WorldWideScience

Sample records for system induces ganglioneuromatosis

  1. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean,

  2. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carnation, cucumber, radish, tobacco, and tomato under conditions in which the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remained spatially separated. Bacterial strains differ in their ability to ...

  3. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure

  4. Hyper-inducible expression system for streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herai, Sachio; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Higashibata, Hiroki; Maseda, Hideaki; Ikeda, Haruo; Ōmura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2004-01-01

    Streptomycetes produce useful enzymes and a wide variety of secondary metabolites with potent biological activities (e.g., antibiotics, immunosuppressors, pesticides, etc.). Despite their importance in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical fields, there have been no reports for practical expression systems in streptomycetes. Here, we developed a “PnitA-NitR” system for regulatory gene expression in streptomycetes based on the expression mechanism of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1 nitrilase, which is highly induced by an inexpensive and safe inducer, ε-caprolactam. Heterologous protein expression experiments demonstrated that the system allowed suppressed basal expression and hyper-inducible expression, yielding target protein levels of as high as ≈40% of all soluble protein. Furthermore, the system functioned in important streptomycete strains. Thus, the PnitA-NitR system should be a powerful tool for improving the productivity of various useful products in streptomycetes. PMID:15377796

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum dot systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yiwen; Zhu Kadi; Wu Zhuojie; Yuan Xiaozhong; Yao Ming

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in quantum dot exciton systems in which the exciton behaves as a two-level system is investigated theoretically. It is shown that due to strong exciton-phonon coupling EIT can occur in such a quantum dot system and ultraslow light can propagate. The nonlinear optical absorption and Kerr coefficient based on EIT are also calculated. The numerical results show that giant nonlinear optical effects can be obtained while the frequency of the signal field differs only by an amount of LO phonon frequency from the exciton frequency in quantum dot systems

  6. Induced systemic resistance by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth-promoting effects through effective suppression of soilborne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis, production of lytic enzymes, and induced systemic resistance (ISR). The involvement of ISR is typically studied in systems in which the Pseudomonas bacteria and the pathogen are inoculated and rema...

  7. Induced Systemic Resistance by Beneficial Microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Corn\\xe M.J. Pieterse; Christos Zamioudis; Roeland L. Berendsen; David M. Weller; Saskia C.M. Van Wees; Peter A.H.M. Bakker

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial microbes in the microbiome of plant roots improve plant health. Induced systemic resistance (ISR) emerged as an important mechanism by which selected plant growth–promoting bacteria and fungi in the rhizosphere prime the whole plant body for enhanced defense against a broad range of pathogens and insect herbivores. A wide variety of root-associated mutualists, including Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Trichoderma, and mycorrhiza species sensitize the plant immune system for enhanced defense...

  8. Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2006-09-26

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the

  9. Mechanisms of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, S.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2001-01-01

    Some of non-pathogenic rhizosphere bacteria reduce disease by activating a resistance mechanism in the plant called rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR). Rhizobacteria-mediated ISR resembles classic pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in that both types of

  10. INDUCIBLE TRANSPORT SYSTEM FOR CITRULLINE IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIBB, W R; STRAUGHN, W R

    1964-04-01

    Bibb, William R. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), and W. R. Straughan. Inducible transport system for citrulline in Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:815-822. 1964.-With Streptococcus faecalis F24, it was demonstrated: that the citrulline transport mechanism, induced by growth in arginine, follows enzyme kinetics; that cell membranes from induced and noninduced cells differ considerably in their ability to adsorb citrulline; that protoplasts demonstrate a similar selectivity; and that, throughout various alterations of the growth medium and growth conditions, a consistent difference in citrulline uptake between induced and noninduced cells was present. A proposed explanation based on experimental findings is offered.

  11. Migration-induced architectures of planetary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszkiewicz, Ewa; Podlewska-Gaca, Edyta

    2012-06-01

    The recent increase in number of known multi-planet systems gives a unique opportunity to study the processes responsible for planetary formation and evolution. Special attention is given to the occurrence of mean-motion resonances, because they carry important information about the history of the planetary systems. At the early stages of the evolution, when planets are still embedded in a gaseous disc, the tidal interactions between the disc and planets cause the planetary orbital migration. The convergent differential migration of two planets embedded in a gaseous disc may result in the capture into a mean-motion resonance. The orbital migration taking place during the early phases of the planetary system formation may play an important role in shaping stable planetary configurations. An understanding of this stage of the evolution will provide insight on the most frequently formed architectures, which in turn are relevant for determining the planet habitability. The aim of this paper is to present the observational properties of these planetary systems which contain confirmed or suspected resonant configurations. A complete list of known systems with such configurations is given. This list will be kept by us updated from now on and it will be a valuable reference for studying the dynamics of extrasolar systems and testing theoretical predictions concerned with the origin and the evolution of planets, which are the most plausible places for existence and development of life.

  12. Induced Ellipticity for Inspiraling Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Lisa; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Although gravitational waves tend to erase eccentricity of an inspiraling binary system, ellipticity can be generated in the presence of surrounding matter. We present a semianalytical method for understanding the eccentricity distribution of binary black holes (BHs) in the presence of a supermassive BH in a galactic center. Given a matter distribution, we show how to determine the resultant eccentricity analytically in the presence of both tidal forces and evaporation up to one cutoff and one matter-distribution-independent function, paving the way for understanding the environment of detected inspiraling BHs. We furthermore generalize Kozai–Lidov dynamics to situations where perturbation theory breaks down for short time intervals, allowing more general angular momentum exchange, such that eccentricity is generated even when all bodies orbit in the same plane.

  13. Bicarbonate trigger for inducing lipid accumulation in algal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith E.

    2015-08-04

    The present invention provides bicarbonate containing and/or bicarbonate-producing compositions and methods to induce lipid accumulation in an algae growth system, wherein the algae growth system is under light-dark cycling condition. By adding said compositions at a specific growth stage, said methods lead to much higher lipid accumulation and/or significantly reduced total time required for accumulating lipid in the algae growth system.

  14. Tetracycline-inducible gene expression system in Leishmania mexicana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraeva, N.; Ishemgulova, A.; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 1 (2014), s. 11-13 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Leishmania mexicana * Gene expression * Tet-inducible system Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.787, year: 2014

  15. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  16. Systemic induced tolerance against root-knot nematodes in rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    riboflavin was sprayed on this plant mutated in the NIM1/NPR1 gene. However, the spray of. NahG plant with riboflavin solution (10μM) induced the same resistance as in normal plants. In light of these observations Dong, H and Beer, S.V., (2000) concluded that the foliar spray of riboflavin elicits systemic resistance in ...

  17. Flow induced noise modelling for industrial piping systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijrath, H.; Ǎbom, M.

    2003-01-01

    Noise from e.g. gas-transport piping systems becomes more and more a problem for plants located close to urban areas. Too high noise levels are unacceptable and will put limitations on the plant capacity. Flow-induced noise of valves, orifices and headers installed in the installation plays a

  18. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... absolute sequence identity with trichosanthin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from Trichosanthes kirilowii, and a 78% and 100% homology respectively with an RIP from Bryonia dioica, bryodin. Further, effort was made to look at the fate of TMV in induced resistant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, a systemic host of the virus, ...

  19. Shear-induced transitions in a ternary polymeric system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    The first three-dimensional simulation of shear-induced phase transitions in a polymeric system has been performed. The method is based on dynamic density-functional theory. The pathways between a bicontinuous phase with developing gyroid mesostructure and a lamellar/cylinder phase coexistence are

  20. Systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana induced by biocontrol bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Wees, A.C.M. van; Pelt, J.A. van; Trijssenaar, A.; Westende, Y.A.M. van 't; Bolink, E.M.; Loon, L.C. van

    1996-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a pathogen-inducible defense mechanism in plants effective against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. The resistant state is dependent on endogenous accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and is associated with the activation of a specific set of genes encoding

  1. Noise-induced multimode behavior in excitable systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D E; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Han, S K

    2002-01-01

    Based on experiments with electronic circuits, we show how a system of coupled excitable units can possess several noise-induced oscillatory modes. We characterize the multimode organization in terms of the coherence resonance effect. Multiple gain of regularity is found to be related to different...

  2. Bacterial elicitors and plant signaling in induced systemic resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pelt, J.A. van; Sluis, I. van der; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Plant root colonizing, fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth promoting properties and their effective suppression of soil borne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis, and induced systemic resistance (ISR). The involvement of ISR is typically studied in systems in which the Pseudomonas bacteria and the pathogen are inoculated and rema...

  3. Electromagnetically induced transparency in an open multilevel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tian; Lu Meiju; Weinstein, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency in a multilevel system is investigated in 173 Yb. The level structure investigated is ''open'' in that the light that gives rise to the transparency also resonantly couples the atoms to excited states which do not exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency. The resulting reduction of transparency is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is found that, while the transparency is poor in certain regimes, it can be made to perform arbitrarily well in the limit of a large intensity imbalance between the optical fields.

  4. Observation of electromagnetically induced Talbot effect in an atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Dan; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2018-01-01

    The electromagnetically induced Talbot effect (EITE) resulting from the repeated self-reconstruction of a spatially intensity-modulated probe field is experimentally demonstrated in a three-level atomic configuration. The probe beam is launched into an optically induced lattice (established by the interference of two coupling fields) inside a rubidium vapor cell and is diffracted by the electromagnetically induced grating that was formed. The diffraction pattern repeats itself at the planes of integer multiple Talbot lengths. In addition, a fractional EITE is also investigated. The experimental observations agree well with the theoretical predictions. This investigation may potentially pave the way for studying the nonlinear and quantum dynamical features that have been predicted for established periodic optical systems.

  5. Laser induced fluorescence imaging system for localization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Xie, Shusen

    2007-11-01

    A laser induced fluorescence imaging system for localization of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma is developed. In this fluorescence imaging system, the fluorescence intensity with information of detected objection is gained by an image intensifier, which makes color information of the fluorescence image eliminated and the result is a monochrome image of the fluorescence with thermally induced noise. The monochrome fluorescence image is sent to a CCD and captured by an image board, which is controlled by a computer. Image processing is carried out to improve the image quality and therefore improve the system's ability to differentiate carcinomas from normal tissue. Gaussian smoothing is implemented in order to reduce the noise. Image binarizing process is realized to obtain an optimal threshold of the image. Image pixels with grey value below this threshold are assigned as diseased and those above are normal. A pseudo color processing is then accomplished to get better visual perception and understanding of the image, greatly increasing the detail resolution of the grey image. The processed image is then displayed on the screen of the computer in real time. The real time laser induced fluorescence imaging system with the image processing methods developed is efficient for localization of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  6. Pressure-induced phase transition in a ternary microemulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Michihiro; Seto, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    Static and dynamic structure of a ternary microemulsion system including AOT (Aerosol-OT; dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt) were investigated in order to clarify the mechanism of the structural phase transition induced by pressure. From the static measurement by means of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS), it was observed that the dense water-in-oil droplet structure at ambient temperature and pressure transformed to two-phase coexistence with the lamellar phase and the bicontinuous phase with increasing pressure as the case of increasing temperature. The characteristic features of pressure-induced phase transition were quite similar to the temperature-induced one below the phase transition temperature and pressure, however, above the transition temperature and pressure, they were different. From the dynamical measurement by means of the neutron spin echo (NSE), membrane dynamics at high-pressure phase was observed completely different from the high temperature phase. The result showed that with increasing temperature the membrane became flexible and, on the other hand, it became rigid with increasing pressure. These differences suggested the different mechanism of the pressure-induced phase transition from the temperature-induced one. (author)

  7. Statin Induced Myopathy a Patient with Multiple Systemic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Uçar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins are the most successful class of drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemia. However, the popular profile of statins in terms of efficacy has been maligned by theiradverse effects. Statin induced myopathy, which can be seen at any time during the course of therapy, is a clinically important cause of statin intolerance and discontinuation. When a patient with multiple systemic diseases who use numerous medications represent with myalgia and muscle cramps, statin induced myopathy may not be remembered at first. We present a patient with multiple systemic diseases, alcohol and morphine abuse in whom myopathy developed. After exclusion of other etiologies, we concluded that myopathy was related to statin therapy.

  8. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  9. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis. PMID:24509933

  10. Systemic sarcoidosis induced by etanercept: first Brazilian case report

    OpenAIRE

    Unterstell, Natasha; Bressan, Aline Lopes; Serpa, Laura Araújo; Castro, Pérola Peres da Fonseca e; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The antagonists of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are increasingly being used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Several adverse effects of these drugs have been reported, including the paradoxical development of sarcoidosis, especially with the use of etanercept. We present the first Brazilian case report of systemic sarcoidosis induced by etanercept and a literature review. Os medicamentos antagonistas do fator de necrose tumoral alfa (TNF-α) estão sendo cada ...

  11. Frequency loss induced quench protection system for high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijagbemi, K.; Noyes, P.; Stiers, E.; Pamidi, S.

    2017-12-01

    A novel circuit design for Frequency Loss Induced Quench (FLIQ) protection system for safely driving REBCO coated conductor superconducting coils to quench is reported. The details of the H-bridge circuit design with Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)s and the various elements used to build a prototype are reported. The results of a successful test of the circuit conducted to demonstrate the validity of the circuit design is presented.

  12. Urinary incontinence monitoring system using laser-induced graphene sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2017-12-25

    This paper presents the design and development of a sensor patch to be used in a sensing system to deal with the urinary incontinence problem primarily faced by women and elderly people. The sensor patches were developed from laser-induced graphene from low-cost commercial polyimide (PI) polymers. The graphene was manually transferred to a commercial tape, which was used as sensor patch for experimentation. Salt solutions with different concentrations were tested to determine the most sensitive frequency region of the sensor. The results are encouraging to further develop this sensor in a platform for a fully functional urinary incontinence detection system.

  13. Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritto, Roland [Array Information Technology, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Dreger, Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Heidbach, Oliver [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam (Germany, German Research Center for Geosciences; Hutchings, Lawrence [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    This DOE funded project was a collaborative effort between Array Information Technology (AIT), the University of California at Berkeley (UCB), the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). It was also part of the European research project “GEISER”, an international collaboration with 11 European partners from six countries including universities, research centers and industry, with the goal to address and mitigate the problems associated with induced seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The goal of the current project was to develop a combination of techniques, which evaluate the relationship between enhanced geothermal operations and the induced stress changes and associated earthquakes throughout the reservoir and the surrounding country rock. The project addressed the following questions: how enhanced geothermal activity changes the local and regional stress field; whether these activities can induce medium sized seismicity M > 3; (if so) how these events are correlated to geothermal activity in space and time; what is the largest possible event and strongest ground motion, and hence the potential hazard associated with these activities. The development of appropriate technology to thoroughly investigate and address these questions required a number of datasets to provide the different physical measurements distributed in space and time. Because such a dataset did not yet exist for an EGS system in the United State, we used current and past data from The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, which has been in operation since the 1960s. The research addressed the need to understand the causal mechanisms of induced seismicity, and demonstrated the advantage of imaging the physical properties and temporal changes of the reservoir. The work helped to model the relationship between injection and production and medium sized magnitude events that have

  14. Optomechanically induced absorption in parity-time-symmetric optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Guo, Y. Q.; Pei, P.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-06-01

    We explore the optomechanically induced absorption (OMIA) in a parity-time- (PT -) symmetric optomechanical system (OMS). By numerically calculating the Lyapunov exponents, we find out the stability border of the PT -symmetric OMS. The results show that in the PT -symmetric phase the system can be either stable or unstable depending on the coupling constant and the decay rate. In the PT -symmetric broken phase the system can have a stable state only for small gain rates. By calculating the transmission rate of the probe field, we find that there is an inverted optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) at δ =-ωM and an OMIA at δ =ωM for the PT -symmetric optomechanical system. At each side of δ =-ωM there is an absorption window due to the resonance absorption of the two generated supermodes. Comparing with the case of optomechanics coupled to a passive cavity, we find that the active cavity can enhance the resonance absorption. The absorption rate at δ =ωM increases as the coupling strength between the two cavities increases. Our work provides us with a promising platform for controlling light propagation and light manipulation in terms of PT symmetry, which might have potential applications in quantum information processing and quantum optical devices.

  15. Reducing Technology-Induced Errors: Organizational and Health Systems Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Senthriajah, Yalini; Kushniruk, Andre W; Palojoki, Sari; Saranto, Kaija; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Technology-induced errors are a growing concern for health care organizations. Such errors arise from the interaction between healthcare and information technology deployed in complex settings and contexts. As the number of health information technologies that are used to provide patient care rises so will the need to develop ways to improve the quality and safety of the technology that we use. The objective of the panel is to describe varying approaches to improving software safety from and organizational and health systems perspective. We define what a technology-induced error is. Then, we discuss how software design and testing can be used to improve health information technologies. This discussion is followed by work in the area of monitoring and reporting at a health district and national level. Lastly, we draw on the quality, safety and resilience literature. The target audience for this work are nursing and health informatics researchers, practitioners, administrators, policy makers and students.

  16. Magnetically induced electric fields and currents in the circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Thomas S

    2005-01-01

    Blood flow in an applied magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the aorta and other major arteries of the central circulatory system that can be observed as superimposed electrical signals in the electrocardiogram (ECG). The largest magnetically induced voltage occurs during pulsatile blood flow into the aorta, and results in an increased signal at the location of the T-wave in the ECG. Studies involving the measurement of blood pressure, blood flow rate, heart sounds, and cardiac valve displacements have been conducted with monkeys and dogs exposed to static fields up to 1.5 tesla (T) under conditions producing maximum induced voltages in the aorta. Results of these studies gave no indication of alterations in cardiac functions or hemodynamic parameters. Cardiac activity monitored by ECG biotelemetry during continuous exposure of rats to a 1.5-T field for 10 days gave no evidence for any significant changes relative to the 10 days prior to and following exposure. Theoretical modeling of magnetic field interactions with blood flow has included a complete solution of the equation describing the flow of an electrically conductive fluid in the presence of a magnetic field (the Navier-Stokes equation) using the finite element technique. Magnetically induced voltages and current densities as a function of the applied magnetic field strength have been calculated for the aorta and surrounding tissues structures, including the sinoatrial node. Induced current densities in the region of the sinoatrial node are predicted to be >100 mA/m2 at field levels >5 T in an adult human under conditions of maximum electrodynamic coupling with aortic blood flow. Magnetohydrodynamic interactions are predicted to reduce the volume flow rate of blood in the human aorta by a maximum of 1.3%, 4.9%, and 10.4% at field levels of 5, 10, and 15 T, respectively.

  17. Asymmetric noise-induced large fluctuations in coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Szwaykowska, Klimka; Carr, Thomas W.

    2017-10-01

    Networks of interacting, communicating subsystems are common in many fields, from ecology, biology, and epidemiology to engineering and robotics. In the presence of noise and uncertainty, interactions between the individual components can lead to unexpected complex system-wide behaviors. In this paper, we consider a generic model of two weakly coupled dynamical systems, and we show how noise in one part of the system is transmitted through the coupling interface. Working synergistically with the coupling, the noise on one system drives a large fluctuation in the other, even when there is no noise in the second system. Moreover, the large fluctuation happens while the first system exhibits only small random oscillations. Uncertainty effects are quantified by showing how characteristic time scales of noise-induced switching scale as a function of the coupling between the two coupled parts of the experiment. In addition, our results show that the probability of switching in the noise-free system scales inversely as the square of reduced noise intensity amplitude, rendering the virtual probability of switching an extremely rare event. Our results showing the interplay between transmitted noise and coupling are also confirmed through simulations, which agree quite well with analytic theory.

  18. Salmonella enterica Induces And Subverts The Plant Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Victoria Garcia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Whereas it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, the data gathered suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity.

  19. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  20. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.C.; Perez, M.R. Del

    1997-01-01

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  1. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation

  2. Tourniquet-induced systemic inflammatory response in extremity surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury in animals produces significant systemic inflammatory effects. This study investigated whether a biologic response occurs in a clinically relevant model of tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective knee arthroscopy were prospectively randomized into controls (no tourniquet) and subjects (tourniquet-controlled). The effects of tourniquet-induced reperfusion on monocyte activation state, neutrophil activation state, and transendothelial migration (TEM) were studied. Changes in the cytokines implicated in reperfusion injury, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-10 were also determined. RESULTS: After 15 minutes of reperfusion, neutrophil and monocyte activation were significantly increased. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pooled subject (ischemia-primed) plasma significantly increased TEM. In contrast, TEM was not significantly altered by ischemia-primed plasma pretreatment of the endothelial monolayer. Significant elevation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1beta were observed in subjects compared with controls after 15 minutes of reperfusion. There was no significant difference in serum IL-10 levels between the groups at all the time points studied. CONCLUSION: These results indicate a transient neutrophil and monocyte activation after tourniquet-ischemia that translates into enhanced neutrophil transendothelial migration with potential for tissue injury.

  3. Biomedical implications of heavy metals induced imbalances in redox systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  4. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bechan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity, central nervous system (neurotoxicity, DNA (genotoxicity, and kidney (nephrotoxicity in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s. This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  5. Lightning-induced overvoltages in low-voltage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeidalen, Hans Kristian

    1997-12-31

    Lightning-induced overvoltages (LIOs) are a main source of failures in low-voltage overhead line systems. This thesis deals mainly with calculations of LIOs aiming to enable the design of a proper voltage protection. Models for calculation of LIOs are adapted from the literature or developed based on measurements. The models used are believed to be fairly accurate for the first few microseconds, which is usually sufficient for predicting the maximum induced voltage in the system. The lightning channel is modelled by the Modified Transmission Line (MTL) model with the Transmission Line (TL) model as a special case. The coupling between the electrical fields from a lightning channel and an overhead line is modelled by Agrawal`s model. The attenuation of electrical fields over a lossy ground is modelled by Norton`s- or the Surface Impedance methods. The validity of all the applied models is analysed. In addition, measurements have been performed in order to develop models of distribution transformers and low-voltage power installation (LVPI) networks. Simple models of typical transformers and LVPIs are developed for calculations when specific data are unavailable. The practical range of values and its influence on the LIOs in a system is investigated. The main frequency range of interest related to LIOs is 10 kHz - 1 MHz in which all the models are accurate. The adapted or developed models are used to calculate LIOs in low-voltage systems. The influence of various key parameters in the system is investigated. Most important are the return stroke amplitude and rise time, the overhead line height and location, the termination of overhead line segments, neutral grounding, and the ground conductivity. 135 refs., 136 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Chromium-induced DNA damge is mutagenic in mammalian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.; Dixon, K. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    To study the mutagenic mechanism of hexavalent chromium compounds, a SV40 virus-based shuttle vector system was used for mutation analysis. The plasmid pZ189 allowed us to induce mutations in mammalian cells, identify them in a bacterial system, and then sequence them. Naked DNA pZ189 was treated with Cr{sup 6+}, Cr{sup 5+} and Cr{sup 3+} compounds. The studies showed that DNA strand breaks were induced in the reduction process of Cr{sup 6+} by glutathione. On the average, 0.66 {mu}M Cr{sup 6+} induced about one nick/DNA molecule. The treated DNA also showed a decrease of biological activity upon transformation into E. coli cells. Hydroxyl radical (HO{center_dot}) scavengers, Tris and mannitol, suppressed the Cr-induced DNA damage. The DNA damage caused by the co-incubation of Cr{sup 6+} with glutathione was ionic-strength and pH dependent, which supported the hypothesis that Cr{sup 5+}, an intermediate agent, was the critical agent in Cr reduction causing DNA damage through radical species. Further, Cr{sup 5+} induced DNA damage in a kinetic pattern similar to the co-incubation of Cr{sup 6+} and glutathione. In contrast, Cr{sup 3+}, the final product of Cr{sup 6+} reduction, was not shown to be a DNA-damaging agent in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). To evaluate if the Cr-treated DNA was mutagenic, a mutagenesis assay was carried out in which the chromium-treated plasmid was replicated in CV-1 monkey cells and mutation spectra were analyzed. Mutation frequency increased significantly for both Cr{sup 6+} and Cr{sup 5+} treated DNAs; the frequency was 0.18% and 0.80% for Cr{sup 6+} 1 and 10{mu}M respectively, and 0.14% and 0.21% for Cr{sup 5+} 0.25 and 0.125 {mu}M respectively compared to 0.01% in the untreated vector. The experiments suggested that one mechanism of Cr mutagenesis might be mediated by DNA damage caused by reactive radical species.

  7. Inducible Promoter Systems for Gene Perturbation Experiments in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Bennett; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Assessing molecular changes that occur through altering a gene's activity is often hampered by difficulties that arise due to the typically static nature of the introduced perturbation. This is especially problematic when investigating molecular events at specific stages and/or in certain tissues or organs during Arabidopsis development. To circumvent these issues, we have employed chemically inducible artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) for the specific knockdown of developmental regulators. For our own research, we have combined this gene perturbation approach with a floral induction system, which allows the simultaneous induction of a large number of flowers on the inflorescence of a single plant, and the ability to knock down a gene's activity at any given stage of development. To enable the plant community to avail of the full benefits of these systems, we describe, in this chapter, strategies for amiRNA-mediated gene perturbations and address some common problems that can be encountered when generating inducible amiRNA constructs, growing these plants, and collecting floral buds for analysis.

  8. Two-phase flow induced parametric vibrations in structural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1980-01-01

    This paper is divided into two parts concerning piping systems and a nuclear fuel pin system. The significant experimental results concerning the random vibration induced in an L-shaped pipe by air-water two-phase flow and the theoretical analysis of the vibration are described in the first part. It was clarified for the first time that the parametric excitation due to the periodic changes of system mass, centrifugal force and Coriolis force was the mechanism of exciting the vibration. Moreover, the experimental and theoretical analyses of the mechanism of exciting vibration by air-water two-phase flow in a straight, horizontal pipe were carried out, and the first natural frequency of the piping system was strongly related to the dominant frequency of void signals. The experimental results on the vibration of a nuclear fuel pin model in parallel air-water two-phase flow are reported in the latter part. The relations between vibrational strain variance and two-phase flow velocity or pressure fluctuation, and the frequency characteristics of vibrational strain variance were obtained. The theoretical analysis of the dynamic interaction between air-water two-phase flow and a fuel pin structure, and the vibrational instability of fuel pins in alternate air and water slugs or in large bubble flow are also reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Prospects and challenges for practical application of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Selected strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are able to induce a systemic resistance (ISR) in plants, which is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). The generally non-specific character of induced resistance constitutes an increase in the

  12. First experience with the new Coupling Loss Induced Quench system

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Dudarev, A V; Kirby, G; Sperin, K A; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    New-generation high-field superconducting magnets pose a challenge relating to the protection of the coil winding pack in the case of a quench. The high stored energy per unit volume calls for a very efficient quench detection and fast quench propagation in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system called Coupling-Loss Induced Quench (CLIQ) was recently, developed and tested at CERN. This method provokes a fast change in the magnet transport current by means of a capacitive discharge. The resulting change in the local magnetic field induces inter-filament and inter-strand coupling losses which heat up the superconductor and eventually initiate a quench in a large fraction of the coil winding pack. The method is extensively tested on a Nb-Ti single-wire test solenoid magnet in the CERN Cryogenic Laboratory in order to assess its performance, optimize its operating parameters, and study new electrical configurations. Each parameter is thoroughly analyzed and its impact on the quench effi...

  13. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  14. Methodology for simulation of geomagnetically induced currents in power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boteler David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems it is useful to be able to simulate the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC that are produced during major geomagnetic disturbances. This paper examines the methodology used in power system analysis and shows how it can be applied to modelling GIC. Electric fields in the area of the power network are used to determine the voltage sources or equivalent current sources in the transmission lines. The power network can be described by a mesh impedance matrix which is combined with the voltage sources to calculate the GIC in each loop. Alternatively the power network can be described by a nodal admittance matrix which is combined with the sum of current sources into each node to calculate the nodal voltages which are then used to calculate the GIC in the transmission lines and GIC flowing to ground at each substation. Practical calculations can be made by superposition of results calculated separately for northward and eastward electric fields. This can be done using magnetic data from a single observatory to calculate an electric field that is a uniform approximation of the field over the area of the power system. It is also shown how the superposition of results can be extended to use data from two observatories: approximating the electric field by a linear variation between the two observatory locations. These calculations provide an efficient method for simulating the GIC that would be produced by historically significant geomagnetic storm events.

