improved for 2700K. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact Research Report and Site Summaries for Project ALERT. Workplace Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Dale C.

    In order to evaluate the Project ALERT (Adult Literacy Enhanced & Redefined through Training) Workplace Literacy Project, data were collected to gauge the impact of the program on individual participants, the organizations in which they were employed, and to provide the use of whole language and multimedia techniques in workplace literacy…

  10. Radar-based alert system to operate a sewerage network: relevance and operational effectiveness after several years of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, D; Payrastre, O; Auchet, P

    2005-01-01

    Since January 2000, the sewerage network of a very urbanised catchment area in the Greater Nancy Urban Community has been operated according to the alarms generated in real time by a storm alert system using weather radar data. This alert system is based on an automatic identification of intense rain cells in the radar images. This paper presents the characteristics of this alert system and synthesises the main results of two complementary studies realised in 2002 in order to estimate the relevance and the operational effectiveness of the alert system. The first study consisted in an off-line analysis of almost 50,000 intense rain cells detected in four years of historical radar data. The second study was an analysis of the experience feedback after two years of operational use of this alert system. The results of these studies are discussed in function of the initial operational objectives.

  11. The correlation analysis of alert notifications in the rasff to food from the non-eea countries and from the eea countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Pigłowski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: The RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed is used to quickly mutual information of member countries of the European Economic Area (EEA on risks in food. A similar trend line course of alert notifications in the RASFF in time to food from the non-EEA countries and the EEA countries, as well as a very high value of the Pearson's r correlation coefficient (0.96 indicated an interdependence of alert notifications from these two groups of countries. Therefore, the goal of the article was to examine the strength of correlation within particular products categories and hazards categories. Methods: Data for the study came from the RASFF database from the years 1979-2013 covering 8175 alert notifications, including the 2540 notifications to food from the non-EEA countries and 5635 notifications to food from the EEA countries. Within each products category and hazards category examined whether there was a correlation (i.e. the value of calculated statistics t exceeded the value of critical statistics t0.05;n-2, and then calculated the Pearson's r correlation coefficient. Results: The value of Pearson's correlation coefficient indicated the occurrence of a very high correlation in the products category "Herbs and spices" (0.98, and the high correlation in the following categories: "Bivalve molluscs and products thereof" (0.70, "Dietetic foods, food supplements fortified foods" (0.86, "Fish and fish products" (0.79, "Food contact materials" (0.89, "Fruits and vegetables" (0.88 and "Meat and meat products (other than poultry" (0.72. However, in the case of hazards categories the very high correlation occurred in the category of "Food additives and flavourings" (0.93 and "Radiation" (0.94 and the high correlation in the case of "Composition" (0.89, "Foreign bodies" (0.88, "Heavy metals" (0.80, "Mycotoxins" (0.81  and "Pathogenic micro-organisms" (0.72. Conclusions: The results showed the need to pay particular attention by the border

  12. Earthquake Early Warning ShakeAlert System: Testing and certification platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Kohler, Monica D.; Given, Douglas; Guiwits, Stephen; Andrews, Jennifer; Meier, Men-Andrin; Ahmad, Mohammad; Henson, Ivan; Hartog, Renate; Smith, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake early warning systems provide warnings to end users of incoming moderate to strong ground shaking from earthquakes. An earthquake early warning system, ShakeAlert, is providing alerts to beta end users in the western United States, specifically California, Oregon, and Washington. An essential aspect of the earthquake early warning system is the development of a framework to test modifications to code to ensure functionality and assess performance. In 2016, a Testing and Certification Platform (TCP) was included in the development of the Production Prototype version of ShakeAlert. The purpose of the TCP is to evaluate the robustness of candidate code that is proposed for deployment on ShakeAlert Production Prototype servers. TCP consists of two main components: a real‐time in situ test that replicates the real‐time production system and an offline playback system to replay test suites. The real‐time tests of system performance assess code optimization and stability. The offline tests comprise a stress test of candidate code to assess if the code is production ready. The test suite includes over 120 events including local, regional, and teleseismic historic earthquakes, recentering and calibration events, and other anomalous and potentially problematic signals. Two assessments of alert performance are conducted. First, point‐source assessments are undertaken to compare magnitude, epicentral location, and origin time with the Advanced National Seismic System Comprehensive Catalog, as well as to evaluate alert latency. Second, we describe assessment of the quality of ground‐motion predictions at end‐user sites by comparing predicted shaking intensities to ShakeMaps for historic events and implement a threshold‐based approach that assesses how often end users initiate the appropriate action, based on their ground‐shaking threshold. TCP has been developed to be a convenient streamlined procedure for objectively testing algorithms, and it has

  13. Prescription errors before and after introduction of electronic medication alert system in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Usha; Kannikeswaran, Nirupama; Murray, Kyle P; Zidan, Marwan A; Chamberlain, James M

    2015-06-01

    Prescription errors occur frequently in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs).The effect of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) with electronic medication alert system (EMAS) on these is unknown. The objective was to compare prescription errors rates before and after introduction of CPOE with EMAS in a PED. The hypothesis was that CPOE with EMAS would significantly reduce the rate and severity of prescription errors in the PED. A prospective comparison of a sample of outpatient, medication prescriptions 5 months before and after CPOE with EMAS implementation (7,268 before and 7,292 after) was performed. Error types and rates, alert types and significance, and physician response were noted. Medication errors were deemed significant if there was a potential to cause life-threatening injury, failure of therapy, or an adverse drug effect. There was a significant reduction in the errors per 100 prescriptions (10.4 before vs. 7.3 after; absolute risk reduction = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2 to 4.0). Drug dosing error rates decreased from 8 to 5.4 per 100 (absolute risk reduction = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.8 to 3.4). Alerts were generated for 29.6% of prescriptions, with 45% involving drug dose range checking. The sensitivity of CPOE with EMAS in identifying errors in prescriptions was 45.1% (95% CI = 40.8% to 49.6%), and the specificity was 57% (95% CI = 55.6% to 58.5%). Prescribers modified 20% of the dosing alerts, resulting in the error not reaching the patient. Conversely, 11% of true dosing alerts for medication errors were overridden by the prescribers: 88 (11.3%) resulted in medication errors, and 684 (88.6%) were false-positive alerts. A CPOE with EMAS was associated with a decrease in overall prescription errors in our PED. Further system refinements are required to reduce the high false-positive alert rates. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  14. Dogs Can Be Successfully Trained to Alert to Hypoglycemia Samples from Patients with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Dana S; Anderson, Wesley; Cattet, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Hypoglycemia (Hypo) is the most common side effect of insulin therapy in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Over time, patients with T1D become unaware of signs and symptoms of Hypo. Hypo unawareness leads to morbidity and mortality. Diabetes alert dogs (DADs) represent a unique way to help patients with Hypo unawareness. Our group has previously presented data in abstract form which demonstrates the sensitivity and specificity of DADS. The purpose of our current study is to expand evaluation of DAD sensitivity and specificity using a method that reduces the possibility of trainer bias. We evaluated 6 dogs aging 1-10 years old who had received an average of 6 months of training for Hypo alert using positive training methods. Perspiration samples were collected from patients during Hypo (BG 46-65 mg/dL) and normoglycemia (BG 85-136 mg/dl) and were used in training. These samples were placed in glass vials which were then placed into 7 steel cans (1 Hypo, 2 normal, 4 blank) randomly placed by roll of a dice. The dogs alerted by either sitting in front of, or pushing, the can containing the Hypo sample. Dogs were rewarded for appropriate recognition of the Hypo samples using a food treat via a remote control dispenser. The results were videotaped and statistically evaluated for sensitivity (proportion of lows correctly alerted, "true positive rate") and specificity (proportion of blanks + normal samples not alerted, "true negative rate") calculated after pooling data across all trials for all dogs. All DADs displayed statistically significant (p value <0.05) greater sensitivity (min 50.0%-max 87.5%) to detect the Hypo sample than the expected random correct alert of 14%. Specificity ranged from a min of 89.6% to a max of 97.9% (expected rate is not defined in this scenario). Our results suggest that properly trained DADs can successfully recognize and alert to Hypo in an in vitro setting using smell alone.

  15. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  16. Real Time Volcanic Cloud Products and Predictions for Aviation Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Habib, Shahid; da Silva, Arlindo; Hughes, Eric; Yang, Kai; Brentzel, Kelvin; Seftor, Colin; Li, Jason Y.; Schneider, David; Guffanti, Marianne; hide

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and volcanic ash into the atmosphere, posing a substantial risk to aviation safety. Ingesting near-real time and Direct Readout satellite volcanic cloud data is vital for improving reliability of volcanic ash forecasts and mitigating the effects of volcanic eruptions on aviation and the economy. NASA volcanic products from the Ozone Monitoring Insrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite have been incorporated into Decision Support Systems of many operational agencies. With the Aura mission approaching its 10th anniversary, there is an urgent need to replace OMI data with those from the next generation operational NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite. The data provided from these instruments are being incorporated into forecasting models to provide quantitative ash forecasts for air traffic management. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the volcanic near-real time and Direct Readout data products from the new Ozone Monitoring and Profiling Suite (OMPS) ultraviolet sensor onboard SNPP for monitoring and forecasting volcanic clouds. The transition of NASA data production to our operational partners is outlined. Satellite observations are used to constrain volcanic cloud simulations and improve estimates of eruption parameters, resulting in more accurate forecasts. This is demonstrated for the 2012 eruption of Copahue. Volcanic eruptions are modeled using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) and the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol and Radiation Transport (GOCART) model. A hindcast of the disruptive eruption from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull is used to estimate aviation re-routing costs using Metron Aviation's ATM Tools.

  17. Radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeister, K.

    1977-01-01

    This chapter is included in a textbook which is primarily intended for medical students. The following topics are dealt with: radiation effects on molecules; chemical and biochemical radiation effects; modification of radiation effects and radiosensitivity; radiation-induced pathomorphological and pathophysiological effects in organs and organ systems; radiation syndrome; radiation effects in embryos and fetuses; genetic radiation effects; carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis after irradiation; and radiation effects after intake of radionuclides

  18. A Comparison of Blue Light and Caffeine Effects on Cognitive Function and Alertness in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, C. Martyn; Ekström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The alerting effects of both caffeine and short wavelength (blue) light have been consistently reported. The ability of blue light to enhance alertness and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways have been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for drowsiness across a range of occupational settings. Here we compare and contrast the alerting and psychomotor effects of 240 mg of caffeine and a 1-h dose of ~40 lx blue light in a non-athletic population. Twenty-one healthy subjects performed a computer-based psychomotor vigilance test before and after each of four randomly assigned trial conditions performed on different days: white light/placebo; white light/240 mg caffeine; blue light/placebo; blue light/240 mg caffeine. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was used to assess subjective measures of alertness. Both the caffeine only and blue light only conditions enhanced accuracy in a visual reaction test requiring a decision and an additive effect was observed with respect to the fastest reaction times. However, in a test of executive function, where a distraction was included, caffeine exerted a negative effect on accuracy. Furthermore, the blue light only condition consistently outperformed caffeine when both congruent and incongruent distractions were presented. The visual reactions in the absence of a decision or distraction were also enhanced in the blue light only condition and this effect was most prominent in the blue-eyed participants. Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important. Specifically, despite the widespread use of caffeine in competitive sporting environments, the possible impact of blue light has received no research attention. PMID:24282477

  19. A comparison of blue light and caffeine effects on cognitive function and alertness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, C Martyn; Ekström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The alerting effects of both caffeine and short wavelength (blue) light have been consistently reported. The ability of blue light to enhance alertness and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways have been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for drowsiness across a range of occupational settings. Here we compare and contrast the alerting and psychomotor effects of 240 mg of caffeine and a 1-h dose of ~40 lx blue light in a non-athletic population. Twenty-one healthy subjects performed a computer-based psychomotor vigilance test before and after each of four randomly assigned trial conditions performed on different days: white light/placebo; white light/240 mg caffeine; blue light/placebo; blue light/240 mg caffeine. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was used to assess subjective measures of alertness. Both the caffeine only and blue light only conditions enhanced accuracy in a visual reaction test requiring a decision and an additive effect was observed with respect to the fastest reaction times. However, in a test of executive function, where a distraction was included, caffeine exerted a negative effect on accuracy. Furthermore, the blue light only condition consistently outperformed caffeine when both congruent and incongruent distractions were presented. The visual reactions in the absence of a decision or distraction were also enhanced in the blue light only condition and this effect was most prominent in the blue-eyed participants. Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important. Specifically, despite the widespread use of caffeine in competitive sporting environments, the possible impact of blue light has received no research attention.

  20. A comparison of blue light and caffeine effects on cognitive function and alertness in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Martyn Beaven

    Full Text Available The alerting effects of both caffeine and short wavelength (blue light have been consistently reported. The ability of blue light to enhance alertness and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways have been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for drowsiness across a range of occupational settings. Here we compare and contrast the alerting and psychomotor effects of 240 mg of caffeine and a 1-h dose of ~40 lx blue light in a non-athletic population. Twenty-one healthy subjects performed a computer-based psychomotor vigilance test before and after each of four randomly assigned trial conditions performed on different days: white light/placebo; white light/240 mg caffeine; blue light/placebo; blue light/240 mg caffeine. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was used to assess subjective measures of alertness. Both the caffeine only and blue light only conditions enhanced accuracy in a visual reaction test requiring a decision and an additive effect was observed with respect to the fastest reaction times. However, in a test of executive function, where a distraction was included, caffeine exerted a negative effect on accuracy. Furthermore, the blue light only condition consistently outperformed caffeine when both congruent and incongruent distractions were presented. The visual reactions in the absence of a decision or distraction were also enhanced in the blue light only condition and this effect was most prominent in the blue-eyed participants. Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important. Specifically, despite the widespread use of caffeine in competitive sporting environments, the possible impact of blue light has received no research attention.

  1. Evaluating daytime alertness in individuals with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) compared to sleep restricted controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaldo, Charlene; Benbrook, Amy R; Allen, Richard P; Oguntimein, Oluwamurewa; Earley, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder often associated with significant chronic sleep loss. Previous studies looking at the effects of sleep loss on daytime function in RLS individuals, using subjective reporting techniques have yielded mixed results. In this study we used more objective measures of alertness and compared RLS subjects who are off treatments and chronically sleep restricted to chronic sleep-restricted controls. The final sample consisted of 20 RLS subjects (10 male and 10 female) and 13 sleep-restricted controls (seven male and six female). Thirteen controls underwent a 14-day chronic partial sleep-restriction protocol in order to closely match the degree of chronic sleep loss reportedly experienced by untreated RLS patients. On the final day of the protocol each subject performed a morning and evening Suggested Immobilization Test (SIT) which served as a modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). RLS and control groups were compared for differences in alertness as measured objectively by the sleep latency on the morning and evening SITs. The RLS subjects had a longer sleep latency on the morning and evening SIT than controls (t=3.80, p=0.001, U=31.0, pRLS individuals still demonstrated a higher degree of objective alertness (p=0.023, p=0.006, Fisher's exact test). RLS subjects, despite having, if anything, greater sleep loss, displayed greater sustained alertness than sleep-restricted controls. Thus, the heightened degree of alertness demonstrated by RLS patients may be in contrast to the perceived impairment in mood, vigor, and vigilance commonly reported in previous studies.

  2. Implementation of a real-time computerized sepsis alert in nonintensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Amber M; Deal, Eli N; Labelle, Andrew J; Witt, Chad; Thiel, Steven W; Heard, Kevin; Reichley, Richard M; Micek, Scott T; Kollef, Marin H

    2011-03-01

    Early therapy of sepsis involving fluid resuscitation and antibiotic administration has been shown to improve patient outcomes. A proactive tool to identify patients at risk for developing sepsis may decrease time to interventions and improve patient outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the implementation of an automated sepsis screening and alert system facilitated early appropriate interventions. Prospective, observational, pilot study. Six medicine wards in Barnes-Jewish Hospital, a 1250-bed academic medical center. Patients identified by the sepsis screen while admitted to a medicine ward were included in the study. A total of 300 consecutive patients were identified comprising the nonintervention group (n=200) and the intervention group (n=100). A real-time sepsis alert was implemented for the intervention group, which notified the charge nurse on the patient's hospital ward by text page. Within 12 hrs of the sepsis alert, interventions by the treating physicians were assessed, including new or escalated antibiotics, intravenous fluid administration, oxygen therapy, vasopressors, and diagnostic tests. After exclusion of patients without commitment to aggressive management, 181 patients in the nonintervention group and 89 patients in the intervention group were analyzed. Within 12 hrs of the sepsis alert, 70.8% of patients in the intervention group had received≥1 intervention vs. 55.8% in the nonintervention group (p=.018). Antibiotic escalation, intravenous fluid administration, oxygen therapy, and diagnostic tests were all increased in the intervention group. This was a single-center, institution- and patient-specific algorithm. The sepsis alert developed at Barnes-Jewish Hospital was shown to increase early therapeutic and diagnostic interventions among nonintensive care unit patients at risk for sepsis.

