WorldWideScience

Sample records for system interfaces hsis

  1. Design and Evaluation of Human System Interfaces (HSIs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the safe operation of nuclear power plants and other complex process industries the performance of the control room crews plays an important role. In this respect a well-functioning and well-designed Human-System Interface (HSI) is crucial for safe and efficient operation of the plant. It is therefore essential that the design, development and evaluation of both control rooms and HSI-solutions are conducted in a well-structured way, applying sound human factors principles and guidelines in all phases of the HSI development process. Many nuclear power plants around the world are currently facing major modernisation of their control rooms. In this process computerised, screen-based HSIs replace old conventional operator interfaces. In new control rooms, both in the nuclear field and in other process industries, fully digital, screen-based control rooms are becoming the standard. It is therefore of particular importance to address the design and evaluation of screen-based HSIs in a systematic and consistent way in order to arrive at solutions which take proper advantage of the possibilities for improving operator support through the use of digital, screen-based HSIs, at the same time avoiding pitfalls and problems in the use of this technology. The Halden Reactor Project, in cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, organised an International Summer School on ''Design and Evaluation of Human-System Interfaces (HSIs)'' in Halden, Norway in the period August 25th - 29th, 2003. The Summer School addressed the different steps in design, development and evaluation of HSIs, and the human factors principles, standards and guidelines which should be followed in this process. The lectures comprised both theoretical background, as well as examples of good and bad HSI design, thereby providing practical advice in design and evaluation of operator interfaces and control room solutions to the participants in the Summer School. This CD contains the

  2. Design and Evaluation of Human System Interfaces (HSIs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the safe operation of nuclear power plants and other complex process industries the performance of the control room crews plays an important role. In this respect a well-functioning and well-designed Human-System Interface (HSI) is crucial for safe and efficient operation of the plant. It is therefore essential that the design, development and evaluation of both control rooms and HSI-solutions are conducted in a well-structured way, applying sound human factors principles and guidelines in all phases of the HSI development process. Many nuclear power plants around the world are currently facing major modernisation of their control rooms. In this process computerised, screen-based HSIs replace old conventional operator interfaces. In new control rooms, both in the nuclear field and in other process industries, fully digital, screen-based control rooms are becoming the standard. It is therefore of particular importance to address the design and evaluation of screen-based HSIs in a systematic and consistent way in order to arrive at solutions which take proper advantage of the possibilities for improving operator support through the use of digital, screen-based HSIs, at the same time avoiding pitfalls and problems in the use of this technology. The Halden Reactor Project, in cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, organised an International Summer School on ''Design and Evaluation of Human-System Interfaces (HSIs)'' in Halden, Norway in the period August 25th - 29th, 2003. The Summer School addressed the different steps in design, development and evaluation of HSIs, and the human factors principles, standards and guidelines which should be followed in this process. The lectures comprised both theoretical background, as well as examples of good and bad HSI design, thereby providing practical advice in design and evaluation of operator interfaces and control room solutions to the participants in the Summer School. This CD contains the Proceedings of the

  3. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  4. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Illobre, Luis Fernandez; Ortega Pascual, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user. (authors)

  5. The Impact of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), Emerging HSIs, and Non-HSIs on Latina/o Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is presently limited on experiences and outcomes at four-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and emerging HSIs. Multiple regression analyses, performed on data from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program, illuminate how background characteristics and student experiences at four-year HSIs, emerging HSIs, and non-HSIs…

  6. Does Percentage of Latinas/os Affect Graduation Rates at 4-Year Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), Emerging HSIs, and Non-HSIs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gina A.

    2013-01-01

    As the population of college-aged Latinas/os grows, the number of Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) increases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the percentage of Latinas/os has an effect on the institutional graduation rates of Latina/o students attending HSIs, emerging HSIs, and non-HSIs. Data were drawn from the Integrated…

  7. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  8. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.; Barnes, V.

    2010-01-01

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  9. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  10. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, Stephen; Barnes, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  11. Design Development and Implementation of the Human-System Interface for Lungmen Nuclear Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chang-Fu; Chou, Hwai-Pwu

    2008-10-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Project (LMNPP), under construction in Taiwan, consists of two GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) units, each with 1350 MW electrical output. Major Human-System Interfaces (HSIs) of LMNPP are different from traditional operating BWRs or ABWRs. Video display units (VDUs) are the main human-system interface for operators to manipulate and to know the status of the equipment and plant information. Based upon NUREG-0711, the applicable human factors engineering (HFE) guideline in the design of HSIs has been adopted. An important aspect of the Lungmen HFE program has been the direct involvement of the end user, Taiwan Power Company (TPC), throughout the design development and implementation to ensure that the process for the design is compliant with the HFE principles, and that the necessary displays, control, and alarms are provided to support the identified personnel tasks. This paper reviews the applicable HFE principles and the HSI design process including verification and validation (V&V) process in the design of HSIs for the LMNPP. This paper also presents three topics of interest in the LMNPP HSI design development and implementation process-validation with simulator, alarm auto reset, and VDU operational configuration strategy. The objective for developing the VDU operational configuration strategy was, after appropriate V&V, to reinforce operation discipline and optimize operator crew task assignments and workload during typical operations, and to confirm the need for an intensive training program that addresses the knowledge and skill requirements of the operators to meet the task characteristics and the responses of the plant processes. The results to date and implications for going forward from this process are also presented.

  12. Icinga Monitoring System Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Neculae, Alina Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a web interface that would be used by the Icinga monitoring system to manage the CMS online cluster, in the experimental site. The interface would allow users to visualize the information in a compressed and intuitive way, as well as modify the information of each individual object and edit the relationships between classes.

  13. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  14. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-31

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  15. The high speed interconnect system architecture and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steven C.

    The design and operation of a fiber-optic high-speed interconnect system (HSIS) being developed to meet the requirements of future avionics and flight-control hardware with distributed-system architectures are discussed. The HSIS is intended for 100-Mb/s operation of a local-area network with up to 256 stations. It comprises a bus transmission system (passive star couplers and linear media linked by active elements) and network interface units (NIUs). Each NIU is designed to perform the physical, data link, network, and transport functions defined by the ISO OSI Basic Reference Model (1982 and 1983) and incorporates a fiber-optic transceiver, a high-speed protocol based on the SAE AE-9B linear token-passing data bus (1986), and a specialized application interface unit. The operating modes and capabilities of HSIS are described in detail and illustrated with diagrams.

  16. The Effect of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Gunther, B.; Martinez-Guridi, G. (BNL); Xing, J.; Barnes, V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    Integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in new and advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) will support operators in monitoring and controlling the plants. Even though digital systems typically are expected to be reliable, their potential for degradation or failure significantly could affect the operators performance and, consequently, jeopardize plant safety. This U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research investigated the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and on plant operations. The objective was to develop technical basis and guidance for human factors engineering (HFE) reviews addressing the operator's ability to detect and manage degraded digital I&C conditions. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we evaluated the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater control system of a currently operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and the operators performance. Our findings indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems, and the overall effects on the plant's behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations may affect the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, deterioration of the sensors can complicate the operators interpretation of displays, and sometimes may mislead them by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the findings as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance.

  17. Human factors verification and validation process of the human system interface for Chinese power plants: Lessons learned from new designs - 15415

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba Alonso, P.; Fernandez Illobre, L.; Fernando Ortega, P.

    2015-01-01

    Tecnatom has been participating in the design and implementation of the Human System Interfaces (HSIs) of several Nuclear Power Plants in China equipped with Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The design process had associated a Human Factors Engineering (HFE) program, where Verification and Validation (VV) activities were included. These VV activities were performed by an independent team, following as the primary reference the Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (HFEPRM), as described in NUREG-0711. The plants under the scope of these VV activities were Fuqing 1, 2, 3 and 4 units (PWR 1000 MW), Fangjiashan 1 and 2 units (PWR 1000 MW), and Changjiang 1 and 2 units (PWR 600 MW). These plants are owned by the Chinese National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), all with a M310+ reactor design (Generation II), and plant engineering supplied by China Nuclear Power Engineering (CNPE). These plants included a new advanced HSIs concerning the main control room and the remote shutdown station, with a major use of digital technology, using only conventional technology as a backup in a specific panel. This paper describes the activities and experience obtained during the execution of the HFE VV activities on the HSIs designed and implemented by Tecnatom. The VV activities covered the development of implementation plans and methodologies, HSI task support verifications (TSV), HSI design verifications (DV), partial validations (PV), integrated system validation (ISV), HSI implementation verification (or as built verification) and human engineering discrepancy (HED) management. The project was led by Invensys Operation Management (IOM, currently Schneider Electric), as the main contractor of the Distributed Control System, but with a HFE part, where the VV took place. (authors)

  18. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  19. Delphi Interface Maintenance System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — DIMS is the primary financial information system for tracking federally funded highway projects. It tracks authorizations, obligations, apportionments, allocations,...

  20. New Console Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-14

    DAMINT SHARED TV PVDS MEMORY SIGNAL NO.1 SHARED PANSKY MEMORY NO. 2 DAIT SHARED SHARED CNOE R-3 S22 R-3 DAIT MEMORY MEMORY PROCESOERS -3 S22 R- NO.1 NO.2... MOTOR DATA, MODULE DIRECTION ALARM LOCAL ERROR BUTTONS BUTTON AND MODULE TEST LIGHTS MAIN ANALOG OTHER SENSOR INPUTS SYSTEMS TV BUTTONS, SELECT 2

  1. The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; W. Gunther, G. Martinez-Guridi

    2010-02-26

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I&C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I&C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I&C performance and manage I&C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

  2. The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Gunther, W.; Martinez-Guridi, G.

    2010-01-01

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I and C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I and C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I and C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I and C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I and C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I and C performance and manage I and C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

  3. Control system oriented human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  4. GUIDANCE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM AND HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE MODERNIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.; Morris, G.

    2004-01-01

    Several nuclear power plants in the United States are starting instrumentation and control (I and C) modernization programs using digital equipment to address obsolescence issues and the need to improve plant performance while maintaining high levels of safety. As an integral part of the I and C modernization program at a nuclear power plant, the control room and other human-system interfaces (HSIs) are also being modernized. To support safe and effective operation, it is critical to plan, design, implement, train for, operate, and maintain the control room and HSI changes to take advantage of human cognitive processing abilities. A project, jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program, is developing guidance for specifying and designing control rooms, remote shut-down panels, HSIs etc. The guidance is intended for application by utilities and suppliers of control room and HSI modernization. The guidance will facilitate specification, design, implementation, operations, maintenance, training, and licensing activities. This guidance will be used to reduce the likelihood of human errors and licensing risk, to gain maximum benefit of implemented technology, and to increase performance. The guidance is of five types. The first is planning guidance to help a utility develop its plant-specific control room operating concepts, its plant-specific endpoint vision for the control room, its migration path to achieve that endpoint vision, and its regulatory, licensing, and human factors program plans. The second is process guidance for general HSI design and integration, human factors engineering analyses, verification and validation, in-service monitoring processes, etc. The third is detailed human factors engineering guidance for control room and HSI technical areas. The fourth is guidance for licensing. The fifth is guidance for special topics

  5. UNIVERSAL INTERFACE TO MULTIPLE OPERATIONS SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1986-01-01

    Alternative ways to provide access to operations systems that maintain, test, and configure complex telephone networks are being explored. It is suggested that a universal interface that provides simultaneous access to multiple operations systems that execute in different hardware and software...... environments, can be provided by an architecture that is based on the separation of presentation issues from application issues and on a modular interface management system that consists of a virtual user interface, physical user interface, and interface agent. The interface functionality that is needed...

  6. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use

  7. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  8. A Systems Design Course Emphasizing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental course where students develop a (small) system focusing on the interfaces between different components of the system. The components are developed independently of each other using web based documentation and focusing on techniques for modeling and analysis...... of interfaces. These techniques are supported by prototype tools...

  9. On Building a Search Interface Discovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, Denis

    A huge portion of the Web known as the deep Web is accessible via search interfaces to myriads of databases on the Web. While relatively good approaches for querying the contents of web databases have been recently proposed, one cannot fully utilize them having most search interfaces unlocated. Thus, the automatic recognition of search interfaces to online databases is crucial for any application accessing the deep Web. This paper describes the architecture of the I-Crawler, a system for finding and classifying search interfaces. The I-Crawler is intentionally designed to be used in the deep web characterization surveys and for constructing directories of deep web resources.

  10. Application of a computational situation assessment model to human system interface design and experimental validation of its effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Koh, Kwang-Yong; Seong, Poong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We validate the effectiveness of a proposed procedure thru an experiment. ► The proposed procedure addresses the salient coding of the key information. ► It was found that salience coding affects operators’ attention significantly. ► The first observation to the key information quickly guided to the correct situation awareness. ► It was validated the proposed procedure is effective for better situation awareness. - Abstract: To evaluate the effects of human cognitive characteristics on situation awareness, a computational situation assessment model of nuclear power plant operators has been developed, as well as a procedure to apply the developed model to the design of human system interfaces (HSIs). The concept of the proposed procedure is to identify the key information source, which is expected to guarantee fast and accurate diagnosis when operators attend to it. The developed computational model is used to search the diagnostic paths and the key information source. In this study, an experiment with twelve trained participants was executed to validate the effectiveness of the proposed procedure. Eighteen scenarios covering various accidents were administered twice for each subject, and experimental data were collected and analyzed. As a result of the data analysis, it was validated that the salience level of information sources significantly influences the attention of operators, and the first observation of the key information sources leads operators to a quick and correct situation assessment. Therefore, we conclude that the proposed procedure for applying the developed model to HSI design is effective

  11. Concept of software interface for BCI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svejda, Jaromir; Zak, Roman; Jasek, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology is intended to control external system by brain activity. One of main part of such system is software interface, which carries about clear communication between brain and either computer or additional devices connected to computer. This paper is organized as follows. Firstly, current knowledge about human brain is briefly summarized to points out its complexity. Secondly, there is described a concept of BCI system, which is then used to build an architecture of proposed software interface. Finally, there are mentioned disadvantages of sensing technology discovered during sensing part of our research.

  12. Development of Baby-EBM Interface System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhlis Mokhtar; Abu Bakar Ghazali; Muhammad Zahidee Taat

    2010-01-01

    This paper explains the works being done to develop an interface system for Baby-Electron Beam Machine (EBM). The function of the system is for the safety, controlling and monitoring the Baby-EBM. The integration for the system is using data acquisition (DAQ) hardware and LabVIEW to develop the software. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Explanation Interfaces in Recommender Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cleger-Tamayo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Explaining interfaces become a useful tool in systems that have a lot of content to evaluate by users. The different interfaces represent a help for the undecided users or those who consider systems as boxed black smart. These systems present recommendations to users based on different learning models. In this paper, we present the different objectives of the explanation interfaces and some of the criteria that you can evaluate, as well as a proposal of metrics to obtain results in the experiments. Finally, we showed the main results of a study with real users and their interaction with e-commerce systems. Among the main results, highlight the positive impact in relation to the time of interaction with the applications and acceptance of the recommendations received.

  14. Spectrometer user interface to computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Davies, M.; Fry, F.A.; Venn, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A computer system for use in radiation spectrometry should be designed around the needs and comprehension of the user and his operating environment. To this end, the functions of the system should be built in a modular and independent fashion such that they can be joined to the back end of an appropriate user interface. The point that this interface should be designed rather than just allowed to evolve is illustrated by reference to four related computer systems of differing complexity and function. The physical user interfaces in all cases are keyboard terminals, and the virtues and otherwise of these devices are discussed and compared with others. The language interface needs to satisfy a number of requirements, often conflicting. Among these, simplicity and speed of operation compete with flexibility and scope. Both experienced and novice users need to be considered, and any individual's needs may vary from naive to complex. To be efficient and resilient, the implementation must use an operating system, but the user needs to be protected from its complex and unfamiliar syntax. At the same time the interface must allow the user access to all services appropriate to his needs. The user must also receive an image of privacy in a multi-user system. The interface itself must be stable and exhibit continuity between implementations. Some of these conflicting needs have been overcome by the SABRE interface with languages operating at several levels. The foundation is a simple semimnemonic command language that activates indididual and independent functions. The commands can be used with positional parameters or in an interactive dialogue the precise nature of which depends upon the operating environment and the user's experience. A command procedure or macrolanguage allows combinations of commands with conditional branching and arithmetic features. Thus complex but repetitive operations are easily performed

  15. Interface For Fault-Tolerant Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Charles; Williamson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Interface unit and controller emulator developed for research on electronic helicopter-flight-control systems equipped with artificial intelligence. Interface unit interrupt-driven system designed to link microprocessor-based, quadruply-redundant, asynchronous, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant control system (controller) with electronic servocontrol unit that controls set of hydraulic actuators. Receives digital feedforward messages from, and transmits digital feedback messages to, controller through differential signal lines or fiber-optic cables (thus far only differential signal lines have been used). Analog signals transmitted to and from servocontrol unit via coaxial cables.

  16. Construction of new operation interface for the LABIHS simulator using the ELIPSE E3 studio software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: silas@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS), located at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), has a compact simulator that simulate the processes of a pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant of 930 MWe of power. This simulator is composed by a HP-UX workstation computer, where the simulation software runs, and a set of computer stations, that represent an advanced control room, where the simulator is operated by software control panels that represent several systems of the simulated nuclear power plant. The current HSIs for the LABIHS simulator was built using iLog software tool. The development of new human-system interfaces (HSIs) for the simulator is one of the research fields of LABIHS. This paper presents the screen components development process for a new HSI for the LABIHS simulator, using the software Elipse{sup TM} E3 Studio. These new components developed using the E3 Studio are similar to the ones used in the current simulator interface. The article shows some comparisons between the component and screen development with Elipse{sup TM} E3 Studio processes and using iLog Studio. (author)

  17. Construction of new operation interface for the LABIHS simulator using the ELIPSE E3 studio software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2011-01-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS), located at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), has a compact simulator that simulate the processes of a pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant of 930 MWe of power. This simulator is composed by a HP-UX workstation computer, where the simulation software runs, and a set of computer stations, that represent an advanced control room, where the simulator is operated by software control panels that represent several systems of the simulated nuclear power plant. The current HSIs for the LABIHS simulator was built using iLog software tool. The development of new human-system interfaces (HSIs) for the simulator is one of the research fields of LABIHS. This paper presents the screen components development process for a new HSI for the LABIHS simulator, using the software Elipse TM E3 Studio. These new components developed using the E3 Studio are similar to the ones used in the current simulator interface. The article shows some comparisons between the component and screen development with Elipse TM E3 Studio processes and using iLog Studio. (author)

  18. ITER diagnostic system: Vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, K.M.; Udintsev, V.S.; Hughes, S.; Walker, C.I.; Andrew, P.; Barnsley, R.; Bertalot, L.; Drevon, J.M.; Encheva, A.; Kashchuk, Y.; Maquet, Ph.; Pearce, R.; Taylor, N.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostics play an essential role for the successful operation of the ITER tokamak. They provide the means to observe control and to measure plasma during the operation of ITER tokamak. The components of the diagnostic system in the ITER tokamak will be installed in the vacuum vessel, in the cryostat, in the upper, equatorial and divertor ports, in the divertor cassettes and racks, as well as in various buildings. Diagnostic components that are placed in a high radiation environment are expected to operate for the life of ITER. There are approx. 45 diagnostic systems located on ITER. Some diagnostics incorporate direct or independently pumped extensions to maintain their necessary vacuum conditions. They require a base pressure less than 10 −7 Pa, irrespective of plasma operation, and a leak rate of less than 10 −10 Pa m 3 s −1 . In all the cases it is essential to maintain the ITER closed fuel cycle. These directly coupled diagnostic systems are an integral part of the ITER vacuum containment and are therefore subject to the same design requirements for tritium and active gas confinement, for all normal and accidental conditions. All the diagnostics, whether or not pumped, incorporate penetration of the vacuum boundary (i.e. window assembly, vacuum feedthrough etc.) and demountable joints. Monitored guard volumes are provided for all elements of the vacuum boundary that are judged to be vulnerable by virtue of their construction, material, load specification etc. Standard arrangements are made for their construction and for the monitoring, evacuating and leak testing of these volumes. Diagnostic systems are incorporated at more than 20 ports on ITER. This paper will describe typical and particular arrangements of pumped diagnostic and monitored guard volume. The status of the diagnostic vacuum systems, which are at the start of their detailed design, will be outlined and the specific features of the vacuum systems in ports and extensions will be described

  19. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use

  20. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J. [Carlow International Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  1. A Modeling Pattern for Layered System Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, Peter M.; Sarrel, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Communications between systems is often initially represented at a single, high level of abstraction, a link between components. During design evolution it is usually necessary to elaborate the interface model, defining it from several different, related viewpoints and levels of abstraction. This paper presents a pattern to model such multi-layered interface architectures simply and efficiently, in a way that supports expression of technical complexity, interfaces and behavior, and analysis of complexity. Each viewpoint and layer of abstraction has its own properties and behaviors. System elements are logically connected both horizontally along the communication path, and vertically across the different layers of protocols. The performance of upper layers depends on the performance of lower layers, yet the implementation of lower layers is intentionally opaque to upper layers. Upper layers are hidden from lower layers except as sources and sinks of data. The system elements may not be linked directly at each horizontal layer but only via a communication path, and end-to-end communications may depend on intermediate components that are hidden from them, but may need to be shown in certain views and analyzed for certain purposes. This architectural model pattern uses methods described in ISO 42010, Recommended Practice for Architectural Description of Software-intensive Systems and CCSDS 311.0-M-1, Reference Architecture for Space Data Systems (RASDS). A set of useful viewpoints and views are presented, along with the associated modeling representations, stakeholders and concerns. These viewpoints, views, and concerns then inform the modeling pattern. This pattern permits viewing the system from several different perspectives and at different layers of abstraction. An external viewpoint treats the systems of interest as black boxes and focuses on the applications view, another view exposes the details of the connections and other components between the black boxes

  2. Hardware system for man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Kiyoshi; Tai, Ichirou; Hiromoto, Hiroshi; Inubushi, Hiroyuki; Makino, Teruyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Keeping pace with the recent advance of electronic technology, the adoption of the system that can present more information efficiently and in orderly form to operators has been promoted rapidly, in place of the man-machine interface for power stations, which comprises conventional indicators, switches and annunciators. By the introduction of new hardware and software, the form of the central control rooms of power stations and the sharing of roles between man and machine there have been reexamined. In this report, the way the man-machine interface in power stations should be and the requirement for the role of operators are summarized, and based on them, the role of man-machine equipment is considered, thereafter, the features and functions of new typical man-machine equipments that are used for power stations at present or can be applied are described. Finally, the example of how these equipments are applied to power plants as the actual system is shown. The role of man-machine system in power stations, recent operation monitoring and control, the sharing of roles between hardware and operators, the role of machines, the recent typical hard ware of man-machine interface, and the examples of the latest application are reported. (K.I.)

  3. A software prototype development of human system interfaces for human factors engineering validation tests of SMART MCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jong Tae; Han, Kwan Ho; Yang, Seung Won

    2011-02-01

    An integrated system validation test bed used for human factors engineering validation test is being developed. This study has a goal to develop a software prototype for HFE validation of SMART MCR design. To achieve these, first, some prototype specifications of the software was developed. Then software prototypes of alarm reduction logic system, Plant Protection System, ESF-CCS, Elastic Tile Alarm Indication, and EID-based HSIs were implemented as codes. Test procedures for the software prototypes were established to verify the completeness of the codes implemented. The careful software test has been done according to these test procedures, and the result were documented

  4. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5700, MS-6170, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Clark, Robert [U.S. Department of Energy (United States); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  5. Investigation of human system interface design in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Zhang Yunbo; Wang Zhongqiu

    2012-01-01

    The paper introduces the importance of HFE in designing nuclear power plant, and introduces briefly the content and scope of HFE, discusses human system interface design of new built nuclear power plants. This paper also describes human system interface design of foreign nuclear power plant, and describes in detail human system interface design of domestic nuclear power plant. (authors)

  6. ADST ARWA Visual System Module Interface Design Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    Window Display Interface Control Document 901182-775AA Rotary Wing Aircraft Simulation System ESIG-2000 Image Generator Interface Control Document...OTWDisplaysjTOVSC interface. 3.8.1 0TW Displays To VSC Data Elements I Reference the vendor supplied interface control document for the Out-The- Window display for...VSC To OTW Displays Data Elements Reference the vendor supplied interface control document for the Out-The- I Window display for information regarding

  7. Support for User Interfaces for Distributed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychaner, Glenn; Niessner, Albert

    2005-01-01

    An extensible Java(TradeMark) software framework supports the construction and operation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for distributed computing systems typified by ground control systems that send commands to, and receive telemetric data from, spacecraft. Heretofore, such GUIs have been custom built for each new system at considerable expense. In contrast, the present framework affords generic capabilities that can be shared by different distributed systems. Dynamic class loading, reflection, and other run-time capabilities of the Java language and JavaBeans component architecture enable the creation of a GUI for each new distributed computing system with a minimum of custom effort. By use of this framework, GUI components in control panels and menus can send commands to a particular distributed system with a minimum of system-specific code. The framework receives, decodes, processes, and displays telemetry data; custom telemetry data handling can be added for a particular system. The framework supports saving and later restoration of users configurations of control panels and telemetry displays with a minimum of effort in writing system-specific code. GUIs constructed within this framework can be deployed in any operating system with a Java run-time environment, without recompilation or code changes.

  8. The Combat-System/Ship-System Interface,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    Identify by block nubee ) This report describes some of the work being done by the Combat Systems Department of the Naval Surface Weapons Center in the...CL 0 nu L Ut-1 I I l l ~ l I I I LA I u ~ l I I I I I- I n I I I I I I < I I I riI I I 1 1. I a Z I u 0 1 1> 1 W C I C I Il ~ I I <. < z L < m zCL.zW

  9. Desirable Elements for a Particle System Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schroeder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle systems have many applications, with the most popular being to produce special effects in video games and films. To permit particle systems to be created quickly and easily, Particle System Interfaces (PSIs have been developed. A PSI is a piece of software designed to perform common tasks related to particle systems for clients, while providing them with a set of parameters whose values can be adjusted to create different particle systems. Most PSIs are inflexible, and when clients require functionality that is not supported by the PSI they are using, they are forced to either find another PSI that meets their requirements or, more commonly, create their own particle system or PSI from scratch. This paper presents three original contributions. First, it identifies 18 features that a PSI should provide in order to be capable of creating diverse effects. If these features are implemented in a PSI, clients will be more likely to be able to accomplish all desired effects related to particle systems with one PSI. Secondly, it introduces a novel use of events to determine, at run time, which particle system code to execute in each frame. Thirdly, it describes a software architecture called the Dynamic Particle System Framework (DPSF. Simulation results show that DPSF possesses all 18 desirable features.

  10. Salt Repository Project transportation system interface requirements: Transportation system/repository receiving facility interface requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.A.; Insalaco, J.W.; Trainer, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report is a preliminary review of the interface between the transportation system and the repository receiving facility for a nuclear waste mined geologic disposal system in salt. Criteria for generic cask and facility designs are developed. These criteria are derived by examining the interfaces that occur as a result of the operations needed to receive nuclear waste at a repository. These criteria provide the basis for design of a safe, operable, practical nuclear waste receiving facility. The processing functions required to move the shipping unit from the gate into the unloading area and back to the gate for dispatch are described. Criteria for a generic receiving facility are discussed but no specific facility design is presented or evaluated. The criteria are stated in general terms to allow application to a wide variety of cask and facility designs. 9 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Standard interfaces for program-modular multiprocessor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernykh, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The peculiarities of the structures of existing and developed standard interfaces used in automation systems for nuclear physical experiments are considered. general structural characteristics of multiprocessor system interfaces are revealed. The comparison of the existing system CAMAC crate and designed standards of COMPEX, E3S and FASTBUS interfaces by capacity and relative cost is carried out. The analysis of the given data shows that operation of any interface is more advantageous at the rates close to capacity values, the relative cost being minimum. In this case the advantage is on the side of interfaces with greater capacity values for which at a moderated decrease of the exchange or requests processing rate the relative costs grow slower. A higher capacity of one-cycle exchange is provided with functional data way specialization in the interface. The conclusion is drawn that most perspective trend in the development of automation systems for high energy physics experiments is using FASTBUS standard

  12. Interface management for the Mined Geologic Disposal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashlock, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the interface management process that is to be used for Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) development. As part of the systems engineering and integration performed on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), interface management is critical in the development of the potential MGDS. The application of interface management on the YMP directly addresses integration between physical elements of the MGDS and the organizations responsible for their development

  13. Critical interfaces in geosynthetic multilayer liner system of a landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xuede

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is to identify the critical interface in a geosynthetic multilayer liner system by examining the effects of the interface shear strength of liner components, leachate level, leachate buildup cases, and peak and residual interface strengths. According to current landfill design procedures, conducting stability analysis along the same interface at both the back slope and base may result in a non-conservative result. The critical interfaces with the minimum factor of safety are generally found at different locations along the back slope and base. The critical interface for a multilayer liner system cannot simply be assumed during stability analysis. It can shift from one interface to another with changes in the leachate level and with different leachate buildup cases. The factor of safety for an interface with a high friction angle and low apparent cohesion generally drops much more quickly than it does under inverse conditions when the leachate level increases. The failure interface in a liner system under residual conditions is usually different from the failure interface under peak conditions.

  14. NASA Docking System (NDS) Interface Definitions Document (IDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakman, Alexander; England, Warren

    2013-01-01

    The contents of this document define the integrated performance and interface design for NASA Docking System (NDS) Block 1 and the International Docking Adapter. The intent of this IDD is to provide the interface design for using, installing, and interfacing to the NDS Block 1 that will enable successful docking to the IDA. This document is under the control of the ISS Development Projects Office (OG).

  15. Spoken language interface for a network management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Robert J.

    1999-11-01

    Leaders within the Information Technology (IT) industry are expressing a general concern that the products used to deliver and manage today's communications network capabilities require far too much effort to learn and to use, even by highly skilled and increasingly scarce support personnel. The usability of network management systems must be significantly improved if they are to deliver the performance and quality of service needed to meet the ever-increasing demand for new Internet-based information and services. Fortunately, recent advances in spoken language (SL) interface technologies show promise for significantly improving the usability of most interactive IT applications, including network management systems. The emerging SL interfaces will allow users to communicate with IT applications through words and phases -- our most familiar form of everyday communication. Recent advancements in SL technologies have resulted in new commercial products that are being operationally deployed at an increasing rate. The present paper describes a project aimed at the application of new SL interface technology for improving the usability of an advanced network management system. It describes several SL interface features that are being incorporated within an existing system with a modern graphical user interface (GUI), including 3-D visualization of network topology and network performance data. The rationale for using these SL interface features to augment existing user interfaces is presented, along with selected task scenarios to provide insight into how a SL interface will simplify the operator's task and enhance overall system usability.

  16. Interface management for the Mined Geologic Disposal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashlock, K.J.; Sellers, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The Management and Operations (M and O) contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) program exists to support DOE in the successful development and operation of an integrated system to manage the nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level wastes. As part of the system engineering and integration performed on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), interface management is critical in the development of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). The application of interface management on the YMP directly addresses integration between physical elements of the MGDS and the organizations responsible for their development. An initiative to utilize interface management and the interface control document development process for organizational interfaces is also being pursued to help ensure consistent use of information by multiple organizations

  17. Human machine interface for research reactor instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2010-01-01

    Most present design of Human Machine Interface for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System is modular-based, comprise of several cabinets such as Reactor Protection System, Control Console, Information Console as well as Communication Console. The safety, engineering and human factor will be concerned for the design. Redundancy and separation of signal and power supply are the main factor for safety consideration. The design of Operator Interface absolutely takes consideration of human and environmental factors. Physical parameters, experiences, trainability and long-established habit patterns are very important for user interface, instead of the Aesthetic and Operator-Interface Geometry. Physical design for New Instrumentation and Control System of RTP are proposed base on the state-of- the-art Human Machine Interface design. (author)

  18. Age Based User Interface in Mobile Operating System

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, Rohitt; Singh, Paramjit; Mahajan, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of different interfaces in the mobile operating system for different age groups. The different age groups identified are kids, elderly people and all others. The motive behind creating different interfaces is to make the smartphones of today's world usable to all age groups.

  19. Connected Lighting System Interoperability Study Part 1: Application Programming Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidon, Clement [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poplawski, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    First in a series of studies that focuses on interoperability as realized by the use of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), explores the diversity of such interfaces in several connected lighting systems; characterizes the extent of interoperability that they provide; and illustrates challenges, limitations, and tradeoffs that were encountered during this exploration.

  20. The intelligent user interface for NASA's advanced information management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas, Jr.; Rolofs, Larry H.; Wattawa, Scott L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Intelligent Data Management Project to design and develop advanced information management systems. The project's primary goal is to formulate, design and develop advanced information systems that are capable of supporting the agency's future space research and operational information management needs. The first effort of the project was the development of a prototype Intelligent User Interface to an operational scientific database, using expert systems and natural language processing technologies. An overview of Intelligent User Interface formulation and development is given.

  1. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  2. Resident database interfaces to the DAVID system, a heterogeneous distributed database management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroh, Marsha

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for building interfaces of resident database management systems to a heterogeneous distributed database management system under development at NASA, the DAVID system, was developed. The feasibility of that methodology was demonstrated by construction of the software necessary to perform the interface task. The interface terminology developed in the course of this research is presented. The work performed and the results are summarized.

  3. Design interface management system for nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun

    2012-01-01

    Design interfaces exist between different participants and during the whole course of a nuclear power project, and include different disciplinary requirements. The purpose of interface management is to establish a procedure, which can be efficiently used to control the complex design interfaces and ensure its compliance with NPP design requirements. To this end, a complete work procedures and relationship will be defined and classified, so as to set up the structure of interface management system. The system consists of three levels, i.e. working procedure level, management tool level and technical document level. Two management routes, i.e. administration route and technical route, are adopted so as to conduct management efficiently. (author)

  4. Applying of USB interface technique in nuclear spectrum acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianbin; Huang Jinhua

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces applying of USB technique and constructing nuclear spectrum acquisition system via PC's USB interface. The authors choose the USB component USB100 module and the W77E58μc to do the key work. It's easy to apply USB interface technique, when USB100 module is used. USB100 module can be treated as a common I/O component for the μc controller, and can be treated as a communication interface (COM) when connected to PC' USB interface. It's easy to modify the PC's program for the new system with USB100 module. The authors can smoothly change from ISA, RS232 bus to USB bus. (authors)

  5. Multiple multichannel spectra acquisition and processing system with intelligent interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ying; Wei Yixiang; Qu Jianshi; Zheng Futang; Xu Shengkui; Xie Yuanming; Qu Xing; Ji Weitong; Qiu Xuehua

    1986-01-01

    A Multiple multichannel spectra acquisition and processing system with intelligent interface is described. Sixteen spectra measured with various lengths, channel widths, back biases and acquisition times can be identified and collected by the intelligent interface simultaneously while the connected computer is doing data processing. The execution time for the Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrum analysis software on IBM PC-XT is about 55 seconds

  6. Human-system interface for CAREM nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaurre, Norberto F.; Flury, Celso A.; Pierini, Juan P.; Etchepareborda, Andres; Breitembuecher, Alfredo J.; Lema, Fabian M.

    2009-01-01

    Associated with activities to be developed by our working group on the construction of the reactor training simulator for the CAREM, we have planned the design of human-system interface (HSI) of the main control room. The goal of this study is to describe the planning and methodology used for the HSI interface design. The products of this process are the layout specifications of the Control Room and the screens specifications for control software. (author)

  7. Nimrod 4080 computer - Nixie data system interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.V.

    1977-02-01

    The Injector Control System employs an ADC/multiplexer system to convert analogue data from the various beamline elements and supply this to the Controls CAMAC for numeric (Nixie) display. Facilities were incorporated to allow this data to be sent via a line driver to the Diagnostics CAMAC. This report describes the system developed to acquire and log the Nixie data. (author)

  8. A Universal Intelligent System-on-Chip Based Sensor Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Ferri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The need for real-time/reliable/low-maintenance distributed monitoring systems, e.g., wireless sensor networks, has been becoming more and more evident in many applications in the environmental, agro-alimentary, medical, and industrial fields. The growing interest in technologies related to sensors is an important indicator of these new needs. The design and the realization of complex and/or distributed monitoring systems is often difficult due to the multitude of different electronic interfaces presented by the sensors available on the market. To address these issues the authors propose the concept of a Universal Intelligent Sensor Interface (UISI, a new low-cost system based on a single commercial chip able to convert a generic transducer into an intelligent sensor with multiple standardized interfaces. The device presented offers a flexible analog and/or digital front-end, able to interface different transducer typologies (such as conditioned, unconditioned, resistive, current output, capacitive and digital transducers. The device also provides enhanced processing and storage capabilities, as well as a configurable multi-standard output interface (including plug-and-play interface based on IEEE 1451.3. In this work the general concept of UISI and the design of reconfigurable hardware are presented, together with experimental test results validating the proposed device.

  9. The Small Explorer Data System - A data system based on standard interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian S.; Hengemihle, Jerome

    1990-01-01

    The Small Explorer Data System was developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center using a 'standard interfaces' approach. Standard interfaces make it adaptable to a wide variety of missions. The paper describes the Small Explorer Data System with particular emphasis on the standard interfaces incorporated in both the hardware and software.

  10. Brain-machine interface circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zjajo, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a complete overview of significant design challenges in respect to circuit miniaturization and power reduction of the neural recording system, along with circuit topologies, architecture trends, and (post-silicon) circuit optimization algorithms. The introduced novel circuits for signal conditioning, quantization, and classification, as well as system configurations focus on optimized power-per-area performance, from the spatial resolution (i.e. number of channels), feasible wireless data bandwidth and information quality to the delivered power of implantable system.

  11. Reservation system with graphical user interface

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Mahmoud A. Abdelhamid

    2012-01-05

    Techniques for providing a reservation system are provided. The techniques include displaying a scalable visualization object, wherein the scalable visualization object comprises an expanded view element of the reservation system depicting information in connection with a selected interval of time and a compressed view element of the reservation system depicting information in connection with one or more additional intervals of time, maintaining a visual context between the expanded view and the compressed view within the visualization object, and enabling a user to switch between the expanded view and the compressed view to facilitate use of the reservation system.

  12. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 1: Systems and Topologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes power electronic interfaces for DE applications and the topologies needed for advanced power electronic interfaces. It focuses on photovoltaic, wind, microturbine, fuel cell, internal combustion engine, battery storage, and flywheel storage systems.

  13. Tecnatom's operation system interfaces and their evolution in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, Pedro

    1998-01-01

    The author comments the evolution of operation system interfaces produced by the Tecnatom Company, notably for the support in the construction of the Spanish nuclear power plants. A system can typically be divided into a data acquisition system, a central processing system, and a graphical system. The author discusses and comments the main functional applications which are: real time data displays, data analysis functions, and other utilities (file management, data storing, file reloading)

  14. Interface requirements in nuclear medicine devices and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, G.Q. Jr.; Brill, A.B.; Noz, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Interface designs for three nuclear medicine imaging systems, and computer networking strategies proposed for medical imaging departments are presented. Configurations for two positron-emission-tomography devices (PET III and ECAT) and a general-purpose tomography instrument (the UNICON) are analyzed in terms of specific performance parameters. Interface designs for these machines are contrasted in terms of utilization of standard versus custom modules, cost, and ease of modification, upgrade, and support. The requirements of general purpose systems for medical image analysis, display, and archiving, are considered, and a realizable state-of-the-art system is specfied, including a suggested timetable

  15. Automation and Accountability in Decision Support System Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Mary L.

    2006-01-01

    When the human element is introduced into decision support system design, entirely new layers of social and ethical issues emerge but are not always recognized as such. This paper discusses those ethical and social impact issues specific to decision support systems and highlights areas that interface designers should consider during design with an…

  16. Maintenance Effectiveness and Target Observation System and its ERP Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon, Han Seong; Kim, Gi Yong; Seo, Mi Ro; Jeong, Hun Jong; Choi, Kwang Hee; Hong, Sung Yull

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance effectiveness and target observation system (MENTOS) is a maintenance rule (MR) implementation software for plant personnel to collect, edit, store, and analyze all information required for the MR implementation. Potential users and the developers of MENTOS have decided that MENTOS is implemented in the ERP system of KHNP. This article describes MENTOS briefly and introduces the ERP interface of MENTOS

  17. Semiotic user interface analysis of building information model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Timo

    2013-01-01

    To promote understanding of how to use building information (BI) systems to support communication, this paper uses computer semiotic theory to study how user interfaces of BI systems operate as a carrier of meaning. More specifically, the paper introduces a semiotic framework for the analysis of BI

  18. Proposing an Abstracted Interface and Protocol for Computer Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, David Richard [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ignatowski, Mike [AMD Research

    2014-07-01

    While it made sense for historical reasons to develop different interfaces and protocols for memory channels, CPU to CPU interactions, and I/O devices, ongoing developments in the computer industry are leading to more converged requirements and physical implementations for these interconnects. As it becomes increasingly common for advanced components to contain a variety of computational devices as well as memory, the distinction between processors, memory, accelerators, and I/O devices become s increasingly blurred. As a result, the interface requirements among such components are converging. There is also a wide range of new disruptive technologies that will impact the computer market in the coming years , including 3D integration and emerging NVRAM memory. Optimal exploitation of these technologies cannot be done with the existing memory, storage, and I/O interface standards. The computer industry has historically made major advances when industry players have been able to add innovation behind a standard interface. The standard interface provides a large market for their products and enables relatively quick and widespread adoption. To enable a new wave of innovation in the form of advanced memory products and accelerators, we need a new standard interface explicitly designed to provide both the performance and flexibility to support new system integration solutions.

  19. Proposing an Abstracted Interface and Protocol for Computer Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, David Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ignatowski, Mike [AMD

    2014-07-01

    While it made sense for historical reasons to develop different interfaces and protocols for memory channels, CPU to CPU interactions, and I/O devices, ongoing developments in the computer industry are leading to more converged requirements and physical implementations for these interconnects. As it becomes increasingly common for advanced components to contain a variety of computational devices as well as memory, the distinction between processors, memory, accelerators, and I/O devices become s increasingly blur red. As a result, the interface requirements among such components are converging. There is also a wide range of new disruptive technologies that will impact the computer market in the coming years , including 3D integration and emerging NVRAM memory. Optimal exploitation of these technologies cannot be done with the existing memory , storage, and I/O interface standards. The computer industry has historically made major advances when industry players have been able to add innovation behind a standard interface. The standard interface provides a large market for their products and enable s relatively quick and widespread adoption. To enable a new wave of innovation in the form of advanced memory products and accelerators, we need a new standard interface explicitly design ed to provide both the performance and flexibility to support new system integration solutions.

  20. Design of natural user interface of indoor surveillance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lili; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Mu-Jin; Cao, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Conventional optical video surveillance systems usually just record what they view, but they can't make sense of what they are viewing. With lots of useless video information stored and transmitted, waste of memory space and increasing the bandwidth are produced every day. In order to reduce the overall cost of the system, and improve the application value of the monitoring system, we use the Kinect sensor with CMOS infrared sensor, as a supplement to the traditional video surveillance system, to establish the natural user interface system for indoor surveillance. In this paper, the architecture of the natural user interface system, complex background monitoring object separation, user behavior analysis algorithms are discussed. By the analysis of the monitoring object, instead of the command language grammar, when the monitored object need instant help, the system with the natural user interface sends help information. We introduce the method of combining the new system and traditional monitoring system. In conclusion, theoretical analysis and experimental results in this paper show that the proposed system is reasonable and efficient. It can satisfy the system requirements of non-contact, online, real time, higher precision and rapid speed to control the state of affairs at the scene.

  1. Operator interface to the ORIC control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludemann, C.A.; Casstevens, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was built in the early 1960s with a hard-wired manual control system. Presently, it serves as a variable-energy heavy-ion cyclotron with an internal ion source, or as an energy booster for the new 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator of the Holifield Heavy Ion Facility. One factor which has kept the cyclotron the productive research tool it is today is the gradual transfer of its control functions to a computer-based system beginning in the 1970s. This particular placement of a computer between an accelerator and its operators afforded some unique challenges and opportunities that would not be encountered today. Historically, the transformation began at a time when computers were just beginning to gain acceptance as reliable operational tools. Veteran operators with tens of years of accelerator experience justifiably expressed skepticism that this improvement would aid them, particularly if they had to re-learn how to operate the machine. The confidence of the operators was gained when they realized that one of the primary principles of ergonomics was being upheld. The computer software and hardware was being designed to serve them and not the computer

  2. Advanced human-system interface design review guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced, computer-based, human-system interface designs are emerging in nuclear power plant (NPP) control rooms. These developments may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will greatly affect the ways in which operators interact with systems. At present, however, the only guidance available to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the review of control room-operator interfaces, NUREG-0700, was written prior to these technological changes and is thus not designed to address them. The objective of the project reported in this paper is to develop an Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline for use in performing human factors reviews of advanced operator interfaces. This guideline will be implemented, in part, as a portable, computer-based, interactive document for field use. The paper describes the overall guideline development methodology, the present status of the document, and the plans for further guideline testing and development. 21 refs., 3 figs

  3. Critical interface issues associated with the ITER EC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M.A.; Saibene, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ITER ECH system is an in-kind procurement consisting of four different types of gyrotrons (from EU, IN, JA and RF), transmission lines (from US) and two types of launchers (from EU and JA). Each subsystem must interface not only with the other but also with the auxiliary systems control and data acquisition computer and with the plasma (in the case of the launchers). The definition and management of interfaces is therefore essential for the system to guarantee performance, availability and reliability. The proper description of each interface boundary is essential for assembly and operation of the entire system as a single unit. In addition, progress has been made in the development of high power, long pulse systems and associated components that have not been integrated into the ITER EC design since the present ITER EC system was essentially specified prior to 2000. The ultimate physics performance and operational reliability in some situations is limited by this old design, which has not taken advantage of the knowledge and experience gained in operating the multi-megawatt ECH systems on present tokamaks and stellarators. The objective of this paper is to review the present ITER ECH system, which includes the power supplies, gyrotrons, transmission lines and launchers. Modifications are proposed which are performance driven and are engineered for reliability and maintainability, whilst reducing complexity and cost. Potential operating scenarios are discussed which require an intelligent and automatic decision making process, for example, directing the EC power to either of the two EC launchers, based on the immediate physics requirements. The interfaces between the subsystems are described and when possible improvements to each interface are proposed

  4. Interfacing Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    by the circulatory system . The membrane- urations by setting appropriate terms equal to zero. Pharmacokinedtc Modeling 115 Table B describes the...and thermodynamic properties of the drug. versal elementary dosing regimen (Sebalt and Krecft, 1987)) Currently available software systems that use...TID85 92-19538 AD-P007 117 Interfacing Physiologically-based Pharmacokincic Modeling and Simulation Systems Derek B. Janszen and M.C. Miller, H11

  5. Speech control interface for Eurocontrol’s LINK2000+ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Cristian ION

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues recent research of the authors, considering the use of speech recognition in air traffic control. It proposes the use of a voice control interface for Eurocontrol’s LINK2000+ system, offering an alternative means to improve air transport safety and efficiency.