  15. Design of remote laser-induced fluorescence system's acquisition circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Lou, Yue; Wang, Ran; Yan, Debao; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence system(LIfS) has been found its significant application in identifying one kind of substance from another by its properties even it's thimbleful, and becomes useful in plenty of fields. Many superior works have reported LIfS' theoretical analysis , designs and uses. However, the usual LIPS is always constructed in labs to detect matter quite closely, for the system using low-power laser as excitation source and charge coupled device (CCD) as detector. Promoting the detectivity of LIfS is of much concern to spread its application. Here, we take a high-energy narrow-pulse laser instead of commonly used continuous wave laser to operate sample, thus we can get strong fluorescent. Besides, photomultiplier (PMT) with high sensitivity is adopted in our system to detect extremely weak fluorescence after a long flight time from the sample to the detector. Another advantage in our system, as the fluorescence collected into spectroscopy, multiple wavelengths of light can be converted to the corresponding electrical signals with the linear array multichannel PMT. Therefore, at the cost of high-powered incentive and high-sensitive detector, a remote LIFS is get. In order to run this system, it is of importance to turn light signal to digital signal which can be processed by computer. The pulse width of fluorescence is deeply associated with excitation laser, at the nanosecond(ns) level, which has a high demand for acquisition circuit. We design an acquisition circuit including, I/V conversion circuit, amplifying circuit and peak-holding circuit. The simulation of circuit shows that peak-holding circuit can be one effective approach to reducing difficulty of acquisition circuit.

  16. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  17. Noise-induced transitions and resonant effects in nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikin, Alexei

    2003-02-01

    Our every-day experience is connected with different acoustical noise or music. Usually noise plays the role of nuisance in any communication and destroys any order in a system. Similar optical effects are known: strong snowing or raining decreases quality of a vision. In contrast to these situations noisy stimuli can also play a positive constructive role, e.g. a driver can be more concentrated in a presence of quiet music. Transmission processes in neural systems are of especial interest from this point of view: excitation or information will be transmitted only in the case if a signal overcomes a threshold. Dr. Alexei Zaikin from the Potsdam University studies noise-induced phenomena in nonlinear systems from a theoretical point of view. Especially he is interested in the processes, in which noise influences the behaviour of a system twice: if the intensity of noise is over a threshold, it induces some regular structure that will be synchronized with the behaviour of neighbour elements. To obtain such a system with a threshold one needs one more noise source. Dr. Zaikin has analyzed further examples of such doubly stochastic effects and developed a concept of these new phenomena. These theoretical findings are important, because such processes can play a crucial role in neurophysics, technical communication devices and living sciences. Unsere alltägliche Erfahrung ist mit verschiedenen akustischen Einfluessen wie Lärm, aber auch Musik verbunden. Jeder weiss, wie Lärm stören kann und Kommunikation behindert oder gar unterbindet. Ähnliche optische Effekte sind bekannt: starkes Schneetreiben oder Regengüsse verschlechtern die Sicht und lassen uns Umrisse nur noch schemenhaft erkennen. Jedoch koennen ähnliche Stimuli auch sehr positive Auswirkungen haben: Autofahrer fahren bei leiser Musik konzentrierter -- die Behauptung von Schulkindern, nur bei dröhnenden Bässen die Mathehausaufgaben richtig rechnen zu können, ist allerdings nicht wissenschaftlich

  18. Inducing sex reversal of the urogenital system of marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Chew, Keng Yih; Shaw, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Marsupials differ from eutherian mammals in their reproductive strategy of delivering a highly altricial young after a short gestation. The young, with its undeveloped organ systems completes its development post-natally, usually within a pouch. The young is dependent on milk with a composition that varies through lactation to support its growth and changing needs as it matures over a lengthy period. Gonadal differentiation occurs after birth, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effects of hormonal manipulations on its sexual differentiation of the highly accessible young. In marsupials a difference in the migration of the urinary ducts around the genital ducts from eutherian mammals results in the unique tammar reproductive tract which has three vaginae and two cervices, and two distinctly separate uteri. In the tammar wallaby, a small member of the kangaroo family, we showed that virilisation of the Wolffian duct, prostate and phallus depends on an alternate androgen pathway, which has now been shown to be important for virilisation in humans. Through hormonal manipulations over differing time periods we have achieved sex reversal of both ovaries and testes, germ cells, genital ducts, prostate and phallus. Whilst we understand many of the mechanisms behind sexual differentiation there are still many lessons to be learned from understanding how sex reversal is achieved by using a model such as the tammar wallaby. This will help guide investigations into the major questions of how and why sex determination is achieved in other species. This review discusses the control and development of the marsupial urogenital system, largely drawn from our studies in the tammar wallaby and our ability to manipulate this system to induce sex reversal. Copyright © 2013 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Amorphous silica nanoparticles impair vascular homeostasis and induce systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemmar A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abderrahim Nemmar,1 Sulayma Albarwani,2 Sumaya Beegam,1 Priya Yuvaraju,1 Javed Yasin,3 Samir Attoub,4 Badreldin H Ali5 1Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 2Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod, Sultanate of Oman; 3Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 4Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 5Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod, Sultanate of Oman Abstract: Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs are being used in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and many other industrial applications entailing human exposure. However, their potential vascular and systemic pathophysiologic effects are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the acute (24 hours systemic toxicity of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm and 500 nm SiNPs in mice (0.5 mg/kg. Both sizes of SiNPs induced a platelet proaggregatory effect in pial venules and increased plasma concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen and a decrease in the number of circulating platelets were only seen following the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. The direct addition of SiNPs to untreated mouse blood significantly induced in vitro platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent fashion, and these effects were more pronounced with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and interleukin 1β concentration. However, tumor necrosis factor α concentration was only increased after the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. Nevertheless, plasma markers of oxidative stress, including 8-isoprostane

  20. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, F. J.; De la Rosa, J.; Gallegos, F. J.

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence methods are being used increasingly in the measurement of species concentrations in gases, liquids and solids. Laser induced fluorescence is spontaneous emission from atoms or molecules that have been excited by laser radiation. Here we present a time resolved fluorescence instrument that consists of a 5 μJ Nitrogen laser (337.1 nm), a sample holder, a quartz optical fiber, a spectrometer, a PMT and a PC that allows the measurement of visible fluorescence spectra (350-750 nm). Time response of the system is approximately 5 ns. The instrument has been used in the measurement of colored bond paper, antifreeze, diesel, cochineal pigment and malignant tissues. The data acquisition was achieved through computer control of a digital oscilloscope (using General Purpose Interface Bus GPIB) and the spectrometer via serial (RS232). The instrument software provides a graphic interface that lets make some data acquisition tasks like finding fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes. The software was developed using the Lab-View 6i graphic programming package and can be easily managed in order to add more functions to it.

  1. Acrolein consumption induces systemic dyslipidemia and lipoprotein modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage-fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

  2. Methylglyoxal induces systemic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS.

  3. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; De Geest, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05) in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (h...

  4. Ubiquitin-dependent system controls radiation induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delic, J.; Magdelenat, H.; Glaisner, S.; Magdelenat, H.; Maciorowski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The selective proteolytic pathway, dependent upon 'N-end rule' protein recognition/ubiquitination and on the subsequent proteasome dependent processing of ubiquitin conjugates, operates in apoptosis induced by γ-irradiation. The proteasome inhibitor peptide aldehyde, MG132, efficiently induced apoptosis and was also able (at doses lower than those required for apoptosis induction) to potentiate apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Its specificity is suggested by the induction of the ubiquitin (UbB and UbC) and E1 (ubiquitin activating enzyme) genes and by an altered ubiquitination pattern. More selectively, a di-peptide competitor of the 'N-end rule' of ubiquitin dependent protein processing inhibited radiation induced apoptosis. This inhibition is also followed by an altered ubiquitination pattern and by activation of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These data strongly suggest that early apoptosis radiation induced events are controlled by ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic processing. (author)

  5. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome increases immobility-induced neuromuscular weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Heidrun; Helming, Marc; Unterbuchner, Christoph; Lenz, Andrea; Neff, Frauke; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Blobner, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Inflammation and immobility are comorbid etiological factors inducing muscle weakness in critically ill patients. This study establishes a rat model to examine the effect of inflammation and immobilization alone and in combination on muscle contraction, histology, and acetylcholine receptor regulation. Prospective, randomized, experimental study. Animal laboratory of a university hospital. Sprague-Dawley rats. To produce systemic inflammation, rats (n = 34) received three consecutive intravenous injections of Corynebacterium parvum on days 0, 4, and 8. Control rats (n = 21) received saline. Both groups were further divided to have one hind limb either immobilized by pinning of knee and ankle joints or sham-immobilized (surgical leg). The contralateral nonsurgical leg of each animal served as control (nonsurgical leg). After 12 days, body weight and muscle mass were significantly reduced in all C. parvum animals compared with saline-injected rats. Immobilization led to local muscle atrophy. Normalized to muscle mass, tetanic contraction was reduced in the surgical leg after immobilization (7.64 +/- 1.91 N/g) and after inflammation (8.71 +/- 2.0 N/g; both p < .05 vs. sham immobilization and saline injection, 11.03 +/- 2.26 N/g). Histology showed an increase in inflammatory cells in all C. parvum-injected animals. Immobilization in combination with C. parvum injection had an additive effect on inflammation. Acetylcholine receptors were increased in immobilized muscles and in all muscles of C. parvum-injected animals. The muscle weakness in critically ill patients can be replicated in our novel rat model. Inflammation and immobilization independently lead to muscle weakness.

  6. Condensation induced water hammer in steam supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, P.B.; Antaki, G.A.; Rawls, G.B.; Gutierrez, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The accidental mixing of steam and water usually leads to condensation induced water hammer. THis phenomenon is not uncommon in the power and process industries, and is of particular concern due to the high energies which accompany steam transients. The paper discusses the conditions which lead to a recent condensation induced water hammer in a 150 psig steam supply header. The insuing structural damage, inspection and repairs are described. Finally, a list of design cautions are presented to help minimize the potential for condensation induced water hammer in steam lines

  7. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernie [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Nelson, James [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Robertson-Tait, Ann [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Savy, Jean [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Wong, Ivan [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This Protocol is a living guidance document for geothermal developers, public officials, regulators and the general public that provides a set of general guidelines detailing useful steps to evaluate and manage the effects of induced seismicity related to EGS projects.

  8. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    62 and CT-VIA-32, were purified from Cyamopsis tetragonoloba plants that were induced to resist virus infection following treatment with CIP-29, with. CT-VIA-62 sharing sequence homology with a lectin that possessed a ...

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Flow Induced Vibration in a Rotor-Seal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow induced vibration is an important factor affecting the performance of the rotor-seal system. From the point of view of flow induced vibration, the nonlinear models of the rotor-seal system are presented for the analysis of the fluid force, which is induced by the interaction between the unstable fluid flow in the seal and the vibrating rotor. The nonlinear characteristics of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system are analyzed, and the nonlinear phenomena in the unbalanced rotor-seal system are investigated using the nonlinear models. Various nonlinear phenomena of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system, such as synchronization phenomenon and amplitude mutation, are reproduced.

  10. Stress-induced obesity and the emotional nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallman, Mary F

    2010-03-01

    Stress and emotional brain networks foster eating behaviors that can lead to obesity. The neural networks underlying the complex interactions among stressors, body, brain and food intake are now better understood. Stressors, by activating a neural stress-response network, bias cognition toward increased emotional activity and degraded executive function. This causes formed habits to be used rather than a cognitive appraisal of responses. Stress also induces secretion of glucocorticoids, which increases motivation for food, and insulin, which promotes food intake and obesity. Pleasurable feeding then reduces activity in the stress-response network, reinforcing the feeding habit. These effects of stressors emphasize the importance of teaching mental reappraisal techniques to restore responses from habitual to thoughtful, thus battling stress-induced obesity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-10-26

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  12. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reduc...

  13. Stress-induced obesity and the emotional nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Dallman, Mary F

    2009-01-01

    Stress and emotional brain networks foster eating behaviors that may lead to obesity. The neural networks underlying the complex interactions among stressors, body, brain and food intake are now better understood. Stressors, by activating a neural stress-response network, bias cognition toward increased emotional activity and degraded executive function. This causes formed habits to be used rather than a cognitive appraisal of responses. Stress also induces secretion of both glucocorticoids, ...

  14. Condensate induced water hammer in a steam distribution system results in fatality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debban, H.L.; Eyre, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Water hammer event s in steam distribution piping interrupt service and have the potential to cause serious injury and property damage. Conditions of condensation induced water hammer are discussed and recommendations aimed to improve safety of steam systems are presented. Condensate induced water hammer events at Hanford, a DOE facility, are examined.

  15. Transcriptomics and knockout mutant analysis of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A classic example of induced resistance is triggered after infection by a necrotizing pathogen, rendering uninfected,distal parts more resistant to subsequent pathogen attack, and is often referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). A phenotypically comparable type of induced resistance is

  16. Condensate induced water hammer in a steam distribution system results in fatality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, H.L.; Eyre, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Water hammer event s in steam distribution piping interrupt service and have the potential to cause serious injury and property damage. Conditions of condensation induced water hammer are discussed and recommendations aimed to improve safety of steam systems are presented. Condensate induced water hammer events at Hanford, a DOE facility, are examined

  17. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; De Geest, Bart

    2017-07-18

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher ( p coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64) during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold ( p coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower ( p coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  18. Ozone-induced systemic and pulmonary effects are diminished in adrenalectomized rats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set is an excel file pertaining to the study that examined ozone-induced systemic and pulmonary effects in rats that underwent SHAM surgery (control),...

  19. Liposomally encapsulated diclofenac for sonophoresis induced systemic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, S P; Singh, R; Asati, R K

    1995-01-01

    Liposomes containing diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory agent were incorporated into an ointment base for topical application. The drug loaded liposomes were characterized for various physico-chemical attributes and drug efflux profile in in vitro. The systemic availability of drug from liposomes following topical application was evaluated in rats. The effect of sonophoresis on the drug release profile in vitro and systemic availability in vivo was established. The application of liposomal diclofenac resulted in localization of the drug at the site of application with slow systemic availability; however, with the application of ultrasound pulsed drug systemic levels could be achieved.

  20. Towards Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Models of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, M

    2017-05-01

    Neutropenia is a serious toxic complication of chemotherapeutic treatment. For years, mathematical models have been developed to better predict hematological outcomes during chemotherapy in both the traditional pharmaceutical sciences and mathematical biology disciplines. An increasing number of quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) models that combine systems approaches, physiology, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics have been successfully developed. Here, I detail the shift towards QSP efforts, emphasizing the importance of incorporating systems-level physiological considerations in pharmacometrics. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. Novel BCH Code Design for Mitigation of Phase Noise Induced Cycle Slips in DQPSK Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, M. Y.; Larsen, Knud J.; Jacobsen, G.

    2014-01-01

    We show that by proper code design, phase noise induced cycle slips causing an error floor can be mitigated for 28 Gbau d DQPSK systems. Performance of BCH codes are investigated in terms of required overhead......We show that by proper code design, phase noise induced cycle slips causing an error floor can be mitigated for 28 Gbau d DQPSK systems. Performance of BCH codes are investigated in terms of required overhead...

  2. Virus-induced Systemic Vasculitides: New Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Guillevin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The best therapeutic strategy in virus-induced vasculitides should take into account the etiology of the disease and be adapted to the pathogenesis. The combination of antiviral treatments and plasma exchanges has been proven effective in polyarteritis nodosa (PAN. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related vasculitis this strategy is also effective and does not jeopardize, like cytotoxic agents, the outcome of AIDS. In vasculitis related to HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia, plasma exchanges improve the outcome but the poor effectiveness of antiviral drugs is not able to favor, usually, a definite recovery of the patients and relapses are frequent.

  3. The influence of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on transmission systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertson, V.; Kappenman, J.; Damsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particles emitted by the sun from flares or similar phenomena can enter the magnetic field of the earth and induce large currents within the earth. These currents follow a circular path around the magnetic poles and are large enough to produce earth surface potentials up to 10 volts per mile. Such currents have been known to last for many minutes, effectively a dc mode which can saturate power or current transformers. Factors known to influence susceptibility to the phenomenon include grounding philosophy, transformer core construction, transmission line length and orientation, and local geology. In this paper plans for a mitigation scheme and a warning network are explained

  4. A new maltose-inducible high-performance heterologous expression system in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jie; Fu, Gang; Zhang, Dawei; Wen, Jianping

    2017-08-01

    To improve heterologous proteins production, we constructed a maltose-inducible expression system in Bacillus subtilis. An expression system based on the promoter for maltose utilization constructed in B. subtilis. Successively, to improve the performance of the P malA -derived system, mutagenesis was employed by gradually shortening the length of P malA promoter and altering the spacing between the predicted MalR binding site and the -35 region. Furthermore, deletion of the maltose utilization genes (malL and yvdK) improved the P malA promoter activity. Finally, using this efficient maltose-inducible expression system, we enhanced the production of luciferase and D-aminoacylase, compared with the P hpaII system. A maltose-inducible expression system was constructed and evaluated. It could be used for high level expression of heterologous proteins production.

  5. Bifurcation of transition paths induced by coupled bistable systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chengzhe; Mitarai, Namiko

    2016-06-07

    We discuss the transition paths in a coupled bistable system consisting of interacting multiple identical bistable motifs. We propose a simple model of coupled bistable gene circuits as an example and show that its transition paths are bifurcating. We then derive a criterion to predict the bifurcation of transition paths in a generalized coupled bistable system. We confirm the validity of the theory for the example system by numerical simulation. We also demonstrate in the example system that, if the steady states of individual gene circuits are not changed by the coupling, the bifurcation pattern is not dependent on the number of gene circuits. We further show that the transition rate exponentially decreases with the number of gene circuits when the transition path does not bifurcate, while a bifurcation facilitates the transition by lowering the quasi-potential energy barrier.

  6. Crisis-induced unstable dimension variability in a dynamical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Geraldo T.; Viana, Ricardo L.; Lopes, Sergio R.; Grebogi, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Unstable dimension variability is an extreme form of non-hyperbolic behavior in chaotic systems whose attractors have periodic orbits with a different number of unstable directions. We propose a new mechanism for the onset of unstable dimension variability based on an interior crisis, or a collision between a chaotic attractor and an unstable periodic orbit. We give a physical example by considering a high-dimensional dissipative physical system driven by impulsive periodic forcing

  7. Mobility induces global synchronization of oscillators in periodic extended systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peruani, Fernando; Nicola, Ernesto M; Morelli, Luis G

    2010-01-01

    We study the synchronization of locally coupled noisy phase oscillators that move diffusively in a one-dimensional ring. Together with the disordered and the globally synchronized states, the system also exhibits wave-like states displaying local order. We use a statistical description valid for a large number of oscillators to show that for any finite system there is a critical mobility above which all wave-like solutions become unstable. Through Langevin simulations, we show that the transition to global synchronization is mediated by a shift in the relative size of attractor basins associated with wave-like states. Mobility disrupts these states and paves the way for the system to attain global synchronization.

  8. Climate-induced tree mortality: Earth system consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Henry D.; Macalady, Alison K.; Breshears, David D.; Allen, Craig D.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Saleska, Scott; Huxman, Travis E.; McDowell, Nathan G.

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest uncertainties in global environmental change is predicting changes in feedbacks between the biosphere and the Earth system. Terrestrial ecosystems and, in particular, forests exert strong controls on the global carbon cycle and influence regional hydrology and climatology directly through water and surface energy budgets [Bonan, 2008; Chapin et al., 2008].According to new research, tree mortality associated with elevated temperatures and drought has the potential to rapidly alter forest ecosystems, potentially affecting feedbacks to the Earth system [Allen et al., 2010]. Several lines of recent research demonstrate how tree mortality rates in forests may be sensitive to climate change—particularly warming and drying. This emerging consequence of global change has important effects on Earth system processes (Figure 1).

  9. Evaluation of novel inducible promoter/repressor systems for recombinant protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Hörmann, Angelika; Tauer, Christopher; Sonnleitner, Margot; Egger, Esther; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2016-03-10

    Engineering lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is of growing importance for food and feed industry as well as for in vivo vaccination or the production of recombinant proteins in food grade organisms. Often, expression of a transgene is only desired at a certain time point or period, e.g. to minimize the metabolic burden for the host cell or to control the expression time span. For this purpose, inducible expression systems are preferred, though cost and availability of the inducing agent must be feasible. We selected the plasmid free strain Lactobacillus plantarum 3NSH for testing and characterization of novel inducible promoters/repressor systems. Their feasibility in recombinant protein production was evaluated. Expression of the reporter protein mCherry was monitored with the BioLector(®) micro-fermentation system. Reporter gene mCherry expression was compared under the control of different promoter/repressor systems: PlacA (an endogenous promoter/repressor system derived from L. plantarum 3NSH), PxylA (a promoter/repressor system derived from Bacillus megaterium DSMZ 319) and PlacSynth (synthetic promoter and codon-optimized repressor gene based on the Escherichia coli lac operon). We observed that PlacA was inducible solely by lactose, but not by non-metabolizable allolactose analoga. PxylA was inducible by xylose, yet showed basal expression under non-induced conditions. Growth on galactose (as compared to exponential growth phase on glucose) reduced basal mCherry expression at non-induced conditions. PlacSynth was inducible with TMG (methyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and IPTG (isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside), but also showed basal expression without inducer. The promoter PlacSynth was used for establishment of a dual plasmid expression system, based on T7 RNA polymerase driven expression in L. plantarum. Comparative Western blot supported BioLector(®) micro-fermentation measurements. Conclusively, overall expression levels were moderate (compared to a

  10. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    Jan 11, 2015 ... exogenous application of chemicals such as salicylic acid or its synthetic analogues, leading to a long-term resistance to sub- sequent attack by diverse pathogens (Sticher et al. 1997;. Vallad and Goodman 2004; Fu and Dong 2013). In both local and systemic tissues of such plants, pathogenesis-related ...

  11. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngou J. Graafland H, Segondy M. Antibodies against polypeptides of purified. Epstein-Barr virus in sera grown from patients with connective tissue diseases'. J Autoimmun 1992; 5: 243-249. 4. Stancek D, Rovensky J. Enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus antibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  12. Dry Process Induced Phase Transited Drug Delivery System: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in-situ formed phase transited, nondisintegrating, controlled release, asymmetric membrane capsular system for the poorly water soluble model drug ketoprofen was developed and evaluated in vitro to assess for osmotic and controlled release and in vivo to assess the ability of the fabricated dosage form to control GI ...

  13. Wet Process Induced Phase Transited Drug Delivery System as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non-disintegrating, asymmetric membrane capsular system for a poorly water soluble drug, flurbiprofen, was developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Asymmetric membrane capsules were made by phase inversion. The effect of varying osmotic pressure of the dissolution medium on drug release was studied.

  14. Miniaturized test system for soil respiration induced by volatile pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Karin; Chapman, Stephen J.; Campbell, Colin D.; Harms, Hauke; Hoehener, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A miniaturized method based on 96-well microtitre plates was developed and used to study respiration in pristine and contaminated soils following addition of volatile substrates. Small soil samples were exposed to fuel components, which were volatilized from spatially separate reservoirs of 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN) as an organic carrier. Respiration was determined as CO 2 production by means of a pH-indicator and bicarbonate-containing agar, or as 14 CO 2 evolution from 14 C-labelled substrates. Substrate concentrations inducing maximum microbial activity or inhibition were determined and CO 2 production profiles examined by multivariate analysis. When high concentrations of fuel components were applied, distinction of hydrocarbon exposed soils from unexposed soil was achieved within 6 h of incubation. With low concentrations, adequate distinction was achieved after 24 h, probably as a result of community adaptation. Nutrient limitation was identified with the 14 C method for toluene, and the optimal N and P amendment determined. Further potential applications of this rapid and inexpensive method are outlined. - A new method to study soil respiration is used when volatile organic contaminants are added

  15. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilayaraja Muthuramu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05 in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64 during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold (p < 0.01 higher in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density (p < 0.001 was decreased, interstitial fibrosis was 1.88-fold (p < 0.001 higher, and systolic and diastolic function was worse in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold (p < 0.001 higher in coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower (p < 0.05 in coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  16. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in phencyclidine-induced cognitive deficits modelling schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigano, Daniela; Guidali, Cinzia; Petrosino, Stefania; Realini, Natalia; Rubino, Tiziana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Parolaro, Daniela

    2009-06-01

    Recent advances in the neurobiology of cannabinoids have renewed interest in the association between cannabis and schizophrenia. Our studies showed that chronic-intermittent phencyclidine (PCP) treatment of rats, an animal model of schizophrenia-like cognitive deficit, impaired recognition memory in the novel object recognition (NOR) test and induced alterations in CB1 receptor functionality and in endocannabinoid levels mainly in the prefrontal cortex. In this region, we observed a significant reduction in GTPgammaS binding (-41%) accompanied by an increase in the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG (+38%) in PCP-treated rats, suggesting that a maladaptation of the endocannabinoid system might contribute to the glutamatergic-related cognitive symptoms encountered in schizophrenia disorders. Moreover, we evaluated the ability of the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), to modulate the cognitive dysfunctions and neuroadaptations in the endocannabinoid system induced by PCP. Chronic THC co-treatment worsened PCP-induced cognitive impairment, without inducing any effect per se, and in parallel, it provoked a severe reduction in the levels of the other endocannabinoid, AEA, vs. either vehicle (-73%) or PCP (-64%), whereas it reversed the PCP-induced increase in 2-AG levels. These results point to the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in this pharmacological model of cognitive dysfunction, with a potentially different role of AEA and 2-AG in schizophrenia-like behaviours and suggest that prolonged cannabis use might aggravate cognitive performances induced by chronic PCP by throwing off-balance the endocannabinoid system.

  17. Financial tools to induce cooperation in power asymmetrical water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Simona; Castelletti, Andrea; Giuliani, Matteo; Characklis, Gregory W.

    2017-04-01

    In multi-purpose water systems, power asymmetry is often responsible of inefficient and inequitable water allocations. Climate Change and anthropogenic pressure are expected to exacerbate such disparities at the expense of already disadvantaged groups. The intervention of a third party, charged with redefining water sharing policies to give greater consideration to equity and social justice, may be desirable. Nevertheless, to be accepted by private actors, this interposition should be coupled with some form of compensation. For a public agency, compensation measures may be burdensome, especially when the allowance is triggered by natural events whose timing and magnitude are subject to uncertainty. In this context, index based insurance contracts may represent a viable alternative option and reduce the cost of achieving socially desirable outcomes. In this study we explore soft measures to achieve global change mitigation by designing a hybrid coordination mechanism composed of i) a direct normative constraint and ii) an indirect financial compensatory tool. The performance of an index-based insurance (i.e. hedging) contract to be used as a compensation tool is evaluated relative to more traditional alternatives. First, the performance of the status quo system, or baseline (BL), is contrasted to an idealized scenario in which a central planner (CP) maximizes global efficiency. Then, the CP management is analyzed in order to identify an efficient water rights redistribution to be legally imposed on the advantaged stakeholders in the BL scenario. Finally, a hedging contract is designed to compensate those stakeholders more negatively affected by the legal constraint. The approach is demonstrated on a multi-purpose water system in Italy, where different decision makers individually manage the same resource. The system is characterized by a manifest power asymmetry: the upstream users, i.e., hydropower companies, are free to release their stored water in time

  18. Emergency control of unstable behavior of nonlinear systems induced by fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Pinsky

    1998-01-01

    -functions significantly simplifying analysis and control of fault phenomena. The design of an mergency controller is based on the technique for computing fault-induced jumps of the system states, which is described in the paper. An emergency controller instantaneously returning states of a sample nonlinear system to its stability basin is designed.

  19. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women wit...

  20. Wounding induces local resistance but systemic susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in pepper plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Tania; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Veloso, Javier; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Díaz, José

    2015-03-15

    Cotyledon wounding in pepper caused the early generation of hydrogen peroxide both locally (cotyledons) and systemically (upper true leaves). However, 72 h later there is a different wound response between local and systemic organs, as shown by resistance to the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea, that increased locally and decreased systemically. Signaling by ethylene and jasmonic acid was assessed by using two inhibitors: 1-methylcyclopropene (MCP, inhibitor of ethylene receptors) and ibuprofen (inhibitor of jasmonate biosynthesis). MCP did not affect the modulation of resistance levels to Botrytis by wounding, ruling out the involvement of ethylene signaling. Ibuprofen did not inhibit wound-induced resistance at the local level, but inhibited wound-induced systemic susceptibility. Moreover, changes of biochemical and structural defenses in response to wounding were studied. Peroxidase activity and the expression of a peroxidase gene (CAPO1) increased locally as a response to wounding, but no changes were observed systemically. Lignin deposition was induced in wounded cotyledons, but was repressed in systemic leaves of wounded plants, whereas soluble phenolics did not change locally and decreased systemically. The expression of two other genes involved in plant defense (CABPR1 and CASC1) was also differentially regulated locally and systemically, pointing to a generalized increase in plant defenses at the local level and a systemic decrease as a response to wounding. Wound-induced defenses at the local level coincided with resistance to the necrotroph fungus B. cinerea, whereas depleted defenses in systemic leaves of wounded plants correlated to induced susceptibility against this pathogen. It may be that the local response acts as a sink of energy resources to mount a defense against pathogens, whereas in systemic organs the resources for defense are lower. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Field-induced phase transitions in antiferromagnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeets, J.P.M.