  3. Time course of sleep inertia dissipation in human performance and alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, M. E.; Wyatt, J. K.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Khalsa, S. B.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Alertness and performance on a wide variety of tasks are impaired immediately upon waking from sleep due to sleep inertia, which has been found to dissipate in an asymptotic manner following waketime. It has been suggested that behavioural or environmental factors, as well as sleep stage at awakening, may affect the severity of sleep inertia. In order to determine the time course of sleep inertia dissipation under normal entrained conditions, subjective alertness and cognitive throughput were measured during the first 4 h after habitual waketime from a full 8-h sleep episode on 3 consecutive days. We investigated whether this time course was affected by either sleep stage at awakening or behavioural/environmental factors. Sleep inertia dissipated in an asymptotic manner and took 2-4 h to near the asymptote. Saturating exponential functions fitted the sleep inertia data well, with time constants of 0.67 h for subjective alertness and 1.17 h for cognitive performance. Most awakenings occurred out of stage rapid eye movement (REM), 2 or 1 sleep, and no effect of sleep stage at awakening on either the severity of sleep inertia or the time course of its dissipation could be detected. Subjective alertness and cognitive throughput were significantly impaired upon awakening regardless of whether subjects got out of bed, ate breakfast, showered and were exposed to ordinary indoor room light (approximately 150 lux) or whether subjects participated in a constant routine (CR) protocol in which they remained in bed, ate small hourly snacks and were exposed to very dim light (10-15 lux). These findings allow for the refinement of models of alertness and performance, and have important implications for the scheduling of work immediately upon awakening in many occupational settings.

  4. Medical radiation protection in next decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M. M.; Vano, E.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in medical radiation protection today is the same as what it would have been almost a century ago. After many decades of relatively safe application of radiation in medicine, the recent spurt in over exposures, over-use of imaging and accidental exposures has created the need for stakeholders to join hands and contribute towards increasing radiation safety levels. Whether it be the need for technological developments to achieve sub-mSv CT scans, tracking of patient exposure history, accounting for repeated exposures of the same patient, specific consideration of requests for radiological examinations that deliver few mSv of dose, or utilization of regulatory approaches, radiological equipment will need to alert users whenever the radiation dose to the patient is above a defined value. The current decade will focus increasingly on carcinogenic effects in patients. (authors)

  5. MO-F-16A-06: Implementation of a Radiation Exposure Monitoring System for Surveillance of Multi-Modality Radiation Dose Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, B; Kanal, K; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We have implemented a commercially available Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) to enhance the processes of radiation dose data collection, analysis and alerting developed over the past decade at our sites of practice. REMS allows for consolidation of multiple radiation dose information sources and quicker alerting than previously developed processes. Methods: Thirty-nine x-ray producing imaging modalities were interfaced with the REMS: thirteen computed tomography scanners, sixteen angiography/interventional systems, nine digital radiography systems and one mammography system. A number of methodologies were used to provide dose data to the REMS: Modality Performed Procedure Step (MPPS) messages, DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR), and DICOM header information. Once interfaced, the dosimetry information from each device underwent validation (first 15–20 exams) before release for viewing by end-users: physicians, medical physicists, technologists and administrators. Results: Before REMS, our diagnostic physics group pulled dosimetry data from seven disparate databases throughout the radiology, radiation oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, anesthesiology/pain management and vascular surgery departments at two major medical centers and four associated outpatient clinics. With the REMS implementation, we now have one authoritative source of dose information for alerting, longitudinal analysis, dashboard/graphics generation and benchmarking. REMS provides immediate automatic dose alerts utilizing thresholds calculated through daily statistical analysis. This has streamlined our Closing the Loop process for estimated skin exposures in excess of our institutional specific substantial radiation dose level which relied on technologist notification of the diagnostic physics group and daily report from the radiology information system (RIS). REMS also automatically calculates the CT size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) as well as provides

  6. Remote data acquisition system based on MSM7512B8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Junfeng

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a remote data acquisition system based on MC68HC908GP32 and MSM7512B, which can accomplish remote data communications on telephone network, and realize remote data acquisition. (authors)

  7. Implementation of a landslide early warning system based on near-real-time monitoring, multisensor mapping and geophysical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teza, Giordano; Galgaro, Antonio; Francese, Roberto; Ninfo, Andrea; Mariani, Rocco

    2017-04-01

    An early warning system has been implemented to monitor the Perarolo di Cadore landslide (North-Eastern Italian Alps), which is a slump whose induced risk is fairly high because a slope collapse could form a temporary dam on the underlying torrent and, therefore, could directly threaten the close village. A robotic total station (RTS) measures, with 6h returning time, the positions of 23 retro-reflectors placed on the landslide upper and middle sectors. The landslide's kinematical behavior derived from these near-real-time (NRT) surface displacements is interpreted on the basis of available geomorphological and geological information, geometrical data provided by some laser scanning and photogrammetric surveys, and a landslide model obtained by means of 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (3D ERT) measurements. In this way, an analysis of the time series provided by RTS and a pluviometer, which cover several years, allows the definition of some pre-alert and alert kinematical and rainfall thresholds. These thresholds, as well as the corresponding operational recommendations, are currently used for early warning purposes by Authorities involved in risk management for the Perarolo landslide. It should be noted the fact that, as new RTS and pluviometric data are available, the thresholds can be updated and, therefore, a fine tuning of the early warning system can be carried out in order to improve its performance. Although the proposed approach has been implemented in a particular case, it can be used to develop an early warning system based on NRT data in each site where a landslide threatens infrastructures and/or villages that cannot be relocated.

  8. Airborne derivation of microburst alerts from ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar information: A flight evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    An element of the NASA/FAA windshear program is the integration of ground-based microburst information on the flight deck, to support airborne windshear alerting and microburst avoidance. NASA conducted a windshear flight test program in the summer of 1991 during which airborne processing of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) data was used to derive microburst alerts. Microburst information was extracted from TDWR, transmitted to a NASA Boeing 737 in flight via data link, and processed to estimate the windshear hazard level (F-factor) that would be experienced by the aircraft in each microburst. The microburst location and F-factor were used to derive a situation display and alerts. The situation display was successfully used to maneuver the aircraft for microburst penetrations, during which atmospheric 'truth' measurements were made. A total of 19 penetrations were made of TDWR-reported microburst locations, resulting in 18 airborne microburst alerts from the TDWR data and two microburst alerts from the airborne reactive windshear detection system. The primary factors affecting alerting performance were spatial offset of the flight path from the region of strongest shear, differences in TDWR measurement altitude and airplane penetration altitude, and variations in microburst outflow profiles. Predicted and measured F-factors agreed well in penetrations near microburst cores. Although improvements in airborne and ground processing of the TDWR measurements would be required to support an airborne executive-level alerting protocol, the practicality of airborne utilization of TDWR data link data has been demonstrated.

  9. Exploring the heavy air pollution in Beijing in the fourth quarter of 2015: assessment of environmental benefits for red alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Teng; Nie, Lei; Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Zhanshan; Xue, Yifeng; Gao, Jiajia; Wu, Xiaoqing; Fan, Shoubin; Cheng, Linglong

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, Beijing has experienced severe air pollution which has caused widespread public concern. Compared to the same period in 2014, the first three quarters of 2015 exhibited significantly improved air quality. However, the air quality sharply declined in the fourth quarter of 2015, especially in November and December. During that time, Beijing issued the first red alert for severe air pollution in history. In total, 2 red alerts, 3 orange alerts, 3 yellow alerts, and 3 blue alerts were issued based on the adoption of relatively temporary emergency control measures to mitigate air pollution. This study explored the reasons for these variations in air quality and assessed the effectiveness of emergency alerts in addressing severe air pollution. A synthetic analysis of emission variations and meteorological conditions was performed to better understand these extreme air pollution episodes in the fourth quarter of 2015. The results showed that compared to those in the same period in 2014, the daily average emissions of air pollutants decreased in the fourth quarter of 2015. However, the emission levels of primary pollutants were still relatively high, which was the main intrinsic cause of haze episodes, and unfavorable meteorological conditions represented important external factors. Emergency control measures for heavy air pollution were implemented during this red alert period, decreasing the emissions of primary air pollutants by approximately 36% and the PM2.5 concentration by 11%‒21%.

  10. Preliminary evidence that both blue and red light can induce alertness at night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plitnick Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of studies have demonstrated that retinal light exposure can increase alertness at night. It is now well accepted that the circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light and is quite insensitive to long-wavelength (red light. Retinal exposures to blue light at night have been recently shown to impact alertness, implicating participation by the circadian system. The present experiment was conducted to look at the impact of both blue and red light at two different levels on nocturnal alertness. Visually effective but moderate levels of red light are ineffective for stimulating the circadian system. If it were shown that a moderate level of red light impacts alertness, it would have had to occur via a pathway other than through the circadian system. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in a within-subject two-night study, where each participant was exposed to four experimental lighting conditions. Each night each subject was presented a high (40 lx at the cornea and a low (10 lx at the cornea diffuse light exposure condition of the same spectrum (blue, λmax = 470 nm, or red, λmax = 630 nm. The presentation order of the light levels was counterbalanced across sessions for a given subject; light spectra were counterbalanced across subjects within sessions. Prior to each lighting condition, subjects remained in the dark ( Results Exposures to red and to blue light resulted in increased beta and reduced alpha power relative to preceding dark conditions. Exposures to high, but not low, levels of red and of blue light significantly increased heart rate relative to the dark condition. Performance and sleepiness ratings were not strongly affected by the lighting conditions. Only the higher level of blue light resulted in a reduction in melatonin levels relative to the other lighting conditions. Conclusion These results support previous findings that alertness may be mediated by the circadian system

  11. Utilization of the examinations with ionizing radiation and pregnance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serson, D.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Scharfstein, M.; Camera, A.J.; Schmilevitch, J.; Oliveira Nunes, J.E. de

    1984-01-01

    The authors reviewed the world literature on the effects of radiation and in this paper alert the clinicians and obstetricians to the use of radiation and the possible damage to the embryo and fetus. A table with absorbed doses in the majority of regular examinations by nuclear medicine and X-ray is presented, including the oppinion of world authorities and explaining how to procede when the use of radiation is unavoidable. They concluded that an indication for abortion must be considered only in cases where a high dose was used. (author) [pt

  12. A systematic review of the effectiveness of interruptive medication prescribing alerts in hospital CPOE systems to change prescriber behavior and improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, N; Baysari, M T; Westbrook, J I

    2017-09-01

    To assess the evidence of the effectiveness of different categories of interruptive medication prescribing alerts to change prescriber behavior and/or improve patient outcomes in hospital computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and February 2016. Studies were included if they compared the outcomes of automatic, interruptive medication prescribing alert/s to a control/comparison group to determine alert effectiveness. Twenty-three studies describing 32 alerts classified into 11 alert categories were identified. The most common alert categories studied were drug-condition interaction (n=6), drug-drug interaction alerts (n=6) and corollary order alerts (n=6). All 23 papers investigated the effect of the intervention alert on at least one outcome measure of prescriber behavior. Just over half of the studies (53%, n=17) reported a statistically significant beneficial effect from the intervention alert; 34% (n=11) reported no statistically significant effect, and 6% (n=2) reported a significant detrimental effect. Two studies also evaluated the effect of alerts on patient outcome measures; neither finding that patient outcomes significantly improved following alert implementation (6%, n=2). The greatest volume of evidence relates to three alert categories: drug-condition, drug-drug and corollary order alerts. Of these, drug-condition alerts had the greatest number of studies reporting positive effects (five out of six studies). Only two of six studies of drug-drug interaction and one of six of corollary alerts reported positive benefits. The current evidence-base does not show a clear indication that particular categories of alerts are more effective than others. While the majority of alert categories were shown to improve outcomes in some studies, there were also many cases where outcomes did not improve. This lack of evidence hinders decisions

  13. Comparison of 'time to detection' values between BacT/ALERT VIRTUO and BacT/ALERT 3D instruments for clinical blood culture samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestrì, Francesco; Pedna, Maria Federica; Fantini, Michela; Samuelli, Michela; Schiavone, Pasqua; Torri, Arianna; Bertini, Stefania; Sambri, Vittorio

    2017-09-01

    The early detection of bacteraemia and fungemia is of paramount importance to guide antimicrobial therapy in septic patients. In this study the 'time to detection' (TTD) value for the new blood culture system BacT/ALERT VIRTUO (VIRTUO) was evaluated in 1462 positive clinical bottles and compared with the TTD for 1601 positive clinical bottles incubated in the BacT/ALERT 3D system (BTA-3D). The most representative microorganisms isolated from bottles incubated in both blood culture systems were divided into eight categories (in order of frequency): coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae (other than E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, viridans group streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida spp. The comparison of TTD values for the two blood culture systems strongly indicated that growth of the first five groups listed above was detected earlier with VIRTUO than with BTA-3D (p culture system can reduce the TTD for more than 75% of isolated microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Intrusion-Aware Alert Validation Algorithm for Cooperative Distributed Intrusion Detection Schemes of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Song

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing anomaly and intrusion detection schemes of wireless sensor networks have mainly focused on the detection of intrusions. Once the intrusion is detected, an alerts or claims will be generated. However, any unidentified malicious nodes in the network could send faulty anomaly and intrusion claims about the legitimate nodes to the other nodes. Verifying the validity of such claims is a critical and challenging issue that is not considered in the existing cooperative-based distributed anomaly and intrusion detection schemes of wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we propose a validation algorithm that addresses this problem. This algorithm utilizes the concept of intrusion-aware reliability that helps to provide adequate reliability at a modest communication cost. In this paper, we also provide a security resiliency analysis of the proposed intrusion-aware alert validation algorithm.

  15. The combination of L-theanine and caffeine improves cognitive performance and increases subjective alertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, T; Rycroft, J A; Rowson, M J; De Bruin, E A

    2010-12-01

    The non-proteinic amino acid L-theanine and caffeine, a methylxanthine derivative, are naturally occurring ingredients in tea. The present study investigated the effect of a combination of 97 mg L-theanine and 40 mg caffeine as compared to placebo treatment on cognitive performance, alertness, blood pressure, and heart rate in a sample of young adults (n = 44). Cognitive performance, self-reported mood, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before L-theanine and caffeine administration (i.e. at baseline) and 20 min and 70 min thereafter. The combination of moderate levels of L-theanine and caffeine significantly improved accuracy during task switching and self-reported alertness (both P effects on other cognitive tasks, such as visual search, choice reaction times, or mental rotation. The present results suggest that 97 mg of L-theanine in combination with 40 mg of caffeine helps to focus attention during a demanding cognitive task.

  16. Effect of air quality alerts on human health: a regression discontinuity analysis in Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Li, Qiongsi; Kaufman, Jay S; Wang, Jun; Copes, Ray; Su, Yushan; Benmarhnia, Tarik

    2018-01-01

    Ambient air pollution is a major health risk globally. To reduce adverse health effects on days when air pollution is high, government agencies worldwide have implemented air quality alert programmes. Despite their widespread use, little is known about whether these programmes produce any observable public-health benefits. We assessed the effectiveness of such programmes using a quasi-experimental approach. We assembled a population-based cohort comprising all individuals who resided in the city of Toronto (Ontario, Canada) from 2003 to 2012 (about 2·6 million people). We ascertained seven health outcomes known to be affected by short-term elevation of air pollution, using provincial health administrative databases. These health outcomes were cardiovascular-related mortality, respiratory-related mortality, and hospital admissions or emergency-department visits for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We applied a regression discontinuity design to assess the effectiveness of an intervention (ie, the air quality alert programme). To quantify the effect of the air quality alert programme, we estimated for each outcome both the absolute rate difference and the rate ratio attributable to programme eligibility (by intention-to-treat analysis) and the alerts themselves (by two-stage regression approach), respectively. Between Jan 1, 2003, and Dec 31, 2012, on average between three and 27 daily cardiovascular or respiratory events were reported in Toronto (depending on the outcome). Alert announcements reduced asthma-related emergency-department visits by 4·73 cases per 1 000 000 people per day (95% CI 0·55-9·38), or in relative terms by 25% (95% CI 1-47). Programme eligibility also led to 2·05 (95% CI 0·07-4·00) fewer daily emergency-department visits for asthma. We did not detect a significant reduction in any other health outcome as a result of alert announcements or programme

  17. In Silico Prediction of Chemical Toxicity for Drug Design Using Machine Learning Methods and Structural Alerts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During drug development, safety is always the most important issue, including a variety of toxicities and adverse drug effects, which should be evaluated in preclinical and clinical trial phases. This review article at first simply introduced the computational methods used in prediction of chemical toxicity for drug design, including machine learning methods and structural alerts. Machine learning methods have been widely applied in qualitative classification and quantitative regression studies, while structural alerts can be regarded as a complementary tool for lead optimization. The emphasis of this article was put on the recent progress of predictive models built for various toxicities. Available databases and web servers were also provided. Though the methods and models are very helpful for drug design, there are still some challenges and limitations to be improved for drug safety assessment in the future.

  18. In Silico Prediction of Chemical Toxicity for Drug Design Using Machine Learning Methods and Structural Alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongbin; Sun, Lixia; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun

    2018-01-01

    During drug development, safety is always the most important issue, including a variety of toxicities and adverse drug effects, which should be evaluated in preclinical and clinical trial phases. This review article at first simply introduced the computational methods used in prediction of chemical toxicity for drug design, including machine learning methods and structural alerts. Machine learning methods have been widely applied in qualitative classification and quantitative regression studies, while structural alerts can be regarded as a complementary tool for lead optimization. The emphasis of this article was put on the recent progress of predictive models built for various toxicities. Available databases and web servers were also provided. Though the methods and models are very helpful for drug design, there are still some challenges and limitations to be improved for drug safety assessment in the future.