  6. DIII-D Neutral Beam control system operator interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.J.; Campbell, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A centralized graphical user interface has been added to the DIII-D Neutral Beam (NB) control systems for status monitoring and remote control applications. This user interface provides for automatic data acquisition, alarm detection and supervisory control of the four NB programmable logic controllers (PLC) as well as the Mode Control PLC. These PLCs are used for interlocking, control and status of the NB vacuum pumping, gas delivery, and water cooling systems as well as beam mode status and control. The system allows for both a friendly user interface as well as a safe and convenient method of communicating with remote hardware that formerly required interns to access. In the future, to enable high level of control of PLC subsystems, complete procedures is written and executed at the touch of a screen control panel button. The system consists of an IBM compatible 486 computer running the FIX DMACS trademark for Windows trademark data acquisition and control interface software, a Texas Instruments/Siemens communication card and Phoenix Digital optical communications modules. Communication is achieved via the TIWAY (Texas Instruments protocol link utilizing both fiber optic communications and a copper local area network (LAN). Hardware and software capabilities will be reviewed. Data and alarm reporting, extended monitoring and control capabilities will also be discussed

  7. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  8. A graphical user-interface control system at SRRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.S.; Wang, C.J.; Chen, S.J.; Jan, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    A graphical user interface control system of 1.3 GeV synchrotron radiation light source was designed and implemented for the beam transport line (BTL) and storage ring (SR). A modern control technique has been used to implement and control the third generation synchrotron light source. Two level computer hardware configuration, that includes process and console computers as a top level and VME based intelligent local controller as a bottom level, was setup and tested. Both level computers are linked by high speed Ethernet data communication network. A database includes static and dynamic databases as well as access routines were developed. In order to commission and operate the machine friendly, the graphical man machine interface was designed and coded. The graphical user interface (GUI) software was installed on VAX workstations for the BTL and SR at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC). The over all performance has been evaluated at 10Hz update rate. The results showed that the graphical operator interface control system is versatile system and can be implemented into the control system of the accelerator. It will provide the tool to control and monitor the equipments of the radiation light source especially for machine commissioning and operation

  9. Functional Interface Considerations within an Exploration Life Support System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jay L.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    As notional life support system (LSS) architectures are developed and evaluated, myriad options must be considered pertaining to process technologies, components, and equipment assemblies. Each option must be evaluated relative to its impact on key functional interfaces within the LSS architecture. A leading notional architecture has been developed to guide the path toward realizing future crewed space exploration goals. This architecture includes atmosphere revitalization, water recovery and management, and environmental monitoring subsystems. Guiding requirements for developing this architecture are summarized and important interfaces within the architecture are discussed. The role of environmental monitoring within the architecture is described.

  10. The organizational context of error tolerant interface systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepanloo, K.; Meshkati, N.; Kozuh, M.

    1995-01-01

    Human error has been recognized as the main contributor to the occurrence of incidents in large technological systems such as nuclear power plants. Recent researches have concluded that human errors are unavoidable side effects of exploration of acceptable performance during adaptation to the unknown changes in the environment. To assist the operators in coping with unforeseen situations, the innovative error tolerant interface systems have been proposed to provide the operators with opportunities to make hypothetical tests without having to carry them out directly on the plant in potentially irreversible conditions. On the other hand, the degree of success of introduction of any new system into a tightly-coupled complex socio-technological system is known to be a great deal dependent upon the degree of harmony of that system with the organization s framework and attitudes. Error tolerant interface systems with features of simplicity, transparency, error detectability and recoverability provide a forgiving cognition environment where the effects of errors are observable and recoverable. The nature of these systems are likely to be more consistent with flexible and rather plain organizational structures, in which static and punitive concepts of human error are modified on the favour of dynamic and adaptive approaches. In this paper the features of error tolerant interface systems are explained and their consistent organizational structures are explored. (author)

  11. Advanced operator interface design for CANDU-3 fuel handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arapakota, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Operator Interface for the CANDU 3 Fuel Handling (F/H) System incorporates several improvements over the existing designs. A functionally independent sit-down CRT (cathode-ray tube) based Control Console is provided for the Fuel Handling Operator in the Main Control Room. The Display System makes use of current technology and provides a user friendly operator interface. Regular and emergency control operations can be carried out from this control console. A stand-up control panel is provided as a back-up with limited functionality adequate to put the F/H System in a safe state in case of an unlikely non-availability of the Plant Display System or the F/H Control System'. The system design philosophy, hardware configuration and the advanced display system features are described in this paper The F/H Operator Interface System developed for CANDU 3 can be adapted to CANDU 9 as well as to the existing stations. (author)

  12. Development of Graphical User Interface Student Electoral System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challiz Delima- Omorog

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to design and obtain evidence concerning the software quality and acceptance of a graphical user interface (GUI student electoral voting system. The intention of this research is three-fold; firstly, a system based on ISO 9126 software quality characteristics, secondly, a system that conforms to the current hardware and software standard and lastly, improve student participation to decision-making. Designing a usable system in the context of the user’s perception (needs and let these perceptions dictate the design is therefore a great challenge. This study used descriptivedevelopment research method. Data were collected thru guided interviews and survey questionnaires from the respondents. The researcher adopted the Princeton Development Methodology through the entire life cycle of the software development process. A very substantial majority of the respondents stated that for them, the new voting system is highly acceptable as compared to the old system both in terms of development (maintainability and portability and implementation (efficiency, functionality, reliability and usability requirements of the ISO 9126. The researcher came to conclude that usability is tied to the four software characteristics. Users’ perception about software quality-implementation requirement is correlated specifically with usability. Based on data and the problems encountered, respondents’ placed low importance on metrics if it is not well represented in the interface. When the interface fails, users are more likely to take longer to vote, failing efficiency targets and be less reliable, weakening functionality

  13. Risk Interfaces to Support Integrated Systems Analysis and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Shelhamer, Mark; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives for systems analysis capability: Develop integrated understanding of how a complex human physiological-socio-technical mission system behaves in spaceflight. Why? Support development of integrated solutions that prevent unwanted outcomes (Implementable approaches to minimize mission resources(mass, power, crew time, etc.)); Support development of tools for autonomy (need for exploration) (Assess and maintain resilience -individuals, teams, integrated system). Output of this exercise: -Representation of interfaces based on Human System Risk Board (HSRB) Risk Summary information and simple status based on Human Research Roadmap; Consolidated HSRB information applied to support communication; Point-of-Departure for HRP Element planning; Ability to track and communicate status of collaborations. 4

  14. Advanced human-system interface design review guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced, computer-based, human-system interface designs are emerging in nuclear power plant control rooms as a result of several factors. These include: (1) incorporation of new systems such as safety parameter display systems, (2) backfitting of current control rooms with new technologies when existing hardware is no longer supported by equipment vendors, and (3) development of advanced control room concepts. Control rooms of the future will be developed almost exclusively with advanced instrumentation and controls based upon digital technology. In addition, the control room operator will be interfacing with more intelligent systems which will be capable of providing information processing support to the operator. These developments may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will greatly affect the operator's role in the system as well as the ways in which he interacts with it. At present, however, the only guidance available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the review of control room-operator interfaces is NUREG-0700. It is a document which was written prior to these technological changes and is, therefore, tailored to the technologies used in traditional control rooms. Thus, the present guidance needs to be updated since it is inadequate to serve as the basis for NRC staff review of such advanced or hybrid control room designs. The objective of the project reported in this paper is to develop an Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline suitable for use in performing human factors reviews of advanced operator interfaces. This guideline will take the form of a portable, interactive, computer-based document that may be conveniently used by an inspector in the field, as well as a text-based document

  15. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi M El-Helw

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB converter for Photovoltaic (PV arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system.

  16. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system.

  17. SOME EXAMPLES OF APPLIED SYSTEMS WITH SPEECH INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zhitko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three examples of applied systems with a speech interface are considered in the article. The first two of these provide the end user with the opportunity to ask verbally the question and to hear the response from the system, creating an addition to the traditional I / O via the keyboard and computer screen. The third example, the «IntonTrainer» system, provides the user with the possibility of voice interaction and is designed for in-depth self-learning of the intonation of oral speech.

  18. ATCA-based ATLAS FTK input interface system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Yasuyuki [Chicago U., EFI; Liu, Tiehui Ted [Fermilab; Olsen, Jamieson [Fermilab; Iizawa, Tomoya [Waseda U.; Mitani, Takashi [Waseda U.; Korikawa, Tomohiro [Waseda U.; Yorita, Kohei [Waseda U.; Annovi, Alberto [Frascati; Beretta, Matteo [Frascati; Gatta, Maurizio [Frascati; Sotiropoulou, C-L. [Aristotle U., Thessaloniki; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios [Aristotle U., Thessaloniki; Kordas, Konstantinos [Aristotle U., Thessaloniki; Kimura, Naoki [Aristotle U., Thessaloniki; Cremonesi, Matteo [Chicago U., EFI; Yin, Hang [Fermilab; Xu, Zijun [Peking U.

    2015-04-27

    The first stage of the ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) is an ATCA-based input interface system, where hits from the entire silicon tracker are clustered and organized into overlapping eta-phi trigger towers before being sent to the tracking engines. First, FTK Input Mezzanine cards receive hit data and perform clustering to reduce data volume. Then, the ATCA-based Data Formatter system will organize the trigger tower data, sharing data among boards over full mesh backplanes and optic fibers. The board and system level design concepts and implementation details, as well as the operation experiences from the FTK full-chain testing, will be presented.

  19. MRS [monitored retrievable storage] to transportation system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Row, T.H.; Croff, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    In March 1987, the US Department of Energy presented to Congress the proposal to construct and operate a facility for the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portions of Oak Ridge. In discussing the MRS to Transportation System Interfaces, the authors provide a blending of the technical and institutional issues, for they do not believe the solutions to success of this enterprise lie wholly in one area. The authors cover: early chronology of the MRS; comparison of total-system life cycle cost estimates of the authorized system and improved-performance system (i.e., the system that includes a facility for MRS); transportation costs resulting from shipping, security and cask; assumptions for dedicated rail transport from MRS to repository; and significant results from the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) analysis of the improved performance system. (AT)

  20. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  1. Interface methods for using intranet portal organizational memory information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yong Gu; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, an intranet portal is considered as an information infrastructure (organizational memory information system, OMIS) supporting organizational learning. The properties and the hierarchical structure of information and knowledge in an intranet portal OMIS was identified as a problem for navigation tools of an intranet portal interface. The problem relates to navigation and retrieval functions of intranet portal OMIS and is expected to adversely affect user performance, satisfaction, and usefulness. To solve the problem, a conceptual model for navigation tools of an intranet portal interface was proposed and an experiment using a crossover design was conducted with 10 participants. In the experiment, a separate access method (tabbed tree tool) was compared to an unified access method (single tree tool). The results indicate that each information/knowledge repository for which a user has a different structural knowledge should be handled separately with a separate access to increase user satisfaction and the usefulness of the OMIS and to improve user performance in navigation.

  2. General-purpose interface bus for multiuser, multitasking computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.; Roth, Don J.; Stang, David B.

    1990-01-01

    The architecture of a multiuser, multitasking, virtual-memory computer system intended for the use by a medium-size research group is described. There are three central processing units (CPU) in the configuration, each with 16 MB memory, and two 474 MB hard disks attached. CPU 1 is designed for data analysis and contains an array processor for fast-Fourier transformations. In addition, CPU 1 shares display images viewed with the image processor. CPU 2 is designed for image analysis and display. CPU 3 is designed for data acquisition and contains 8 GPIB channels and an analog-to-digital conversion input/output interface with 16 channels. Up to 9 users can access the third CPU simultaneously for data acquisition. Focus is placed on the optimization of hardware interfaces and software, facilitating instrument control, data acquisition, and processing.

  3. Control system user interface for accelerator commissioning and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrott, D.; Keeley, D.; Kolte, G.; Mikic, Z.; Lee, M.; Corbett, J.; Howry, S.; King, A.

    1991-01-01

    An Interactive Accelerator Interface Module (AIM) has been developed in a workstation environment for the purposes of assisting in the commissioning and operation of any storage ring/collider system. The function of AIM is to integrate modeling and simulation codes into accelerator and beamline control systems for the purpose of rapid on-line data analysis and error-correction, resulting in significant time-saving. A system dependent module provides for the translation of specific control system data files to appropriate input format for application programs within AIM. Interactive screen graphics, including system function diagrams, menus, beamline element status and update information are standard in AIM. AIM is currently connected to the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) control system, but is easily transportable to other facilities. This paper describes the development of AIM and its applications on SLC

  4. Design of groundwater pollution expert system: forward chaining and interfacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongkon Ta-oun; Mohamed Daud; Mohd Zohadie Bardaie; Shamshuddin Jusop

    2000-01-01

    The groundwater pollution expert system (GWPES was developed by C Language Integrate Production System (CLEPS). The control techniques of this system consider some conclusion and then attempts to prove it by searching for supportive information from the database. The inference process goes in forward chaining of this system such as predicting groundwater pollution vulnerability, predicting the effect of nitrogen fertiliser, agricultural impact and project development on groundwater pollution potential. In GWPES, forward chaining system begins with a matching of inputs with the existing database of groundwater environment and activities impact of the project development. While, interaction between an expert system and user is conducted in simple English language. The interaction is highly interactive. A basis design with simple Graphic User Interface (GUI) to input data and by asking simple questions. (author)

  5. Bringing Control System User Interfaces to the Web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xihui [ORNL; Kasemir, Kay [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    With the evolution of web based technologies, especially HTML5 [1], it becomes possible to create web-based control system user interfaces (UI) that are cross-browser and cross-device compatible. This article describes two technologies that facilitate this goal. The first one is the WebOPI [2], which can seamlessly display CSS BOY [3] Operator Interfaces (OPI) in web browsers without modification to the original OPI file. The WebOPI leverages the powerful graphical editing capabilities of BOY and provides the convenience of re-using existing OPI files. On the other hand, it uses generic JavaScript and a generic communication mechanism between the web browser and web server. It is not optimized for a control system, which results in unnecessary network traffic and resource usage. Our second technology is the WebSocket-based Process Data Access (WebPDA) [4]. It is a protocol that provides efficient control system data communication using WebSocket [5], so that users can create web-based control system UIs using standard web page technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript. WebPDA is control system independent, potentially supporting any type of control system.

  6. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cornat, R

    2012-01-01

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  7. Impact of mental representational systems on design interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1998-02-25

    The purpose of the studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory is to understand the impact mental representational systems have in identifying how user comfort parameters influence how information is to best be presented. By understanding how each individual perceives information based on the three representational systems (visual, auditory and kinesthetic modalities), it has been found that a different approach must be taken in the design of interfaces resulting in an outcome that is much more effective and representative of the users mental model. This paper will present current findings and future theories to be explored.

  8. Molecular tailoring of interfaces for thin film on substrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Martha Elizabeth

    Thin film on substrate systems appear most prevalently within the microelectronics industry, which demands that devices operate in smaller and smaller packages with greater reliability. The reliability of these multilayer film systems is strongly influenced by the adhesion of each of the bimaterial interfaces. During use, microelectronic components undergo thermo-mechanical cycling, which induces interfacial delaminations leading to failure of the overall device. The ability to tailor interfacial properties at the molecular level provides a mechanism to improve thin film adhesion, reliability and performance. This dissertation presents the investigation of molecular level control of interface properties in three thin film-substrate systems: photodefinable polyimide films on passivated silicon substrates, self-assembled monolayers at the interface of Au films and dielectric substrates, and mechanochemically active materials on rigid substrates. For all three materials systems, the effect of interfacial modifications on adhesion is assessed using a laser-spallation technique. Laser-induced stress waves are chosen because they dynamically load the thin film interface in a precise, noncontacting manner at high strain rates and are suitable for both weak and strong interfaces. Photodefinable polyimide films are used as dielectrics in flip chip integrated circuit packages to reduce the stress between silicon passivation layers and mold compound. The influence of processing parameters on adhesion is examined for photodefinable polyimide films on silicon (Si) substrates with three different passivation layers: silicon nitride (SiNx), silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy), and the native silicon oxide (SiO2). Interfacial strength increases when films are processed with an exposure step as well as a longer cure cycle. Additionally, the interfacial fracture energy is assessed using a dynamic delamination protocol. The high toughness of this interface (ca. 100 J/m2) makes it difficult

  9. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Electronic Interfacing Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Alassi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM sensors are actively being implemented in various fields due to their compatibility with different operating conditions in gaseous/liquid mediums for a wide range of measurements. This trend has been matched by the parallel advancement in tailored electronic interfacing systems for QCM sensors. That is, selecting the appropriate electronic circuit is vital for accurate sensor measurements. Many techniques were developed over time to cover the expanding measurement requirements (e.g., accommodating highly-damping environments. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the various existing QCM electronic interfacing systems. Namely, impedance-based analysis, oscillators (conventional and lock-in based techniques, exponential decay methods and the emerging phase-mass based characterization. The aforementioned methods are discussed in detail and qualitatively compared in terms of their performance for various applications. In addition, some theoretical improvements and recommendations are introduced for adequate systems implementation. Finally, specific design considerations of high-temperature microbalance systems (e.g., GaPO4 crystals (GCM and Langasite crystals (LCM are introduced, while assessing their overall system performance, stability and quality compared to conventional low-temperature applications.

  10. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Electronic Interfacing Systems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benammar, Mohieddine; Brett, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensors are actively being implemented in various fields due to their compatibility with different operating conditions in gaseous/liquid mediums for a wide range of measurements. This trend has been matched by the parallel advancement in tailored electronic interfacing systems for QCM sensors. That is, selecting the appropriate electronic circuit is vital for accurate sensor measurements. Many techniques were developed over time to cover the expanding measurement requirements (e.g., accommodating highly-damping environments). This paper presents a comprehensive review of the various existing QCM electronic interfacing systems. Namely, impedance-based analysis, oscillators (conventional and lock-in based techniques), exponential decay methods and the emerging phase-mass based characterization. The aforementioned methods are discussed in detail and qualitatively compared in terms of their performance for various applications. In addition, some theoretical improvements and recommendations are introduced for adequate systems implementation. Finally, specific design considerations of high-temperature microbalance systems (e.g., GaPO4 crystals (GCM) and Langasite crystals (LCM)) are introduced, while assessing their overall system performance, stability and quality compared to conventional low-temperature applications. PMID:29206212

  11. SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-09

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

  12. Design of video interface conversion system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a FPGA based video interface conversion system that enables the inter-conversion between digital and analog video. Cyclone IV series EP4CE22F17C chip from Altera Corporation is used as the main video processing chip, and single-chip is used as the information interaction control unit between FPGA and PC. The system is able to encode/decode messages from the PC. Technologies including video decoding/encoding circuits, bus communication protocol, data stream de-interleaving and de-interlacing, color space conversion and the Camera Link timing generator module of FPGA are introduced. The system converts Composite Video Broadcast Signal (CVBS) from the CCD camera into Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS), which will be collected by the video processing unit with Camera Link interface. The processed video signals will then be inputted to system output board and displayed on the monitor.The current experiment shows that it can achieve high-quality video conversion with minimum board size.

  13. Operator interface design considerations for a PACS information management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, James E.; Nabijee, Kamal H.; Freeman, Rick H.; Prior, Fred W.

    1990-08-01

    As prototype PACS grow into fully digital departmental and hospital-wide systems, effective information storage and retrieval mechanisms become increasingly important. Thus far, designers of PACS workstations have concentrated on image communication and display functionality. The new challenge is to provide appropriate operator interface environments to facilitate information retrieval. The "Marburg Model" 1 provides a detailed analysis of the functions, control flows and data structures used in Radiology. It identifies a set of "actors" who perform information manipulation functions. Drawing on this model and its associated methodology it is possible to identify four modes of use of information systems in Radiology: Clinical Routine, Research, Consultation, and Administration. Each mode has its own specific access requirements and views of information. An operator interface strategy appropriate for each mode will be proposed. Clinical Routine mode is the principal concern of PACS primary diagnosis workstations. In a full PACS implementation, such workstations must provide a simple and consistent navigational aid for the on-line image database, a local work list of cases to be reviewed, and easy access to information from other hospital information systems. A hierarchical method of information access is preferred because it provides the ability to start at high-level entities and iteratively narrow the scope of information from which to select subsequent operations. An implementation using hierarchical, nested software windows which fulfills such requirements shall be examined.

  14. TGeoCad: an Interface between ROOT and CAD Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, C.; Carminati, F.

    2014-06-01

    In the simulation of High Energy Physics experiment a very high precision in the description of the detector geometry is essential to achieve the required performances. The physicists in charge of Monte Carlo Simulation of the detector need to collaborate efficiently with the engineers working at the mechanical design of the detector. Often, this collaboration is made hard by the usage of different and incompatible software. ROOT is an object-oriented C++ framework used by physicists for storing, analyzing and simulating data produced by the high-energy physics experiments while CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software is used for mechanical design in the engineering field. The necessity to improve the level of communication between physicists and engineers led to the implementation of an interface between the ROOT geometrical modeler used by the virtual Monte Carlo simulation software and the CAD systems. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of the TGeoCad Interface that has been developed to enable the use of ROOT geometrical models in several CAD systems. To achieve this goal, the ROOT geometry description is converted into STEP file format (ISO 10303), which can be imported and used by many CAD systems.

  15. TGeoCad: an Interface between ROOT and CAD Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, C; Carminati, F

    2014-01-01

    In the simulation of High Energy Physics experiment a very high precision in the description of the detector geometry is essential to achieve the required performances. The physicists in charge of Monte Carlo Simulation of the detector need to collaborate efficiently with the engineers working at the mechanical design of the detector. Often, this collaboration is made hard by the usage of different and incompatible software. ROOT is an object-oriented C++ framework used by physicists for storing, analyzing and simulating data produced by the high-energy physics experiments while CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software is used for mechanical design in the engineering field. The necessity to improve the level of communication between physicists and engineers led to the implementation of an interface between the ROOT geometrical modeler used by the virtual Monte Carlo simulation software and the CAD systems. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of the TGeoCad Interface that has been developed to enable the use of ROOT geometrical models in several CAD systems. To achieve this goal, the ROOT geometry description is converted into STEP file format (ISO 10303), which can be imported and used by many CAD systems

  16. Human system interface concerns in support system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johannsen, Gunnar; Rijnsdorp, J.E.; Sage, Andrew P.

    1983-01-01

    Current research needs and future prospects in the area of support to man-machine system analysis, design, and evaluation are described. We are especially concerned with system design requirements to enable efficient and effective human system interaction. Prospects for enhanced support to the human

  17. Solid-liquid interface free energy in binary systems: theory and atomistic calculations for the (110) Cu-Ag interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, T; Mishin, Y

    2009-08-07

    We analyze thermodynamics of solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems when the solid is in a nonhydrostatic state of stress. The difficulty lies in the fact that chemical potential of at least one of the chemical components in a nonhydrostatic solid is an undefined quantity. We show, nevertheless, that the interface free energy gamma can be defined as excess of an appropriate thermodynamic potential that depends on the chemical potentials in the liquid phase. We derive different forms of the adsorption equation for solid-liquid interfaces, with differential coefficients representing excesses of extensive properties. This leads, in particular, to the formulation of interface stress tau(ij) as an appropriate excess over nonhydrostatic bulk stresses. The interface stress is not unique unless the solid is in a hydrostatic state of stress. We also derive Gibbs-Helmholtz type equations that can be applied for thermodynamic integration of gamma. All thermodynamic relations derived here are presented in forms suitable for atomistic simulations. In particular, the excess quantities can be computed without constructing interface profiles. As an application, we perform semigrand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the (110) solid-liquid interface in the Cu-Ag system. We show that gamma computed by thermodynamic integration along a coexistence path decreases with increasing composition difference between the phases. At the same time, tau(ij) remains negative (i.e., the interface is in a state of compression), drastically increases in magnitude, and becomes highly anisotropic. Some of the interface excess properties are computed by different methods and demonstrate accurate agreement with each other, confirming the correctness of our analysis.

  18. 47 CFR 15.115 - TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV interface devices, including cable system... FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.115 TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices. (a) Measurements of the radiated emissions of a TV interface device shall be conducted with the...

  19. 76 FR 8353 - Positioning Systems Directorate Will Be Hosting an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Positioning Systems Directorate Will Be Hosting an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) Meeting for Document ICD-GPS-870 AGENCY: Interface Control... informs the public that the Global Positioning Systems Directorate will be hosting an Interface Control...

  20. [The interface between the immune system and autonomic nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Shunya; Mukaino, Akihiro; Ando, Yukio

    2017-01-01

      The nervous system and the immune system are two major systems in human body. Although it was revealed these two systems correlated, the control of immune cell dynamics by the nervous system has come to draw a lot of attention at the present time. Recent advances in basic and preclinical science reveal that reflex neural circuits inhibit the production of cytokines and inflammation in several animal models. One well-characterized cytokine-inhibiting mechanism, termed the "inflammatory reflex", is dependent upon vagus nerve stimulation that inhibits cytokine production and attenuates the inflammation. And the mechanism for controlling lymphocyte trafficking becomes clear, and molecular basis of immune regulation by the nervous system was reported. On the other hand, the nervous system is protected from the invasion of harmful agents by the barrier. However, there are neuroimmunological disorders, which is associated with autoimmunity, tumor immunity, and infection immunity. Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) is an acquired immune-mediated disorder that leads to widespread autonomic manifestations, in which autoantibodies to ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play a central role. Previously, we elucidated the prevalence of extra-autonomic manifestations in patients with AAG. It is necessary to establish the new systems for the detection of autoantibodies to other subunits of acetylcholine receptor.

  1. RoboCon: Operator interface for robotic applications. Final report: RoboCon electrical interfacing -- system architecture, and Interfacing NDDS and LabView

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempf, H.

    1998-04-30

    The first appendix contains detailed specifications of the electrical interfacing employed in Robocon. This includes all electrical signals and power requirement descriptions up to and including the interface entry points for external robots and systems. The reader is first presented with an overview of the overall Robocon electrical system, followed by sub-sections describing each module in detail. The appendices contain listings of power requirements and the electrical connectors and cables used, followed by an overall electrical system diagram. Custom electronics employed are also described. The Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) is a real-time dissemination communications architecture which allows nodes on a network to publish data and subscribe to data published by other nodes while remaining anonymous. The second appendix explains how to facilitate a seamless interface between NDDS and LabView and provides sample source code used to implement an NDDS consumer which writes a string to a socket.

  2. Evaluation of a Compact Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We realized a compact hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI system by integrating a portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS device with an economical electroencephalography (EEG system. The NIRS array was located on the subjects’ forehead, covering the prefrontal area. The EEG electrodes were distributed over the frontal, motor/temporal, and parietal areas. The experimental paradigm involved a Stroop word-picture matching test in combination with mental arithmetic (MA and baseline (BL tasks, in which the subjects were asked to perform either MA or BL in response to congruent or incongruent conditions, respectively. We compared the classification accuracies of each of the modalities (NIRS or EEG with that of the hybrid system. We showed that the hybrid system outperforms the unimodal EEG and NIRS systems by 6.2% and 2.5%, respectively. Since the proposed hybrid system is based on portable platforms, it is not confined to a laboratory environment and has the potential to be used in real-life situations, such as in neurorehabilitation.

  3. TA-55 facility control system upgrade project - human-system interface functional requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, W.H.; Pope, N.G.; Turner, W.J.; Brown, R.E.

    1995-11-01

    The functional requirements for that part of the Technical Area (TA)-55 Operations Center Upgrade Project that involves the human-system interface (HSI) are described in this document. The upgrade project seeks to replace completely the center's existing computerized data acquisition and display system, which consists of the field multiplexer units, Data General computer systems, and associated peripherals and software. The upgrade project has two parts-the Facility Data Acquisition Interface System (FDAIS) and the HSI. The HSI comprises software and hardware to provide a high-level graphical operator interface to the data acquisition system, as well as data archiving, alarm annunciation, and logging. The new system will be built with modern, commercially available components; it will improve reliability and maintainability, and it can be expanded for future needs

  4. A Review of Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setare Amiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of research activities and different types of studies in brain-computer interface (BCI systems show potential in this young research area. Research teams have studied features of different data acquisition techniques, brain activity patterns, feature extraction techniques, methods of classifications, and many other aspects of a BCI system. However, conventional BCIs have not become totally applicable, due to the lack of high accuracy, reliability, low information transfer rate, and user acceptability. A new approach to create a more reliable BCI that takes advantage of each system is to combine two or more BCI systems with different brain activity patterns or different input signal sources. This type of BCI, called hybrid BCI, may reduce disadvantages of each conventional BCI system. In addition, hybrid BCIs may create more applications and possibly increase the accuracy and the information transfer rate. However, the type of BCIs and their combinations should be considered carefully. In this paper, after introducing several types of BCIs and their combinations, we review and discuss hybrid BCIs, different possibilities to combine them, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  6. Microfluidic hubs, systems, and methods for interface fluidic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Michael S; Claudnic, Mark R; Kim, Hanyoup; Patel, Kamlesh D; Renzi, Ronald F; Van De Vreugde, James L

    2015-01-27

    Embodiments of microfluidic hubs and systems are described that may be used to connect fluidic modules. A space between surfaces may be set by fixtures described herein. In some examples a fixture may set substrate-to-substrate spacing based on a distance between registration surfaces on which the respective substrates rest. Fluidic interfaces are described, including examples where fluid conduits (e.g. capillaries) extend into the fixture to the space between surfaces. Droplets of fluid may be introduced to and/or removed from microfluidic hubs described herein, and fluid actuators may be used to move droplets within the space between surfaces. Continuous flow modules may be integrated with the hubs in some examples.

  7. Designing Guiding Systems for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kosmyna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain–Computer Interface (BCI community has focused the majority of its research efforts on signal processing and machine learning, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. Guiding users on how to use a BCI is crucial in order to teach them to produce stable brain patterns. In this work, we explore the instructions and feedback for BCIs in order to provide a systematic taxonomy to describe the BCI guiding systems. The purpose of our work is to give necessary clues to the researchers and designers in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI in making the fusion between BCIs and HCI more fruitful but also to better understand the possibilities BCIs can provide to them.

  8. Designing Guiding Systems for Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2017-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) community has focused the majority of its research efforts on signal processing and machine learning, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. Guiding users on how to use a BCI is crucial in order to teach them to produce stable brain patterns. In this work, we explore the instructions and feedback for BCIs in order to provide a systematic taxonomy to describe the BCI guiding systems. The purpose of our work is to give necessary clues to the researchers and designers in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in making the fusion between BCIs and HCI more fruitful but also to better understand the possibilities BCIs can provide to them.

  9. Accelerator-control-system interface for intelligent power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.

    1992-01-01

    A number of high-current high-precision magnet power supplies have been installed at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Complex. The units replace existing supplies, powering large dipole magnets in the ring. These bending magnets require a high-current supply that is precise and stable. The control and interface design for these power supplies represents a departure from all others on-site. The supplies have sophisticated microprocessor control on-board and communicate with the accelerator control system via RS-422 (serial communications). The units, built by Alpha Scientific Electronics, Hayward, CA use a high-level ASCII control protocol. The low-level ''front-end'' software used by the accelerator control system has been written to accommodate these new devices. They communicate with the control system through a terminal server port connected to the site-wide ethernet backbone. Details of the software implementation for the analog and digital control of the supplies through the accelerator control system will be presented

  10. Ion Transfer Voltammetry Associated with Two Polarizable Interfaces Within Water and Moderately Hydrophobic Ionic Liquid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical system composed of two polarizable interfaces (the metallic electrode|water and water|ionic liquid interfaces), namely two‐polarized‐interface (TPI) technique, has been proposed to explore the ion transfer processes between water and moderately hydrophobic ionic liquids (W|mIL)...

  11. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  12. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  13. A virtual reality interface to an intelligent dental care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, J; Myszkowski, K; Kunii, T L; Ibusuki, M

    1996-01-01

    The design and fabrication of teeth restorations in dentistry rely increasingly on CAD/CAM techniques. We present an approach for interactive design of the occlusal surface of teeth based on simulation of jaw articulation and computer-aided diagnosis of occlusal disorders. To bridge the cognitive gap between the dentist and the computer system, we propose a virtual reality user interface, which applies the metaphors of tools and techniques known in dentistry. This makes the restoration design more intuitive for dentists. The system uses Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and HTML standards to generate a treatment report and exchange data in an electronic form. The simulation of jaw articulation requires fast calculation of multi-point contacts and detection of collisions between surfaces of teeth and restorations. We have developed a distance maps technique which exhibits realtime performance for objects with complex geometry and is suitable for other virtual reality systems dealing with complex contacts. The characteristics of contacts between teeth acquired during lower jaw motion are compactly represented as accumulated distance maps. These maps are then used for automatic removal of interferences between the restorations and the opponent teeth, and provide the dentist with information for further manual adjustments of the occlusal surfaces.

  14. Used fuel management system architecture and interface analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, Mark; Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid; Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena; Cotton, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  15. Brain-Computer Interfacing Embedded in Intelligent and Affective Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    In this talk we survey recent research views on non-traditional brain-computer interfaces (BCI). That is, interfaces that can process brain activity input, but that are designed for the ‘general population’, rather than for clinical purposes. Control of applications can be made more robust by fusing

  16. High speed digital interfacing for a neural data acquisition system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahr Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diseases like schizophrenia and genetic epilepsy are supposed to be caused by disorders in the early development of the brain. For the further investigation of these relationships a custom designed application specific integrated circuit (ASIC was developed that is optimized for the recording from neonatal mice [Bahr A, Abu-Saleh L, Schroeder D, Krautschneider W. 16 Channel Neural Recording Integrated Circuit with SPI Interface and Error Correction Coding. Proc. 9th BIOSTEC 2016. Biodevices: Rome, Italy, 2016; 1: 263; Bahr A, Abu-Saleh L, Schroeder D, Krautschneider W. Development of a neural recording mixed signal integrated circuit for biomedical signal acquisition. Biomed Eng Biomed Tech Abstracts 2015; 60(S1: 298–299; Bahr A, Abu-Saleh L, Schroeder D, Krautschneider WH. 16 Channel Neural Recording Mixed Signal ASIC. CDNLive EMEA 2015 Conference Proceedings, 2015.]. To enable the live display of the neural signals a multichannel neural data acquisition system with live display functionality is presented. It implements a high speed data transmission from the ASIC to a computer with a live display functionality. The system has been successfully implemented and was used in a neural recording of a head-fixed mouse.

  17. The computerised procedure system COPMA and its user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogsaeter, M.; Larsen, J.; Nilsen, S.; Oewre, F.

    1990-01-01

    At the OECD Halden Reactor Project, the COPMA system has been developed in order to investigate whether procedures can be executed more safety and efficiently if they are computerised, i.e. if the operator uses a CRT-based system instead of written manuals. Procedures are entered in a procedure data base using PED, a procedure editor. Each procedure is given a textual as well as a graphical representation. For the textual representation, the language PROLA is used, a language which has been designed for simple procedure specification. The COPMA online system lets the operator execute procedures that are stored in the procedure data base. The operator interface is a screen divided into non-overlapping windows each serving a different purpose. All commands to the system are given by moving a mouse device around and clicking buttons on top of the mouse. A procedure consists of steps, each step containing a number of instructions. The operator works on one activity at a time, an activity to be seen as a procedure instance. A graph shows the overall procedure (or activity) structure in a window and activity execution is traced in the graph. Another windows shows the instructions of the step currently being executed. The operator steps through the activity by selecting whether and how to execute the listed instructions. COPMA can maintain the status of several activities in parallel, so that the operator can easily switch between different activities. COPMA is linked to a PWR nuclear simulator over Ethernet using the TCP/IP protocol. This gives a number of advantages as compared to conventional written procedures, especially the fact that COPMA can help collect data from the procedure data base automatically

  18. Functional fusion of living systems with synthetic electrode interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufer, Oskar; Weber, Sebastian; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar; Spatz, Joachim P; Rustom, Amin

    2016-01-01

    The functional fusion of "living" biomaterial (such as cells) with synthetic systems has developed into a principal ambition for various scientific disciplines. In particular, emerging fields such as bionics and nanomedicine integrate advanced nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells and organisms in order to develop novel strategies for applications, including energy production or real-time diagnostics utilizing biomolecular machineries "perfected" during billion years of evolution. To date, hardware-wetware interfaces that sample or modulate bioelectric potentials, such as neuroprostheses or implantable energy harvesters, are mostly based on microelectrodes brought into the closest possible contact with the targeted cells. Recently, the possibility of using electrochemical gradients of the inner ear for technical applications was demonstrated using implanted electrodes, where 1.12 nW of electrical power was harvested from the guinea pig endocochlear potential for up to 5 h (Mercier, P.; Lysaght, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chandrakasan, A.; Stankovic, K. Nat. Biotech. 2012, 30, 1240-1243). More recent approaches employ nanowires (NWs) able to penetrate the cellular membrane and to record extra- and intracellular electrical signals, in some cases with subcellular resolution (Spira, M.; Hai, A. Nat. Nano. 2013, 8, 83-94). Such techniques include nanoelectric scaffolds containing free-standing silicon NWs (Robinson, J. T.; Jorgolli, M.; Shalek, A. K.; Yoon, M. H.; Gertner, R. S.; Park, H. Nat Nanotechnol. 2012, 10, 180-184) or NW field-effect transistors (Qing, Q.; Jiang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gao, R.; Mai, L.; Lieber, C. Nat. Nano. 2013, 9, 142-147), vertically aligned gallium phosphide NWs (Hällström, W.; Mårtensson, T.; Prinz, C.; Gustavsson, P.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.; Kanje, M. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 2960-2965) or individually contacted, electrically active carbon nanofibers. The latter of these approaches is capable of recording electrical responses from oxidative events

  19. Functional fusion of living systems with synthetic electrode interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Staufer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The functional fusion of “living” biomaterial (such as cells with synthetic systems has developed into a principal ambition for various scientific disciplines. In particular, emerging fields such as bionics and nanomedicine integrate advanced nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells and organisms in order to develop novel strategies for applications, including energy production or real-time diagnostics utilizing biomolecular machineries “perfected” during billion years of evolution. To date, hardware–wetware interfaces that sample or modulate bioelectric potentials, such as neuroprostheses or implantable energy harvesters, are mostly based on microelectrodes brought into the closest possible contact with the targeted cells. Recently, the possibility of using electrochemical gradients of the inner ear for technical applications was demonstrated using implanted electrodes, where 1.12 nW of electrical power was harvested from the guinea pig endocochlear potential for up to 5 h (Mercier, P.; Lysaght, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chandrakasan, A.; Stankovic, K. Nat. Biotech. 2012, 30, 1240–1243. More recent approaches employ nanowires (NWs able to penetrate the cellular membrane and to record extra- and intracellular electrical signals, in some cases with subcellular resolution (Spira, M.; Hai, A. Nat. Nano. 2013, 8, 83–94. Such techniques include nanoelectric scaffolds containing free-standing silicon NWs (Robinson, J. T.; Jorgolli, M.; Shalek, A. K.; Yoon, M. H.; Gertner, R. S.; Park, H. Nat Nanotechnol. 2012, 10, 180–184 or NW field-effect transistors (Qing, Q.; Jiang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gao, R.; Mai, L.; Lieber, C. Nat. Nano. 2013, 9, 142–147, vertically aligned gallium phosphide NWs (Hällström, W.; Mårtensson, T.; Prinz, C.; Gustavsson, P.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.; Kanje, M. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 2960–2965 or individually contacted, electrically active carbon nanofibers. The latter of these approaches is capable of recording

  20. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage.

  1. Human-system interfaces for space cognitive awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, J.

    Space situational awareness is a human activity. We have advanced sensors and automation capabilities but these continue to be tools for humans to use. The reality is, however, that humans cannot take full advantage of the power of these tools due to time constraints, cognitive limitations, poor tool integration, poor human-system interfaces, and other reasons. Some excellent tools may never be used in operations and, even if they were, they may not be well suited to provide a cohesive and comprehensive picture. Recognizing this, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is applying cognitive science principles to increase the knowledge derived from existing tools and creating new capabilities to help space analysts and decision makers. At the center of this research is Sensemaking Support Environment technology. The concept is to create cognitive-friendly computer environments that connect critical and creative thinking for holistic decision making. AFRL is also investigating new visualization technologies for multi-sensor exploitation and space weather, human-to-human collaboration technologies, and other technology that will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Principle of human system interface (HSI) design for new reactor console of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Mohd Idris Taib; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: This paper will describe the principle of human system interface design for new reactor console in control room at TRIGA reactor facility. In order to support these human system interface challenges in digital reactor console. Software-based instrumentation and control (I and C) system for new reactor console could lead to new human machine integration. The proposed of Human System Interface (HSI) which included the large display panels which shows reactor status, compact and computer-based workstations for monitoring, control and protection function. The proposed Human System Interface (HIS) has been evaluated using various human factor engineering. It can be concluded that the Human System Interface (HIS) is designed as to address the safety related computer controlled system. (author)

  3. System and Method for Providing a Climate Data Analytic Services Application Programming Interface Distribution Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John L. (Inventor); Duffy, Daniel Q. (Inventor); Tamkin, Glenn S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system, method and computer-readable storage devices for providing a climate data analytic services application programming interface distribution package. The example system can provide various components. The system provides a climate data analytic services application programming interface library that enables software applications running on a client device to invoke the capabilities of a climate data analytic service. The system provides a command-line interface that provides a means of interacting with a climate data analytic service by issuing commands directly to the system's server interface. The system provides sample programs that call on the capabilities of the application programming interface library and can be used as templates for the construction of new client applications. The system can also provide test utilities, build utilities, service integration utilities, and documentation.

  4. Modal Transition Systems as the Basis for Interface Theories and Product Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyman, Ulrik

    of these present and discuss four different forms of consistency. Algorithms for synthesizing implementations from a given consistency relation is described for all four consistencies. The final paper proves PSPACE-hardness for common implementation and thorough refinement for mixed and modal transition systems...... Systems, Modal Specifications, Mixed Specifications, Interfaces, Interface Theory, Interface Automata, I/O automata, Modal I/O Automata, Behavioral Inequalities, Consistency, Common Implementation, Thorough Refinement, Operational Characterization, Synthesizing Implementations, Relativized Simulation...

  5. Development of an X Window based operator's interface for a core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, J.; Huszar, J.; Laz, J.

    1992-09-01

    The components, functioning and programming concepts of the man-machine interface applied in an upgraded version of the core monitoring system and reactor information system VERONA for WWER-440 type nuclear power reactors, installed at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, are described. The application of the X Window standard Graphical User Interface facilitated modular interface design and made program development easier and faster. (author) 3 refs.; 13 figs

  6. VisTool: A user interface and visualization development system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shangjin

    Although software usability has long been emphasized, there is a lot of software with poor usability. In Usability Engineering, usability professionals prescribe a classical usability approach to improving software usability. It is essential to prototype and usability test user interfaces before....... However, it is more difficult to follow the classical usability approach for graphical presentation development. These difficulties result from the fact that designers cannot implement user interface with interactions and real data. We developed VisTool – a user interface and visualization development...... interface objects and properties. We built visualizations such as Lifelines, Parallel Coordinates, Heatmap, etc. to show that the formula-based approach is powerful enough for building customized visualizations. The evaluation with Cognitive Dimensions shows that the formula-based approach is cognitively...

  7. Design Concept of Human Interface System for Risk Monitoring for Proactive Trouble Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidekazu, Yoshikawa; Ming, Yang; Zhijian, Zhang

    2011-01-01

    interface systems to support the collaboration work between workers at local workplace and the main control room. In this paper, the general issues are reviewed on how to configure the whole human interface system for helping proactive trouble prevention and risk evaluation on the basis of the presented......A new concept is first proposed of distributed human interface system to integrate both operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. Then, a method of constructing human interface system is introduced by integrating the plant knowledge database system based on Multilevel Flow Model (MFM......) with the risk monitor to watch Defense-in Depth plant safety functions. The proposed concept is applied for a liquid metal fast reactor Monju and necessary R&D subjects are reviewed to realize human interface system for the maintenance work in Monju plant. Because of using high temperature liquid sodium...

  8. The high level programmer and user interface of the NSLS control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.; Smith, J.D.; Sathe, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the major components of the high level software in the NSLS upgraded control system. Both programmer and user interfaces are discussed. The use of the high-speed work stations, fast network communications, UNIX system, X-window and Motif have greatly changed and improved these interfaces

  9. Extending the POSIX I/O interface: a parallel file system perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilayannur, M.; Lang, S.; Ross, R.; Klundt, R.; Ward, L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; VMWare, Inc.; SNL

    2008-12-11

    The POSIX interface does not lend itself well to enabling good performance for high-end applications. Extensions are needed in the POSIX I/O interface so that high-concurrency HPC applications running on top of parallel file systems perform well. This paper presents the rationale, design, and evaluation of a reference implementation of a subset of the POSIX I/O interfaces on a widely used parallel file system (PVFS) on clusters. Experimental results on a set of micro-benchmarks confirm that the extensions to the POSIX interface greatly improve scalability and performance.

  10. Ecological Design of Cooperative Human-Machine Interfaces for Safety of Intelligent Transport Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research results in the domain of cooperative intelligent transport systems. The requirements for human-machine interface considering safety issue of for intelligent transport systems (ITSare analyzed. Profiling of the requirements to cooperative human-machine interface (CHMI for such systems including requirements to usability and safety is based on a set of standards for ITSs. An approach and design technique of cooperative human-machine interface for ITSs are suggested. The architecture of cloud-based CHMI for intelligent transport systems has been developed. The prototype of software system CHMI4ITSis described.