    1984-05-01

    Neutron scattering experiments and magnetization measurements are carried out on cobalt bromide hexahydrate, of which 48% of the water molecules are replaced by deuterium oxide molecules. Results were compared with data obtained from non-deuterated cobalt bromide hexahydrate. Neutron scattering experiments showed the importance of the deuterium fraction. Interplay exists between the crystallographic system and the magnetic system, which is influenced by changing the deuterium fraction. Neutron scattering and magnetization experiments on partially deuterated RbFeCl 3 .2H 2 O and CsFeCl 3 .2H 2 O were performed to study the magnetic phase transitions in these quasi one-dimensional Ising compounds. The observed behaviour in the various phases can be described by the nucleation theory of chain reversals. (Auth.)

  2. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using stochastic simulations at a wide range of points in parameter space and compare with analytical approximations. Specifically, we investigate whether polarity switching of stochastic patterns occurs at a defined frequency. We find that it can do so in individual realizations of a stochastic simulation, but that the frequency is not defined consistently across realizations in our samples of parameter space. Further, we examine the effect of noise on deterministically predicted traveling waves and find them increased in amplitude and decreased in speed. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  3. Rattler-induced aging dynamics in jammed granular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Giacco, Ferdinando; de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Lippiello, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    Granular materials jam when developing a network of contact forces able to resist the applied stresses. Through numerical simulations of the dynamics of the jamming process, we show that the jamming transition does not occur when the kinetic energy vanishes. Rather, as the system jams, the kinetic energy becomes dominated by rattlers particles, that scatter withing their cages. The relaxation of the kinetic energy in the jammed configuration exhibits a double power-law decay, which we interpr...

  4. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  5. Robotic reactions: Delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  6. Hyperammonemia-induced toxicity for the developing central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Cagnon, L.; Braissant, O.

    2007-01-01

    In pediatric patients, hyperammonemia can be caused by various acquired or inherited disorders such as urea cycle deficiencies or organic acidemias. The brain is much more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ammonium during development than in adulthood. Hyperammonemia can provoke irreversible damages to the developing central nervous system that lead to cortical atrophy, ventricular enlargement and demyelination, responsible for cognitive impairment, seizures and cerebral palsy. Until ...

  7. CELECOXIB ATTENUATES SYSTEMIC LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BRAIN INFLAMMATION AND WHITE MATTER INJURY IN THE NEONATAL RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAN, L.-W.; KAIZAKI, A.; TIEN, L.-T.; PANG, Y.; TANAKA, S.; NUMAZAWA, S.; BHATT, A. J.; CAI, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain is associated with inflammatory processes. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can be induced by inflammatory stimuli, such as cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 may be considered as the target for anti-inflammation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, can reduce systemic LPS-induced brain inflammation and brain damage. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2 mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) of Sprague-Dawley rat pups and celecoxib (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered i.p. 5 min after LPS injection. The body weight and wire hanging maneuver test were performed 24 hr after the LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined after these tests. Systemic LPS exposure resulted in an impairment of behavioral performance and acute brain injury, as indicated by apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes (OLs) and loss of OL immunoreactivity in the neonatal rat brain. Treatments with celecoxib significantly reduced systemic LPS-induced neurobehavioral disturbance and brain damage. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated systemic LPS-induced increments in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes, concentrations of IL-1β and TNFα, and protein levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAPK in the neonatal rat brain. The protection of celecoxib was also associated with a reduction of systemic LPS-induced COX-2+ cells which were double labeled with GFAP+ (astrocyte) cells. The overall results suggest that celecoxib was capable of attenuating the brain injury and neurobehavioral disturbance induced by systemic LPS exposure, and the protective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:23485816

  8. Bistability of the naturally induced lactose utilization system of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajic, Jelena; Wall, Michael

    2006-03-01

    In the absence of the preferred sugar glucose, lactose utilization machinery in the bacterium E. coli is activated. The genetic circuit responsible for this response, lac operon, has been observed to exhibit bistability when induced by an artificial inducer, TMG. Here we investigate conditions under which bistability might be observed in response to lactose. The aim of our study is to establish whether the natural system exhibits bistability, as is often assumed despite the lack of experimental support.

  9. Compression induced folding of a sheet: An integrable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim; Witten, Thomas A.

    2012-02-01

    The apparently intractable shape of a fold in a compressed elastic film lying on a fluid substrate is found to have an exact solution. Such systems buckle at a nonzero wave vector set by the bending stiffness of the film and the weight of the substrate fluid. Our solution describes the entire progression from a weakly displaced sinusoidal buckling to a single large fold that contacts itself. The pressure decrease is exactly quadratic in the lateral displacement. We demonstrate a subtle connection to the sine-Gordon problem, which reveals a new symmetry in the folding phenomenon.

  10. Compression induced folding of a sheet: an integrable system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim; Witten, Thomas A

    2011-10-14

    The apparently intractable shape of a fold in a compressed elastic film lying on a fluid substrate is found to have an exact solution. Such systems buckle at a nonzero wave vector set by the bending stiffness of the film and the weight of the substrate fluid. Our solution describes the entire progression from a weakly displaced sinusoidal buckling to a single large fold that contacts itself. The pressure decrease is exactly quadratic in the lateral displacement. We identify a complex wave vector whose magnitude remains invariant with compression.

  11. Acid-induced assembly of a reconstituted silk protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, A. Pasha; Weigandt, Katie M.; Blair, Daniel L.

    2017-08-01

    Silk cocoons are reconstituted into an aqueous suspension, and protein stability is investigated by comparing the protein's response to hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride. Aggregation occurs for systems mixed with hydrochloric acid, while sodium chloride over the same range of concentrations does not cause aggregation. We measure the structures present on the protein and aggregate length scales in these solutions using both optical and small-angle neutron scattering, while mass spectrometry techniques shed light on a possible mechanism for aggregate formation. We find that the introduction of acid modulates the aggregate size and pervaded volume of the protein, an effect that is not observed with salt.

  12. Hyperammonemia-induced toxicity for the developing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnon, Laurène; Braissant, Olivier

    2007-11-01

    In pediatric patients, hyperammonemia can be caused by various acquired or inherited disorders such as urea cycle deficiencies or organic acidemias. The brain is much more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ammonium during development than in adulthood. Hyperammonemia can provoke irreversible damages to the developing central nervous system that lead to cortical atrophy, ventricular enlargement and demyelination, responsible for cognitive impairment, seizures and cerebral palsy. Until recently, the mechanisms leading to these irreversible cerebral damages were poorly understood. Using experimental models allowing the analysis of the neurotoxic effects of ammonium on the developing brain, these last years have seen the emergence of new clues showing that ammonium exposure alters several amino acid pathways and neurotransmitter systems, as well as cerebral energy metabolism, nitric oxide synthesis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition and signal transduction pathways. Those alterations may explain neuronal loss and impairment of axonal and dendritic growth observed in the different models of congenital hyperammonemia. Some neuroprotective strategies such as the potential use of NMDA receptor antagonists, nitric oxide inhibitors, creatine and acetyl-l-carnitine have been suggested to counteract these toxic effects. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms involved in the chain of events leading to neuronal dysfunction under hyperammonemia may be useful to develop new potential strategies for neuroprotection.

  13. Insult-induced adaptive plasticity of the auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Gold

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain displays a remarkable capacity for both widespread and region-specific modifications in response to environmental challenges, with adaptive processes bringing about the reweighting of connections in neural networks putatively required for optimising performance and behaviour. As an avenue for investigation, studies centred around changes in the mammalian auditory system, extending from the brainstem to the cortex, have revealed a plethora of mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult, be it lesion-, noise trauma, drug-, or age-related. Of particular interest in recent work are those aspects of auditory processing which, after sensory disruption, change at multiple – if not all – levels of the auditory hierarchy. These include changes in excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory networks, consistent with theories of homeostatic plasticity; functional alterations in gene expression and in protein levels; as well as broader network processing effects with cognitive and behavioural implications. Nevertheless, there abounds substantial debate regarding which of these processes may only be sequelae of the original insult, and which may, in fact, be maladaptively compelling further degradation of the organism’s competence to cope with its disrupted sensory context. In this review, we aim to examine how the mammalian auditory system responds in the wake of particular insults, and to disambiguate how the changes that develop might underlie a correlated class of phantom disorders, including tinnitus and hyperacusis, which putatively are brought about through maladaptive neuroplastic disruptions to auditory networks governing the spatial and temporal processing of acoustic sensory information.

  14. Novel and tightly regulated resorcinol and cumate-inducible expression systems for Streptomyces and other actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbal, Liliya; Fedorenko, Victor; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-10-01

    Inducible expression is a versatile genetic tool for controlling gene transcription, determining gene functions and other uses. Herein, we describe our attempts to create several inducible systems based on a cumate or a resorcinol switch, a hammerhead ribozyme, the LacI repressor, and isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). We successfully developed a new cumate (p-isopropylbenzoic acid)-inducible gene switch in actinobacteria that is based on the CymR regulator, the operator sequence (cmt) from the Pseudomonas putida cumate degradation operon and P21 synthetic promoter. Resorcinol-inducible expression system is also functional and is composed of the RolR regulator and the PA3 promoter fused with the operator (rolO) from the Corynebacterium glutamicum resorcinol catabolic operon. Using the gusA (β-glucuronidase) gene as a reporter, we showed that the newly generated expression systems are tightly regulated and hyper-inducible. The activity of the uninduced promoters is negligible in both cases. Whereas the induction factor reaches 45 for Streptomyces albus in the case of cumate switch and 33 in the case of resorcinol toggle. The systems are also dose-dependent, which allows the modulation of gene expression even from a single promoter. In addition, the cumate system is versatile, given that it is functional in different actinomycetes. Finally, these systems are nontoxic and inexpensive, as these are characteristics of cumate and resorcinol, and they are easy to use because inducers are water-soluble and easily penetrate cells. Therefore, the P21-cmt-CymR and PA3-rolO-RolR systems are powerful tools for engineering actinobacteria.

  15. Tyre induced vibrations of the car-trailer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beregi, S.; Takács, D.; Stépán, G.

    2016-02-01

    The lateral and yaw dynamics of the car-trailer combination are analysed by means of a single track model. The equations of motion are derived rigorously by means of the Appell-Gibbs equations for constant longitudinal velocity of the vehicle. The tyres are described with the help of the so-called delayed tyre model, which is based on a brush model with pure rolling contact. The lateral forces and aligning torques of the tyre/road interaction are calculated via the instantaneous lateral deformations in the contact patches. The linear stability analysis of the rectilinear motion is performed via the analytically determined characteristic function of the system. Stability charts are constructed with respect to the vehicle longitudinal velocity and the payload position on the trailer. Self-excited lateral vibrations are detected with different vibration modes at low and at high longitudinal speeds of the vehicle. The effects of the tyre parameters are also investigated.

  16. Field induced order in magnetic systems: Marginal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, D., E-mail: daniel@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150-Urca, 22290-180 RJ (Brazil); Continentino, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niteroi, RJ 24.210-340 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    The bond operator representation and the one-loop renormalization group treatment are used to study the spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic with single-ion anisotropy and transversal magnetic fields in three-dimensional cubic lattices. We start from a disordered spin-liquid phase to an ordered phase, at a critical field H{sub c1} above which the system enters an XY-antiferromagnetic phase. This transition is interpreted as belonging to a universality class with a dynamical critical exponent z=1. In this marginal case logarithmic corrections are found to the physical quantities. These theoretical predictions are compared with the scaling of the magnetization as a function of field and temperature for the organic compound NiCl{sub 2}-4SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}.

  17. Resonant scattering induced thermopower in one-dimensional disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel; Smit, Wilbert J.; Sigrist, Manfred

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzes thermoelectric properties of a one-dimensional random conductor which shows localization effects and simultaneously includes resonant scatterers yielding sharp conductance resonances. These sharp features give rise to a distinct behavior of the Seebeck coefficient in finite systems and incorporate the degree of localization as a means to enhance thermoelectric performance, in principle. The model for noninteracting electrons is discussed within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism such that analytical treatment is possible for a wide range of properties, if a special averaging scheme is applied. The approximations in the averaging procedure are tested with numerical evaluations showing good qualitative agreement, with some limited quantitative disagreement. The validity of low-temperature Mott's formula is determined and a good approximation is developed for the intermediate temperature range. In both regimes the intricate interplay between Anderson localization due to disorder and conductance resonances of the disorder potential is analyzed.

  18. Square root module to combat dispersion-induced nonlinear distortion in Radio-over-Fiber Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Prat Gomà, Josep Joan; Santos Blanco, M. Concepción; Omella Cáncer, Mireia Esther

    2006-01-01

    Reduced dispersion-induced harmonics levels are reported for analogue radio-over-fiber systems by using a linearized receiver incorporating a memoryless electronic circuit with square root (SQRT)-like transfer function, and performing amplitude modulation (AM) at the transmitter. A practical implementation demonstrates the effectiveness of the AM-SQRT approach in linearizing the optical transmission system with respect to the conventional intensity modulation and direct detection system. P...

  19. Policy-induced market introduction of Generation IV reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, Aliki Irina van; Roelofs, Ferry

    2011-01-01

    Almost 10 years ago the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started the Generation IV Initiative (GenIV) with 9 other national governments with a positive ground attitude towards nuclear energy. Some of these Generation IV systems, like the fast reactors, are nearing the demonstration stage. The question on how their market introduction will be implemented becomes increasingly urgent. One main topic for future reactor technologies is the treatment of radioactive waste products. Technological solutions to this issue are being developed. One possible process is the transformation of long-living radioactive nuclides into short living ones; a process known as transmutation, which can be done in a nuclear reactor only. Various Generation IV reactor concepts are suitable for this process, and of these systems most experience has been gained with the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). However, both these first generation SFR plants and their Generation IV successors are designed as electricity generating plants, and therefore supposed to be commercially viable in the electricity markets. Various studies indicate that the generation costs of a combined LWR-(S)FR nuclear generating park (LWR: light water reactor) will be higher than that of an LWR-only park. To investigate the effects of the deployment of the different reactors and fuel cycles on the waste produced, resources used and costs incurred as a function of time, a dynamic fuel cycle assessment is performed. This study will focus on the waste impact of the introduction of a fraction of fast reactors in the European nuclear reactor park with a cost increase as described in the previous paragraph. The nuclear fuel cycle scenario code DANESS is used for this, as well as the nuclear park model of the EU-27 used for the previous study. (orig.)

  20. FM-AM Conversion Induced by Polarization Mode Dispersion in Fiber Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dong, Huang; Sheng-Zhi, Zhao; Jian-Jun, Wang; Ming-Zhong, Li; Dang-Peng, Xu; Hong-Huan, Lin; Rui, Zhang; Ying, Deng; Xiao-Min, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The conversion of the frequency modulated pulse induced from frequency modulation (FM) to amplitude modulation (AM) by the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is theoretically and experimentally investigated. When there is no polarizer at the output end of a fiber system, the amplitude modulation depth is stable by 8%. Random amplitude modulation is observed when a polarizer is placed at the output end of the fiber system. The observed minimum and maximum modulation depths in our experiment are 5% and 80%, respectively. Simulation results show that the amplitude modulation is stable by 4% induced mainly by group velocity dispersion (GVD) when there is no polarizer, and the amplitude modulation depth displays the random variation character induced by the GVD and PMD. Lastly, a new fiber system scheme is proposed and little amplitude modulation is observed at the top of the output pulse

  1. Voltage induced control and magnetoresistance of magnetically frustrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitsov, A.; Chshiev, M.; Canals, B.; Lacroix, C.

    2010-03-01

    The discovery of giant magnetoresistance [1] (GMR) in magnetic nanostructures has generated a new field of spin-based electronics (spintronics) [2]. This advent has considerably increased an interest in related phenomenon in bulk materials, colossal magnetoresistance [3] (CMR), which is several orders higher than GMR, and can be viewed as an ``intrinsic'' property of material. The CMR is typically observed in certain manganite compounds with characteristic magnetic fields of several Tesla. Such fields make them inappropriate for use in spintronic applications where appropriate scale should be about Oersteds. Here we promote magnetically frustrated (MF) bulk materials [4] as a possible alternative for spintronic applications with high magnetoresistance (MR) which can be controlled with relatively small voltages. We demonstrate that MR of MF systems may reach extremely high values and their magnetic configuration may be controlled by applied voltage. The proposed phenomenon is the bulk material analog of spin transfer torque [5] used in spin-valve structures. This work was supported by Nanosciences Foundation (France). [1] M. Baibich et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 2472 (1988); [2] S. Wolf, Science, 294, 1488 (2001); [3] S. Jin et al, Science, 264, 413 (1994); [4] J. Gardner et al, arXiv:0906.3661; [5] J. Slonczewski, JMMM 159, L1 (1996).

  2. Development of a code system DEURACS for theoretical analysis and prediction of deuteron-induced reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama Shinsuke; Kouno Hiroshi; Watanabe Yukinobu; Iwamoto Osamu; Ye Tao; Ogata Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an integrated code system dedicated for theoretical analysis and prediction of deuteron-induced reactions, which is called DEUteron-induced Reaction Analysis Code System (DEURACS). DEURACS consists of several calculation codes based on theoretical models to describe respective reaction mechanisms and it was successfully applied to (d,xp) and (d,xn) reactions. In the present work, the analysis of (d,xn) reactions is extended to higher incident energy up to nearly 100 MeV and ...

  3. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than

  4. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation-induced nervous system disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation-Induced Nervous System Disease has been issued and implemented by the Ministry of health. This standard contained three independent criteria of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. These three kinds of disease often go together in clinic,therefore,the three diagnostic criteria were merged into radioactive nervous system disease diagnostic criteria for entirety and maneuverability of the standard. This standard was formulated based on collection of the clinical practice experience, extensive research of relevant literature and foreign relevant publications. It is mainly applied to diagnosis and treatment of occupational radiation-induced nervous system diseases, and to nervous system diseases caused by medical radiation exposure as well. In order to properly implement this standard, also to correctly deal with radioactive nervous system injury, the main contents of this standard including dose threshold, clinical manifestation, indexing standard and treatment principle were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  5. Peripheral Antinociception Induced by Aripiprazole Is Mediated by the Opioid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Mendes Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and related disorders. Our previous study showed that this compound also induces antinociceptive effects. The present study aimed to assess the participation of the opioid system in this effect. Methods. Male Swiss mice were submitted to paw pressure test and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 2 μg. Aripiprazole was injected 10 min before the measurement. Naloxone, clocinnamox, naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and bestatin were given 30 min before aripiprazole. Nociceptive thresholds were measured in the 3rd hour after PGE2 injection. Results. Aripiprazole (100 μg/paw injected locally into the right hind paw induced an antinociceptive effect that was blocked by naloxone (50 μg/paw, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist. The role of μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors was investigated using the selective antagonists, clocinnamox (40 μg/paw, naltrindole (15, 30, and 60 μg/paw, and nor-binaltorphimine (200 μg/paw, respectively. The data indicated that only the δ-opioid receptor antagonist inhibited the peripheral antinociception induced by aripiprazole. Bestatin (400 μg, an aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, significantly enhanced low-dose (25 μg/paw aripiprazole-induced peripheral antinociception. Conclusion. The results suggest the participation of the opioid system via δ-opioid receptor in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by aripiprazole.

  6. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  7. [Risk factors and management of systemic reactions induced by subcutaneous immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liping; Wen, Zhaoming; Yang, Na

    2014-10-21

    To explore the risk factors (causes or possible causes) of systemic reactions induced by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) through clinical observations and develop countermeasures for preventing further SCIT-induced systemic reactions. Each patient on SCIT at our department from December 1993 to September 2013 was inquired about systemic reactions induced by SCIT. Individuals with systemic reactions immediately after SCIT were included. Clinical history and manifestations were inquired and recorded carefully. Risk factors of systemic reactions were probed and analyzed. SCIT schedule was adjusted according to the risk factors and the patients on continuous SCIT were followed up until the end of SCIT course. A total of 70 reactions were observed in 35 patients during the observation period. A large majority (97.1% (68/70) ) of systemic reactions occurred at a maximal concentration of 10(-2). Risk factor included an injection of maximal dosage (0.6-1.0 ml of 10(-2) vial, 27.2% (28/103) ), a further injection of large dosage (0.1-0.5 ml of 10(-2) vial) during pollen season (20.4% (21/103) ), incremental dose regardless of marked local reaction (12.6% (13/103) ), suspected incorrect injection procedure(12.6% (13/103) ) and an injection with a wrong vial of higher concentration (9.7% (10/103) ). Countermeasures were taken accordingly, include stopping injection of maximal dosage, avoiding SCIT of 10(-2) vial on pollen season, decreasing SCIT dosage on existence of large local reactions, performing SCIT only at medical institutions capable of managing anaphylaxis and implementing normalized injection procedures. Most patients (n = 29) finished the course of SCIT successfully without further systemic reactions. Six patients ceased SCIT for personal reasons or on medical advice. Probing the risk factors of systemic reactions induced by SCIT and adopting countermeasures accordingly prevent further systemic reactions. It may provide rationales for preventing or minimizing

  8. An in vivo transfection system for inducible gene expression and gene silencing in murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Eric K; Lechler, Christian; Kohnke-Ertel, Birgit; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Sage, Julien; Schmid, Roland M; Ehmer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection (HTVI) of transposon-based integration vectors is an established system for stably transfecting mouse hepatocytes in vivo that has been successfully employed to study key questions in liver biology and cancer. Refining the vectors for transposon-mediated hepatocyte transfection will further expand the range of applications of this technique in liver research. In the present study, we report an advanced transposon-based system for manipulating gene expression in hepatocytes in vivo. Transposon-based vector constructs were generated to enable the constitutive expression of inducible Cre recombinase (CreER) together with tetracycline-inducible transgene or miR-small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression (Tet-ON system). Transposon and transposase expression vectors were co-injected into R26R-mTmG reporter mice by HTVI. Cre-mediated gene recombination was induced by tamoxifen, followed by the administration of doxycycline to drive tetracycline-inducible gene or shRNA expression. Expression was visualized by immunofluorescence staining in livers of injected mice. After HTVI, Cre recombination by tamoxifen led to the expression of membrane-bound green fluorescent protein in transfected hepatocytes. Activation of inducible gene or shRNA expression was detected by immunostaining in up to one-third of transfected hepatocytes, with an efficiency dependent on the promoter driving the Tet-ON system. Our vector system combines Cre-lox mediated gene mutation with inducible gene expression or gene knockdown, respectively. It provides the opportunity for rapid and specific modification of hepatocyte gene expression and can be a useful tool for genetic screening approaches and analysis of target genes specifically in genetically engineered mouse models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A screening system to identify transcription factors that induce binding site-directed DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Maeda, Shiori; Furuhata, Erina; Shimizu, Yuri; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-12-08

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that is involved in many biological systems such as differentiation and disease. We and others recently showed that some transcription factors (TFs) are involved in the site-specific determination of DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner, although the reports of such TFs are limited. Here, we develop a screening system to identify TFs that induce binding site-directed DNA methylation changes. The system involves the ectopic expression of target TFs in model cells followed by DNA methylome analysis and overrepresentation analysis of the corresponding TF binding motif at differentially methylated regions. It successfully identified binding site-directed demethylation of SPI1, which is known to promote DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner. We extended our screening system to 15 master TFs involved in cellular differentiation and identified eight novel binding site-directed DNA demethylation-inducing TFs (RUNX3, GATA2, CEBPB, MAFB, NR4A2, MYOD1, CEBPA, and TBX5). Gene ontology and tissue enrichment analysis revealed that these TFs demethylate genomic regions associated with corresponding biological roles. We also describe the characteristics of binding site-directed DNA demethylation induced by these TFs, including the targeting of highly methylated CpGs, local DNA demethylation, and the overlap of demethylated regions between TFs of the same family. Our results show the usefulness of the developed screening system for the identification of TFs that induce DNA demethylation in a site-directed manner.

  10. Enhanced Chondrocyte Proliferation in a Prototyped Culture System with Wave-Induced Agitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilarek Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the actual challenges in tissue engineering applications is to efficiently produce as high of number of cells as it is only possible, in the shortest time. In static cultures, the production of animal cell biomass in integrated forms (i.e. aggregates, inoculated scaffolds is limited due to inefficient diffusion of culture medium components observed in such non-mixed culture systems, especially in the case of cell-inoculated fiber-based dense 3D scaffolds, inside which the intensification of mass transfer is particularly important. The applicability of a prototyped, small-scale, continuously wave-induced agitated system for intensification of anchorage-dependent CP5 chondrocytes proliferation outside and inside three-dimensional poly(lactic acid (PLA scaffolds has been discussed. Fibrous PLA-based constructs have been inoculated with CP5 cells and then maintained in two independent incubation systems: (i non-agitated conditions and (ii culture with wave-induced agitation. Significantly higher values of the volumetric glucose consumption rate have been noted for the system with the wave-induced agitation. The advantage of the presented wave-induced agitation culture system has been confirmed by lower activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH released from the cells in the samples of culture medium harvested from the agitated cultures, in contrast to rather high values of LDH activity measured for static conditions. Results of the proceeded experiments and their analysis clearly exhibited the feasibility of the culture system supported with continuously wave-induced agitation for robust proliferation of the CP5 chondrocytes on PLA-based structures. Aside from the practicability of the prototyped system, we believe that it could also be applied as a standard method offering advantages for all types of the daily routine laboratory-scale animal cell cultures utilizing various fiber-based biomaterials, with the use of only regular laboratory

  11. CoIN: co-inducible nitrate expression system for secondary metabolites in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemann, Philipp; Soukup, Alexandra A; Folz, Jacob S; Wang, Pin-Mei; Noack, Andreas; Keller, Nancy P

    2018-01-01

    Sequencing of fungal species has demonstrated the existence of thousands of putative secondary metabolite gene clusters, the majority of them harboring a unique set of genes thought to participate in production of distinct small molecules. Despite the ready identification of key enzymes and potential cluster genes by bioinformatics techniques in sequenced genomes, the expression and identification of fungal secondary metabolites in the native host is often hampered as the genes might not be expressed under laboratory conditions and the species might not be amenable to genetic manipulation. To overcome these restrictions, we developed an inducible expression system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans . We genetically engineered a strain of A. nidulans devoid of producing eight of the most abundant endogenous secondary metabolites to express the sterigmatocystin Zn(II) 2 Cys 6 transcription factor-encoding gene aflR and its cofactor aflS under control of the nitrate inducible niiA / niaD promoter. Furthermore, we identified a subset of promoters from the sterigmatocystin gene cluster that are under nitrate-inducible AflR/S control in our production strain in order to yield coordinated expression without the risks from reusing a single inducible promoter. As proof of concept, we used this system to produce β-carotene from the carotenoid gene cluster of Fusarium fujikuroi . Utilizing one-step yeast recombinational cloning, we developed an inducible expression system in the genetic model A. nidulans and show that it can be successfully used to produce commercially valuable metabolites.

  12. PPS nanoparticles as versatile delivery system to induce systemic and broad mucosal immunity after intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Armando; van der Vlies, André J; Martino, Mikael M; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Simeoni, Eleonora

    2011-01-17

    Degradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs, 50 nm) based on polypropylene sulfide (PPS) were conjugated to thiolated antigen and adjuvant proteins by reversible disulfide bonds and evaluated in mucosal vaccination. Ovalbumin was used as a model antigen, and antigen-conjugated NPs were administered intranasally in the mouse. We show penetration of nasal mucosae, transit via M cells, and uptake by antigen-presenting cells in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Ovalbumin-conjugated NPs induced cytotoxic T lymphocytic responses in lung and spleen tissues, as well as humoral response in mucosal airways. Co-conjugation of the TLR5 ligand flagellin further enhanced humoral responses in the airways as well as in the distant vaginal and rectal mucosal compartments and induced cellular immune responses with a Th1 bias, in contrast with free flagellin. The PPS NP platform thus appears interesting as a platform for intranasally-administered mucosal vaccination for inducing broad mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Position of Effective Spins Induced by Dilution in Two-Dimensional Spin-Peierls Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Chitoshi; Miyara, Shouta

    2018-01-01

    The site- and bond-dilution effects of the nonmagnetic ground state of a two-dimensional S = 1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, coupled with the lattice distortions on a square lattice, are investigated by performing quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the nondiluted system, a phase diagram parameterized by the interchain interaction and the elastic constant is obtained, and the values of the lattice distortions in the dimerized phase are evaluated precisely. In the diluted system, we compare two ground-state energies assuming two patterns of lattice distortions with magnetic moments (effective spins) induced near the diluted parts and induced at the midpoint between the diluted parts. As a result, we find that it is difficult to induce effective spins near diluted parts for large elastic constants, small interchain interactions, and large concentrations of dilution.