  19. Distributed Pedestrian Detection Alerts Based on Data Fusion with Accurate Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo de la Escalera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Among Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS pedestrian detection is a common issue due to the vulnerability of pedestrians in the event of accidents. In the present work, a novel approach for pedestrian detection based on data fusion is presented. Data fusion helps to overcome the limitations inherent to each detection system (computer vision and laser scanner and provides accurate and trustable tracking of any pedestrian movement. The application is complemented by an efficient communication protocol, able to alert vehicles in the surroundings by a fast and reliable communication. The combination of a powerful location, based on a GPS with inertial measurement, and accurate obstacle localization based on data fusion has allowed locating the detected pedestrians with high accuracy. Tests proved the viability of the detection system and the efficiency of the communication, even at long distances. By the use of the alert communication, dangerous situations such as occlusions or misdetections can be avoided.

  20. Distributed pedestrian detection alerts based on data fusion with accurate localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Fernando; Jiménez, Felipe; Anaya, José Javier; Armingol, José María; Naranjo, José Eugenio; de la Escalera, Arturo

    2013-09-04

    Among Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) pedestrian detection is a common issue due to the vulnerability of pedestrians in the event of accidents. In the present work, a novel approach for pedestrian detection based on data fusion is presented. Data fusion helps to overcome the limitations inherent to each detection system (computer vision and laser scanner) and provides accurate and trustable tracking of any pedestrian movement. The application is complemented by an efficient communication protocol, able to alert vehicles in the surroundings by a fast and reliable communication. The combination of a powerful location, based on a GPS with inertial measurement, and accurate obstacle localization based on data fusion has allowed locating the detected pedestrians with high accuracy. Tests proved the viability of the detection system and the efficiency of the communication, even at long distances. By the use of the alert communication, dangerous situations such as occlusions or misdetections can be avoided.

  1. Post-crisis analysis of an ineffective tsunami alert: the 2010 earthquake in Maule, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulé, Bastien

    2014-04-01

    Considering its huge magnitude and its location in a densely populated area of Chile, the Maule seism of 27 February 2010 generated a low amount of victims. However, post-seismic tsunamis were particularly devastating on that day; surprisingly, no full alert was launched, not at the national, regional or local level. This earthquake and associated tsunamis are of interest in the context of natural hazards management as well as crisis management planning. Instead of focusing exclusively on the event itself, this article places emphasis on the process, systems and long-term approach that led the tsunami alert mechanism to be ineffectual. Notably, this perspective reveals interrelated forerunner signs of vulnerability. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  2. Exposure to blue light during lunch break: effects on autonomic arousal and behavioral alertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuda, Emi; Ogasawara, Hiroki; Yoshida, Yutaka; Hayano, Junichiro

    2017-07-11

    Exposures to melanopsin-stimulating (melanopic) component-rich blue light enhance arousal level. We examined their effects in office workers. Eight healthy university office workers were exposed to blue and orange lights for 30 min during lunch break on different days. We compared the effects of light color on autonomic arousal level assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) and behavioral alertness by psychomotor vigilance tests (PVT). Heart rate was higher and high-frequency (HF, 0.150.45 Hz) power of HRV was lower during exposure to the blue light than to orange light. No significant difference with light color was observed, however, in any HRV indices during PVT or in PVT performance after light exposure. Exposure to blue light during lunch break, compared with that to orange light, enhances autonomic arousal during exposure, but has no sustained effect on autonomic arousal or behavioral alertness after exposure.

  3. Hypoglycemia Alert Dogs: A Novel, Cost-effective Approach for Diabetes Monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Dondi, Maurizio; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    The recent publication of the results of 3 small trials, and as many as 5 case reports on dogs producing clear and intelligible alerts in the presence of their owners' hypoglycemia, opens an intriguing clinical scenario for management of diabetes. The skill seems attributable to the ability of dogs to identify patterns in skin and breath odors as well as to understand and interpret visual cues from humans during hypoglycemia. Provided that further trials can confirm the findings, the use of diabetes alert dogs that are trained to detect the onset of hypoglycemia can be regarded as a fast, versatile, reliable, and cost-effective approach for safeguarding the health of individuals with diabetes.

  4. Panel 2.2: surveillance, early warning alert, and response: communicable and vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roure, Collette; Khalakdina, Asheena; Ungchusak, Kumnuan; Yulizar, Media; Ravindran, P; Watson, John; Pinto, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    This is a summary of the presentations and discussion of Surveillance, Early Warning Alert and Response at the Conference, Health Aspects of the Tsunami Disaster in Asia, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Phuket, Thailand, 04-06 May 2005. The topics discussed included issues related to the surveillance, early warning alert, and response to communicable and vector-borne diseases as pertaining to the responses to the damage created by the Tsunami. It is presented in the following major sections: (1) key questions; (2) needs assessment; (3) coordination; (4) gap filling; and (5) capacity building. The key questions section is presented in six sub-sections: (1) communicable diseases; (2) early warning; (3) laboratory capacity and referral networking; (4) coordination of disease surveillance, early warning, and response; (5) health infrastructure rebuilding; and (6) using existing national surveillance plans to enhance disease surveillance and early warning systems.

  5. Quality of prescription of high-alert medication and patient safety in pediatric emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vieira de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Verify the importance of compliance by prescribed doses of high-alert medications in unit of pediatric emergency in patient safety. Method: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in a unit of pediatric emergency, for March to April of 2012. This study included all prescriptions that contained at least one high-alert medication, excluding all of others. The data were analyzed using Microsoft Office Excel® version 2007, and the study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Hospital. Results: This study included prescriptions for 100 patients with a mean age of 5.2 ± 4.2 years. Were identified 983 (40.1% high-alert medications (21 different, with predominance of injectable solutions (834, 84,8%, and of these 727 (73.95% were electrolytes. The analysis of the dose was possible for 641 electrolytes and 104 non-electrolytes, being the dose inadequacies observed for some medications. Was observed concentration absent to 189 (18.9% prescribed medications, these with liquid pharmaceutical form or aerosol. Was observed also the absence of maximum dose for 8 (36.3% prescribed drugs “if necessary”. Conclusión: The inadequacies of doses of high-alert medications identified in this study may compromise patient safety, demonstrating the importance of knowledge of multidisciplinary health care team by this subject, in this context, it is noteworthy that the acting of a clinical pharmacist together with the health multidisciplined team can contributes with the review of drug prescriptions, reducing potential errors and collaborating with patient safety.

  6. Generating Artificial Snort Alerts and Implementing SELK: The Snort-Elasticsearch-Logstash-Kibana Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    priority distribution for outputting high, medium , low, and very low alerts based on Snort’s classifications. We construct the ELK pipeline, using... Environment 19 List of Symbols, Abbreviations, and Acronyms 28 Distribution List 29 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. iv List of...network-scan”, and “misc- attack”. Each classification has an associated priority level from 1 to 4, defined as high (1), medium (2), low (3), and very

  7. Design and Fabrication of Detector Module for UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, A.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. -B.; Barrillon, P.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-JØRgensen, C.; CaStro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, H. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; De La Taille, C.; Eyles, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) pathfinder is a space mission devoted to the measurement of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), especially their early light curves which will give crucial information on the progenitor stars and central engines of the GRBs. It consists of two instruments: the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger telescope (UBAT) for the detection of GRB locations and the Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) for the UV/optical afterglow observations, upon triggering by UBAT. The UBAT employs ...

  8. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single neuron recording in alert non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Grigsby, Erinn M.; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W.; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V.; Sommer, Marc A.; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report novel methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally per...

  9. Entrepreneurial Alertness and Innovation: Innovation Networks in the Oslo Region of Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Solevik, Marina; Gulbrandsen, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    The paper attempts to close a research gap related to remoteness of pure innovation and pure entrepreneurship research streams. In this study, we use theoretical concepts from the entrepreneurship research (i.e., entrepreneurial dynamism and entrepreneurial alertness) and attempt to analyze interaction between the actors in the regional networks in the Oslo region of Norway. The study derives several propositions which will be subsequently tested in the further quantitative stu...

  10. The Acute Effects of Intermittent Light Exposure in the Evening on Alertness and Subsequent Sleep Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Minqi Yang; Ning Ma; Yingying Zhu; Ying-Chu Su; Qingwei Chen; Fan-Chi Hsiao; Yanran Ji; Chien-Ming Yang; Guofu Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to bright light is typically intermittent in our daily life. However, the acute effects of intermittent light on alertness and sleep have seldom been explored. To investigate this issue, we employed within-subject design and compared the effects of three light conditions: intermittent bright light (30-min pulse of blue-enriched bright light (~1000 lux, ~6000 K) alternating with 30-min dim normal light (~5 lux, ~3600 K) three times); continuous bright light; and continuous dim light o...

  11. 981: Evaluation of Burn Sepsis Automated Alerts in an Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    procalcitonin may improve automated alert usefulness. 982 SEPTIC SHOCK - STEROID TREATMENT DECREASES A MARKER OF MICRO VASCULAR LEAKAGE Anja Kathrin...death in hospitals across the United States. The shock index (SI), calculated as heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure, has been studied as...a risk stratifying tool in patients presenting to the emergency department with severe sepsis and has been shown to predict disease escalation

  12. The LOFT Burst Alert System and its Burst On-board Trigger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schanne, Stephane; Götz, Diego; Provost, Herve Le

    2014-01-01

    for a world-wide observers community. However, observing the quickly decaying GRB afterglows with ground-based telescopes needs the rapid knowledge of their precise localization. The task of the Loft Burst Alert System (LBAS) is therefore to detect in near- real-time GRBs (about 120 detections expected per...... system). In this article we present the LBAS and its components, the LBOT and the associated ground-segment....

  13. Optical Flow and Driver’s Kinematics Analysis for State of Alert Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Torres-Torriti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Road accident statistics from different countries show that a significant number of accidents occur due to driver’s fatigue and lack of awareness to traffic conditions. In particular, about 60% of the accidents in which long haul truck and bus drivers are involved are attributed to drowsiness and fatigue. It is thus fundamental to improve non-invasive systems for sensing a driver’s state of alert. One of the main challenges to correctly resolve the state of alert is measuring the percentage of eyelid closure over time (PERCLOS, despite the driver’s head and body movements. In this paper, we propose a technique that involves optical flow and driver’s kinematics analysis to improve the robustness of the driver’s alert state measurement under pose changes using a single camera with near-infrared illumination. The proposed approach infers and keeps track of the driver’s pose in 3D space in order to ensure that eyes can be located correctly, even after periods of partial occlusion, for example, when the driver stares away from the camera. Our experiments show the effectiveness of the approach with a correct eyes detection rate of 99.41%, on average. The results obtained with the proposed approach in an experiment involving fifteen persons under different levels of sleep deprivation also confirm the discriminability of the fatigue levels. In addition to the measurement of fatigue and drowsiness, the pose tracking capability of the proposed approach has potential applications in distraction assessment and alerting of machine operators.

  14. Severity Summarization and Just in Time Alert Computation in mHealth Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathinarupothi, Rahul Krishnan; Alangot, Bithin; Rangan, Ekanath

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health is fast evolving into a practical solution to remotely monitor high-risk patients and deliver timely intervention in case of emergencies. Building upon our previous work on a fast and power efficient summarization framework for remote health monitoring applications, called RASPRO (Rapid Alerts Summarization for Effective Prognosis), we have developed a real-time criticality detection technique, which ensures meeting physician defined interventional time. We also present the results from initial testing of this technique.

  15. Entrepreneurial alertness and new venture performance: facilitating roles of networking capability

    OpenAIRE

    Adomako, Samuel; Danso, Albert; Boso, Nathaniel; Narteh, Bedman

    2017-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. An ability to act upon an entrepreneurial opportunity has been noted to be a major driver of new venture success. However, scholarly knowledge is limited on how and when entrepreneurs’ alertness to entrepreneurial opportunities drives new venture success. The current study addresses this gap in the entrepreneurship literature by arguing that variations in new venture performance are a function of levels of entrep...

  16. Real-Time Detector of Human Fatigue: Detecting Lapses in Alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-15

    dynamics. Acta Psychologica, 102, 43-75. Visser, B., de Looze, M.P., De Graaff , M.P. & van Dieen, J.H. (2004) Effects of precision demands and mental...FATIGUE: Detecting Lapses in Alertness Final Technical Report 1 General Considerations 1.1 Introduction Our concern is with the development of software and...would reliably generate performance lapses, where such lapses could be objectively defined, and one that would require gaze shifts. The Psychomotor

  17. The effects of spectral tuning of evening ambient light on melatonin suppression, alertness and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shadab A; St Hilaire, Melissa A; Lockley, Steven W

    2017-08-01

    We compared the effects of bedroom-intensity light from a standard fluorescent and a blue- (i.e., short-wavelength) depleted LED source on melatonin suppression, alertness, and sleep. Sixteen healthy participants (8 females) completed a 4-day inpatient study. Participants were exposed to blue-depleted circadian-sensitive (C-LED) light and a standard fluorescent light (FL, 4100K) of equal illuminance (50lx) for 8h prior to a fixed bedtime on two separate days in a within-subject, randomized, cross-over design. Each light exposure day was preceded by a dim light (light conditions, auditory reaction times were significantly slower under C-LED conditions compared to FL 30min prior to bedtime. EEG-based correlates of alertness corroborated the reduced alertness under C-LED conditions as shown by significantly increased EEG spectral power in the delta-theta (0.5-8.0Hz) bands under C-LED as compared to FL exposure. There was no significant difference in total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE%), and slow-wave activity (SWA) between the two conditions. Unlike melatonin suppression and alertness, a significant order effect was observed on all three sleep variables, however. Individuals who received C-LED first and then FL had increased TST, SE% and SWA averaged across both nights compared to individuals who received FL first and then C-LED. These data show that the spectral characteristics of light can be fine-tuned to attenuate non-visual responses to light in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Morning sleep inertia in alertness and performance: effect of cognitive domain and white light conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayantara Santhi

    Full Text Available The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT, n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at regular intervals for four hours, starting immediately after awakening in the morning, in eleven participants, in a four-way cross-over laboratory design. We also investigated whether exposure to Blue-Enhanced or Bright Blue-Enhanced white light would reduce sleep inertia. Alertness and all cognitive processes were impaired immediately upon awakening (p<0.01. However, alertness and sustained attention were more affected than cognitive throughput and working memory. Moreover, speed was more affected than accuracy of responses. The light conditions had no differential effect on performance except in the 3-back task (p<0.01, where response times (RT at the end of four hours in the two Blue-Enhanced white light conditions were faster (200 ms than at wake time. We conclude that the effect of sleep inertia varies with cognitive domain and that it's spectral/intensity response to light is different from that of sleepiness. That is, just increasing blue-wavelength in light may not be sufficient to reduce sleep inertia. These findings have implications for critical professions like medicine, law-enforcement etc., in which, personnel routinely wake up from night-time sleep to respond to emergency situations.

  19. Environmental monitoring: setting alert and action limits based on a zero-inflated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Harry; Zhao, Wei; O'day, Terrence; Fleming, William

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of an environmental monitoring program is to provide oversight for microbiological cleanliness of manufacturing operation and document the state of control of the facility. Key to the success of the program is the establishment of alert and action limits. In practice, several statistical methods including normal, Poisson, and negative binomial modeling have been routinely used to set these limits. However, data collected from clean rooms or controlled locations often display excess of zeros and overdispersion, caused by sampling population heterogeneity. Such data render it inappropriate to use the traditional methods to set alert and action levels. In this paper, a method based on a zero-inflated negative binomial model is proposed for the above instances. The method provides an enhanced alternative for trending environmental data of classified rooms, and it is demonstrated to show a clear improvement in terms of model fitting and parameter estimation. The primary purpose of an environmental monitoring program is to provide oversight for microbiological cleanliness of manufacturing operation and document the state of control of the facility. Key to the success of the program is the establishment of alert and action limits. In practice, several statistical methods including normal, Poisson, and negative binomial modeling have been routinely used to set these limits. However, data collected from clean rooms or controlled locations often display excess of zeros and overdispersion, caused by sampling population heterogeneity. Such data render it inappropriate to use the traditional methods to set alert and action levels. In this paper, a method based on a zero-inflated negative binomial model is proposed for the above instances. The method provides an enhanced alternative for trending environmental data of classified rooms, and it is demonstrated to show a clear improvement in terms of model fitting and parameter estimation.

  20. Crew Factors in Flight Operations XIV: Alertness Management in Regional Flight Operations Education Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Neri, David F.; Oyung, Raymond L.; Mallis, Melissa M.

    2002-01-01

    Regional operations encompass a broad range of pilots and equipment. This module is intended to help all those involved in regional aviation, including pilots, schedulers, dispatchers, maintenance technicians, policy makers, and others, to understand the physiological factors underlying fatigue, how flight operations affect fatigue, and what can be done to counteract fatigue and maximize alertness and performance in their operations. The overall purpose of this module is to promote aviation safety, performance, and productivity. It is intended to meet three specific objectives: (1) to explain the current state of knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying fatigue; (2) to demonstrate how this knowledge can be applied to improving flight crew sleep, performance, and alertness; and (3) to offer strategies for alertness management. Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) and National Transportation Safety Board (NISH) reports are used throughout this module to demonstrate that fatigue is a safety issue in the regional operations community. The appendices at the end of this module include the ASRS reports used for the examples contained in this publication, brief introductions to sleep disorders and relaxation techniques, summaries of relevant NASA publications, and a list of general readings on sleep, sleep disorders, and circadian rhythms.