  11. Interfacing a processor core in FPGA to an audio system

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos, José Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    The thesis project consists on developing an interface for a Nios II processor integrated in a board of Altera (UP3- 2C35F672C6 Cyclone II). The main goal is show how the Nios II processor can interact with the other components of the board.The Quartus II software has been used to create to vhdl code of the interfaces, compile it and download it into the board. The Nios II IDE tool is used to build the C/C++ files and download them into the processor. It has been prepared an application for t...

  12. A HIGH-LEVEL PYTHON INTERFACE TO THE FERMILAB ACNET CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [Fermilab; Halavanau, A. [Fermilab

    2016-10-19

    This paper discusses the implementation of a python- based high-level interface to the Fermilab acnet control system. The interface has been successfully employed during the commissioning of the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility. Specifically, we present examples of applications at FAST which include the interfacing of the elegant program to assist lattice matching, an automated emittance measurement via the quadrupole-scan method and tranverse transport matrix measurement of a superconducting RF cavity.

  13. Human Machine Interface and Usability Issues: Exploring a Preliminary Mission Management System Evaluation Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kardos, Monique

    2001-01-01

    ...) concept demonstrator test during June 2000. The questionnaire was designed to examine usability and interface issues relating to the design of the systems or tools, and to provide suggestions for future iterations of the system...

  14. User interface for a partially incompatible system software environment with non-ADP users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loffman, R.S.

    1987-08-01

    Good user interfaces to computer systems and software applications are the result of combining an analysis of user needs with knowledge of interface design principles and techniques. This thesis reports on an interface for an environment: (a) that consists of users who are not computer science or data processing professionals; and (b) which is bound by predetermined software and hardware. The interface was designed which combined these considerations with user interface design principles. Current literature was investigated to establish a baseline of knowledge about user interface design. There are many techniques which can be used to implement a user interface, but all should have the same basic goal, which is to assist the user in the performance of a task. This can be accomplished by providing the user with consistent, well-structured interfaces which also provide flexibility to adapt to differences among users. The interface produced used menu selection and command language techniques to make two different operating system environments appear similar. Additional included features helped to address the needs of different users. The original goal was also to make the transition between the two systems transparent. This was not fully accomplished due to software and hardware limitations.

  15. The web-based user interface for EAST plasma control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.R.; Xiao, B.J.; Yuan, Q.P.; Yang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Johnson, R.D.; Penaflor, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma control system (PCS) plays a vital role at EAST for fusion science experiments. Its software application consists of two main parts: an IDL graphical user interface for setting a large number of plasma parameters to specify each discharge, several programs for performing the real-time feedback control and managing the whole control system. The PCS user interface can be used from any X11 Windows client with privileged access to the PCS computer system. However, remote access to the PCS system via the IDL user interface becomes an extreme inconvenience due to the high network latency to draw or operate the interfaces. In order to realize lower latency for remote access to the PCS system, a web-based system has been developed for EAST recently. The setup data are retrieved from the PCS system and client-side JavaScript draws the interfaces into the user's browser. The user settings are also sent back to the PCS system for controlling discharges. These technologies allow the web-based user interface to be viewed by authorized users with a web browser and have it communicate with PCS server processes directly. It works together with the IDL interface and provides a new way to aid remote participation

  16. Short report on the evaluation of a graphical user interface for radiation therapy planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Since their introduction graphical user interfaces for computing applications have generally appealed more to users than command-line or menu interfaces. Benefits from using a graphical interface include ease-of-use, ease-of-under-standing and increased productivity. For a radiation therapy planning application, an additional potential benefit is that the user regards the planning activity as a closer simulation of the real world situation. A prototype radiation therapy planning system incorporating a graphical user interface was developed on an Apple Macintosh microcomputer. Its graphic interface was then evaluated by twenty-six participants. The results showed markedly that the features associated with a graphic user interface were preferred. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Human-centered design of the human-system interfaces of medical equipment: thyroid uptake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Jonathan K.R.; Farias, Marcos S.; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti; Monteiro, Beany G.

    2013-01-01

    Technology plays an important role in modern medical centers, making healthcare increasingly complex, relying on complex technical equipment. This technical complexity is particularly noticeable in the nuclear medicine. Poorly design human-system interfaces can increase the risks for human error. The human-centered approach emphasizes the development of the equipment with a deep understanding of the users activities, current work practices, needs and abilities of the users. An important concept of human-centered design is that the ease-of-use of the equipment can be ensured only if users are actively incorporated in all phases of the life cycle of design process. Representative groups of users are exposed to the equipment at various stages in development, in a variety of testing, evaluation and interviewing situations. The users feedback obtained is then used to refine the design, with the result serving as input to the next interaction of design process. The limits of the approach are that the users cannot address any particular future needs without prior experience or knowledge about the equipment operation. The aim of this paper is to present a methodological framework that contributes to the design of the human-system interfaces, through an approach related to the users and their activities. A case study is described in which the methodological framework is being applied in development of new human-system interfaces of the thyroid uptake system. (author)

  18. Developing a Prototype ALHAT Human System Interface for Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Robert L.; Chua, Zarrin K.; Heino, Todd A.; Strahan, Al; Major, Laura; Duda, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project is to safely execute a precision landing anytime/anywhere on the moon. This means the system must operate in any lighting conditions, operate in the presence of any thruster generated regolith clouds, and operate without the help of redeployed navigational aids or prepared landing site at the landing site. In order to reach this ambitious goal, computer aided technologies such as ALHAT will be needed in order to permit these landings to be done safely. Although there will be advanced autonomous capabilities onboard future landers, humans will still be involved (either onboard as astronauts or remotely from mission control) in any mission to the moon or other planetary body. Because many time critical decisions must be made quickly and effectively during the landing sequence, the Descent and Landing displays need to be designed to be as effective as possible at presenting the pertinent information to the operator, and allow the operators decisions to be implemented as quickly as possible. The ALHAT project has established the Human System Interface (HSI) team to lead in the development of these displays and to study the best way to provide operators enhanced situational awareness during landing activities. These displays are prototypes that were developed based on multiple design and feedback sessions with the astronaut office at NASA/ Johnson Space Center. By working with the astronauts in a series of plan/build/evaluate cycles, the HSI team has obtained astronaut feedback from the very beginning of the design process. In addition to developing prototype displays, the HSI team has also worked to provide realistic lunar terrain (and shading) to simulate a "out the window" view that can be adjusted to various lighting conditions (based on a desired date/time) to allow the same terrain to be viewed under varying lighting terrain. This capability will be critical to determining the

  19. A simple low cost speed log interface for oceanographic data acquisition system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khedekar, V.D.; Phadte, G.M.

    A speed log interface is designed with parallel Binary Coded Decimal output. This design was mainly required for the oceanographic data acquisition system as an interface between the speed log and the computer. However, this can also be used as a...

  20. A Python Interface for the Dakota Iterative Systems Analysis Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, M.; Hutton, E.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty quantification is required to improve the accuracy, reliability, and accountability of Earth science models. Dakota is a software toolkit, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, that provides an interface between models and a library of analysis methods, including support for sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, optimization, and calibration techniques. Dakota is a powerful tool, but its learning curve is steep: the user not only must understand the structure and syntax of the Dakota input file, but also must develop intermediate code, called an analysis driver, that allows Dakota to run a model. The CSDMS Dakota interface (CDI) is a Python package that wraps and extends Dakota's user interface. It simplifies the process of configuring and running a Dakota experiment. A user can program to the CDI, allowing a Dakota experiment to be scripted. The CDI creates Dakota input files and provides a generic analysis driver. Any model written in Python that exposes a Basic Model Interface (BMI), as well as any model componentized in the CSDMS modeling framework, automatically works with the CDI. The CDI has a plugin architecture, so models written in other languages, or those that don't expose a BMI, can be accessed by the CDI by programmatically extending a template; an example is provided in the CDI distribution. Currently, six Dakota analysis methods have been implemented for examples from the much larger Dakota library. To demonstrate the CDI, we performed an uncertainty quantification experiment with the HydroTrend hydrological water balance and transport model. In the experiment, we evaluated the response of long-term suspended sediment load at the river mouth (Qs) to uncertainty in two input parameters, annual mean temperature (T) and precipitation (P), over a series of 100-year runs, using the polynomial chaos method. Through Dakota, we calculated moments, local and global (Sobol') sensitivity indices, and probability density and

  1. The design of graphical interface software package in safeguards NDA (non-destructive nuclear analysis) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Yajun

    1993-01-01

    The general method of graphical interface is analysed, the design technique of some subroutines (text characters, multiple layer pull-down menu, multiple windows, etc.) is put forward. By giving a actual package used in safeguards NDA (non-destructive nuclear analysis) system, it shows that the software system is better than the current international packages in friendly interface, spectrum dynamical display and plotting. The algorithms of software design are suitable for not only general nuclear spectrum acquisition and analysis system, but also general microcomputer graphical interface design

  2. A meta-analysis of human-system interfaces in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) swarm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocraffer, Amy; Nam, Chang S

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the current state of research on human-system interfaces for users controlling semi-autonomous swarms composed of groups of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAV swarms pose several human factors challenges, such as high cognitive demands, non-intuitive behavior, and serious consequences for errors. This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 27 UAV swarm management papers focused on the human-system interface and human factors concerns, providing an overview of the advantages, challenges, and limitations of current UAV management interfaces, as well as information on how these interfaces are currently evaluated. In general allowing user and mission-specific customization to user interfaces and raising the swarm's level of autonomy to reduce operator cognitive workload are beneficial and improve situation awareness (SA). It is clear more research is needed in this rapidly evolving field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. System Interface for an Integrated Intelligent Safety System (ISS for Vehicle Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahammad A. Hannan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the interface-relevant activity of a vehicle integrated intelligent safety system (ISS that includes an airbag deployment decision system (ADDS and a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS. A program is developed in LabWindows/CVI, using C for prototype implementation. The prototype is primarily concerned with the interconnection between hardware objects such as a load cell, web camera, accelerometer, TPM tire module and receiver module, DAQ card, CPU card and a touch screen. Several safety subsystems, including image processing, weight sensing and crash detection systems, are integrated, and their outputs are combined to yield intelligent decisions regarding airbag deployment. The integrated safety system also monitors tire pressure and temperature. Testing and experimentation with this ISS suggests that the system is unique, robust, intelligent, and appropriate for in-vehicle applications.

  4. System interface for an integrated intelligent safety system (ISS) for vehicle applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussain, Aini; Samad, Salina A

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the interface-relevant activity of a vehicle integrated intelligent safety system (ISS) that includes an airbag deployment decision system (ADDS) and a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS). A program is developed in LabWindows/CVI, using C for prototype implementation. The prototype is primarily concerned with the interconnection between hardware objects such as a load cell, web camera, accelerometer, TPM tire module and receiver module, DAQ card, CPU card and a touch screen. Several safety subsystems, including image processing, weight sensing and crash detection systems, are integrated, and their outputs are combined to yield intelligent decisions regarding airbag deployment. The integrated safety system also monitors tire pressure and temperature. Testing and experimentation with this ISS suggests that the system is unique, robust, intelligent, and appropriate for in-vehicle applications.

  5. The Johnson Space Center Management Information Systems (JSCMIS): An interface for organizational databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Erickson, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The Management Information and Decision Support Environment (MIDSE) is a research activity to build and test a prototype of a generic human interface on the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Information Network (CIN). The existing interfaces were developed specifically to support operations rather than the type of data which management could use. The diversity of the many interfaces and their relative difficulty discouraged occasional users from attempting to use them for their purposes. The MIDSE activity approached this problem by designing and building an interface to one JSC data base - the personnel statistics tables of the NASA Personnel and Payroll System (NPPS). The interface was designed against the following requirements: generic (use with any relational NOMAD data base); easy to learn (intuitive operations for new users); easy to use (efficient operations for experienced users); self-documenting (help facility which informs users about the data base structure as well as the operation of the interface); and low maintenance (easy configuration to new applications). A prototype interface entitled the JSC Management Information Systems (JSCMIS) was produced. It resides on CIN/PROFS and is available to JSC management who request it. The interface has passed management review and is ready for early use. Three kinds of data are now available: personnel statistics, personnel register, and plan/actual cost.

  6. Skin-interfaced systems for sweat collection and analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jungil; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Baker, Lindsay B; Rogers, John A

    2018-02-01

    Recent interdisciplinary advances in materials, mechanics, and microsystem designs for biocompatible electronics, soft microfluidics, and electrochemical biosensors establish the foundations for emerging classes of thin, skin-interfaced platforms capable of capturing, storing, and performing quantitative, spatiotemporal measurements of sweat chemistry, instantaneous local sweat rate, and total sweat loss. This review summarizes scientific and technical progress in this area and highlights the implications in real time and ambulatory modes of deployment during physical activities across a broad range of contexts in clinical health, physiology research, fitness/wellness, and athletic performance.

  7. A Formal Approach to User Interface Design using Hybrid System Theory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optimal Synthesis Inc.(OSI) proposes to develop an aiding tool for user interface design that is based on mathematical formalism of hybrid system theory. The...

  8. The Los Alamos accelerator control system data base: A generic instrumentation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalesio, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Controlling experimental-physics applications requires a control system that can be quickly integrated and easily modified. One aspect of the control system is the interface to the instrumentation. An instrumentation set has been chosen to implement the basic functions needed to monitor and control these applications. A data-driven interface to this instrumentation set provides the required quick integration of the control system. This type of interface is limited by its built-in capabilities. Therefore, these capabilities must provide an adequate range of functions to be of any use. The data-driven interface must support the instrumentation range requird, the events on which to read or control the instrumentation and a method for manipulating the data to calculate terms or close control loops. The database for the Los Alamos Accelerator Control System addresses these requirements. (orig.)

  9. Advanced User Interface Design and Advanced Internetting for Tactical Security Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murray, S

    1998-01-01

    ...), at the request of the U.S. Army Product Manager - Physical Security Equipment, initiated two exploratory development projects at SPAWAR Systems Center, San Diego, to develop an Advanced User Interface for Tactical Security (AITS...

  10. A Formal Approach to User Interface Design using Hybrid System Theory, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optimal Synthesis Inc.(OSI) proposes to develop an aiding tool for user interface design that is based on mathematical formalism of hybrid system theory. The...

  11. Standardisation of command and control systems and simulator interfaces, and the definition of scenarios

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of numerous command and control (C2) systems and simulators necessitate the standardisation of interfaces and the definition of scenarios to facilitate their efficient co-existence. This paper comments on the activities...

  12. User interface design of software tool system as a technology transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, I.

    1982-01-01

    Design considerations of an on going research project for developing an effective and easy to use tool system that supports entire maintenance phases are introduced. The primary focus is the design of an intelligent user interface mechanism. By analyzing why existing tools and tool systems are not used very effectively, we can define user requirements for the user interface mechanisms, specify design criteria of user interface functions, and introduce some features of the implementation. Because this project is still in process, intermediate evaluation and expected effectiveness are discussed.

  13. Solidification interface shape control in a continuous Czochralski silicon growth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenlei; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Tihu; Zheng, Lili

    2006-01-01

    In a continuous Czochralski (CCZ) growth system with a shallow and replenished melt proposed earlier, large-diameter crystals may be grown at a high pull rate and reduced melt convection. The proposed system consists of two heaters. In this paper, the relationship between the solidification interface and the power levels is established. An interface control algorithm is developed to achieve the desired interface shape by adjusting the power level of the bottom heater. The control algorithm is incorporated into an existing process model, and the efficiency of the control algorithm is tested.

  14. Efficient Data Transfer Rate and Speed of Secured Ethernet Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanti, Shaila

    2016-01-01

    Embedded systems are extensively used in home automation systems, small office systems, vehicle communication systems, and health service systems. The services provided by these systems are available on the Internet and these services need to be protected. Security features like IP filtering, UDP protection, or TCP protection need to be implemented depending on the specific application used by the device. Every device on the Internet must have network interface. This paper proposes the design of the embedded Secured Ethernet Interface System to protect the service available on the Internet against the SYN flood attack. In this experimental study, Secured Ethernet Interface System is customized to protect the web service against the SYN flood attack. Secured Ethernet Interface System is implemented on ALTERA Stratix IV FPGA as a system on chip and uses the modified SYN flood attack protection method. The experimental results using Secured Ethernet Interface System indicate increase in number of genuine clients getting service from the server, considerable improvement in the data transfer rate, and better response time during the SYN flood attack. PMID:28116350

  15. Efficient Data Transfer Rate and Speed of Secured Ethernet Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanti, Shaila; Naik, G M

    2016-01-01

    Embedded systems are extensively used in home automation systems, small office systems, vehicle communication systems, and health service systems. The services provided by these systems are available on the Internet and these services need to be protected. Security features like IP filtering, UDP protection, or TCP protection need to be implemented depending on the specific application used by the device. Every device on the Internet must have network interface. This paper proposes the design of the embedded Secured Ethernet Interface System to protect the service available on the Internet against the SYN flood attack. In this experimental study, Secured Ethernet Interface System is customized to protect the web service against the SYN flood attack. Secured Ethernet Interface System is implemented on ALTERA Stratix IV FPGA as a system on chip and uses the modified SYN flood attack protection method. The experimental results using Secured Ethernet Interface System indicate increase in number of genuine clients getting service from the server, considerable improvement in the data transfer rate, and better response time during the SYN flood attack.

  16. Distributorless ignition system interface for engine diagnostic testers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedline, J.G.; Rich, L.G.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes an interface for use with a test engine analyzer to analyze a computer controlled automotive engine having an electronic control module which develops timing signals to a coil ignition module which fires the spark plugs of the engine, the timing signals carrying dwell information. The interface comprises: input means for receiving timing signals from the electronic control module; output means for transmitting timing signals to the coil ignition module; cylinder clock modification circuitry for receiving the timing signals from the input means and for passing timing signals to the output means. The cylinder clock modification circuitry generates a modified timing signal in response to an inhibit command signal for transmission to the coil ignition module. The modified timing signal carries dwell information of a dwell period insufficient to fire a spark plug; and power balance command circuitry for receiving a cylinder inhibit command from the engine analyzer and responsively generating the inhibit command signal, whereby a cylinder of the engine is inhibited from firing.

  17. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  18. Toward multidisciplinary use of LANDSAT: Interfacing computerized LANDSAT analysis systems with geographic information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The LANDSAT-geographic information system (GIS) interface must summarize the results of the LANDSAT classification over the same cells that serve as geographic referencing units for the GIS, and output these summaries on a cell-by-cell basis in a form that is readable by the input routines of the GIS. The ZONAL interface for cell-oriented systems consists of two primary programs. The PIXCEL program scans the grid of cells and outputs a channel of pixels. Each pixel contains not the reflectance values but the identifier of the cell in which the center of the pixel is located. This file of pixelized cells along with the results of a pixel-by-pixel classification of the scene produced by the LANDSAT analysis system are input to the CELSUM program which then outputs a cell-by-cell summary formatted according to the requirements of the host GIS. Cross-correlation of the LANDSAT layer with the other layers in the data base is accomplished with the analysis and display facilities of the GIS.

  19. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Nomiya, Diogo V.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  20. Transmission/reflection behaviors of surface plasmons at an interface between two plasmonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Fuxin; Sun, Shulin; Ma, Shaojie; Fang, Zhening; Zhu, Baocheng; Li, Xin; He, Qiong; Xiao, Shiyi; Zhou, Lei

    2018-03-01

    Although surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) have been intensively studied in past years, the transmission/reflection properties of SPPs at an interface between two plasmonic media are still not fully understood. In this article, we employ a mode expansion method (MEM) to systematically study such a problem based on a model system jointing two superlattices, each consisting of a periodic stacking of dielectric and plasmonic slabs with different material properties. Such a generic model can represent two widely used plasmonic structures (i.e. interfaces between two single dielectric/metal systems or between two metal–insulator–metal waveguides) under certain conditions. Our MEM calculations, in excellent agreement with full-wave simulations, uncover the rich physics behind the SPP reflections at generic plasmonic interfaces. In particular, we successfully derive from the MEM several analytical formulas that can quantitatively describe the SPP reflections at different plasmonic interfaces, and show that our formulas exhibit wider applicable regions than previously proposed empirical ones.

  1. A Digital Interface for the Part Designers and the Fixture Designers for a Reconfigurable Assembly System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwa V. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a web-based framework for interfacing product designers and fixture designers to fetch the benefits of early supplier involvement (ESI to a reconfigurable assembly system (RAS. The interfacing of the two members requires four steps, namely, collaboration chain, fixture supplier selection, knowledge share, and accommodation of service facilities so as to produce multiple products on a single assembly line. The interfacing not only provokes concurrency in the activities of product and fixture designer but also enables the assembly systems to tackle the spatial and generational variety. Among the four stages of interfacing, two steps are characterized by optimization issues, one from the product customer side and the other from the fixture designer side. To impart promptness in the optimization and hence the interaction, computationally economic tools are also presented in the paper for both of the supplier selection and fixture design optimization.

  2. Interfaces between transport and geological disposal systems for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document is an IAEA publication which identifies and discusses the interfaces and the interface requirements between high level waste, the waste transport system used for carriage of the waste to the disposal facility, and the high level waste disposal facility. The development of this document was prompted in part by the initiatives in various Member States to select, characterize and design the facilities for potential high level waste geological repositories. These initiatives have progressed to the point where an international document would be useful in calling attention to the need for establishing, in a systematic way, interfaces and interface requirements between the transport systems to be used and the waste disposal packages and geological repository. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mag@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nomiya, Diogo V., E-mail: diogonomiya@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  4. Sensory System for Implementing a Human—Computer Interface Based on Electrooculography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ortega

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a sensory system for implementing a human–computer interface based on electrooculography. An acquisition system captures electrooculograms and transmits them via the ZigBee protocol. The data acquired are analysed in real time using a microcontroller-based platform running the Linux operating system. The continuous wavelet transform and neural network are used to process and analyse the signals to obtain highly reliable results in real time. To enhance system usability, the graphical interface is projected onto special eyewear, which is also used to position the signal-capturing electrodes.

  5. Sensory system for implementing a human-computer interface based on electrooculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barea, Rafael; Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Ortega, Sergio; López, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a sensory system for implementing a human-computer interface based on electrooculography. An acquisition system captures electrooculograms and transmits them via the ZigBee protocol. The data acquired are analysed in real time using a microcontroller-based platform running the Linux operating system. The continuous wavelet transform and neural network are used to process and analyse the signals to obtain highly reliable results in real time. To enhance system usability, the graphical interface is projected onto special eyewear, which is also used to position the signal-capturing electrodes.

  6. Viscosity and viscoelasticity of two-phase systems having diffuse interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium stability criterion for diffuse interfaces in a two-component solution with a miscibility gap requires that the interdiffusion flux vanish. If the system is continuously deformed, convective fluxes disrupt the equilibrium in the interface regions and induce a counter diffusive flux, which is dissipative and contributes to the apparent viscosity of the mixture. Chemical free energy is recoverably stored, causing viscoelastic phenomena. Both effects are significant.

  7. Multiple IMU system hardware interface design, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landey, M.; Brown, D.

    1975-01-01

    The design of each system component is described. Emphasis is placed on functional requirements unique in this system, including data bus communication, data bus transmitters and receivers, and ternary-to-binary torquing decision logic. Mechanization drawings are presented.

  8. Usability evaluation of user interface of thesis title review system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tri, Y.; Erna, A.; Gellysa, U.

    2018-03-01

    Presentation of programs with user interface that can be accessed online through the website of course greatly provide user benefits. User can easily access the program they need. There are usability values that serve as a benchmark for the success of a user accessible program, ie efficiency, effectiveness, and convenience. These usability values also determine the development of the program for the better use. Therefore, on the review title thesis program that will be implemented in STT Dumai was measured usability evaluation. It aims to see which sides are not yet perfect and need to be improved to improve the performance and utilization of the program. Usability evaluation was measured by using smartPLS software. Database used was the result of respondent questionnaires that include questions about the experience when they used program. The result of a review of thesis title program implemented in STT Dumai has an efficiency value of 22.615, the effectiveness of 20.612, and satisfaction of 33.177.

  9. Efficient Data Transfer Rate and Speed of Secured Ethernet Interface System

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanti, Shaila; Naik, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Embedded systems are extensively used in home automation systems, small office systems, vehicle communication systems, and health service systems. The services provided by these systems are available on the Internet and these services need to be protected. Security features like IP filtering, UDP protection, or TCP protection need to be implemented depending on the specific application used by the device. Every device on the Internet must have network interface. This paper proposes the design...

  10. Energy management system for power distribution. Interfaces and data communication requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, P.; Lemstroem, B.; Ikonen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The opening of the electricity market for competition in Finland creates new requirements for the information systems and data communication in distribution utilities. Energy management systems for distribution utilities are needed with interfaces that make it possible to separate the network business from the energy trade business. However, these interfaces should also support optimization of the whole energy supply system of the country. In this report the interfaces and data communication requirements of the energy management system of the electricity trade business are analyzed. To support this subfunctions of the energy management have been analyzed. It was realized that the amount of necessary data transfer and optimization of the national power system both depend strongly on the general rules of the energy markets. (author)

  11. Diffusion-controlled interface kinetics-inclusive system-theoretic propagation models for molecular communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inspired by biological systems, molecular communication has been proposed as a new communication paradigm that uses biochemical signals to transfer information from one nano device to another over a short distance. The biochemical nature of the information transfer process implies that for molecular communication purposes, the development of molecular channel models should take into consideration diffusion phenomenon as well as the physical/biochemical kinetic possibilities of the process. The physical and biochemical kinetics arise at the interfaces between the diffusion channel and the transmitter/receiver units. These interfaces are herein termed molecular antennas. In this paper, we present the deterministic propagation model of the molecular communication between an immobilized nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver, where the emission and reception kinetics are taken into consideration. Specifically, we derived closed-form system-theoretic models and expressions for configurations that represent different communication systems based on the type of molecular antennas used. The antennas considered are the nanopores at the transmitter and the surface receptor proteins/enzymes at the receiver. The developed models are simulated to show the influence of parameters such as the receiver radius, surface receptor protein/enzyme concentration, and various reaction rate constants. Results show that the effective receiver surface area and the rate constants are important to the system's output performance. Assuming high rate of catalysis, the analysis of the frequency behavior of the developed propagation channels in the form of transfer functions shows significant difference introduce by the inclusion of the molecular antennas into the diffusion-only model. It is also shown that for t > > 0 and with the information molecules' concentration greater than the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant of the systems, the inclusion of surface receptors proteins and enzymes in the models

  12. Effect of Er:YAG laser energy on the morphology of enamel/adhesive system interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of Er:YAG laser energy variation to cavity preparation on the morphology of enamel/adhesive system interface, using SEM. Eighteen molars were used and the buccal surfaces were flattened without dentine exposure. The specimens were randomly assigned to two groups, according to the adhesive system (conventional total-etching or self-etching), and each group was divided into three subgroups (bur carbide in turbine of high rotation, Er:YAG laser 250 mJ/4 Hz and Er:YAG laser 300 mJ/4 Hz) containing six teeth each. The enamel/adhesive system interface was serially sectioned and prepared for SEM. The Er:YAG laser, in general, produced a more irregular adhesive interface than the control group. For Er:YAG laser 250 mJ there was formation of a more regular hybrid layer with good tag formation, mainly in the total-etching system. However, Er:YAG laser 300 mJ showed a more irregular interface with amorphous enamel and fused areas, for both adhesive systems. It was concluded that cavity preparation with Er:YAG laser influenced on the morphology of enamel/adhesive system interface and the tissual alterations were more evident when the energy was increased.

  13. Pulse mode counting system with parallel port interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, M.A.; Mushtaq, N.; Sultan, M.; Karim, A.

    2010-11-01

    Pulse mode Counting System (PPCS) module has been designed and developed which is compatible with SPP (Standard Parallel Port) and EPP Enhanced Parallel Port). This system can capture, present and store real time data in a well formatted form. The stored data is in a format that can be imported in different packages for further analysis. The purpose of this system is to facilitate the research experiments having frequency range up to 4 MHz and storing range up to 16 million counts. (author)

  14. Comparing two anesthesia information management system user interfaces: a usability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Rao, Anoop V; Rothwell, Sarah H; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2012-11-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been developed by multiple vendors and are deployed in thousands of operating rooms around the world, yet not much is known about measuring and improving AIMS usability. We developed a methodology for evaluating AIMS usability in a low-fidelity simulated clinical environment and used it to compare an existing user interface with a revised version. We hypothesized that the revised user interface would be more useable. In a low-fidelity simulated clinical environment, twenty anesthesia providers documented essential anesthetic information for the start of the case using both an existing and a revised user interface. Participants had not used the revised user interface previously and completed a brief training exercise prior to the study task. All participants completed a workload assessment and a satisfaction survey. All sessions were recorded. Multiple usability metrics were measured. The primary outcome was documentation accuracy. Secondary outcomes were perceived workload, number of documentation steps, number of user interactions, and documentation time. The interfaces were compared and design problems were identified by analyzing recorded sessions and survey results. Use of the revised user interface was shown to improve documentation accuracy from 85.1% to 92.4%, a difference of 7.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] for the difference 1.8 to 12.7). The revised user interface decreased the number of user interactions by 6.5 for intravenous documentation (95% CI 2.9 to 10.1) and by 16.1 for airway documentation (95% CI 11.1 to 21.1). The revised user interface required 3.8 fewer documentation steps (95% CI 2.3 to 5.4). Airway documentation time was reduced by 30.5 seconds with the revised workflow (95% CI 8.5 to 52.4). There were no significant time differences noted in intravenous documentation or in total task time. No difference in perceived workload was found between the user interfaces. Two user interface

  15. Performance Evaluation of Speech Recognition Systems as a Next-Generation Pilot-Vehicle Interface Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2016-01-01

    During the flight trials known as Gulfstream-V Synthetic Vision Systems Integrated Technology Evaluation (GV-SITE), a Speech Recognition System (SRS) was used by the evaluation pilots. The SRS system was intended to be an intuitive interface for display control (rather than knobs, buttons, etc.). This paper describes the performance of the current "state of the art" Speech Recognition System (SRS). The commercially available technology was evaluated as an application for possible inclusion in commercial aircraft flight decks as a crew-to-vehicle interface. Specifically, the technology is to be used as an interface from aircrew to the onboard displays, controls, and flight management tasks. A flight test of a SRS as well as a laboratory test was conducted.

  16. Hybrid systems: a real-time interface to control engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Heilmann, Søren; Holdgaard, Michael

    1996-01-01

    An important application area for real time computing is embedded systems where the computing system provides intelligent control of a mechanical, chemical etc. plant or device. The software requirements for such applications depend heavily on the properties of the plant. These properties...

  17. Towards passive brain-computer interfaces: applying brain-computer interface technology to human-machine systems in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Thorsten O; Kothe, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive monitoring is an approach utilizing realtime brain signal decoding (RBSD) for gaining information on the ongoing cognitive user state. In recent decades this approach has brought valuable insight into the cognition of an interacting human. Automated RBSD can be used to set up a brain-computer interface (BCI) providing a novel input modality for technical systems solely based on brain activity. In BCIs the user usually sends voluntary and directed commands to control the connected computer system or to communicate through it. In this paper we propose an extension of this approach by fusing BCI technology with cognitive monitoring, providing valuable information about the users' intentions, situational interpretations and emotional states to the technical system. We call this approach passive BCI. In the following we give an overview of studies which utilize passive BCI, as well as other novel types of applications resulting from BCI technology. We especially focus on applications for healthy users, and the specific requirements and demands of this user group. Since the presented approach of combining cognitive monitoring with BCI technology is very similar to the concept of BCIs itself we propose a unifying categorization of BCI-based applications, including the novel approach of passive BCI.

  18. USER EVALUATION OF THE INTERFACES FOR THE REMOTE CONTROL OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Spasojević Brkić

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a contribution to the new direction for enhancement in remote controlling functionality in manufacturing systems and presents a methodology for evaluating user interfaces for the remote control of a Ubiquitous Manufacturing System. Survey is based on the experiment that involved 68 subjects, students at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, the University of Belgrade, Serbia, as future users of the interface for the remote collaborative control of manufacturing systems. The results show that the user evaluation instrument consists of usability and collaboration as correlated measures.

  19. Actuator digital interface unit (AIU). [control units for space shuttle data system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Alternate versions of the actuator interface unit are presented. One alternate is a dual-failure immune configuration which feeds a look-and-switch dual-failure immune hydraulic system. The other alternate is a single-failure immune configuration which feeds a majority voting hydraulic system. Both systems communicate with the data bus through data terminals dedicated to each user subsystem. Both operational control data and configuration control information are processed in and out of the subsystem via the data terminal which yields the actuator interface subsystem, self-managing within its failure immunity capability.

  20. Information visualization to user-friendly interface construction for information retrieval systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Monique de Lira Vieira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The information presented through visualization help the Information Retrieval System (IRS to reach its main goal: to retrieve relevant information that meets the informational needs of its users. The objective of this article is to describe and analyze techniques proposed by the Information Visualization area and interface models discussed in Information Science Literature, which applied to graphical interface construction would facilitate the appropriation of information by the users of IRS and would help them to search, browse and retrieve information. The methodology consists of a literature review focusing on the potential contribution of the visual representation of information in the development of user-friendly interfaces to IRS, as well as identification and analyses of visualizations used as interfaces by IRS. The use of visualizations is of great importance in the communication between SRI and users, because the information presented through visual representation are better understood by user and allow the discovery of new knowledge.

  1. Coping with human errors through system design: Implications for ecological interface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Vicente, Kim J.

    1989-01-01

    of the adaptive mechanisms involved in learning. In terms of design implications, these findings suggest that reliable human-system interaction will be achieved by designing interfaces which tend to minimize the potential for control interference and support recovery from errors. In other words, the focus should......Research during recent years has revealed that human errors are not stochastic events which can be removed through improved training programs or optimal interface design. Rather, errors tend to reflect either systematic interference between various models, rules, and schemata, or the effects...... be on control of the effects of errors rather than on the elimination of errors per se. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework for interface design that attempts to satisfy these objectives. The goal of our framework, called ecological interface design, is to develop a meaningful representation...

  2. Dynamic Brain-Machine Interface: a novel paradigm for bidirectional interaction between brains and dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Francois D; Semprini, Marianna; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Fadiga, Luciano; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) are systems which mediate communication between brains and artificial devices. Their long term goal is to restore motor functions, and this ultimately demands the development of a new generation of bidirectional brain-machine interfaces establishing a two-way brain-world communication channel, by both decoding motor commands from neural activity and providing feedback to the brain by electrical stimulation. Taking inspiration from how the spinal cord of vertebrates mediates communication between the brain and the limbs, here we present a model of a bidirectional brain-machine interface that interacts with a dynamical system by generating a control policy in the form of a force field. In our model, bidirectional communication takes place via two elements: (a) a motor interface decoding activities recorded from a motor cortical area, and (b) a sensory interface encoding the state of the controlled device into electrical stimuli delivered to a somatosensory area. We propose a specific mathematical model of the sensory and motor interfaces guiding a point mass moving in a viscous medium, and we demonstrate its performance by testing it on realistically simulated neural responses.

  3. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  4. Framework for man-machine interface design evaluation system considering cognitive factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Toru; Sasaki, Kazunori; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Furuta, Tomihiko.

    1994-01-01

    It is necessary to improve human reliability in order to gain a higher reliability of the total plant system taking an account of development of plant automation and improvement of machine reliability. Therefore, the role of the man-machine system will come to be important. Accordingly, the evaluation of the man-machine system design information is desired in order to solve the mismatch problem between plant information presented by the man-machine system and information required by the operator comprehensively. This paper discusses required functions and software framework for the man-machine interface design evaluation system. The man-machine interface design evaluation system has features to extract the potential matters which are inherent on the design information of man-machine system by simulating the operator behavior, the plant system and the man-machine system, considering the operator's cognitive performance and time dependency. (author)

  5. Managing the pharmaceutical industry-health system interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarowitz, B J; Muma, B; Coggan, P; Davis, G; Barkley, G L

    2001-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising, media, and Internet marketing to physicians and patients, as well as enticing marketing strategies, are used by the pharmaceutical industry to ensure market share growth of new drugs. Our health system adopted a strict vendor policy governing detailing and sampling activities of pharmaceutical representatives, but realized that further analysis of vendor influence in our system was needed. An assessment of tangible benefits, ethical concerns, and financial liabilities and gains was conducted to reassess the need for further vendor restriction. Based on our findings, several recommendations have been made. Medical practices and health systems are encouraged to establish and enforce explicit vendor policies, measure their effectiveness, partner proactively with representatives to deliver a drug-detailing message consistent with system initiatives, monitor and regulate continuing medical education funding, and implement strategies to ensure appropriate drug use.

  6. Integrated design of intelligent surveillance systems and their user interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2005-01-01

    Modern complex surveillance systems consisting of multiple and heterogeneous sensors, automatic information registration and data analysis techniques, and decision support tools should provide the human operator an integrated, transparent and easily comprehensible view of the surveyed scene.

  7. Interfacing industrial process control systems to LEP/LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabany, M.

    1992-01-01

    Modern industrial process control systems have developed to meet the needs of industry to increase the production while decreasing the costs. Although particle accelerators designers have pioneered in control systems during the seventies, it has now become possible to them to profit of industrial solutions in substitution of, or in complement with the more traditional home made ones. Adapting and integrating such industrial systems to the accelerator control area will certainly benefit to the field in terms of finance, human resources and technical facilities offered off-the-shelf by the widely experienced industrial controls community; however this cannot be done without slightly affecting the overall accelerator control architecture. The paper briefly describes the industrial controls arena and takes example on an industrial process control system recently installed at CERN to discuss in detail the related choices and issues. (author)

  8. Interfaces for Modular Surgical Planning and Assistance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gessat, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modern surgery of the 21st century relies in many aspects on computers or, in a wider sense, digital data processing. Department administration, OR scheduling, billing, and - with increasing pervasion - patient data management are performed with the aid of so called Surgical Information Systems (SIS) or, more general, Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS) summarizes techniques which assist a surgeon in the preparation and conduction of surgical interventions...

  9. Stability performance and interface shear strength of geocomposite drain/soil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Maidiana; Frost, Matthew; Dixon, Neil

    2018-02-01

    Landfill covers are designed as impermeable caps on top of waste containment facilities after the completion of landfill operations. Geocomposite drain (GD) materials consist of a geonet or geospacer (as a drainage core) sandwiched between non-woven geotextiles that act as separators and filters. GD provides a drainage function as part of the cover system. The stability performance of landfill cover system is largely controlled by the interface shear strength mobilized between the elements of the cover. If a GD is used, the interface shear strength properties between the upper surface of the GD and the overlying soil may govern stability of the system. It is not uncommon for fine grained materials to be used as cover soils. In these cases, understanding soil softening issues at the soil interface with the non-woven geotextile is important. Such softening can be caused by capillary break behaviour and build-up of water pressures from the toe of the drain upwards into the cover soil. The interaction processes to allow water flow into a GD core through the soil-geotextile interface is very complex. This paper reports the main behaviour of in-situ interface shear strength of soil-GD using field measurements on the trial landfill cover at Bletchley, UK. The soil softening at the interface due to soaked behaviour show a reduction in interface shear strength and this aspect should be emphasized in design specifications and construction control. The results also help to increase confidence in the understanding of the implications for design of cover systems.

  10. Interface Testing for RTOS System Tasks based on the Run-Time Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Ahyoung; Choi, Byoungju

    2006-01-01

    Safety critical embedded system requires high dependability of not only hardware but also software. It is intricate to modify embedded software once embedded. Therefore, it is necessary to have rigorous regulations to assure the quality of safety critical embedded software. IEEE V and V (Verification and Validation) process is recommended for software dependability, but a more quantitative evaluation method like software testing is necessary. In case of safety critical embedded software, it is essential to have a test that reflects unique features of the target hardware and its operating system. The safety grade PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) is a safety critical embedded system where hardware and software are tightly coupled. The PLC has HdS (Hardware dependent Software) and it is tightly coupled with RTOS (Real Time Operating System). Especially, system tasks that are tightly coupled with target hardware and RTOS kernel have large influence on the dependability of the entire PLC. Therefore, interface testing for system tasks that reflects the features of target hardware and RTOS kernel becomes the core of the PLC integration test. Here, we define interfaces as overlapped parts between two different layers on the system architecture. In this paper, we identify interfaces for system tasks and apply the identified interfaces to the safety grade PLC. Finally, we show the test results through the empirical study

  11. Intelligent Adaptive Interface: A Design Tool for Enhancing Human-Machine System Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Based on Mobile Agents. Engineering Interactive Systems. J. Gulliksen, M. B. Harning, P. Palanque, G. C. v. d. Veer and J. Wesson . Berlin, Germany...Interface Software Infrastructure. Knowledge-Based Systems 6(4): 220-229. [54] Taylor, R, M. (1997). Human Electronic Crew Team Work. In M. J. Smith , G

  12. Hierarchy and Interactions in Environmental Interfaces Regarded as Biophysical Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T.; Balaz, Igor

    The field of environmental sciences is abundant with various interfaces and is the right place for the application of new fundamental approaches leading towards a better understanding of environmental phenomena. For example, following the definition of environmental interface by Mihailovic and Balaž [23], such interface can be placed between: human or animal bodies and surrounding air, aquatic species and water and air around them, and natural or artificially built surfaces (vegetation, ice, snow, barren soil, water, urban communities) and the atmosphere. Complex environmental interface systems are open and hierarchically organised, interactions between their constituent parts are nonlinear, and the interaction with the surrounding environment is noisy. These systems are therefore very sensitive to initial conditions, deterministic external perturbations and random fluctuations always present in nature. The study of noisy non-equilibrium processes is fundamental for modelling the dynamics of environmental interface systems and for understanding the mechanisms of spatio-temporal pattern formation in contemporary environmental sciences, particularly in environmental fluid mechanics. In modelling complex biophysical systems one of the main tasks is to successfully create an operative interface with the external environment. It should provide a robust and prompt translation of the vast diversity of external physical and/or chemical changes into a set of signals, which are "understandable" for an organism. Although the establishment of organisation in any system is of crucial importance for its functioning, it should not be forgotten that in biophysical systems we deal with real-life problems where a number of other conditions should be reached in order to put the system to work. One of them is the proper supply of the system by the energy. Therefore, we will investigate an aspect of dynamics of energy flow based on the energy balance equation. The energy as well as

  13. Controlled multiphase interfaces in microfluidic systems for chemical/biological sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Daming

    Multiphase interfaces, which are scale-dependant, play an important role in microfluidics to develop a broad range of applications. There are rising demands for interface control methods, which provide more precise control over the positions and the configurations of the interfaces, consume minimum or zero power, possess simple structures, and require fewer fabrication steps. In my studies, I explored the controlled interfaces in microfluidic systems to provide competitive alternatives in the development of chemical/biological sensors and devices. In Chapter 2, selective alkanethiol treatment on gold or copper surfaces is used to create hydrophilic-hydrophobic boundaries at the boundaries between glass and these metal surfaces in microfluidic channels. Robust liquid-air interfaces, featured with different 3-D structures, are formed at these boundaries. This method has been further extended into the application of liquid crystal for aqueous phase sensing in a microfluidic channel structure, which is described in Chapter 5. In Chapter 3, an interface of liquid crystal for vapor phase sensing application is stabilized using a micropillar array structure, which provided an effective tool for utilizing liquid crystal interface for sensing. The sensing performance was improved by better design and process optimization. In Chapter 4, a sensing interface between liquid crystal and the target aqueous phase is created using the laminar flow of the liquids within a packaged microfluidic sensing device. This study provided an autonomous sensing scheme, which can be used without technical personnel evolved, and contributed to fulfilling the demand of conducting sensing application in the hostile environments inaccessible to human beings. In Chapter 6, I describe a bubble control device for microfluidic systems, which harnesses the controlled liquid-air interfaces for bubble trapping and removal. This study provided a solution for the long-existing problem of inadvertently

  14. Neuromorphic neural interfaces: from neurophysiological inspiration to biohybrid coupling with nervous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccard, Frédéric D.; Joshi, Siddharth; Wang, Jun; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Computation in nervous systems operates with different computational primitives, and on different hardware, than traditional digital computation and is thus subjected to different constraints from its digital counterpart regarding the use of physical resources such as time, space and energy. In an effort to better understand neural computation on a physical medium with similar spatiotemporal and energetic constraints, the field of neuromorphic engineering aims to design and implement electronic systems that emulate in very large-scale integration (VLSI) hardware the organization and functions of neural systems at multiple levels of biological organization, from individual neurons up to large circuits and networks. Mixed analog/digital neuromorphic VLSI systems are compact, consume little power and operate in real time independently of the size and complexity of the model. Approach. This article highlights the current efforts to interface neuromorphic systems with neural systems at multiple levels of biological organization, from the synaptic to the system level, and discusses the prospects for future biohybrid systems with neuromorphic circuits of greater complexity. Main results. Single silicon neurons have been interfaced successfully with invertebrate and vertebrate neural networks. This approach allowed the investigation of neural properties that are inaccessible with traditional techniques while providing a realistic biological context not achievable with traditional numerical modeling methods. At the network level, populations of neurons are envisioned to communicate bidirectionally with neuromorphic processors of hundreds or thousands of silicon neurons. Recent work on brain-machine interfaces suggests that this is feasible with current neuromorphic technology. Significance. Biohybrid interfaces between biological neurons and VLSI neuromorphic systems of varying complexity have started to emerge in the literature. Primarily intended as a

  15. A new workstation based man/machine interface system for the JT-60 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekawa, I.; Shimono, M.; Totsuka, T.; Yamagishi, K.