  14. Recent advances in the understanding of sepsis-induced alterations in the neuroendocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Fazal; Atika, Bibi; Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela Ravanelli; Rocha, Maria José Alves

    2013-12-01

    Sepsis is a fatal systemic inflammatory disease. It is caused by an immune system inflammatory response to the entry of microorganisms or their products into the blood circulatory system. The pathophysiological mechanisms of sepsis are still poorly understood. The presence of microorganisms in the systemic circulation causes activation of the immune system, which in turn leads to a robust release of inflammatory cytokines. These inflammatory cytokines result in alterations across all important physiological systems, including the neuroendocrine system. Neuroendocrine responses differ between the acute and the late phase of sepsis. In the acute phase there are robust alterations in the secretion of neuroendocrine hormones in response to body demand. In the late phase, the plasma concentrations of some hormones remain low, despite heavy systemic demand, whereas several others increase despite of diminished needs. In this review, we give a brief overview on sepsis-induced major alterations in neuroendocrine secretions, and summarize current knowledge about mechanisms and targets for their treatment.

  15. A LabVIEW-Based Virtual Instrument System for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qijun; Wang, Lufei; Zu, Lily

    2011-01-01

    We report the design and operation of a Virtual Instrument (VI) system based on LabVIEW 2009 for laser-induced fluorescence experiments. This system achieves synchronous control of equipment and acquisition of real-time fluorescence data communicating with a single computer via GPIB, USB, RS232, and parallel ports. The reported VI system can also accomplish data display, saving, and analysis, and printing the results. The VI system performs sequences of operations automatically, and this system has been successfully applied to obtain the excitation and dispersion spectra of α-methylnaphthalene. The reported VI system opens up new possibilities for researchers and increases the efficiency and precision of experiments. The design and operation of the VI system are described in detail in this paper, and the advantages that this system can provide are highlighted.

  16. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, N.Y.L.; Both, S.; van Heemst, D.; van der Grond, J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain's "reward system", and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in

  17. EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC NEUTROPHIL DEPLETION ON LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of Systemic Neutrophil Depletion on LPS-induced Airway DiseaseJordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, David A. SchwartzPulmonary and Critical Care Division, Dept of Medicine ? Duke University Medical Center* National Health and E...

  18. CRH engagement of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system mediates stress-induced anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jordan G.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Siuda, Edward R.; Hong, Daniel Y.; Norris, Aaron J.; Ford, Christopher P.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The locus coeruleus noradrenergic (LC-NE) system is one of the first systems engaged following a stressful event. While numerous groups have demonstrated that LC-NE neurons are activated by many different stressors, the underlying neural circuitry and the role of this activity in generating stress-induced anxiety has not been elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo chemogenetics, optogenetics, and retrograde tracing we determine that increased tonic activity of the LC-NE system is necessary and sufficient for stress-induced anxiety and aversion. Selective inhibition of LC-NE neurons during stress prevents subsequent anxiety-like behavior. Exogenously increasing tonic, but not phasic, activity of LC-NE neurons is alone sufficient for anxiety-like and aversive behavior. Furthermore, endogenous corticotropin releasing hormone+ (CRH+) LC inputs from the amygdala increase tonic LC activity, inducing anxiety-like behaviors. These studies position the LC-NE system as a critical mediator of acute stress-induced anxiety and offer a potential intervention for preventing stress-related affective disorders. PMID:26212712

  19. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm

  20. Dietary L-arginine supplementation modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response through LPS/TLR-4 signaling pathway in broilers. The experiment was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatm...

  1. Flow induced vibration of subsea gas production systems caused by choke valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, N.E.; Groot, R. de; Gharaibah, E.; Slot, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the design of subsea flow systems the integrity and reliability is paramount. As the equipment must be designed to operate at a large variety of conditions, inherent to the many processes, evaluation of the integrity is complex. . Flow induced pulsations and vibrations can cause serious design

  2. Flow induced vibration of subsea gas production system caused by choke valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, N.E.; Groot, R. de; Gharaibah, E.; Slot, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the design of subsea flow systems the integrity and reliability is paramount. As the equipment must be designed to operate at a large variety of conditions, inherent to the many processes, evaluation of the integrity is complex. . Flow induced pulsations and vibrations can cause serious design

  3. Computer circuit analysis of induced currents in the MFTF-B magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnuson, G.D.; Woods, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was made of the induced current behavior of the MFTF-B magnet system. Although the magnet system consists of 22 coils, because of its symmetry we considered only 11 coils in the analysis. Various combinations of the coils were dumped either singly or in groups, with the current behavior in all magnets calculated as a function of time after initiation of the dump

  4. Recovery from UV-induced potentially lethal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The repair of ultraviolet light-induced potentially lethal damage was investigated in density-inhibited skin fibroblast cell strains derived from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of exposure to polychromatic ultraviolet light composed of environmentally relevant wavelengths or to the more commonly studied, short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light was studied. Systemic lupus erythematosus cells, which are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light under growth promoting conditions, were able to repair potentially lethal damage as well as normal cells. (author)

  5. A framework of induced hyperspace dynamical systems equipped with the hit-or-miss topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yangeng; Wei Guo; Campbell, William H.; Bourquin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    For any dynamical system (E,d,f), where E is Hausdorff locally compact second countable (HLCSC), let F (resp., 2 E ) denote the space of all closed subsets (resp., non-empty closed subsets) of E equipped with the hit-or-miss topology τ f . Both F and 2 E are again HLCSC (F actually compact), thus metrizable. Let ρ be such a metric (three metrics available). The main purpose is to determine the conditions on f that ensure the continuity of the induced hyperspace maps 2 f :F→F and 2 f :2 E →2 E defined by 2 f (F)=f(F). With this setting, the induced hyperspace systems (F,ρ,2 f ) and (2 E ,ρ,2 f ) are compact and locally compact dynamical systems, respectively. Consequently, dynamical properties, particularly metric related dynamical properties, of the given system (E,d,f) can be explored through these hyperspace systems. In contrast, when the Vietoris topology τ v is equipped on 2 E , the space of the induced hyperspace topological dynamical system (2 E ,τ v ,2 f ) is not metrizable if E is not compact metrizable, e.g., E=R n , implying that metric related dynamical concepts cannot be defined for (2 E ,τ v ,2 f ). Moreover, two examples are provided to illustrate the advantages of the hit-or-miss topology as compared to the Vietoris topology.

  6. A combined laser-induced breakdown and Raman spectroscopy Echelle system for elemental and molecular microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehse, Marek [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Mory, David [LTB Lasertechnik Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 29, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Florek, Stefan [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Science, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Weritz, Friederike [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gornushkin, Igor, E-mail: igor.gornushkin@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, Ulrich [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Chemistry Department, Brook-Taylor-Strasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is integrated into a single system for molecular and elemental microanalyses. Both analyses are performed on the same approx 0.002 mm{sup 2} sample spot allowing the assessment of sample heterogeneity on a micrometric scale through mapping and scanning. The core of the spectrometer system is a novel high resolution dual arm Echelle spectrograph utilized for both techniques. In contrast to scanning Raman spectroscopy systems, the Echelle-Raman spectrograph provides a high resolution spectrum in a broad spectral range of 200-6000 cm{sup -1} without moving the dispersive element. The system displays comparable or better sensitivity and spectral resolution in comparison to a state-of-the-art scanning Raman microscope and allows short analysis times for both Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy performance of the system is characterized by ppm detection limits, high spectral resolving power (15,000), and broad spectral range (290-945 nm). The capability of the system is demonstrated with the mapping of heterogeneous mineral samples and layer by layer analysis of pigments revealing the advantages of combining the techniques in a single unified set-up.

  7. A theoretical analysis of the feasibility of a singularity-induced micro-electroporation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Troszak

    Full Text Available Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane lipid bilayer due to a pulsed electric field, has important implications in the biotechnology, medicine, and food industries. Traditional macro and micro-electroporation devices have facing electrodes, and require significant potential differences to induce electroporation. The goal of this theoretical study is to investigate the feasibility of singularity-induced micro-electroporation; an electroporation configuration aimed at minimizing the potential differences required to induce electroporation by separating adjacent electrodes with a nanometer-scale insulator. In particular, this study aims to understand the effect of (1 insulator thickness and (2 electrode kinetics on electric field distributions in the singularity-induced micro-electroporation configuration. A non-dimensional primary current distribution model of the micro-electroporation channel shows that while increasing insulator thickness results in smaller electric field magnitudes, electroporation can still be performed with insulators thick enough to be made with microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, a secondary current distribution model of the singularity-induced micro-electroporation configuration with inert platinum electrodes and water electrolyte indicates that electrode kinetics do not inhibit charge transfer to the extent that prohibitively large potential differences are required to perform electroporation. These results indicate that singularity-induced micro-electroporation could be used to develop an electroporation system that consumes minimal power, making it suitable for remote applications such as the sterilization of water and other liquids.

  8. 3-Acetonyl-3-hydroxyoxindole: a new inducer of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Zhongkai; Jia, Yantao; Shen, Yuemao; He, Hongping; Fang, Rongxiang; Chen, Xiaoying; Hao, Xiaojiang

    2008-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defence mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from microbial pathogen attack. Guided by bioassays, a new chemical inducer of SAR was isolated from the extracts of Strobilanthes cusia and identified to be 3-acetonyl-3-hydroxyoxindole (AHO), a derivative of isatin. Tobacco plants treated with AHO exhibited enhanced resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and to the fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum (powdery mildew), accompanied by increased levels of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (PR-1) expression, salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity. To study the mode of action of AHO, its ability to induce PR-1 expression and TMV resistance in nahG transgenic plants expressing salicylate hydroxylase, which prevents the accumulation of SA, was analysed. AHO treatment did not induce TMV resistance or PR-1 expression in nahG transgenic plants, suggesting that AHO acts upstream of SA in the SAR signalling pathway. In addition, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry, five AHO-induced plant proteins were identified which were homologous to the effector proteins with which SA interacts. Our data suggest that AHO may represent a novel class of inducer that stimulates SA-mediated defence responses.

  9. Flutamide-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in an In Vitro Rat Hepatocyte System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Maruf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flutamide (FLU is a competitive antagonist of the androgen receptor which has been reported to induce severe liver injury in some patients. Several experimental models suggested that an episode of inflammation during drug treatment predisposes animals to tissue injury. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of FLU in isolated rat hepatocytes using an in vitro oxidative stress inflammation system were investigated in this study. When a nontoxic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generating system (glucose/glucose oxidase with peroxidase or iron(II [Fe(II] (to partly simulate in vivo inflammation was added to the hepatocytes prior to the addition of FLU, increases in FLU-induced cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation (LPO were observed that were decreased by 6-N-propyl-2-thiouracil or deferoxamine, respectively. N-Acetylcysteine decreased FLU-induced cytotoxicity in this system. Potent antioxidants, for example, Trolox ((±-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid, resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, and DPPD (N,N′-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine also significantly decreased FLU-induced cytotoxicity and LPO and increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and glutathione (GSH levels in the H2O2 generating system with peroxidase. TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, a known reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and superoxide dismutase mimetic, also significantly decreased toxicity caused by FLU in this system. These results raise the possibility that the presence or absence of inflammation may be another susceptibility factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

  10. Induced seismicity hazard and risk by enhanced geothermal systems: an expert elicitation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutnevyte, Evelina; Azevedo, Inês L.

    2018-03-01

    Induced seismicity is a concern for multiple geoenergy applications, including low-carbon enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). We present the results of an international expert elicitation (n = 14) on EGS induced seismicity hazard and risk. Using a hypothetical scenario of an EGS plant and its geological context, we show that expert best-guess estimates of annualized exceedance probabilities of an M ≥ 3 event range from 0.2%-95% during reservoir stimulation and 0.2%-100% during operation. Best-guess annualized exceedance probabilities of M ≥ 5 event span from 0.002%-2% during stimulation and 0.003%-3% during operation. Assuming that tectonic M7 events could occur, some experts do not exclude induced (triggered) events of up to M7 too. If an induced M = 3 event happens at 5 km depth beneath a town with 10 000 inhabitants, most experts estimate a 50% probability that the loss is contained within 500 000 USD without any injuries or fatalities. In the case of an induced M = 5 event, there is 50% chance that the loss is below 50 million USD with the most-likely outcome of 50 injuries and one fatality or none. As we observe a vast diversity in quantitative expert judgements and underlying mental models, we conclude with implications for induced seismicity risk governance. That is, we suggest documenting individual expert judgements in induced seismicity elicitations before proceeding to consensual judgements, to convene larger expert panels in order not to cherry-pick the experts, and to aim for multi-organization multi-model assessments of EGS induced seismicity hazard and risk.

  11. Integrated protective systems for operational acceleration-induced loss of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, P E

    1991-01-01

    Systems that can protect pilots from not only acceleration-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) but also from exposure to chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons are discussed. Hazards such as fire, drowning, and ballistic injury are not considered. Physiological stresses, protection methods, and their impact on G capability at increased altitudes are examined, as are stresses induced by the environment (heat stress, cold stress, and cold water immersion). Sustained and short-duration acceleration effects are described. Requirements for protection against chemical, biological, radiological, and laser weapons and the incorporation of mission-enhancement devices are addressed. Concepts for integration of all of these elements are discussed.

  12. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them ...

  13. In vitro comparison of laser induced lithotripsy on artificial stones by means of different laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, R.; Hecht, V.; Reich, O.; Seitz, M.; Stief, C. G.; Bader, M. J.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: In this study, clinically available pulsed laser systems emitting either in the infrared (IR) - or visible (VIS) spectral region were compared in a standardized manner with respect to their impact on phantom stones in an underwater laboratory set-up. Methods: There were three pulsed laser systems emitting light either in the IR (λ=2100nm: Ho: YAG-laser) or VIS (λ=532nm/1064nm: FREDDY-laser and 598nm: FLPD-laser) spectral range available for this investigation. After determination of the ablation threshold different fragmentation rates were determined in relation to the fluence (depending on pulse energy and fiber diameter) using artificial stones. Results: The threshold value of the laser pulse energy to induce an ablation of artificial stones induced by the different laser systems showed that even the lowest laser settings induced significant ablation with no regards to the repetition rate and fiber diameter. The VIS-lasers showed higher fragmentation rates than the IR-lasers. Conclusions: VIS-lasers are solely useful for laser induced shockwave lithotripsy, while IR-lasers are also in use for other clinical applications (e.g. coagulation and ablation). Investigations on artificial stone fragmentation are useful to compare clinical laser parameter settings but can partially be transferred to clinically urinary stone fragmentation.

  14. A Safeguard System for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Rejuvenated T Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Ando

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has created promising new avenues for therapies in regenerative medicine. However, the tumorigenic potential of undifferentiated iPSCs is a major safety concern for clinical translation. To address this issue, we demonstrated the efficacy of suicide gene therapy by introducing inducible caspase-9 (iC9 into iPSCs. Activation of iC9 with a specific chemical inducer of dimerization (CID initiates a caspase cascade that eliminates iPSCs and tumors originated from iPSCs. We introduced this iC9/CID safeguard system into a previously reported iPSC-derived, rejuvenated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (rejCTL therapy model and confirmed that we can generate rejCTLs from iPSCs expressing high levels of iC9 without disturbing antigen-specific killing activity. iC9-expressing rejCTLs exert antitumor effects in vivo. The system efficiently and safely induces apoptosis in these rejCTLs. These results unite to suggest that the iC9/CID safeguard system is a promising tool for future iPSC-mediated approaches to clinical therapy.

  15. Regulation of diet-induced adipose tissue and systemic inflammation by salicylates and pioglitazone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sunny Kim

    Full Text Available It is increasingly accepted that chronic inflammation participates in obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Salicylates and thiazolidinediones (TZDs both have anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperglycemic properties. The present study compared the effects of these drugs on obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue (AT and AT macrophages (ATMs, as well as the metabolic and immunological phenotypes of the animal models. Both drugs improved high fat diet (HFD-induced insulin resistance. However, salicylates did not affect AT and ATM inflammation, whereas Pioglitazone improved these parameters. Interestingly, HFD and the drug treatments all modulated systemic inflammation as assessed by changes in circulating immune cell numbers and activation states. HFD increased the numbers of circulating white blood cells, neutrophils, and a pro-inflammatory monocyte subpopulation (Ly6C(hi, whereas salicylates and Pioglitazone normalized these cell numbers. The drug treatments also decreased circulating lymphocyte numbers. These data suggest that obesity induces systemic inflammation by regulating circulating immune cell phenotypes and that anti-diabetic interventions suppress systemic inflammation by normalizing circulating immune phenotypes.

  16. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, Pgingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  17. Interleukin-6 and lung inflammation: evidence for a causative role in inducing respiratory system resistance increments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that has been shown to be increased in some pathological conditions involving the respiratory system such as those experimentally induced in animals or spontaneously occurring in humans. Experimental data demonstrating that interleukin-6 plays a significant role in commonly occurring respiratory system inflammatory diseases are reviewed here. Those diseases, i.e. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are characterised by mechanical derangements of the respiratory system, for the most part due to increased elastance and airway resistance. Recent findings showing that interleukin-6 has a causative role in determining an increase in airway resistance are reviewed. The end-inflation occlusion method was used to study the mechanical properties of the respiratory system before and after interleukin-6 administration. The cytokine was shown to induce significant, dose-dependent increments in both the resistive pressure dissipation due to frictional forces opposing the airflow in the airway (ohmic resistance) and the additional resistive pressure dissipation due to the visco-elastic properties of the system, i.e. stress relaxation (visco-elastic resistance). There were no alterations in respiratory system elastance. Even when administered to healthy mammals, interleukin-6 determines a significant effect on respiratory system resistance causing an increase in the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration. IL-6 hypothetically plays an active role in the pathogenesis of respiratory system diseases and the mechanisms that may be involved are discussed here.

  18. Quality control systems for aberrant mRNAs induced by aberrant translation elongation and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    RNA processing is an essential gene expression step and plays a crucial role to achieve diversity of gene products in eukaryotes. Various aberrant mRNAs transiently produced during RNA processing reactions are recognized and eliminated by specific quality control systems. It has been demonstrated that these mRNA quality control systems stimulate the degradation of aberrant mRNA to prevent the potentially harmful products derived from aberrant mRNAs. Recent studies on quality control systems induced by abnormal translation elongation and termination have revealed that both aberrant mRNAs and proteins are subjected to rapid degradation. In NonStop Decay (NSD) quality control system, a poly(A) tail of nonstop mRNA is translated and the synthesis of poly-lysine sequence results in translation arrest followed by co-translational degradation of aberrant nonstop protein. In No-Go Decay (NGD) quality control system, the specific amino acid sequences of the nascent polypeptide induce ribosome stalling, and the arrest products are ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In Nonfunctional rRNA Decay (NRD) quality control system, aberrant ribosomes composed of nonfunctional ribosomal RNAs are also eliminated when aberrant translation elongation complexes are formed on mRNA. I describe recent progresses on the mechanisms of quality control systems and the relationships between quality control systems. This article is part of a Special issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in rat blood, heart and brain during induced systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septelia I. Wanandi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia results in an increased generation of ROS. Until now, little is known about the role of MnSOD - a major endogenous antioxidant enzyme - on the cell adaptation response against hypoxia. The aim of this study was to  determine the MnSOD mRNA expression and levels of specific activity in blood, heart and brain of rats during induced systemic hypoxia.Methods: Twenty-five male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to systemic hypoxia in an hypoxic chamber (at 8-10% O2 for 0, 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. The mRNA relative expression of MnSOD was analyzed using Real Time RT-PCR. MnSOD specific activity was determined using xanthine oxidase inhibition assay.Results: The MnSOD mRNA relative expression in rat blood and heart was decreased during early induced systemic hypoxia (day 1 and increased as hypoxia continued, whereas the mRNA expression in brain was increased since day 1 and reached its maximum level at day 7. The result of MnSOD specific activity during early systemic hypoxia was similar to the mRNA expression. Under very late hypoxic condition (day 21, MnSOD specific activity in blood, heart and brain was significantly decreased. We demonstrate a positive correlation between MnSOD mRNA expression and specific activity in these 3 tissues during day 0-14 of induced systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, mRNA expression and specific activity levels in heart strongly correlate with those in blood.Conclusion: The MnSOD expression at early and late phases of induced systemic hypoxia is distinctly regulated. The MnSOD expression in brain differs from that in blood and heart revealing that brain tissue can  possibly survive better from induced systemic hypoxia than heart and blood. The determination of MnSOD expression in blood can be used to describe its expression in heart under systemic hypoxic condition. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:27-33Keywords: MnSOD, mRNA expression, ROS, specific activity, systemic hypoxia

  20. DNA repair in B. subtilis: an inducible dimer-specific W-reactivation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, P.I.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The W-reactivation system of Bacillus subtilis can repair pyrimidine dimers in bacteriophage DNA. This inducible repair system can be activated by treatment of the bacteria with uv, alkylating agents, cross-linking agents and gamma irradiation. However, bacteriophage treated with agents other than those that cause pyrimidine dimers to be produced was not repaired by this unique form of W-reactivation. In contrast, the W-reactivation system of Escherichia coli can repair a variety of damages placed in the bacteriophage DNA

  1. Experimental pathophysiology of systemic alterations induced by Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, José María; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2009-12-01

    Moderate and severe envenomations by the snake Bothrops asper provoke systemic alterations, such as systemic bleeding, coagulopathy, hypovolemia, hemodynamic instability and shock, and acute renal failure. Systemic hemorrhage is a typical finding of these envenomations, and is primarily caused by the action of P-III snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). This venom also contains a thrombin-like serine proteinase and a prothrombin-activating P-III SVMP, both of which cause defibrin(ogen)ation. Thrombocytopenia, predominantly induced by a C-type lectin-like protein, and platelet hypoaggregation, caused by the two defibrin(ogen)ating enzymes, also contribute to hemostatic disturbances, which potentiate the systemic bleeding induced by hemorrhagic SVMPs. Cardiovascular disturbances leading to shock are due to the combined effects of hemorrhagic toxins, other venom components that increase vascular permeability, the action of hypotensive agents in the venom and of endogenous mediators, and the potential cardiotoxic effect of some toxins. Renal alterations are likely to be caused by direct cytotoxicity of venom components in the kidney, and by renal ischemia resultant from hypovolemia and hypoperfusion. Lethality induced by B. asper venom is the consequence of several combined effects among which the action of P-III SVMPs is especially relevant.

  2. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-optoelectromechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Koerber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    The continuous development of laser systems toward more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices. These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, micro-optoelectromechanical systems, such as a digital micromirror device (DMD), are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources, both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW)-lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructive device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects, such as persistent dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  3. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Körber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The continuous development of laser systems towards more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD). These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, also micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) like a digital micromirror device (DMD) are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructed device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects like persisting dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  4. Virgin coconut oil supplementation ameliorates cyclophosphamide-induced systemic toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, S S; Manalil, J J; Ramavarma, S K; Suseela, I M; Thekkepatt, A; Raghavamenon, A C

    2016-02-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is an unrefined kernal oil, prepared from Cocos nucifera L., having substantial nutritional and medicinal value. Experimental studies have suggested its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulatory and hypolipidemic effects. The present study assesses its effect on formalin-induced chronic inflammation and cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced systemic toxicity in murine models. Oral administration of VCO effectively reduced formalin-induced paw oedema in mice with more or less similar efficacy as that of diclofenac. The CTX-induced hike in blood urea, creatinine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and liver marker enzymes in mice was marginally decreased by VCO (8 g/kg body weight) ingestion orally. The liver and kidney catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, together with cellular glutathione and TBARS levels, were found to be improved in these animals. Overall the study reveals the protective efficacy of VCO against secondary toxicity induced by CTX possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Systemic resistance to gray mold induced in tomato by benzothiadiazole and Trichoderma harzianum T39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Yael Meller; Mehari, Zeraye Haile; Rav-David, Dalia; Elad, Yigal

    2014-02-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is an important disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). This study examined defense-related gene expression involved in the resistance to B. cinerea that is induced in tomato plants by benzothiadiazole and Trichoderma harzianum T39 soil drench. In whole plants, transcriptional changes related to salicylic acid and ethylene were induced by the application of a 0.01% benzothiadiazole solution, whereas changes related to jasmonic acid were induced by the application of a 0.4% T39 suspension. On detached leaves, soil treatment by T39 led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea infection that was proportional to the concentration of the T39 suspension. By 5 days after pathogen inoculation, the plants that had received the 0.04% T39 drench exhibited 62% less severe disease than the untreated plants. The 0.4% T39 drench led to an 84% reduction in disease severity. Observations of B. cinerea infection in leaves harvested from plants grown in the treated soils revealed that drenching with a T39 suspension induces systemic resistance against B. cinerea and primes salicylic acid- and ethylene-related gene expression in a manner proportional to the concentration of the biocontrol agent. Benzothiadiazole treatment induced resistance to gray mold independently of salicylic acid and led to strong priming of two genes known to be involved in defense against B. cinerea, Pti5 and PI2.

  6. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  8. Generation of a Drug-inducible Reporter System to Study Cell Reprogramming in Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sergio; Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Montserrat, Nuria; Multon, Marie-Christine; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Spanakis, Emmanuel; Batchelder, Erika M.; Orsini, Cécile; Deleuze, Jean-François; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells is achieved by the expression of defined transcription factors. In the last few years, reprogramming strategies on the basis of doxycycline-inducible lentiviruses in mouse cells became highly powerful for screening purposes when the expression of a GFP gene, driven by the reactivation of endogenous stem cell specific promoters, was used as a reprogramming reporter signal. However, similar reporter systems in human cells have not been generated. Here, we describe the derivation of drug-inducible human fibroblast-like cell lines that express different subsets of reprogramming factors containing a GFP gene under the expression of the endogenous OCT4 promoter. These cell lines can be used to screen functional substitutes for reprogramming factors or modifiers of reprogramming efficiency. As a proof of principle of this system, we performed a screening of a library of pluripotent-enriched microRNAs and identified hsa-miR-519a as a novel inducer of reprogramming efficiency. PMID:23019325

  9. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute resistance exercise induces antinociception by activation of the endocannabinoid system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; Silva, José Felippe Pinho da; Aguiar, Daniele; Paula, Ana Maria de; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength, and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors, and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase in endocannabinoid plasma levels. The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception.

  11. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla contribute to neurogenic hypertension induced by systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to systemic inflammation, neuroinflammation in the brain, which enhances sympathetic drive, plays a significant role in cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM that augments sympathetic outflow to blood vessels is involved in neural mechanism of hypertension. We investigated whether neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in RVLM contribute to hypertension following chronic systemic inflammation. Methods In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, systemic inflammation was induced by infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the peritoneal cavity via an osmotic minipump. Systemic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured under conscious conditions by the non-invasive tail-cuff method. The level of the inflammatory markers in plasma or RVLM was analyzed by ELISA. Protein expression was evaluated by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. Tissue level of superoxide anion (O2·- in RVLM was determined using the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe dihydroethidium. Pharmacological agents were delivered either via infusion into the cisterna magna with an osmotic minipump or microinjection bilaterally into RVLM. Results Intraperitoneal infusion of LPS (1.2 mg/kg/day for 14 days promoted sustained hypertension and induced a significant increase in plasma level of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, or interleukin-1β (IL-1β. This LPS-induced systemic inflammation was accompanied by activation of microglia, augmentation of IL-1β, IL-6, or TNF-α protein expression, and O2·- production in RVLM, all of which were blunted by intracisternal infusion of a cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, NS398; an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline; or a cytokine synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline. Neuroinflammation in RVLM was also associated with a COX-2-dependent downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and an

  12. Methamphetamine-induced changes in the mice hippocampal neuropeptide Y system: implications for memory impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, J; Baptista, S; Olesen, MV

    2012-01-01

    , being involved in learning and memory processing. It has been demonstrated that METH induces significant alteration in mice striatal NPY, Y(1) and Y(2) receptor mRNA levels. However, the impact of this drug on the hippocampal NPY system and its consequences remain unknown. Thus, in this study, we...... investigated the effect of METH intoxication on mouse hippocampal NPY levels, NPY receptors function, and memory performance. Results show that METH increased NPY, Y(2) and Y(5) receptor mRNA levels, as well as total NPY binding accounted by opposite up- and down-regulation of Y(2) and Y(1) functional binding......, respectively. Moreover, METH-induced impairment in memory performance and AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway were both prevented by the Y(2) receptor antagonist, BIIE0246. These findings demonstrate that METH interferes with the hippocampal NPY system, which seems to be associated with memory failure...