  1. Crew Factors in Flight Operations XV: Alertness Management in General Aviation Education Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Neri, David F.; Oyung, Raymond L.; Mallis, Melissa M.; Cannon, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Regional operations encompass a broad range of pilots and equipment. This module is intended to help all those involved in regional aviation, including pilots, schedulers, dispatchers, maintenance technicians, policy makers, and others, to understand the physiological factors underlying fatigue, how flight operations affect fatigue, and what can be done to counteract fatigue and maximize alertness and performance in their operations. The overall purpose of this module is to promote aviation safety, performance, and productivity. It is intended to meet three specific objectives: (1) to explain the current state of knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying fatigue; (2) to demonstrate how this knowledge can be applied to improving flight crew sleep, performance, and alertness; and (3) to offer strategies for alertness management. Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) and National Transportation Safety Board (NISH) reports are used throughout this module to demonstrate that fatigue is a safety issue in the regional operations community. The appendices at the end of this module include the ASRS reports used for the examples contained in this publication, brief introductions to sleep disorders and relaxation techniques, summaries of relevant NASA publications, and a list of general readings on sleep, sleep disorders, and circadian rhythms.

  2. Mobile Traffic Alert and Tourist Route Guidance System Design Using Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Painho, M.; Mishra, S.; Gupta, A.

    2017-09-01

    The present study describes an integrated system for traffic data collection and alert warning. Geographical information based decision making related to traffic destinations and routes is proposed through the design. The system includes a geospatial database having profile relating to a user of a mobile device. The processing and understanding of scanned maps, other digital data input leads to route guidance. The system includes a server configured to receive traffic information relating to a route and location information relating to the mobile device. Server is configured to send a traffic alert to the mobile device when the traffic information and the location information indicate that the mobile device is traveling toward traffic congestion. Proposed system has geospatial and mobile data sets pertaining to Bangalore city in India. It is envisaged to be helpful for touristic purposes as a route guidance and alert relaying information system to tourists for proximity to sites worth seeing in a city they have entered into. The system is modular in architecture and the novelty lies in integration of different modules carrying different technologies for a complete traffic information system. Generic information processing and delivery system has been tested to be functional and speedy under test geospatial domains. In a restricted prototype model with geo-referenced route data required information has been delivered correctly over sustained trials to designated cell numbers, with average time frame of 27.5 seconds, maximum 50 and minimum 5 seconds. Traffic geo-data set trials testing is underway.

  3. Effects of modafinil on cognitive performance and alertness during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesensten, Nancy J

    2006-01-01

    The performance- and alertness-sustaining/restoring effects of modafinil during sleep deprivation in normal, healthy adults were reviewed. Results indicate that modafinil is efficacious for sustaining/restoring objective performance and alertness during sleep deprivation with few adverse effects. At appropriate dosages, modafinil restores performance and alertness to non-sleep deprived levels. Modafinil also impairs post-sleep deprivation recovery sleep, but from the few studies available addressing this issue, it is unclear whether these sleep impairments translate into post-sleep performance impairments. Further research is needed to determine whether modafinil restores performance on simple cognitive tasks only or whether modafinil additionally restores executive functions (e.g., abstract thought, critical reasoning, planning, decision-making, situational awareness, and effective judgment) which are critical in most modern operational settings. In addition, studies are needed to determine whether modafinil use during sleep deprivation is preferable to that of other available controlled stimulants (such as dextroamphetamine) or non-controlled stimulants (such as caffeine). Such studies would be comprised of direct, head-to-head comparisons among various stimulants across a range of dosages.

  4. Investigation into the value of trained glycaemia alert dogs to clients with type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Nicola J; Morant, Steve; Guest, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that some pet dogs respond to their owners' hypoglycaemic state. Here, we show that trained glycaemia alert dogs placed with clients living with diabetes afford significant improvements to owner well-being. We investigated whether trained dogs reliably respond to their owners' hypoglycaemic state, and whether owners experience facilitated tightened glycaemic control, and wider psychosocial benefits. Since obtaining their dog, all seventeen clients studied reported positive effects including reduced paramedic call outs, decreased unconscious episodes and improved independence. Owner-recorded data showed that dogs alerted their owners, with significant, though variable, accuracy at times of low and high blood sugar. Eight out of the ten dogs (for which owners provided adequate records) responded consistently more often when their owner's blood sugars were reported to be outside, than within, target range. Comparison of nine clients' routine records showed significant overall change after obtaining their dogs, with seven clients recording a significantly higher proportion of routine tests within target range after obtaining a dog. HbA1C showed a small, non significant reduction after dog allocation. Based on owner-reported data we have shown, for the first time, that trained detection dogs perform above chance level. This study points to the potential value of alert dogs, for increasing glycaemic control, client independence and consequent quality of life and even reducing the costs of long-term health care.

  5. Investigation into the value of trained glycaemia alert dogs to clients with type I diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Rooney

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that some pet dogs respond to their owners' hypoglycaemic state. Here, we show that trained glycaemia alert dogs placed with clients living with diabetes afford significant improvements to owner well-being. We investigated whether trained dogs reliably respond to their owners' hypoglycaemic state, and whether owners experience facilitated tightened glycaemic control, and wider psychosocial benefits. Since obtaining their dog, all seventeen clients studied reported positive effects including reduced paramedic call outs, decreased unconscious episodes and improved independence. Owner-recorded data showed that dogs alerted their owners, with significant, though variable, accuracy at times of low and high blood sugar. Eight out of the ten dogs (for which owners provided adequate records responded consistently more often when their owner's blood sugars were reported to be outside, than within, target range. Comparison of nine clients' routine records showed significant overall change after obtaining their dogs, with seven clients recording a significantly higher proportion of routine tests within target range after obtaining a dog. HbA1C showed a small, non significant reduction after dog allocation. Based on owner-reported data we have shown, for the first time, that trained detection dogs perform above chance level. This study points to the potential value of alert dogs, for increasing glycaemic control, client independence and consequent quality of life and even reducing the costs of long-term health care.

  6. Investigation into the Value of Trained Glycaemia Alert Dogs to Clients with Type I Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Nicola J.; Morant, Steve; Guest, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that some pet dogs respond to their owners’ hypoglycaemic state. Here, we show that trained glycaemia alert dogs placed with clients living with diabetes afford significant improvements to owner well-being. We investigated whether trained dogs reliably respond to their owners’ hypoglycaemic state, and whether owners experience facilitated tightened glycaemic control, and wider psychosocial benefits. Since obtaining their dog, all seventeen clients studied reported positive effects including reduced paramedic call outs, decreased unconscious episodes and improved independence. Owner-recorded data showed that dogs alerted their owners, with significant, though variable, accuracy at times of low and high blood sugar. Eight out of the ten dogs (for which owners provided adequate records) responded consistently more often when their owner’s blood sugars were reported to be outside, than within, target range. Comparison of nine clients’ routine records showed significant overall change after obtaining their dogs, with seven clients recording a significantly higher proportion of routine tests within target range after obtaining a dog. HbA1C showed a small, non significant reduction after dog allocation. Based on owner-reported data we have shown, for the first time, that trained detection dogs perform above chance level. This study points to the potential value of alert dogs, for increasing glycaemic control, client independence and consequent quality of life and even reducing the costs of long-term health care. PMID:23950905

  7. Design of a Novel Multifunction Decision Support Display for Anesthesia Care: AlertWatch® OR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremper, Kevin K; Mace, Jenny J; Gombert, Jan M; Tremper, Theodore T; Adams, Justin F; Bagian, James P

    2018-02-05

    This paper describes the design of a multifunction alerting display for intraoperative anesthetic care. The design was inspired by the multifunction primary flight display used in modern aviation. The display retrieves live data from multiple sources; the physiologic monitors, the anesthesia information management system, the laboratory values and comorbidities from patient's problem summary list, medical history or history & physical. This information is integrated into a display composed of readily identifiable icons of organ systems, which are color coded to signify normal range, marginal range, abnormal range (by green, yellow, red respectively) and orange outlines for comorbidities/risk factors. There are dozens of text alerts, which can be presented as black text (informational), red text (important information) and red scrolling text (highest importance information). The alerts are derived from current standards in the literature and some involve complex calculations being conducted in the background. The goal of such a system is to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic care by providing enhanced situational awareness in a fashion analogous to the "glass cockpit" and its primary flight display which has improved aviation safety.

  8. Computerized pharmacy surveillance and alert system for drug-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrández, O; Urbina, O; Grau, S; Mateu-de-Antonio, J; Marin-Casino, M; Portabella, J; Mojal, S; Riu, M; Salas, E

    2017-04-01

    Because of the impact of drug-related problems (DRPs) on morbidity and mortality, there is a need for computerized strategies to increase drug safety. The detection and identification of the causes of potential DRPs can be facilitated by the incorporation of a pharmacy warning system (PWS) in the computerized prescriber order entry (CPOE) and its application in the routine validation of inpatient drug therapy. A limited number of studies have evaluated a clinical decision support system to monitor drug treatment. Most of these applications have utilized a small range of drugs with alerts and/or types of alert. The objective of this study was to describe the implementation of a PWS integrated in the electronic medical record (EMR). The PWS was developed in 2003-2004. Pharmacological information to generate drug alerts was entered on demographic data, drug dosage, laboratory tests related to the prescribed drug and drug combinations (interactions, duplications and necessary combinations). The PWS was applied in the prescription reviews conducted in patients admitted to the hospital in 2012. Information on 83% of the drugs included in the pharmacopeia was introduced into the PWS, allowing detection of 2808 potential DRPs, representing 79·1% of all potential DRPs detected during the study period. Twenty per cent of PWS DRPs were clinically relevant, requiring pharmacist intervention. The PWS detected most potential DRPs, thus increasing inpatient safety. The detection ability of the PWS was higher than that reported for other tools described in the literature. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Automatic recognition of alertness and drowsiness from EEG by an artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Radivojevic, Vlada; Chen, Andrew C N; Popovic, Dejan

    2002-06-01

    We present a novel method for classifying alert vs drowsy states from 1 s long sequences of full spectrum EEG recordings in an arbitrary subject. This novel method uses time series of interhemispheric and intrahemispheric cross spectral densities of full spectrum EEG as the input to an artificial neural network (ANN) with two discrete outputs: drowsy and alert. The experimental data were collected from 17 subjects. Two experts in EEG interpretation visually inspected the data and provided the necessary expertise for the training of an ANN. We selected the following three ANNs as potential candidates: (1) the linear network with Widrow-Hoff (WH) algorithm; (2) the non-linear ANN with the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) rule; and (3) the Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) neural network. We showed that the LVQ neural network gives the best classification compared with the linear network that uses WH algorithm (the worst), and the non-linear network trained with the LM rule. Classification properties of LVQ were validated using the data recorded in 12 healthy volunteer subjects, yet whose EEG recordings have not been used for the training of the ANN. The statistics were used as a measure of potential applicability of the LVQ: the t-distribution showed that matching between the human assessment and the network output was 94.37+/-1.95%. This result suggests that the automatic recognition algorithm is applicable for distinguishing between alert and drowsy state in recordings that have not been used for the training.

  10. Morning sleep inertia in alertness and performance: effect of cognitive domain and white light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Nayantara; Groeger, John A; Archer, Simon N; Gimenez, Marina; Schlangen, Luc J M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at regular intervals for four hours, starting immediately after awakening in the morning, in eleven participants, in a four-way cross-over laboratory design. We also investigated whether exposure to Blue-Enhanced or Bright Blue-Enhanced white light would reduce sleep inertia. Alertness and all cognitive processes were impaired immediately upon awakening (psleep inertia varies with cognitive domain and that it's spectral/intensity response to light is different from that of sleepiness. That is, just increasing blue-wavelength in light may not be sufficient to reduce sleep inertia. These findings have implications for critical professions like medicine, law-enforcement etc., in which, personnel routinely wake up from night-time sleep to respond to emergency situations.

  11. Usability Flaws in Medication Alerting Systems: Impact on Usage and Work System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammenwerth, E.; Roehrer, E.; Pelayo, S.; Vasseur, F.; Beuscart-Zéphir, M.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Previous research has shown that medication alerting systems face usability issues. There has been no previous attempt to systematically explore the consequences of usability flaws in such systems on users (i.e. usage problems) and work systems (i.e. negative outcomes). This paper aims at exploring and synthesizing the consequences of usability flaws in terms of usage problems and negative outcomes on the work system. Methods A secondary analysis of 26 papers included in a prior systematic review of the usability flaws in medication alerting was performed. Usage problems and negative outcomes were extracted and sorted. Links between usability flaws, usage problems, and negative outcomes were also analyzed. Results Poor usability generates a large variety of consequences. It impacts the user from a cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and attitudinal perspective. Ultimately, usability flaws have negative consequences on the workflow, the effectiveness of the technology, the medication management process, and, more importantly, patient safety. Only few complete pathways leading from usability flaws to negative outcomes were identified. Conclusion Usability flaws in medication alerting systems impede users, and ultimately their work system, and negatively impact patient safety. Therefore, the usability dimension may act as a hidden explanatory variable that could explain, at least partly, the (absence of) intended outcomes of new technology. PMID:26123906

  12. Fatigue in Younger and Older Drivers: Effectiveness of an Alertness-Maintaining Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woojin; Woon, Fu L; Doong, Alice; Persad, Carol; Tijerina, Louis; Pandit, Pooja; Cline, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an alertness-maintaining task (AMT) in older, fatigued drivers. Fatigue during driving increases crash risk, and previous research suggests that alertness and driving in younger adults may be improved using a secondary AMT during boring, fatigue-eliciting drives. However, the potential impact of an AMT on driving has not been investigated in older drivers whose ability to complete dual tasks has been shown to decline and therefore may be negatively affected with an AMT in driving. Younger ( n = 29) and older drivers ( n = 39) participated in a 50-minute simulated drive designed to induce fatigue, followed by four 10-minute sessions alternating between driving with and without an AMT. Younger drivers were significantly more affected by fatigue on driving performance than were older drivers but benefitted significantly from the AMT. Older drivers did not demonstrate increased driver errors with fatigue, and driving did not deteriorate significantly during participation in the AMT condition, although their speed was significantly more variable with the AMT. Consistent with earlier research, an AMT applied during fatiguing driving is effective in improving alertness and reducing driving errors in younger drivers. Importantly, older drivers were relatively unaffected by fatigue, and use of an AMT did not detrimentally affect their driving performance. These results support the potential use of an AMT as a new automotive technology to improve fatigue and promote driver safety, though the benefits of such technology may differ between different age groups.

  13. MOBILE TRAFFIC ALERT AND TOURIST ROUTE GUIDANCE SYSTEM DESIGN USING GEOSPATIAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bhattacharya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes an integrated system for traffic data collection and alert warning. Geographical information based decision making related to traffic destinations and routes is proposed through the design. The system includes a geospatial database having profile relating to a user of a mobile device. The processing and understanding of scanned maps, other digital data input leads to route guidance. The system includes a server configured to receive traffic information relating to a route and location information relating to the mobile device. Server is configured to send a traffic alert to the mobile device when the traffic information and the location information indicate that the mobile device is traveling toward traffic congestion. Proposed system has geospatial and mobile data sets pertaining to Bangalore city in India. It is envisaged to be helpful for touristic purposes as a route guidance and alert relaying information system to tourists for proximity to sites worth seeing in a city they have entered into. The system is modular in architecture and the novelty lies in integration of different modules carrying different technologies for a complete traffic information system. Generic information processing and delivery system has been tested to be functional and speedy under test geospatial domains. In a restricted prototype model with geo-referenced route data required information has been delivered correctly over sustained trials to designated cell numbers, with average time frame of 27.5 seconds, maximum 50 and minimum 5 seconds. Traffic geo-data set trials testing is underway.

  14. Radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, C.T.; Green, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    A system for indicating radiation from a radioactive fluid such as a gas wherein simultaneous indications of the activity concentration of radioactivity of the gas, the radiation dose rate and average energy of the radiation are provided

  15. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  16. Real-time mobile phone dialing system based on SSVEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongsheng; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Cui, Gaochao; Watabe, Daishi; Cao, Jianting

    2017-03-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on the steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) provide higher information transfer rates and require shorter training time than BCI systems using other brain signals. It has been widely used in brain science, rehabilitation engineering, biomedical engineering and intelligent information processing. In this paper, we present a real-time mobile phone dialing system based on SSVEP, and it is more portable than other dialing system because the flashing dial interface is set on a small tablet. With this online BCI system, we can take advantage of this system based on SSVEP to identify the specific frequency on behalf of a number using canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method and dialed out successfully without using any physical movements such as finger tapping. This phone dialing system will be promising to help disable patients to improve the quality of lives.