    1992-01-01

    Development of a new man/machine interface system was stimulated by the requirements of making the JT-60 operator interface more 'friendly' on the basis of the past five-year operational experience. Eleven Sun/3 workstations and their supervisory mini-computer HIDIC V90/45 are connected through the standard network; Ethernet. The network is also connected to the existing 'ZENKEI' mini-computer system through the shared memory on the HIDIC V90/45 mini-computer. Improved software, such as automatic setting of the discharge conditions, consistency check among the related parameters and easy operation for discharge result data display, offered the 'user-friendly' environments. This new man/machine interface system leads to the efficient operation of the JT-60. (author)

  16. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) upgrade graphical interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffon, J.D.; Peters, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    Technology advances in the past few years have prompted an effort at Argonne National Laboratory to replace existing equipment with high performance digital computers and color graphic displays. Improved operation of process systems can be achieved by utilizing state-of-the-art computer technology in the areas of process control and process monitoring. The Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) at EBR-II is the first system to be upgraded with high performance digital equipment. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper describes the main control computer and the operator interface control software

  17. Control and Automation Systems at the TSO/DSO interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestro, F.; Pilo, F.; Mauri, G.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing diffusion of variable not programmable energy sources, the forecasted forthcoming diffusion of distributed energy storage systems (ESS) and the active participation of demand will characterize the future Distribution Network in terms of operation and planning. Currently DNOs...... (Distribution Network Operator) have to assure a secure reliable and good power quality, without taking into consideration any real-time operation of the active components present in their systems. In order to accomplish their missions, DNOs will have to exploit the support of control and automation systems...... that manage, coordinate and regulate the behaviour of the diverse devices by adopting a true operation of the Distribution Network. Centralized control functions and local control functions will have to coordinate their operation taking into account not only “internal inputs” coming from DNO monitoring...

  18. The prokineticin system: an interface between neural inflammation and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Silvia; Sacerdote, Paola; Panerai, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Prokineticins (PK) 1 and 2 belong to a new family of chemokines capable to interact with two different G coupled receptors: Prokineticin receptor (PKR)1 and 2. Both prokineticins and their receptors are widely distributed in different tissues and regulate several biological functions. In particular, a role of the PK system in inflammation and nociception has been established. PKRs are expressed in regions of the nervous system associated with pain and in primary sensitive neurons they colocalize with transient potential receptor vanilloid-TRPV1 providing an anatomical interaction in nociceptor sensitization. Moreover, PKs are strongly upregulated in immune and glial cells and sustain a proinflammatory loop in inflamed tissues. Recent evidences indicate that the block of the PK system represents a promising strategy to contrast inflammation and pain.

  19. Investigating the interface between health system reform and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the period in which the HIV/AIDS epidemic has taken hold in sub-Saharan Africa, health system reforms have and continue to be introduced throughout the region. In spite of the multidisciplinary research undertaken, it can be questioned whether the relationships between processes of reform and some of the critical ...

  20. Interfacing knowledge systems: Local knowledge and science in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This discourse captures the rich combination of spirituality, materiality and the social in a concept referred to here as Cosmo vision. Nowadays this worldview co-exists with western ... The role of colonialism in subordination of the African science and knowledge system in general is discussed. The article argues that the ...

  1. Communication interface of computerized automatic fire alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongmei; Zhu Liqun; Fang Shaohong; Du Chengbao

    1997-01-01

    The problems of communication between multiple single-chip computers and microcomputer have been solved by the way of hardware and software. The automatic fire alarm system is realized by using the serial port both on single-chip computer and microcomputer

  2. Operator aids and expert systems in user computer interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    Recent events have demonstrated the potential for catastrophic accidents at process control facilities, resulting in severe economic damages or loss of human life. Human operators play a central role in the outcome of accidents in process control plants, because of their responsibility to make decisions regarding the appropriate corrective actions needed to control the event. In recent years, researchers have been attempting to apply Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for developing computer-based decision aids for process control operators. Much of this research activity has taken place within the nuclear industry. In order to assess the implications of expert systems for nuclear reactor operators, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has sponsored a research program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Included in this program have been the development of a prototype expert system for nuclear reactor operators, as well as two experiments to measure the effects of the expert system on operator performance in simulated accident conditions. This paper briefly summarizes the experience gained during this research program and assesses the potential future of expert system decision aids for process control operators

  3. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  4. Graphical User Interface for an Observing Control System for the UK Infrared Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M.; Bridger, A.; Wright, G. S.; Adamson, A. J.; Currie, M. J.; Economou, F.

    A Graphical user interface for the observing control system of UK Infrared Telescope has been developed as a part of the ORAC (Observatory Reduction and Acquisition Control) Project. We analyzed and designed the system using the Unified Modelling Language (UML) with the CASE tool Rational Rose 98. The system has been implemented in a modular way with Java packages using Swing and RMI. This system is component-based with pluggability. Object orientation concepts and UML notations have been applied throughout the development.

  5. Development of a user interface style guide for the reactor protection system cabinet operator module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung-Woon

    2004-01-01

    The reactor protection system (RPS) plays the roles of generating the reactor trip signal and the engineered safety features (ESF) actuation signal when the monitored plant processes reach the predefined limits. A Korean project group is developing a new digitalized RPS and the Cabinet Operator Module (COM) of the RPS is used for the RPS integrity testing and monitoring by an equipment operator. A flat panel display (FPD) with a touch screen capability is provided as a main user interface for the RPS operation. To support the RPS COM user interface design, actually the FPD screen design, we developed a user interface style guide because the system designer could not properly deal with the many general human factors design guidelines. To develop the user interface style guide, various design guideline gatherings, a walk-though with a video recorder, guideline selection with respect to user interface design elements, determination of the properties of the design elements, discussion with system designers, and a conversion of the properties into the screen design were carried out. This paper describes the process details and the findings in the course of the style guide development. (Author)

  6. Modeling power electronics and interfacing energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    2017-01-01

    Discusses the application of mathematical and engineering tools for modeling, simulation and control oriented for energy systems, power electronics and renewable energy. This book builds on the background knowledge of electrical circuits, control of dc/dc converters and inverters, energy conversion and power electronics. The book shows readers how to apply computational methods for multi-domain simulation of energy systems and power electronics engineering problems. Each chapter has a brief introduction on the theoretical background, a description of the problems to be solved, and objectives to be achieved. Block diagrams, electrical circuits, mathematical analysis or computer code are covered. Each chapter concludes with discussions on what should be learned, suggestions for further studies and even some experimental work.

  7. Examination of the Benefits of Standardized Interfaces on Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Jeff Bezos with Blue Origin. All of these entrepreneurs have invested billions of privately funded dollars into their respective companies to...focused on developing systems that best captures the requirements of the end users at an indeterminate cost. With this mindset within the USG, each...Multiple factors ensue before standardization can take place, such key issues include changing the current mindset with the current design approach of

  8. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Entremont, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment

  9. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Entremont, P.D.

    1999-01-14

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment.

  10. Designing Cognition-Adaptive Human-Computer Interface for Mission-Critical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Choi, Eric; Taib, Ronnie; Chen, Fang

    With applications of new information and communication technologies, computer-based information systems are becoming more and more sophisticated and complex. This is particularly true in large incident and emergency management systems. The increasing complexity creates significant challenges to the design of user interfaces (UIs). One of the fundamental goals of UI design is to provide users with intuitive and effective interaction channels to/from the computer system so that tasks are completed more efficiently and user's cognitive work load or stress is minimized. To achieve this goal, UI and information system designers should understand human cognitive process and its implications, and incorporate this knowledge into task design and interface design. In this chapter we present the design of CAMI, a cognition-adaptive multimodal interface, for a large metropolitan traffic incident and emergency management system. The novelty of our design resides in combining complementary concepts and tools from cognitive system engineering and from cognitive load theory. Also presented in this chapter is our work on several key components of CAMI such as real-time cognitive load analysis and multimodal interfaces.

  11. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  12. Streamflow forecasting using the modular modeling system and an object-user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeton, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), developed a computer program to provide a general framework needed to couple disparate environmental resource models and to manage the necessary data. The Object-User Interface (OUI) is a map-based interface for models and modeling data. It provides a common interface to run hydrologic models and acquire, browse, organize, and select spatial and temporal data. One application is to assist river managers in utilizing streamflow forecasts generated with the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System running in the Modular Modeling System (MMS), a distributed-parameter watershed model, and the National Weather Service Extended Streamflow Prediction (ESP) methodology.

  13. Optimal Power System and Grid Interface Design Considerations for the CLICs Klystron Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Marija, Jankovic; Jon, Clare; Pat, Wheeler; Davide, Aguglia

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an electron-positron collider under study at CERN with the aim to explore the next generation of high precision/high energy particles physics. The CLIC’s drive beams will be accelerated by approximately 1300 klystrons, requiring highly efficient and controllable solid state capacitor discharge modulators. Capacitor charger specifications include the requirement to mask the pulsed effect of the load from the utility grid, ensure maximum power quality, control the derived DC voltage precisely (to maximize accuracy for the modulators being implemented), and achieve high efficiency and operability of the overall power system. This paper presents the work carried out on the power system interface for the CLIC facility. In particular it discusses the challenges on the utility interface and analysis of the grid interface converters with regards to required functionality, efficiency, and control methodologies.

  14. Miniaturized Blood Pressure Telemetry System with RFID Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Caldara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the development and characterization of a potentially implantable blood pressure telemetry system, based on an active Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID tag, International Organization for Standardization (ISO 15693 compliant. This approach aims to continuously measure the average, systolic and diastolic blood pressure of the small/medium animals. The measured pressure wave undergoes embedded processing and results are stored onboard in a non-volatile memory, providing the data under interrogation by an external RFID reader. In order to extend battery lifetime, RFID energy harvesting has been investigated. The paper presents the experimental characterization in a laboratory and preliminary in-vivo tests. The device is a prototype mainly intended, in a future engineered version, for monitoring freely moving test animals for pharmaceutical research and drug safety assessment purposes, but it could have multiple uses in environmental and industrial applications.

  15. Research Update: Interfacing ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Metal nanoclusters (NCs), a new type of nanomaterial with unique physicochemical properties, show great potential in many biomedical applications. Understanding their behavior in the complex biological environment is critical not only for designing highly efficient NC-based nanomedicines but also for elucidating the biological impact (e.g., toxicity) of these emerging nanomaterials. In this review, we give an overview of recent progress in exploring interactions of metal NCs with biological systems, including protein adsorption onto NCs, NC interactions with cells, and also the in vivo behavior of NCs. We also discuss the biological responses to the interactions, key parameters defining the interactions, and current challenges in the exploration of NCs in the complex biological environment.

  16. Research on the Countermeasures against Electromagnetic Interface in Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Bin; Kang, Young Suk; Choi, Hyo Yul; Cha, Ok Hyun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gi Chul; Le, Jae Bok; Ha, Tae Hyun; Kim, Suk Joo; Na, Dae Yul; Kim, Yong Ho; Jeong, Kyo Beom [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the results of widespread use of microelectronics in electric power system, electric environment of power operation facilities in substation has become more weak and severe for surge voltages. Electromagnetic coupled overvoltage caused by HV bus switching operating lead to the malfunction or destruction of low voltage control circuit which mostly used signal. To scope with this transients overvoltage, it is necessary to be investigated transient source and propagation path and analysed its effects to low voltage circuit such as relay. This study is to analysis source of conducted EMP(electromagnetic pulse) on the low voltage control circuit and to acquits transient voltage waveforms, and to provide countermeasures against transient voltage, and EMP filtering method according to each EMP each type. With this, gradual improvement of EMI countermeasure will be achieved. (author). 49 refs., figs.

  17. DESIGN OF A VISUAL INTERFACE FOR ANN BASED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan BAYINDIR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence application methods have been used for control of many systems with parallel of technological development besides conventional control techniques. Increasing of artificial intelligence applications have required to education in this area. In this paper, computer based an artificial neural network (ANN software has been presented to learning and understanding of artificial neural networks. By means of the developed software, the training of the artificial neural network according to the inputs provided and a test action can be performed by changing the components such as iteration number, momentum factor, learning ratio, and efficiency function of the artificial neural networks. As a result of the study a visual education set has been obtained that can easily be adapted to the real time application.

  18. Transfer of control system interface solutions from other domains to the thermal power industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligård, L-O; Andersson, J; Osvalder, A-L

    2012-01-01

    In a thermal power plant the operators' roles are to control and monitor the process to achieve efficient and safe production. To achieve this, the human-machine interfaces have a central part. The interfaces need to be updated and upgraded together with the technical functionality to maintain optimal operation. One way of achieving relevant updates is to study other domains and see how they have solved similar issues in their design solutions. The purpose of this paper is to present how interface design solution ideas can be transferred from domains with operator control to thermal power plants. In the study 15 domains were compared using a model for categorisation of human-machine systems. The result from the domain comparison showed that nuclear power, refinery and ship engine control were most similar to thermal power control. From the findings a basic interface structure and three specific display solutions were proposed for thermal power control: process parameter overview, plant overview, and feed water view. The systematic comparison of the properties of a human-machine system allowed interface designers to find suitable objects, structures and navigation logics in a range of domains that could be transferred to the thermal power domain.

  19. Architecture, On-Chip Network and Programming Interface Concept for Multiprocessor System-on-Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Samman, Faizal Arya

    2017-01-01

    in Proc. of the International Conference onSmart Green Technology in Electrical and Information Systems (ICSGTEIS), 2016, publised in IEEE Explorer (indexed by SCOPUS) This paper presents a system architecture, data communnication scheme and application programming interface model or concept for a multiprocessor system based on a network-on-chip (NoC) platform. Each processing node connected to a mesh node has its own local (instruction and data) memory portion, and a global (shared) memor...

  20. Mission Operations Center (MOC) - Precipitation Processing System (PPS) Interface Software System (MPISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Jeffrey; Calk, William; Atwell, William; Tsui, Tina

    2013-01-01

    MPISS is an automatic file transfer system that implements a combination of standard and mission-unique transfer protocols required by the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) Precipitation Processing System (PPS) to control the flow of data between the MOC and the PPS. The primary features of MPISS are file transfers (both with and without PPS specific protocols), logging of file transfer and system events to local files and a standard messaging bus, short term storage of data files to facilitate retransmissions, and generation of file transfer accounting reports. The system includes a graphical user interface (GUI) to control the system, allow manual operations, and to display events in real time. The PPS specific protocols are an enhanced version of those that were developed for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). All file transfers between the MOC and the PPS use the SSH File Transfer Protocol (SFTP). For reports and data files generated within the MOC, no additional protocols are used when transferring files to the PPS. For observatory data files, an additional handshaking protocol of data notices and data receipts is used. MPISS generates and sends to the PPS data notices containing data start and stop times along with a checksum for the file for each observatory data file transmitted. MPISS retrieves the PPS generated data receipts that indicate the success or failure of the PPS to ingest the data file and/or notice. MPISS retransmits the appropriate files as indicated in the receipt when required. MPISS also automatically retrieves files from the PPS. The unique feature of this software is the use of both standard and PPS specific protocols in parallel. The advantage of this capability is that it supports users that require the PPS protocol as well as those that do not require it. The system is highly configurable to accommodate the needs of future users.

  1. Knowledge acquisition and interface design for learning on demand systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wayne A.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid changes in our world precipitated by technology have created new problems and new challenges for education and training. A knowledge 'explosion' is occurring as our society moves toward a service oriented economy that relies on information as the major resource. Complex computer systems are beginning to dominate the workplace, causing alarming growth and change in many fields. The rapidly changing nature of the workplace, especially in fields related to information technology, requires that our knowledge be updated constantly. This characteristic of modern society poses seemingly unsolvable instructional problems involving coverage and obsolescence. The sheer amount of information to be learned is rapidly increasing, while at the same time some information becomes obsolete in light of new information. Education, therefore, must become a lifelong process that features learning of new material and skills as needed in relation to the job to be done. Because of the problems cited above, the current model of learning in advance may no longer be feasible in our high-technology world. In many cases, learning in advance is impossible because there are simply too many things to learn. In addition, learning in advance can be time consuming, and often results in decontextualized knowledge that does not readily transfer to the work environment. The large and growing discrepancy between the amount of potentially relevant knowledge available and the amount a person can know and remember makes learning on demand an important alternative to current instructional practices. Learning on demand takes place whenever an individual must learn something new in order to perform a task or make a decision. Learning on demand is a promising approach for addressing the problems of coverage and obsolescence because learning is contextualized and integrated into the task environment rather than being relegated to a separate phase that precedes work. Learning on demand allows learners

  2. An approach to design interface topologies across interdependent urban infrastructure systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang Min, E-mail: min.ouyang@rice.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-318, TX 77005 (United States); Duenas-Osorio, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo.duenas-osorio@rice.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-318, TX 77005 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    This paper proposes an approach to design or retrofit interface topologies to minimize cascading failures across urban infrastructure systems. Four types of interface design strategies are formulated based on maximum network component degree, maximum component betweenness, minimum Euclidean distance across components and component reliability rankings. To compute and compare strategy effectiveness under multiple hazard types, this paper introduces a global annual cascading failure effect (GACFE) metric as well as a GACFE-based cost improvement (GACI) metric. The GACI metric quantifies the improvement of the strategy effectiveness per kilometer increment of interdependent link length (ILL) relative to a reference strategy with minimum ILL. Taking as examples the power and gas transmission systems in Harris County, Texas, USA, optimum interface designs under random and hurricane hazards are discussed. Findings include that the strategy based on reliability rankings minimizes the GACFE metric, and decreases the GACI value relative to a reference practical strategy by 10-15% under different power grid safety margins. Such metrics will contribute to coupled utility system design or retrofit given that current guidelines or recommended practices in the utility industry mostly rely on minimum Euclidean distances and are yet to include interdependent effects in their provisions. - Highlights: > This paper offers interface topology design methods to reduce cascading failures. > Design strategies are judged by performance and cost metrics under multiple hazards. > Reliability-based interfaces globally outperform topological and distance designs. > Only low levels of extra link density and distance are needed for desired designs. > Interface distance relaxation is more effective at yielding maximum performance.

  3. An approach to design interface topologies across interdependent urban infrastructure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Min; Duenas-Osorio, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to design or retrofit interface topologies to minimize cascading failures across urban infrastructure systems. Four types of interface design strategies are formulated based on maximum network component degree, maximum component betweenness, minimum Euclidean distance across components and component reliability rankings. To compute and compare strategy effectiveness under multiple hazard types, this paper introduces a global annual cascading failure effect (GACFE) metric as well as a GACFE-based cost improvement (GACI) metric. The GACI metric quantifies the improvement of the strategy effectiveness per kilometer increment of interdependent link length (ILL) relative to a reference strategy with minimum ILL. Taking as examples the power and gas transmission systems in Harris County, Texas, USA, optimum interface designs under random and hurricane hazards are discussed. Findings include that the strategy based on reliability rankings minimizes the GACFE metric, and decreases the GACI value relative to a reference practical strategy by 10-15% under different power grid safety margins. Such metrics will contribute to coupled utility system design or retrofit given that current guidelines or recommended practices in the utility industry mostly rely on minimum Euclidean distances and are yet to include interdependent effects in their provisions. - Highlights: → This paper offers interface topology design methods to reduce cascading failures. → Design strategies are judged by performance and cost metrics under multiple hazards. → Reliability-based interfaces globally outperform topological and distance designs. → Only low levels of extra link density and distance are needed for desired designs. → Interface distance relaxation is more effective at yielding maximum performance.

  4. Hybrid System for the Inventory of the Cultural Heritage Using Voice Interface for Knowledge acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Château, Stefan Du; Boulanger, Danielle; Mercier-Laurent, Eunika

    This document presents our work on a definition and experimentation of a voice interface for cultural heritage inventory. This hybrid system includes signal processing, natural language techniques and knowledge modeling for future retrieval. We discuss the first results and present some challenges for our future work.

  5. STIMULUS: End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkesh-Ha, Payman [University of New Mexico

    2014-09-12

    The main goal of this research grant is to develop a system-level solution leveraging novel technologies that enable network communications at 100 Gb/s or beyond. University of New Mexico in collaboration with Acadia Optronics LLC has been working on this project to develop the 100 Gb/s Network Interface Controller (NIC) under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant.

  6. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables

  7. Arduino-Based embedded systems interfacing, simulation, and LabVIEW GUI

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Rajesh; Singh, Bhupendra; Choudhury, Sushabhan

    2018-01-01

    Arduino is an open-source electronics platform based on easy-to-use hardware and software while LabVIEW is a graphical programming telling how to connect functions and work with a variety of datatypes when constructing applications.This book will help beginners to get started with Arduino-based embedded systems including essential know-how of the programming and interfacing of the devices. Book includes programming and simulation of Arduino-based projects and interfacing with LabVIEW, based on practical case studies. The book comprises of total twenty five chapters with description, working model of LabVIEW and programming with Arduino IDE.

  8. System requirements and design description for the document basis database interface (DocBasis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes system requirements and the design description for the Document Basis Database Interface (DocBasis). The DocBasis application is used to manage procedures used within the tank farms. The application maintains information in a small database to track the document basis for a procedure, as well as the current version/modification level and the basis for the procedure. The basis for each procedure is substantiated by Administrative, Technical, Procedural, and Regulatory requirements. The DocBasis user interface was developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

  9. Advanced interfacing techniques for sensors measurement circuits and systems for intelligent sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Joyanta; Kumar, V; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas

    2017-01-01

    This book presents ways of interfacing sensors to the digital world, and discusses the marriage between sensor systems and the IoT: the opportunities and challenges. As sensor output is often affected by noise and interference, the book presents effective schemes for recovering the data from a signal that is buried in noise. It also explores interesting applications in the area of health care, un-obstructive monitoring and the electronic nose and tongue. It is a valuable resource for engineers and scientists in the area of sensors and interfacing wanting to update their knowledge of the latest developments in the field and learn more about sensing applications and challenges.

  10. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Labranche, Wayne; Lareau, William

    2010-05-26

    Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR). Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS) is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1), followed by interface building (step 2) with subsequent testing (step 3), and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4). The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS), and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  11. A mainframe interfacing computer management system for the control of oral anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, P; Stear, M

    1992-01-01

    A unique computerized management system has been used to control the anticoagulation of over 400 patients at a large teaching hospital for the last eighteen months. The system is located on the main pathology computer which can be interfaced with the patient administration system (PAS). This enables files in the anticoagulant program to be linked with files in the PAS and files in the haematology database. This system has many advantages over a stand-alone microcomputer system and will form the basis for the next generation of computerized anticoagulant management systems.

  12. A bidirectional brain-machine interface connecting alert rodents to a dynamical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Fabio; Semprini, Marianna; Mussa Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel experimental framework that implements a bidirectional brain-machine interface inspired by the operation of the spinal cord in vertebrates that generates a control policy in the form of a force field. The proposed experimental set-up allows connecting the brain of freely moving rats to an external device. We tested this apparatus in a preliminary experiment with an alert rat that used the interface for acquiring a food reward. The goal of this approach to bidirectional interfaces is to explore the role of voluntary neural commands in controlling a dynamical system represented by a small cart moving on vertical plane and connected to a water/pellet dispenser.

  13. Theory of bulk and interface constant phase elements in electrode-electrolyte systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the progress gained in the last few years in our understanding of bulk and interface constant-phase-angle (CPA) behavior in electrode-electrolyte systems. It is now fairly well established that the interface constant-phase element originates from the fractal nature of the interface. The complex geometry gives rise to a fractal distribution of parallel current paths, and the competition between these paths results in the fractional power law behavior of the impedance across the interface. On the other hand, the early hope of relating the CPA exponent to the fractal dimension of the interface has been shown to be unattainable. Our understanding of the bulk CPA behavior, which is most prevalent in solid electrolytes, is only tentative. It is illustrated using a simple model that, under nonlinear dynamical laws that govern the flow of ions in the electrolyte, a current in the solid can generate a fractal distribution of vacancies which tend to impede the flow. The current is forced to negotiate a complex path through the solid, and the resulting fluctuation in path length and flow rate could be a source of the CPA behavior. (author). 32 refs, 18 figs

  14. Experimental study of hybrid interface cooling system using air ventilation and nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, M. F. H.; Razlan, Z. M.; Bakar, S. A.; Desa, H.; Wan, W. K.; Ibrahim, I.; Kamarrudin, N. S.; Bin-Abdun, Nazih A.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid interface cooling system needs to be established to chill the battery compartment of electric car and maintained its ambient temperature inside the compartment between 25°C to 35°C. The air cooling experiment has been conducted to verify the cooling capacity, compressor displacement volume, dehumidifying value and mass flow rate of refrigerant (R-410A). At the same time, liquid cooling system is analysed theoretically by comparing the performance of two types of nanofluid, i.e., CuO + Water and Al2O3 + Water, based on the heat load generated inside the compartment. In order for the result obtained to be valid and reliable, several assumptions are considered during the experimental and theoretical analysis. Results show that the efficiency of the hybrid interface cooling system is improved as compared to the individual cooling system.

  15. Graphical user interface for input output characterization of single variable and multivariable highly nonlinear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrukh Adnan Khan M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Graphical User Interface (GUI software utility for the input/output characterization of single variable and multivariable nonlinear systems by obtaining the sinusoidal input describing function (SIDF of the plant. The software utility is developed on MATLAB R2011a environment. The developed GUI holds no restriction on the nonlinearity type, arrangement and system order; provided that output(s of the system is obtainable either though simulation or experiments. An insight to the GUI and its features are presented in this paper and example problems from both single variable and multivariable cases are demonstrated. The formulation of input/output behavior of the system is discussed and the nucleus of the MATLAB command underlying the user interface has been outlined. Some of the industries that would benefit from this software utility includes but not limited to aerospace, defense technology, robotics and automotive.

  16. Design and Implementation of 32-Bit Controller For Interfacing with reconfigurable computing systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh Gupta; Kota Solomon Raju

    2009-01-01

    Partial reconfiguration allows time-sharing of physical resources for the execution of multiple functionalmodules by swapping in or out at run-time without incurring any system downtime. This results indramatically increase in speed and functionality of FPGA based system. This paper presents thedesigning an interface controller through UART for execution & implementation of reconfigurablemodules (RM) on Xilinx Virtex-4(XC4VFX12), (XC4VFX20) and (XC4VFX60) devices. To verify partialreconfigura...

  17. A Developed Graphical User Interface for Power System Stability and Robustness Studies

    OpenAIRE

    GHOURAF Djamel Eddine; NACERI Abdellatif; ABID Mohamed; KABI Wahiba

    2015-01-01

    This paper present the realization and development of a graphical user interface (GUI) to studied the stability and robustness of power systems (analysis and synthesis), using Conventional Power System Stabilizers (CPSS - realized on PID scheme) or advanced controllers (based on adaptive and robust control), and applied on automatic excitation control of powerful synchronous generators, to improve dynamic performances and robustness. The GUI is a useful average to facilitate stability study o...

  18. Dynamic Self Adjusting FACTS-Switched Filter Compensation Schemes for Wind-Smart Grid Interface Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Elgammal, Adel; Sharaf, Adel M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper validates a number of Flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) filter compensator devices on voltage stabilization and reactive power compensation in a distribution network with embedded wind energy conversion system (WECS).  The FACTS filter compensator schemes provide Better voltage stabilization, improved power quality, Interface security, efficient utilization, minimum harmonics levels and energy loss minimization of electricity networks with reactive power and FACTS control, wh...

  19. ReportTutor – An Intelligent Tutoring System that Uses a Natural Language Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Rebecca S.; Tseytlin, Eugene; Jukic, Drazen

    2005-01-01

    ReportTutor is an extension to our work on Intelligent Tutoring Systems for visual diagnosis. ReportTutor combines a virtual microscope and a natural language interface to allow students to visually inspect a virtual slide as they type a diagnostic report on the case. The system monitors both actions in the virtual microscope interface as well as text created by the student in the reporting interface. It provides feedback about the correctness, completeness, and style of the report. ReportTutor uses MMTx with a custom data-source created with the NCI Metathesaurus. A separate ontology of cancer specific concepts is used to structure the domain knowledge needed for evaluation of the student’s input including co-reference resolution. As part of the early evaluation of the system, we collected data from 4 pathology residents who typed in their reports without the tutoring aspects of the system, and compared responses to an expert dermatopathologist. We analyzed the resulting reports to (1) identify the error rates and distribution among student reports, (2) determine the performance of the system in identifying features within student reports, and (3) measure the accuracy of the system in distinguishing between correct and incorrect report elements. PMID:16779024

  20. Activities of IAEA related to human interface in man-machine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    The present paper outlines some activities of IAEA related to human interface in man-machine systems. It has been recognized for quite some time that in large and complex man-machine interactive systems human errors can contribute substantially to failures of these systems, and that the improvement in the human interface in man-machine systems is essential for the safety of the plant. Many important surveys have been made in some member countries. These studies and operational experience have shown that it is possible to substantially reduce this adverse impact of human errors in nuclear power plant operations by the application of human factors technology. This technology. This technology includes: (1) selection of people with the requisite skills and knowledge and providing them with job-relevant training, (2) maintenance of the necessary job qualifications for each person in the plant, (3) design of man-machine interfaces which are fully compatible with the capabilities and limitations of the people in the system, and (4) design of job operations, including written materials, to facilitate required quality of human performance. A review is made of education/training, operator support systems, human error data collection, analysis of safety significant events and future activities. (Nogami, K.)

  1. A multi-system interface module for automating the patient treatment cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Tim; Brooks, Ken; Davis, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The use of many different computer systems in a radiation oncology department for treatment simulation, planning, and delivery typically introduces increased planning times and redundant data entry. This redundancy is not only a time-consuming chore, but it also has the possibility of introducing human errors at each step. These computer systems often have different hardware platforms and operating systems making it even more difficult to the users for accessing the data. In addition, there is typically a common set of patient and treatment information scattered among these various systems. The purpose of this study is to describe our experience for automating the patient treatment cycle which includes treatment simulation, planning, and delivery using an interface module for sharing this core set of data among the various computer systems in a department without additional complexity to the staff. Materials and Methods: An object-oriented software tool was developed to support a user-driven, dependent query, retrieve, and update of different radiation therapy data systems using Networked File Systems (NFS) and the Structured Query Language (SQL). The interface module was designed to support a many-to-many systems' connectivity depending on the needs of a department. The software tool makes use of the Virtual Machine Platform and Foundation Library specifications of the NCI-sponsored Radiation Therapy Planning Tools Collaborative Working Group for accessing treatment planning data from a system that conforms to these standards. It also takes advantage of the Microsoft Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) standard for accessing commercial radiation therapy database systems. A custom data access method is developed for any data system that does not conform to these two standards. The software tool has an intuitive graphical user interface for review and verification of the data after the query and retrieve process. The software was written in the C++ language

  2. Interfacing the septa movement (DC motors) equipment to the PS control system and the MIL1553 bus

    CERN Document Server

    Dehavay, Claude

    1995-01-01

    Continuing the rejuvenation of the PS Control system , this application replaces the Single Transceiver Hybrid used to interface the Septa Movement Fquipment by a G64 system connected to the VME crate via the MIL1553 bus. This note explains the G64 hardware interface and details the standard message as defined in the Control Protocole for Power Converter, RF and Stepping Motor equipment.

  3. Development of an Economical Interfacing Circuit for Upgrading of SEM Data Printing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punnachaiya, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2002-01-01

    The operating conditions of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) i.e., magnification, accelerating voltage, micron mark and film identification labeling, are very important for the accurate interpretation of a micrograph picture. In the old model SEM, the built-in data printing system for film identification can be inputted only the numerical number. This will be made a confusing problems when various operating conditions were applied in routine work. An economical interfacing circuit, therefore, was developed to upgrade the data printing system for capable of alphanumerical labeling. The developed circuit was tested on both data printing systems of JSM-T220 and JSM-T330 (JEOL SEM). It was found that the interfacing function worked properly and easily installed

  4. A 3D City Model Used as User-interface for an Energy-system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Erik

    2011-01-01

    At CUPUM 2009 the project “Object Oriented Visualization of Urban Energy Consumption” was presented, explaining the technology behind the visualization of an energy-model connected to a 3D city model. This paper presents the subsequent work involving the final design, the user involvement...... and the overall results after the system has been used at the Bright Green Exhibition connected to the COP15 conference in Copenhagen. This paper presents the empirical findings of the attempt to use a 3D city model as user-interface. The system gave the user the possibility to try out different scenarios...... of combinations of the energy-consumption and energy-production for an entire city. The interface was supposed to help especially nonprofessionals, among them politicians, to better perceive the numbers and graphs adjoining the 3D model in a combined view. Only very few systems have been developed for this kind...

  5. Man-machine interface systems for the Sizewell B Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    Sizewell B is the first nuclear power station to be built in the United Kingdom using the Pressurised Water Reactor or PWR system. The design is based on stations operating in the United States, but many changes and new features have been introduced to bring it up to date, and to meet United Kingdom practice and regulatory requirements. The Man-Machine Interfaces (MMIs) in the control rooms have been newly designed from first principles, with special attention paid to human factors and the role of the operators. The instrumentation and control (1 and C) systems which interface the MMIs to the process plant, and automate the operation of the station, use advanced technology to achieve high performance and availability. This paper describes the development of the control rooms and 1 and C systems, explaining the thinking that lay behind the principal decisions. (author)

  6. A python based interface for the tandem-linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajith Kumar, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    The control system for the Tandem-LINAC accelerator system at IUAC is a client-server design running on a network of PCs under the GNU/Linux operating system. The computers connected to the devices in the accelerator run a server program. The computers providing the user interface runs different kinds of client programs that communicates to the servers over a TCT/IP network to control/monitor the accelerator parameters. Both the programs were written in C language and some programming expertise was required to write the client programs. The addition of a Python language interface has enabled the users to write programs for specific tasks like data logging and partial automation of the operation with minimal effort. (author)

  7. Pygrass: An Object Oriented Python Application Programming Interface (API for Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS Geographic Information System (GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ciolli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PyGRASS is an object-oriented Python Application Programming Interface (API for Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS Geographic Information System (GIS, a powerful open source GIS widely used in academia, commercial settings and governmental agencies. We present the architecture of the PyGRASS library, covering interfaces to GRASS modules, vector and raster data, with a focus on the new capabilities that it provides to GRASS users and developers. Our design concept of the module interface allows the direct linking of inputs and outputs of GRASS modules to create process chains, including compatibility checks, process control and error handling. The module interface was designed to be easily extended to work with remote processing services (Web Processing Service (WPS, Web Service Definition Language (WSDL/Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP. The new object-oriented Python programming API introduces an abstract layer that opens the possibility to use and access transparently the efficient raster and vector functions of GRASS that are implemented in C. The design goal was to provide an easy to use, but powerful, Python interface for users and developers who are not familiar with the programming language C and with the GRASS C-API. We demonstrate the capabilities, scalability and performance of PyGRASS with several dedicated tests and benchmarks. We compare and discuss the results of the benchmarks with dedicated C implementations.

  8. Interface-Based Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Alfaro, Luca; Henzinger, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    .... Interface automata support incremental design and independent implementability. Incremental design means that the compatibility checking of interfaces can proceed for partial system descriptions, without knowing the interfaces of all components...

  9. Small-Signal Stability of Wind Power System With Full-Load Converter Interfaced Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Nielsen, Jørgen Nygaard; Jensen, Kim Høj

    2012-01-01

    Small-signal stability analysis of power system oscillations is a well established field within power system analysis, but not much attention has yet been paid to systems with a high penetration of wind turbines and with large wind power plants (WPP). In this paper a comprehensive analysis...... is presented which assesses the impact of full-load converter interfaced wind turbines on power system small-signal stability. The study is based on a 7 generator network with lightly damped inter-area modes. A detailed wind turbine (WT) model with all grid relevant control functions is used in the study...

  10. Interface Anywhere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current paradigms for crew interfaces to the systems that require control are constrained by decades old technologies which require the crew to be physically near an...

  11. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering.

  12. A study of System Interface Sets (SIS) for the host, target and integration environments of the Space Station Program (SSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Charles; Auty, David; Rogers, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    System interface sets (SIS) for large, complex, non-stop, distributed systems are examined. The SIS of the Space Station Program (SSP) was selected as the focus of this study because an appropriate virtual interface specification of the SIS is believed to have the most potential to free the project from four life cycle tyrannies which are rooted in a dependance on either a proprietary or particular instance of: operating systems, data management systems, communications systems, and instruction set architectures. The static perspective of the common Ada programming support environment interface set (CAIS) and the portable common execution environment (PCEE) activities are discussed. Also, the dynamic perspective of the PCEE is addressed.

  13. Validating the Technology Acceptance Model in the Context of the Laboratory Information System-Electronic Health Record Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a research validating the efficacy of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by pairing it with the Organizational Change Readiness Theory (OCRT) to develop another extension to the TAM, using the medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)--Electronic Health Records (EHR) interface as the medium. The TAM posits that it is…

  14. Development of intelligent interface for simulation execution by module-based simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Mizutani, Naoki; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1988-01-01

    An intelligent user support for the two phases of simulation execution was newly developed for Module-based Simulation System (MSS). The MSS has been in development as a flexible simulation environment to improve software productivity in complex, large-scale dynamic simulation of nuclear power plant. The AI programing by Smalltalk-80 was applied to materialize the two user-interface programs for (i) semantic diagnosis of the simulation program generated automatically by MSS, and (ii) consultation system by which user can set up consistent numerical input data files necessary for executing a MSS-generated program. Frame theory was utilized in those interface programs to represent the four knowledge bases, which are (i) usage information on module library in MSS and MSS-generated program, and (ii) expertise knowledge on nuclear power plant analysis such as material properties and reactor system configuration. Capabilities of those interface programs were confirmed by some example practice on LMFBR reactor dynamic calculation, and it was demonstrated that the knowledge-based systemization was effective to improve software work environment. (author)

  15. Power transfer capability assessment of transmission interfaces with SVC and load shedding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovsky, V. [DMCC-Engineering, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Electrodynamics; Dolzhenitsa, Y. [DMCC Engineering, Kiev (Ukraine); Ushapovskiy, K. [National Power Co. Ukrenergo, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2009-07-01

    As a result of deregulation in the power industry, energy trade and markets are pushing transmission system operators to operate their systems closer to the edge of the power transfer capability. Voltage instability and inadequate reactive power support of generators is a key factor in most major outages around the world. The ideal way to control power systems is to avoid emergencies by reliable planning and secure operation of power systems. Therefore, the accurate calculation of the power transfer capability of transmission interfaces is an important task on the planning and operation stages. This paper discussed the issue of transfer capability assessment and monitoring for interfaces with static var compensator (SVC) and load shedding schemes. It also proposed a special measure, a distance to voltage instability point, to monitor transfer capability on-line. The distance may be observed by measurement of SVC output. The paper considered the problem of optimal SVC size selection and a new approach was proposed based on P-V curves analysis. The paper discussed the problem formulation and proposed approach. A case was also presented in order to demonstrate the proposed approach on the IPS Ukraine-Crimea interface. It was concluded that the proposed approach allows the optimal rating of SVC for increasing transfers capability of transmission corridors. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  16. The design of an intelligent human-computer interface for the test, control and monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaff, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The graphical intelligence and assistance capabilities of a human-computer interface for the Test, Control, and Monitor System at Kennedy Space Center are explored. The report focuses on how a particular commercial off-the-shelf graphical software package, Data Views, can be used to produce tools that build widgets such as menus, text panels, graphs, icons, windows, and ultimately complete interfaces for monitoring data from an application; controlling an application by providing input data to it; and testing an application by both monitoring and controlling it. A complete set of tools for building interfaces is described in a manual for the TCMS toolkit. Simple tools create primitive widgets such as lines, rectangles and text strings. Intermediate level tools create pictographs from primitive widgets, and connect processes to either text strings or pictographs. Other tools create input objects; Data Views supports output objects directly, thus output objects are not considered. Finally, a set of utilities for executing, monitoring use, editing, and displaying the content of interfaces is included in the toolkit.

  17. Flexusi Interface Builder For Computer Based Accelerator Monitoring And Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Kurakin, V G; Kurakin, P V

    2004-01-01

    We have developed computer code for any desired graphics user interface designing for monitoring and control system at the executable level. This means that operator can build up measurement console consisting of virtual devices before or even during real experiment without recompiling source file. Such functionality results in number of advantages comparing with traditional programming. First of all any risk disappears to introduce bug into source code. Another important thing is the fact the both program developers and operator staff do not interface in developing ultimate product (measurement console). Thus, small team without detailed project can design even very complicated monitoring and control system. For the reason mentioned below, approach suggested is especially helpful for large complexes to be monitored and control, accelerator being among them. The program code consists of several modules, responsible for data acquisition, control and representation. Borland C++ Builder technologies based on VCL...

  18. Renewable Electric Plant Information System user interface manual: Paradox 7 Runtime for Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) is a comprehensive database with detailed information on grid-connected renewable electric plants in the US. The current version, REPiS3 beta, was developed in Paradox for Windows. The user interface (UI) was developed to facilitate easy access to information in the database, without the need to have, or know how to use, Paradox for Windows. The UI is designed to provide quick responses to commonly requested sorts of the database. A quick perusal of this manual will familiarize one with the functions of the UI and will make use of the system easier. There are six parts to this manual: (1) Quick Start: Instructions for Users Familiar with Database Applications; (2) Getting Started: The Installation Process; (3) Choosing the Appropriate Report; (4) Using the User Interface; (5) Troubleshooting; (6) Appendices A and B.

  19. Interface control document for tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure support Project W-519

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the functional and physical interfaces between the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Project W-519 and the various other projects (i.e., Projects W-314, W-464, W-465, and W-520) supporting Phase 1 that will require the allocation of land in and about the Privatization Phase 1 Site and/or interface with the utilities extended by Project W-519. Project W-519 will identify land use allocations and upgrade/extend several utilities in the 200-East Area into the Privatization Phase 1 Site (formerly the Grout Disposal Compound) in preparation for the Privatization Contractors (PC) to construct treatment facilities. The project will upgrade/extend: Roads, Electrical Power, Raw Water (for process and fire suppression), Potable Water, and Liquid Effluent collection. The replacement of an existing Sanitary Sewage treatment system that may be displaced by Phase 1 site preparation activities may also be included

  20. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  1. ON THE EFFECT OF ADAPTIVE USER INTERFACES ON RELIABILITY AND EFFICIENCY OF THE AUTOMATED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. O. Furtat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern automated systems users often have to face the information overload problem because of ever increasing volumes of information with short time processing requirements. Working in such conditions affects the system operator’s work quality and the systems reliability. One possible approach to solving the information overload problem is to create personalized interfaces that take into account the user’s information management particularities. System operator’s features, which determine the shape and pace of information representation preferred by him, form the user’s cognitive portrait. To determine the values of portrait characteristics professional testing with the assistance of psychologists or operational testing at the user’s workplace is performed. The second option is more preferable for use in automated systems, since it has no issue with lack of psychologists. Cognitive portrait is then built as a result of user interaction with the software diagnostic tools that are based on the cognitive psychology methods. The effect of personalized user interface application in an automated system can be estimated by quantifying how the reduction in user’s response time to critical events affects the system reliability and efficiency. For this purpose, the formulae of reliability theory for complex automated systems are used, showing the dependence between the system reliability and user’s response time to critical event.

  2. Man-machine interface in a submarine command and weapon control system: features and design experience

    OpenAIRE

    Johan H. Aas; Karsten Brathen; Erik Nordo; Ole Ø. Ørpen

    1989-01-01

    Important man-machine interface (MMI) issues concerning a submarine command and weapon control system (CWCS) such as crew organization, automation level and decision support are discussed in this paper. Generic submarine CWCS functions and operating conditions are outlined. Detailed, dynamic and real-time prototypes were used to support the MMI design. The prototypes are described and experience with detailed prototyping is discussed. Some of the main interaction principles are summarized and...

  3. System requirements and design description for the environmental requirements management interface (ERMI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biebesheimer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes system requirements and the design description for the Environmental Requirements Management Interface (ERMI). The ERMI database assists Tank Farm personnel with scheduling, planning, and documenting procedure compliance, performance verification, and selected corrective action tracking activities for Tank Farm S/RID requirements. The ERMI database was developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This document was prepared by SAIC and edited by LMHC

  4. A graphical user-interface development tool for intelligent computer-assisted instruction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Suwono, Francius.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. An interactive graphical interface helps intelligent computer- assisted instruction systems, because many applications can be well represented by graphic objects. One approach is a facility whereby a teacher constructing a tutor can associate specific graphics with specific predicate-calculus expressions describing a state in a tutoring simulation. This further requires a specification of the arrangement of graphic objects on the scre...

  5. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system.

  6. A Prototype Graphical User Interface for Co-op: A Group Decision Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    INTRODUCTION 1 A. PURPOSE OF THESIS. ................. 1 B. BACKGROUND ...................... 1. System Overview ................. 1 2. Model Components...74 ix i I. INTRODUCTION A. PURPOSE OF THESIS The purpose of this research is to design a prototype Graphical User Interface (GUI) for Co-oP...which each participant of the group has his own DSS whose model base is based on multiple criteria decision 1 methods ( MCDM ) along with additional

  7. Comparison of Microleakage of Composite Resin Veneering Systems at the Alloy Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    technique that there is leakage around resin veneers in gold crowns. Microleakage studies have been used primarily for the evaluation of direct...investigation is to evaluate the bond between veneering composite resin and metal substructure. Measurement of microleakage at the composite resin-alloy...34OVERPRINT" COMPARISON OF MICROLEAKAGE OF COMPOSITE RESIN VENEERING SYSTEMS AT THE ALLOY INTERFACE A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The University

  8. BRAIN-COMPUTER MUSIC INTERFACING: DESIGNING PRACTICAL SYSTEMS FOR CREATIVE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer music interfacing (BCMI) presents a novel approach to music making, as it requires only the brainwaves of a user to control musical parameters. This presents immediate benefits for users with motor disabilities that may otherwise prevent them from engaging in traditional musical activities such as composition, performance or collaboration with other musicians. BCMI systems with active control, where a user can make cognitive choices that are detected within brain signals, provi...

  9. A CAMAC-system crate interface based on EUR 6100 standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolstenholme, P.; Verelst, H.; Parker, C.R.C.B.

    1980-01-01

    The particle beams in the Intersecting Storage Rings of the CERN accelerator are controlled by means of a CAMAC Branch Highway and three CAMAC Serial Highway Systems. The highway controllers, housed in system crates, are driven by crate controllers interfaced to the control computers. The crate controllers are implemented as auxiliary controllers and are PROM based to allow N, A and F to be generated from a small zone of computer addresses and are largely transparent to the host computer. The concept has enabled standard modules and techniques taken from the Serial Highway to be adopted for use in system crates. (Auth.)