  13. The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate antiporter, system x (c) (-) : cystine supplier and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marcus; Sato, Hideyo

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate exchange system, system x (c) (-) , transports one molecule of cystine, the oxidized form of cysteine, into cells and thereby releases one molecule of glutamate into the extracellular space. It consists of two protein components, the 4F2 heavy chain, necessary for membrane location of the heterodimer, and the xCT protein, responsible for transport activity. Previously, system x (c) (-) has been regarded to be a mere supplier of cysteine to cells for the synthesis of proteins and the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In that sense, oxygen, electrophilic agents, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide trigger xCT expression to accommodate with increased oxidative stress by stimulating GSH biosynthesis. However, emerging evidence established that system x (c) (-) may act on its own as a GSH-independent redox system by sustaining a redox cycle over the plasma membrane. Hallmarks of this cycle are cystine uptake, intracellular reduction to cysteine and secretion of the surplus of cysteine into the extracellular space. Consequently, increased levels of extracellular cysteine provide a reducing microenvironment required for proper cell signaling and communication, e.g. as already shown for the mechanism of T cell activation. By contrast, the enhanced release of glutamate in exchange with cystine may trigger neurodegeneration due to glutamate-induced cytotoxic processes. This review aims to provide a comprehensive picture from the early days of system x (c) (-) research up to now.

  14. Current-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in two-dimensional electron systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, X. L.

    2006-01-01

    Electric current-induced magnetoresistance oscillations recently discovered in two-dimensional electron systems are analyzed using a microscopic scheme for nonlinear magnetotransport direct controlled by the current. The magnetoresistance oscillations are shown to result from drift-motion assisted electron scatterings between Landau levels. The theoretical predictions not only reproduce all the main features observed in the experiments but also disclose other details of the phenomenon.

  15. Apparatus and Method for Elimination of Polarization-Induced Fading in Fiber-optic Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Parker, Jr., Allen R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method of eliminating polarization-induced fading in interferometric fiber-optic sensor system having a wavelength-swept laser optical signal. The interferometric return signal from the sensor arms are combined and provided to a multi-optical path detector assembly and ultimately to a data acquisition and processing unit by way of a switch that is time synchronized with the laser scan sweep cycle.

  16. Construction and application of an inducible system for homogenous expression levels in bulk cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu

    Full Text Available Stringently controlled conditional expressing systems are crucial for the functional characterization of genes. Currently, screening of multiple clones to identify the tightly controlled ones is necessary but time-consuming. Here, we describe a system fusing Tet (tetracycline-inducible elements, BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome and Gateway technology together to allow tight control of gene expression in BAC-transfected eukaryotic bulk cell cultures. Recombinase cloning into the shuttle vector and the BAC facilitates vector construction. An EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein allows FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting and the BAC technology ensures tight control of gene expression that is independent of the integrating site. In the current first application, our gene of interest encodes a beta-catenin-ERalpha fusion protein. Tested by luciferase assay and western blotting, in HTB56 lung cancer cells the final BAC E11-IGR-beta-catenin-ERalpha vector demonstrated sensitive inducibility by Tet or Dox (doxycycline in a dose-dependent manner with low background, and the EGFP was an effective selection marker by FACS in bulk culture HTB56 and myeloblastic 32D cells. This is a highly efficient tool for the rapid generation of stringently controlled Tet-inducible systems in cell lines.

  17. Application of an inducible system to engineer unmarked conditional mutants of essential genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tomida, Junko; Tokuda, Hajime; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2010-09-01

    The Phi CTX-based integration vector pYM101 harboring a tightly controlled modified phage T7 early gene promoter/LacI(q) repressor (T7/LacI) system was constructed for the generation of unmarked conditional mutants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Promoter activity of the T7/LacI system was demonstrated to be dependent on the presence of the inducer isopropyl -beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), as evaluated by measuring beta-galactosidase activity. In the absence of the inducer, the promoter was silent as its activity was lower than those of a promoter-less lacZ control. Unmarked conditional mutants of four predicted essential genes (lolCDE (PA2988-86), lpxC (PA4406), rho (PA5239), and def (PA0019)) were successfully constructed using this recombination system. In the absence of IPTG, the growth of all mutants was repressed; however, the addition of either 0.1 or 1mM IPTG restored growth rates to levels nearly identical to wild-type cells. It was therefore demonstrated that the inducible integration vector pYM101 is suitable for the creation of unmarked conditional mutants of P. aeruginosa, and is particularly useful for examining the function of essential genes. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of the bacterial mismatch repair system in SOS-induced mutagenesis: a theoretical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.; Kapralov, M.I.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Sweilam, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study is performed of the possible role of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system in the ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis of Escherichia coli bacterial cells. For this purpose, a mathematical model of the bacterial mismatch repair system is developed. Within this model, the key pathways of this type of repair are simulated on the basis of modern experimental data related to its mechanisms. Here we have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Using our calculations, we have tested the hypothesis that the bacterial mismatch repair system is responsible for the removal of the nucleotides misincorporated by DNA polymerase V (the UmuD' 2 C complex) during ultraviolet-induced SOS response. For the theoretical analysis of the mutation frequency, we have combined the proposed mathematical approach with the model of SOS-induced mutagenesis in the E.coli bacterial cell developed earlier. Our calculations support the hypothesis that methyl-directed mismatch repair influences the mutagenic effect of ultraviolet radiation

  19. The endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago R L; Silva, José Felipe P; Aguiar, Daniele C; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader S; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor D; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea C

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced antinociception is widely described in the literature, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are poorly understood. Systemic (s.c.) and central (i.t., i.c.v.) pretreatment with CB₁ and CB₂ cannabinoid receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630) blocked the antinociception induced by an aerobic exercise (AE) protocol in both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests. Western blot analysis revealed an increase and activation of CB₁ receptors in the rat brain, and immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increase of activation and expression of CB₁ receptors in neurons of the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) after exercise. Additionally, pretreatment (s.c., i.t. and i.c.v.) with endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors (MAFP and JZL184) and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor (VDM11) prolonged and intensified this antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that exercise could activate the endocannabinoid system, producing antinociception. Supporting this hypothesis, liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry measurements demonstrated that plasma levels of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and of anandamide-related mediators (palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide) were increased after AE. Therefore, these results suggest that the endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception at peripheral and central levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Endogenous interleukin (IL)-17A promotes pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity and lupus nephritis induced by pristane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, S A; Odobasic, D; Khouri, M B; Steinmetz, O M; Yang, Y; Holdsworth, S R; Kitching, A R

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is increased both in serum and in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis, but direct evidence of pathogenicity is less well established. Administration of pristane to genetically intact mice results in the production of autoantibodies and proliferative glomerulonephritis, resembling human lupus nephritis. These studies sought to define the role of IL-17A in experimental lupus induced by pristane administration. Pristane was administered to wild-type (WT) and IL-17A(-/-) mice. Local and systemic immune responses were assessed after 6 days and 8 weeks, and autoimmunity, glomerular inflammation and renal injury were measured at 7 months. IL-17A production increased significantly 6 days after pristane injection, with innate immune cells, neutrophils (Ly6G(+)) and macrophages (F4/80(+)) being the predominant source of IL-17A. After 8 weeks, while systemic IL-17A was still readily detected in WT mice, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were diminished in the absence of endogenous IL-17A. Seven months after pristane treatment humoral autoimmunity was diminished in the absence of IL-17A, with decreased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Renal inflammation and injury was less in the absence of IL-17A. Compared to WT mice, glomerular IgG, complement deposition, glomerular CD4(+) T cells and intrarenal expression of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated proinflammatory mediators were decreased in IL-17A(-/-) mice. WT mice developed progressive proteinuria, but functional and histological renal injury was attenuated in the absence of IL-17A. Therefore, IL-17A is required for the full development of autoimmunity and lupus nephritis in experimental SLE, and early in the development of autoimmunity, innate immune cells produce IL-17A. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factor signalling mechanisms in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, A; O'Connor, J J

    2013-08-01

    In the CNS, neurones are highly sensitive to the availability of oxygen. In conditions where oxygen availability is decreased, neuronal function can be altered, leading to injury and cell death. Hypoxia has been implicated in a number of central nervous system pathologies including stroke, head trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Cellular responses to oxygen deprivation are complex and result in activation of short- and long-term mechanisms to conserve energy and protect cells. Failure of synaptic transmission can be observed within minutes following this hypoxia. The acute effects of hypoxia on synaptic transmission are primarily mediated by altering ion fluxes across membranes, pre-synaptic effects of adenosine and other actions at glutamatergic receptors. A more long-term feature of the response of neurones to hypoxia is the activation of transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor. The activation of hypoxia-inducible factor is governed by a family of dioxygenases called hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl 4 hydroxylases (PHDs). Under hypoxic conditions, PHD activity is inhibited, thereby allowing hypoxia-inducible factor to accumulate and translocate to the nucleus, where it binds to the hypoxia-responsive element sequences of target gene promoters. Inhibition of PHD activity stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor and other proteins thus acting as a neuroprotective agent. This review will focus on the response of neuronal cells to hypoxia-inducible factor and its targets, including the prolyl hydroxylases. We also present evidence for acute effects of PHD inhibition on synaptic transmission and plasticity in the hippocampus. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  3. Metastable decoherence-free subspaces and electromagnetically induced transparency in interacting many-body systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Yanli; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a generic interacting many-body system under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). This problem is of current relevance due to its connection to nonlinear optical media realized by Rydberg atoms. In an interacting system the structure...... of the dynamics and the approach to the stationary state becomes far more complex than in the case of conventional EIT. In particular, we discuss the emergence of a metastable decoherence-free subspace, whose dimension for a single Rydberg excitation grows linearly in the number of atoms. On approach...

  4. [Successful treatment of surgically induced necrotizing sclerokeratitis (SINS) with systemic immunosuppresive agents and amniotic membrane grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Coma, M; Franco-Benito, M; García-Ruiz-de-Morales, J M; Alonso-Orcajo, N; Del Barrio-Manso, I

    2009-11-01

    We report the case of a 74-year-old female who developed a necrotizing sclerokeratitis affecting her left eye after uncomplicated cataract surgery. She had no previous history of systemic autoimmune disease. Histopathology of the lesion revealed necrotic granulomatosis with an increased number of plasma cells. Surgically induced necrotizing sclerokeratitis (SINS) is a serious entity which requires prompt and aggressive therapy to prevent its potential devastating ocular consequences. Conjunctival resection and amniotic membrane grafting may be necessary to temporarily interrupt local immunologic events in severe cases. However, associated systemic immunomodulatory therapy seems to be mandatory (Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol 2009; 84: 577-580).

  5. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Nan; Cao, Ming-Ya; Dong, Fei-Fan; Jiang, Ya-Ming; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Although current antiviral strategies can inhibit baculovirus infection and decrease viral DNA replication to a certain extent, novel tools are required for specific and accurate elimination of baculovirus genomes from infected insects. Using the newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we disrupted a viral genome in infected insect cells in vitro as a defense against viral infection. We optimized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit foreign and viral genome in insect cells. Using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) as a model, we found that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was capable of cleaving the replication key factor ie-1 in BmNPV thus effectively inhibiting virus proliferation. Furthermore, we constructed a virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, which minimized the probability of off-target effects and was rapidly activated after viral infection. This is the first report describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect antiviral research. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells provides insights to produce virus-resistant transgenic strains for future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Protection against fine particle-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Lei; Liu, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chih-Yu; Pai, Victor J; Kang, Jing X

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter, such as through air pollution, has been linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases. However, few measures have been taken to reduce the health risks associated with fine particle exposure. The identification of safe and effective methods to protect against fine particle exposure-related damage is urgently needed. We used synthetic, non-toxic, fluorescent fine particles to investigate the physical distribution of inhaled fine particles and their effects on pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice. Tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids were elevated via dietary supplementation or the fat-1 transgenic mouse model. Markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed. We discovered that fine particulate matter not only accumulates in the lungs but can also penetrate the pulmonary barrier and travel into other organs, including the brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and testis. These particles induced both pulmonary and systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We also show that elevating tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids was effective in reducing fine particle-induced inflammation, whether as a preventive method (prior to exposure) or as an intervention (after exposure). These results advance our understanding of how fine particles contribute to disease development and suggest that increasing tissue omega-3 levels may be a promising nutritional means for reducing the risk of diseases induced by particle exposure. Our findings demonstrate that elevating tissue omega-3 levels can prevent and treat fine particle-induced health problems and thereby present an immediate, practical solution for reducing the disease burden of air pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pump RIN-induced impairments in unrepeatered transmission systems using distributed Raman amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingchi; Tang, Ming; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao; Wang, Liang; Dong, Zhenhua; Bilal, Syed Muhammad; Fu, Songnian; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2015-05-04

    High spectral efficiency modulation format based unrepeatered transmission systems using distributed Raman amplifier (DRA) have attracted much attention recently. To enhance the reach and optimize system performance, careful design of DRA is required based on the analysis of various types of impairments and their balance. In this paper, we study various pump RIN induced distortions on high spectral efficiency modulation formats. The vector theory of both 1st and higher-order stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) effect using Jones-matrix formalism is presented. The pump RIN will induce three types of distortion on high spectral efficiency signals: intensity noise stemming from SRS, phase noise stemming from cross phase modulation (XPM), and polarization crosstalk stemming from cross polarization modulation (XPolM). An analytical model for the statistical property of relative phase noise (RPN) in higher order DRA without dealing with complex vector theory is derived. The impact of pump RIN induced impairments are analyzed in polarization-multiplexed (PM)-QPSK and PM-16QAM-based unrepeatered systems simulations using 1st, 2nd and 3rd-order forward pumped Raman amplifier. It is shown that at realistic RIN levels, negligible impairments will be induced to PM-QPSK signals in 1st and 2nd order DRA, while non-negligible impairments will occur in 3rd order case. PM-16QAM signals suffer more penalties compared to PM-QPSK with the same on-off gain where both 2nd and 3rd order DRA will cause non-negligible performance degradations. We also investigate the performance of digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to mitigate such impairments.

  8. Normally occurring intersexuality and testosterone induced plasticity in the copulatory system of adult leopard geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Melissa M; Putz, Oliver; Crews, David; Wade, Juli

    2005-04-01

    The copulatory neuromuscular system of lizards is highly sexually dimorphic. Adult males possess bilateral penises called hemipenes, which are independently controlled by two muscles, the retractor penis magnus (RPM) and transversus penis (TPN). These structures are not obvious in adult females. However, in adult female leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius), testosterone induces hemipene growth. We investigated whether these structures develop de novo in adulthood or are histologically present as rudimentary structures in the female leopard gecko. We also investigated the extent of sexual dimorphisms and plasticity in the associated neuromuscular components. To do this, we compared copulatory morphology (sizes of hemipenes, RPM and TPN muscle fibers, and associated motoneurons, as well as motoneuron and RPM fiber number) in adult females treated with testosterone, control females, and control males. All of the geckos possessed hemipenes, RPMs and TPNs, but these structures were indeed vestigial in control females. Testosterone induced striking increases in hemipene and copulatory muscle fiber size in females, but not to levels equivalent to control males. In parallel, males with increased levels of androgenic activity had larger hemipenes, suggesting naturally occurring steroid-induced plasticity. Copulatory motoneurons were not sexually dimorphic in size or number, and these measures did not respond to testosterone. The data demonstrate that the copulatory system of leopard geckos, in which gonadal sex is determined by egg incubation temperature, differs from that of many species (both reptilian and mammalian) with genotypic sex determination. Indeed, the system is remarkable in that adult females have normally occurring intersex characteristics and they exhibit substantial steroid-induced morphological plasticity in adulthood.

  9. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  10. Instability in time-delayed switched systems induced by fast and random switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Chen, Yuming; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a switched system comprising finitely or infinitely many subsystems described by linear time-delayed differential equations and a rule that orchestrates the system switching randomly among these subsystems, where the switching times are also randomly chosen. We first construct a counterintuitive example where even though all the time-delayed subsystems are exponentially stable, the behaviors of the randomly switched system change from stable dynamics to unstable dynamics with a decrease of the dwell time. Then by using the theories of stochastic processes and delay differential equations, we present a general result on when this fast and random switching induced instability should occur and we extend this to the case of nonlinear time-delayed switched systems as well.

  11. Mating-Induced Increase in Germline Stem Cells via the Neuroendocrine System in Female Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameku, Tomotsune; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2016-06-01

    Mating and gametogenesis are two essential components of animal reproduction. Gametogenesis must be modulated by the need for gametes, yet little is known of how mating, a process that utilizes gametes, may modulate the process of gametogenesis. Here, we report that mating stimulates female germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation in Drosophila melanogaster. Mating-induced increase in GSC number is not simply owing to the indirect effect of emission of stored eggs, but rather is stimulated by a male-derived Sex Peptide (SP) and its receptor SPR, the components of a canonical neuronal pathway that induces a post-mating behavioral switch in females. We show that ecdysteroid, the major insect steroid hormone, regulates mating-induced GSC proliferation independently of insulin signaling. Ovarian ecdysteroid level increases after mating and transmits its signal directly through the ecdysone receptor expressed in the ovarian niche to increase the number of GSCs. Impairment of ovarian ecdysteroid biosynthesis disrupts mating-induced increase in GSCs as well as egg production. Importantly, feeding of ecdysteroid rescues the decrease in GSC number caused by impairment of neuronal SP signaling. Our study illustrates how female GSC activity is coordinately regulated by the neuroendocrine system to sustain reproductive success in response to mating.

  12. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  13. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Cristóbal-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks and short-term (3 weeks effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW, OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water, OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW, or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Induced Systemic Drought Tolerance Elicited by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Mi Cho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Root colonization by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 induces systemic drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Microarray analysis was performed using the 22,800-gene Affymetrix GeneChips to identify differentially-expressed genes from plants colonized with or without P. chlororaphis O6 under drought stressed conditions or normal growth conditions. Root colonization in plants grown under regular irrigation condition increased transcript accumulation from genes associated with defense, response to reactive oxygen species, and auxin- and jasmonic acid-responsive genes, but decreased transcription factors associated with ethylene and abscisic acid signaling. The cluster of genes involved in plant disease resistance were up-regulated, but the set of drought signaling response genes were down-regulated in the P. chlororaphis O6-colonized under drought stress plants compared to those of the drought stressed plants without bacterial treatment. Transcripts of the jasmonic acid-marker genes, VSP1 and pdf-1.2, the salicylic acid regulated gene, PR-1, and the ethylene-response gene, HEL, also were up-regulated in plants colonized by P. chlororaphis O6, but differed in their responsiveness to drought stress. These data show how gene expression in plants lacking adequate water can be remarkably influenced by microbial colonization leading to plant protection, and the activation of the plant defense signal pathway induced by root colonization of P. chlororaphis O6 might be a key element for induced systemic tolerance by microbes.

  15. [Chromosomal large fragment deletion induced by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L H; Liu, Y; Niu, T

    2017-05-14

    Objective: Using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology to achieve a number of genes co-deletion on the same chromosome. Methods: CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral plasmid that could induce deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes located on mouse 11B3 chromosome was constructed via molecular clone. HEK293T cells were transfected to package lentivirus of CRISPR or Cas9 cDNA, then mouse NIH3T3 cells were infected by lentivirus and genomic DNA of these cells was extracted. The deleted fragment was amplified by PCR, TA clone, Sanger sequencing and other techniques were used to confirm the deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes. Results: The CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral plasmid, which could induce deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes, was successfully constructed. Deletion of target chromosome fragment (Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes) was verified by PCR. The deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes was affirmed by TA clone, Sanger sequencing, and the breakpoint junctions of the CRISPR-Cas9 system mediate cutting events were accurately recombined, insertion mutation did not occur between two cleavage sites at all. Conclusion: Large fragment deletion of Aloxe3-Alox12b-Alox8 cluster genes located on mouse chromosome 11B3 was successfully induced by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system.

  16. Protective effect of thymoquinone against lead-induced antioxidant defense system alteration in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Aymen

    2017-09-01

    Alteration of the antioxidant system may be related to lead (Pb) hepatotoxicity. This study was carried out to investigate the possible beneficial effect of thymoquinone (TQ), the major active ingredient of volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds, against Pb-induced liver antioxidant defense system impairment. Adult male rats were randomized into four groups: control group received no treatment, Pb group was exposed to 2000 ppm of Pb acetate in drinking water, Pb-TQ group was cotreated with Pb plus TQ (5 mg/kg/day, per os) and TQ group receiving only TQ. All treatments were applied for five weeks. TQ alone did not induce any significant changes in the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status. By contrast, Pb exposure significantly decreased not only reduced glutathione level, but also superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities in the liver tissue. Interestingly, when coadministrated with Pb, TQ significantly improved the affected antioxidant parameters. In conclusion, our results indicate a protective effect of TQ against Pb-induced liver antioxidant capacity impairment and suggest that this component might be a clinically promising alternative in Pb hepatotoxicity.

  17. Investigation of flow-induced vibration for energy harvesting using a model soap-film system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenchao; Stremler, Mark; Virginia Tech Team

    2017-11-01

    One way to extract energy from geophysical flows is to take advantage of flow-induced vibration (FIV) caused by vortices being shed from a bluff body. Wake-induced vibration of the downstream cylinder in a tandem pair is a promising design for a FIV energy harvesting system, especially suitable for low Reynolds number flows. For this design, the upstream cylinder is fixed in place, while the downstream cylinder is free to oscillate like a pendulum that is driven by interactions with the flow, including the wake of the upstream cylinder. We use a flowing soap film system, with behavior that resembles two-dimensional hydrodynamics, to experimentally investigate the wake interaction between a stationary upstream circular disk and a free downstream circular disk, which acts as a swinging pendulum. The wake flow generates thickness variations in the thin soap film, allowing direct observation of wake patterns through visualization of interference fringes. With the ability to tie together the wake structure and the object motion, we investigate the relationship between energy generation and flow structure in the simplified model energy harvesting system for Re =150. The research results find the optimal efficiency of the energy harvesting system by a parametric study.

  18. Mixed Mode Oscillations and Synchronous Activity in Noise Induced Modified Morris-Lecar Neural System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Mondal, Argha; Teka, Wondimu W.

    The modified three-dimensional (3D) Morris-Lecar (M-L) model is very useful to understand the spiking activities of neurons. The present article addresses the random dynamical behavior of a modified M-L model driven by a white Gaussian noise with mean zero and unit spectral density. The applied stimulus can be expressed as a random term. Such random perturbations are represented by a white Gaussian noise current added through the electrical potential of membrane of the excitatory principal cells. The properties of the stochastic system (perturbed one) and noise induced mixed mode oscillation are analyzed. The Lyapunov spectrum is computed to present the nature of the system dynamics. The noise intensity is varied while keeping fixed the predominant parameters of the model in their ranges and also observed the changes in the dynamical behavior of the system. The dynamical synchronization is studied in the coupled M-L systems interconnected by excitatory and inhibitory neurons with noisy electrical coupling and verified with similarity functions. This result suggests the potential benefits of noise and noise induced oscillations which have been observed in real neurons and how that affects the dynamics of the neural model as well as the coupled systems. The analysis reports that the modified M-L system which has the limit cycle behavior can show a type of phase locking behavior which follows either period adding (i.e. 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1) sequences or Farey sequences. For the coupled neural systems, complete synchronization is shown for sufficient noisy coupling strength.

  19. The importance of systemic response in the pathobiology of blast-induced neurotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibolja eCernak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body, parallel blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure-increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as 1 direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and 2 via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body’s fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.

  20. Countermeasures Assessment of Liquefaction-Induced Lateral Deformation in a Slope Ground System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Forcellini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction-induced lateral spreading may result in significant damage and disruption of functionality for structures and Slope Ground System. In this regard, finite-element simulations are increasingly providing a versatile environment in order to assess economical and effective countermeasures. Several systematic bidimensional FEM computations have been conducted to evaluate mitigation strategies under the action of an applied earthquake excitation. The presented study highlights the potential of computations in providing insights for analysis of liquefaction-induced lateral deformations. In the analysis, some specific assumptions are introduced and verified such as a nine-node quadrilateral elements, massive columns of soil with periodic boundary conditions, and a Lysmer-Kuhlemeyer dashpot used to model the finite rigidity of the underlying elastic medium. Moreover, the study aims to systematically explore the effectiveness of densification as a countermeasure and then evaluate the best extension comparing two scenarios.

  1. The pathway of estradiol-induced apoptosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastin, Maryam; Hatef, Mohammad Reza; Tabasi, Nafisseh; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2012-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with unknown etiology. The pathologic role of sex hormones and apoptosis in SLE has often been discussed. We studied the effects of estradiol in the pathway of induced apoptosis in Iranian SLE patients. T lymphocytes from 35 SLE patients and 20 age-matched controls were isolated and cultured in the presence of 10(-8) M 17-β estradiol. The expression levels of Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), Bcl-2, caspase-8, and caspase-9 mRNAs were determined semiquantitatively in comparison to the expression level of beta actin RNA. Estradiol exposure did not have any significant effects on the expression levels of Fas, Bcl-2, and caspase-9 in SLE patients and controls. However, the expression levels of FasL and caspase-8 were significantly increased in SLE patients, but not in controls. This suggests the probable involvement of extrinsic apoptosis pathway in estradiol-induced apoptosis in SLE.

  2. Photon- and pion-induced reactions in the few body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    The study of the interplay of the degrees of freedom of the many nuclear system and the internal degrees of freedom of its constituents is reviewed. First nucleon-nucleon interaction mechanisms are recalled in relation to the interaction range. It appears that pion and photon induced reactions should provide two complementary ways to disentangle these various mechanisms. Most of pion and photon induced reactions, performed until now, can be understood in terms of nucleons, pions and deltas. But after a short description of the method of analysis of the reactions it is shown that this agreement is achieved at the price of the adjustment of two parameters (the πNN form factor and the rho-nucleon coupling contant) which may simulate more subtle short range effects. Then the relevance of the analysis of the same reactions in terms of quark degrees of freedom is discussed briefly

  3. Involvement of opioid system in cognitive deficits induced by ∆⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Manome, Naomi; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Oishi, Ryozo; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2012-02-01

    Cannabis is a widely used illicit substance. ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of cannabis, is known to induce cognitive deficits that closely resemble the impairment observed in schizophrenic patients. We previously reported that THC (6 mg/kg) impairs spatial memory in the eight-arm radial maze, and that this memory disturbance was reversed by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg), suggesting that the effect of THC is mediated through cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. The present study was designed to examine the possible involvement of opioid receptors in the THC-induced impairment of spatial memory. The effects of treatment with the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.3 and 1 mg/kg), the μ-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine (0.3 and 1 mg/kg), the δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole (1 and 3 mg/kg), and the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg) on the impairment of spatial memory induced by THC were evaluated using the eight-arm radial maze. The nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, the μ-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine, and the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine, but not the δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole, attenuated THC-induced cognitive deficits, suggesting an involvement of μ- and κ-opioid receptors in this behavioral response. These results demonstrate that the endogenous opioid system is involved in the regulation of the acute short-term and working memory deficits induced by cannabis.