  17. Prescribers' interactions with medication alerts at the point of prescribing: A multi-method, in situ investigation of the human-computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Zillich, Alan J; McManus, M Sue; Doebbeling, Bradley N; Saleem, Jason J

    2012-04-01

    Few studies have examined prescribers' interactions with medication alerts at the point of prescribing. We conducted an in situ, human factors investigation of outpatient prescribing to uncover factors that influence the prescriber-alert interaction and identify strategies to improve alert design. Field observations and interviews were conducted with outpatient prescribers at a major Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Physicians, clinical pharmacists, and nurse practitioners were recruited across five primary care clinics and eight specialty clinics. Prescribers were observed in situ as they ordered medications for patients and resolved alerts. Researchers collected 351 pages of typed notes across 102 hours of observations and interviews. An interdisciplinary team identified emergent themes via inductive qualitative analysis. Altogether, 320 alerts were observed among 30 prescribers and their interactions with 146 patients. Qualitative analysis uncovered 44 emergent themes and 9 overarching factors, which were organized into a framework that describes the prescriber-alert interaction. Prescribers' ability to act on alerts was impeded by the alert interface, which did not adequately support all prescriber types. This empiric study produced a novel framework for understanding the prescriber-alert interaction. Results revealed key components of the alert interface that influence prescribers and indicate a need for more universal design. Actionable design recommendations are presented and may be used to enhance alert design and patient safety. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Optimization of drug-drug interaction alert rules in a pediatric hospital's electronic health record system using a visual analytics dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Desai, Bimal R; Bonafide, Christopher P; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A; Jawad, Abbas F; Palma, Krisha L; Shelov, Eric D

    2015-03-01

    To develop and evaluate an electronic dashboard of hospital-wide electronic health record medication alerts for an alert fatigue reduction quality improvement project. We used visual analytics software to develop the dashboard. We collaborated with the hospital-wide Clinical Decision Support committee to perform three interventions successively deactivating clinically irrelevant drug-drug interaction (DDI) alert rules. We analyzed the impact of the interventions on care providers' and pharmacists' alert and override rates using an interrupted time series framework with piecewise regression. We evaluated 2 391 880 medication alerts between January 31, 2011 and January 26, 2014. For pharmacists, the median alert rate prior to the first DDI deactivation was 58.74 alerts/100 orders (IQR 54.98-60.48) and 25.11 alerts/100 orders (IQR 23.45-26.57) following the three interventions (pdashboard facilitated safe rapid-cycle reductions in alert burden that were temporally associated with lower pharmacist override rates in a subgroup of DDIs not directly affected by the interventions; meanwhile, the pharmacists' frequency of selecting the 'cancel' option increased. We hypothesize that reducing the alert burden enabled pharmacists to devote more attention to clinically relevant alerts. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effect of Oral Contraceptives, Menstrual Phase and Conditions on Alertness, Performance, and Rhythms in Sleep Deprived Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Badia, Pietro

    1996-01-01

    During our first year of funding, we tested the effects of caffeine, bright light, and placebo treatments on alertness, performance, mood, melatonin, and body temperature during 48 hr of sleep deprivation...

  20. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  1. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  2. Reshaping orthopaedic resident education in systems-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Susanne M; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Pratt, Daniel D; Polonijo, Andrea; Polinijo, Andrea; Stacy, Elizabeth; Wisener, Katherine; Black, Kevin P

    2012-08-01

    Despite advances in understanding the "systems-based practice" competency in resident education, this topic has remained difficult to teach, assess, and document. The goal of this study was to perform a needs assessment and an analysis of the current state of systems-based practice education in orthopaedic residency programs across the U.S. and within our own institution. A sample of orthopaedic educators and residents from across the U.S. who were attending the 2010 American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) Effective Orthopaedic Educator Course, AOA Resident Leadership Forum, and AOA Council of Residency Directors meeting were surveyed to determine (1) which aspects of systems-based practice, if any, were being taught; (2) how systems-based practice is being taught; and (3) how residency programs are assessing systems-based practice. In addition, an in-depth case study of these issues was performed by means of seven semi-structured focus group sessions with diverse stakeholders who participated in the care of musculoskeletal patients at the authors' institution. A quantitative approach was used to analyze the survey data. The focus group data were analyzed with procedures associated with grounded theory, relying on a constant comparative method to develop salient themes arising from the discussion. "Clinical observation" (33%) and "didactic case-based learning" (23%) were reported by the survey respondents as the most commonly used teaching methods, but specific topics were taught inconsistently. Competency assessment was reported to occur infrequently, and 36% of respondents reported that systems-based practice areas were not being assessed by any methods. The focus group discussions emphasized the need for standardized experiential learning that was closely linked to the patient's perspective. Orthopaedic faculty members were uncomfortable with their knowledge of this competency and their ability to teach and assess it. Teaching the systems-based practice

  3. Management of a power system based on renewable energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronay Karoly

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article main purpose is to highlight the main advantage of the hardware and software implementation for an energy management system based on renewable energy sources. By using implemented and dedicated hardware and software the evolution of energy production and consumption can be monitored. The advantages of such system are highlighted by the results obtained from experimental simulations. An experimental model for the power system based on renewable energy sources was implemented, where the actual status of the system in different situations when the equipments change their own statuses can be shown.

  4. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  5. Real Time View of the Functions and Services of the Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Aranda, J.; Ibarrola Alvarez, G.; Cuellar Martinez, A.; Inostroza Puk, M.

    2013-05-01

    The Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX) is integrated since March 2012 by the Seismic Alert System of Mexico City (SAS), in continuous operation since 1991, and the Seismic Alert System of Oaxaca City (SASO) that started its services in 2003. SASMEX consists of 97 field seismic sensor station (FS) type triaxial accelerometer, mostly sponsored by the government of Mexico City and secondly by Oaxaca. The SASMEX covers the Pacific seismic hazard among the coast of Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca; and the seismic region of Puebla and northern Oaxaca and Guerrero states. This integration lets to warn with better opportunity to the population of Mexico City, Oaxaca Oax., Acapulco Gro., Chilpancingo Gro. and recently Morelia Mich.; cities with a system called EASAS where receives seismic data from FS and emits earthquake early warning signals to the population. The recent sponsorship of Federal Government through the General Coordination of Civil Protection and the National Center for Disaster Prevention, reinforced integration SAS and SASO, and auspiced the development of a Real-Time Monitoring System of functions and services of SASMEX. This work show how is displayed the functions of services of SASMEX through this monitoring system and its possible application by Civil Protection authorities. This monitoring system can indicate the status of FS, the communications system and cities with EASAS. Additionally, when an earthquake occurs and is detected by the SASMEX, the monitoring system shows the messages of FS, whose consist in the characteristics of detection and seismic danger forecasted; in the case of a strong earthquake estimated by more than one FS, the EASAS of each city could automatically issue an Alert Public to its population. The monitoring system allows observing cities with EASAS that activate their alerts, displays a basic earthquake propagation model and how it reaches to other FS. Additionally, the monitoring system shows the

  6. Three-dimensional radiation treatment planning system based on STARDENT super graphic workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, K.M.; Suntharalingam, Nagaligam; Tupchong, Leslie; Haghbin, Mahroo; Mansfield, C.M.; Yeung, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we have demonstrated our 3D treatment planning system developed on a commercial workstation. The system has been in routine use for planning stereotactic brain implants for the last 2 years. Also we have demonstrated a few cases of the application of our 3D planning system for external beams. In future, several patient with specific clinical indication will be designated for planning, using this system. However, in its current state, the system is not ready to replace 2D planning with 3D planning. This is partly due to the inadequacy of the system, but mostly related to the lack of manpower, commitment and inadequacy of proper technology in the treatment machines in our department. (author). 6 refs., 14 figs

  7. A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON DRUG UTILISATION EVALUATION OF HIGH ALERT DRUGS USED IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Shaji*, Christy Sara Andrews, Adith Pillai, Alwin Jose, Rinto Paul Raju1, Robin Jose, S .Hemalatha

    2017-01-01

    Background:High alert medications are drugs with narrow margin of safety and require heightened vigilance. Although any drugs used improperly can cause harm, high-alert medications cause patient harm more likely when used in error and the harm they produce is likely to be more serious and leads to patient suffering and additional costs associated with care of these patients. Objective: To ensure safe medication practices and to eliminate medication errors that cause harm to the patients and s...

  8. Identifying High-alert Medications in a University Hospital by Applying Data From the Medication Error Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyynismaa, Lotta; Honkala, Anni; Airaksinen, Marja; Shermock, Kenneth; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2017-06-01

    To facilitate safe use of high-alert medications, lists of medications posing higher risks for medication errors (MEs) and harmful effects have been compiled. These lists can be general or reflect clinical practices in specific settings. Less common has been to compile a hospital-specific list applying data from the organization's ME reporting system. Our objective was to demonstrate a method for compiling such a high-alert medication list in a university hospital. Of the eighteen 136 MEs reported during 2007 to 2013, ME reports with medications coded as a contributing factor to the incident were included (n = 249). The involved medications were identified and compared with the hospital's drug consumption and Institute for Safe Medication Practice's List of High-Alert Medications. The report narratives of MEs with most reported and high-alert medications (120 reports) were qualitatively content analyzed. The included 249 reports concerned 280 medications, of which 33% were classified as high-alert medications by the Institute for Safe Medication Practice. The most common therapeutic groups were antibacterials for systemic use (13%), psycholeptics (10%), analgesics (9%), and antithrombotic agents (9%). The most common high-alert medications were oxycodone (5%), enoxaparin (3%), and noradrenaline (3%). Serious patient harm (3%) was related to cefuroxime, enoxaparin, ibuprofen, midazolam, propofol, and warfarin. A half of the MEs were related to parenteral preparations. The qualitative content analysis revealed the key process safety risks of the most reported and high-alert medications. The method is applicable for compiling a hospital-specific high-alert medication list and related analysis of key process safety risks contributing to MEs.

  9. Best practices: an electronic drug alert program to improve safety in an accountable care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Sara; Lustig, Adam; Malsin, Luanne; Carley, Blake; Westrich, Kimberly D; Dubois, Robert W

    2015-04-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO), one of the most promising and talked about new models of care, focuses on improving communication and care transitions by tying potential shared savings to specific clinical and financial benchmarks. An important factor in meeting these benchmarks is an ACO's ability to manage medications in an environment where medical and pharmacy care has been integrated. The program described in this article highlights the critical components of Marshfield Clinic's Drug Safety Alert Program (DSAP), which focuses on prioritizing and communicating safety issues related to medications with the goal of reducing potential adverse drug events. Once the medication safety concern is identified, it is reviewed to evaluate whether an alert warrants sending prescribers a communication that identifies individual patients or a general communication to all physicians describing the safety concern. Instead of basing its decisions regarding clinician notification about drug alerts on subjective criteria, the Marshfield Clinic's DSAP uses an internally developed scoring system. The scoring system includes criteria developed from previous drug alerts, such as level of evidence, size of population affected, severity of adverse event identified or targeted, litigation risk, available alternatives, and potential for duration of medication use. Each of the 6 criteria is assigned a weight and is scored based upon the content and severity of the alert received.  In its first 12 months, the program targeted 6 medication safety concerns involving the following medications: topiramate, glyburide, simvastatin, citalopram, pioglitazone, and lovastatin. Baseline and follow-up prescribing data were gathered on the targeted medications. Follow-up review of prescribing data demonstrated that the DSAP provided quality up-to-date safety information that led to changes in drug therapy and to decreases in potential adverse drug events. In aggregate, nearly 10,000 total

  10. ALERTES-SC3: an EEWS prototype for south Iberia peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Martín Davila, José; Gallego Carrasco, Javier; Rioja del Rio, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo; Hanka, Winfried; Strollo, Angelo; Cibeira, Angel; Cabieces, Roberto; Carranza, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Since several decades Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) have been developed for different parts of the world based on the hypothesis of the earthquake characteristics can be derived from the analysis of the low energy P-wave prior to the arrival of more energetic S-waves and later phases. Thereby a time ("lead time") is available to evaluate a warning and perform automatic or semi -automatic actions on certain systems and deliver and alert to the authorities involved in emergency. The South Iberia peninsula area, between SW San Vicente Cape to the East of the Alboran sea, is one of the most seismically active zones in the Ibero-Maghrebian region, with predominantly moderate and superficial seismicity, but also big events with associated tsunamis are well documented in the area, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. The main goal of the ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) Spanish projects has been to develop an EEWS for South Iberia region (ALERTES-SC3 EEWS) from a regional and also an on-site approach, and the study of the scaling laws for this area to estimate the moment magnitude (Mw) and predict the expected PGV (peak ground velocity) and Pd (peak displacement) among other parameters. The ALERTES-SC3 EEWS, regional approach, prototype has been developed at the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and is being tested in near real time for South Iberia area. This prototype, based on the SeisComP3 software package, is largely based on algorithms derived from the analysis of the first seconds of the P wave records. Calculation of several parameters are carried out, mainly the characteristic period (τc), Peak displacement and velocity (Pd, Pv) and maximum period (τPmáx), among others, from which correlations with corresponding earthquake magnitude, peak ground velocities , etc. are derived. Decision tables have been developed in order to deliver warnings (Buforn et al, 2012). The algorithms have been implemented by ROA in the seismic data system Seis

  11. A case study of pediatric asthma alerts from the beacon community program in cincinnati: technology is just the first step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudnak, Tara; Mansour, Mona; Mandel, Keith; Sauers, Hadley; Pandzik, Gerry; Donisi, Carl; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Community in Cincinnati, Ohio was an innovative, community-wide initiative to use technology to transform care. One important feature was the development of regional alerts to notify practices when patients were hospitalized or seen in the emergency department. The purpose of this paper is to describe the way in which technology engages the improvement process, and to describe the early stages of learning how to use technology to enhance quality improvement. We interviewed key Beacon leaders as well as providers and office staff in selected practices. We also collected preliminary data from practices that reflected handling of alerts, including the number of asthma related alerts received and followed up. Regional alerts, supplied by the community-wide health information exchange, were a significant addition to the quality improvement effort in that they enabled practices to identify and follow up with additional children at risk. An important finding was the substantial effort at the practice level to integrate technology into ongoing patient care. Developing the technology for community wide alerts represented a significant endeavor in the Cincinnati Beacon Community. However, the technology was just the first step. Despite extra effort and time required on the part of individual practices, they reported that the value of having alerts was high. Hospital and ED visits represent some of the most costly aspects of care, and an efficient process for intervening with children using these costly services was seen as of significant value.

  12. Greenhouse with a CPV system based on NIR reflecting lamellae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous research a new type of greenhouse with an integrated concentrated photovoltaic system (CPV) was developed based on a circular covering geometry and an integrated filter for reflecting the near infrared radiation (NIR) of the greenhouse and exploiting this radiation in a solar energy

  13. Firewood Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry; PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources; Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

    2006-01-01

    Help stop the movement of exotic pests. Don't move Firewood! Exotic wood borers like emerald ash borer, Asian Long-horned beetle and Sirex wood wasp threaten Pennsylvania's forestland. Exotic wood boring insects can become established when infested firewood is transported to new areas.

  14. Alcohol Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special ... 466 KB] No. 81: Exploring Treatment Options for Alcohol Use Disorders [ PDF - 539K] No. 80: Alcohol and HIV/AIDS: ...

  15. Drug Alert

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Persons with a history of severe hypersensitivity to eggs;. 2. Persons with acute febrile illnesses should ... care for c'onditions such as chronic pulmonary and cardiac disease, chronic renal diseases, diabetes mellitus ... Africa and Latin America are used to illustrate how empowerment, democratisation and equity, and the.

  16. Noninteracting control of nonlinear systems based on relaxed control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayawardhana, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose methodology to solve noninteracting control problem for general nonlinear systems based on the relaxed control technique proposed by Artstein. For a class of nonlinear systems which cannot be stabilized by smooth feedback, a state-feedback relaxed control can be designed to

  17. Security of Electronic Payment Systems Based on Digital Money

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Vavrenyuk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic payment systems based on digital money are evaluated in terms of information protection. Mechanisms of protection of interests of bank-emitter, buyer and seller are described. Course of life of a digital denomination is resulted: transactions of removal from the account, purchase and transfer into the account.

  18. [An intelligent optometry system based on Client/Server Mode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Li; Xue, Yong-Qi; Shi, Peng-Fei

    2005-05-01

    The optometry in physical examinations is conducted manually at present and this method is neither precise nor efficient. After studying the standard logarithmic visual acuity charts which is popular in our country, we have designed an optometry system based on Client/Server Computing Mode. The system's architecture and its working principle are also presented in the article.

  19. A Situated Cultural Festival Learning System Based on Motion Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Hsing; Lin, Yu-Kai; Fang, Rong-Jyue; Lu, You-Te

    2017-01-01

    A situated Chinese cultural festival learning system based on motion sensing is developed in this study. The primary design principle is to create a highly interactive learning environment, allowing learners to interact with Kinect through natural gestures in the designed learning situation to achieve efficient learning. The system has the…

  20. [A wireless mobile monitoring system based on bluetooth technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-jun; Wu, Kai; Wu, Xiao-Ming

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a wireless mobile monitoring system based on Bluetooth technology. This system realizes the remote mobile monitoring of multiple physiological parameters, and has the characters of easy use, low cost, good reliability and strong capability of anti-jamming.

  1. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    This will be a simple explanation of the reasons why CERN has to be careful about radiation protections issues, a practical guide on how to recognize radiation dangers, the monitoring systems that make sure radiation levels are well tolerable norms, and a quick summary of what radiation levels mean in terms of personal risk.