  10. Graphic Interface for the Gearhart-Owen 3500 Uranium Logging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, I; Mendieta, C; Tenzi, A

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the design and development of a computing graphic interface in order to modernize the data acquisition of an old Gearhart-Owen uranium logging system.The paper describes the different items involved in the project: the system hardware developed to carry out the signal conditioning and data digitization the system software, which performs the monitoring and storing of the updated information.Finally, we compare the results of de recent field measurements with the previous one obtained with the original equipment and show the feasibility of the project

  11. Research and Implementation of a USB Interfaced Real-Time Power Quality Disturbance Classification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOK, M.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the research and implementation of an automatic power quality (PQ recognition system are presented. This system contains a USB interfaced multichannel data acquisition (DAQ device and a graphical user interfaced (GUI application. The DAQ device consists of an analog-to-digital (ADC converter, field programmable gate array (FPGA and a USB first in first out (FIFO buffer interface chip. The application employs Stockwell Transform (ST technique combined with neural network model to build the classifier. Eight basic and two combined PQ disturbances are determined for the classification. Different from the previous studies, the synthetic signals used for neural network training are modified by adding the harmonics detected in the real signal. This approach is used to increase the classifier accuracy against the real line power signal. Also, ST is simplified by using only the frequencies which are required in the feature extraction step to reduce the processing time. Developed application handles the signal processing, the classification, and the database recording tasks by using multi-threaded programming approach under the mean time of 41 ms. The experimental results show that the proposed power quality disturbance detection system is capable of recognizing and reporting power quality faults effectively within the real-time requirements.

  12. Systems and technologies for high-speed inter-office/datacenter interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Y.; Nishizawa, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Fukutoku, M.; Yoshimatsu, T.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging requirements for inter-office/inter-datacenter short reach links for data center interconnects (DCI) and metro transport networks have led to various inter-office and inter-datacenter optical interface technologies. These technologies are bringing significant changes to systems and network architectures. In this paper, we present a system and ZR optical interface technologies for DCI and metro transport networks, then introduce the latest challenges facing the system framework. There are two trends in reach extension; one is to use Ethernet and the other is to use digital coherent technologies. The first approach achieves reach extension while using as many existing Ethernet components as possible. It offers low costs as reuses the cost-effective components created for the large Ethernet market. The second approach adopts low-cost and low power coherent DSPs that implement the minimal set long haul transmission functions. This paper introduces an architecture that integrates both trends. The architecture satisfies both datacom and telecom needs with a common control and management interface and automated configuration.

  13. Real-time distributed simulation using the Modular Modeling System interfaced to a Bailey NETWORK 90 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Turso, J.A.; Garcia, H.E.; Ghie, M.H.; Dharap, S.; Lee, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Modular Modeling System was adapted for real-time simulation testing of diagnostic expert systems in 1987. The early approach utilized an available general purpose mainframe computer which operated the simulation and diagnostic program in the multitasking environment of the mainframe. That research program was subsequently expanded to intelligent distributed control applications incorporating microprocessor based controllers with the aid of an equipment grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Bailey NETWORK 90 microprocessor-based control system, acquired with the NSF grant, has been operational since April of 1990 and has been interfaced to both VAX mainframe and PC simulations of power plant processes in order to test and demonstrate advanced control and diagnostic concepts. This paper discusses the variety of techniques that have been used and which are under development to interface simulations and other distributed control functions to the Penn State Bailey system

  14. An open source web interface for linking models to infrastructure system databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S.; Mohamed, K.; Harou, J. J.; Rheinheimer, D. E.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Meier, P.; Tilmant, A.; Rosenberg, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Models of networked engineered resource systems such as water or energy systems are often built collaboratively with developers from different domains working at different locations. These models can be linked to large scale real world databases, and they are constantly being improved and extended. As the development and application of these models becomes more sophisticated, and the computing power required for simulations and/or optimisations increases, so has the need for online services and tools which enable the efficient development and deployment of these models. Hydra Platform is an open source, web-based data management system, which allows modellers of network-based models to remotely store network topology and associated data in a generalised manner, allowing it to serve multiple disciplines. Hydra Platform uses a web API using JSON to allow external programs (referred to as `Apps') to interact with its stored networks and perform actions such as importing data, running models, or exporting the networks to different formats. Hydra Platform supports multiple users accessing the same network and has a suite of functions for managing users and data. We present ongoing development in Hydra Platform, the Hydra Web User Interface, through which users can collaboratively manage network data and models in a web browser. The web interface allows multiple users to graphically access, edit and share their networks, run apps and view results. Through apps, which are located on the server, the web interface can give users access to external data sources and models without the need to install or configure any software. This also ensures model results can be reproduced by removing platform or version dependence. Managing data and deploying models via the web interface provides a way for multiple modellers to collaboratively manage data, deploy and monitor model runs and analyse results.

  15. Computerized operator support system with new man-machine interface for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, K.; Naito, N.; Sugawara, M.; Sato, N.; Mori, N.; Tai, I.; Fukumoto, A.; Tsuchida, M.

    1984-01-01

    Improvement of the man-machine interface of nuclear power plants is an important contribution to the further enhancement of operational safety. In addition, recent advances in computer technology seem to offer the greatest opportunity to date for achieving improvement in the man-machine interface. The development of a computerized operator support system for BWRs has been undertaken since 1980 with the support of the Japanese Government. The conceptual design of this system is based on the role of the operators. The main functions are standby system management, disturbance analysis and post-trip operational guidance. The objective of the standby system management is to monitor the standby status of the engineered safety feature during normal operation to assure its proper functioning at the onset of emergency situations. The disturbance analysis system detects disturbances in the plant in their early stages and informs the plant operators about, for example, the cause of the disturbances, the plant status and possible propagations. Consequently, operators can take corrective actions to prevent unnecessary plant shutdown. The objective of the post trip operational guide is to support operators in diagnosis and corrective action after a plant trip. Its functions are to monitor the performance of the engineered safety feature, to identify the plant status and to guide the appropriate corrective action to achieve safe plant shutdown. The information from the computerized operator support system is supplied to operators through a colour CRT operator console. The authors have evaluated the performance of various new man-machine interfacing tools and proposed a new operator console design. A prototype system has been developed and verification/validation is proceeding with a BWR plant simulator. (author)

  16. MATLAB Graphical User Interface based Fuzzy Logic Controllers for Liquid Level Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immanuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and development of MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI based fuzzy logic controller (FLC and integrated fuzzy logic controller (IFLC for liquid level control system. The main objective of this work is to design and develop a MATLAB based GUI for liquid level control system. In this application, the inflow of water to the tank is controlled. The necessary algorithm is developed in MATLAB. The liquid level in a cylindrical tank is measured by using differential-pressure sensor (SX05DN. The sensor converts change in water level into change in resistance which is further converted into voltage and applied to an instrumentation amplifier. The computer acquires voltage through Analog to Digital–Digital to Analog Converter (AD-DA board designed indigenously for this application. The Digital Input/ Output and Timer (DIOT card is used to interface AD-DA board with PC. To control liquid level, MATLAB/GUI based PIDC, FLC, and IFLC is developed. The performance of these controllers is tested for a step input of 15 cm. The results show that IFLC exhibits the best response in terms of less rise time and settling time, negligible overshoot and undershoot. The proposed MATLAB/GUI provides various graphical user interfaces for easy access, tuning, and visual display of performance of controllers implemented.

  17. Secure Web-based Ground System User Interfaces over the Open Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, James H.; Murray, Henry L.; Hunt, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    A prototype has been developed which makes use of commercially available products in conjunction with the Java programming language to provide a secure user interface for command and control over the open Internet. This paper reports successful demonstration of: (1) Security over the Internet, including encryption and certification; (2) Integration of Java applets with a COTS command and control product; (3) Remote spacecraft commanding using the Internet. The Java-based Spacecraft Web Interface to Telemetry and Command Handling (Jswitch) ground system prototype provides these capabilities. This activity demonstrates the use and integration of current technologies to enable a spacecraft engineer or flight operator to monitor and control a spacecraft from a user interface communicating over the open Internet using standard World Wide Web (WWW) protocols and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products. The core command and control functions are provided by the COTS Epoch 2000 product. The standard WWW tools and browsers are used in conjunction with the Java programming technology. Security is provided with the current encryption and certification technology. This system prototype is a step in the direction of giving scientist and flight operators Web-based access to instrument, payload, and spacecraft data.

  18. Development of a Common User Interface for the Launch Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Jean C.

    1991-01-01

    The Launch Decision Support System (LDSS) is software to be used by the NASA Test Director (NTD) in the firing room during countdown. This software is designed to assist the NTD with time management, that is, when to resume from a hold condition. This software will assist the NTD in making and evaluating alternate plans and will keep him advised of the existing situation. As such, the interface to this software must be designed to provide the maximum amount of information in the clearest fashion and in a timely manner. This research involves applying user interface guidelines to a mature prototype of LDSS and developing displays that will enable the users to easily and efficiently obtain information from the LDSS displays. This research also extends previous work on organizing and prioritizing human-computer interaction knowledge.

  19. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  20. XUIMS the X-Window User Interface Management System at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Eynden, M

    1995-01-01

    The CERN X-Window User Interface Management System (XUIMS) is a modular and highly configurable software development environment allowing the interactive design, prototyping, and production of OSF/Motif Human Computer Interfaces (HCI). Fully compliant with the X11R5 and OSF/Motif industry standards, XUIMS covers complex software areas like the development of schematics, the visualization and on-line interactions with 2D and 3D scientific data, the display of relational database data, and the direct access to CERN SPS and LEP accelerators equipment. The guarantee of consistency across the applications and the encapsulation of complex functionality in re-usable and user-friendly components has also been implemented through the development of home made graphical objects (widgets) and templates. The XUIMS environment is built with commercial software products integrated in the CERN SPS and LEP controls infrastructure with a very limited home-made effort. Productivity and quality have been improved through less co...

  1. Simulation of rarefied gas flows in atmospheric pressure interfaces for mass spectrometry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the gas dynamics of the atmospheric pressure interface is very important for the development of mass spectrometry systems with high sensitivity. While the gas flows at high pressure (>1 Torr) and low pressure (pressure stage (1 to 10(-3) Torr) remains challenging. In this study, we used the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) method to develop the gas dynamic simulations for the continuous and discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces (API), with different focuses on the ion transfer by gas flows through a skimmer or directly from the atmospheric pressure to a vacuum stage, respectively. The impacts by the skimmer location in the continuous API and the temporal evolvement of the gas flow with a discontinuous API were characterized, which provide a solid base for the instrument design and performance improvement.

  2. Examination of Color-Lighting Control System Using Colored Paper User Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, Full-Color LED Lighting that can be changed to various color such as red, green, blue has been appeared with development of LED Lighting. By Color-Lighting control, users affected such as concentrating and relaxing. Therefore, Color-lighting control will spread to various place such as home, offices, stations. However color-lighting control affected some disturbance such as daylight, display when Full-Color LED controlled indoors. Also, information devices control get difficult with information technology develop. I propose Color-Lighting Control System using Colored Paper User Interface(CLC/CPUI. The purpose of CLC/CPUI is that anyone can intuitively control Full-Color LED Lighting. CLC/CPUI uses colored paper as user interface by sensing the paper. CLC/CPUI realizes lighting color that user demanded to do feedback control. I conduct accuracy verification experiment of CLC/CPUI.

  3. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR. Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1, followed by interface building (step 2 with subsequent testing (step 3, and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4. The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS, and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  4. Latency Analysis of Systems with Multiple Interfaces for Ultra-Reliable M2M Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen; Popovski, Petar

    2016-01-01

    One of the ways to satisfy the requirements of ultra-reliable low latency communication for mission critical Machine-type Communications (MTC) applications is to integrate multiple communication interfaces. In order to estimate the performance in terms of latency and reliability of such an integr......One of the ways to satisfy the requirements of ultra-reliable low latency communication for mission critical Machine-type Communications (MTC) applications is to integrate multiple communication interfaces. In order to estimate the performance in terms of latency and reliability...... of such an integrated communication system, we propose an analysis framework that combines traditional reliability models with technology-specific latency probability distributions. In our proposed model we demonstrate how failure correlation between technologies can be taken into account. We show for the considered...

  5. Four Principles for User Interface Design of Computerised Clinical Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Marion Berg; Nøhr, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract.  The paper presents results from design of a user interface for a Computerised Clinical Decision Support System (CSSS). The ambition has been to design Human-Computer Interaction that can minimise medication errors. Through an iterative design process a digital prototype for prescription...... of medicine has been developed. This paper presents results from the formative evaluation of the prototype conducted in a simulation laboratory with ten participating physicians. Data from the simulation is analysed by use of theory on how users perceive information. The conclusion is a model, which...... four interaction principles are integrated in the design of user interfaces for CDSS, i.e. the model is an integrated model which we suggest as a guide for interaction design when working with preventing medication errors....

  6. Taking account of human factors for interface assessment and design in monitoring automated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musso, J.-F.; Sicard, Y.; Martin, M.

    1990-01-01

    Optimum balance between control means and the operator capacities is sought for to achieve computerization of Man-Machine interfaces. Observation of the diagnosis activity of populations of operators in situation on simulators enables design criteria to be defined which are well-suited to the characteristics of the tasks with which they are confronted. This observation provides an assessment of the interfaces from the standpoint of the graphic layer, of the Human behaviour induced by the Machine and of the nature of the interaction between these two systems. This requires an original approach dialectically involving cognitive psychology, dynamic management of the knowledge bases (artificial intelligence) in a critical industrial control and monitoring application. (author)

  7. Automatic Supervision And Fault Detection In PV System By Wireless Sensors With Interfacing By Labview Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra M Abbas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work a wireless monitoring system are designed for automatic detection localization fault in photovoltaic system. In order to avoid the use of modeling and simulation of the PV system we detected the fault by monitoring the output of each individual photovoltaic panel connected in the system by Arduino and transmit this data wirelessly to laptop then interface it by LabVIEW program which made comparison between this data and the measured data taking from reference module at the same condition. The proposed method is very simple but effective detecting and diagnosing the main faults of a PV system and was experimentally validated and has demonstrated its effectiveness in the detection and diagnosing of main faults present in the DC side of PV system.

  8. Development and Evaluation of Disaster Information Management System Using Digital Pens and Tabletop User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Hidemi; Kobayashi, Kazue; Satou, Kenji; Kawana, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomohiro

    Most traditional disaster information systems are necessary to post expert staff with high computer literacy to operate the system quickly and correctly in the tense situation when a disaster occurs. However, in the current disaster response system of local governments, it is not easy for local governments to post such expert staff because they are struggling with staff cuts due to administrative and fiscal reform. In this research, we propose a disaster information management system that can be easily operated, even under the disorderly conditions of a disaster, by municipal personnel in charge of disaster management. This system achieves usability enabling easy input of damage information, even by local government staff with no expertise, by using a digital pen and tabletop user interface. Evaluation was conducted by prospective users using a prototype, and the evaluation results are satisfactory with regard to the function and operationality of the proposed system.

  9. Power System Stabilizer Design Based on a Particle Swarm Optimization Multiobjective Function Implemented Under Graphical Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghouraf Djamel Eddine

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Power system stability considered a necessary condition for normal functioning of an electrical network. The role of regulation and control systems is to ensure that stability by determining the essential elements that influence it. This paper proposes a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO based multiobjective function to tuning optimal parameters of Power System Stabilizer (PSS; this later is used as auxiliary to generator excitation system in order to damp electro mechanicals oscillations of the rotor and consequently improve Power system stability. The computer simulation results obtained by developed graphical user interface (GUI have proved the efficiency of PSS optimized by a Particle Swarm Optimization, in comparison with a conventional PSS, showing stable   system   responses   almost   insensitive   to   large parameter variations.Our present study was performed using a GUI realized under MATLAB in our work.

  10. Human-machine interface (HMI) report for 241-SY-101 data acquisition system (DACS) upgrade study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truitt, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides an independent evaluation of information for a Windows based Human Machine Interface (HMI) to replace the existing DOS based Iconics HMI currently used in the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used at Tank 241-SY-101. A fundamental reason for this evaluation is because of the difficulty of maintaining the system with obsolete, unsupported software. The DACS uses a software operator interface (Genesis for DOS HMI) that is no longer supported by its manufacturer, Iconics. In addition to its obsolescence, it is complex and difficult to train additional personnel on. The FY 1997 budget allocated $40K for phase 1 of a software/hardware upgrade that would have allowed the old DOS based system to be replaced by a current Windows based system. Unfortunately, budget constraints during FY 1997 has prompted deferral of the upgrade. The upgrade needs to be performed at the earliest possible time, before other failures render the system useless. Once completed, the upgrade could alleviate other concerns: spare pump software may be able to be incorporated into the same software as the existing pump, thereby eliminating the parallel path dilemma; and the newer, less complex software should expedite training of future personnel, and in the process, require that less technical time be required to maintain the system

  11. Interactions at the head-tape interface of a linear tape system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, M.A.

    2001-08-01

    Many of the recent improvements in the capacity of data cartridge systems have been achieved through the use of narrower tracks, higher linear densities and continuous servo tracking with multi-channel heads. These changes have produced new tribological problems at the head/tape interface. It is crucial that the tribology of such systems is understood and this will continue since increasing storage capacities and faster transfer rates are constantly being sought. Chemical changes in the surface of single and dual layer MP tape have been correlated to signal performance. An accelerated tape tester, consisting of a custom made cycler ( l oop tester ) , was used to ascertain if results could be produced that were representative of a real tape drive system. A second set of experiments used a modified tape drive (Georgens cycler), which allowed the effects of the tape transport system on the tape surface to be studied. To isolate any effects on the tape surface due to the head/tape interface, read/write heads were not fitted to the cycler. Two further sets of experiments were conducted which included a head in the tape path. This allowed the effects of the head/tape interface on the physical and chemical properties of the head and tape surfaces to be investigated. It was during the final set of experiments that the effect on the head/tape interface, of an energised MR element, was investigated. The effect of operating each cycler at extreme relative humidity and temperature was investigated through the use of an environmental chamber. Extensive use was made of surface specific analytical techniques such as XPS, AFM, AES and SEM to study the physical and chemical changes that occur at the head/tape interface. Results showed that cycling improved the signal performance of all the tapes tested. The data cartridge drive belt had an effect on the chemical properties of the tape surface on which it was in contact. Also binder degradation occurred for each tape and appeared to

  12. Hybrid EEG-EOG brain-computer interface system for practical machine control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsawad, Yunyong; Wongsawat, Yodchanan; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2010-01-01

    Practical issues such as accuracy with various subjects, number of sensors, and time for training are important problems of existing brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. In this paper, we propose a hybrid framework for the BCI system that can make machine control more practical. The electrooculogram (EOG) is employed to control the machine in the left and right directions while the electroencephalogram (EEG) is employed to control the forword, no action, and complete stop motions of the machine. By using only 2-channel biosignals, the average classification accuracy of more than 95% can be achieved.

  13. Modeling reliability measurement of interface on information system: Towards the forensic of rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. K. M.; Sitompul, Darwin; Harahap, Marwan

    2018-02-01

    Today almost all machines depend on the software. As a software and hardware system depends also on the rules that are the procedures for its use. If the procedure or program can be reliably characterized by involving the concept of graph, logic, and probability, then regulatory strength can also be measured accordingly. Therefore, this paper initiates an enumeration model to measure the reliability of interfaces based on the case of information systems supported by the rules of use by the relevant agencies. An enumeration model is obtained based on software reliability calculation.

  14. The development and evaluation of guidelines for the review of advanced human-system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced control rooms for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes a general approach to advanced human-system interface review, development of human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems, and the results of a guideline test and evaluation program

  15. The use of DBMS and document oriented interface in the TPLAN-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, F.N.

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes the user-friendly input/output interface (DOI) for the TPLAN database management system that includes high quality output in Latex format from databases and retrieves selected information from Latex document (according to a specific grammar that includes a subset of the Latex grammar) to be stored in the databases. The TPLAN system was developed to manage the annual Topical Plan of JINR. It was written in 'C' and DOS Fox Base/Fox Pro for IBM comparable personal computer. It was also proto typed in Visual Basic and Windows Access using standard V B controls. 8 refs.; 7 figs. (author)

  16. An X window based graphics user interface for radiation information processing system developed with object-oriented programming technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Wenhuan; Fu Changqing; Kang Kejun

    1993-01-01

    X Window is a network-oriented and network transparent windowing system, and now dominant in the Unix domain. The object-oriented programming technology can be used to change the extensibility of a software system remarkably. An introduction to graphics user interface is given. And how to develop a graphics user interface for radiation information processing system with object-oriented programming technology, which is based on X Window and independent of application is described briefly

  17. Emerging interface dipole versus screening effect in copolymer/metal nano-layered systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, V., E-mail: v.torrisi@unict.it [Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology (LAMSUN), Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125, Catania (Italy); Ruffino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia-Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Liscio, A. [Istituto per la Sintesi e la Fotoreattività CNR, via Gobetti 101, 40129, Bologna (Italy); Grimaldi, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia-Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Marletta, G. [Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology (LAMSUN), Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125, Catania (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Gold/copolymer multilayered thin films are prepared. • Mapping of the multilayers surface potential are performed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. • Surface potential is controlled by the thickness and the surface coverage of the gold layer. • The work function of the gold layer is influenced by the underlying copolymer layer. - Abstract: Despite to the importance on the charge carrier injection and transport at organic/metal interface, there is yet an incomplete estimation of the various contribution to the overall dipole. This work shows how the mapping of the surface potential performed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) allows the direct observation of the interface dipole within an organic/metal multilayered structure. Moreover, we show how the sub-surface sensitivity of the KPFM depends on the thickness and surface coverage of the metallic layer. This paper proposes a way to control the surface potential of the exposed layer of an hybrid layered system by controlling the interface dipole at the organic/metal interface as a function of the nanometer scale thickness and the surface coverage of the metallic layer. We obtained a layered system constituted by repeated sequence of a copolymer film, poly(n-butylacrylate)-b-polyacrilic acid, and Au layer. We compared the results obtained by means of scanning probe microscopy technique with the results of the KPFM technique, that allows us to obtain high-contrast images of the underlying layer of copolymer behind a typical threshold, on the nanoscale, of the thickness of the metal layer. We considered the effect of the morphology of the gold layer on the covered area at different thicknesses by using the scanning electron microscopy technique. This finding represents a step forward towards the using of dynamic atomic force microscopy based characterization to explore the electrical properties of the sub-surface states of layered nanohybrid, that is a critical point for

  18. Human-machine interfaces based on EMG and EEG applied to robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarcinelli-Filho Mario

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two different Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs were developed, both based on electro-biological signals. One is based on the EMG signal and the other is based on the EEG signal. Two major features of such interfaces are their relatively simple data acquisition and processing systems, which need just a few hardware and software resources, so that they are, computationally and financially speaking, low cost solutions. Both interfaces were applied to robotic systems, and their performances are analyzed here. The EMG-based HMI was tested in a mobile robot, while the EEG-based HMI was tested in a mobile robot and a robotic manipulator as well. Results Experiments using the EMG-based HMI were carried out by eight individuals, who were asked to accomplish ten eye blinks with each eye, in order to test the eye blink detection algorithm. An average rightness rate of about 95% reached by individuals with the ability to blink both eyes allowed to conclude that the system could be used to command devices. Experiments with EEG consisted of inviting 25 people (some of them had suffered cases of meningitis and epilepsy to test the system. All of them managed to deal with the HMI in only one training session. Most of them learnt how to use such HMI in less than 15 minutes. The minimum and maximum training times observed were 3 and 50 minutes, respectively. Conclusion Such works are the initial parts of a system to help people with neuromotor diseases, including those with severe dysfunctions. The next steps are to convert a commercial wheelchair in an autonomous mobile vehicle; to implement the HMI onboard the autonomous wheelchair thus obtained to assist people with motor diseases, and to explore the potentiality of EEG signals, making the EEG-based HMI more robust and faster, aiming at using it to help individuals with severe motor dysfunctions.

  19. A convertor and user interface to import CAD files into worldtoolkit virtual reality systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peter Hor-Ching

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a rapidly developing human-to-computer interface technology. VR can be considered as a three-dimensional computer-generated Virtual World (VW) which can sense particular aspects of a user's behavior, allow the user to manipulate the objects interactively, and render the VW at real-time accordingly. The user is totally immersed in the virtual world and feel the sense of transforming into that VW. NASA/MSFC Computer Application Virtual Environments (CAVE) has been developing the space-related VR applications since 1990. The VR systems in CAVE lab are based on VPL RB2 system which consists of a VPL RB2 control tower, an LX eyephone, an Isotrak polhemus sensor, two Fastrak polhemus sensors, a folk of Bird sensor, and two VPL DG2 DataGloves. A dynamics animator called Body Electric from VPL is used as the control system to interface with all the input/output devices and to provide the network communications as well as VR programming environment. The RB2 Swivel 3D is used as the modelling program to construct the VW's. A severe limitation of the VPL VR system is the use of RB2 Swivel 3D, which restricts the files to a maximum of 1020 objects and doesn't have the advanced graphics texture mapping. The other limitation is that the VPL VR system is a turn-key system which does not provide the flexibility for user to add new sensors and C language interface. Recently, NASA/MSFC CAVE lab provides VR systems built on Sense8 WorldToolKit (WTK) which is a C library for creating VR development environments. WTK provides device drivers for most of the sensors and eyephones available on the VR market. WTK accepts several CAD file formats, such as Sense8 Neutral File Format, AutoCAD DXF and 3D Studio file format, Wave Front OBJ file format, VideoScape GEO file format, Intergraph EMS stereolithographics and CATIA Stereolithographics STL file formats. WTK functions are object-oriented in their naming convention, are grouped into classes, and provide easy C

  20. Shielding Factor Method for producing effective cross sections: MINX/SPHINX and the CCCC interface system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Weisbin, C.R.; Paik, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Shielding Factor Method (SFM) is an economical designer-oriented method for producing the coarse-group space and energy self-shielded cross sections needed for reactor-core analysis. Extensive experience with the ETOX/1DX and ENDRUN/TDOWN systems has made the SFM the method of choice for most US fast-reactor design activities. The MINX/SPHINX system was designed to expand upon the capabilities of the older SFM codes and to incorporate the new standard interfaces for fast-reactor cross sections specified by the Committee for Computer Code Coordination (CCCC). MINX is the cross-section processor. It generates multigroup cross sections, shielding factors, and group-to-group transfer matriccs from ENDF/B-IV and writes them out as CCCC ISOTXS and BRKOXS files. It features detailed pointwise resonance reconstruction, accurate Doppler broadening, and an efficient treatment of anisotropic scattering. SPHINX is the space-and-energy shielding code. It uses specific mixture and geometry information together with equivalence principles to construct shielded macroscopic multigroup cross sections in as many as 240 groups. It then makes a flux calculation by diffusion or transport methods and collapses to an appropriate set of cell-averaged coarse-group effective cross sections. The integration of MINX and SPHINX with the CCCC interface system provides an efficient, accurate, and convenient system for producing effective cross sections for use in fast-reactor problems. The system has also proved useful in shielding and CTR applications. 3 figures, 4 tables

  1. Interface of data transmission for a transcutaneous communication system using the human body as transmission medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kato, Yoshikuni; Seino, Kazuyuki; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2012-03-01

    We have been developing a new transcutaneous communication system (TCS) that uses the human body as an electrical conductive medium. We studied an interface circuit of the TCS in order to optimize the leading data current into the human body effectively. Two types of LC circuits were examined for the interface circuit, one was an LC series-parallel circuit, and the other was a parallel-connected LC circuit. The LC series-parallel circuit connected to the body could be tuned to a resonant frequency, and the frequency was determined by the values of an external inductor and an external capacitor. Permittivity of the body did not influence the electrical resonance. Connection of the LC series-parallel circuit to the body degraded the quality factor Q because of the conductivity of the body. However, the LC parallel-connected circuit when connected to the body did not indicate electrical resonance. The LC series-parallel circuit restricts a direct current and a low-frequency current to flow into the body; thus, it can prevent a patient from getting a shock. According to the above results, an LC series-parallel circuit is an optimum interface circuit between the TCS and the body for leading data current into the body effectively and safely.

  2. Dynamics of Defects and Dopants in Complex Systems: Si and Oxide Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Taras; Yu, Decai; Banarjee, Sanjay; Hwang, Gyeong

    2004-10-01

    Fabrication of forthcoming nanometer scale electronic devices faces many difficulties including formation of extremely shallow and highly doped junctions. At present, ultra-low-energy ion implantation followed by high-temperature thermal annealing is most widely used to fabricate such ultra-shallow junctions. In the process, a great challenge lies in achieving precise control of redistribution and electrical activation of dopant impurities. Native defects (such as vacancies and interstitials) generated during implantation are known to be mainly responsible for the TED and also influence significantly the electrical activation/deactivation. Defect-dopant dynamics is rather well understood in crystalline Si and SiO2. However, little is known about their diffusion and annihilation (or precipitation) at the surfaces and interfaces, despite its growing importance in determining junction profiles as device dimensions get smaller. In this talk, we will present our density functional theory calculation results on the atomic and electronic structure and dynamical behavior of native defects and dopant-defect complexes in disordered/strained Si and oxide systems, such as i) clean and absorbent-modified Si(100) surface and subsurface layers, ii) amorphous-crystalline Si interfaces and iii) amorphous SiO2/Si interfaces. The fundamental understanding and data is essential in developing a comprehensive kinetic model for junction formation, which would contribute greatly in improving current process technologies.

  3. PCIE interface design for high-speed image storage system based on SSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiming

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes and implements a standard interface of miniaturized high-speed image storage system, which combines PowerPC with FPGA and utilizes PCIE bus as the high speed switching channel. Attached to the PowerPC, mSATA interface SSD(Solid State Drive) realizes RAID3 array storage. At the same time, a high-speed real-time image compression patent IP core also can be embedded in FPGA, which is in the leading domestic level with compression rate and image quality, making that the system can record higher image data rate or achieve longer recording time. The notebook memory card buckle type design is used in the mSATA interface SSD, which make it possible to complete the replacement in 5 seconds just using single hand, thus the total length of repeated recordings is increased. MSI (Message Signaled Interrupts) interruption guarantees the stability and reliability of continuous DMA transmission. Furthermore, only through the gigabit network, the remote display, control and upload to backup function can be realized. According to an optional 25 frame/s or 30 frame/s, upload speeds can be up to more than 84 MB/s. Compared with the existing FLASH array high-speed memory systems, it has higher degree of modularity, better stability and higher efficiency on development, maintenance and upgrading. Its data access rate is up to 300MB/s, realizing the high speed image storage system miniaturization, standardization and modularization, thus it is fit for image acquisition, storage and real-time transmission to server on mobile equipment.

  4. Vision based interface system for hands free control of an intelligent wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Eun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the shift of the age structure in today's populations, the necessities for developing the devices or technologies to support them have been increasing. Traditionally, the wheelchair, including powered and manual ones, is the most popular and important rehabilitation/assistive device for the disabled and the elderly. However, it is still highly restricted especially for severely disabled. As a solution to this, the Intelligent Wheelchairs (IWs have received considerable attention as mobility aids. The purpose of this work is to develop the IW interface for providing more convenient and efficient interface to the people the disability in their limbs. Methods This paper proposes an intelligent wheelchair (IW control system for the people with various disabilities. To facilitate a wide variety of user abilities, the proposed system involves the use of face-inclination and mouth-shape information, where the direction of an IW is determined by the inclination of the user's face, while proceeding and stopping are determined by the shapes of the user's mouth. Our system is composed of electric powered wheelchair, data acquisition board, ultrasonic/infra-red sensors, a PC camera, and vision system. Then the vision system to analyze user's gestures is performed by three stages: detector, recognizer, and converter. In the detector, the facial region of the intended user is first obtained using Adaboost, thereafter the mouth region is detected based on edge information. The extracted features are sent to the recognizer, which recognizes the face inclination and mouth shape using statistical analysis and K-means clustering, respectively. These recognition results are then delivered to the converter to control the wheelchair. Result & conclusion The advantages of the proposed system include 1 accurate recognition of user's intention with minimal user motion and 2 robustness to a cluttered background and the time-varying illumination

  5. Human-Computer Interface Development: Concepts and Systems for its Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hartson, H. Rex; Hix, Deborah

    1986-01-01

    Human-computer interface management, from a computer science viewpoint, focuses on the process of developing quality human computer interfaces, including their representation, design, implementation, execution, evaluation, and maintenance. This survey presents important concepts of interface management: dialogue independence, structural modeling, specification, rapid prototyping, holistic software engineering, control structures, and support environments, including User Interface Management S...

  6. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  7. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment...

  8. The graphics-based human interface to the DISYS diagnostic/control guidance system at EBR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Chavez, C.; Kamarthi, S.; Dharap, S.; Lindsay, R.W.; Staffon, J.

    1990-01-01

    An initial graphics based interface to the real-time DISYS diagnostic system has been developed using the multi-tasking capabilities of the UNIX operating system and X-Windows 11 Xlib graphics library. This system is interfaced to live plant data at the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2) for the Argon Cooling System of fuel handling operations and the steam plant. The interface includes an intelligent process schematic which highlights problematic components and sensors based on the results of the diagnostic computations. If further explanation of a faulted component is required, the user can call up a display of the diagnostic computations presented in a tree-like diagram. Numerical data on the process schematic and optional diagnostic tree are updated as new real-time data becomes available. The initial X-Windows 11 based interface will be further enhanced using VI Corporation DATAVIEWS graphical data base software. 5 refs., 6 figs

  9. Medical Data Manager an Interface between PACS and the gLite Data Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Montagnat, Johan; Texier, Romain; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Baud, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The medical imaging community uses the DICOM image format and protocol to store and exchange data. The Medical Data Manager (MDM) is an interface between DICOM compliant systems such as PACS and the EGEE Data Management System. It opens hospital imaging networks to the world scale Grid while protecting sensitive medical data. It can be accessed transparently from any gLite service. It is an important milestone towards adoption of Grid technologies in the medical imaging community. Hospitals continuously produce tremendous amounts of image data that is managed by local PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems). These systems are often limited to a local network access although the community experiences a growing interest for data sharing and remote processing. Indeed, patient data is often spread out different medical data acquisition centers. Furthermore, researchers in the area often need to analyze large populations whose data can be gathered through federations of PACS. Opening PACS to the outer I...

  10. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gervasio Varela

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC and Ambient Intelligence (AmI systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  11. Interface diagram: Design tool for supporting the development of modularity in complex product systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Peter Lomholt; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Harlou, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    For products with a myriad of systems, groups of specialised engineers develop entire technical sub-systems, and great effort is needed to integrate these systems for fulfilling the product’s intended properties describing its purposeful behaviour. This way of developing products gets even more...... complex when using a mass customisation strategy because standard designs (reusable modules) have to be designed to fit a range of products. This product development set-up requires that engineers working in different technical domains collaborate and are able to share information in a unified way...... the activity of decomposing a product system into modules consisting of components developed by different engineering teams. The usefulness of the Interface diagram has been tested in an industrial development project showing positive results of shortening the lead time and minimising rework. Moreover...

  12. Development of intergrated accident management assessment technology; development of interface modules of risk-monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. K.; Park, S. K.; Seok, H.; Kim, D. K.; Han, J. K.; Park, B. R. [KOPEC, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    Based on the development of interface modules with FORTE.- DynaRM can quantify risk model very fast (Very frequent risk model quantification is needed for configuration risk management).- risk monitoring system technology transfer to foreign NPPs. Contribution to component failure and maintenance control automation with the development of Tagging control System. On-Line risk monitoring system development by joint team between Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and KOPEC is a request by KEPCO. The softwares developed in this study is easily implemented at domestic NPPs without extra study or cost. Economic benefit and Software export to foreign NPPs are expected because of the development of technology related to risk monitoring system and its management. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  13. Minimally-Invasive Neural Interface for Distributed Wireless Electrocorticogram Recording Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sun-Il

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a minimally-invasive neural interface for distributed wireless electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording systems. The proposed interface equips all necessary components for ECoG recording, such as the high performance front-end integrated circuits, a fabricated flexible microelectrode array, and wireless communication inside a miniaturized custom-made platform. The multiple units of the interface systems can be deployed to cover a broad range of the target brain region and transmit signals via a built-in intra-skin communication (ISCOM) module. The core integrated circuit (IC) consists of 16-channel, low-power push-pull double-gated preamplifiers, in-channel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADC) with a single-clocked bootstrapping switch and a time-delayed control unit, an ISCOM module for wireless data transfer through the skin instead of a power-hungry RF wireless transmitter, and a monolithic voltage/current reference generator to support the aforementioned analog and mixed-signal circuit blocks. The IC was fabricated using 250 nm CMOS processes in an area of 3.2 × 0.9 mm2 and achieved the low-power operation of 2.5 µW per channel. Input-referred noise was measured as 5.62 µVrms for 10 Hz to 10 kHz and ENOB of 7.21 at 31.25 kS/s. The implemented system successfully recorded multi-channel neural activities in vivo from a primate and demonstrated modular expandability using the ISCOM with power consumption of 160 µW. PMID:29342103

  14. Minimally-Invasive Neural Interface for Distributed Wireless Electrocorticogram Recording Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sun-Il; Park, Sung-Yun; Yoon, Euisik

    2018-01-17

    This paper presents a minimally-invasive neural interface for distributed wireless electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording systems. The proposed interface equips all necessary components for ECoG recording, such as the high performance front-end integrated circuits, a fabricated flexible microelectrode array, and wireless communication inside a miniaturized custom-made platform. The multiple units of the interface systems can be deployed to cover a broad range of the target brain region and transmit signals via a built-in intra-skin communication (ISCOM) module. The core integrated circuit (IC) consists of 16-channel, low-power push-pull double-gated preamplifiers, in-channel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADC) with a single-clocked bootstrapping switch and a time-delayed control unit, an ISCOM module for wireless data transfer through the skin instead of a power-hungry RF wireless transmitter, and a monolithic voltage/current reference generator to support the aforementioned analog and mixed-signal circuit blocks. The IC was fabricated using 250 nm CMOS processes in an area of 3.2 × 0.9 mm² and achieved the low-power operation of 2.5 µW per channel. Input-referred noise was measured as 5.62 µV rms for 10 Hz to 10 kHz and ENOB of 7.21 at 31.25 kS/s. The implemented system successfully recorded multi-channel neural activities in vivo from a primate and demonstrated modular expandability using the ISCOM with power consumption of 160 µW.

  15. A new approach to the phenomena at the interfaces of finely dispersed systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Lazarevic, Mihailo P

    2007-12-15

    A new idea has been applied for the elucidation of the electron and momentum transfer phenomena, at both rigid and deformable interfaces, in finely (micro-, nano-, atto-) dispersed systems. The electroviscoelastic behavior of, e.g., liquid/liquid interfaces (emulsions and double emulsions), is based on three forms of "instabilities"; these are rigid, elastic, and plastic. The events are understood as interactions between the internal (immanent) and external (incident) periodical physical fields. Since the events at the interfaces of finely dispersed systems must be considered at the molecular, atomic, and/or entities level it is inevitable to introduce the electron transfer phenomenon beside the classical heat, mass, and momentum transfer phenomena commonly used in chemical engineering. Therefore, an entity can be defined as the smallest indivisible element of matter that is related to the particular transfer phenomena. Hence, the entity can be either differential element of mass/demon, ion, phonon as quanta of acoustic energy, infon as quanta of information, photon, and electron. Three possible mathematical formalisms have been derived and discussed related to this physical formalism, i.e., to the developed theory of electroviscoelasticity. The first is the stretching tensor model, where the normal and tangential forces are considered, only in mathematical formalism, regardless of their origin (mechanical and/or electrical). The second is the classical integer-order van der Pol derivative model. Finally, the third model comprises an effort to generalize the previous van der Pol differential equations, both linear and nonlinear, where the ordinary time derivatives and integrals are replaced by corresponding fractional-order time derivatives and integrals of order p < 2 (p = n - delta, n = 1,2,delta < 1). In order to justify and corroborate a more general approach the obtained calculated results were compared to those experimentally measured using the representative

  16. Minimally-Invasive Neural Interface for Distributed Wireless Electrocorticogram Recording Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Il Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a minimally-invasive neural interface for distributed wireless electrocorticogram (ECoG recording systems. The proposed interface equips all necessary components for ECoG recording, such as the high performance front-end integrated circuits, a fabricated flexible microelectrode array, and wireless communication inside a miniaturized custom-made platform. The multiple units of the interface systems can be deployed to cover a broad range of the target brain region and transmit signals via a built-in intra-skin communication (ISCOM module. The core integrated circuit (IC consists of 16-channel, low-power push-pull double-gated preamplifiers, in-channel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADC with a single-clocked bootstrapping switch and a time-delayed control unit, an ISCOM module for wireless data transfer through the skin instead of a power-hungry RF wireless transmitter, and a monolithic voltage/current reference generator to support the aforementioned analog and mixed-signal circuit blocks. The IC was fabricated using 250 nm CMOS processes in an area of 3.2 × 0.9 mm2 and achieved the low-power operation of 2.5 µW per channel. Input-referred noise was measured as 5.62 µVrms for 10 Hz to 10 kHz and ENOB of 7.21 at 31.25 kS/s. The implemented system successfully recorded multi-channel neural activities in vivo from a primate and demonstrated modular expandability using the ISCOM with power consumption of 160 µW.

  17. Interfacing the septa movement (DC motor) equipment to the PS control system and the MIL1553 bus

    CERN Document Server

    Dehavay, Claude

    1993-01-01

    Continuing the rejuvenation of the PS Control system , it is planned to replace the Single Transceiver Hybrid used to interface the Septa Movement Equipment by a G64 system connected to the VME crate via the MIL1553 bus. This note explains the G64 hardware interface and details the standard message as defined in the Control Protocole for Power Converter, RF and Stepping Motor equipment.

  18. A High Density Electrophysiological Data Analysis System for a Peripheral Nerve Interface Communicating with Individual Neurons in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    microdevices. Cable to TDT Headplug fixed with dental cement Subcutaneous wires Regenerative microchannel electrode implant Figure 7...s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 9...nerve interface (μPNI) placed on the peripheral nervous system and custom- designed µCuff/µECoG interfaces on the central nervous system. A neuron

  19. Non-invasive brain-computer interface system: towards its application as assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Aloise, Fabio; Bufalari, Simona; Schalk, Gerwin; Oriolo, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2008-04-15

    The quality of life of people suffering from severe motor disabilities can benefit from the use of current assistive technology capable of ameliorating communication, house-environment management and mobility, according to the user's residual motor abilities. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can translate brain activity into signals that control external devices. Thus they can represent the only technology for severely paralyzed patients to increase or maintain their communication and control options. Here we report on a pilot study in which a system was implemented and validated to allow disabled persons to improve or recover their mobility (directly or by emulation) and communication within the surrounding environment. The system is based on a software controller that offers to the user a communication interface that is matched with the individual's residual motor abilities. Patients (n=14) with severe motor disabilities due to progressive neurodegenerative disorders were trained to use the system prototype under a rehabilitation program carried out in a house-like furnished space. All users utilized regular assistive control options (e.g., microswitches or head trackers). In addition, four subjects learned to operate the system by means of a non-invasive EEG-based BCI. This system was controlled by the subjects' voluntary modulations of EEG sensorimotor rhythms recorded on the scalp; this skill was learnt even though the subjects have not had control over their limbs for a long time. We conclude that such a prototype system, which integrates several different assistive technologies including a BCI system, can potentially facilitate the translation from pre-clinical demonstrations to a clinical useful BCI.

  20. A study on advanced man-machine interface system for autonomous nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Numano, Masayoshi; Fukuto, Junji; Sugasawa, Shinobu; Miyazaki, Keiko; Someya, Minoru; Haraki, Nobuo

    1994-01-01

    A man-machine interface(MMI) system of an autonomous nuclear power plant has an advanced function compared with that of the present nuclear power plants. The MMI has a function model of a plant state, and updates and revises this function model by itself. This paper describes the concept of autonomous nuclear power plants, a plant simulator of an autonomous power plant, a contracted function model of a plant state, three-dimensional color graphic display of a plant state, and an event-tree like expression for plant states. (author)

  1. Data flow methods for dynamic system simulation - A CSSL-IV microcomputer network interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoui, A.; Karplus, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A major problem in employing networks of microcomputers for the real-time simulation of complex systems is to allocate computational tasks to the various microcomputers in such a way that idle time and time lost in interprocess communication is minimized. The research reported in this paper is directed to the development of a software interface between a higher-level simulation language and a network of microcomputers. A CSSL-IV source program is translated to a data flow graph. This graph is then analyzed automatically so as to allocate computing tasks to the various processors.

  2. High accuracy interface characterization of three phase material systems in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Hansen, Karin Vels; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    by tomography schemes such as focused ion beam serial sectioning or micro-computed tomography. We present a high accuracy method of calculating two phase surface areas and triple phase length of triple phase systems from subvoxel accuracy segmentations of constituent phases. The method performs a three phase...... polygonization of the interface boundaries which results in a non-manifold mesh of connected faces. We show how the triple phase boundaries can be extracted as connected curve loops without branches. The accuracy of the method is analyzed by calculations on geometrical primitives...

  3. An in-situ RBS system for measuring nuclides adsorbed at the liquid-solid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Yuhara, J.; Ishigami, R. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-01

    An in-situ RBS system has been developed in which heavier nuclides adsorbed at the inner surface of a thin lighter window specimen of liquid container in order to determine the rate constants for their sorption and release at the interface. The testing of a thin silicon window of the sample assembly, in which Xe gas of one atmosphere was enclosed, against the bombardment of the probing ion beam has been performed. A desorption behavior of a lead layer adsorbed at the SiO{sub 2} layer of silicon window surface into deionized water has been measured as a preliminary experiment. (author)

  4. Well-posedness for the compressible Navier–Stokes–Lamé system with a free interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukavica, Igor; Tuffaha, Amjad

    2012-01-01

    We address the system of fluid–structure interaction consisting of a compressible Navier–Stokes equation coupled with an elasticity equation, with the velocity and stress continuity requirements across the free moving interface. We prove the a priori estimates for existence of solutions when the initial velocity belongs to H 3 , the initial density is bounded from below and belongs to H 3/2+r , where r > 0, and the initial velocity of the displacement is in H 3/2+r . (paper)

  5. Computational Virtual Reality (VR) as a human-computer interface in the operation of telerobotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejczy, Antal K.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the application of computer graphics or 'virtual reality' (VR) techniques as a human-computer interface tool in the operation of telerobotic systems. VR techniques offer very valuable task realization aids for planning, previewing and predicting robotic actions, operator training, and for visual perception of non-visible events like contact forces in robotic tasks. The utility of computer graphics in telerobotic operation can be significantly enhanced by high-fidelity calibration of virtual reality images to actual TV camera images. This calibration will even permit the creation of artificial (synthetic) views of task scenes for which no TV camera views are available.