  4. Antidepressant effects of insulin in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice: Modulation of brain serotonin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-04-22

    Diabetes is a persistent metabolic disorder, which often leads to depression as a result of the impaired neurotransmitter function. Insulin is believed to have antidepressant effects in depression associated with diabetes; however, the mechanism underlying the postulated effect is poorly understood. In the present study, it is hypothesized that insulin mediates an antidepressant effect in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in mice through modulation of the serotonin system in the brain. Therefore, the current study investigated the antidepressant effect of insulin in STZ induced diabetes in mice and insulin mediated modulation in the brain serotonin system. In addition, the possible pathways that lead to altered serotonin levels as a result of insulin administration were examined. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice of either sex were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ. After one week, diabetic mice received a single dose of either insulin or saline or escitalopram for 14days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the behavioral despair effects using forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), followed by biochemical estimations of serotonin concentrations and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the whole brain content. The results demonstrated that, STZ treated diabetic mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility in FST and TST as compared to non-diabetic mice, while insulin treatment significantly reversed the effect. Biochemical assays revealed that administration of insulin attenuated STZ treated diabetes induced neurochemical alterations as indicated by elevated serotonin levels and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B activities in the brain. Collectively, the data indicate that insulin exhibits antidepressant effects in depression associated with STZ induced diabetes in mice through the elevation of the brain serotonin levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Simple Model for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Induced Seismicity Associated With Deep Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlittenhardt, Joerg; Spies, Thomas; Kopera, Juergen; Morales Aviles, Wilhelm

    2014-05-01

    In the research project MAGS (Microseismic activity of geothermal systems) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) a simple model was developed to determine seismic hazard as the probability of the exceedance of ground motion of a certain size. Such estimates of the annual frequency of exceedance of prescriptive limits of e.g. seismic intensities or ground motions are needed for the planning and licensing, but likewise for the development and operation of deep geothermal systems. For the development of the proposed model well established probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) methods for the estimation of the hazard for the case of natural seismicity were adapted to the case of induced seismicity. Important differences between induced and natural seismicity had to be considered. These include significantly smaller magnitudes, depths and source to site distances of the seismic events and, hence, different ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) that had to be incorporated to account for the seismic amplitude attenuation with distance as well as differences in the stationarity of the underlying tectonic and induced processes. Appropriate GMPE's in terms of PGV (peak ground velocity) were tested and selected from the literature. The proposed model and its application to the case of induced seismicity observed during the circulation period (operation phase of the plant) at geothermal sites in Germany will be presented. Using GMPE's for PGV has the advantage to estimate hazard in terms of velocities of ground motion, which can be linked to engineering regulations (e.g. German DIN 4150) which give prescriptive standards for the effects of vibrations on buildings and people. It is thus possible to specify the probability of exceedance of such prescriptive standard values and to decide whether they can be accepted or not. On the other hand hazard curves for induced and natural seismicity can be compared to study the impact at a site. Preliminary

  6. Controlled Gene Expression Systems for Lactic Acid Bacteria : Transferable Nisin-Inducible Expression Cassettes for Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Lactobacillus spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, Michiel; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1997-01-01

    A transferable dual-plasmid inducible gene expression system for use in lactic acid bacteria that is based on the autoregulatory properties of the antimicrobial peptide nisin produced by Lactococcus lactis was developed. Introduction of the two plasmids allowed nisin-inducible gene expression in

  7. Current reprogramming systems in regenerative medicine: from somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) paved the way for research fields including cell therapy, drug screening, disease modeling and the mechanism of embryonic development. Although iPSC technology has been improved by various delivery systems, direct transduction and small molecule regulation, low reprogramming efficiency and genomic modification steps still inhibit its clinical use. Improvements in current vectors and the exploration of novel vectors are required to balance efficiency and genomic modification for reprogramming. Herein, we set out a comprehensive analysis of current reprogramming systems for the generation of iPSCs from somatic cells. By clarifying advantages and disadvantages of the current reprogramming systems, we are striding toward an effective route to generate clinical grade iPSCs.

  8. The test system for the study on irradiation effects induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiancheng; Li Zhichang; Li Shuyuan; Wang Wenyan; Tang Min

    2004-01-01

    A test system was developed in order to study the single event effects (SEE) of the static RAM circuits and programmable peripheral interface circuits. The characteristics of the system are the good man-machine interaction, easy and visual operation. Therefore the reliable control and the data acquisition can be performed. This system is successfully applied to the investigation of SEE induced by the heavy ions produced by HI-13 tandem accelerator, such as the experimental studies of SEE for the HM1-65642 (SRAM 8K x 8 bit) and CMOS programmable peripheral interface ID82C55A. The SEE measurements for these two kinds of devices with 5 types of ions, 16 O, 35 Cl, 56 Fe, 79 Br and 127 I are carried out. (authors)

  9. Effects on cuytoskeleton system in pollen tube of pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunce; Liang Qiuxia; Li Guopin

    2008-01-01

    The damage of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen and the pollen tube of Pinus thunbergii induced by ion beam implantation were researched. The results showed that the disorganization of the micro-tubules in the pollen tube was produced by N + implantation. The abnormal states of the pollen tube in morphology were very correlative with the abnormality of the cytoskeleton system. N + implantation was responsible for morphological abnormalities in the pollen tubes. There was a distinct correlation between the damage effects and the ion implantation dose. The add of dose caused more obvious damage effects. Furthermore, the state of the cytoskeleton system in the pollen tube was influenced by the ion implantation. The impact grade depended also on the ion implantation dose. (authors)

  10. Flow-induced symmetry reduction in two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai Xiang; Li, Xiao Chun; Li, Qian Shu

    2009-03-01

    The influence of uniform flow on the pattern formation is investigated in a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system. It is found that the convective flow plays a key role on pattern modulation. Both traveling and stationary periodic patterns are obtained. At moderate flow rates, the perfect hexagon, phase-shifted hexagon and stable square, which are essentially unstable in unperturbed reaction-diffusion systems, are obtained. These patterns move downstream. If the flow rate is increased further, the stationary flow-oriented stripes develop and compete with the spots. If the flow rate exceeds some critical value, the system is convectively unstable and the stationary stripes prevail against the traveling spots. The above patterns all have the same critical wavenumber associated with Turing bifurcation, which indicates that Turing instability produces the patterns while the flow induces the symmetry reduction, i.e., from six-fold symmetry to four-fold one, and to two-fold one ultimately.

  11. The role of hypoxia-inducible factor-2 in digestive system cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Du, F; Shen, G; Zheng, F; Xu, B

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia is an all but ubiquitous phenomenon in cancers. Two known hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), HIF-1α and HIF-2α, primarily mediate the transcriptional response to hypoxia. Despite the high homology between HIF-1α and HIF-2α, emerging evidence suggests differences between both molecules in terms of transcriptional targets as well as impact on multiple physiological pathways and tumorigenesis. To date, much progress has been made toward understanding the roles of HIF-2α in digestive system cancers. Indeed, HIF-2α has been shown to regulate multiple aspects of digestive system cancers, including cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis, metabolism, metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. These findings make HIF-2α a critical regulator of this malignant phenotype. Here we summarize the function of HIF-2 during cancer development as well as its contribution to tumorigenesis in digestive system malignancies.

  12. Controlled expression of functional miR-122 with a ligand inducible expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Cathy M; Tzertzinis, George

    2010-10-20

    To study the biological function of miRNAs, and to achieve sustained or conditional gene silencing with siRNAs, systems that allow controlled expression of these small RNAs are desirable. Methods for cell delivery of siRNAs include transient transfection of synthetic siRNAs and expression of siRNAs in the form of short hairpins using constitutive RNA polymerase III promoters. Systems employing constitutive RNA polymerase II promoters have been used to express miRNAs. However, for many experimental systems these methods do not offer sufficient control over expression. We present an inducible mammalian expression system that allows for the conditional expression of short hairpin RNAs that are processed in vivo to generate miRNAs or siRNAs. Using modified nuclear receptors in a two hybrid format and a synthetic ligand, the Rheoswitch system allows rapid and reversible induction of mRNA expression. We evaluated the system's properties using miR-122 as a model miRNA. A short hairpin encoding miR-122 cloned into the expression vector was correctly processed to yield mature miRNA upon induction with ligand and the amount of miRNA produced was commensurate with the concentration of ligand. miR-122 produced in this way was capable of silencing both endogenous target genes and appropriately designed reporter genes. Stable cell lines were obtained, resulting in heritable, consistent and reversible expression of miR-122, a significant advantage over transient transfection. Based on these results, obtained with a microRNA we adapted the method to produce a desired siRNA by designing short hairpins that can be accurately and efficiently processed. We established an Inducible expression system with a miR-122 backbone that can be used for functional studies of miRNAs and their targets, in heterologous cells that do not normally express the miRNA. Additionally we demonstrate the feasibility of using the miR-122 backbone to express shRNA with a desired siRNA guide strand for

  13. Controlled expression of functional miR-122 with a ligand inducible expression system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzertzinis George

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the biological function of miRNAs, and to achieve sustained or conditional gene silencing with siRNAs, systems that allow controlled expression of these small RNAs are desirable. Methods for cell delivery of siRNAs include transient transfection of synthetic siRNAs and expression of siRNAs in the form of short hairpins using constitutive RNA polymerase III promoters. Systems employing constitutive RNA polymerase II promoters have been used to express miRNAs. However, for many experimental systems these methods do not offer sufficient control over expression. Results We present an inducible mammalian expression system that allows for the conditional expression of short hairpin RNAs that are processed in vivo to generate miRNAs or siRNAs. Using modified nuclear receptors in a two hybrid format and a synthetic ligand, the Rheoswitch system allows rapid and reversible induction of mRNA expression. We evaluated the system's properties using miR-122 as a model miRNA. A short hairpin encoding miR-122 cloned into the expression vector was correctly processed to yield mature miRNA upon induction with ligand and the amount of miRNA produced was commensurate with the concentration of ligand. miR-122 produced in this way was capable of silencing both endogenous target genes and appropriately designed reporter genes. Stable cell lines were obtained, resulting in heritable, consistent and reversible expression of miR-122, a significant advantage over transient transfection. Based on these results, obtained with a microRNA we adapted the method to produce a desired siRNA by designing short hairpins that can be accurately and efficiently processed. Conclusion We established an Inducible expression system with a miR-122 backbone that can be used for functional studies of miRNAs and their targets, in heterologous cells that do not normally express the miRNA. Additionally we demonstrate the feasibility of using the miR-122 backbone to

  14. Proteomic analysis of beryllium-induced genotoxicity in an Escherichia coli mutant model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Wang, Zaolin; Sauer, Nancy N; Marrone, Babetta L

    2006-03-01

    Beryllium is the second lightest metal, has a high melting point and high strength-to-weight ratio, and is chemically stable. These unique chemical characteristics make beryllium metal an ideal choice as a component material for a wide variety of applications in aerospace, defense, nuclear weapons, and industry. However, inhalation of beryllium dust or fumes induces significant health effects, including chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. In this study, the mutagenicity of beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) and the comutagenicity of beryllium with a known mutagen 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) were evaluated using a forward mutant detection system developed in Escherichia coli. In this system, BeSO(4) was shown to be weakly mutagenic alone and significantly enhanced the mutagenicity of MNNG up to 3.5-fold over MNNG alone. Based on these results a proteomic study was conducted to identify the proteins regulated by BeSO(4). Using the techniques of 2-DE and oMALDI-TOF MS, we successfully identified 32 proteins being differentially regulated by beryllium and/or MNNG in the E. coli test system. This is the first study to describe the proteins regulated by beryllium in vitro, and the results suggest several potential pathways for the focus of further research into the mechanisms underlying beryllium-induced genotoxicity.

  15. Flavonoids are systemically induced by UV-B in Zea mays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossi, V.E.; Lamattina, L.; Cassia, R.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoid concentration is increased by UV-B irradiation, but it is unknown if this is a local or systemic response. Nitric oxide (NO) is a diffusible molecule involved in the UV-B response. NO regulates the expression of chalcone synthase (CHS), a key enzyme in the synthesis of flavonoids. The aim of this work was to determine if maize flavonoids are local or systemically induced by UV-B, and what is the participation of NO in this response. We have used maize seedlings where the second leaf was sprayed with H 2 O or cPTIO (a NO scavenger), and then completely covered (C), partially covered (P) or uncovered (U) before to be UV-B irradiated. The results show a 60% increase in the NO concentration of U, 42% in P and 35% in C respectively. Flavonoid concentration increased 90% in C, 70% in P and 40% in U. Flavonoid concentration was reduced when leaves were pretreated with cPTIO before the UV-B irradiation. RT-PCR shows that CHS was up-regulated by UV-B in U, P and C, but downregulated with cPTIO. We have analyzed the subcellular localization of flavonoid and NO in UV-B irradiated plants. Flavonoid localization was coincident with the NO presence in the irradiated surface of the leaves and flavonoids were detected in vesicles. These results indicate that flavonoids are systemically induced by UV-B in a NO-related mechanism. (authors)

  16. Systemic chemotherapy induces microsatellite instability in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Fernando LA; Sant Ana, Aleksandra VL; Bendit, Israel; Arias, Vitor; Costa, Luciano J; Pinhal, Aparecida A; Giglio, Auro del

    2005-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is an important part of treatment for breast cancer. We conducted the present study to evaluate whether systemic chemotherapy could produce microsatellite instability (MSI) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction of breast cancer patients. We studied 119 sequential blood samples from 30 previously untreated breast cancer patients before, during and after chemotherapy. For comparison, we also evaluated 20 women who had no relevant medical history (control group). In 27 out of 30 patients we observed MSI in at least one sample, and six patients had loss of heterozygosity. We found a significant correlation between the number of MSI events per sample and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (P < 0.0001). We also observed an inverse correlation between the percentage of cells positive for hMSH2 and the number of MSI events per sample (P = 0.00019) and use of alkylating agents (P = 0.019). We conclude that systemic chemotherapy may induce MSI and loss of heterozygosity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients receiving alkylating agents, possibly mediated by a chemotherapy-induced decrease in the expression of hMSH2. These effects may be related to the generation of secondary leukaemia in some patients, and may also intensify the genetic instability of tumours and increase resistance to treatment

  17. Sensitive electrochemical measurement of hydroxyl radical generation induced by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Tsuchiya, Yui; Sakamoto, Koichi

    2014-12-15

    A sensitive electrochemical measurement system for hydroxyl radical (OH) was developed using enzyme-catalyzed signal amplification. In the presence of 2,6-xylenol as a trapping agent, glucose as a substrate, and pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH) as a catalyst, the amperometric signal of the trapping adduct 2,6-dimethylhydroquinone (DMHQ) produced by the hydroxylation of 2,6-xylenol was able to be amplified and detected sensitively. The limit of detection (signal/noise [S/N]=3) for DMHQ was 1 nM. There was no significant interference from urate and other oxidizable compounds in the reaction mixture at the applied potential of 0V versus Ag/AgCl. This method was employed to observe the OH generation induced by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (XO) system. The reaction rates of the DMHQ production induced from the xanthine-XO system in the presence and absence of various Fe(III) complexes and proteins were compared. Those with a free coordination site on the Fe atom effectively enhanced the OH generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Systemic chemotherapy induces microsatellite instability in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fernando L A; Sant Ana, Aleksandra V L; Bendit, Israel; Arias, Vitor; Costa, Luciano J; Pinhal, Aparecida A; del Giglio, Auro

    2005-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is an important part of treatment for breast cancer. We conducted the present study to evaluate whether systemic chemotherapy could produce microsatellite instability (MSI) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction of breast cancer patients. We studied 119 sequential blood samples from 30 previously untreated breast cancer patients before, during and after chemotherapy. For comparison, we also evaluated 20 women who had no relevant medical history (control group). In 27 out of 30 patients we observed MSI in at least one sample, and six patients had loss of heterozygosity. We found a significant correlation between the number of MSI events per sample and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (P < 0.0001). We also observed an inverse correlation between the percentage of cells positive for hMSH2 and the number of MSI events per sample (P = 0.00019) and use of alkylating agents (P = 0.019). We conclude that systemic chemotherapy may induce MSI and loss of heterozygosity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients receiving alkylating agents, possibly mediated by a chemotherapy-induced decrease in the expression of hMSH2. These effects may be related to the generation of secondary leukaemia in some patients, and may also intensify the genetic instability of tumours and increase resistance to treatment.

  19. Food-grade micro-encapsulation systems that may induce satiety via delayed lipolysis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corstens, Meinou N; Berton-Carabin, Claire C; de Vries, Renko; Troost, Freddy J; Masclee, Ad A M; Schroën, Karin

    2017-07-03

    The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity requires new, effective prevention and treatment strategies. One approach to reduce energy intake is by developing novel foods with increased satiating properties, which may be accomplished by slowing down lipolysis to deliver substrates to the ileum, thereby enhancing natural gut-brain signaling pathways of satiety that are normally induced by meal intake. To develop slow release food additives, their processing in the gastrointestinal tract has to be understood; therefore, we start from a general description of the digestive system and relate that to in vitro modeling, satiety, and lipolytic mechanisms. The effects of physicochemical lipid composition, encapsulation matrix, and interfacial structure on lipolysis are emphasized. We give an overview of techniques and materials used, and discuss partitioning, which may be a key factor for encapsulation performance. Targeted release capsules that delay lipolysis form a real challenge because of the high efficiency of the digestive system; hardly any proof was found that intact orally ingested lipids can be released in the ileum and thereby induce satiety. We expect that this challenge could be tackled with structured o/w-emulsion-based systems that have some protection against lipase, e.g., by hindering bile salt adsorption and/or delaying lipase diffusion.

  20. Plant systemic induced responses mediate interactions between root parasitic nematodes and aboveground herbivorous insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin eWondafrash

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Insects and nematodes are the most diverse and abundant groups of multicellular animals feeding on plants on either side of the soil-air interface. Several herbivore-induced responses are systemic, and hence can influence the preference and performance of organisms in other plant organs. Recent studies show that plants mediate interactions between belowground plant parasitic nematodes and aboveground herbivorous insects. Based on the knowledge of plant responses to pathogens, we review the emerging insights on plant systemic responses against root-feeding nematodes and shoot-feeding insects. We discuss the potential mechanisms of plant-mediated indirect interactions between both groups of organisms and point to gaps in our knowledge. Root-feeding nematodes can positively or negatively affect shoot herbivorous insects, and vice versa. The outcomes of the interactions between these spatially separated herbivore communities appear to be influenced by the feeding strategy of the nematodes and the insects, as well as by host plant susceptibility to both herbivores. The potential mechanisms for these interactions include systemic induced plant defence, interference with the translocation and dynamics of locally induced secondary metabolites, and reallocation of plant nutritional reserves. During evolution, plant parasitic nematodes as well as herbivorous insects have acquired effectors that modify plant defence responses and resource allocation patterns to their advantage. However, it is also known that plants under herbivore attack change the allocation of their resources, e.g. for compensatory growth responses, which may affect the performance of other organisms feeding on the plant. Studying the chemical and molecular basis of these interactions will reveal the molecular mechanisms that are involved. Moreover, it will lead to a better understanding of the ecological relevance of aboveground-belowground interactions, as well as support the

  1. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dexamethasone loaded nanoparticles exert protective effects against Cisplatin-induced hearing loss by systemic administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changling; Wang, Xueling; Chen, Dongye; Lin, Xin; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao

    2016-04-21

    Ototoxicity is one of the most important adverse effects of cisplatin chemotherapy. As a common treatment of acute sensorineural hearing loss, systemic administration of steroids was demonstrated ineffective against cisplatin-induced hearing loss (CIHL) in published studies. The current study aimed to evaluate the potential protective effect of dexamethasone (DEX) encapsulated in polyethyleneglycol-coated polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles (DEX-NPs) against cisplatin-induced hearing loss following systemic administration. DEX was fabricated into PEG-PLA nanoparticles using emulsion and evaporation technique as previously reported. DEX or DEX-NPs was administered intraperitoneally to guinea pigs 1h before cisplatin administration. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts were measured at four frequencies (4, 8, 16, and 24kHz) 1 day before and three days after cisplatin injection. Cochlear morphology was examined to evaluate inner ear injury induced by cisplatin exposure. A single dose of DEX-NPs 1h before cisplatin treatment resulted in a significant preservation of the functional and structural properties of the cochlea, which was equivalent to the effect of multidose (3 days) DEX injection. In contrast, no significant protective effect was observed by single dose injection of DEX. The results of histological examination of the cochleae were consistent with the functional measurements. In conclusion, a single dose DEX-NPs significantly attenuated cisplatin ototoxicity in guinea pigs after systemic administration at both histological and functional levels indicating the potential therapeutic benefits of these nanoparticles for enhancing the delivery of DEX in acute sensorineural hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microparticles from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus induce production of reactive oxygen species and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winberg, Line Kjær; Jacobsen, Søren; Nielsen, Claus H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The interaction of circulating microparticles (MPs) with immune cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is sparsely investigated. We examined the ability of MPs from SLE patients to induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  4. A review of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging: Excitation source, data acquisition system and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Cui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI is a noninvasive modality based on the differences in microwave absorption of various biological tissues. TAI has been extensively researched in recent years, and several studies have revealed that TAI possesses advantages such as high resolution, high contrast, high imaging depth and fast imaging speed. In this paper, we reviewed the development of the TAI technique, its excitation source, data acquisition system and biomedical applications. It is believed that TAI has great potential applications in biomedical research and clinical study.

  5. Cocaine and MDMA Induce Cellular and Molecular Changes in Adult Neurogenic Systems: Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the brain to generate new adult neurons is a recent discovery that challenges the old theory of an immutable adult brain. A new and fascinating field of research now focuses on this regenerative process. The two brain systems that constantly produce new adult neurons, known as the adult neurogenic systems, are the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the lateral ventricules/olfactory bulb system. Both systems are involved in memory and learning processes. Different drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and MDMA, have been shown to produce cellular and molecular changes that affect adult neurogenesis. This review summarizes the effects that these drugs have on the adult neurogenic systems. The functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is obscured by the functions of the systems that integrate adult neurons. Therefore, we explore the effects that cocaine and MDMA produce not only on adult neurogenesis, but also on the DG and olfactory bulbs. Finally, we discuss the possible role of new adult neurons in cocaine- and MDMA-induced impairments. We conclude that, although harmful drug effects are produced at multiple physiological and anatomical levels, the specific consequences of reduced hippocampus neurogenesis are unclear and require further exploration.

  6. Experimental investigation on preconditioned rate induced tipping in a thermoacoustic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, J; Subarna, S; Syamkumar, K S; Sudha, G; Akshay, S; Gopalakrishnan, E A; Surovyatkina, E; Sujith, R I

    2017-07-14

    Many systems found in nature are susceptible to tipping, where they can shift from one stable dynamical state to another. This shift in dynamics can be unfavorable in systems found in various fields ranging from ecology to finance. Hence, it is important to identify the factors that can lead to tipping in a physical system. Tipping can mainly be brought about by a change in parameter or due to the influence of external fluctuations. Further, the rate at which the parameter is varied also determines the final state that the system attains. Here, we show preconditioned rate induced tipping in experiments and in a theoretical model of a thermoacoustic system. We provide a specific initial condition (preconditioning) and vary the parameter at a rate higher than a critical rate to observe tipping. We find that the critical rate is a function of the initial condition. Our study is highly relevant because the parameters that dictate the asymptotic behavior of many physical systems are temporally dynamic.

  7. Flight-induced inhibition of the cerebral median peptidergic neurosecretory system in Locusta migratoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederen, J.H.; van Etten, E.W.; Biegstraaten, A.I.; Terlou, M.; Vullings, H.G.; Jansen, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    This study discusses the effects of a 1-hr period of flight on the peptidergic pars intercerebralis (PI)-corpus cardiacum storage part (CCS) system in male Locusta migratoria, particularly the effect on material in this system stained by a histochemical method for peptidergic neurosecretory material (NSM) or labeled by in vivo incorporation of radioactive amino acid molecules. By use of an automatic image analysis system a number of parameters of the stained or radioactively labeled substances were measured to quantify the flight-induced effects and to get information on the manner in which the neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI and their axonal endings in the CCS accommodate changing amounts of NSM. The CCS of flown locusts contained distinctly more stained and radioactively labeled substances than the CCS of unflown locusts. A tendency to similar differences was observed in the cluster of neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI. The results indicate that 1 hr flight inhibited the release of NSM by the PI-CCS system. After the onset of reduced release activity by flight, some NSM continued to be synthesized and transported from the PI to the CCS, gradually filling up and expanding the entire PI-CCS system, the NSM at the same time becoming more and more densely packed. It is concluded that the peptidergic PI-CCS system is not actively involved in the control of flight metabolism or flight behavior

  8. Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: carlos.leite@pucrs.br [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina: Ciências Médicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90035-003 (Brazil); Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Biociências, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Farmácia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Rosemberg, Denis Broock [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Ambientais, Universidade Comunitária da Região de Chapecó, Chapecó, CEP 89809-000 (Brazil); and others

    2013-11-01

    The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 μM of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE{sub 2} occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence

  9. Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira; Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes; Rosemberg, Denis Broock

    2013-01-01

    The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 μM of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE 2 . Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE 2 occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence of

  10. A lentivirus-free inducible CRISPR-Cas9 system for efficient targeting of human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Kamlesh; Grill, Sherilyn; Graniel, Jacqueline; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 is a cutting-edge tool for modifying genomes. The efficacy with which Cas9 recognizes its target has revolutionized the engineering of knockouts. However this efficacy complicates the knocking out of important genes in cultured cells. Unedited cells holding a survival advantage within an edited population can confound the knockout phenotype. Here we develop a HeLa-based system that overcomes this limitation, incorporating several attractive features. First, we use Flp-recombinase to generate clones stably integrated for Cas9 and guide RNAs, eliminating the possibility of unedited cells. Second, Cas9 can be induced uniformly in the clonal cultures using doxycycline to measure the knockout phenotype. Third, two genes can be simultaneously knocked out using this approach. Finally, by not involving lentiviruses, our method is appealing to a broad research audience. Using this methodology we generated an inducible AGO2-knockout cell line showing normal RNA interference in the absence of doxycycline. Upon induction of Cas9, the AGO2 locus was cleaved, the AGO2 protein was depleted, and RNA interference was compromised. In addition to generating inducible knockouts, our technology can be adapted to improve other applications of Cas9, including transcriptional/epigenetic modulation and visualization of cellular DNA loci. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seong Ho, E-mail: yoosh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute and Institute of Forensic Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A. [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Song, Byoung-Joon, E-mail: bj.song@nih.gov [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  12. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI

  13. HTLV-1 bZIP factor induces T-cell lymphoma and systemic inflammation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorifumi Satou

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is the causal agent of a neoplastic disease of CD4+ T cells, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, and inflammatory diseases including HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, dermatitis, and inflammatory lung diseases. ATL cells, which constitutively express CD25, resemble CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T(reg. Approximately 60% of ATL cases indeed harbor leukemic cells that express FoxP3, a key transcription factor for T(reg cells. HTLV-1 encodes an antisense transcript, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ, which is expressed in all ATL cases. In this study, we show that transgenic expression of HBZ in CD4+ T cells induced T-cell lymphomas and systemic inflammation in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. In HBZ-transgenic mice, CD4+Foxp3+ T(reg cells and effector/memory CD4+ T cells increased in vivo. As a mechanism of increased T(reg cells, HBZ expression directly induced Foxp3 gene transcription in T cells. The increased CD4+Foxp3+ T(reg cells in HBZ transgenic mice were functionally impaired while their proliferation was enhanced. HBZ could physically interact with Foxp3 and NFAT, thereby impairing the suppressive function of T(reg cells. Thus, the expression of HBZ in CD4+ T cells is a key mechanism of HTLV-1-induced neoplastic and inflammatory diseases.

  14. The use of radiolabelled milk proteins to study thermally-induced interactions in milk systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat induced complexes between milk proteins are of considerable importance in determining the heat stability and rennin clottability of milk products. Thiol-disulfide interchange reactions have been suggested as the principal reaction mechanism for complex formation. Studies to data have not adequately established the mechanism and stoichiometry of complex formation in situ in total milk system. Tracer amounts of 14 C-β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin were heated under various conditions. After clotting with rennet, radioactivity retained in the curd was counted to estimate extent of interaction of β-lactoglobulin with casein. 14 C- and 3 H-Methyl labelled proteins were used for the preparation of radiolabelled artificial casein micelles. These micelles with radiolabelled whey proteins were heated and heat-induced complexes were separated on Sephacryl S-300 eluting with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride to break all non-covalent bonds. Further separation of the protein complexes was obtained using CPG-10 or Sephacryl S-1000. The ratios of 3 H to 14 C labelled proteins in the protein complexes suggested that the stoichiometries of k-, α s2 -casein, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the heat-induced complexes varied as a function of the heat treatment

  15. Sodium nitrite induces acute central nervous system toxicity in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehler, Paul W.; Butt, Omer I. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Vascular Biology, Division of Hematology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); D' Agnillo, Felice, E-mail: felice.dagnillo@fda.hhs.gov [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Vascular Biology, Division of Hematology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Toxicological implications associated with the use of NaNO{sub 2} therapy to treat systemic cell-free Hb exposure are not well-defined. {yields} Systemic Hb exposure followed by NaNO{sub 2} infusion induces acute CNS toxicities in guinea pigs. {yields} These CNS effects were not reproduced by the infusion of cell-free Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. {yields} NaNO{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of cell-free Hb may play a causative role in the observed CNS changes. -- Abstract: Systemic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) released via hemolysis disrupts vascular homeostasis, in part, through the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) therapy can attenuate the hypertensive effects of Hb. However, the chemical reactivity of NaNO{sub 2} with Hb may enhance heme- or iron-mediated toxicities. Here, we investigate the effect of NaNO{sub 2} on the central nervous system (CNS) in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free Hb. Intravascular infusion of NaNO{sub 2}, at doses sufficient to alleviate Hb-mediated blood pressure changes, reduced the expression of occludin, but not zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) or claudin-5, in cerebral tight junctions 4 h after Hb infusion. This was accompanied by increased perivascular heme oxygenase-1 expression, neuronal iron deposition, increased astrocyte and microglial activation, and reduced expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). These CNS changes were not observed in animals treated with Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of nitrite salts to treat systemic Hb exposure may promote acute CNS toxicity.