  2. GSM module for wireless radiation monitoring system via SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Hisyam Ibrahim, Noor; Lombigit, Lojius; Azman, Azraf; Jaafar, Zainudin; Arymaswati Abdullah, Nor; Hadzir Patai Mohamad, Glam

    2018-01-01

    A customised Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) module is designed for wireless radiation monitoring through Short Messaging Service (SMS). This module is able to receive serial data from radiation monitoring devices such as survey meter or area monitor and transmit the data as text SMS to a host server. It provides two-way communication for data transmission, status query, and configuration setup. The module hardware consists of GSM module, voltage level shifter, SIM circuit and Atmega328P microcontroller. Microcontroller provides control for sending, receiving and AT command processing to GSM module. The firmware is responsible to handle task related to communication between device and host server. It process all incoming SMS, extract, and store new configuration from Host, transmits alert/notification SMS when the radiation data reach/exceed threshold value, and transmits SMS data at every fixed interval according to configuration. Integration of this module with radiation survey/monitoring device will create mobile and wireless radiation monitoring system with prompt emergency alert at high-level radiation.

  3. Finite-Fault and Other New Capabilities of CISN ShakeAlert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, M.; Felizardo, C.; Heaton, T. H.; Hudnut, K. W.; Hauksson, E.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 6 years, scientists at Caltech, UC Berkeley, the Univ. of Southern California, the Univ. of Washington, the US Geological Survey, and ETH Zurich (Switzerland) have developed the 'ShakeAlert' earthquake early warning demonstration system for California and the Pacific Northwest. We have now started to transform this system into a stable end-to-end production system that will be integrated into the daily routine operations of the CISN and PNSN networks. To quickly determine the earthquake magnitude and location, ShakeAlert currently processes and interprets real-time data-streams from several hundred seismic stations within the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN). Based on these parameters, the 'UserDisplay' software predicts and displays the arrival and intensity of shaking at a given user site. Real-time ShakeAlert feeds are currently being shared with around 160 individuals, companies, and emergency response organizations to gather feedback about the system performance, to educate potential users about EEW, and to identify needs and applications of EEW in a future operational warning system. To improve the performance during large earthquakes (M>6.5), we have started to develop, implement, and test a number of new algorithms for the ShakeAlert system: the 'FinDer' (Finite Fault Rupture Detector) algorithm provides real-time estimates of locations and extents of finite-fault ruptures from high-frequency seismic data. The 'GPSlip' algorithm estimates the fault slip along these ruptures using high-rate real-time GPS data. And, third, a new type of ground-motion prediction models derived from over 415,000 rupture simulations along active faults in southern California improves MMI intensity predictions for large earthquakes with consideration of finite-fault, rupture directivity, and basin response effects. FinDer and GPSlip are currently being real-time and offline tested in a separate internal

  4. [Major influential factors of the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhuo; Hou, Chunlin; Zheng, Xianyou; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Wanhong; Lin, Haodong

    2008-08-01

    To study major influential factors of the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladders for the product design and clinical application of the device. One ferrite permanent magnet with thickness and diameter of 3 mm and 10 mm, respectively, and three NdFeB permanent magnets with the thickness of 3 mm and diameter of 10, 15 and 20 mm, respectively, were used. The effects of thickness of the abdominal wall as well as the position and type of permanent magnets on the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladders were measured in vitro simulated test, when the abdominal wall was set to 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 cm, respectively, and the position of permanent magnets was 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 cm, respectively. The effect of the geomagnetic field on the device was measured under the condition that the thickness of the simulated abdominal wall was set to 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm, respectively, and the position of permanent magnets was 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 cm, respectively. The value showed in the warning unit was positively correlated with the position of the ferrite permanent magnet only when the thickness of the simulated abdominal wall was 2 cm (r=0.632, P NdFeB permanent magnets was significant (r > 0.622, P NdFeB permanent magnets, but weakened with the increasing thickness of the simulated abdominal wall. The effect of the geomagnetic field was correlated with the exposition of the body, the position of the permanent magnet and the thickness of the abdominal wall. The major influential factors of the micturition alert device dedicated to neurogenic bladder include the magnetism and location of the permanent magnet, the thickness of the abdominal wall and the geomagnetic field. These factors are correlated with and affect each other. Reasonable allocation of these factors may optimize the device.

  5. Optimized molecular resolution of cross-contamination alerts in clinical mycobacteriology laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Viedma Darío

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of misdiagnosing tuberculosis (TB by laboratory cross-contamination when culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB has been widely reported and it has an obvious clinical, therapeutic and social impact. The final confirmation of a cross-contamination event requires the molecular identification of the same MTB strain cultured from both the potential source of the contamination and from the false-positive candidate. The molecular tool usually applied in this context is IS6110-RFLP which takes a long time to provide an answer, usually longer than is acceptable for microbiologists and clinicians to make decisions. Our purpose in this study is to evaluate a novel PCR-based method, MIRU-VNTR as an alternative to assure a rapid and optimized analysis of cross-contamination alerts. Results MIRU-VNTR was prospectively compared with IS6110-RFLP for clarifying 19 alerts of false positivity from other laboratories. MIRU-VNTR highly correlated with IS6110-RFLP, reduced the response time by 27 days and clarified six alerts unresolved by RFLP. Additionally, MIRU-VNTR revealed complex situations such as contamination events involving polyclonal isolates and a false-positive case due to the simultaneous cross-contamination from two independent sources. Conclusion Unlike standard RFLP-based genotyping, MIRU-VNTR i could help reduce the impact of a false positive diagnosis of TB, ii increased the number of events that could be solved and iii revealed the complexity of some cross-contamination events that could not be dissected by IS6110-RFLP.

  6. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Boriani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Health intervention systems are complex and subject to multiple variables in different phases of implementation. This constitutes a concrete challenge for the application of translational science in real life. Complex systems as health-oriented interventions call for interdisciplinary approaches with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors’ system (BEST aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk], a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary project based on the application of measurable biomarkers at strategic points of the milk chain for improved food security (including safety, human, and ecosystem health (1. In fact, the European food safety framework calls for science-based support to the primary producers’ mandate for legal, scientific, and ethical responsibility in food supply. Because of its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach involving human, animal, and ecosystem health, ALERT can be considered as a One Health project. Within the ALERT context, we identified the need to take into account the main actors, interactions, and relationships of stakeholders to depict a simplified skeleton of the system. The framework can provide elements to highlight how and where to improve the project development when project evaluations are required.

  7. Risk models to improve safety of dispensing high-alert medications in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L; Westphal, John E; Comden, Sharon Conrow; Horn, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether sociotechnical probabilistic risk assessment can create accurate approximations of detailed risk models that describe error pathways, estimate the incidence of preventable adverse drug events (PADEs) with high-alert medications, rank the effectiveness of interventions, and provide a more informative picture of risk in the community pharmacy setting than is available currently. Developmental study. 22 community pharmacies representing three U.S. regions. Model-building group: six pharmacists and three technicians. Model validation group: 11 pharmacists; staff at two pharmacies observed. A model-building team built 10 event trees that estimated the incidence of PADEs for four high-alert medications: warfarin, fentanyl transdermal systems, oral methotrexate, and insulin analogs. Validation of event tree structure and incidence of defined PADEs with targeted medications. PADEs with the highest incidence included dispensing the wrong dose/strength of warfarin as a result of data entry error (1.83/1,000 prescriptions), dispensing warfarin to the wrong patient (1.22/1,000 prescriptions), and dispensing an inappropriate fentanyl system dose due to a prescribing error (7.30/10,000 prescriptions). PADEs with the lowest incidence included dispensing the wrong drug when filling a warfarin prescription (9.43/1 billion prescriptions). The largest quantifiable reductions in risk were provided by increasing patient counseling (27-68% reduction), conducting a second data entry verification process during product verification (50-87% reduction), computer alerts that can't be bypassed easily (up to 100% reduction), opening the bag at the point of sale (56% reduction), and use of barcoding technology (almost a 100,000% increase in risk if technology not used). Combining two or more interventions resulted in further overall reduction in risk. The risk models define thousands of ways process failures and behavioral elements combine to lead to PADEs. This level of

  8. Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Peter J; Heatherley, Susan V; Mullings, Emma L; Smith, Jessica E

    2013-03-01

    Despite 100 years of psychopharmacological research, the extent to which caffeine consumption benefits human functioning remains unclear. To measure the effects of overnight caffeine abstinence and caffeine administration as a function of level of habitual caffeine consumption. Medium-high (n = 212) and non-low (n = 157) caffeine consumers completed self-report measures and computer-based tasks before (starting at 10:30 AM) and after double-blind treatment with either caffeine (100 mg, then 150 mg) or placebo. The first treatment was given at 11:15 AM and the second at 12:45 PM, with post-treatment measures repeated twice between 1:45 PM and 3:30 PM. Caffeine withdrawal was associated with some detrimental effects at 10:30 AM, and more severe effects, including greater sleepiness, lower mental alertness, and poorer performance on simple reaction time, choice reaction time and recognition memory tasks, later in the afternoon. Caffeine improved these measures in medium-high consumers but, apart from decreasing sleepiness, had little effect on them in non-low consumers. The failure of caffeine to increase mental alertness and improve mental performance in non-low consumers was related to a substantial caffeine-induced increase in anxiety/jitteriness that offset the benefit of decreased sleepiness. Caffeine enhanced physical performance (faster tapping speed and faster simple and choice reaction times) in both medium-high and non-low consumers. While caffeine benefits motor performance and tolerance develops to its tendency to increase anxiety/jitteriness, tolerance to its effects on sleepiness means that frequent consumption fails to enhance mental alertness and mental performance.

  9. Randomized Trial of Intelligent Sensor System for Early Illness Alerts in Senior Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn; Phillips, Lorraine J; Galambos, Colleen; Lane, Kari; Alexander, Gregory L; Despins, Laurel; Koopman, Richelle J; Skubic, Marjorie; Hicks, Lanis; Miller, Steven; Craver, Andy; Harris, Bradford H; Deroche, Chelsea B

    2017-10-01

    Measure the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of using sensor data from an environmentally embedded sensor system for early illness recognition. This sensor system has demonstrated in pilot studies to detect changes in function and in chronic diseases or acute illnesses on average 10 days to 2 weeks before usual assessment methods or self-reports of illness. Prospective intervention study in 13 assisted living (AL) communities of 171 residents randomly assigned to intervention (n=86) or comparison group (n=85) receiving usual care. Intervention participants lived with the sensor system an average of one year. Continuous data collected 24 hours/7 days a week from motion sensors to measure overall activity, an under mattress bed sensor to capture respiration, pulse, and restlessness as people sleep, and a gait sensor that continuously measures gait speed, stride length and time, and automatically assess for increasing fall risk as the person walks around the apartment. Continuously running computer algorithms are applied to the sensor data and send health alerts to staff when there are changes in sensor data patterns. The randomized comparison group functionally declined more rapidly than the intervention group. Walking speed and several measures from GaitRite, velocity, step length left and right, stride length left and right, and the fall risk measure of functional ambulation profile (FAP) all had clinically significant changes. The walking speed increase (worse) and velocity decline (worse) of 0.073 m/s for comparison group exceeded 0.05 m/s, a value considered to be a minimum clinically important difference. No differences were measured in health care costs. These findings demonstrate that sensor data with health alerts and fall alerts sent to AL nursing staff can be an effective strategy to detect and intervene in early signs of illness or functional decline. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published

  10. Sleep and Alertness in Medical Interns and Residents: An Observational Study on the Role of Extended Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Shea, Judy A; Small, Dylan S; Zhu, Jingsan; Norton, Laurie; Ecker, Adrian J; Novak, Cristina; Bellini, Lisa M; Volpp, Kevin G

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue from sleep loss is a risk to physician and patient safety, but objective data on physician sleep and alertness on different duty hour schedules is scarce. This study objectively quantified differences in sleep duration and alertness between medical interns working extended overnight shifts and residents not or rarely working extended overnight shifts. Sleep-wake activity of 137 interns and 87 PGY-2/3 residents on 2-week Internal Medicine and Oncology rotations was assessed with wrist-actigraphy. Alertness was assessed daily with a brief Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. Interns averaged 6.93 hours (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.84-7.03 hours) sleep per 24 hours across shifts, significantly less than residents not working overnight shifts (7.18 hours, 95% CI 7.06-7.30 hours, p = .007). Interns obtained on average 2.19 hours (95% CI 2.02-2.36 hours) sleep during on-call nights (17.5% obtained no sleep). Alertness was significantly lower on mornings after on-call nights compared to regular shifts (p Sleep inertia significantly affected alertness in the 60 minutes after waking on-call. Extended overnight shifts increase the likelihood of chronic sleep restriction in interns. Reduced levels of alertness after on-call nights need to be mitigated. A systematic comparison of sleep, alertness, and safety outcomes under current and past duty hour rules is encouraged. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Reducing the feature positive effect by alerting people to its existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric G C

    2014-12-01

    The feature-positive effect (FPE) is the phenomenon that learning organisms are better at detecting the association between two present stimuli than between the absence of one stimulus and the presence of the other. Although the FPE was first described 40 years ago, it remains an ill-studied and ill-understood bias. The aim of the present study was to test whether the FPE can be remedied by simply alerting individuals to the possibility that the solution to a given problem may lie in the diagnosticity of a stimulus being absent. The results indicated that the instructions given to participants can indeed reduce the FPE.

  12. Federal Technology Alert: Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities--Second Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, Donald L.

    2001-03-01

    This Federal Technology Alert, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs, provides the detailed information and procedures that a Federal energy manager needs to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. This report updates an earlier report on ground-source heat pumps that was published in September 1995. In the current report, general benefits of this technology to the Federal sector are described, as are ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits. In addition, information on current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are provided.

  13. Passive pavement-mounted acoustical linguistic drive alert system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Roger A.; Anderson, Richard L.; Carnal, Charles L.; Hylton, James O.; Stevens, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for passive pavement-mounted acoustical alert of the occupants of a vehicle. A method of notifying a vehicle occupant includes providing a driving medium upon which a vehicle is to be driven; and texturing a portion of the driving medium such that the textured portion interacts with the vehicle to produce audible signals, the textured portion pattern such that a linguistic message is encoded into the audible signals. The systems and methods provide advantages because information can be conveyed to the occupants of the vehicle based on the location of the vehicle relative to the textured surface.

  14. A Randomized Trial of Palliative Care Discussions Linked to an Automated Early Warning System Alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker, David; Dans, Maria; Heard, Kevin; Bailey, Thomas; Chen, Yixin; Lu, Chenyang; Kollef, Marin H

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether an Early Warning System could identify patients wishing to focus on palliative care measures. Prospective, randomized, pilot study. Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Saint Louis, MO (January 15, 2015, to December 12, 2015). A total of 206 patients; 89 intervention (43.2%) and 117 controls (56.8%). Palliative care in high-risk patients targeted by an Early Warning System. Advanced directive documentation was significantly greater prior to discharge in the intervention group (37.1% vs 15.4%; p Warning System alerts can identify patients potentially benefitting from directed palliative care discussions and reduce the number of ICU transfers.

  15. Exploring the Pulse Structure of the Gamma-Ray Bursts from the Swift Burst Alert Telescop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Juan-Carlos; Team 1: Jon Hakkila, Amy Lien, Judith, Racusin, Team 2: Antonino Cucchiara, David Morris

    2018-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are one of the brightest and most intense explosions in our universe. For this project, we studied the shape of 400 single pulse GRBs using data gathered from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Hakkila et al. (2015) have discovered a mathematical Model that describes the GRB’s pulse shapes. Following the method in Hakkila et al. (2015), we fit GRB pulses with the Norris function and examined the residual in the fitting, to see whether the results are consistent with the one reported in Hakkila et al. (2015).

  16. Enrichment of true positives from structural alerts through the use of novel atomic fragment based descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, A.; Rydberg, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the discrimination rate for methods applying structural alerts and biotransformation rules in the prediction of toxicity and drug metabolism we have developed a set of novel fragment based atomic descriptors. These atomic descriptors encode the properties of the fragments separating...... an atom from the closest end of a branch or the molecule. The end of a branch and the end of a molecule, as well as the selection of the fragments, are made by an algorithm that uses only the distance matrix of the molecule. The novel descriptors are applied to a small set of biotransformation rules...

  17. Multifunctional Solar Systems Based On Two-Stage Regeneration Absorbent Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko A.V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of multifunctional dehumidification solar systems, heat supply, cooling, and air conditioning based on the open absorption cycle with direct absorbent regeneration developed. The solar systems based on preliminary drainage of current of air and subsequent evaporated cooling. The solar system using evaporative coolers both types (direct and indirect. The principle of two-stage regeneration of absorbent used in the solar systems, it used as the basis of liquid and gas-liquid solar collectors. The main principle solutions are designed for the new generation of gas-liquid solar collectors. Analysis of the heat losses in the gas-liquid solar collectors, due to the mechanism of convection and radiation is made. Optimal cost of gas and liquid, as well as the basic dimensions and configuration of the working channel of the solar collector identified. Heat and mass transfer devices, belonging to the evaporative cooling system based on the interaction between the film and the gas stream and the liquid therein. Multichannel structure of the polymeric materials used to create the tip. Evaporative coolers of water and air both types (direct and indirect are used in the cooling of the solar systems. Preliminary analysis of the possibilities of multifunctional solar absorption systems made reference to problems of cooling media and air conditioning on the basis of experimental data the authors. Designed solar systems feature low power consumption and environmental friendliness.