  6. Towards Effective Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces Dedicated to Gait Rehabilitation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Castermans

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the field of walk rehabilitation. Motor cortex signals in bipedal monkeys have been interpreted to predict walk kinematics. Epidural electrical stimulation in rats and in one young paraplegic has been realized to partially restore motor control after spinal cord injury. However, these experimental trials are far from being applicable to all patients suffering from motor impairments. Therefore, it is thought that more simple rehabilitation systems are desirable in the meanwhile. The goal of this review is to describe and summarize the progress made in the development of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces dedicated to motor rehabilitation systems. In the first part, the main principles of human locomotion control are presented. The paper then focuses on the mechanisms of supra-spinal centers active during gait, including results from electroencephalography, functional brain imaging technologies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, positron-emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT] and invasive studies. The first brain-computer interface (BCI applications to gait rehabilitation are then presented, with a discussion about the different strategies developed in the field. The challenges to raise for future systems are identified and discussed. Finally, we present some proposals to address these challenges, in order to contribute to the improvement of BCI for gait rehabilitation.

  7. Efficient decoding with steady-state Kalman filter in neural interface systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Wasim Q; Truccolo, Wilson; Brown, Emery N; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2011-02-01

    The Kalman filter is commonly used in neural interface systems to decode neural activity and estimate the desired movement kinematics. We analyze a low-complexity Kalman filter implementation in which the filter gain is approximated by its steady-state form, computed offline before real-time decoding commences. We evaluate its performance using human motor cortical spike train data obtained from an intracortical recording array as part of an ongoing pilot clinical trial. We demonstrate that the standard Kalman filter gain converges to within 95% of the steady-state filter gain in 1.5±0.5 s (mean ±s.d.). The difference in the intended movement velocity decoded by the two filters vanishes within 5 s, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 between the two decoded velocities over the session length. We also find that the steady-state Kalman filter reduces the computational load (algorithm execution time) for decoding the firing rates of 25±3 single units by a factor of 7.0±0.9. We expect that the gain in computational efficiency will be much higher in systems with larger neural ensembles. The steady-state filter can thus provide substantial runtime efficiency at little cost in terms of estimation accuracy. This far more efficient neural decoding approach will facilitate the practical implementation of future large-dimensional, multisignal neural interface systems.

  8. Interfacing systems LOCAs [Loss of Coolant Accidents] at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun; Fitzpatrick, R.; Stoyanov, S.

    1987-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) effort towards the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) at Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs).'' For BWRs, intersystem LOCA have typically either not been considered in probabilistic risk analyses, or if considered, were judged to contribute little to the risk estimates because of their perceived low frequency of occurrence. However, recent operating experience indicates that the pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in BWRs may not adequately protect against overpressurization of low pressure systems. The objective of this paper is to present the results of a study which analyzed interfacing system LOCA at several BWRs. The BWRs were selected to best represent a spectrum of BWRs in service using industry operating event experience and plant-specific information/configurations. The results presented here include some possible changes in test requirements/practices as well as an evaluation of their reduction potential in terms of core damage frequency

  9. Security Risks, Low-tech User Interfaces, and Implantable Medical Devices: A Case Study with Insulin Pump Infusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Nathanael R [ORNL; Kohno, Tadayoshi [University of Washington, Seattle

    2012-01-01

    Portable implantable medical device systems are playing a larger role in modern health care. Increasing attention is now being given to the wireless control interface of these systems. Our position is that wireless security in portable implantable medical device systems is just a part of the overall system security, and increased attention is needed to address low-tech security issues.

  10. Effects of Dental Implant-abutment Interfaces on the Reliability of Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, by analyzing the effects of two different kinds of implant-abutment connection interfaces under the same working condition on the mechanical and fatigue performances of the implant system as well as on the surrounding bones, we intend to study such effects on the reliability of the implants and provide a theoretical basis for the design and clinical application of dental implant systems. For the purpose, we adopt a 3-D modeling method to establish the model, and use FEA (finite element analysis to carry out static mechanic and fatigue analysis on the implant system and its surrounding bones; then we make the two implant systems, and carry out fatigue tests on a dynamic fatigue testing machine to verify the FEA results. After comparing the results from the two different systems, we find that the stress distribution and fatigue safety factor of the system which has deeper axial matching of the taper connection are better than those of the other system, that is to say, between the two major elements of a implant system, the axial length of the connecting taper and the size of the hexagon, the former has greater effects than the latter. When the axial matching is deeper, the stress distribution of the implant system will be better, the fatigue safety factor will be higher, and the implant system will be more reliable.

  11. Goal-recognition-based adaptive brain-computer interface for navigating immersive robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Ebert, Felix; Peer, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    This work proposes principled strategies for self-adaptations in EEG-based Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) as a way out of the bandwidth bottleneck resulting from the considerable mismatch between the low-bandwidth interface and the bandwidth-hungry application, and a way to enable fluent and intuitive interaction in embodiment systems. The main focus is laid upon inferring the hidden target goals of users while navigating in a remote environment as a basis for possible adaptations. To reason about possible user goals, a general user-agnostic Bayesian update rule is devised to be recursively applied upon the arrival of evidences, i.e. user input and user gaze. Experiments were conducted with healthy subjects within robotic embodiment settings to evaluate the proposed method. These experiments varied along three factors: the type of the robot/environment (simulated and physical), the type of the interface (keyboard or BCI), and the way goal recognition (GR) is used to guide a simple shared control (SC) driving scheme. Our results show that the proposed GR algorithm is able to track and infer the hidden user goals with relatively high precision and recall. Further, the realized SC driving scheme benefits from the output of the GR system and is able to reduce the user effort needed to accomplish the assigned tasks. Despite the fact that the BCI requires higher effort compared to the keyboard conditions, most subjects were able to complete the assigned tasks, and the proposed GR system is additionally shown able to handle the uncertainty in user input during SSVEP-based interaction. The SC application of the belief vector indicates that the benefits of the GR module are more pronounced for BCIs, compared to the keyboard interface. Being based on intuitive heuristics that model the behavior of the general population during the execution of navigation tasks, the proposed GR method can be used without prior tuning for the individual users. The proposed methods can be

  12. Goal-recognition-based adaptive brain-computer interface for navigating immersive robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Alqumsan, Mohammad; Ebert, Felix; Peer, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    Objective. This work proposes principled strategies for self-adaptations in EEG-based Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) as a way out of the bandwidth bottleneck resulting from the considerable mismatch between the low-bandwidth interface and the bandwidth-hungry application, and a way to enable fluent and intuitive interaction in embodiment systems. The main focus is laid upon inferring the hidden target goals of users while navigating in a remote environment as a basis for possible adaptations. Approach. To reason about possible user goals, a general user-agnostic Bayesian update rule is devised to be recursively applied upon the arrival of evidences, i.e. user input and user gaze. Experiments were conducted with healthy subjects within robotic embodiment settings to evaluate the proposed method. These experiments varied along three factors: the type of the robot/environment (simulated and physical), the type of the interface (keyboard or BCI), and the way goal recognition (GR) is used to guide a simple shared control (SC) driving scheme. Main results. Our results show that the proposed GR algorithm is able to track and infer the hidden user goals with relatively high precision and recall. Further, the realized SC driving scheme benefits from the output of the GR system and is able to reduce the user effort needed to accomplish the assigned tasks. Despite the fact that the BCI requires higher effort compared to the keyboard conditions, most subjects were able to complete the assigned tasks, and the proposed GR system is additionally shown able to handle the uncertainty in user input during SSVEP-based interaction. The SC application of the belief vector indicates that the benefits of the GR module are more pronounced for BCIs, compared to the keyboard interface. Significance. Being based on intuitive heuristics that model the behavior of the general population during the execution of navigation tasks, the proposed GR method can be used without prior tuning for the

  13. Embedded System for Prosthetic Control Using Implanted Neuromuscular Interfaces Accessed Via an Osseointegrated Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastinu, Enzo; Doguet, Pascal; Botquin, Yohan; Hakansson, Bo; Ortiz-Catalan, Max

    2017-08-01

    Despite the technological progress in robotics achieved in the last decades, prosthetic limbs still lack functionality, reliability, and comfort. Recently, an implanted neuromusculoskeletal interface built upon osseointegration was developed and tested in humans, namely the Osseointegrated Human-Machine Gateway. Here, we present an embedded system to exploit the advantages of this technology. Our artificial limb controller allows for bioelectric signals acquisition, processing, decoding of motor intent, prosthetic control, and sensory feedback. It includes a neurostimulator to provide direct neural feedback based on sensory information. The system was validated using real-time tasks characterization, power consumption evaluation, and myoelectric pattern recognition performance. Functionality was proven in a first pilot patient from whom results of daily usage were obtained. The system was designed to be reliably used in activities of daily living, as well as a research platform to monitor prosthesis usage and training, machine-learning-based control algorithms, and neural stimulation paradigms.

  14. Establishing a novel modeling tool: a python-based interface for a neuromorphic hardware system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Brüderle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromorphic hardware systems provide new possibilities for the neuroscience modeling community. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of the micro-electronic emulation of neural computation, such models are highly scalable without a loss of speed. However, the communities of software simulator users and neuromorphic engineering in neuroscience are rather disjoint. We present a software concept that provides the possibility to establish such hardware devices as valuable modeling tools. It is based on the integration of the hardware interface into a simulator-independent language which allows for unified experiment descriptions that can be run on various simulation platforms without modification, implying experiment portability and a huge simplification of the quantitative comparison of hardware and simulator results. We introduce an accelerated neuromorphic hardware device and describe the implementation of the proposed concept for this system. An example setup and results acquired by utilizing both the hardware system and a software simulator are demonstrated.

  15. Interfaces and Communication Protocols in ATCA-Based LLRF Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Dariusz; Koprek, Waldemar; Jezynski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Adam; Jablonski, Grzegorz; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Simrock, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    Linear accelerators driving Free Electron Lasers (FELs), such as the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) or the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), require sophisticated Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control systems. The controller of the LLRF system should stabilize the phase and amplitude of the field in accelerating modules below 0.02% of the amplitude and 0.01 degree for phase tolerances to produce an ultra stable electron beam that meets the required conditions for Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Since the LLRF system for the XFEL must be in operation for the next 20 years, it should be reliable, reproducible and upgradeable. Having in mind all requirements of the LLRF control system, the Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) has been chosen to build a prototype of the LLRF system for the FLASH accelerator that is able to supervise 32 cavities of one RF station. The LLRF controller takes advantage of features offered by the ATCA standard. The LLRF system consists of a few ATCA carrier blades, Rear Transition Modules (RTM) and several Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMCs) that provide all necessary digital and analog hardware components. The distributed hardware of the LLRF system requires a number of communication links that should provide different latencies, bandwidths and protocols. The paper presents the general view of the ATC A-based LLRF system, discusses requirements and proposes an application for various interfaces and protocols in the distributed LLRF control system.

  16. Prosthetics socket that incorporates an air splint system focusing on dynamic interface pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Nasrul Anuar Abd; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ali, Sadeeq

    2014-08-01

    The interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee's satisfaction and comfort. This paper presents the design and performance of a new prosthetic socket that uses an air splint system. The air splint prosthetic socket system was implemented by combining the air splint with a pressure sensor that the transhumeral user controls through the use of a microcontroller. The modular construction of the system developed allows the FSR pressure sensors that are placed inside the air splint socket to determine the required size and fitting for the socket used. Fifteen transhumeral amputees participated in the study. The subject's dynamic pressure on the socket that's applied while wearing the air splint systems was recorded using F-socket transducers and microcontroller analysis. The values collected by the F-socket sensor for the air splint prosthetic socket system were determined accordingly by comparing the dynamic pressure applied using statically socket. The pressure volume of the air splint fluctuated and was recorded at an average of 38 kPa (2.5) to 41 kPa (1.3) over three hours. The air splint socket might reduce the pressure within the interface of residual limb. This is particularly important during the daily life activities and may reduce the pain and discomfort at the residual limb in comparison to the static socket. The potential development of an auto-adjusted socket that uses an air splint system as the prosthetic socket will be of interest to researchers involved in rehabilitation engineering, prosthetics and orthotics.

  17. Proposal of digital interface for the system of the air conditioner's remote control: analysis of the system of feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva de Queiroz Pierre, Raisa; Kawada, Tarô Arthur Tavares; Fontes, André Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Develop a proposal of digital interface for the system of the remote control, that functions as support system during the manipulation of air conditioner adjusted for the users in general, from ergonomic parameters, objectifying the reduction of the problems faced for the user and improving the process. 20 people with questionnaire with both qualitative and quantitative level. Linear Method consists of a sequence of steps in which the input of one of them depends on the output from the previous one, although they are independent. The process of feedback, when necessary, must occur within each step separately.

  18. Cognitive Human-Machine Interface Applied in Remote Support for Industrial Robot Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kosicki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is currently being made to widely introduce industrial robots to Small-Medium Enterprises (SMEs. Since the enterprises usually employ too small number of robot units to afford specialized departments for robot maintenance, they must be provided with inexpensive and immediate support remotely. This paper evaluates whether the support can be provided by means of Cognitive Info-communication – communication in which human cognitive capabilities are extended irrespectively of geographical distances. The evaluations are given with an aid of experimental system that consists of local and remote rooms, which are physically separated – a six-degree-of-freedom NACHI SH133-03 industrial robot is situated in the local room, while the operator, who supervises the robot by means of audio-visual Cognitive Human-Machine Interface, is situated in the remote room. The results of simple experiments show that Cognitive Info-communication is not only efficient mean to provide the support remotely, but is probably also a powerful tool to enhance interaction with any data-rich environment that require good conceptual understanding of system's state and careful attention management. Furthermore, the paper discusses data presentation and reduction methods for data-rich environments, as well as introduces the concepts of Naturally Acquired Data and Cognitive Human-Machine Interfaces.

  19. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable

  20. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable.

  1. Development of new plant monitoring and control system with advanced man-machine interfaces NUCAMM-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hideyuki; Joge, Toshio; Miyake, Masao; Kishi, Shoichi

    1981-01-01

    BWR type nuclear power stations are the typical plants adopting central monitoring system in view of the size of the scale of system and the prevention of radiation exposure. Central control boards became large as much informations and many operating tools are concentrated on them. Recently, the unit capacity has increased, and the safety has been strengthened, therefore more improvement of the man-machine interface is required concerning the monitoring of plant operation. Hitachi Ltd. developed the central monitoring and control system for nuclear power stations ''NUCAMM-80'', concentrating related fundamental techniques such as the collection of plant informations, the expansion of automatic operation, the ergonomic re-evaluation of the arrangement of panels and subsystems, and the effective use of functional hardwares such as controlling computers and cathode ray tubes, for the purposes of improving the reliability of plant operation and the rate of operation, the reduction of the burden of operators and drastic labor saving. The fundamental policy of the development, the construction of the system, panel layout and the collection of informations, the development of the system for plant automation, the development of plant diagnosis and prevention systems, computer system and the merits of this system are described. (Kako, I.)

  2. A Review of Interface Electronic Systems for AT-cut Quartz Crystal Microbalance Applications in Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Arnau

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available From the first applications of AT-cut quartz crystals as sensors in solutionsmore than 20 years ago, the so-called quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor isbecoming into a good alternative analytical method in a great deal of applications such asbiosensors, analysis of biomolecular interactions, study of bacterial adhesion at specificinterfaces, pathogen and microorganism detection, study of polymer film-biomolecule orcell-substrate interactions, immunosensors and an extensive use in fluids and polymercharacterization and electrochemical applications among others. The appropriateevaluation of this analytical method requires recognizing the different steps involved andto be conscious of their importance and limitations. The first step involved in a QCMsystem is the accurate and appropriate characterization of the sensor in relation to thespecific application. The use of the piezoelectric sensor in contact with solutions stronglyaffects its behavior and appropriate electronic interfaces must be used for an adequatesensor characterization. Systems based on different principles and techniques have beenimplemented during the last 25 years. The interface selection for the specific application isimportant and its limitations must be known to be conscious of its suitability, and foravoiding the possible error propagation in the interpretation of results. This article presentsa comprehensive overview of the different techniques used for AT-cut quartz crystalmicrobalance in in-solution applications, which are based on the following principles:network or impedance analyzers, decay methods, oscillators and lock-in techniques. Theelectronic interfaces based on oscillators and phase-locked techniques are treated in detail,with the description of different configurations, since these techniques are the most used inapplications for detection of analytes in solutions, and in those where a fast sensorresponse is necessary.

  3. Dynamics of interface in three-dimensional anisotropic bistable reaction-diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhizhu; Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of dynamics of interface (wave front) in three-dimensional (3D) reaction-diffusion (RD) system for bistable media with anisotropy constructed by means of anisotropic surface tension. An equation of motion for the wave front is derived to carry out stability analysis of transverse perturbations, which discloses mechanism of pattern formation such as labyrinthine in 3D bistable media. Particularly, the effects of anisotropy on wave propagation are studied. It was found that, sufficiently strong anisotropy can induce dynamical instabilities and lead to breakup of the wave front. With the fast-inhibitor limit, the bistable system can further be described by a variational dynamics so that the boundary integral method is adopted to study the dynamics of wave fronts.

  4. Development of comprehensive HFE guidelines for the evaluation of NPP human systems interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Wachtel, J.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced control room (ACR) concepts are being developed in the commercial nuclear power industry as part of future reactor designs. The ACRs will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the ways in which the operator interacts with and supervises an increasingly complex system. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The NRC is developing guidelines to support its review of these advanced designs. This paper discusses (1) the development of guidelines for advanced HSI review, (2) the integration of those guidelines with existing guidance, and (3) a methodology for further guidance development

  5. Does Prescribed Randomness Hold the Key to Interface Synthetic and Natural Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting

    The bottlenecks to engineering biomimetic functional materials are not only to duplicate hierarchical structures, but also to manipulate the system dynamics. Bio-inspired responsive materials have been investigated extensively within the past few decades with much success. Yet, the level of control of these complex systems is still rather simplistic. More importantly, we have yet to uncover the design rules to synergize natural and synthetic building blocks that allows us to go beyond just a few specific families of natural building blocks. I am going to discuss our recent studies that demonstrated the feasibility to develop synthetic protein-like polymers that can interface with natural proteins and biomachinaries. Rational design of these protein-like polymers thus opens a viable approach toward functional materials based on natural components. The work is supported by DOD-ARO W911NF-16-1-0405.

  6. Impact of representational systems on color selections for graphic user interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Brownson, L.W.

    1996-04-01

    This paper is based on a study involving representational systems and color preference on graphic user interfaces (GUI). The study is an extension of a general exploratory experiment (GEE) conducted in October of 1993, wherein individuals` favored sensory representational systems (visual, auditory and kinesthetic) (FRS) were compared to their GUI comfort parameters. The results of the study show that an individual`s FRS is a significant factor in their acceptance of a GUI design, and that further in-depth study of the various display attributes to an individual`s FRS is required. This research is the first in the series of follow-up studies to be conducted regarding specific characteristics of GUI (i.e., fonts, character density, etc.) with respect to an individual`s FRS. The study focus on the attribute of color preferences for GUI design.

  7. Permanency analysis on human electroencephalogram signals for pervasive Brain-Computer Interface systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Koosha; Junghyo Lee; Banerjee, Ayan; Sohankar, Javad; Gupta, Sandeep K S

    2017-07-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems use some permanent features of brain signals to recognize their corresponding cognitive states with high accuracy. However, these features are not perfectly permanent, and BCI system should be continuously trained over time, which is tedious and time consuming. Thus, analyzing the permanency of signal features is essential in determining how often to repeat training. In this paper, we monitor electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, and analyze their behavior through continuous and relatively long period of time. In our experiment, we record EEG signals corresponding to rest state (eyes open and closed) from one subject everyday, for three and a half months. The results show that signal features such as auto-regression coefficients remain permanent through time, while others such as power spectral density specifically in 5-7 Hz frequency band are not permanent. In addition, eyes open EEG data shows more permanency than eyes closed data.

  8. Evaluating Distributed Usability: the role of user interfaces in an activity system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Vrazalic

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional definitions of usability localise this fundamental Human Computer Interaction (HCI concept in the user interface and reduce it to a variety of qualitative and quantitative attributes of the computer system. This simplistic view of usability has been used as the basis for developing design and evaluation methods in the discipline. This paper argues that, as a result, HCI methods are ineffective and suffer from various shortcomings. It is proposed that the notion of usability must be extended to include contextual factors, and viewed as being distributed across an activity system. Adopting this notion of distributed usability then requires a review of existing HCI methods. Usability testing, as a complete and self-contained HCI method, was chosen for this purpose, and the result, a distributed usability evaluation method (DUEM, is presented in this paper.

  9. A small, portable, battery-powered brain-computer interface system for motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrimmon, Colin M; Ming Wang; Silva Lopes, Lucas; Wang, Po T; Karimi-Bidhendi, Alireza; Liu, Charles Y; Heydari, Payam; Nenadic, Zoran; Do, An H

    2016-08-01

    Motor rehabilitation using brain-computer interface (BCI) systems may facilitate functional recovery in individuals after stroke or spinal cord injury. Nevertheless, these systems are typically ill-suited for widespread adoption due to their size, cost, and complexity. In this paper, a small, portable, and extremely cost-efficient (<;$200) BCI system has been developed using a custom electroencephalographic (EEG) amplifier array, and a commercial microcontroller and touchscreen. The system's performance was tested using a movement-related BCI task in 3 able-bodied subjects with minimal previous BCI experience. Specifically, subjects were instructed to alternate between relaxing and dorsiflexing their right foot, while their EEG was acquired and analyzed in real-time by the BCI system to decode their underlying movement state. The EEG signals acquired by the custom amplifier array were similar to those acquired by a commercial amplifier (maximum correlation coefficient ρ=0.85). During real-time BCI operation, the average correlation between instructional cues and decoded BCI states across all subjects (ρ=0.70) was comparable to that of full-size BCI systems. Small, portable, and inexpensive BCI systems such as the one reported here may promote a widespread adoption of BCI-based movement rehabilitation devices in stroke and spinal cord injury populations.

  10. Usability testing of the human-machine interface for the Light Duty Utility Arm System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.; Ellis, J.E.; Masliah, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the usability testing that has been done for the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. A program of usability testing has been established as a part of a process for making the LDUA as easy to use as possible. The LDUA System is being designed to deploy a family of tools, called End Effectors, into underground storage tanks by means of a robotic arm on the end of a telescoping mast, and to collect and manage the data that they generate. The LDUA System uses a vertical positioning mast, to lower the arm into a tank through an existing 30.5 cm access riser. A Mobile Deployment Subsystem is used to position the mast and arm over a tank riser for deployment, and to transport them from tank to tank. The LDUA System has many ancillary subsystems including the Operations Control Trailer, the Tank Riser Interface and Confinement Subsystem, the Decontamination Subsystem, and the End Effector Exchange Subsystem. This work resulted in the identification of several important improvements to the LDUA control and data acquisition system before the design was frozen. The most important of these were color coding of joints in motion, simultaneous operator control of multiple joints, and changes to the field-of-views of the camera lenses for the robot and other camera systems

  11. Evaluation of different EEG acquisition systems concerning their suitability for building a brain-computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pinegger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One important aspect in non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI research is to acquire the electroencephalogram (EEG in a proper way. From an end-user perspective this means with maximum comfort and without any extra inconveniences (e.g., washing the hair. Whereas from a technical perspective, the signal quality has to be optimal to make the BCI work effectively and efficiently.In this work we evaluated three different commercially available EEG acquisition systems that differ in the type of electrode (gel-, water-, and dry-based, the amplifier technique, and the data transmission method. Every system was tested regarding three different aspects, namely, technical, BCI effectiveness and efficiency (P300 communication and control, and user satisfaction (comfort.We found that the water-based system had the lowest short circuit noise level, the hydrogel-based system had the highest P300 spelling accuracies, and the dry electrode system caused the least inconveniences.Therefore, building a reliable BCI is possible with all evaluated systems and it is on the user to decide which system meets the given requirements best.

  12. Towards a Reduced-Wire Interface for CMUT-Based Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jaemyung; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F Levent; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2017-04-01

    Having intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging capability on guide wires used in cardiovascular interventions may eliminate the need for separate IVUS catheters and expand the use of IVUS in a larger portion of the vasculature. High frequency capacitive micro machined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays should be integrated with interface electronics and placed on the guide wire for this purpose. Besides small size, this system-on-a-chip (SoC) front-end should connect to the back-end imaging system with a minimum number of wires to preserve the critical mechanical properties of the guide wire. We present a 40 MHz CMUT array interface SoC, which will eventually use only two wires for power delivery and transmits image data using a combination of analog-to-time conversion (ATC) and an impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) wireless link. The proof-of-concept prototype ASIC consumes only 52.8 mW and occupies 4.07 [Formula: see text] in a 0.35- [Formula: see text] standard CMOS process. A rectifier and regulator power the rest of the SoC at 3.3 V from a 10 MHz power carrier that is supplied through a 2.4 m micro-coax cable with an overall efficiency of 49.1%. Echo signals from an 8-element CMUT array are amplified by a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) array and down-converted to baseband by quadrature sampling using a 40 MHz clock, derived from the power carrier. The ATC generates pulse-width-modulated (PWM) samples at 2 × 10 MS/s with 6 bit resolution, while the entire system achieved 5.1 ENOB. Preliminary images from the prototype system are presented, and alternative data transmission and possible future directions towards practical implementation are discussed.

  13. LIANA Model Integration System - architecture, user interface design and application in MOIRA DSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hofman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The LIANA Model Integration System is the shell application supporting model integration and user interface functionality required for the rapid construction and run-time support of the environmental decision support systems (EDSS. Internally it is constructed as the framework of C++ classes and functions covering most common tasks performed by the EDSS (such as managing of and alternative strategies, running of the chain of the models, supporting visualisation of the data with tables and graphs, keeping ranges and default values for input parameters etc.. EDSS is constructed by integration of LIANA system with the models or other applications such as GIS or MAA software. The basic requirements to the model or other application to be integrated is minimal - it should be a Windows or DOS .exe file and receive input and provide output as text files. For the user the EDSS is represented as the number of data sets describing scenario or giving results of evaluation of scenario via modelling. Internally data sets correspond to the I/O files of the models. During the integration the parameters included in each the data sets as well as specifications necessary to present the data set in GUI and export or import it to/from text file are provided with MIL_LIANA language. Visual C++ version of LIANA has been developed in the frame of MOIRA project and is used as the basis for the MOIRA Software Framework - the shell and user interface component of the MOIRA Decision Support System. At present, the usage of LIANA for the creation of a new EDSS requires changes to be made in its C++ code. The possibility to use LIANA for the new EDSS construction without extending the source code is achieved by substituting MIL_LIANA with the object-oriented LIANA language.

  14. Usability Study Identifies Vocabulary, Facets, and Education as Primary Primo Discovery System Interface Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Muriel Lavallee Warren

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Brett, K. R., Lierman, A., & Turner, C. (2016. Lessons learned: A Primo usability study. Information Technology and Libraries, 35(1, 7-25. https://doi.org/10.6017/ital.v35i1.8965 Abstract Objective – To discover whether users can effectively complete common research tasks in a modified Primo Discovery System interface. Design – Usability testing. Setting – University of Houston Libraries. Subjects – Users of the University of Houston Libraries Ex Libris Primo Discovery System interface. Methods – The researchers used a think aloud usability test methodology, with participants asked to verbalize their thought processes as they completed a set of tasks. Four tasks were developed and divided into two task sets (Test 1 and Test 2, with session facilitators alternating sets for each participant. Tasks were as follows: locating a known article, finding a peer reviewed article on a requested subject, locating a book, and finding a newspaper article on a topic. Tests were conducted in front of the library entrance using a laptop equipped with Morae (screen and audio recording software, and participants were recruited via an assigned “caller” at the table offering library merchandise and food as a research incentive. Users could opt out of having their session recorded, resulting in a total of fifteen sessions completed with fourteen recorded. Thirteen of the fifteen participants were undergraduate students, one was a graduate student, one was a post-baccalaureate student, and there were no faculty participants. Facilitators completed notes on a standard rubric, coding participant responses into successes or failures and noting participant feedback. Main Results – All eight participants assigned Test 1 successfully completed Test 1, Task 1: locating a known article. Participants expressed a need for an author limiter in advanced search, and had difficulty using the citation formatted information to locate materials

  15. Development of double density whole brain fNIRS with EEG system for brain machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, A; Udagawa, H; Masuda, Y; Kohno, S; Amita, T; Inoue, Y

    2011-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) are expected as new man-machine interfaces. Non-invasive BMI have the potential to improve the quality of life of many disabled individuals with safer operation. The non-invasive BMI using the functional functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) with the electroencephalogram (EEG) has potential applicability beyond the restoration of lost movement and rehabilitation in paraplegics and would enable normal individuals to have direct brain control of external devices in their daily lives. To shift stage of the non-invasive BMI from laboratory to clinical, the key factor is to develop high-accuracy signal decoding technology and highly restrictive of the measurement area. In this article, we present the development of a high-accuracy brain activity measurement system by combining fNIRS and EEG. The new fNIRS had high performances with high spatial resolution using double density technique and a large number of measurement channels to cover a whole human brain.

  16. Comparison of Interleaved Boost Converter Configurations for Solar Photovoltaic System Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ramaprabha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar photovoltaic (SPV panels that convert light energy into electrical energy through the photovoltaic effect have nonlinear internal resistance. Hence, with the variation in the intensity of light falling on the panel, the internal resistance varies. For effective utilization of the SPV panel, it is necessary to extract the maximum power from it. For maximum power extraction from SPV panels, DC-DC converter interface is used. The problem in using high frequency converter interface is the resultant high frequency ripple interaction with the SPV system. In this work, an interleaved boost converter (IBC is considered to reduce the ripple. Our finding is that IBC fed by a SPV panel reduces this ripple to a greater extent. IBC also has a faster transient response as compared to conventional boost converters with reduced ripple contents. The main aim of this paper is to present a comparative analysis of the performance of IBC with inductors that are coupled in different ways. The results of the simulation were extrapolated with the help of MATLAB software and verified through experimentation.

  17. Integrated digital control and man-machine interface for complex remote handing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.C.; Spille, R.F.; Zimmermann, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is part of a continuing effort within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and extend the capabilities of remote manipulation and maintenance technology. The AIMS is a totally integrated approach to remote handling in hazardous environments. State-of-the-art computer systems connected through a high-speed distributed control system that supports the flexibility and expandability needed for large integrated maintenance applications. A man-Machine Interface provides high-level human interaction through a powerful color graphics menu-controlled operator console. An auxiliary control system handles the real-time processing needs for a variety of support hardware. A pair of dedicated fiber-optic-linked master/slave computer systems control the Advanced Servomanipulator master/slave arms using powerful distributed digital processing methods. The FORTH language was used as a real-time operating and development environment for the entire system, and all of these components are integrated into a control room concept that represents the latest advancements in the development of remote maintenance facilities for hazardous environments

  18. Interface Tracking Simulation of Drops Rising through Liquids in a Vertical Pipe Using Three Coordinate Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Hayashi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface tracking simulations of single drops rising through a vertical pipe are carried out using three coordinate systems, i.e. cylindrical, general curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates, to investigate the effects of coordinate system and spatial resolution on the accuracy of predictions. Experiments of single drops in a vertical pipe are also conducted to obtain experimental data for comparisons with simulations. The drop shape observed are spheroidal and deformed spheroidal at low values of the diameter ratio, Λ, of the sphere-volume equivalent diameter of a drop to the pipe diameter, whereas they take bullet-shapes at large Λ. The conclusions obtained are as follows: (1 the effects of coordinate system on drop shape are small at low Λ. At large Λ, the effects are also small for drops in a low viscosity system, whereas non-physical shape distortion takes place when the Cartesian coordinates are used with low spatial resolution for drops in a high viscosity system, and (2 the drop terminal velocity and the velocity profile in the liquid film between a bullet-shaped drop and a pipe wall are well predicted using all the coordinate systems tested even at low spatial resolution.

  19. Integrated digital control and man-machine interface for complex remote handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.C.; Spille, R.F.; Zimmermann, S.D.

    1986-12-01

    The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is part of a continuing effort within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and extend the capabilities of remote manipulation and maintenance technology. The AIMS is a totally integrated approach to remote handling in hazardous environments. State-of-the-art computer systems connected through a high-speed communication network provide a real-time distributed control system that supports the flexibility and expandability needed for large integrated maintenance applications. A Man-Machine Interface provides high-level human interaction through a powerful color graphics menu-controlled operator console. An auxiliary control system handles the real-time processing needs for a variety of support hardware. A pair of dedicated fiber-optic-linked master/slave computer system control the Advanced Servomanipulator master/slave arms using powerful distributed digital processing methods. The FORTH language was used as a real-time operating and development environment for the entire system, and all of these components are integrated into a control room concept that represents the latest advancements in the development of remote maintenance facilities for hazardous environments

  20. Evaluation of air-liquid interface exposure systems for in vitro ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure of cells to airborne pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of submerged cells. The published literature, however, describes irreproducible and/or unrealistic experimental conditions using ALI systems. We have compared five ALI systems for their ability to deliver both particulate matter (PM) and gases to cells cultured on porous membrane inserts. The ALI systems use different mechanisms to deliver pollutants to the inserts: diffusion, sedimentation, electrostatic precipitation (ESP), and thermophoresis (THP). We used fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) as a surrogate for PM to assess the efficacy of particle deposition in each system. PM loading in each insert was determined by dissolving the PSLs in ethyl acetate and measuring the fluorescence. Results show that using ESP as an external force enhances deposition of 50-nm PSLs by 5.5-fold and 11-fold for 1-µm PSLs when compared to diffusion alone. Similarly, THP enhances deposition of 50-nm and 1-µm PSLs by 4.5-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively. The interaction of ozone with an indigo dye on the surface of the insert showed that diffusion alone permitted gas-cell interaction. For each system there were various design and operational factors, such as the flow rate, surface materials and flow path geometry that adversely affected performance. Increased flow rates correlated with increased efficacy of the systems to deliver the gas to the inserts.

  1. Design of a 32-channel EEG system for brain control interface applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Sung

    2012-01-01

    This study integrates the hardware circuit design and the development support of the software interface to achieve a 32-channel EEG system for BCI applications. Since the EEG signals of human bodies are generally very weak, in addition to preventing noise interference, it also requires avoiding the waveform distortion as well as waveform offset and so on; therefore, the design of a preamplifier with high common-mode rejection ratio and high signal-to-noise ratio is very important. Moreover, the friction between the electrode pads and the skin as well as the design of dual power supply will generate DC bias which affects the measurement signals. For this reason, this study specially designs an improved single-power AC-coupled circuit, which effectively reduces the DC bias and improves the error caused by the effects of part errors. At the same time, the digital way is applied to design the adjustable amplification and filter function, which can design for different EEG frequency bands. For the analog circuit, a frequency band will be taken out through the filtering circuit and then the digital filtering design will be used to adjust the extracted frequency band for the target frequency band, combining with MATLAB to design man-machine interface for displaying brain wave. Finally the measured signals are compared to the traditional 32-channel EEG signals. In addition to meeting the IFCN standards, the system design also conducted measurement verification in the standard EEG isolation room in order to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this system design.

  2. Design of a 32-Channel EEG System for Brain Control Interface Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Sung Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study integrates the hardware circuit design and the development support of the software interface to achieve a 32-channel EEG system for BCI applications. Since the EEG signals of human bodies are generally very weak, in addition to preventing noise interference, it also requires avoiding the waveform distortion as well as waveform offset and so on; therefore, the design of a preamplifier with high common-mode rejection ratio and high signal-to-noise ratio is very important. Moreover, the friction between the electrode pads and the skin as well as the design of dual power supply will generate DC bias which affects the measurement signals. For this reason, this study specially designs an improved single-power AC-coupled circuit, which effectively reduces the DC bias and improves the error caused by the effects of part errors. At the same time, the digital way is applied to design the adjustable amplification and filter function, which can design for different EEG frequency bands. For the analog circuit, a frequency band will be taken out through the filtering circuit and then the digital filtering design will be used to adjust the extracted frequency band for the target frequency band, combining with MATLAB to design man-machine interface for displaying brain wave. Finally the measured signals are compared to the traditional 32-channel EEG signals. In addition to meeting the IFCN standards, the system design also conducted measurement verification in the standard EEG isolation room in order to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this system design.

  3. TiD-Introducing and Benchmarking an Event-Delivery System for Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Christian; Tavella, Michele; Schreuder, Martijn; Cincotti, Febo; Leeb, Robert; Muller-Putz, Gernot R

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present and analyze an event distribution system for brain-computer interfaces. Events are commonly used to mark and describe incidents during an experiment and are therefore critical for later data analysis or immediate real-time processing. The presented approach, called Tools for brain-computer interaction interface D (TiD), delivers messages in XML format via a buslike system using transmission control protocol connections or shared memory. A dedicated server dispatches TiD messages to distributed or local clients. The TiD message is designed to be flexible and contains time stamps for event synchronization, whereas events describe incidents, which occur during an experiment. TiD was tested extensively toward stability and latency. The effect of an occurring event jitter was analyzed and benchmarked on a reference implementation under different conditions as gigabit and 100-Mb Ethernet or Wi-Fi with a different number of event receivers. A 3-dB signal attenuation, which occurs when averaging jitter influenced trials aligned by events, is starting to become visible at around 1-2 kHz in the case of a gigabit connection. Mean event distribution times across operating systems are ranging from 0.3 to 0.5ms for a gigabit network connection for 10 6 events. Results for other environmental conditions are available in this paper. References already using TiD for event distribution are provided showing the applicability of TiD for event delivery with distributed or local clients.

  4. Modular mechatronic system for stationary bicycles interfaced with virtual environment for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranky, Richard G; Sivak, Mark L; Lewis, Jeffrey A; Gade, Venkata K; Deutsch, Judith E; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2014-06-05

    Cycling has been used in the rehabilitation of individuals with both chronic and post-surgical conditions. Among the challenges with implementing bicycling for rehabilitation is the recruitment of both extremities, in particular when one is weaker or less coordinated. Feedback embedded in virtual reality (VR) augmented cycling may serve to address the requirement for efficacious cycling; specifically recruitment of both extremities and exercising at a high intensity. In this paper a mechatronic rehabilitation bicycling system with an interactive virtual environment, called Virtual Reality Augmented Cycling Kit (VRACK), is presented. Novel hardware components embedded with sensors were implemented on a stationary exercise bicycle to monitor physiological and biomechanical parameters of participants while immersing them in an augmented reality simulation providing the user with visual, auditory and haptic feedback. This modular and adaptable system attaches to commercially-available stationary bicycle systems and interfaces with a personal computer for simulation and data acquisition processes. The complete bicycle system includes: a) handle bars based on hydraulic pressure sensors; b) pedals that monitor pedal kinematics with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and forces on the pedals while providing vibratory feedback; c) off the shelf electronics to monitor heart rate and d) customized software for rehabilitation. Bench testing for the handle and pedal systems is presented for calibration of the sensors detecting force and angle. The modular mechatronic kit for exercise bicycles was tested in bench testing and human tests. Bench tests performed on the sensorized handle bars and the instrumented pedals validated the measurement accuracy of these components. Rider tests with the VRACK system focused on the pedal system and successfully monitored kinetic and kinematic parameters of the rider's lower extremities. The VRACK system, a virtual reality mechatronic bicycle

  5. Integrated graphical user interface for the back-end software sub-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badescu, E.; Caprini, M.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS data acquisition and Event Filter prototype '-1' project was intended to produce a prototype system for evaluating candidate technologies and architectures for the final ATLAS DAQ system on the LHC accelerator at CERN. Within the prototype project, the back-end sub-system encompasses the software for configuring, controlling and monitoring the data acquisition (DAQ). The back-end sub-system includes core components and detector integration components. One of the detector integration components is the Integrated Graphical User Interface (IGUI), which is intended to give a view of the status of the DAQ system and its sub-systems (Dataflow, Event Filter and Back-end) and to allow the user (general users, such as a shift operator at a test beam or experts, in order to control and debug the DAQ system) to control its operation. The IGUI is intended to be a Status Display and a Control Interface too, so there are three groups of functional requirements: display requirements (the information to be displayed); control requirements (the actions the IGUI shall perform on the DAQ components); general requirements, applying to the general functionality of the IGUI. The constraint requirements include requirements related to the access control (shift operator or expert user). The quality requirements are related to the portability on different platforms. The IGUI has to interact with many components in a distributed environment. The following design guidelines have been considered in order to fulfil the requirements: use a modular design with easy possibility to integrate different sub-systems; use Java language for portability and powerful graphical features; use CORBA interfaces for communication with other components. The actual implementation of Back-end software components use Inter-Language Unification (ILU) for inter-process communication. Different methods of access of Java applications to ILU C++ servers have been evaluated (native methods, ILU Java support

  6. Development of an interface for an ultrareliable fault-tolerant control system and an electronic servo-control unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Charles; Williamson, Michael

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center sponsors a research program for the investigation of Intelligent Flight Control Actuation systems. The use of artificial intelligence techniques in conjunction with algorithmic techniques for autonomous, decentralized fault management of flight-control actuation systems is explored under this program. The design, development, and operation of the interface for laboratory investigation of this program is documented. The interface, architecturally based on the Intel 8751 microcontroller, is an interrupt-driven system designed to receive a digital message from an ultrareliable fault-tolerant control system (UFTCS). The interface links the UFTCS to an electronic servo-control unit, which controls a set of hydraulic actuators. It was necessary to build a UFTCS emulator (also based on the Intel 8751) to provide signal sources for testing the equipment.

  7. Experimental study of poison moderator interface movement for shut down system #2(SDS#2) of 540 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapra, M.K.; Kundu, S.; Chawan, D.B.; Ananthan, P.; Sharma, B.S.V.G.; Mohan, L.R.

    2005-03-01

    The poison solution and the moderator in Secondary Shutdown System (SDS-2) of 500 MWe PHWR, are separated by their own liquid in liquid interface, termed as poison moderator interface (PMI). During normal operation of the reactor, the interface moves towards the calandria, mainly because of molecular diffusion from poison to moderator. Other reasons for movement are mixing of poison and moderator due to physical disturbances in the moderator level and to some extent due to temperature difference between the two liquids. The electrical conductivity of these liquids was found to be the most reliable parameter indicating interface movement. For this purpose, two on-line high-pressure conductivity probes have been installed on moderator side for each one of the six poison tanks. During normal operation of reactor, the interface moves slowly towards the calandria over a period of time and gives rise to increase in conductivity. To study the interface pattern and factors affecting the same, a full-scale experimental setup was developed and series of experiments carried out. The experimental results showed that the interface is quite stable and annunciation can be placed around 100 micro siemens/cm before back flushing is initiated. One dimensional diffusion analysis of the obtained experimental data showed that the derived model for PMI setup with diffusion parameter of 900 cm 2 /hr is able to predict the interface movement quite satisfactorily. This report gives an insight into the experiments carried out for estimation of the effective diffusion parameter for the poison moderator interface, model formulation and its prognostic behavior. (author)

  8. Design and Implementation of a Brain Computer Interface System for Controlling a Robotic Claw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakis, D.; Zoumis, S.; Asvestas, P.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design and implementation of a brain-computer interface (BCI) system that can control a robotic claw. The system is based on the Emotiv Epoc headset, which provides the capability of simultaneous recording of 14 EEG channels, as well as wireless connectivity by means of the Bluetooth protocol. The system is initially trained to decode what user thinks to properly formatted data. The headset communicates with a personal computer, which runs a dedicated software application, implemented under the Processing integrated development environment. The application acquires the data from the headset and invokes suitable commands to an Arduino Uno board. The board decodes the received commands and produces corresponding signals to a servo motor that controls the position of the robotic claw. The system was tested successfully on a healthy, male subject, aged 28 years. The results are promising, taking into account that no specialized hardware was used. However, tests on a larger number of users is necessary in order to draw solid conclusions regarding the performance of the proposed system.

  9. Asset Analysis Method for the Cyber Security of Man Machine Interface System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Kon; Kim, Hun Hee; Shin, Yeong Cheol [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    As digital MMIS (Man Machine Interface System) is applied in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), cyber security is becoming more and more important. Regulatory guide (KINS/GT-N27) requires that implementation plan for cyber security be prepared in NPP. Regulatory guide recommends the following 4 processes: 1) an asset analysis of MMIS, 2) a vulnerability analysis of MMIS, 3) establishment of countermeasures, and 4) establishment of operational guideline for cyber security. Conventional method for the asset analysis is mainly performed with a table form for each asset. Conventional method requires a lot of efforts due to the duplication of information. This paper presents an asset analysis method using object oriented approach for the NPP

  10. Man-machine interface in a submarine command and weapon control system: features and design experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan H. Aas

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Important man-machine interface (MMI issues concerning a submarine command and weapon control system (CWCS such as crew organization, automation level and decision support are discussed in this paper. Generic submarine CWCS functions and operating conditions are outlined. Detailed, dynamic and real-time prototypes were used to support the MMI design. The prototypes are described and experience with detailed prototyping is discussed. Some of the main interaction principles are summarized and a restricted example of the resulting design is given. Our design experience and current work have been used to outline future perspectives of MMI design in naval CWCSs. The need for both formal and experimental approaches is emphasized.

  11. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs

  12. Restoration of Low-Voltage Distribution Systems with Inverter-Interfaced DG Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietmannsberger, Markus; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    -area voltage collapse. This paper proposes a restoration strategy from zero voltage conditions for inverter-interfaced DG under islanded conditions. In the approach, a flexible and scalable Master DG inverter concept is introduced for distributed generations, where no communication is needed and an outage......The increasing share of distributed generation (DG) offers new chances in grid restoration of low-voltage distribution grids. Instead of relying on the transmission or high- and medium-voltage levels, establishing islanding operation in low-voltage grids might be a good option after a wide...... of the Master can be balanced by other DG inverters. The control strategy ensures the tracking of nominal values of the system voltage and frequency without zero steady-state error. The influences of non-controllable DG are also taken into account in the strategy with an effective countermeasure developed...