  16. Sodium nitrite induces acute central nervous system toxicity in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, Paul W.; Butt, Omer I.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Toxicological implications associated with the use of NaNO 2 therapy to treat systemic cell-free Hb exposure are not well-defined. → Systemic Hb exposure followed by NaNO 2 infusion induces acute CNS toxicities in guinea pigs. → These CNS effects were not reproduced by the infusion of cell-free Hb or NaNO 2 alone. → NaNO 2 -mediated oxidation of cell-free Hb may play a causative role in the observed CNS changes. -- Abstract: Systemic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) released via hemolysis disrupts vascular homeostasis, in part, through the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) therapy can attenuate the hypertensive effects of Hb. However, the chemical reactivity of NaNO 2 with Hb may enhance heme- or iron-mediated toxicities. Here, we investigate the effect of NaNO 2 on the central nervous system (CNS) in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free Hb. Intravascular infusion of NaNO 2 , at doses sufficient to alleviate Hb-mediated blood pressure changes, reduced the expression of occludin, but not zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) or claudin-5, in cerebral tight junctions 4 h after Hb infusion. This was accompanied by increased perivascular heme oxygenase-1 expression, neuronal iron deposition, increased astrocyte and microglial activation, and reduced expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). These CNS changes were not observed in animals treated with Hb or NaNO 2 alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of nitrite salts to treat systemic Hb exposure may promote acute CNS toxicity.

  17. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of the Nigrostriatal Dopamine System in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Hou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies indicate that physical activity and exercise may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD, and clinical observations suggest that physical exercise can reduce the motor symptoms in PD patients. In experimental animals, a profound observation is that exercise of appropriate timing, duration, and intensity can reduce toxin-induced lesion of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA system in animal PD models, although negative results have also been reported, potentially due to inappropriate timing and intensity of the exercise regimen. Exercise may also minimize DA denervation-induced medium spiny neuron (MSN dendritic atrophy and other abnormalities such as enlarged corticostriatal synapse and abnormal MSN excitability and spiking activity. Taken together, epidemiological studies, clinical observations, and animal research indicate that appropriately dosed physical activity and exercise may not only reduce the risk of developing PD in vulnerable populations but also benefit PD patients by potentially protecting the residual DA neurons or directly restoring the dysfunctional cortico-basal ganglia motor control circuit, and these benefits may be mediated by exercise-triggered production of endogenous neuroprotective molecules such as neurotrophic factors. Thus, exercise is a universally available, side effect-free medicine that should be prescribed to vulnerable populations as a preventive measure and to PD patients as a component of treatment. Future research needs to establish standardized exercise protocols that can reliably induce DA neuron protection, enabling the delineation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that in turn can maximize exercise-induced neuroprotection and neurorestoration in animal PD models and eventually in PD patients.

  18. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  19. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [ 3 H]glucose and 2-deoxy[ 14 C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats

  20. Genetic characterization of the inducible SOS-like system of Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, P.E.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    The SOS-like system of Bacillus subtilis consists of several coordinately induced phenomena which are expressed after cellular insult such as DNA damage of inhibition of DNA replication. Mutagenesis of the bacterial chromosomes and the development of maintenance of competence also appear to be involved in the SOS-like response in this bacterium. The genetic characterization of the SOS-like system has involved an analysis of (i) the effects of various DNA repair mutations on the expression of inducible phenomena and (ii) the tsi-23 mutation, which renders host strains thermally inducible for each of the SOS-like functions. Bacterial filamentation was unaffected by any of the DNA repair mutations studied. In contrast, the induction of prophage after thermal or UV pretreatment was abolished in strains carrying the recE4, recA1, recB2, or recG13 mutation. The Weigle reactivation of UV-damaged bacteriophage was also inhibited by the recE4, recA1, recB2, or recG13 mutation, whereas levels of Weigle reactivation were lower in strains which carried the uvrA42, polA5, or rec-961 mutation than in the DNA repair-proficient strain. Strains which carried the recE4 mutation were incapable of chromosomal DNA-mediated transformation, and the frequency of this event was decreased in strains carrying recA1, recB2, or tsi-23 mutation. Plasmid DNA transformation efficiency was decreased only in strains carrying the tsi-23 mutation in addition to the recE4, recA1, or recB2 mutation. The results indicate that the SOS-like system of B. subtilis is regulated at different levels by two or more gene products. In this report, the current data regarding the genetic regulation of inducible phenomena are summarized, and a model is proposed to explain the mechanism of SOS-like induction in B. subtillis. 50 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the peripheral nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, A.-M.; Bøgh, I. B.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a common acute side effect in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, especially during intensive insulin therapy. The peripheral nervous system (PNS) depends on glucose as its primary energy source during normoglycaemia and, consequently, it may be particularly...... state exceeds a certain level of severity and duration, resulting in a sensory-motor neuropathy with associated skeletal muscle atrophy. Large myelinated motor fibres appear to be particularly vulnerable. Thus, although the PNS is not an obligate glucose consumer, as is the brain, it appears to be more...... prone to IIH than the central nervous system when hypoglycaemia is not severe (blood glucose level ≤ 2 mm), possibly reflecting a preferential protection of the brain during periods of inadequate glucose availability. With a primary focus on evidence from experimental animal studies investigating...

  2. MAGIK: a Monte Carlo system for computing induced residual activation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, J.; Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1979-08-01

    The photon dose rate from the induced activity produced by sustained bombardment of materials by neutrons and charged particles may present a significant radiation hazard. To minimize this hazard, the material configuration must be so designed that the photon dose rate decays to an acceptable level soon after the source beam is turned off. MAGIK calculates the time-independent photon dose rates that result from activities produced by nucleon-nucleus and meson-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies. The system has been used both for high-energy accelerator studies and for fusion reactor studies. In the MAGIK system the lengthy photon transport calculations are carried out independent of time, and the time dependence is introduced in the final program, thereby permitting study of various operating scenarios with a minimum computing cost

  3. Design of a novel Cherenkov detectors system for machine induced background monitoring in the CMS cavern

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Giunta, Marina; Stickland, David P; Ambrose, Mitchell J; Rusack, Roger; Finkel, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    A novel detector system has been designed for an efficient online measurement of the machineinduced background in the CMS experimental cavern. The suppression of the CMS cavern background originating from pp collision products and the 25 ns bunch spacing have set the requirements for the detector design. Each detector unit will be a radiation hard, cylindrical Cherenkov radiator optically coupled to an ultra-fast UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube, providing a prompt, directionally sensitive measurement. Simulation and test beam measurements have shown the achievability of the goals that have driven the baseline design. The system will consist of 20 azimuthally distributed detectors per end, installed at a radius of r ~ 180 cm and a distance 20.6 m away from the CMS interaction region. The detector units will enable a measurement of the transverse distribution of the bunchby- bunch machine induced background flux. This will provide important feedback from the CMS on the beam conditions during the LHC machine s...

  4. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of meteorites as a probe of the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aglio, M.; De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; De Pascale, O.; Longo, S.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as a technique for gathering data relevant to Solar System geophysics. Two test cases were demonstrated: elemental analysis of chondrules in a chondrite meteorite, and space- resolved analysis of the interface between kamacite and taenite crystals in an octahedrite iron meteorite. In particular most major and minor elements (Fe, Mg, Si, Ti, Al, Cr, Mn, Ca, Fe, Ni, Co) in Sahara 98222 (chondrite) and its chondrules, as well as the profile of Ni content in Toluca (iron meteorite), were determined with the Calibration Free (CF) method. A special attention was devoted to exploring the possibilities offered by variants of the basic technique, such as the use of Fe I Boltzmann distribution as an intensity calibration method of the spectroscopic system, and the use of spatially resolved analysis.

  5. Optomechanically induced transparency with Bose–Einstein condensate in double-cavity optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Wei; Gengzang, Duo-Jie; An, Xiu-Jia; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a novel technique of generating multiple optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) of a weak probe field in hybrid optomechanical system. This system consists of a cigar-shaped Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside each high finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity. In the resolved sideband regime, the analytic solutions of the absorption and the dispersion spectrum are given. The tunneling strength of the two resonators and the coupling parameters of the each BEC in combination with the cavity field have the appearance of three distinct OMIT windows in the absorption spectrum. Furthermore, whether there is BEC in each cavity is a key factor in the number of OMIT windows determination. The technique presented may have potential applications in quantum engineering and quantum information networks. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11564034, 11105062, and 21663026) and the Scientific Research Funds of College of Electrical Engineering, Northwest University, China (Grant No. xbmuyjrc201115).

  6. Development of a pulsed laser system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, J.; Lang, T.; Huss, R.; Ernst, M.; Moalem, A.; Kolleck, C.; Kracht, D.

    2017-11-01

    A prototype of a compact light-weight passively Q-switched diode pumped Nd:YLF solid-state laser system for harsh environments has been developed. It emits 2ns pulses at a wavelength of 1053nm with a repetition rate of up to 50Hz and an energy of 1.5mJ. The beam propagation factor M2-has a value of 1.2. The total mass of the prototype electronics, consisting of an electronic board including pump diodes and thermal control to be accommodated with other electronics in a shared electronics box, and the complete solid-state laser head is 189g with further potential for mass reduction with respect to a flight model development. Applications of this laser system are amongst others laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for planetary surface exploration or short range altimetry.

  7. CLIQ – Coupling-Loss Induced Quench System for Protecting Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Ravaioli, E; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed Coupling-Loss-Induced Quench (CLIQ) protection system is a new method for initiating a fast and voluminous transition to the normal state for protecting high energy density superconducting magnets. Upon quench detection, CLIQ is triggered to generate an oscillating current in the magnet coil by means of a capacitive discharge. This in turn introduces a high coupling loss in the superconductor which provokes a quick transition to the normal state of the coil windings. The system is now implemented for the protection of a two meter long superconducting quadrupole magnet and characterized in the CERN magnet test facility. Various CLIQ configurations with different current injection points are tested and the results compared to similar transients lately measured with a not optimized configuration. Test results convincingly show that the newly tested design allows for a more global quench initiation and thus a faster discharge of the magnet energy. Moreover, the performance of CLIQ for reduc...

  8. Multicomponent semiconducting polymer systems with low crystallization-induced percolation threshold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goffri, S.; Müller, C.; Stingelin-Stutzmann, N.

    2006-01-01

    with the excellent mechanical properties of certain commodity polymers. Here we investigate bicomponent blends comprising semicrystalline regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and selected semicrystalline commodity polymers, and show that, owing to a highly favourable, crystallization-induced phase segregation......–crystalline/semiconducting–insulating multicomponent systems offer expanded flexibility for realizing high-performance semiconducting architectures at drastically reduced materials cost with improved mechanical properties and environmental stability, without the need to design all performance requirements into the active semiconducting polymer......Blends and other multicomponent systems are used in various polymer applications to meet multiple requirements that cannot be fulfilled by a single material1, 2, 3. In polymer optoelectronic devices it is often desirable to combine the semiconducting properties of the conjugated species...

  9. Heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a small-world neuronal network system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Yang, Xianqing

    2016-06-01

    A neuronal network often involves time delay caused by the finite signal propagation time in a given biological network. This time delay is not a homogenous fluctuation in a biological system. The heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a noisy small-world neuronal network system are numerically studied in this work by calculating synchronization measure and spike interval distribution. We focus on three different delay conditions: double-values delay, triple-values delay, and Gaussian-distributed delay. Our results show the following: 1) the heterogeneity in delay results in asynchronous firing in the neuronal network, and 2) maximum synchronization could be achieved through resonance given that the delay values are integer or half-integer times of each other.

  10. Hepcidin is an antibacterial, stress-inducible peptide of the biliary system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Strnad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepcidin (gene name HAMP, an IL-6-inducible acute phase peptide with antimicrobial properties, is the key negative regulator of iron metabolism. Liver is the primary source of HAMP synthesis, but it is also produced by other tissues such as kidney or heart and is found in body fluids such as urine or cerebrospinal fluid. While the role of hepcidin in biliary system is unknown, a recent study demonstrated that conditional gp130-knockout mice display diminished hepcidin levels and increased rate of biliary infections. METHODS: Expression and localization of HAMP in biliary system was analyzed by real time RT-PCR, in-situ hybridization, immunostaining and -blotting, while prohepcidin levels in human bile were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Hepcidin was detected in mouse/human gallbladder and bile duct epithelia. Biliary HAMP is stress-inducible, in that it is increased in biliary cell lines upon IL-6 stimulation and in gallbladder mucosa of patients with acute cholecystitis. Hepcidin is also present in the bile and elevated prohepcidin levels were observed in bile of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC patients with concurrent bacterial cholangitis compared to PSC subjects without bacterial infection (median values 22.3 vs. 8.9; p = 0.03. In PSC-cholangitis subjects, bile prohepcidin levels positively correlated with C-reactive protein and bilirubin levels (r = 0.48 and r = 0.71, respectively. In vitro, hepcidin enhanced the antimicrobial capacity of human bile (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin is a stress-inducible peptide of the biliary epithelia and a potential marker of biliary stress. In the bile, hepcidin may serve local functions such as protection from bacterial infections.

  11. Development and modelisation of a hydro-power conversion system based on vortex induced vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebure, David; Dellinger, Nicolas; François, Pierre; Mosé, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The Vortex Induced Vibration (VIV) phenomenon leads to mechanical issues concerning bluff bodies immerged in fluid flows and have therefore been studied by numerous authors. Moreover, an increasing demand for energy implies the development of alternative, complementary and renewable energy solutions. The main idea of EauVIV project consists in the use of VIV rather than its deletion. When rounded objects are immerged in a fluid flow, vortices are formed and shed on their downstream side, creating a pressure imbalance resulting in an oscillatory lift. A convertor modulus consists of an elastically mounted, rigid cylinder on end-springs, undergoing flow- induced motion when exposed to transverse fluid-flow. These vortices induce cyclic lift forces in opposite directions on the circular bar and cause the cylinder to vibrate up and down. An experimental prototype was developed and tested in a free-surface water channel and is already able to recover energy from free-stream velocity between 0.5 and 1 m.s -1. However, the large number of parameters (stiffness, damping coefficient, velocity of fluid flow, etc.) associated with its performances requires optimization and we choose to develop a complete tridimensionnal numerical model solution. A 3D numerical model has been developed in order to represent the real system behavior and improve it through, for example, the addition of parallel cylinders. The numerical model build up was carried out in three phases. The first phase consists in establishing a 2D model to choose the turbulence model and quantify the dependence of the oscillations amplitudes on the mesh size. The second corresponds to a 3D simulation with cylinder at rest in first time and with vertical oscillation in a second time. The third and final phase consists in a comparison between the experimental system dynamic behavior and its numerical model.

  12. Involvement of Nitric Oxide System on Anxiolytic-Like Behaviors Induced by Cholestasiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasehi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The mechanisms of hepatic encephalopathy are not fully understood. Moreover, there is no comprehensive data concerning the effects of nitric oxide (NO system on anxiolytic-like behaviors induced by bile duct ligation (BDL. Methods: Male mice weighing 25-30 g were used and anxiety-like behaviors were tested using hole-board task. Results: The data indicated that cholestasis increased the number of head-dipping but did not alter other aspects of behavior, 7 days after BDL, suggesting an anxiolytic-like response. Furthermore, the results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of L-arginine (200 and 250 mg/kg 15 min before testing induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in the normal animals, 4 and 7 days after BDL (considering that the dose of 200 mg in the normal mice is ineffective but is effective in the BDL mice. On the other hand, injection of L-NAME (35 and 45 mg/kg, i.p. 15 min before testing induced anxiogenic-like behaviors in the normal animals, 4 and 7 days after BDL (the dose of 35 mg/kg in the normal mice is ineffective but is effective in the BDL mice . Moreover, injection of ineffective doses of L-NAME (25 and 35 mg/kg, i.p. 15 min before administration of L-arginine (250 mg/kg, i.p. and 7 days after BDL, decreased anxiolytic-like behaviors, signi.cantly. Discussion: Cholestatic mice show anxiolytic-like behaviors suggesting the involvement of the nitric oxide system.

  13. Drug-induced sedation endoscopy (DISE) classification systems: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijemeni, Esuabom; D'Amone, Gabriele; Gbati, Israel

    2017-12-01

    Drug-induced sedation endoscopy (DISE) classification systems have been used to assess anatomical findings on upper airway obstruction, and decide and plan surgical treatments and act as a predictor for surgical treatment outcome for obstructive sleep apnoea management. The first objective is to identify if there is a universally accepted DISE grading and classification system for analysing DISE findings. The second objective is to identify if there is one DISE grading and classification treatment planning framework for deciding appropriate surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The third objective is to identify if there is one DISE grading and classification treatment outcome framework for determining the likelihood of success for a given OSA surgical intervention. A systematic review was performed to identify new and significantly modified DISE classification systems: concept, advantages and disadvantages. Fourteen studies proposing a new DISE classification system and three studies proposing a significantly modified DISE classification were identified. None of the studies were based on randomised control trials. DISE is an objective method for visualising upper airway obstruction. The classification and assessment of clinical findings based on DISE is highly subjective due to the increasing number of DISE classification systems. Hence, this creates a growing divergence in surgical treatment planning and treatment outcome. Further research on a universally accepted objective DISE assessment is critically needed.

  14. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Carroll, D.P.; Kasturi, S.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant's electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant's protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well

  15. Aqueous two-phase system purification for superoxide dismutase induced by menadione from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakcıoğlu, Berna; Tongul, Burcu; Tarhan, Leman

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, the partitioning behavior of menadione-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), an antioxidant enzyme that has various applications in the medical and cosmetic industries, from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been characterized on different types of aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) (poly(ethylene glycol)/polypropylene glycol (PEG/PPG)-dextran, PEG-salt and PPG-salt). PEG-salt combinations were found most optimal systems for the purification of SOD. The best partition conditions were found using the PEG-3350 24% and K 2 HPO 4 5% (w/w) with pH 7.0 at 25 °C. The partition coefficient of total SOD activity and total protein concentration observed in this system were 0.17 and 6.65, respectively, with the recovery percentage as 78.90% in the bottom phase and 13.17% in the top phase. The highest purification fold for SOD from P. chrysosporium was found as 6.04 in the bottom phase of PEG 3350%24 - K 2 HPO 4 %5 (w/w) system with pH 7.0. SOD purified from P. chrysosporium was determined to be a homodimer in its native state with a molecular weight of 60  ± 4 kDa. Consequently, simple and only one step PEG-salt ATPS system was developed for SOD purification from P. chrysosporium.

  16. Assessment of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-induced Pneumonia using Different Lung Lesion Scoring Systems: a Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Morante, B; Segalés, J; Fraile, L; Pérez de Rozas, A; Maiti, H; Coll, T; Sibila, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary aetiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP) and one of the major contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Gross lung lesions in pigs affected by EP consist of cranioventral pulmonary consolidation (CVPC), usually distributed bilaterally in the apical, intermediate, accessory and cranial parts of the diaphragmatic lobes. Several lung scoring methods are currently in place for the evaluation of CVPC. The aims of this study were (1) to review the lung lesion scoring systems used to assess pneumonia associated with M. hyopneumoniae infection, and (2) to evaluate eight of these scoring systems by applying them to the lungs of 76 pigs with experimentally-induced M. hyopneumoniae pneumonia. A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was observed and the coefficients of determination in a regression analysis were very high between each pair-wise comparison, except for a unique scoring system based on image analysis. A formula of equivalence between lung scoring methods was developed in order to compare the results obtained with these methods. The present review provides a basis for comparison (even retrospectively) of lesions evaluated using different lung scoring systems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

  18. Analysis of an innovative solar water desalination system using gravity induced vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayhan, T.; Al-Madani, H.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the theoretical analysis, design and appropriate models of a new desalination system using gravity induced vacuum. The system utilizes natural means (gravity and atmospheric pressure) to create a vacuum under which water can be rapidly evaporated at much lower temperatures with less energy than conventional techniques. This technique is developed to overcome water storage, in the areas where good solar radiation (or waste heat sources) and sea water (or waste water sources). The developed system consists of an evaporator connected to condenser by means of a vacuum tank. The vapour produced in the evaporator is driven to condenser through the vacuum tank, where it condenses and collected as a product. Vacuum equivalent to 7 kPa (abs) or less can be created depending on ambient temperature of Bahrain climatic conditions. The effect of various operating conditions, namely water levels in condensation and evaporating columns on the system performance were studied. The theoretical analysis and preliminary experimental results show that the performance of this system depends on the condensation temperature

  19. Induced Systemic Tolerance to Multiple Stresses Including Biotic and Abiotic Factors by Rhizobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Je Yoo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, global warming and drastic climate change are the greatest threat to the world. The climate change can affect plant productivity by reducing plant adaptation to diverse environments including frequent high temperature; worsen drought condition and increased pathogen transmission and infection. Plants have to survive in this condition with a variety of biotic (pathogen/pest attack and abiotic stress (salt, high/low temperature, drought. Plants can interact with beneficial microbes including plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, which help plant mitigate biotic and abiotic stress. This overview presents that rhizobacteria plays an important role in induced systemic resistance (ISR to biotic stress or induced systemic tolerance (IST to abiotic stress condition; bacterial determinants related to ISR and/or IST. In addition, we describe effects of rhizobacteria on defense/tolerance related signal pathway in plants. We also review recent information including plant resistance or tolerance against multiple stresses (bioticabiotic. We desire that this review contribute to expand understanding and knowledge on the microbial application in a constantly varying agroecosystem, and suggest beneficial microbes as one of alternative environment-friendly application to alleviate multiple stresses.

  20. FXR antagonism of NSAIDs contributes to drug-induced liver injury identified by systems pharmacology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiqiang; Cheng, Feixiong; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Chen; Deng, Xiaokang; Xu, Zhongyu; Zou, Shien; Shen, Xu; Tang, Yun; Huang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are worldwide used drugs for analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory therapeutics. However, NSAIDs often cause several serious liver injuries, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), and the molecular mechanisms of DILI have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we developed a systems pharmacology approach to explore the mechanism-of-action of NSAIDs. We found that the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) antagonism of NSAIDs is a potential molecular mechanism of DILI through systematic network analysis and in vitro assays. Specially, the quantitative real-time PCR assay reveals that indomethacin and ibuprofen regulate FXR downstream target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the western blot shows that FXR antagonism by indomethacin induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), promotes the activation of caspase9, and finally causes DILI. In summary, our systems pharmacology approach provided novel insights into molecular mechanisms of DILI for NSAIDs, which may propel the ways toward the design of novel anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapeutics. PMID:25631039

  1. FXR antagonism of NSAIDs contributes to drug-induced liver injury identified by systems pharmacology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiqiang; Cheng, Feixiong; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Chen; Deng, Xiaokang; Xu, Zhongyu; Zou, Shien; Shen, Xu; Tang, Yun; Huang, Jin

    2015-01-29

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are worldwide used drugs for analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory therapeutics. However, NSAIDs often cause several serious liver injuries, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), and the molecular mechanisms of DILI have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we developed a systems pharmacology approach to explore the mechanism-of-action of NSAIDs. We found that the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) antagonism of NSAIDs is a potential molecular mechanism of DILI through systematic network analysis and in vitro assays. Specially, the quantitative real-time PCR assay reveals that indomethacin and ibuprofen regulate FXR downstream target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the western blot shows that FXR antagonism by indomethacin induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), promotes the activation of caspase9, and finally causes DILI. In summary, our systems pharmacology approach provided novel insights into molecular mechanisms of DILI for NSAIDs, which may propel the ways toward the design of novel anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapeutics.

  2. Systemic zinc protoporphyrin administration reduces intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y; Tian, H; Xi, G; Keep, R F; Hoff, J T; Hua, Y

    2006-01-01

    Hemoglobin degradation products result in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Recent studies found that intracerebral infusion of heme oxygenase inhibitors reduces hemoglobin- and ICH-induced brain edema in rats and pigs. The present study examined whether systemic use of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a heme oxygenase inhibitor, can attenuate brain edema, behavioral deficits, and brain atrophy following ICH. All rats had intracerebral infusion of 100-microL autologous blood. ZnPP (1 nmol/hour/rat) or vehicle was given immediately or 6 hours following ICH. ZnPP was delivered intraperitoneally up to 14 days through an osmotic mini-pump. Rats were killed at day 3 and day 28 after ICH for brain edema and brain atrophy measurements, respectively. Behavioral tests were performed. We found that ZnPP attenuated brain edema in animals sacrificed 3 days after ICH (p ZnPP also reduced ICH-induced caudate atrophy (p ZnPP given immediately or 6 hours after ICH improved neurological deficits (p < 0.05). In conclusion, systemic zinc protoporphyrin treatment started at 0 or 6 hours after ICH reduced brain edema, neurological deficits, and brain atrophy after ICH. These results indicate that heme oxygenase may be a new target for ICH therapeutics.

  3. Cross-diffusion-induced subharmonic spatial resonances in a predator-prey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, G.; Lombardo, M. C.; Sammartino, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the complex dynamics originated by a cross-diffusion-induced subharmonic destabilization of the fundamental subcritical Turing mode in a predator-prey reaction-diffusion system. The model we consider consists of a two-species Lotka-Volterra system with linear diffusion and a nonlinear cross-diffusion term in the predator equation. The taxis term in the search strategy of the predator is responsible for the onset of complex dynamics. In fact, our model does not exhibit any Hopf or wave instability, and on the basis of the linear analysis one should only expect stationary patterns; nevertheless, the presence of the nonlinear cross-diffusion term is able to induce a secondary instability: due to a subharmonic spatial resonance, the stationary primary branch bifurcates to an out-of-phase oscillating solution. Noticeably, the strong resonance between the harmonic and the subharmonic is able to generate the oscillating pattern albeit the subharmonic is below criticality. We show that, as the control parameter is varied, the oscillating solution (sub T mode) can undergo a sequence of secondary instabilities, generating a transition toward chaotic dynamics. Finally, we investigate the emergence of sub T -mode solutions on two-dimensional domains: when the fundamental mode describes a square pattern, subharmonic resonance originates oscillating square patterns. In the case of subcritical Turing hexagon solutions, the internal interactions with a subharmonic mode are able to generate the so-called "twinkling-eyes" pattern.

  4. Pathogen-triggered ethylene signaling mediates systemic-induced susceptibility to herbivory in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Simon C; Whiteman, Noah K; Bahrami, Adam K; Wilczek, Amity M; Cui, Jianping; Russell, Jacob A; Cibrian-Jaramillo, Angelica; Butler, Ian A; Rana, Jignasha D; Huang, Guo-Hua; Bush, Jenifer; Ausubel, Frederick M; Pierce, Naomi E

    2013-11-01

    Multicellular eukaryotic organisms are attacked by numerous parasites from diverse phyla, often simultaneously or sequentially. An outstanding question in these interactions is how hosts integrate signals induced by the attack of different parasites. We used a model system comprised of the plant host Arabidopsis thaliana, the hemibiotrophic bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, and herbivorous larvae of the moth Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) to characterize mechanisms involved in systemic-induced susceptibility (SIS) to T. ni herbivory caused by prior infection by virulent P. syringae. We uncovered a complex multilayered induction mechanism for SIS to herbivory. In this mechanism, antiherbivore defenses that depend on signaling via (1) the jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile) and (2) other octadecanoids are suppressed by microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered salicylic acid (SA) signaling and infection-triggered ethylene signaling, respectively. SIS to herbivory is, in turn, counteracted by a combination of the bacterial JA-Ile mimic coronatine and type III virulence-associated effectors. Our results show that SIS to herbivory involves more than antagonistic signaling between SA and JA-Ile and provide insight into the unexpectedly complex mechanisms behind a seemingly simple trade-off in plant defense against multiple enemies.

  5. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-25

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis.