  18. Road landslide information management and forecasting system base on GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Dong; Du, Xiang Gang; Xie, Cui Ming

    2009-09-01

    Take account of the characters of road geological hazard and its supervision, it is very important to develop the Road Landslides Information Management and Forecasting System based on Geographic Information System (GIS). The paper presents the system objective, function, component modules and key techniques in the procedure of system development. The system, based on the spatial information and attribute information of road geological hazard, was developed and applied in Guizhou, a province of China where there are numerous and typical landslides. The manager of communication, using the system, can visually inquire all road landslides information based on regional road network or on the monitoring network of individual landslide. Furthermore, the system, integrated with mathematical prediction models and the GIS's strongpoint on spatial analyzing, can assess and predict landslide developing procedure according to the field monitoring data. Thus, it can efficiently assists the road construction or management units in making decision to control the landslides and to reduce human vulnerability.

  19. An Intelligent Logistics Tracking System Based on Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Jijun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the shortcomings in information collection and tracking management in existing logistics, the key technologies of wireless sensor network and the basic concepts and methods of Information Technology Infrastructure Library(ITIL is studied. The basic structure and main functions of the logistics tracking system based on wireless sensor network is put forward. It can effectively solve the detection, location, recognition and automatic processing of fault events and other issues of goods in the process of logistics tracking management. In addition, combined with the GIS software, the logistics tracking and monitoring system based on the wireless sensor network is realized by using Java language coding. The results show that this system can realize the tracking, visualization and automatic management of the information in the process of goods transportation. Therefore, the proposed method significantly improves the accuracy, rapidity and intuition of the logistics information management.

  20. A novel PMT test system based on waveform sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, S.; Ma, L.; Ning, Z.; Qian, S.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, X.; Wang, Z.; Yu, B.; Gao, F.; Zhu, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2018-01-01

    Comparing with the traditional test system based on a QDC and TDC and scaler, a test system based on waveform sampling is constructed for signal sampling of the 8"R5912 and the 20"R12860 Hamamatsu PMT in different energy states from single to multiple photoelectrons. In order to achieve high throughput and to reduce the dead time in data processing, the data acquisition software based on LabVIEW is developed and runs with a parallel mechanism. The analysis algorithm is realized in LabVIEW and the spectra of charge, amplitude, signal width and rising time are analyzed offline. The results from Charge-to-Digital Converter, Time-to-Digital Converter and waveform sampling are discussed in detailed comparison.

  1. Design and Implementation of Distributed Crawler System Based on Scrapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhao

    2018-01-01

    At present, some large-scale search engines at home and abroad only provide users with non-custom search services, and a single-machine web crawler cannot sovle the difficult task. In this paper, Through the study and research of the original Scrapy framework, the original Scrapy framework is improved by combining Scrapy and Redis, a distributed crawler system based on Web information Scrapy framework is designed and implemented, and Bloom Filter algorithm is applied to dupefilter modul to reduce memory consumption. The movie information captured from douban is stored in MongoDB, so that the data can be processed and analyzed. The results show that distributed crawler system based on Scrapy framework is more efficient and stable than the single-machine web crawler system.

  2. The experimental study of a two-stage photovoltaic thermal system based on solar trough concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Lijun; Ji, Xu; Li, Ming; Leng, Congbin; Luo, Xi; Li, Haili

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A two-stage photovoltaic thermal system based on solar trough concentration. • Maximum cell efficiency of 5.21% with the mirror opening width of 57 cm. • With single cycle, maximum temperatures rise in the heating stage is 12.06 °C. • With 30 min multiple cycles, working medium temperature 62.8 °C, increased 28.7 °C. - Abstract: A two-stage photovoltaic thermal system based on solar trough concentration is proposed, in which the metal cavity heating stage is added on the basis of the PV/T stage, and thermal energy with higher temperature is output while electric energy is output. With the 1.8 m 2 mirror PV/T system, the characteristic parameters of the space solar cell under non-concentrating solar radiation and concentrating solar radiation are respectively tested experimentally, and the solar cell output characteristics at different opening widths of concentrating mirror of the PV/T stage under condensation are also tested experimentally. When the mirror opening width was 57 cm, the solar cell efficiency reached maximum value of 5.21%. The experimental platform of the two-stage photovoltaic thermal system was established, with a 1.8 m 2 mirror PV/T stage and a 15 m 2 mirror heating stage, or a 1.8 m 2 mirror PV/T stage and a 30 m 2 mirror heating stage. The results showed that with single cycle, the long metal cavity heating stage would bring lower thermal efficiency, but temperature rise of the working medium is higher, up to 12.06 °C with only single cycle. With 30 min closed multiple cycles, the temperature of the working medium in the water tank was 62.8 °C, with an increase of 28.7 °C, and thermal energy with higher temperature could be output

  3. Greenhouse with a CPV system based on NIR reflecting lamellae

    OpenAIRE

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Tuijl, van, B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous research a new type of greenhouse with an integrated concentrated photovoltaic system (CPV) was developed based on a circular covering geometry and an integrated filter for reflecting the near infrared radiation (NIR) of the greenhouse and exploiting this radiation in a solar energy system. The performance of the system was promising. In this study further optimalisation of the CPV system is made to avoid the large construction for solar tracing and the high investment. Hereto all...

  4. Secure electronic commerce communication system based on CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Deyun; Zhang, Junfeng; Pei, Shujun

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the situation of electronic commercial security, then we analyze the working process and security for SSL protocol. At last, we propose a secure electronic commerce communication system based on CA. The system provide secure services such as encryption, integer, peer authentication and non-repudiation for application layer communication software of browser clients' and web server. The system can implement automatic allocation and united management of key through setting up the CA in the network.

  5. An Expert System-Based Approach to Hospitality Company Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Balfe, Andrew; O'Connor, Peter; McDonnell, Ciaran

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype Expert System-based Analysis and Diagnostic (ESAD) package for the Hotel and Catering Industry. This computerised tool aids the hospitality manager in methodically scrutinising the hotel unit and environment, combining key information with systematic reasoning. The system searches through its extensive knowledge base, investigating complicated relationships. The number of possibilities considered is increased which will broaden the depth and...

  6. A Hybrid Recommender System Based on User-Recommender Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Heng-Ru; Min, Fan; He, Xu; Xu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are used to make recommendations about products, information, or services for users. Most existing recommender systems implicitly assume one particular type of user behavior. However, they seldom consider user-recommender interactive scenarios in real-world environments. In this paper, we propose a hybrid recommender system based on user-recommender interaction and evaluate its performance with recall and diversity metrics. First, we define the user-recommender interaction...

  7. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R

    2007-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory

  8. Arabic Question Answering System Based On Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheeb Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we describe An Arabic Question AnsweringQA system based on data mining approach. The system employs text mining techniques to determine the likely answers to factoid questions. It depends mainly on the use of lexical information and does not apply any complex language processing tools such as named entity recognizers parsers and ontologies. The system achieved an accuracy of 61.5.

  9. [Implementation of ECG Monitoring System Based on Internet of Things].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liangliang; Chen, Minya

    2015-11-01

    In order to expand the capabilities of hospital's traditional ECG device and enhance medical staff's work efficiency, an ECG monitoring system based on internet of things is introduced. The system can monitor ECG signals in real time and analyze data using ECG sensor, PDA, Web servers, which embeds C language, Android systems, .NET, wireless network and other technologies. After experiments, it can be showed that the system has high reliability and stability and can bring the convenience to medical staffs.

  10. Design of Mine Locomotive System Based on CAN Bus

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuanhong; Zhang Quanzhu; Zhang Wenshan

    2017-01-01

    Based on CAN bus, this paper studies the system control and management system of locomotive in mine, analyzes the working principle of locomotive system, gives the CAN bus scheme, hardware circuit design and CAN communication protocol, and implements long-distance, high-reliability communication function and remote monitoring function. Experiments show that the auxiliary system based on CAN bus control easier, operation more secure, as well as improving the control performance and service lif...

  11. Gamma spectrometric system based on the personal computer Pravetz-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanakiev, K; Grigorov, T.; Vuchkov, M.

    1985-01-01

    A gamma spectrometric system based on a personal microcomputer Pravets-85 is described. The analog modules are NIM standard. ADC data are stored in the memory of the computer via a DMA channel and a real-time data processing is possible. The results from a series of tests indicate that the performance of the system is comparable with that of comercially avalable computerized spectrometers Ortec and Canberra

  12. The Development of Sensor Technology and Application to Detect Nuclear Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskia

    2007-01-01

    Radiation is energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles. Radiation can be ionizing or non-ionizing radiation, depending on its effect on atomic matter. Because radiation cannot be seen, felt, tasted, heard or smelled, even at lethal levels, radiations detection devices must be used to alert those exposed to radiation. The measurement of radioactivity in the environment is a regulatory requirement around sites where significant amounts of radioactive materials are used or stored. Recently, advent in microelectronics and material technology has enabled to produce small sensor or microsensor, sensitive, accurate, and integrated in a chip or substrate. Development of radiation sensor technology using thin/thick film and micromachining technique was described in this paper. Indonesian capabilities in radiation sensor research and development and opportunities for commercialization also given. (author)

  13. Development of Sensor Technology and Its Application for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskia

    2007-01-01

    Radiation is energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles. Radiation can be ionizing or nonionizing radiation, depending on its effect on atomic matter. Because radiation cannot be seen, felt, tasted, heard or smelled, even at lethal levels, radiations detection devices must be used to alert those exposed to radiation. The measurement of radioactivity in the environment is a regulatory requirement around sites where significant amounts of radioactive materials are used or stored. Recently, advent in microelectronics and material technology has enabled to produce small sensor or microsensor, sensitive, accurate, and integrated in a chip or substrate. Development of radiation sensor technology using thin/thick film and micromachining technique was described in this paper. Indonesian capabilities in radiation sensor research and development and opportunities for commercialization also given. (author)

  14. Disrupted Structural and Functional Networks and Their Correlation with Alertness in Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Graph Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE involves abnormal structural or functional connectivity in specific brain areas. However, limited comprehensive studies have been conducted on TLE associated changes in the topological organization of structural and functional networks. Additionally, epilepsy is associated with impairment in alertness, a fundamental component of attention. In this study, structural networks were constructed using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, and functional networks were obtained from resting-state functional MRI temporal series correlations in 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE patients and 19 healthy controls. Global network properties were computed by graph theoretical analysis, and correlations were assessed between global network properties and alertness. The results from these analyses showed that rTLE patients exhibit abnormal small-world attributes in structural and functional networks. Structural networks shifted toward more regular attributes, but functional networks trended toward more random attributes. After controlling for the influence of the disease duration, negative correlations were found between alertness, small-worldness, and the cluster coefficient. However, alertness did not correlate with either the characteristic path length or global efficiency in rTLE patients. Our findings show that disruptions of the topological construction of brain structural and functional networks as well as small-world property bias are associated with deficits in alertness in rTLE patients. These data suggest that reorganization of brain networks develops as a mechanism to compensate for altered structural and functional brain function during disease progression.

  15. The effect of an electronic "hard-stop" alert on HIV testing rates in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Sperling, Jeremy D; Liu, Nan; Green, Robert A; Clark, Sunday; Vawdrey, David K

    2013-01-01

    Use of electronic alerts in clinical practice has had mixed effects on providers' prescribing practices. Little research has explored the use of electronic alerts for improving screening practices. New York City has one of the highest rates of HIV in the United States. Recent New York State legislation requires healthcare providers to offer an HIV test to patients aged 13-64 years during a clinical encounter. Adhering to this requirement is particularly challenging in emergency department (ED) settings, which are frequently overcrowded and under-resourced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electronic "hard-stop" alert on HIV testing rates in the ED. Approximately four months of data were reviewed before and after the implementation of the alert. We found that use of the electronic alert significantly increased documentation of offering an HIV test (O.R. = 267.27, p<0.001) and resulted in a significant increase in HIV testing. Findings from this study add to the current knowledge about the use of electronic alertsfor improving disease screening.

  16. Ontology-Driven Monitoring of Patient’s Vital Signs Enabling Personalized Medical Detection and Alert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hristoskova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF. Its novelty is the integration of: (i personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii dynamic adaptation of the vital signs’ monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient’s condition on the most suited device within the physician’s reach.

  17. Decreased alertness due to sleep loss increases pain sensitivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Chloe; Latremoliere, Alban; Ferreira, Ashley; Miracca, Giulia; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Scammell, Thomas E; Woolf, Clifford J

    2017-06-01

    Extended daytime and nighttime activities are major contributors to the growing sleep deficiency epidemic, as is the high prevalence of sleep disorders like insomnia. The consequences of chronic insufficient sleep for health remain uncertain. Sleep quality and duration predict presence of pain the next day in healthy subjects, suggesting that sleep disturbances alone may worsen pain, and experimental sleep deprivation in humans supports this claim. We demonstrate that sleep loss, but not sleep fragmentation, in healthy mice increases sensitivity to noxious stimuli (referred to as 'pain') without general sensory hyper-responsiveness. Moderate daily repeated sleep loss leads to a progressive accumulation of sleep debt and also to exaggerated pain responses, both of which are rescued after restoration of normal sleep. Caffeine and modafinil, two wake-promoting agents that have no analgesic activity in rested mice, immediately normalize pain sensitivity in sleep-deprived animals, without affecting sleep debt. The reversibility of mild sleep-loss-induced pain by wake-promoting agents reveals an unsuspected role for alertness in setting pain sensitivity. Clinically, insufficient or poor-quality sleep may worsen pain and this enhanced pain may be reduced not by analgesics, whose effectiveness is reduced, but by increasing alertness or providing better sleep.

  18. Machine Learning-based Transient Brokers for Real-time Classification of the LSST Alert Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Gautham; Zaidi, Tayeb; Soraisam, Monika; ANTARES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The number of transient events discovered by wide-field time-domain surveys already far outstrips the combined followup resources of the astronomical community. This number will only increase as we progress towards the commissioning of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), breaking the community's current followup paradigm. Transient brokers - software to sift through, characterize, annotate and prioritize events for followup - will be a critical tool for managing alert streams in the LSST era. Developing the algorithms that underlie the brokers, and obtaining simulated LSST-like datasets prior to LSST commissioning, to train and test these algorithms are formidable, though not insurmountable challenges. The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. We have been developing completely automated methods to characterize and classify variable and transient events from their multiband optical photometry. We describe the hierarchical ensemble machine learning algorithm we are developing, and test its performance on sparse, unevenly sampled, heteroskedastic data from various existing observational campaigns, as well as our progress towards incorporating these into a real-time event broker working on live alert streams from time-domain surveys.

  19. Pattern recognition applied to infrared images for early alerts in fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Marchetti, Mario; Dumoulin, Jean; Cord, Aurélien

    2014-09-01

    Fog conditions are the cause of severe car accidents in western countries because of the poor induced visibility. Its forecast and intensity are still very difficult to predict by weather services. Infrared cameras allow to detect and to identify objects in fog while visibility is too low for eye detection. Over the past years, the implementation of cost effective infrared cameras on some vehicles has enabled such detection. On the other hand pattern recognition algorithms based on Canny filters and Hough transformation are a common tool applied to images. Based on these facts, a joint research program between IFSTTAR and Cerema has been developed to study the benefit of infrared images obtained in a fog tunnel during its natural dissipation. Pattern recognition algorithms have been applied, specifically on road signs which shape is usually associated to a specific meaning (circular for a speed limit, triangle for an alert, …). It has been shown that road signs were detected early enough in images, with respect to images in the visible spectrum, to trigger useful alerts for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems.

  20. Cough once for danger: icons versus abstract warnings as informative alerts in civil aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nathan C; Stevens, Catherine J; Wiggins, Mark W; Howell, Clare E

    2007-12-01

    An experiment investigated the efficacy of auditory icons as warning signals in an aviation context. Iconic signals, such as a cough to signal dangerous levels of carbon monoxide, convey information about the nature of an incident and alert the operator that there is a problem, whereas signals that are arbitrarily associated with a critical incident provide relatively less information. Warning recognition speed and accuracy are likely to be influenced by modality of presentation (visual, auditory, auditory + visual) and task demand (low, high). The 172 participants completed a computer-based training session and test task that involved responding to abstract or iconic auditory (1 s), visual, or auditory + visual warnings associated with seven critical incidents while performing low- and high-demand concurrent tasks. Significantly fewer training trials were required to learn iconic warnings than abstract warnings. An advantage for iconic warnings persisted into the test phase, evident most consistently as greater warning recognition accuracy. The effect was observed in both high- and low-demand conditions. Auditory abstract warnings, in particular, elicited slow reaction times and poor accuracy. Associations between a small number of meaningful environmental sounds and critical incidents can be learned with ease relative to more abstract associations, although training is required and response times are relatively slow. Sets of distinctive auditory iconic warnings can be designed to alert and inform pilots about non-time-pressured events. Potential applications of language-neutral icons as informative warnings include civil, commercial, and defense aircraft.