  13. Man-Machine Interface System for Neuromuscular Training and Evaluation Based on EMG and MMG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernández

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System, a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS. In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  14. Man-machine interface system for neuromuscular training and evaluation based on EMG and MMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Ramon; Alonso, Alonso; Carrera, Albano; Durán, Ramon; Fernández, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System), a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES) and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  15. Recasting brain-machine interface design from a physical control system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Chase, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    With the goal of improving the quality of life for people suffering from various motor control disorders, brain-machine interfaces provide direct neural control of prosthetic devices by translating neural signals into control signals. These systems act by reading motor intent signals directly from the brain and using them to control, for example, the movement of a cursor on a computer screen. Over the past two decades, much attention has been devoted to the decoding problem: how should recorded neural activity be translated into the movement of the cursor? Most approaches have focused on this problem from an estimation standpoint, i.e., decoders are designed to return the best estimate of motor intent possible, under various sets of assumptions about how the recorded neural signals represent motor intent. Here we recast the decoder design problem from a physical control system perspective, and investigate how various classes of decoders lead to different types of physical systems for the subject to control. This framework leads to new interpretations of why certain types of decoders have been shown to perform better than others. These results have implications for understanding how motor neurons are recruited to perform various tasks, and may lend insight into the brain's ability to conceptualize artificial systems.

  16. Man-Machine Interface System for Neuromuscular Training and Evaluation Based on EMG and MMG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Ramon; Alonso, Alonso; Carrera, Albano; Durán, Ramon; Fernández, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System), a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES) and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals. PMID:22163515

  17. The importance of simulation facilities for the development of review criteria for advanced human system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced control room (ACR) concepts are being developed in the commercial nuclear industry as part of future reactor designs. The ACRs will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role (function) in the system, the method of information presentation, the ways in which the operator interacts with the system, and the requirements on the operator to understand and supervise an increasingly complex system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The NRC is developing guidelines to support their review of these advanced designs. As part of this effort, a methodology for guidance development was established, and topics in need of further research were identified. Simulators of various kinds are likely to play important roles in the development of review guidelines and in the evaluation of ACRs. This paper describes a general approach to review criteria development, and discusses the role of simulators in addressing research needs

  18. Final Report: MaRSPlus Sensor System Electrical Cable Management and Distributed Motor Control Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin

    2011-01-01

    The success of JPL's Next Generation Imaging Spectrometer (NGIS) in Earth remote sensing has inspired a follow-on instrument project, the MaRSPlus Sensor System (MSS). One of JPL's responsibilities in the MSS project involves updating the documentation from the previous JPL airborne imagers to provide all the information necessary for an outside customer to operate the instrument independently. As part of this documentation update, I created detailed electrical cabling diagrams to provide JPL technicians with clear and concise build instructions and a database to track the status of cables from order to build to delivery. Simultaneously, a distributed motor control system is being developed for potential use on the proposed 2018 Mars rover mission. This system would significantly reduce the mass necessary for rover motor control, making more mass space available to other important spacecraft systems. The current stage of the project consists of a desktop computer talking to a single "cold box" unit containing the electronics to drive a motor. In order to test the electronics, I developed a graphical user interface (GUI) using MATLAB to allow a user to send simple commands to the cold box and display the responses received in a user-friendly format.

  19. Evaluation of user interface and workflow design of a bedside nursing clinical decision support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Finley, George Mike; Long, Ju; Mills, Christy; Johnson, Ron Kim

    2013-01-31

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are important tools to improve health care outcomes and reduce preventable medical adverse events. However, the effectiveness and success of CDSS depend on their implementation context and usability in complex health care settings. As a result, usability design and validation, especially in real world clinical settings, are crucial aspects of successful CDSS implementations. Our objective was to develop a novel CDSS to help frontline nurses better manage critical symptom changes in hospitalized patients, hence reducing preventable failure to rescue cases. A robust user interface and implementation strategy that fit into existing workflows was key for the success of the CDSS. Guided by a formal usability evaluation framework, UFuRT (user, function, representation, and task analysis), we developed a high-level specification of the product that captures key usability requirements and is flexible to implement. We interviewed users of the proposed CDSS to identify requirements, listed functions, and operations the system must perform. We then designed visual and workflow representations of the product to perform the operations. The user interface and workflow design were evaluated via heuristic and end user performance evaluation. The heuristic evaluation was done after the first prototype, and its results were incorporated into the product before the end user evaluation was conducted. First, we recruited 4 evaluators with strong domain expertise to study the initial prototype. Heuristic violations were coded and rated for severity. Second, after development of the system, we assembled a panel of nurses, consisting of 3 licensed vocational nurses and 7 registered nurses, to evaluate the user interface and workflow via simulated use cases. We recorded whether each session was successfully completed and its completion time. Each nurse was asked to use the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index to self

  20. Efficacy of a pressure-sensing mattress cover system for reducing interface pressure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Holly; Kaufman, Jaime; Baylis, Barry; Conly, John M; Hogan, David B; Stelfox, Henry T; Southern, Danielle A; Ghali, William A; Ho, Chester H

    2015-09-29

    Interface pressure is a key risk factor in the development of pressure ulcers. Visual feedback of continuous interface pressure between the body and support surface could inform clinicians on repositioning strategies and play a key role in an overall strategy for the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. A parallel two-group randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted to study the effect of continuous pressure imaging on reducing interface pressure and on the incidence of pressure ulcers in vulnerable hospital patients. A total of 678 eligible consenting inpatients at risk of pressure ulcer development in a tertiary acute care institution will be randomly allocated to either having the ForeSite PT™ system with the liquid-crystal display monitor turned on to provide visual feedback to the clinicians while also collecting continuous interface pressure data (intervention group) or to having the ForeSite PT™ system with monitor turned off (that is, not providing visual feedback) but still collecting continuous interface pressure data (control group), in a ratio of 1:1. Continuous interface pressure data will be collected in both groups for 3 days (72 h). Data collection will continue until discharge for a subset of approximately 60 patients. The primary outcome will be the differences in the two groups' interface pressure analysis. Interface pressure readings will be collected through hourly samplings of continuous interface pressure recordings. Secondary outcomes will be the differences between the two groups in pressure-related skin and soft tissue changes in areas at risk of pressure ulcer (obtained at baseline within 24 h of admission) and on the third day of the trial or at discharge and perceptions of the intervention by patients and clinicians (obtained on the third day or at discharge). This will be the first randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of visual feedback with continuous interface pressure of vulnerable hospital

  1. A Development of Interfacing System between Level 2 and Level 3 PSA for Integrated Analysis of Full Scope PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seok Jung

    2011-01-01

    An integrated assessment of full scope and entire level PSA including level 1, 2 and 3 PSA is an essential issue of the current PSA implementation for operating and developing nuclear power plants. In order to perform an integrated assessment under restricted resources for PSA, integrated and automation assessment tools are essentially required. For this purpose, KAERI is in the development of an integrated PSA assessment software package named by OCEANS. As a part of OCEANS, an interfacing system linked between level 2 and level 3 PSA was developed. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the currently developing interfacing system with a concept of link method. This interfacing system was designed as a subsidiary tool of SARA program which is a supporting utility of level 3 PSA with Microsoft Window based- program

  2. Brain-machine interfaces for controlling lower-limb powered robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongtian; Eguren, David; Azorín, José M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Phat Luu, Trieu; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Lower-limb, powered robotics systems such as exoskeletons and orthoses have emerged as novel robotic interventions to assist or rehabilitate people with walking disabilities. These devices are generally controlled by certain physical maneuvers, for example pressing buttons or shifting body weight. Although effective, these control schemes are not what humans naturally use. The usability and clinical relevance of these robotics systems could be further enhanced by brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). A number of preliminary studies have been published on this topic, but a systematic understanding of the experimental design, tasks, and performance of BMI-exoskeleton systems for restoration of gait is lacking. Approach. To address this gap, we applied standard systematic review methodology for a literature search in PubMed and EMBASE databases and identified 11 studies involving BMI-robotics systems. The devices, user population, input and output of the BMIs and robot systems respectively, neural features, decoders, denoising techniques, and system performance were reviewed and compared. Main results. Results showed BMIs classifying walk versus stand tasks are the most common. The results also indicate that electroencephalography (EEG) is the only recording method for humans. Performance was not clearly presented in most of the studies. Several challenges were summarized, including EEG denoising, safety, responsiveness and others. Significance. We conclude that lower-body powered exoskeletons with automated gait intention detection based on BMIs open new possibilities in the assistance and rehabilitation fields, although the current performance, clinical benefits and several key challenging issues indicate that additional research and development is required to deploy these systems in the clinic and at home. Moreover, rigorous EEG denoising techniques, suitable performance metrics, consistent trial reporting, and more clinical trials are needed to advance the

  3. Quantization of interface currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Motoko [AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Schulz-Baldes, Hermann [Department Mathematik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Villegas-Blas, Carlos [Instituto de Matematicas, Cuernavaca, UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    At the interface of two two-dimensional quantum systems, there may exist interface currents similar to edge currents in quantum Hall systems. It is proved that these interface currents are macroscopically quantized by an integer that is given by the difference of the Chern numbers of the two systems. It is also argued that at the interface between two time-reversal invariant systems with half-integer spin, one of which is trivial and the other non-trivial, there are dissipationless spin-polarized interface currents.

  4. Interprocessor interface for data transfer between PDP-8/L and NOVA 1220 dedicated gamma energy analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyer, G.L.

    1975-08-01

    A method for data communication between PDP-8/L and NOVA 1220 computer-based multichannel analyzer systems is described. The method is implemented by modification of each system's operating program with appropriate I/O subroutines and by installation of a minor amount of hardware logic to a NOVA general purpose interface board. The method provides for high speed transfer of gamma energy analysis data between a Nuclear Data Corporation 50/50 system and a Tracor-Northern Corporation 660 system

  5. Work-Centered Support System Technology: A New Interface Client Technology for the Battlespace Infosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eggleston, Robert G; Young, Michael J; Whitaker, Randell D

    2000-01-01

    .... Although the infosphere's core web and agent technologies are clearly able to provide a heterogeneous infosphere, improved interface technologies are also needed to address problems of information...

  6. Interaction of a biguanide compound with membrane model interface systems: probing the properties of antimalaria and antidiabetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samart, Nuttaporn; Beuning, Cheryle N; Haller, Kenneth J; Rithner, Chris D; Crans, Debbie C

    2014-07-29

    Since membrane penetration is important for drug efficacy, how antimalarial precursor material 1-phenylbiguanide (PBG) interacts with an interface was characterized using a reverse micelle (RM) model system. (1)H NMR studies show that PBG partitions across the membrane interface. Specifically, the (1)H NMR studies showed that the 1-phenylbiguanide compound in an aqueous environment changed when placed near an interface. PBG is known to affect hydrogen bonding in water, and as the size of the RMs changes, the water organization in the water pool is changed. The NOESY spectrum of PBG in AOT RM contains cross-peak signals between the PBG protons and AOT protons, which is consistent with the penetration of the PBG into the interface. At the same time, there is a cross peak between the biguanide moiety and the HOD signal. This shows that these NH protons are near the HOD protons, placing the biguanide functional group in the water pool. Preliminary differential FTIR spectroscopic studies confirmed this location. In summary, we found that PBG interacts with different regions of the interface, with the phenyl group penetrating the hydrophobic interface while the biguanide remains in the water pool.

  7. An Assistive Computerized System with Tangible User Interfaces for Children with Moderate Intellectual and Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihad Mohamad Aljaam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an assistive learning system for children with moderate intellectual and learning disabilities that supports collaboration, data exploration, communication and creativity. The system offers a wide range of tutorials on basic concepts of elementary sciences with some edutainment games and puzzles based on different tangible user interfaces TUIs. The system can enhance the communications, memorization, reasoning and learning capabilities of the children with special needs. The tutorials contain multimedia elements that help the children understand effectively the topics and allow them to interact and be more proactive. An assessment component is developed to evaluate the children understanding. Parents are actively involved in the learning process by being able to add or customize contents specific to their children. The children can use the TUIs alone and get prompted on all the steps to perform some daily activities like the school day activity, the tooth brushing activity, etc. This will increase their self-reliance and self-dependence.

  8. The High-Level Interface Definitions in the ASTRI/CTA Mini Array Software System (MASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, V.; Tosti, G.; Schwarz, J.; Bruno, P.; Cefal‘A, M.; Paola, A. D.; Gianotti, F.; Grillo, A.; Russo, F.; Tanci, C.; Testa, V.; Antonelli, L. A.; Canestrari, R.; Catalano, O.; Fiorini, M.; Gallozzi, S.; Giro, E.; Palombara, N. L.; Leto, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.; Stringhetti, L.; Trifoglio, M.; Vercellone, S.; Astri Collaboration; Cta Consortium

    2015-09-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of a Small Size Dual-Mirror Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. A second goal of the project is the realization of the ASTRI/CTA mini-array, which will be composed of seven SST-2M telescopes placed at the CTA Southern Site. The ASTRI Mini Array Software System (MASS) is designed to support the ASTRI/CTA mini-array operations. MASS is being built on top of the ALMA Common Software (ACS) framework, which provides support for the implementation of distributed data acquisition and control systems, and functionality for log and alarm management, message driven communication and hardware devices management. The first version of the MASS system, which will comply with the CTA requirements and guidelines, will be tested on the ASTRI SST-2M prototype. In this contribution we present the interface definitions of the MASS high level components in charge of the ASTRI SST-2M observation scheduling, telescope control and monitoring, and data taking. Particular emphasis is given to their potential reuse for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  9. Advanced growth and surface analysis system for in situ studies of interface formation. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayers, D.E.; Nemanich, R.J.; Wang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first annual report for developing an advanced integrated in situ UHV growth/analysis system for synchrotron radiation studies of interface and surface reactions which lead to epitaxial structures on Si, Ge, and Si 1-x Ge x alloys. This equipment will allow one to use techniques based on synchrotron radiation, such as photoemission, x-ray standing wave (XSW), and surface x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAFS) to determining the electronic states and atomic configurations of surfaces in metal-silicon, metal-germanium and metal-silicon-germanium alloys. Since the award of the contract the authors have completed a detailed design of the overall system, identified commercially available equipment which fits the requirements and have purchased or ordered all of this equipment. They have also custom designed a considerable amount of equipment which is not available commercially because of the special requirements. This includes both of the UHV chambers, sample manipulators, and a mobile support stand. In this report, they will describe the design and purchase status of the system. An overview of the equipment purchase status is given in Appendix 1. The details of their custom designed growth and analytical chambers are given in Appendix 2

  10. End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jesse [Acadia Optronics LLC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2013-08-30

    In recent years, network bandwidth requirements have scaled multiple folds, pushing the need for the development of data exchange mechanisms at 100 Gb/s and beyond. High performance computing, climate modeling, large-scale storage, and collaborative scientific research are examples of applications that can greatly benefit by leveraging high bandwidth capabilities of the order of 100 Gb/s. Such requirements and advances in IEEE Ethernet standards, Optical Transport Unit4 (OTU4), and host-system interconnects demand a network infrastructure supporting throughput rates of the order of 100 Gb/s with a single wavelength. To address such a demand Acadia Optronics in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, proposed and developed a end-system Network Interface Controller (NIC) for the 100Gbps WANs. Acadia’s 100G NIC employs an FPGA based system with a high-performance processor interconnect (PCIe 3.0) and a high capacity optical transmission link (CXP) to provide data transmission at the rate of 100 Gbps.

  11. A vector radiative transfer model for coupled atmosphere and ocean systems with a rough interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Pengwang; Hu Yongxiang; Chowdhary, Jacek; Trepte, Charles R.; Lucker, Patricia L.; Josset, Damien B.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an exact vector (polarized) radiative transfer (VRT) model for coupled atmosphere and ocean systems. This VRT model is based on the successive order of scattering (SOS) method, which virtually takes all the multiple scattering processes into account, including atmospheric scattering, oceanic scattering, reflection and transmission through the rough ocean surface. The isotropic Cox-Munk wave model is used to derive the ref and transmission matrices for the rough ocean surface. Shadowing effects are included by the shadowing function. We validated the SOS results by comparing them with those calculated by two independent codes based on the doubling/adding and Monte Carlo methods. Two error analyses related to the ocean color remote sensing are performed in the coupled atmosphere and ocean systems. One is the scalar error caused by ignoring the polarization in the whole system. The other is the error introduced by ignoring the polarization of the light transmitted through the ocean interface. Both errors are significant for the cases studied. This code fits for the next generation of ocean color study because it converges fast for absorbing medium as, for instance, ocean.

  12. Design and construction of an interface system for the extrapolation chamber from the beta secondary standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez C, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Interface System for the Extrapolation Chamber (SICE) contains several devices handled by a personal computer (PC), it is able to get the required data to calculate the absorbed dose due to Beta radiation. The main functions of the system are: a) Measures the ionization current or charge stored in the extrapolation chamber. b) Adjusts the distance between the plates of the extrapolation chamber automatically. c) Adjust the bias voltage of the extrapolation chamber automatically. d) Acquires the data of the temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity of the environment and the voltage applied between the plates of the extrapolation chamber. e) Calculates the effective area of the plates of the extrapolation chamber and the real distance between them. f) Stores all the obtained information in hard disk or diskette. A comparison between the desired distance and the distance in the dial of the extrapolation chamber, show us that the resolution of the system is of 20 μm. The voltage can be changed between -399.9 V and +399.9 V with an error of less the 3 % with a resolution of 0.1 V. These uncertainties are between the accepted limits to be used in the determination of the absolute absorbed dose due to beta radiation. (Author)

  13. Software complex AS (automation of spectrometry). User interface of experiment automation system implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhova, N.V.; Beskrovnyj, A.I.; Bogdzel', A.A.; Butorin, P.E.; Vasilovskij, S.G.; Gundorin, N.A.; Zlokazov, V.B.; Kutuzov, S.A.; Salamatin, I.M.; Shvetsov, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    An instrumental software complex for automation of spectrometry (AS) that enables prompt realization of experiment automation systems for spectrometers, which use data buferisation, has been developed. In the development new methods of programming and building of automation systems together with novel net technologies were employed. It is suggested that programs to schedule and conduct experiments should be based on the parametric model of the spectrometer, the approach that will make it possible to write programs suitable for any FLNP (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics) spectrometer and experimental technique applied and use different hardware interfaces for introducing the spectrometric data into the data acquisition system. The article describes the possibilities provided to the user in the field of scheduling and control of the experiment, data viewing, and control of the spectrometer parameters. The possibility of presenting the current spectrometer state, programs and the experimental data in the Internet in the form of dynamically formed protocols and graphs, as well as of the experiment control via the Internet is realized. To use the means of the Internet on the side of the client, applied programs are not needed. It suffices to know how to use the two programs to carry out experiments in the automated mode. The package is designed for experiments in condensed matter and nuclear physics and is ready for using. (author)

  14. A cost-effective sensor system to train light weight juggling using an interactive virtual reality interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergamasco Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach to train how to juggle using a sensor system based on one of the most commercial, sophisticated and accessible input devices, the Wii Remote controller. This platform, particularly its infrared camera, is used to develop a real-time sensor system for hand motion tracking and fit it into a virtual reality interface. The quality of our algorithm was tested through this 3D virtual interface, which has the finality to give the user visual feedback of his/her hand positions, and created for the user the sensation of juggling.

  15. Modelling nutrient exchange at the sediment water interface of river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Marie; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette

    2007-07-01

    SummaryIn-stream benthic processes can play a significant role on the water quality of overlying waters flowing through a river network. In order to better understand and quantify the fate of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and silica) during their travel through the river continuum, a deterministic benthic sub-model was developed with the purpose of being connected to a drainage network model. This benthic sub-model resolves the differential equations representing early diagenesis in the sediment, linking the sedimentation rate of organic matter onto the sediment to the resulting flux of nutrients across the sediment-water interface. The model has been developed for conditions where sedimentation prevails as well as for situations where net erosion prevents the built-up of a significant sediment layer and where only a biofilm can develop, attached to solid substrates. The benthic model was tested independently of the main water column biological-hydrological model to which it is intended to be coupled. For this, three case studies were chosen from the literature representing various sedimentation/erosion conditions: the 8th order river Seine (France), the water storage basin of Méry s/Oise (France), and the headwater stream Orneau (Belgium). The general benthic model has been validated for ammonium, nitrate, oxygen and phosphorus fluxes across the sediment-water interface. The capability of the model to correctly predict the observed nutrients profiles within the sediment was also validated for organic carbon, ammonium and phosphorus. An uncertainty analysis showed that using two modelling objectives (observed fluxes and concentration profiles in the sediment) strongly reduces the uncertainty in parameters calibration. A sensitivity analysis illustrated the complexity of the interacting reactions driving each variable, and justifies the usefulness of the model as a tool for understanding and predicting the behaviour of the benthic compartment of river systems.

  16. A dry EEG-system for scientific research and brain-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Oliver Zander

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although it ranks among the oldest tools in neuroscientific research, electroencephalography (EEG still forms the method of choice in a wide variety of clinical and research applications. In the context of Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI, EEG recently has become a tool to enhance Human-Machine Interaction (HMI. EEG could be employed in a wider range of environments, especially for the use of BCI systems in a clinical context or at the homes of patients. However, the application of EEG in these contexts is impeded by the cumbersome preparation of the electrodes with conductive gel that is necessary to lower the impedance between electrodes and scalp. Dry electrodes could provide a solution to this barrier and allow for EEG applications outside the laboratory. In addition, dry electrodes may reduce the time needed for neurological exams in clinical practice. This study evaluates a prototype of a three-channel dry electrode EEG system, comparing it to state-of-the-art conventional EEG electrodes. Two experimental paradigms were used: first, Event-Related Potentials (ERP were investigated with a variant of the oddball paradigm. Second, features of the frequency domain were compared by a paradigm inducing occipital alpha. Furthermore, both paradigms were used to evaluate BCI classification accuracies of both EEG systems. Amplitude and temporal structure of ERPs as well as features in the frequency domain did not differ significantly between the EEG systems. BCI classification accuracies were equally high in both systems when the frequency domain was considered. With respect to the oddball classification accuracy, there were slight differences between the wet and dry electrode systems. We conclude that the tested dry electrodes were capable to detect EEG signals with good quality and that these signals can be used for research or BCI applications. Easy to handle electrodes may help to foster the use of EEG among a wider range of potential users.

  17. A PIC microcontroller-based system for real-life interfacing of external peripherals with a mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. Nirmal; Chatterjee, Amitava; Rakshit, Anjan

    2010-02-01

    The present article describes the development of a peripheral interface controller (PIC) microcontroller-based system for interfacing external add-on peripherals with a real mobile robot, for real life applications. This system serves as an important building block of a complete integrated vision-based mobile robot system, integrated indigenously in our laboratory. The system is composed of the KOALA mobile robot in conjunction with a personal computer (PC) and a two-camera-based vision system where the PIC microcontroller is used to drive servo motors, in interrupt-driven mode, to control additional degrees of freedom of the vision system. The performance of the developed system is tested by checking it under the control of several user-specified commands, issued from the PC end.

  18. Software interface system for Geophysical Data Access and Management System (GPDAMS-CD)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    This report examines the principles underlying GPDAMS, philosophy behind data management, and describes functionalities, limitations and usage of GPDAMS. GPDAMS is a complete marine geophysical data management system that provides user...

  19. A high-throughput continuous sample introduction interface for microfluidic chip-based capillary electrophoresis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qun; Xu, Guang-Ming; Fang, Zhao-Lun

    2002-03-15

    The development of efficient sample introduction and pretreatment systems for microfluidic chip-based analytical systems is important for their application to real-life samples. In this work, world-to-chip interfacing was achieved by a novel flow-through sampling reservoir featuring a guided overflow design. The flow-through reservoir was fabricated on a 30 x 60 x 3 mm planar glass chip of crossed-channel design used for capillary electrophoresis separations. The 20-microL sample reservoir was produced from a section of plastic pipet tip and fixed at one end of the sampling channel. Sample change was performed by pumping 80-microL samples sandwiched between air segments at approximately 0.48 mL/min flow rate through the flow-through reservoir, introduced from an access hole on the bottom side of the chip. A filter paper collar wrapped tightly around the reservoir guided the overflowing sample solution into a plastic trough surrounding the reservoir and then to waste. The performance of the system was demonstrated in the separation and determination of FITC-labeled arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid with LIF detection, by continuously introducing a train of different samples through the system without electrical interruption. Employing a separation channel of 4 cm (2-cm effective separation length) and 1.4-kV separation voltage, maximum throughputs of 80/h were achieved with <4.1% carryover and precisions ranging from 1.5% for arginine to 2.6% RSD (n = 11) for glycine. The sampling system was tested in the continuous monitoring of the derivatizing process of amino acids by FITC over a period of 4 h, involving 166 analytical cycles. An outstanding overall precision of 4.8% RSD (n = 166) was achieved for the fluorescein internal standard.

  20. Modular mechatronic system for stationary bicycles interfaced with virtual environment for rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cycling has been used in the rehabilitation of individuals with both chronic and post-surgical conditions. Among the challenges with implementing bicycling for rehabilitation is the recruitment of both extremities, in particular when one is weaker or less coordinated. Feedback embedded in virtual reality (VR) augmented cycling may serve to address the requirement for efficacious cycling; specifically recruitment of both extremities and exercising at a high intensity. Methods In this paper a mechatronic rehabilitation bicycling system with an interactive virtual environment, called Virtual Reality Augmented Cycling Kit (VRACK), is presented. Novel hardware components embedded with sensors were implemented on a stationary exercise bicycle to monitor physiological and biomechanical parameters of participants while immersing them in an augmented reality simulation providing the user with visual, auditory and haptic feedback. This modular and adaptable system attaches to commercially-available stationary bicycle systems and interfaces with a personal computer for simulation and data acquisition processes. The complete bicycle system includes: a) handle bars based on hydraulic pressure sensors; b) pedals that monitor pedal kinematics with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and forces on the pedals while providing vibratory feedback; c) off the shelf electronics to monitor heart rate and d) customized software for rehabilitation. Bench testing for the handle and pedal systems is presented for calibration of the sensors detecting force and angle. Results The modular mechatronic kit for exercise bicycles was tested in bench testing and human tests. Bench tests performed on the sensorized handle bars and the instrumented pedals validated the measurement accuracy of these components. Rider tests with the VRACK system focused on the pedal system and successfully monitored kinetic and kinematic parameters of the rider’s lower extremities. Conclusions The VRACK

  1. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  2. The Input-Interface of Webcam Applied in 3D Virtual Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huey-Min; Cheng, Wen-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Our research explores a virtual reality application based on Web camera (Webcam) input-interface. The interface can replace with the mouse to control direction intention of a user by the method of frame difference. We divide a frame into nine grids from Webcam and make use of the background registration to compute the moving object. In order to…

  3. Integration of computerized operation support systems on a nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Almeida, Jose C.S.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2015-01-01

    Automation of certain tasks in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control room is expected to result in reduced operators' mental workload, which may induce other benefits such as enhanced situation awareness and improved system performance. The final goal should be higher level of operational safety. Thus, recent works are increasingly assessing automation. The LABIHS compact NPP simulator, though, still operates under strictly manual printed hard-copy procedures, despite of the fact that the simulator incorporates several advancements in design of digitalized Human-Interfaces (HSIs). This work presents the development, implementation and integration of selected components to achieve increased level of computerized/automated operation of the LABIHS compact NPP simulator. Specifically, we discuss three components: (I) Automatic Plant Mode Detection, (II) Automatic Alarm Filtering, and (III) Computerized Procedures. Each one of these components has to be carefully designed/integrated so that one can avoid the undesired effects of some known implementations of automated systems on NPP, such as the reduction in the operator's system awareness, an increase in monitoring workload, and the degradation in manual skills, which could lead to automation-induced system failures. (author)

  4. User interface prototype for geospatial early warning systems - a tsunami showcase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitzsch, M.; Lendholt, M.; Esbrí, M. Á.

    2012-03-01

    The command and control unit's graphical user interface (GUI) is a central part of early warning systems (EWS) for man-made and natural hazards. The GUI combines and concentrates the relevant information of the system and offers it to human operators. It has to support operators successfully performing their tasks in complex workflows. Most notably in critical situations when operators make important decisions in a limited amount of time, the command and control unit's GUI has to work reliably and stably, providing the relevant information and functionality with the required quality and in time. The design of the GUI application is essential in the development of any EWS to manage hazards effectively. The design and development of such GUI is performed repeatedly for each EWS by various software architects and developers. Implementations differ based on their application in different domains. But similarities designing and equal approaches implementing GUIs of EWS are not quite harmonized enough with related activities and do not exploit possible synergy effects. Thus, the GUI's implementation of an EWS for tsunamis is successively introduced, providing a generic approach to be applied in each EWS for man-made and natural hazards.

  5. Ergatis: a web interface and scalable software system for bioinformatics workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvis, Joshua; Crabtree, Jonathan; Galens, Kevin; Gussman, Aaron; Inman, Jason M.; Lee, Eduardo; Nampally, Sreenath; Riley, David; Sundaram, Jaideep P.; Felix, Victor; Whitty, Brett; Mahurkar, Anup; Wortman, Jennifer; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The growth of sequence data has been accompanied by an increasing need to analyze data on distributed computer clusters. The use of these systems for routine analysis requires scalable and robust software for data management of large datasets. Software is also needed to simplify data management and make large-scale bioinformatics analysis accessible and reproducible to a wide class of target users. Results: We have developed a workflow management system named Ergatis that enables users to build, execute and monitor pipelines for computational analysis of genomics data. Ergatis contains preconfigured components and template pipelines for a number of common bioinformatics tasks such as prokaryotic genome annotation and genome comparisons. Outputs from many of these components can be loaded into a Chado relational database. Ergatis was designed to be accessible to a broad class of users and provides a user friendly, web-based interface. Ergatis supports high-throughput batch processing on distributed compute clusters and has been used for data management in a number of genome annotation and comparative genomics projects. Availability: Ergatis is an open-source project and is freely available at http://ergatis.sourceforge.net Contact: jorvis@users.sourceforge.net PMID:20413634

  6. Characterizing Design Process Interfaces as Organization Networks: Insights for Engineering Systems Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pedro Parraguez; Eppinger, Steven; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    and interpret the effect of those characteristics on interface problems. As a result, we show how structural and compositional aspects of the organization networks between information-dependent activities provide valuable insights to better manage complex engineering design processes. The proposed approach......The engineering design literature has provided guidance on how to identify and analyze design activities and their information dependencies. However, a systematic characterization of process interfaces between engineering design activities is missing, and the impact of structural and compositional...... aspects of interfaces on process performance is unclear. To fill these gaps, we propose a new approach that characterizes process interfaces as organization networks consisting of people and their interactions when performing interfacing activities. Furthermore, we provide guidance on how to test...

  7. Remote maintenance systems requirements are being developed to provide design guidelines for machine components, to define maintenance interfaces, and to quantify maintenance equipment and procedures needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Tabor, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Remote maintenance systems requirements are being developed to provide design guidelines for machine components, to define maintenance interfaces, and to quantify maintenance equipment and procedures needed

  8. Hybrid brain-computer interface for biomedical cyber-physical system application using wireless embedded EEG systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Rifai; Naik, Ganesh R; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2017-01-07

    One of the key challenges of the biomedical cyber-physical system is to combine cognitive neuroscience with the integration of physical systems to assist people with disabilities. Electroencephalography (EEG) has been explored as a non-invasive method of providing assistive technology by using brain electrical signals. This paper presents a unique prototype of a hybrid brain computer interface (BCI) which senses a combination classification of mental task, steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) and eyes closed detection using only two EEG channels. In addition, a microcontroller based head-mounted battery-operated wireless EEG sensor combined with a separate embedded system is used to enhance portability, convenience and cost effectiveness. This experiment has been conducted with five healthy participants and five patients with tetraplegia. Generally, the results show comparable classification accuracies between healthy subjects and tetraplegia patients. For the offline artificial neural network classification for the target group of patients with tetraplegia, the hybrid BCI system combines three mental tasks, three SSVEP frequencies and eyes closed, with average classification accuracy at 74% and average information transfer rate (ITR) of the system of 27 bits/min. For the real-time testing of the intentional signal on patients with tetraplegia, the average success rate of detection is 70% and the speed of detection varies from 2 to 4 s.

  9. User interface of a teleradiology system for the MR assessment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccichenti, G; Cademartiri, F; Pichiecchio, A; Bontempi, E; Sabatini, U; Bastianello, S

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the image display of a web-based teleradiology system that uses a common web browser and has no need of proprietary applets, plug-ins, or dedicated software for DICOM display. The teleradiology system (TS) is connected to the Internet by ADSL and to radiological modalities using the DICOM standard with TCP/IP. Images were displayed on a PC through Internet connection with the remote TS using a common web browser. MS lesion number and volume in T1- and T2-weighted images (T1w and T2w, respectively) of 30 brain MR studies were quantified using both the TS and a conventional software. Wilcoxon signed ranks test and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess the variability and concordance between intra- and inter-observer and TS and conventional DICOM viewer, setting significance at p < 0.05. No significant differences in T1w and T2w volumes between the TS and the conventional software were found by either operator. The ICC results showed a high level of inter-operator agreement in volume estimation in T1w and T2w images using the two systems. Quantitative assessment of MS lesion volumes in T1w and T2w images with a user interface of a teleradiology system that allows the consultation by means of a common web browser, without the need for proprietary plug-ins, applets, or dedicated software for DICOM display showed no significant differences from, and almost complete agreement with, conventional DICOM viewers.

  10. Appearance of instabilities and fingering from interface in water-oil systems; Surgimento de instabilidades e digitacao a partir da interface em sistemas agua-oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadri, Marintho B.; Machado, Ricardo A.F.; Nogueira, Andre L.; Lopes, Toni J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Baptista, Renan M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Many operations and procedures in the petroleum industry are related to the immiscible displacement of a fluid by another one, as the secondary recovery of petroleum and pumping operation through pipelines of high viscosity oils. In this context, an stability analysis of the water-oil interface as well as of the factors that leads to the appearance of the viscous fingering phenomenon, represented by the viscous flowing of one phase that penetrates inside of the other one in the form of one or more fingers, is of major importance for the forecast, simulation and control of operations involving this kind of system. From the theories of perturbation and unstable immiscible displacement of fluids, initially conceived for cells of parallel slabs (Hele-Shaw), the authors intend to extend the concepts and adapt the criteria for the three-dimensional geometry in macroscopic scale. (author)

  11. Progress on the interface between UPP and CPRHS (Cask and Plug Remote Handling System) tractor/gripping tool for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Elena V.; Rios, Luis; Queral, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► UPP interface requirements in the plug RH extraction/insertion for ITER. ► Analyze of maximum misalignment between port duct and port cell. ► Friction study between plug skids and VV port/ramp rails during the plug transfer. ► Definition of the tolerance in the plug skids to avoid the plug jamming. ► Concepts of gripping tools based on one gripping point and avoiding force feedback. -- Abstract: EFDA finances a training programme called Goal Oriented Training Programme for Remote Handling (GOT RH), whose goal is to train engineers in Remote Handling for ITER. As part of this training programme, the conceptual design of the mechanical interface between Upper Port Plug (UPP) and Cask and Plug Remote Handling System (CPRHS) as well as the conceptual design of the needed tools for UPP Remote Handling is carried out. The paper presents the conceptual design of the UPP/Gripping Tool Interface. This includes the conceptual design of the gripping tool for introducing/removing the UPP in/from the ITER port and the mechanical features on both sides of the UPP/Gripping Tool Interface (e.g. alignment features, mechanical connectors, fasteners). In order to develop the design of the interface between UPP and CPRHS it is necessary to first identify the functional requirements of the Transfer Cask System (TCS) and the CPRHS, such as required degrees of freedom (DoF), required performances of system, geometrical constraints, loading conditions, alignment requirements, RAMI requirements. These requirements are the input data for the design of the interface between UPP and gripping tool and some of them are also described in the paper

  12. Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A): Instrumentation interface control document

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) defines the specific details of the complete accomodation information between the Earth Observing System (EOS) PM Spacecraft and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A)Instrument. This is the first submittal of the ICN: it will be updated periodically throughout the life of the program. The next update is planned prior to Critical Design Review (CDR).

  13. A HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING PROCESS TO SUPPORT HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE DESIGN IN CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, C.; Joe, J.; Boring, R.

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to sustain operation of the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through a multi-pathway approach in conducting research and development (R&D). The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) System Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and other information systems in existing U.S. NPPs. Control room modernization is an important part following this pathway, and human factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been involved in conducting R&D to support migration of new digital main control room (MCR) technologies from legacy analog and legacy digital I&C. This paper describes a human factors engineering (HFE) process that supports human-system interface (HSI) design in MCR modernization activities, particularly with migration of old digital to new digital I&C. The process described in this work is an expansion from the LWRS Report INL/EXT-16-38576, and is a requirements-driven approach that aligns with NUREG-0711 requirements. The work described builds upon the existing literature by adding more detail around key tasks and decisions to make when transitioning from HSI Design into Verification and Validation (V&V). The overall objective of this process is to inform HSI design and elicit specific, measurable, and achievable human factors criteria for new digital technologies. Upon following this process, utilities should have greater confidence with transitioning from HSI design into V&V.

  14. A wireless transmission neural interface system for unconstrained non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A.; Parajuli, Arun; Franklin, Robert; Sorenson, Michael; Felleman, Daniel J.; Hansen, Bryan J.; Hu, Ming; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Studying the brain in large animal models in a restrained laboratory rig severely limits our capacity to examine brain circuits in experimental and clinical applications. Approach. To overcome these limitations, we developed a high-fidelity 96-channel wireless system to record extracellular spikes and local field potentials from the neocortex. A removable, external case of the wireless device is attached to a titanium pedestal placed in the animal skull. Broadband neural signals are amplified, multiplexed, and continuously transmitted as TCP/IP data at a sustained rate of 24 Mbps. A Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA assembles the digital signals into serial data frames for transmission at 20 kHz though an 802.11n wireless data link on a frequency-shift key-modulated signal at 5.7-5.8 GHz to a receiver up to 10 m away. The system is powered by two CR123A, 3 V batteries for 2 h of operation. Main results. We implanted a multi-electrode array in visual area V4 of one anesthetized monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) of a freely moving monkey (Macaca mulatta). The implanted recording arrays were electrically stable and delivered broadband neural data over a year of testing. For the first time, we compared dlPFC neuronal responses to the same set of stimuli (food reward) in restrained and freely moving conditions. Although we did not find differences in neuronal responses as a function of reward type in the restrained and unrestrained conditions, there were significant differences in correlated activity. This demonstrates that measuring neural responses in freely moving animals can capture phenomena that are absent in the traditional head-fixed paradigm. Significance. We implemented a wireless neural interface for multi-electrode recordings in freely moving non-human primates, which can potentially move systems neuroscience to a new direction by allowing one to record neural signals while animals interact with their environment.

  15. Development the interface system of master-slave manipulator and external input device on the graphic simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, T. J.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    The master-slave manipulator is the generally used as remote handling device in the hot cell, in which the high level radioactive materials such as spent fuels are handled. To analyze the motion of remote handling device and to simulate the remote handling operation task in the hot cell, the 3D graphic simulator which has been installed the master-slave manipulator is established. Also the interface program of external input device with 6 DOF(degree of Freedom) is developed and connected to graphic simulator with LLTI(Low Level Tele-operation Interface) which provides a uniquely optimized, high speed, bidirectional communication interface to one or more of system and processes

  16. MATLAB GUI (graphical user interface) for the design of GRIN components for optical systems as an educational tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Bao-Varela, C.

    2014-07-01

    New technologies and the available computing tools are becoming more important every day in the teaching evolution. The use of Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) with MATLAB enables the implementation of practical teaching methodologies to make easier the comprehension of a given subject. In this work, we report on the application of GUIs in order to provide the students with a simple tool for a better understanding on how to design GRIN elements for optical systems. Another GUIs advantage is that they can be converted to an executable file, so any student could use the interface in their own computer without having a MATLAB license. We present a graphical interface to show the performance of an optical device for controlling beam size and for deflecting light for coupling purposes, by a simple geometrical optics study, in a tapered GRIN lens illuminated by a parallel beam of tilted rays. We also show a graphical interface to obtain the maximum coupling efficiency between fundamental modes of two single-mode fibers by a scaling operation carried out by a GRIN fiber lens. With this interface the students can vary the magnification and the image plane in order to get the more suitable GRIN fiber lens to maximize the coupling efficiency between two fibers.

  17. Soybean Yield Prediction Using Adaptive Nero-Fuzzy Interface System (ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Sajadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Productivity of rainfed crops may be predicted using the climatic parameters. Crop yield prediction has an important role in agricultural policies including determining the crop price. Well-known prediction methods are regression method and arterial neural networks. In this paper soybean yield is predicted using Adaptive Nero-Fuzzy Interface System (ANFIS and 11 years of climatic data (1998-2009 in Gonbad-e-Kavous region of Golestan province, Iran. Mean weekly rainfall, mean weekly temperature, mean weekly relative humidity and mean weekly sun shine hours were ANFIS inputs and its output was soybean grain yield (kg/ha. Stepwise Regression for Feature selection from climatic data was done with the SPSS18 software and ANFIS was created, trained and tested with MATLAB R2011a software. Trained ANFIS has ‘constant’ membership function in output layer and ‘gaussmf’ membership function in input layer. Each input has 3 membership functions and each output has one membership function. Root Mean Square Error (RMSE criterion was used to evaluate the performance of the ANFIS. The results showed that the proposed ANFIS with 21 rules has a prediction error (RMSE of 102.170.

  18. C language program analysis system (CLAS) part 1: graphical user interface (GUI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.K.; Seby, A.; Sen, Gopa; Dhodapkar, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    CLAS (C Language Program Analysis System) is a reverse engineering tool intended for use in the verification and validation (V and V) phase of software programs developed in the ANSI C language. From the source code, CLAS generates data pertaining to two conceptual models of software programs viz., Entity-Relationship (E-R) model and Control Flow Graphs (CFG) model. Browsing tools within CLAS, make use of this data, to provide different graphical views of the project. Static analysis tools have been developed earlier for analysing assembly language programs. CLAS is a continuation of this work to provide automated support in analysis of ANSI C language programs. CLAS provides an integrated Graphical User Interface (GUI) based environment under which programs can be analysed into the above mentioned models and the analysed data can be viewed using the browsing tools. The GUI of CLAS is implemented using an OPEN LOOK compliant tool kit XVIEW on Sun SPARC IPC workstation running Sun OS 4.1.1 rev. B. This report describes the GUI of CLAS. CLAS is also expected to be useful in other contexts which may involve understanding architecture/structure of already developed C language programs. Such requirements can arise while carrying out activities like code modification, parallelising etc. (author). 5 refs., 13 figs., 1 appendix

  19. Man/machine interface algorithm for advanced delayed-neutron signal characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    The present failed-element rupture detector (FERD) at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) consists of a single bank of delayed-neutron (DN) detectors at a fixed transit time from the core. Plans are currently under way to upgrade the FERD in 1986 and provide advanced DN signal characterization capability that is embodied in an equivalent-recoil-area (ERA) meter. The new configuration will make available to the operator a wealth of quantitative diagnostic information related to the condition and dynamic evolution of a fuel breach. The diagnostic parameters will include a continuous reading of the ERA value for the breach; the transit time, T/sub tr/, for DN emitters traveling from the core to the FERD; and the isotopic holdup time, T/sub h/, for the source. To enhance the processing, interpretation, and display of these parameters to the reactor operator, a man/machine interface (MMI) algorithm has been developed to run in the background on EBR-II's data acquisition system (DAS). The purpose of this paper is to describe the features and implementation of this newly developed MMI algorithm

  20. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  1. Brain Computer Interface Learning for Systems Based on Electrocorticography and Intracortical Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivayogi V Hiremath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  2. Energy for the interface system of (Nb, Mo)C/γ-Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yanyuan; Wang, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Jiaying; Niu, Zhongyi; Guo, Chunhuan; Jiang, Fengchun [Harbin Engineering University, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin (China); Leng, Zhe [Harbin Engineering University, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin (China); Zhejiang Ocean University, Innovation and Application Institute, Zhoushan (China); Zhang, Zhengyan; Yao, Chunfa [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Department of Structural Steels, Beijing (China); Yang, Zhigang [Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    The interfacial energies of MC/γ-Fe and formation energies of MC carbides have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Results show that the replacement of Nb by Mo in the NbC lattice is unfavorable with respect to the formation energy. However, it reduces the lattice parameter of MC and decreases the σ{sub chemical} (interfacial chemical energy) of MC/γ-Fe, thus favoring the formation of complex (Nb, Mo)C carbide. The substitution of Nb by Mo at the interface of MC/γ-Fe system promotes the hybridizations of Mo-1NNFe and C-1NNFe (or 2NNFe) (the first or second nearest neighboring Fe atoms), which leads to a decrease in σ{sub chemical}. The influence of bond energy is estimated using the discrete lattice plane/nearest neighbor broken bond (DLP/NNBB) model. It is found that the reduced is attributed to the much smaller value of e{sub Fe-C}-e{sub Mo-C} (the difference between Fe-C and Nb-C interactions). The results obtained from the analysis of the precipitates in Nb- and Nb-Mo-bearing steels are in a good agreement with the calculations. (orig.)

  3. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant's HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant's or licensee's HSI design

  4. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant`s or licensee`s HSI design.