  1. Establishing an early warning alert and response network following the Solomon Islands tsunami in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilve, Augustine; Nogareda, Francisco; Joshua, Cynthia; Ross, Lester; Betcha, Christopher; Durski, Kara; Fleischl, Juliet; Nilles, Eric

    2014-11-01

    On 6 February 2013, an 8.0 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that struck the Santa Cruz Islands, Solomon Islands, killing 10 people and displacing over 4700. A post-disaster assessment of the risk of epidemic disease transmission recommended the implementation of an early warning alert and response network (EWARN) to rapidly detect, assess and respond to potential outbreaks in the aftermath of the tsunami. Almost 40% of the Santa Cruz Islands' population were displaced by the disaster, and living in cramped temporary camps with poor or absent sanitation facilities and insufficient access to clean water. There was no early warning disease surveillance system. By 25 February, an EWARN was operational in five health facilities that served 90% of the displaced population. Eight priority diseases or syndromes were reported weekly; unexpected health events were reported immediately. Between 25 February and 19 May, 1177 target diseases or syndrome cases were reported. Seven alerts were investigated. No sustained transmission or epidemics were identified. Reporting compliance was 85%. The EWARN was then transitioned to the routine four-syndrome early warning disease surveillance system. It was necessary to conduct a detailed assessment to evaluate the risk and potential impact of serious infectious disease outbreaks, to assess whether and how enhanced early warning disease surveillance should be implemented. Local capacities and available resources should be considered in planning EWARN implementation. An EWARN can be an opportunity to establish or strengthen early warning disease surveillance capabilities.

  2. The impact of sleep on adolescent depressed mood, alertness and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michelle A; Gradisar, Michael; Lack, Leon C; Wright, Helen R

    2013-12-01

    The present study developed and tested a theoretical model examining the inter-relationships among sleep duration, sleep quality, and circadian chronotype and their effect on alertness, depression, and academic performance. Participants were 385 adolescents aged 13-18 years (M = 15.6, SD = 1.0; 60% male) were recruited from eight socioeconomically diverse high schools in South Australia. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires during class time and recorded their sleep patterns in a sleep diary for 8 days. A good fit was found between the model and the data (χ(2)/df = 1.78, CFI = .99, RMSEA = .04). Circadian chronotype showed the largest association with on adolescent functioning, with more evening-typed students reporting worse sleep quality (β = .50, p Sleep quality was significantly associated with poor outcomes: adolescents with poorer sleep quality reported less sleep on school nights (β = -.28, p sleep quality and/or more evening chronotype were also more likely to report worse grades, through the association with depression. Sleep duration showed no direct effect on adolescent functioning. These results identified the importance of two lesser-studied aspects of sleep: circadian chronotype and sleep quality. Easy-to-implement strategies to optimize sleep quality and maintain an adaptive circadian body clock may help to increase daytime alertness, elevate mood, and improve academic performance. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. All rights reserved.

  3. An Investigation of an RFID-based Patient-tracking and Mobile Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Yeung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the modern era, patient health is no longer the only concern for hospitals. Hospitals have to bear the responsibility of the patient safety and the patient comfort. However, due to the overcrowded and understaffed clinical areas with complex workflow patterns, there are different forms of medical care errors arisen in the healthcare system. According to recent statistic from World Health Organization, ten of milions of patient around the world are injured or dead every yearas a result of incorrect medical care. Rroughly 10% patients admitted to hospital in developed countries suffered some forms of medical care errors or medical adverse events. It is about 1.4 million of world population.In order to enhance the patient safety and patient comfort in the current medical service system, an RFID‐based Patient Tracking and Mobile Alert System integrated with information communications technology was designed and developed. Apart from identifying different patient’s whereabouts, instant alerts are generated through mobile devices so as to enhance patients’ safety and comfort. With a view of investigating the feasibility of RFID and mobile technology in the healthcare environment, a pilot study was conducted in Mindset Club in the Castle Peak Hospital in Hong Kong.

  4. Development and evaluation of a data-adaptive alerting algorithm for univariate temporal biosurveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, Yevgeniy; Burkom, Howard S

    2009-11-20

    This paper discusses further advances in making robust predictions with the Holt-Winters forecasts for a variety of syndromic time series behaviors and introduces a control-chart detection approach based on these forecasts. Using three collections of time series data, we compare biosurveillance alerting methods with quantified measures of forecast agreement, signal sensitivity, and time-to-detect. The study presents practical rules for initialization and parameterization of biosurveillance time series. Several outbreak scenarios are used for detection comparison. We derive an alerting algorithm from forecasts using Holt-Winters-generalized smoothing for prospective application to daily syndromic time series. The derived algorithm is compared with simple control-chart adaptations and to more computationally intensive regression modeling methods. The comparisons are conducted on background data from both authentic and simulated data streams. Both types of background data include time series that vary widely by both mean value and cyclic or seasonal behavior. Plausible, simulated signals are added to the background data for detection performance testing at signal strengths calculated to be neither too easy nor too hard to separate the compared methods. Results show that both the sensitivity and the timeliness of the Holt-Winters-based algorithm proved to be comparable or superior to that of the more traditional prediction methods used for syndromic surveillance.

  5. Wet snow hazard for power lines: a forecast and alert system applied in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bonelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wet snow icing accretion on power lines is a real problem in Italy, causing failures on high and medium voltage power supplies during the cold season. The phenomenon is a process in which many large and local scale variables contribute in a complex way and not completely understood. A numerical weather forecast can be used to select areas where wet snow accretion has an high probability of occurring, but a specific accretion model must also be used to estimate the load of an ice sleeve and its hazard. All the information must be carefully selected and shown to the electric grid operator in order to warn him promptly.

    The authors describe a prototype of forecast and alert system, WOLF (Wet snow Overload aLert and Forecast, developed and applied in Italy. The prototype elaborates the output of a numerical weather prediction model, as temperature, precipitation, wind intensity and direction, to determine the areas of potential risk for the power lines. Then an accretion model computes the ice sleeves' load for different conductor diameters. The highest values are selected and displayed on a WEB-GIS application principally devoted to the electric operator, but also to more expert users. Some experimental field campaigns have been conducted to better parameterize the accretion model. Comparisons between real accidents and forecasted icing conditions are presented and discussed.

  6. Practical In-Depth Analysis of IDS Alerts for Tracing and Identifying Potential Attackers on Darknet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuk Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The darknet (i.e., a set of unused IP addresses is a very useful solution for observing the global trends of cyber threats and analyzing attack activities on the Internet. Since the darknet is not connected with real systems, in most cases, the incoming packets on the darknet (‘the darknet traffic’ do not contain a payload. This means that we are unable to get real malware from the darknet traffic. This situation makes it difficult for security experts (e.g., academic researchers, engineers, operators, etc. to identify whether the source hosts of the darknet traffic are infected by real malware or not. In this paper, we present the overall procedure of the in-depth analysis between the darknet traffic and IDS alerts using real data collected at the Science and Technology Cyber Security Center (S&T CSC in Korea and provide the detailed in-depth analysis results. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide practical experience, insight and know-how to security experts so that they are able to identify and trace the root cause of the darknet traffic. The experimental results show that correlation analysis between the darknet traffic and IDS alerts is very useful to discover potential attack hosts, especially internal hosts, and to find out what kinds of malware infected them.

  7. Sepsis Alert - a triage model that reduces time to antibiotics and length of hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenqvist, Mari; Fagerstrand, Emma; Lanbeck, Peter; Melander, Olle; Åkesson, Per

    2017-07-01

    To study if a modified triage system at an Emergency Department (ED) combined with educational efforts resulted in reduced time to antibiotics and decreased length of hospital stay (LOS) for patients with severe infection. A retrospective, observational study comparing patients before and after the start of a new triage model at the ED of a University Hospital. After the implementation of the model, patients with fever and abnormal vital signs were triaged into a designated sepsis line (Sepsis Alert) for rapid evaluation by the attending physician supported by a infectious diseases (IDs) specialist. Also, all ED staff participated in a designated sepsis education before Sepsis Alert was introduced. Medical records were evaluated for patients during a 3-month period after the triage system was started in 2012, and also during the corresponding months in 2010 and 2014. A total of 1837 patients presented with abnormal vital signs. Of these, 221 patients presented with fever and thus at risk of having severe sepsis. Among patients triaged according to the new model, median time to antibiotics was 58.5 at startup and 24.5 minutes at follow-up two years later. This was significantly less than for patients treated before the new model, 190 minutes. Also, median LOS was significantly decreased after introduction of the new triage model, from nine to seven days. A triage model at the ED with special attention to severe sepsis patients, led to sustained improvements of time to antibiotic treatment and LOS.

  8. Decreased alertness due to sleep loss increases pain sensitivity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Chloe; Latremoliere, Alban; Ferreira, Ashley; Miracca, Giulia; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Scammell, Thomas E; Woolf, Clifford J

    2018-01-01

    Extended daytime and nighttime activities are major contributors to the growing sleep deficiency epidemic1,2, as is the high prevalence of sleep disorders like insomnia. The consequences of chronic insufficient sleep for health remain uncertain3. Sleep quality and duration predict presence of pain the next day in healthy subjects4–7, suggesting that sleep disturbances alone may worsen pain, and experimental sleep deprivation in humans supports this claim8,9. We demonstrate that sleep loss, but not sleep fragmentation, in healthy mice increases sensitivity to noxious stimuli (referred to as ‘pain’) without general sensory hyper-responsiveness. Moderate daily repeated sleep loss leads to a progressive accumulation of sleep debt and also to exaggerated pain responses, both of which are rescued after restoration of normal sleep. Caffeine and modafinil, two wake-promoting agents that have no analgesic activity in rested mice, immediately normalize pain sensitivity in sleep-deprived animals, without affecting sleep debt. The reversibility of mild sleep-loss-induced pain by wake-promoting agents reveals an unsuspected role for alertness in setting pain sensitivity. Clinically, insufficient or poor-quality sleep may worsen pain and this enhanced pain may be reduced not by analgesics, whose effectiveness is reduced, but by increasing alertness or providing better sleep. PMID:28481358

  9. Flood warnings in coastal areas: how do social and behavioural patterns influence alert services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescaroli, G.; Magni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies discuss the economic and technical aspects of flood warnings. Less attention has been given to the social and psychological patterns that affect alert services. In particular, the literature focuses on warnings activated in river basins or marine environments without providing clear evidence of relevance to Mediterranean coastal areas, even though these are subjected to growing flood risk related to climate change. This paper is a first attempt to bridge this gap. Our research develops an in- depth analysis of the village of Cesenatico on the Adriatic Sea coast. Here the municipality adopted two complementary warning systems: a siren and an alert via Short Message Service (SMS). The analysis focuses on a survey conducted in 2011 and 2012 with 228 participants. The relationships between social and behavioural variables and warning services are investigated, and so are flood preparedness and information dissemination. Qualitative evidence from informal interviews is used to support the understanding of key responses. The conclusions show how different social and behavioural patterns can influence the effectiveness and use of warning systems, regardless of the technology adopted and the structural mitigation measures implemented. Education, training and accountability are seen to be critical elements for improvement. Finally, the statistical output is used to suggest new questions and new directions for research.

  10. The impact of morning light intensity and environmental temperature on body temperatures and alertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Kulve, Marije; Schlangen, Luc J M; Schellen, Lisje; Frijns, Arjan J H; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2017-06-01

    Indoor temperature and light exposure are known to affect body temperature, productivity and alertness of building occupants. However, not much is known about the interaction between light and temperature exposure and the relationship between morning light induced alertness and its effect on body temperature. Light intensity and room temperature during morning office hours were investigated under strictly controlled conditions. In a randomized crossover study, two white light conditions (4000K, either bright 1200lx or dim 5lx) under three different room temperatures (26, 29 and 32°C) were investigated. A lower room temperature increased the core body temperature (CBT) and lowered skin temperature and the distal-proximal temperature gradient (DPG). Moreover, a lower room temperature reduced the subjective sleepiness and reaction time on an auditory psychomotor vigilance task (PVT), irrespective of the light condition. Interestingly, the morning bright light exposure did affect thermophysiological parameters, i.e. it decreased plasma cortisol, CBT and proximal skin temperature and increased the DPG, irrespective of the room temperature. During the bright light session, subjective sleepiness decreased irrespective of the room temperature. However, the change in sleepiness due to the light exposure was not related to these physiological changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brucella detection in blood: comparison of the BacT/Alert standard aerobic bottle, BacT/Alert FAN aerobic bottle and BacT/Alert enhanced FAN aerobic bottle in simulated blood culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümerkan, B; Gökahmetoglu, S; Esel, D

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performances of the standard aerobic bottle (StAe), FAN aerobic (FANAe) and enhanced FAN aerobic (E-FANAe) (the charcoal component of the FANAe was revised recently to improve the feasibility of Gram smear interpretation) blood culture bottles for BacT/Alert system for the detection of Brucella melitensis in simulated blood culture. Triplicate strains of eight clinical isolates of B. melitensis were studied. Each bottle was inoculated with 5 mL of freshly collected human blood at three different targeted bacterial inocula (10(1), 10(2) and 10(3) CFU/bottle). All bottles were monitored for up to 21 days or until they became positive. The results of time to detection (TTD) on the eight B. melitensis samples were as follows: at 10(1) CFU/bottle, the E-FANAe had a mean TTD significantly shorter than the StAe (48 h vs. 56.2 h, P StAe (41.2 h and 40 h vs. 45.6 h, P StAe, FANAe and E-FANAe were 96, 83 and 58%, respectively. At 10(3) CFU/bottle, the reproducibilities of StAe, FANAe and E-FANAe were 95, 95 and 91%, respectively. Positive results for the presence of bacteria in Gram smears were confirmed in 68% of StAe, 54% of FANAe and 90% of E-FANAe. In case of suspected brucellosis, the combination of one StAe bottle and one E-FANAe bottle seems to provide the highest and fastest recovery of the organism.

  12. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  13. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Sections include: dose units, dose limits, dose rate, potential hazards of ionizing radiations, control of internal and external radiation exposure, personal dosemeters, monitoring programs and transport of radioactive material (packaging and shielding)

  14. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill any cancer cells that remain. Lifetime Dose Limits There is a limit to the amount of radiation an area of ... total dose of radiation more quickly or to limit damage to healthy cells. Different ways of delivering ...

  15. Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts of radiation and could be caused by Dirty bombs - a mix of explosives with radioactive powder Fallout from a nuclear bomb Accidental release from a nuclear reactor or a nuclear weapons plant A lot of radiation over a short ...

  16. Medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series describes the medical use of X-rays, how X-rays help in diagnosis, radiation protection of the patient, staff protection, how radioactive materials in nuclear medicine examinations help in diagnosis and the use of radiation in radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technique involving no ionizing radiation, is also briefly examined. The role of the NRPB in the medical use of radiation is outlined. (UK).

  17. Radiation watchdog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R.

    1984-01-01

    Designated by WHO as a Collaborating Centre, the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee provides assistance to all countries of the Americas in radiation accidents including human contamination or overexposure. It also conducts courses in radiation emergency response for health professionals from throughout the world

  18. Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a long ...

  19. Time-dependent drug-drug interaction alerts in care provider order entry: software may inhibit medication error reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sijs, Heleen; Lammers, Laureen; van den Tweel, Annemieke; Aarts, Jos; Berg, Marc; Vulto, Arnold; van Gelder, Teun

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent drug-drug interactions (TDDIs) are drug combinations that result in a decreased drug effect due to coadministration of a second drug. Such interactions can be prevented by separately administering the drugs. This study attempted to reduce drug administration errors due to overridden TDDIs in a care provider order entry (CPOE) system. In four periods divided over two studies, logged TDDIs were investigated by reviewing the time intervals prescribed in the CPOE and recorded on the patient chart. The first study showed significant drug administration error reduction from 56.4 to 36.2% (p0.05). Despite interventions, drug administration errors still occurred in more than one third of cases and prescribing errors in 79-87%. Probably the low alert specificity, the unclear alert information content, and the inability of the software to support safe and efficient TDDI alert handling all diminished correct prescribing, and consequently, insufficiently reduced drug administration errors.

  20. Chronology of prescribing error during the hospital stay and prediction of pharmacist's alerts overriding: a prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruni Vanida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug prescribing errors are frequent in the hospital setting and pharmacists play an important role in detection of these errors. The objectives of this study are (1 to describe the drug prescribing errors rate during the patient's stay, (2 to find which characteristics for a prescribing error are the most predictive of their reproduction the next day despite pharmacist's alert (i.e. override the alert. Methods We prospectively collected all medication order lines and prescribing errors during 18 days in 7 medical wards' using computerized physician order entry. We described and modelled the errors rate according to the chronology of hospital stay. We performed a classification and regression tree analysis to find which characteristics of alerts were predictive of their overriding (i.e. prescribing error repeated. Results 12 533 order lines were reviewed, 117 errors (errors rate 0.9% were observed and 51% of these errors occurred on the first day of the hospital stay. The risk of a prescribing error decreased over time. 52% of the alerts were overridden (i.e error uncorrected by prescribers on the following day. Drug omissions were the most frequently taken into account by prescribers. The classification and regression tree analysis showed that overriding pharmacist's alerts is first related to the ward of the prescriber and then to either Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical class of the drug or the type of error. Conclusions Since 51% of prescribing errors occurred on the first day of stay, pharmacist should concentrate his analysis of drug prescriptions on this day. The difference of overriding behavior between wards and according drug Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical class or type of error could also guide the validation tasks and programming of electronic alerts.