  5. A water-powered Energy Harvesting system with Bluetooth Low Energy interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroener, M.; Allinger, K.; Berger, M.; Grether, E.; Wieland, F.; Heller, S.; Woias, P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the design, and testing of a water turbine generator system for typical flow rates in domestic applications, with an integrated power management and a Bluetooth low energy (BLE) based RF data transmission interface. It is based on a commercially available low cost hydro generator. The generator is built into a housing with optimized reduced fluidic resistance to enable operation with flow rates as low as 6 l/min. The power management combines rectification, buffering, defined start-up, and circuit protection. An MSP430FR5949 microcontroller is used for data acquisition and processing. The data are transmitted via RF, using a Bluegiga BLE112 module in advertisement mode, to a PC where the measured flow rate is stored and displayed. The transmission rate of the wireless sensor node (WSN) is set to 1 Hz if enough power is available, which is the case for flow rates above 5.5 l/min. The electronics power demand is calculated to be 340 μW in average, while the generator is capable of delivering more than 200 mW for flow rates above 15 l/min. (paper)

  6. A water-powered Energy Harvesting system with Bluetooth Low Energy interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, M.; Allinger, K.; Berger, M.; Grether, E.; Wieland, F.; Heller, S.; Woias, P.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the design, and testing of a water turbine generator system for typical flow rates in domestic applications, with an integrated power management and a Bluetooth low energy (BLE) based RF data transmission interface. It is based on a commercially available low cost hydro generator. The generator is built into a housing with optimized reduced fluidic resistance to enable operation with flow rates as low as 6 l/min. The power management combines rectification, buffering, defined start-up, and circuit protection. An MSP430FR5949 microcontroller is used for data acquisition and processing. The data are transmitted via RF, using a Bluegiga BLE112 module in advertisement mode, to a PC where the measured flow rate is stored and displayed. The transmission rate of the wireless sensor node (WSN) is set to 1 Hz if enough power is available, which is the case for flow rates above 5.5 l/min. The electronics power demand is calculated to be 340 μW in average, while the generator is capable of delivering more than 200 mW for flow rates above 15 l/min.

  7. A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach to Developing Human Machine Interface Requirements for New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Lisa Carolynn

    This dissertation examines the challenges inherent in designing and regulating to support human-automation interaction for new technologies that will be deployed into complex systems. A key question for new technologies with increasingly capable automation, is how work will be accomplished by human and machine agents. This question has traditionally been framed as how functions should be allocated between humans and machines. Such framing misses the coordination and synchronization that is needed for the different human and machine roles in the system to accomplish their goals. Coordination and synchronization demands are driven by the underlying human-automation architecture of the new technology, which are typically not specified explicitly by designers. The human machine interface (HMI), which is intended to facilitate human-machine interaction and cooperation, typically is defined explicitly and therefore serves as a proxy for human-automation cooperation requirements with respect to technical standards for technologies. Unfortunately, mismatches between the HMI and the coordination and synchronization demands of the underlying human-automation architecture can lead to system breakdowns. A methodology is needed that both designers and regulators can utilize to evaluate the predicted performance of a new technology given potential human-automation architectures. Three experiments were conducted to inform the minimum HMI requirements for a detect and avoid (DAA) system for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The results of the experiments provided empirical input to specific minimum operational performance standards that UAS manufacturers will have to meet in order to operate UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS). These studies represent a success story for how to objectively and systematically evaluate prototype technologies as part of the process for developing regulatory requirements. They also provide an opportunity to reflect on the lessons learned in order

  8. Role of top and bottom interfaces of a Pt/Co/AlOx system in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, interface perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hui Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the role of top and bottom interfaces in inversion symmetry-breaking Pt/Co/AlOx systems by inserting ultra-thin Cu layers. Wedge-type ultrathin Cu layers (0-0.5 nm are introduced between Pt/Co or Co/AlOx interfaces. Interface sensitive physical quantities such as the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (iDMI energy density, the interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (iPMA, and the magneto-optical Kerr effects (MOKE are systematically measured as a function of Cu-insertion layer thickness. We find that the Cu-insertion layer in the bottom interface (Pt/Co plays a more important role in iDMI, PMA, and MOKE. In contrast, the top interface (Co/AlOx noticeably contributes to only PMA, while its contributions to iDMI and MOKE enhancement are less significant. Although the PMA mainly comes from the bottom interface (Pt/Co, the Cu-insertion layers of all interfaces (Pt/Co, Co/AlOx influence PMA. For iDMI, only the Cu-insertion layer in the bottom interface exerts SOC suppression which leads iDMI energy to decrease rapidly.

  9. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferron George A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes, in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Results A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure, repeatable (2. The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates, but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57% is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 μg/cm2 showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8 and oxidative stress (HO-1 markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 μg/cm2 ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. Conclusion The ALICE is a useful tool for dose-controlled nanoparticle (or solute exposure of cells at the air-liquid interface. Significant differences between cellular response after ZnO nanoparticle exposure under submerged and air-liquid interface conditions suggest that pharmaceutical and toxicological studies with inhaled (nano-particles should be performed under the more realistic air-liquid interface, rather than submerged cell conditions.

  10. An Efficient User Interface Design for Nursing Information System Based on Integrated Patient Order Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Weng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    A user friendly interface can enhance the efficiency of data entry, which is crucial for building a complete database. In this study, two user interfaces (traditional pull-down menu vs. check boxes) are proposed and evaluated based on medical records with fever medication orders by measuring the time for data entry, steps for each data entry record, and the complete rate of each medical record. The result revealed that the time for data entry is reduced from 22.8 sec/record to 3.2 sec/record. The data entry procedures also have reduced from 9 steps in the traditional one to 3 steps in the new one. In addition, the completeness of medical records is increased from 20.2% to 98%. All these results indicate that the new user interface provides a more user friendly and efficient approach for data entry than the traditional interface.

  11. An RFID-Enabled Sensor Interface for the EV Modular Instrumentation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) communication module, compliant with the EPCglobal class1, generation 2 air-interface standard, that...

  12. Knowledge-Based User-Computer Interface Design, Prototyping and Evaluation - the Design Pro Advisory System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andriole, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    ...) design, prototyping and evaluation. DesignPro permits designers of user computer interfaces to represent requirements, to build prototypes, and to evaluate their impact -- all via a "workbench" of user accessible functions...

  13. Graphic User Interface Design for Mapping, Information, Display, and Analysis Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lowell, James

    2000-01-01

    This thesis evaluates both the interface design process and the map-based mission planning tools of the Loosely Coupled Components Research Group, Naval Postgraduate School, for human factors usability...

  14. Parallel combination of FC and UC for vehicular power systems using a multi-input converter-based power interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vural, B.; Erdinc, O.; Uzunoglu, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fuel cells (FC) are widely recognized as one of the most promising technologies to meet future power requirements of vehicular applications. However, a FC system combined with an energy storage system (ESS) can perform better for vehicle propulsion as considering several points. As the additional ESS can fulfill the transient power demand fluctuations, the FC system can be downsized to fit the base power demand without facing peak loads. Besides, braking energy can be recovered by the ESS. Interfacing of traction drive requirements with characteristics and modes of operation of on-board generation units and ESSs calls for suitable power electronic converter configuration. In this paper, a FC/UC hybrid vehicular power system using a multi-input converter-based power interface is proposed. The applied power interface topology ensures the active power sharing and DC link voltage stabilization for the hybrid vehicular system. The mathematical and electrical models of the hybrid vehicular system are developed in detail and simulated using MATLAB (registered) , Simulink (registered) and SimPowerSystems (registered) environments.

  15. Operating modes and practical power flow analysis of bidirectional isolated power interface for distributed power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Huiqing; Su, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Four operating modes of Dual-Phase-Shift control for Dual Active Bridge converter are presented. • Effects of “minor parameters” such as the deadtime and power device voltage drops are analyzed. • Accurate power flow models with Dual-Phase-Shift control are developed and verified with experimental results. • Optimal operating mode is determined with respect to the efficiency improvement. • Measured efficiency of the Dual Active Bridge converter is improved up to 14%. - Abstract: Due to the intermittent nature of the renewable energy sources including photovoltaic and wind energy, the energy storage systems are essential to stabilize dc bus voltage. Considering the discharge depth of super-capacitors and energy-storage batteries, the bidirectional isolated power interface will operate for a wide range of voltage and power. This study focuses on in-depth analysis of the dual-active-bridge dc–dc converter that is controlled by the dual-phase-shift scheme to improve the conversion efficiency in distributed power system. The power flow of each operating mode with dual-phase-shift control is characterized based on a detailed analysis of the effects of “minor parameters”, including the deadtime and power device voltage drops. The complete output power plane of the dual-active-bridge converter with dual-phase-shift control is obtained and compared with experimental results. The optimal operating mode is determined according to the practical output power range and the power flow characteristics. Experimental evaluation shows the effectiveness of the proposed power flow model with dual-phase-shift control and significant efficiency improvement using the optimal mode of dual-phase-shift compared with the conventional phase shift control.

  16. A wireless magnetoresistive sensing system for an intraoral tongue-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-12-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users' intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average.

  17. A Wireless Magnetoresistive Sensing System for an Intraoral Tongue-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users’ intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average. PMID:23853258

  18. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  19. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  20. Analysis of neural activity in human motor cortex -- Towards brain machine interface system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secundo, Lavi

    , the correlation of ECoG activity to kinematic parameters of arm movement is context-dependent, an important constraint to consider in future development of BMI systems. The third chapter delves into a fundamental organizational principle of the primate motor system---cortical control of contralateral limb movements. However, ipsilateral motor areas also appear to play a role in the control of ipsilateral limb movements. Several studies in monkeys have shown that individual neurons in ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) may represent, on average, the direction of movements of the ipsilateral arm. Given the increasing body of evidence demonstrating that neural ensembles can reliably represent information with a high temporal resolution, here we characterize the distributed neural representation of ipsilateral upper limb kinematics in both monkey and man. In two macaque monkeys trained to perform center-out reaching movements, we found that the ensemble spiking activity in M1 could continuously represent ipsilateral limb position. We also recorded cortical field potentials from three human subjects and also consistently found evidence of a neural representation for ipsilateral movement parameters. Together, our results demonstrate the presence of a high-fidelity neural representation for ipsilateral movement and illustrates that it can be successfully incorporated into a brain-machine interface.

  1. Development of an intelligent interface for adding spatial objects to a knowledge-based geographic information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William J.; Goettsche, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Earth Scientists lack adequate tools for quantifying complex relationships between existing data layers and studying and modeling the dynamic interactions of these data layers. There is a need for an earth systems tool to manipulate multi-layered, heterogeneous data sets that are spatially indexed, such as sensor imagery and maps, easily and intelligently in a single system. The system can access and manipulate data from multiple sensor sources, maps, and from a learned object hierarchy using an advanced knowledge-based geographical information system. A prototype Knowledge-Based Geographic Information System (KBGIS) was recently constructed. Many of the system internals are well developed, but the system lacks an adequate user interface. A methodology is described for developing an intelligent user interface and extending KBGIS to interconnect with existing NASA systems, such as imagery from the Land Analysis System (LAS), atmospheric data in Common Data Format (CDF), and visualization of complex data with the National Space Science Data Center Graphics System. This would allow NASA to quickly explore the utility of such a system, given the ability to transfer data in and out of KBGIS easily. The use and maintenance of the object hierarchies as polymorphic data types brings, to data management, a while new set of problems and issues, few of which have been explored above the prototype level.

  2. On Small-Signal Stability of Wind Power System with Full-Load Converter Interfaced Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Akhmatov, Vladislav; Nielsen, Jørgen Nygård

    2010-01-01

    Small-signal stability analysis of power system oscillations is a well established field within power system analysis, but not much attention has yet been paid to systems with a high penetration of wind turbines and with large wind power plants. In this paper an analysis is presented which assess...... the impact of full-load converter interfaced wind turbines on power system small-signal stability. The study is based on a 7 generator network with lightly damped inter-area modes. A detailed wind turbine model with all grid relevant control functions is used in the study. Furthermore is the wind power plant...

  3. On Small-Signal Stability of Wind Power System with Full-Load Converter Interfaced Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Knüppel, Thyge; Akhmatov, Vladislav; Nielsen, Jørgen Nygård; Jensen, Kim H.; Dixon, Andrew; Østergaard, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Small-signal stability analysis of power system oscillations is a well established field within power system analysis, but not much attention has yet been paid to systems with a high penetration of wind turbines and with large wind power plants. In this paper an analysis is presented which assess the impact of full-load converter interfaced wind turbines on power system small-signal stability. The study is based on a 7 generator network with lightly damped inter-area modes. A detailed wind tu...

  4. Development of an Analog System to Simulate Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    To improve casting and product yields of Fusion™ cast AA3003-core/AA4045-clad laminate ingots, a fundamental understanding of the wetting and interface formation process between the oxidized AA3003 cast surface and the AA4045 melt is required. In this study, a laboratory scale analog/immersion test was developed which mimics the wetting and interface formation process that occurs during Fusion™ casting. The effects of reheating and remelting of the AA3003 cast surface, the degree of surface oxidation present during initial contact of the two alloys, and the atmospheric conditions (air or argon) on interface formation when dipped into an AA4045 melt were examined. Results indicated that in an argon atmosphere, wetting and dissolution of the solid, oxidized AA3003 samples by liquid AA4045 occurred at temperatures both above and below the measured onset of AA3003 remelting. AA3003/AA4045 interfaces were similar to those produced during Fusion™ casting, with a thin layer of AA4045 forming an oxide-free, metallurgical interface to the AA3003 after immersion. The AA3003 surface oxides were not an impediment to wetting and bond formation. Mg surface segregation was observed on the oxidized AA3003 surfaces and may play a role to help penetrate the oxide layer. For tests conducted in air, wetting of the sample by AA4045 liquid was generally poor regardless of temperature.

  5. The sympathetic nerve--an integrative interface between two supersystems: the brain and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenkov, I J; Wilder, R L; Chrousos, G P; Vizi, E S

    2000-12-01

    suppression of Th1 responses and cellular immunity, and a Th2 shift toward dominance of humoral immunity. On the other hand, in certain local responses, and under certain conditions, catecholamines may actually boost regional immune responses, through induction of IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and primarily IL-8 production. Thus, the activation of SNS during an immune response might be aimed to localize the inflammatory response, through induction of neutrophil accumulation and stimulation of more specific humoral immune responses, although systemically it may suppress Th1 responses, and, thus protect the organism from the detrimental effects of proinflammatory cytokines and other products of activated macrophages. The above-mentioned immunomodulatory effects of catecholamines and the role of SNS are also discussed in the context of their clinical implication in certain infections, major injury and sepsis, autoimmunity, chronic pain and fatigue syndromes, and tumor growth. Finally, the pharmacological manipulation of the sympathetic-immune interface is reviewed with focus on new therapeutic strategies using selective alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenoreceptor agonists and antagonists and inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type IV in the treatment of experimental models of autoimmune diseases, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  6. Study of human interface for narrow road drive assist system considered characteristic of driver; Driver no tokusei wo koryoshita kyoro soko shien system no human interface no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, A. [Subaru Research Center Co., Tokyo (Japan); Amada, N.; Kawashima, H. [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The measurement of driver`s watching point, driving time on narrow road and the evaluation of stress etc. were conducted in order to construct the narrow road drive assist system using the stereo image recognition system. Consequently, the driver`s thinking process, stress factor and the indispensable information for this system were clarified. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Interface design recommendations for computerised clinical audit and feedback: Hybrid usability evidence from a research-led system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Balatsoukas, Panos; Williams, Richard; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain

    2016-10-01

    Audit and Feedback (A&F) is a widely used quality improvement technique that measures clinicians' clinical performance and reports it back to them. Computerised A&F (e-A&F) system interfaces may consist of four key components: (1) Summaries of clinical performance; (2) Patient lists; (3) Patient-level data; (4) Recommended actions. There is a lack of evidence regarding how to best design e-A&F interfaces; establishing such evidence is key to maximising usability, and in turn improving patient safety. To evaluate the usability of a novel theoretically-informed and research-led e-A&F system for primary care (the Performance Improvement plaN GeneratoR: PINGR). (1) Describe PINGR's design, rationale and theoretical basis; (2) Identify usability issues with PINGR; (3) Understand how these issues may interfere with the cognitive goals of end-users; (4) Translate the issues into recommendations for the user-centred design of e-A&F systems. Eight experienced health system evaluators performed a usability inspection using an innovative hybrid approach consisting of five stages: (1) Development of representative user tasks, Goals, and Actions; (2) Combining Heuristic Evaluation and Cognitive Walkthrough methods into a single protocol to identify usability issues; (3) Consolidation of issues; (4) Severity rating of consolidated issues; (5) Analysis of issues according to usability heuristics, interface components, and Goal-Action structure. A final list of 47 issues were categorised into 8 heuristic themes. The most error-prone heuristics were 'Consistency and standards' (13 usability issues; 28% of the total) and 'Match between system and real world' (n=10, 21%). The recommended actions component of the PINGR interface had the most usability issues (n=21, 45%), followed by patient-level data (n=5, 11%), patient lists (n=4, 9%), and summaries of clinical performance (n=4, 9%). The most error-prone Actions across all user Goals were: (1) Patient selection from a list; (2) Data

  8. Design and implementation of a status at a glance user interface for a power distribution expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Eugene M.; Manner, David B.; Dolce, James L.; Mellor, Pamela A.

    1993-01-01

    Expert systems are widely used in health monitoring and fault detection applications. One of the key features of an expert system is that it possesses a large body of knowledge about the application for which it was designed. When the user consults this knowledge base, it is essential that the expert system's reasoning process and its conclusions be as concise as possible. If, in addition, an expert system is part of a process monitoring system, the expert system's conclusions must be combined with current events of the process. Under these circumstances, it is difficult for a user to absorb and respond to all the available information. For example, a user can become distracted and confused if two or more unrelated devices in different parts of the system require attention. A human interface designed to integrate expert system diagnoses with process data and to focus the user's attention to the important matters provides a solution to the 'information overload' problem. This paper will discuss a user interface to the power distribution expert system for Space Station Freedom. The importance of features which simplify assessing system status and which minimize navigating through layers of information will be discussed. Design rationale and implementation choices will also be presented.

  9. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface System for Simultaneous Recording and Stimulation of Peripheral Nerve with a Single Cuff Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnsei Shon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, implantable devices have become widely used in neural prostheses because they eliminate endemic drawbacks of conventional percutaneous neural interface systems. However, there are still several issues to be considered: low-efficiency wireless power transmission; wireless data communication over restricted operating distance with high power consumption; and limited functionality, working either as a neural signal recorder or as a stimulator. To overcome these issues, we suggest a novel implantable wireless neural interface system for simultaneous neural signal recording and stimulation using a single cuff electrode. By using widely available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS components, an easily reconfigurable implantable wireless neural interface system was implemented into one compact module. The implantable device includes a wireless power consortium (WPC-compliant power transmission circuit, a medical implant communication service (MICS-band-based radio link and a cuff-electrode path controller for simultaneous neural signal recording and stimulation. During in vivo experiments with rabbit models, the implantable device successfully recorded and stimulated the tibial and peroneal nerves while communicating with the external device. The proposed system can be modified for various implantable medical devices, especially such as closed-loop control based implantable neural prostheses requiring neural signal recording and stimulation at the same time.

  10. Interface adsorption and micelle formation of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride in the toluene + water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadabadi, Simin; Saien, Javad; Khakizadeh, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Introducing the used ionic liquid causes a significant reduction in toluene–water interfacial tension. • Temperature has a significant effect on the interfacial tension as well as forming micelle in bulk solution. • The Frumkin model provides a suitable isotherm for the studied system. • Tendency, effectiveness of adsorption and repulsive interaction vary with increasing temperature. • Under saturated interface, entropy and energy changes associated with adsorption show a maximum value at about 303.2 K. -- Abstract: The influence of synthesized ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride adsorption on equilibrium interfacial tension of toluene–water was studied within concentration range of (1.00 ⋅ 10 −4 to 6.00 ⋅ 10 −1 ) mol · dm −3 and temperature range of (293.2 to 313.2) K. Very similar to conventional surfactants, the interfacial tension was decreased with both of these parameters. Meanwhile, the CMC values showed a minimum value within the temperature range studied. The Frumkin adsorption isotherm that accounts for the non-ideal adsorption at the interface showed adequately well for modeling the experimental results. Accordingly quantities like interface excess concentration, adsorption tendency and interaction parameter between adsorbed molecules were obtained at different temperatures. Entropy and energy changes associated with adsorption were also obtained from the temperature dependency of interfacial tension. The adsorption tendency and efficiency increased with temperature, and the maximum interface excess concentration and electrostatic repulsion were achieved at about T = 303.2 K

  11. The need for separate operational and engineering user interfaces for command and control of airborne synthetic aperture radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Laura M.; McNamara, Laura A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we address the needed components to create usable engineering and operational user interfaces (UIs) for airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. As airborne SAR technology gains wider acceptance in the remote sensing and Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) communities, the need for effective and appropriate UIs to command and control these sensors has also increased. However, despite the growing demand for SAR in operational environments, the technology still faces an adoption roadblock, in large part due to the lack of effective UIs. It is common to find operational interfaces that have barely grown beyond the disparate tools engineers and technologists developed to demonstrate an initial concept or system. While sensor usability and utility are common requirements to engineers and operators, their objectives for interacting with the sensor are different. As such, the amount and type of information presented ought to be tailored to the specific application.

  12. Experimental and numerical analysis of stress wave propagation in polymers and the role of interfaces in armour systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, Chandragupt V.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Hughes, Foz T. R.; Swallowe, Gerry M.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced polymeric materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. These materials have the potential to improve combat survivability, whilst reducing the cost and weight of armour systems. In this paper the results from a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) sample involving multiple stress waves is discussed with aid of a finite element model of the test. It is seen that the phenomenon of impedance mismatch at interfaces plays an important role in the levels of stress and deformation seen in the sample. A multi-layer armour system is then investigated using the finite element model. This case study illustrates the role of impedance mismatch and interface engineering in the design and optimisation of armour solutions.

  13. Interface for Barge-in Free Spoken Dialogue System Based on Sound Field Reproduction and Microphone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinamoto Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A barge-in free spoken dialogue interface using sound field control and microphone array is proposed. In the conventional spoken dialogue system using an acoustic echo canceller, it is indispensable to estimate a room transfer function, especially when the transfer function is changed by various interferences. However, the estimation is difficult when the user and the system speak simultaneously. To resolve the problem, we propose a sound field control technique to prevent the response sound from being observed. Combined with a microphone array, the proposed method can achieve high elimination performance with no adaptive process. The efficacy of the proposed interface is ascertained in the experiments on the basis of sound elimination and speech recognition.

  14. Methodology for advanced control rooms assessment of nuclear reactors: case study using Laboratory of Human System Interface (LABIHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Eduardo Ferro; Verboonen, Monique; Carvalho, Bruno Batista de

    2005-01-01

    A control room of a nuclear reactor is a complex system that controls a thermodynamic process used to produce electric energy. The operators interact with the control room through interfaces and several monitoring stations. These interfaces present significant implications for the safety of the nuclear power plant, once they influence the activities of the operators, affect the way how operators receive information related with the status from the main systems and determine the necessary requirements so that the operators understand and supervise the main parameters. This article intends to present the methodology and the results of the evaluation carried through in the advanced control room of a compact simulator, that uses as reference a nuclear plant PWR of the Westinghouse. The structure used for evaluation of the simulator is formed by the guideline of human factors of the NRC, the NUREG 700, checklist, questionnaires and the analysis of the operator's activity. (author)

  15. Development of Coupled Interface System between the FADAS Code and a Source-term Evaluation Code XSOR for CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Han Seong; Song, Deok Yong [ENESYS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ma Woong; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, Hyun Koon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    An accident prevention system is essential to the industrial security of nuclear industry. Thus, the more effective accident prevention system will be helpful to promote safety culture as well as to acquire public acceptance for nuclear power industry. The FADAS(Following Accident Dose Assessment System) which is a part of the Computerized Advisory System for a Radiological Emergency (CARE) system in KINS is used for the prevention against nuclear accident. In order to enhance the FADAS system more effective for CANDU reactors, it is necessary to develop the various accident scenarios and reliable database of source terms. This study introduces the construction of the coupled interface system between the FADAS and the source-term evaluation code aimed to improve the applicability of the CANDU Integrated Safety Analysis System (CISAS) for CANDU reactors.

  16. Development of Coupled Interface System between the FADAS Code and a Source-term Evaluation Code XSOR for CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Han Seong; Song, Deok Yong; Kim, Ma Woong; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, Hyun Koon

    2006-01-01

    An accident prevention system is essential to the industrial security of nuclear industry. Thus, the more effective accident prevention system will be helpful to promote safety culture as well as to acquire public acceptance for nuclear power industry. The FADAS(Following Accident Dose Assessment System) which is a part of the Computerized Advisory System for a Radiological Emergency (CARE) system in KINS is used for the prevention against nuclear accident. In order to enhance the FADAS system more effective for CANDU reactors, it is necessary to develop the various accident scenarios and reliable database of source terms. This study introduces the construction of the coupled interface system between the FADAS and the source-term evaluation code aimed to improve the applicability of the CANDU Integrated Safety Analysis System (CISAS) for CANDU reactors

  17. Sitting in the Pilot's Seat; Optimizing Human-Systems Interfaces for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Steven M.; Sanner, Kurt Gregory

    2011-01-01

    One of the pilot-machine interfaces (the forward viewing camera display) for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle called the DROID (Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone) will be analyzed for optimization. The goal is to create a visual display for the pilot that as closely resembles an out-the-window view as possible. There are currently no standard guidelines for designing pilot-machine interfaces for UAVs. Typically, UAV camera views have a narrow field, which limits the situational awareness (SA) of the pilot. Also, at this time, pilot-UAV interfaces often use displays that have a diagonal length of around 20". Using a small display may result in a distorted and disproportional view for UAV pilots. Making use of a larger display and a camera lens with a wider field of view may minimize the occurrences of pilot error associated with the inability to see "out the window" as in a manned airplane. It is predicted that the pilot will have a less distorted view of the DROID s surroundings, quicker response times and more stable vehicle control. If the experimental results validate this concept, other UAV pilot-machine interfaces will be improved with this design methodology.

  18. Dynamics of multiphase systems with complex microstructure. II. Particle-stabilized interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use the GENERIC (general equation for nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling) nonequilibrium thermodynamics framework to derive constitutive equations for the surface extra stress tensor of an interface stabilized by a two-dimensional suspension of anisotropic colloidal

  19. Common Airborne Instrumentation System: CAIS Bus Interface Standard, A00.00-C001. Revision A

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Sidney

    1997-01-01

    .... This interface control document (ICD) was written to provide a single document that designers of CAIS bus controllers and data acquisition units could reference to ensure interoperability on the CAIS bus. This ICD establishes the requirements for digital command/response, time division multiplexing techniques for a single CAIS bus. It encompasses the physical, electrical, and protocol aspects of the CAIS bus.

  20. Development of the user interface for visualization of the auxiliary systems of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merced D, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) has a nuclear research reactor type swimming pool with movable core cooled and moderate with light water. The nominal maximum power of the reactor is 1 MW in steady-state operation and can be pulsed at a maximum power of 2,000 MW for approximately 10 milliseconds. This reactor is mainly used to study the effects of radiation on various materials and substances. In 2001 the new control console of the nuclear reactor was installed which was based on two digital computers, one computer controls the bar management mechanisms and the other the systems to the reactor operator. In 2004, the control computer was replaced and the software was updated. Within the modernization and/or updating of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of ININ, is intended (theme of this work) to develop the user interface for the visualization of the auxiliary systems, through a Man-Machine Interface module for the renewal process of the control console. The man-machine interface system to be developed will have communication with the programmable logic controllers that will be constantly monitored and controlled to obtain real-time variables of the reactor behavior. (Author)

  1. Electrode–electrolyte interface stability in solid state electrolyte systems: influence of coating thickness under varying residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claas Hüter

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a model of electrode–electrolyte interfacial growth which focuses on theeffect of thin coating layers on the interfacial stability in prestressed systems. We take into accounttransport resulting from deposition from the electrolyte, from capillarity driven surface diffusion, andfrom changes of the chemical potential due to the elastic energy associated with the interface profile.As model system, we use metallic lithium as electrode, LLZO as electrolyte and Al2O3 as a thin filminterlayer, which is a highly relevant interfacial system in state of the art all-solid-electrolyte batteries.We consider the stability of the electrode-coating-electrolyte interface depending on the thickness ofthe thin film interlayer and the magnitude of the elastic prestresses. Our central approach is a linearstability analysis based on the mass conservation at the planar interface, employing approximationswhich are appropriate for solid state electrolytes (SSEs like LLZ, a thin Li metal electrode and a thincoating layer with a thickness in the range of nanometres.

  2. Application of the functional surface/interface of Nano/Micro systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiping

    Investigation of the surface/ interface of Nano/Micro systems plays an essential role in lots of areas, include the synthesis and assembly of nanostructures, evaporation of liquid, etc. Through studying the interaction between the polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and the surface of the silver nanowires (AgNWs), it was found that the PVP, serving as a capping agent, has a great impact on the morphology and structure of AgNWs. By means of a series of experiments, the critical minimum PVP chain length for successful formation of uniform nanowires was discovered, below which, only nanoparticles or short Nano rods can be obtained. Surprisingly, a core-shell structure of nanowire with a polycrystal was observed when the PVP with very long chain length was employed in the processing. By controlling the interaction between the Ag NWs and the surface of the substrates, a one-step method was developed for the fabrication of electrodes with patterns. Such film comprising Ag NWs were only self-growing or grafted on a hydrophilic surface area instead of the hydrophobic one. Thus, the selective patterning of the conducting film on the hybrid substrate surface can be realized, which is etching-free method for metal removal usually for the fabrication of electrodes by lithographic process or laser cutting. Therefore, such technique for producing conducting film is green and environmental friendly. A biochip based silver nano dendritic structures was fabricated to detect Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is a common tumor marker in clinical tests. Results show that the Raman signal of the CEA enhanced by about 10 4 times compared with silver nanowires, which is capable of detecting CEA at 1 fg/mL. The surface of liquid water, especial the hydration of ions on the surface, which are of fundamental interest and have potential applications, remain unclear. A fantastic and extraordinary phenomenon was observed during the evaporation of a water droplet doped with manganese chloride. As

  3. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  4. Interface stress in socket/residual limb with transtibial prosthetic suspension systems during locomotion on slopes and stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Gholizadeh, Hossien; Ali, Sadeeq; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of different suspension methods on the interface stress inside the prosthetic sockets of transtibial amputees when negotiating ramps and stairs. Three transtibial prostheses, with a pin/lock system, a Seal-In system, and a magnetic suspension system, were created for the participants in a prospective study. Interface stress was measured as the peak pressure by using the F-socket transducers during stairs and ramp negotiation. Twelve individuals with transtibial amputation managed to complete the experiments. During the stair ascent and descent, the greatest peak pressure was observed in the prosthesis with the Seal-In system. The magnetic prosthetic suspension system caused significantly different peak pressure at the anterior proximal region compared with the pin/lock (P = 0.022) and Seal-In (P = 0.001) during the stair ascent. It was also observed during the stair descent and ramp negotiation. The prostheses exhibited varying pressure profiles during the stair and ramp ascent. The prostheses with the pin/lock and magnetic suspension systems exhibited lower peak pressures compared with the Seal-In system. The intrasystem pressure distribution at the anterior and posterior regions of the residual limb was fairly homogenous during the stair and ramp ascent and descent. Nevertheless, the intrasystem pressure mapping revealed a significant difference among the suspension types, particularly at the anterior and posterior sensor sites.

  5. Interfacing the somatosensory system to restore touch and proprioception: essential considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Douglas J; Friesen, Rebecca; Miller, Lee E

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art upper extremity prostheses include anthropomorphic hands with dexterity that approximates that of a human. To be fully useful, these devices will require an advanced somatosensory neural interface to convey tactile and proprioceptive feedback to the user. To this end, microstimulation methods are being developed using microelectrode arrays implanted at various locations along the somatosensory neuraxis, from peripheral nerves to primary somatosensory cortex. There is presently no consensus as to the best approach, although results from animal and human studies lend support for each. The purpose of this review is to outline practical considerations for the design of a somatosensory interface based on present knowledge of the anatomy and physiology, prior attempts to elicit somatic sensations using electrical stimulation, and lessons learned from successful sensory neuroprostheses such as the cochlear implant.

  6. Soft Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzalkowski, Ireneusz

    1997-01-01

    This book presents an extended form of the 1994 Dirac Memorial Lecture delivered by Pierre Gilles de Gennes at Cambridge University. The main task of the presentation is to show the beauty and richness of structural forms and phenomena which are observed at soft interfaces between two media. They are much more complex than forms and phenomena existing in each phase separately. Problems are discussed including both traditional, classical techniques, such as the contact angle in static and dynamic partial wetting, as well as the latest research methodology, like 'environmental' scanning electron microscopes. The book is not a systematic lecture on phenomena but it can be considered as a compact set of essays on topics which particularly fascinate the author. The continuum theory widely used in the book is based on a deep molecular approach. The author is particularly interested in a broad-minded rheology of liquid systems at interfaces with specific emphasis on polymer melts. To study this, the author has developed a special methodology called anemometry near walls. The second main topic presented in the book is the problem of adhesion. Molecular processes, energy transformations and electrostatic interaction are included in an interesting discussion of the many aspects of the principles of adhesion. The third topic concerns welding between two polymer surfaces, such as A/A and A/B interfaces. Of great worth is the presentation of various unsolved, open problems. The kind of topics and brevity of description indicate that this book is intended for a well prepared reader. However, for any reader it will present an interesting picture of how many mysterious processes are acting in the surrounding world and how these phenomena are perceived by a Nobel Laureate, who won that prize mainly for his investigations in this field. (book review)

  7. Human-machine interface (HMI) report for 241-SY-101 data acquisition [and control] system (DACS) upgrade study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truitt, R.W.

    1997-10-22

    This report provides an independent evaluation of information for a Windows based Human Machine Interface (HMI) to replace the existing DOS based Iconics HMI currently used in the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used at Tank 241-SY-101. A fundamental reason for this evaluation is because of the difficulty of maintaining the system with obsolete, unsupported software. The DACS uses a software operator interface (Genesis for DOS HMI) that is no longer supported by its manufacturer, Iconics. In addition to its obsolescence, it is complex and difficult to train additional personnel on. The FY 1997 budget allocated $40K for phase 1 of a software/hardware upgrade that would have allowed the old DOS based system to be replaced by a current Windows based system. Unfortunately, budget constraints during FY 1997 has prompted deferral of the upgrade. The upgrade needs to be performed at the earliest possible time, before other failures render the system useless. Once completed, the upgrade could alleviate other concerns: spare pump software may be able to be incorporated into the same software as the existing pump, thereby eliminating the parallel path dilemma; and the newer, less complex software should expedite training of future personnel, and in the process, require that less technical time be required to maintain the system.

  8. Development of user interface to support automatic program generation of nuclear power plant analysis by module-based simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Mizutani, Naoki; Nakaya, Ken-ichiro; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1988-01-01

    Module-based Simulation System (MSS) has been developed to realize a new software work environment enabling versatile dynamic simulation of a complex nuclear power system flexibly. The MSS makes full use of modern software technology to replace a large fraction of human software works in complex, large-scale program development by computer automation. Fundamental methods utilized in MSS and developmental study on human interface system SESS-1 to help users in generating integrated simulation programs automatically are summarized as follows: (1) To enhance usability and 'communality' of program resources, the basic mathematical models of common usage in nuclear power plant analysis are programed as 'modules' and stored in a module library. The information on usage of individual modules are stored in module database with easy registration, update and retrieval by the interactive management system. (2) Target simulation programs and the input/output files are automatically generated with simple block-wise languages by a precompiler system for module integration purpose. (3) Working time for program development and analysis in an example study of an LMFBR plant thermal-hydraulic transient analysis was demonstrated to be remarkably shortened, with the introduction of an interface system SESS-1 developed as an automatic program generation environment. (author)

  9. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  10. INFORMATION VISUALIZATION AND PROPOSING NEW INTERFACE FOR MOVIE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (IMDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak ETEMADPOUR

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the development of a new prototype of visualization in support of movie retrieval. The goal of information visualization is unveiling of large amounts of data or abstract data set using visual presentation. With this knowledge the main goal is to develop a 2D presentation of information on movies from the IMDB (Internet Movie Database as our movie search engine. The aim is to amplify the perception of users over the retrieval environment while preserving the output quality at an acceptable meaningful level. Visualization ideas deal with visualization of information seeking results. These visualization techniques have been collected from the literature on how to map the results of the information retrieval process. We propose a 2D visual interface for mapping collections of movies and exploration of their related information to maximize density of needed information in a single page. For this purpose, we introduce a movie categorization scheme to help users in navigating through the movies information. The traditional style (interface of clicking a link to view details of documents in most of the search engines like the IMDB (Internet Movie Database as our movie search engine to find information is very uninteresting and tedious. This is because when clicking a particular link the user’s focus is shifted to the new page, and if the information presented is not to their interest, they will need to switch back to the movie’s search results. The key contribution is thus a reasonable mapping result of a query on an actor/actress movie database displayed in just one page that can amplify visual perception of retrieved movies. This theory of data graphics interface focuses on maximization of the density of useful pertinent information with respect to users query in a screen page. This method of grouping of information needs some data extraction algorithms by parsing and crawling the IMDB web pages that are useful to retrieve

  11. An efficient word typing P300-BCI system using a modified T9 interface and random forest classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Faraz; Han, Seung Moo; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    A typical P300-based spelling brain computer interface (BCI) system types a single character with a character presentation paradigm and a P300 classification system. Lately, a few attempts have been made to type a whole word with the help of a smart dictionary that suggests some candidate words with the input of a few initial characters. In this paper, we propose a novel paradigm utilizing initial character typing with word suggestions and a novel P300 classifier to increase word typing speed and accuracy. The novel paradigm involves modifying the Text on 9 keys (T9) interface, which is similar to the keypad of a mobile phone used for text messaging. Users can type the initial characters using a 3×3 matrix interface and an integrated custom-built dictionary that suggests candidate words as the user types the initials. Then the user can select one of the given suggestions to complete word typing. We have adopted a random forest classifier, which significantly improves P300 classification accuracy by combining multiple decision trees. We conducted experiments with 10 subjects using the proposed BCI system. Our proposed paradigms significantly reduced word typing time and made word typing more convenient by outputting complete words with only a few initial character inputs. The conventional spelling system required an average time of 3.47 min per word while typing 10 random words, whereas our proposed system took an average time of 1.67 min per word, a 51.87% improvement, for the same words under the same conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety control system and its interface to EPICS for the off-line front end of the SPES project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, J.; Andrighetto, A.; Bassato, G.; Costa, L.; Giacchini, M.; Bertocco, M.

    2012-01-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project is based on a facility for the production of neutron-rich radioactive ion beams using the isotope separation on-line technique. The SPES off-line front-end apparatus involves a number of subsystems and procedures that are potentially dangerous both for human operators and for the equipment. The high voltage power supply, the ion source complex power supplies, the target chamber handling systems and the laser source are some example of these subsystems. For that reason, a safety control system has been developed. It is based on Schneider Electrics Preventa family safety modules that control the power supply of critical subsystems in combination with safety detectors that monitor critical variables. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), model BMXP342020 from the Schneider Electrics Modicon M340 family, is used for monitoring the status of the system as well as controlling the sequence of some operations in automatic way. A touch screen, model XBTGT5330 from the Schneider Electrics Magelis family, is used as Human Machine Interface (HMI) and communicates with the PLC using MODBUS-TCP. Additionally, an interface to the EPICS control network was developed using a home-made MODBUS-TCP EPICS driver in order to integrate it to the control system of the Front End as well as present the status of the system to the users on the main control panel. (authors)

  13. High-bandwidth memory interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chulwoo; Song, Junyoung

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in memory interface design at both the architecture and circuit levels. Coverage includes signal integrity and testing, TSV interface, high-speed serial interface including equalization, ODT, pre-emphasis, wide I/O interface including crosstalk, skew cancellation, and clock generation and distribution. Trends for further bandwidth enhancement are also covered.   • Enables readers with minimal background in memory design to understand the basics of high-bandwidth memory interface design; • Presents state-of-the-art techniques for memory interface design; • Covers memory interface design at both the circuit level and system architecture level.

  14. Soft, curved electrode systems capable of integration on the auricle as a persistent brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, James J S; Lee, Dong Sup; Lee, Jung Woo; Lee, Woosik; Kwon, Ohjin; Won, Phillip; Jung, Sung-Young; Cheng, Huanyu; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Akce, Abdullah; Umunna, Stephen; Na, Ilyoun; Kwon, Yong Ho; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Liu, ZhuangJian; Paik, Ungyu; Huang, Yonggang; Bretl, Timothy; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Rogers, John A

    2015-03-31

    Recent advances in electrodes for noninvasive recording of electroencephalograms expand opportunities collecting such data for diagnosis of neurological disorders and brain-computer interfaces. Existing technologies, however, cannot be used effectively in continuous, uninterrupted modes for more than a few days due to irritation and irreversible degradation in the electrical and mechanical properties of the skin interface. Here we introduce a soft, foldable collection of electrodes in open, fractal mesh geometries that can mount directly and chronically on the complex surface topology of the auricle and the mastoid, to provide high-fidelity and long-term capture of electroencephalograms in ways that avoid any significant thermal, electrical, or mechanical loading of the skin. Experimental and computational studies establish the fundamental aspects of the bending and stretching mechanics that enable this type of intimate integration on the highly irregular and textured surfaces of the auricle. Cell level tests and thermal imaging studies establish the biocompatibility and wearability of such systems, with examples of high-quality measurements over periods of 2 wk with devices that remain mounted throughout daily activities including vigorous exercise, swimming, sleeping, and bathing. Demonstrations include a text speller with a steady-state visually evoked potential-based brain-computer interface and elicitation of an event-related potential (P300 wave).

  15. Improvement of nuclear ship engineering simulation system. Hardware renewal and interface improvement of the integral type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Kyoya, Masahiko; Shimazaki, Junya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kano, Tadashi [KCS, Co., Mito, Ibaraki (Japan); Takahashi, Teruo [Energis, Co., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    JAERI had carried out the design study about a lightweight and compact integral type reactor (an advanced marine reactor) with passive safety equipment as a power source for the future nuclear ships, and completed an engineering design. We have developed the simulator for the integral type reactor to confirm the design and operation performance and to utilize the study of automation of the reactor operation. The simulator can be used also for future research and development of a compact reactor. However, the improvement in a performance of hardware and a human machine interface of software of the simulator were needed for future research and development. Therefore, renewal of hardware and improvement of software have been conducted. The operability of the integral-reactor simulator has been improved. Furthermore, this improvement with the hardware and software on the market brought about better versatility, maintainability, extendibility and transfer of the system. This report mainly focuses on contents of the enhancement in a human machine interface, and describes hardware renewal and the interface improvement of the integral type reactor simulator. (author)

  16. Evaluation method of human-system interface for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanji, Junichi [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp. (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Kawai, Jun; Masui, Takao; Ezaki, Ikuko [Mitsubishi Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    We have developed HSI evaluation method based on a model of human cognitive processes in order to provide the viewpoint of the evaluation on the operability of interface. The model describes systematically the human error categories of GEMS by Reason. Based on the model together with reference to the other published information such as NUREG-0700Rev.1, the evaluation items for HSI have embodied in the electronic handbook HIBISCUS. The applicability of HIBISCUS have been assessed by evaluating experimental results using a simulator equipped with control panel using CRTs and touch operations. From the results, the usefulness of the handbook has been confirmed. (author)

  17. Evaluation method of human-system interface for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Junichi; Kawai, Jun; Masui, Takao; Ezaki, Ikuko

    2000-01-01

    We have developed HSI evaluation method based on a model of human cognitive processes in order to provide the viewpoint of the evaluation on the operability of interface. The model describes systematically the human error categories of GEMS by Reason. Based on the model together with reference to the other published information such as NUREG-0700Rev.1, the evaluation items for HSI have embodied in the electronic handbook HIBISCUS. The applicability of HIBISCUS have been assessed by evaluating experimental results using a simulator equipped with control panel using CRTs and touch operations. From the results, the usefulness of the handbook has been confirmed. (author)

  18. Friction of elastomer-on-glass system and direct observation of its frictional interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Sugiura, Jun-ichi; Hirano, Motohisa; Nitta, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    We performed a study on the static friction of PDMS elastomers with well-defined surface topography sliding over glass. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of friction force and direct observations of frictional interface has been developed. The static friction force was nearly proportional to normal load. The static friction force was independent of stick time. The simultaneous measurements revealed that the static friction force was proportional to the total area of contact. The coefficient was nearly independent of the surface topography of PDMS elastomers

  19. Brain machine interface and limb reanimation technologies: restoring function after spinal cord injury through development of a bypass system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, Darlene A; Lee, Kendall H

    2014-05-01

    Functional restoration of limb movement after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains the ultimate goal in SCI treatment and directs the focus of current research strategies. To date, most investigations in the treatment of SCI focus on repairing the injury site. Although offering some promise, these efforts have met with significant roadblocks because treatment measures that are successful in animal trials do not yield similar results in human trials. In contrast to biologic therapies, there are now emerging neural interface technologies, such as brain machine interface (BMI) and limb reanimation through electrical stimulators, to create a bypass around the site of the SCI. The BMI systems analyze brain signals to allow control of devices that are used to assist SCI patients. Such devices may include a computer, robotic arm, or exoskeleton. Limb reanimation technologies, which include functional electrical stimulation, epidural stimulation, and intraspinal microstimulation systems, activate neuronal pathways below the level of the SCI. We present a concise review of recent advances in the BMI and limb reanimation technologies that provides the foundation for the development of a bypass system to improve functional outcome after traumatic SCI. We also discuss challenges to the practical implementation of such a bypass system in both these developing fields. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for interactive information systems. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report, 1 Jul. 1985 - 31 Dec. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Farooq, Mohammad U.

    1986-01-01

    The definition of proposed research addressing the development and validation of a methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for interactive information systems is given. The major objectives of this research are: the development of a comprehensive, objective, and generalizable methodology for the design and evaluation of user interfaces for information systems; the development of equations and/or analytical models to characterize user behavior and the performance of a designed interface; the design of a prototype system for the development and administration of user interfaces; and the design and use of controlled experiments to support the research and test/validate the proposed methodology. The proposed design methodology views the user interface as a virtual machine composed of three layers: an interactive layer, a dialogue manager layer, and an application interface layer. A command language model of user system interactions is presented because of its inherent simplicity and structured approach based on interaction events. All interaction events have a common structure based on common generic elements necessary for a successful dialogue. It is shown that, using this model, various types of interfaces could be designed and implemented to accommodate various categories of users. The implementation methodology is discussed in terms of how to store and organize the information.