  6. The new pLAI (lux regulon based auto-inducible expression system for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocadello Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After many years of intensive research, it is generally assumed that no universal expression system can exist for high-level production of a given recombinant protein. Among the different expression systems, the inducible systems are the most popular for their tight regulation. However, induction is in many cases less favorable due to the high cost and/or toxicity of inducers, incompatibilities with industrial scale-up or detrimental growth conditions. Expression systems using autoinduction (or self-induction prove to be extremely versatile allowing growth and induction of recombinant proteins without the need to monitor cell density or add inducer. Unfortunately, almost all the actual auto inducible expression systems need endogenous or induced metabolic changes during the growth to trigger induction, both frequently linked to detrimental condition to cell growth. In this context, we use a simple modular approach for a cell density-based genetic regulation in order to assemble an autoinducible recombinant protein expression system in E. coli. Result The newly designed pLAI expression system places the expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli under control of the regulatory genes of the lux regulon of Vibrio fischeri's Quorum Sensing (QS system. The pLAI system allows a tight regulation of the recombinant gene allowing a negligible basal expression and expression only at high cell density. Sequence optimization of regulative genes of QS of V. fischeri for expression in E. coli upgraded the system to high level expression. Moreover, partition of regulative genes between the plasmid and the host genome and introduction of a molecular safety lock permitted tighter control of gene expression. Conclusion Coupling gene expression to cell density using cell-to-cell communication provides a promising approach for recombinant protein production. The system allows the control of expression of the target recombinant gene

  7. Contribution of the renin-angiotensin system in chronic foot-shock induced hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Hui; Dong, Tao; Liu, Bei-Bei; Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Jing-Wei; Murao, Koji; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2015-01-15

    Chronic foot shock has been demonstrated to induce hypertension. The present study was designed to explore whether the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in this process and the possible mechanisms involved in chronic-foot-shock-induced hypertension. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a two-week foot shock with or without an angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor blocker (ARB, candesartan) or an angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI, captopril). The expression of RAS components in the central nervous and circulatory systems was examined. Antioxidant levels in the plasma were monitored. Two-week foot shock significantly increased systolic blood pressure (SBP). Angiotensinogen, angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE)-1, ACE-2, angiotensin type 1a and type 1b receptors, and vasopressin (VAP) mRNA expression in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus were increased along with the concentration of renin and Ang II in the plasma; these changes were accompanied by decreased glutathione peroxidase activity and increased lipid peroxidation levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations. Both candesartan and captopril suppressed not only the increases in SBP but also the increases in VAP expression in the hypothalamus and RAS components in the central nervous system and the circulatory system. The decreases in antioxidant levels and the increases in lipid peroxidation and corticosterone levels were also partially reversed by candesartan or captopril treatment. Chronic foot shock increases expression of the main RAS components, which play an important role in the development of high blood pressure through increased VAP levels, oxidative stress levels and stress hormone levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expanding the molecular toolbox for Lactococcus lactis: construction of an inducible thioredoxin gene fusion expression system

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2011-08-09

    Abstract Background The development of the Nisin Inducible Controlled Expression (NICE) system in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris represents a cornerstone in the use of Gram-positive bacterial expression systems for biotechnological purposes. However, proteins that are subjected to such over-expression in L. lactis may suffer from improper folding, inclusion body formation and\\/or protein degradation, thereby significantly reducing the yield of soluble target protein. Although such drawbacks are not specific to L. lactis, no molecular tools have been developed to prevent or circumvent these recurrent problems of protein expression in L. lactis. Results Mimicking thioredoxin gene fusion systems available for E. coli, two nisin-inducible expression vectors were constructed to over-produce various proteins in L. lactis as thioredoxin fusion proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that our novel L. lactis fusion partner expression vectors allow high-level expression of soluble heterologous proteins Tuc2009 ORF40, Bbr_0140 and Tuc2009 BppU\\/BppL that were previously insoluble or not expressed using existing L. lactis expression vectors. Over-expressed proteins were subsequently purified by Ni-TED affinity chromatography. Intact heterologous proteins were detected by immunoblotting analyses. We also show that the thioredoxin moiety of the purified fusion protein was specifically and efficiently cleaved off by enterokinase treatment. Conclusions This study is the first description of a thioredoxin gene fusion expression system, purposely developed to circumvent problems associated with protein over-expression in L. lactis. It was shown to prevent protein insolubility and degradation, allowing sufficient production of soluble proteins for further structural and functional characterization.

  9. MultiSite Gateway-Compatible Cell Type-Specific Gene-Inducible System for Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siligato, Riccardo; Wang, Xin; Yadav, Shri Ram; Lehesranta, Satu; Ma, Guojie; Ursache, Robertas; Sevilem, Iris; Zhang, Jing; Gorte, Maartje; Prasad, Kalika; Heidstra, Renze

    2016-01-01

    A powerful method to study gene function is expression or overexpression in an inducible, cell type-specific system followed by observation of consequent phenotypic changes and visualization of linked reporters in the target tissue. Multiple inducible gene overexpression systems have been developed for plants, but very few of these combine plant selection markers, control of expression domains, access to multiple promoters and protein fusion reporters, chemical induction, and high-throughput cloning capabilities. Here, we introduce a MultiSite Gateway-compatible inducible system for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants that provides the capability to generate such constructs in a single cloning step. The system is based on the tightly controlled, estrogen-inducible XVE system. We demonstrate that the transformants generated with this system exhibit the expected cell type-specific expression, similar to what is observed with constitutively expressed native promoters. With this new system, cloning of inducible constructs is no longer limited to a few special cases but can be used as a standard approach when gene function is studied. In addition, we present a set of entry clones consisting of histochemical and fluorescent reporter variants designed for gene and promoter expression studies. PMID:26644504

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loët, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by email to obtain the files of patients with TNF-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-two cases were collected, revealing two aspects of these manifestations. Ten patients (six patients receiving infliximab, four patients receiving etanercept) only had anti-DNA antibodies and skin manifestations one could classify as 'limited skin lupus' or 'toxidermia' in a context of autoimmunity, whereas 12 patients (nine patients receiving infliximab, three patients receiving etanercept) had more complete drug-induced lupus with systemic manifestations and at least four American Congress of Rheumatology criteria. One patient had central nervous system manifestations. No patients had lupus nephritis. The signs of lupus occurred within a mean of 9 months (range 3-16 months) in patients treated with infliximab and within a mean of 4 months (range 2-5 months) in patients treated with etanercept. In all cases after diagnosis was determined, anti-TNF was stopped and specific treatment introduced in eight patients: two patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, four patients received oral steroids (15-35 mg/day), and two patients received topical steroids. Lupus manifestations abated within a few weeks (median 8 weeks, standard deviation 3-16) in all patients except one with longer-lasting evolution (6 months). At that time, cautious estimations (unpublished data from Schering Plough Inc. and Wyeth Inc.) indicated that about 7700 patients had been exposed to infliximab and 3000 to

  11. The Vulnerability of Earth Systems to Human-Induced Global Change and Strategies for Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, R. T.

    2002-12-01

    Since the IGY, there has been growing evidence that climate is changing in response to human activities. The overwhelming majority of scientific experts, whilst recognizing that scientific uncertainties exist, nonetheless believe that human-induced climate change is inevitable. Indeed, during the last few years, many parts of the world have suffered major heat waves, floods, droughts, fires and extreme weather events leading to significant economic losses and loss of life. While individual events cannot be directly linked to human-induced climate change, the frequency and magnitude of these types of events are predicted to increase in a warmer world. The question is not whether climate will change, but rather how much (magnitude), how fast (the rate of change) and where (regional patterns). It is also clear that climate change and other human-induced modifications to the environment will, in many parts of the world, adversely affect socio-economic sectors, including water resources, agriculture, forestry, fisheries and human settlements, ecological systems (particularly forests and coral reefs), and human health (particularly diseases spread by insects), with developing countries being the most vulnerable. Environmental degradation of all types (i.e., climate change, loss of biodiversity, land degradation, air and water quality) all undermine the challenge of poverty alleviation and sustainable economic growth. One of the major challenges facing humankind is to provide an equitable standard of living for this and future generations: adequate food, water and energy, safe shelter and a healthy environment (e.g., clean air and water). Unfortunately, human-induced climate change, as well as other global environmental issues such as land degradation, loss of biological diversity and stratospheric ozone depletion, threatens our ability to meet these basic human needs. The good news is, however, that the majority of experts believe that significant reductions in net

  12. Blind Multiuser Detection for Long-Code CDMA Systems with Transmission-Induced Cyclostationarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider blind channel identification and signal separation in long-code CDMA systems. First, by modeling the received signals as cyclostationary processes with modulation-induced cyclostationarity, long-code CDMA system is characterized using a time-invariant system model. Secondly, based on the time-invariant model, multistep linear prediction method is used to reduce the intersymbol interference introduced by multipath propagation, and channel estimation then follows by utilizing the nonconstant modulus precoding technique with or without the matrix-pencil approach. The channel estimation algorithm without the matrix-pencil approach relies on the Fourier transform, and requires additional constraint on the code sequences other than being nonconstant modulus. It is found that by introducing a random linear transform, the matrix-pencil approach can remove (with probability one the extra constraint on the code sequences. Thirdly, after channel estimation, equalization is carried out using a cyclic Wiener filter. Finally, since chip-level equalization is performed, the proposed approach can readily be extended to multirate cases, either with multicode or variable spreading factor. Simulation results show that compared with the approach using the Fourier transform, the matrix-pencil-based approach can significantly improve the accuracy of channel estimation, therefore the overall system performance.

  13. Localization of Reversion-Induced LIM Protein (RIL) in the Rat Central Nervous System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishima, Tetsuro; Sasano, Hiroshi; Asai, Kiyofumi; Sobue, Kazuya; Takata, Kuniaki

    2009-01-01

    Reversion-induced LIM protein (RIL) is a member of the ALP (actinin-associated LIM protein) subfamily of the PDZ/LIM protein family. RIL serves as an adaptor protein and seems to regulate cytoskeletons. Immunoblotting suggested that RIL is concentrated in the astrocytes in the central nervous system. We then examined the expression and localization of RIL in the rat central nervous system and compared it with that of water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4). RIL was concentrated in the cells of ependyma lining the ventricles in the brain and the central canal in the spinal cord. In most parts of the central nervous system, RIL was expressed in the astrocytes that expressed AQP4. Double-labeling studies showed that RIL was concentrated in the cytoplasm of astrocytes where glial fibrillary acidic protein was enriched as well as in the AQP4-enriched regions such as the endfeet or glia limitans. RIL was also present in some neurons such as Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and some neurons in the brain stem. Differential expression of RIL suggests that it may be involved in the regulation of the central nervous system

  14. Proxy records of Holocene storm events in coastal barrier systems: Storm-wave induced markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Jérôme; Clemmensen, Lars B.

    2017-10-01

    Extreme storm events in the coastal zone are one of the main forcing agents of short-term coastal system behavior. As such, storms represent a major threat to human activities concentrated along the coasts worldwide. In order to better understand the frequency of extreme events like storms, climate science must rely on longer-time records than the century-scale records of instrumental weather data. Proxy records of storm-wave or storm-wind induced activity in coastal barrier systems deposits have been widely used worldwide in recent years to document past storm events during the last millennia. This review provides a detailed state-of-the-art compilation of the proxies available from coastal barrier systems to reconstruct Holocene storm chronologies (paleotempestology). The present paper aims (I) to describe the erosional and depositional processes caused by storm-wave action in barrier and back-barrier systems (i.e. beach ridges, storm scarps and washover deposits), (ii) to understand how storm records can be extracted from barrier and back-barrier sedimentary bodies using stratigraphical, sedimentological, micro-paleontological and geochemical proxies and (iii) to show how to obtain chronological control on past storm events recorded in the sedimentary successions. The challenges that paleotempestology studies still face in the reconstruction of representative and reliable storm-chronologies using these various proxies are discussed, and future research prospects are outlined.

  15. Sunlight Effects on Immune System: Is There Something Else in addition to UV-Induced Immunosuppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. González Maglio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight, composed of different types of radiation, including ultraviolet wavelengths, is an essential source of light and warmth for life on earth but has strong negative effects on human health, such as promoting the malignant transformation of skin cells and suppressing the ability of the human immune system to efficiently detect and attack malignant cells. UV-induced immunosuppression has been extensively studied since it was first described by Dr. Kripke and Dr. Fisher in the late 1970s. However, skin exposure to sunlight has not only this and other unfavorable effects, for example, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, but also a positive one: the induction of Vitamin D synthesis, which performs several roles within the immune system in addition to favoring bone homeostasis. The impact of low levels of UV exposure on the immune system has not been fully reported yet, but it bears interesting differences with the suppressive effect of high levels of UV radiation, as shown by some recent studies. The aim of this article is to put some ideas in perspective and pose some questions within the field of photoimmunology based on established and new information, which may lead to new experimental approaches and, eventually, to a better understanding of the effects of sunlight on the human immune system.

  16. Dissipation-induced dipole blockade and antiblockade in driven Rydberg systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeremy T.; Boulier, Thomas; Magnan, Eric; Goldschmidt, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Ryan M.; Rolston, Steven L.; Porto, James V.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2018-02-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the competing blockade and antiblockade effects induced by spontaneously generated contaminant Rydberg atoms in driven Rydberg systems. These contaminant atoms provide a source of strong dipole-dipole interactions and play a crucial role in the system's behavior. We study this problem theoretically using two different approaches. The first is a cumulant expansion approximation, in which we ignore third-order and higher connected correlations. Using this approach for the case of resonant drive, a many-body blockade radius picture arises, and we find qualitative agreement with previous experimental results. We further predict that as the atomic density is increased, the Rydberg population's dependence on Rabi frequency will transition from quadratic to linear dependence at lower Rabi frequencies. We study this behavior experimentally by observing this crossover at two different atomic densities. We confirm that the larger density system has a smaller crossover Rabi frequency than the smaller density system. The second theoretical approach is a set of phenomenological inhomogeneous rate equations. We compare the results of our rate-equation model to the experimental observations [E. A. Goldschmidt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 113001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.113001] and find that these rate equations provide quantitatively good scaling behavior of the steady-state Rydberg population for both resonant and off-resonant drives.

  17. Participation of the cholinergic system in the ethanol-induced suppression of paradoxical sleep in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Papale

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is among the many consequences of ethanol abuse in both humans and rodents. Ethanol consumption can reduce REM or paradoxical sleep (PS in humans and rats, respectively. The first aim of this study was to develop an animal model of ethanol-induced PS suppression. This model administered intragastrically (by gavage to male Wistar rats (3 months old, 200-250 g 0.5 to 3.5 g/kg ethanol. The 3.5 g/kg dose of ethanol suppressed the PS stage compared with the vehicle group (distilled water during the first 2-h interval (0-2 h; 1.3 vs 10.2; P < 0.001. The second aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which ethanol suppresses PS. We examined the effects of cholinergic drug pretreatment. The cholinergic system was chosen because of the involvement of cholinergic neurotransmitters in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. A second set of animals was pretreated with 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/kg pilocarpine (cholinergic agonist or atropine (cholinergic antagonist. These drugs were administered 1 h prior to ethanol (3.5 g/kg or vehicle. Treatment with atropine prior to vehicle or ethanol produced a statistically significant decrease in PS, whereas pilocarpine had no effect on minutes of PS. Although the mechanism by which ethanol induces PS suppression is not fully understood, these data suggest that the cholinergic system is not the only system involved in this interaction.

  18. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa eMartinez-Medina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defence signalling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms (ISR. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene (ET signalling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR is believed to involve a wider variety of signalling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defence related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid (ABA and the peptide prosystemin (PS evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA and ABA signalling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defence responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against the necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development

  19. Spatial variation in anthropogenic mortality induces a source-sink system in a hunted mesopredator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnie, Liaan; Zalewski, Andrzej; Zalewska, Hanna; Kerley, Graham I H

    2018-04-01

    Lethal carnivore management is a prevailing strategy to reduce livestock predation. Intensity of lethal management varies according to land-use, where carnivores are more intensively hunted on farms relative to reserves. Variations in hunting intensity may result in the formation of a source-sink system where carnivores disperse from high-density to low-density areas. Few studies quantify dispersal between supposed sources and sinks-a fundamental requirement for source-sink systems. We used the black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas) as a model to determine if heterogeneous anthropogenic mortality induces a source-sink system. We analysed 12 microsatellite loci from 554 individuals from lightly hunted and previously unhunted reserves, as well as heavily hunted livestock- and game farms. Bayesian genotype assignment showed that jackal populations displayed a hierarchical population structure. We identified two genetically distinct populations at the regional level and nine distinct subpopulations at the local level, with each cluster corresponding to distinct land-use types separated by various dispersal barriers. Migration, estimated using Bayesian multilocus genotyping, between reserves and farms was asymmetric and heterogeneous anthropogenic mortality induced source-sink dynamics via compensatory immigration. Additionally some heavily hunted populations also acted as source populations, exporting individuals to other heavily hunted populations. This indicates that heterogeneous anthropogenic mortality results in the formation of a complex series of interconnected sources and sinks. Thus, lethal management of mesopredators may not be an effective long-term strategy in reducing livestock predation, as dispersal and, more importantly, compensatory immigration may continue to affect population reduction efforts as long as dispersal from other areas persists.

  20. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation.

  1. Endotoxin-induced and vaccine-induced systemic inflammation both impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not pulse wave reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lars Lind,1 Johannes Hulthe,2,3 Annika Johansson,3 Ewa Hedner31Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, 2Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg, 3AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, SwedenBackground: Inflammation induced by either endotoxin or vaccination has previously been shown to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV in healthy young individuals. However, the vascular effects of these two mechanisms of inducing inflammation have not been compared in the same individuals.Methods: Twelve young healthy males were studied at the same time of the day on three occasions in a random order; on one occasion 4 hours following an endotoxin injection (Escherichia coli endotoxin, 20 IU/kg, on another occasion 8 hours following vaccination against Salmonella typhi, and on a third occasion 4 hours following a saline control injection. EDV and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIDV were evaluated by local infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in the brachial artery, and forearm blood flow was measured with venous occlusion plethysmography. The augmentation index was determined by pulse wave analysis as an index of pulse wave reflection.Results: Both endotoxin and vaccination impaired EDV to a similar degree compared with the saline control (P = 0.005 and P = 0.014, respectively. EIDV was not significantly affected by inflammation. Endotoxin, but not vaccination, increased body temperature and circulating levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and interleukin-6. Augmentation index was not affected by the interventions.Conclusion: Despite the fact that endotoxin induced a more pronounced degree of inflammation than vaccination, both inflammatory challenges impaired EDV to a similar degree, supporting the view that different inflammatory stimuli could induce harmful effects on the vasculature.Keywords: endothelium, endotoxin, vaccination, vasodilation, inflammation

  2. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike JF; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-01-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or ‘wanting’). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened ‘wanting’ was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact (‘liking’) of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal ‘hot-spots’ that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation. PMID:25761571

  3. Collaboratively Adaptive Vibration Sensing System for High-fidelity Monitoring of Structural Responses Induced by Pedestrians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijia Pan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a collaboratively adaptive vibration monitoring system that captures high-fidelity structural vibration signals induced by pedestrians. These signals can be used for various human activities’ monitoring by inferring information about the impact sources, such as pedestrian footsteps, door opening and closing, and dragging objects. Such applications often require high-fidelity (high resolution and low distortion signals. Traditionally, expensive high resolution and high dynamic range sensors are adopted to ensure sufficient resolution. However, for sensing systems that use low-cost sensing devices, the resolution and dynamic range are often limited; hence this type of sensing methods is not well explored ubiquitously. We propose a low-cost sensing system that utilizes (1 a heuristic model of the investigating excitations and (2 shared information through networked devices to adapt hardware configurations and obtain high-fidelity structural vibration signals. To further explain the system, we use indoor pedestrian footstep sensing through ambient structural vibration as an example to demonstrate the system performance. We evaluate the application with three metrics that measure the signal quality from different aspects: the sufficient resolution rate to present signal resolution improvement without clipping, the clipping rate to measure the distortion of the footstep signal, and the signal magnitude to quantify the detailed resolution of the detected footstep signal. In experiments conducted in a school building, our system demonstrated up to 2× increase on the sufficient resolution rate and 2× less error rate when used to locate the pedestrians as they walk along the hallway, compared to a fixed sensing setting.

  4. Peltatoside Isolated from Annona crassiflora Induces Peripheral Antinociception by Activation of the Cannabinoid System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristina da Costa; Veloso, Clarice de Carvalho; Ferreira, Renata Cristina Mendes; Lage, Gisele Avelar; Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Perez, Andrea de Castro

    2017-02-01

    Peltatoside is a natural compound isolated from leaves of Annona crassiflora Mart., a plant widely used in folk medicine. This substance is an analogue of quercetin, a flavonoid extensively studied because of its diverse biological activities, including analgesic effects. Besides, a previous study suggested, by computer structure analyses, a possible quercetin-CB 1 cannabinoid receptor interaction. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the antinociceptive effect of peltatoside and analyze the cannabinoid system involvement in this action. The mouse paw pressure test was used and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan (200 µg/paw). All used drugs were administered by intraplantar administration in Swiss male mice (n = 6). Peltatoside (100 µg/paw) elicited a local inhibition of hyperalgesia. The peripheral antinociceptive action of peltatoside was antagonized by the CB 1 cannabinoid antagonist AM251 (160 µg/paw), but not by CB 2 cannabinoid antagonist AM630 (100 µg/paw). In order to assess the role of endocannabinoids in this peripheral antinociceptive effect, we used (i) [5 Z ,8 Z ,11 Z ,14 Z ]-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenyl-methyl ester phosphonofluoridic acid, an inhibitor of anandamide amidase; (ii) JZL184, an inhibitor for monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol; and (iii) VDM11, an endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor. MAFP, JZL184, and VDM11 did not induce antinociception, respectively, at the doses 0.5, 3.8, and 2.5 µg/paw, however, these three drugs were able to potentiate the peripheral antinociceptive effect of peltatoside at an intermediary dose (50 µg/paw). Our results suggest that this natural substance is capable of inducing analgesia through the activation of peripheral CB 1 receptors, involving endocannabinoids in this process. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Prenatal stress-induced alterations in major physiological systems correlate with gut microbiota composition in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, Anna V; Crampton, Sean; Desbonnet, Lieve; Edge, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Orla; Lomasney, Kevin W; Zhdanov, Alexander V; Crispie, Fiona; Moloney, Rachel D; Borre, Yuliya E; Cotter, Paul D; Hyland, Niall P; O'Halloran, Ken D; Dinan, Timothy G; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Cryan, John F

    2015-10-01

    Early-life adverse experiences, including prenatal stress (PNS), are associated with a higher prevalence of neurodevelopmental, cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in affected offspring. Here, in a rat model of chronic PNS, we investigate the impact of late gestational stress on physiological outcomes in adulthood. Sprague-Dawley pregnant dams were subjected to repeated restraint stress from embryonic day 14 to day 20, and their male offspring were assessed at 4 months of age. PNS induced an exaggeration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress, as well as an elevation of blood pressure and impairment of cognitive function. Altered respiratory control was also observed, as demonstrated by increased variability in basal respiratory frequency and abnormal frequency responses to both hypoxic and hypercapnic challenges. PNS also affected gastrointestinal neurodevelopment and function, as measured by a decrease in the innervation density of distal colon and an increase in the colonic secretory response to catecholaminergic stimulation. Finally, PNS induced long lasting alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition. 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing revealed a strong trend towards decreased numbers of bacteria in the Lactobacillus genus, accompanied by elevated abundance of the Oscillibacter, Anaerotruncus and Peptococcus genera in PNS animals. Strikingly, relative abundance of distinct bacteria genera significantly correlated with certain respiratory parameters and the responsiveness of the HPA axis to stress. Together, these findings provide novel evidence that PNS induces long-term maladaptive alterations in the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems, accompanied by hyper-responsiveness to stress and alterations in the gut microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, Claudia; Lubatschofski, Annelie; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Kotzerke, Joerg; Buchmann, Inga; Reske, Sven N.

    2003-01-01

    Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for high-risk leukaemia and lymphoma. In bone marrow-selective radioimmunotherapy, beta-irradiation is applied using iodine-131, yttrium-90 or rhenium-188 labelled radioimmunoconjugates. However, the mechanisms by which beta-irradiation induces cell death are not understood at the molecular level. Here, we report that beta-irradiation induced apoptosis and activated apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells depending on doses, time points and dose rates. After beta-irradiation, upregulation of CD95 ligand and CD95 receptor was detected and activation of caspases resulting in apoptosis was found. These effects were completely blocked by the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. In addition, irradiation-mediated mitochondrial damage resulted in perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation and cytochrome c release. Bax, a death-promoting protein, was upregulated and Bcl-x L , a death-inhibiting protein, was downregulated. We also found higher apoptosis rates and earlier activation of apoptosis pathways after gamma-irradiation in comparison to beta-irradiation at the same dose rate. Furthermore, irradiation-resistant cells were cross-resistant to CD95 and CD95-resistant cells were cross-resistant to irradiation, indicating that CD95 and irradiation used, at least in part, identical effector pathways. These findings demonstrate that beta-irradiation induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells using both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. Understanding the timing, sequence and molecular pathways of beta-irradiation-mediated apoptosis may allow rational adjustment of chemo- and radiotherapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  7. Sleep and Sedative States Induced by Targeting the Histamine and Noradrenergic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedatives target just a handful of receptors and ion channels. But we have no satisfying explanation for how activating these receptors produces sedation. In particular, do sedatives act at restricted brain locations and circuitries or more widely? Two prominent sedative drugs in clinical use are zolpidem, a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator, and dexmedetomidine (DEX, a selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. By targeting hypothalamic neuromodulatory systems both drugs induce a sleep-like state, but in different ways: zolpidem primarily reduces the latency to NREM sleep, and is a controlled substance taken by many people to help them sleep; DEX produces prominent slow wave activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG resembling stage 2 NREM sleep, but with complications of hypothermia and lowered blood pressure—it is used for long term sedation in hospital intensive care units—under DEX-induced sedation patients are arousable and responsive, and this drug reduces the risk of delirium. DEX, and another α2 adrenergic agonist xylazine, are also widely used in veterinary clinics to sedate animals. Here we review how these two different classes of sedatives, zolpidem and dexmedetomideine, can selectively interact with some nodal points of the circuitry that promote wakefulness allowing the transition to NREM sleep. Zolpidem enhances GABAergic transmission onto histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN to hasten the transition to NREM sleep, and DEX interacts with neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic area that induce sleep and body cooling. This knowledge may aid the design of more precise acting sedatives, and at the same time, reveal more about the natural sleep-wake circuitry.

  8. Dose-response study of thimerosal-induced murine systemic autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havarinasab, S.; Lambertsson, L.; Qvarnstroem, J.; Hultman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The organic compound ethylmercurithiosalicylate (thimerosal), which is primarily present in the tissues as ethylmercury, has caused illness and several deaths due to erroneous handling when used as a disinfectant or as a preservative in medical preparations. Lately, possible health effects of thimerosal in childhood vaccines have been much discussed. Thimerosal is a well-known sensitizing agent, although usually of no clinical relevance. In rare cases, thimerosal has caused systemic immune reactions including acrodynia. We have studied if thimerosal might induce the systemic autoimmune condition observed in genetically susceptible mice after exposure to inorganic mercury. A.SW mice were exposed to 1.25-40 mg thimerosal/l drinking water for 70 days. Antinucleolar antibodies, targeting the 34-kDa protein fibrillarin, developed in a dose-related pattern and first appeared after 10 days in the two highest dose groups. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) for antifibrillarin antibodies was 2.5 mg thimerosal/l, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 147 μg Hg/kg bw and a concentration of 21 and 1.9 μg Hg/g in the kidney and lymph nodes, respectively. The same LOAEL was found for tissue immune-complex deposits. The total serum concentration of IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a showed a significant dose-related increase in thimerosal-treated mice, with a LOAEL of 5 mg thimerosal/l for IgG1 and IgE, and 20 mg thimerosal/l for IgG2a. The polyclonal B-cell activation showed a significant dose-response relationship with a LOAEL of 10 mg thimerosal/l. Therefore, thimerosal induces in genetically susceptible mice a systemic autoimmune syndrome very similar to that seen after treatment with inorganic mercury, although a higher absorbed dose of Hg is needed using thimerosal. The autoimmune syndrome induced by thimerosal is different from the weaker and more restricted autoimmune reaction observed after treatment with an equipotent dose of methylmercury

  9. Stability analysis and compensation of network-induced delays in communication-based power system control: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichao; Liu, Peter Xiaoping; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    This survey is to summarize and compare existing and recently emerging approaches for the analysis and compensation of the effects of network-induced delays on the stability and performance of communication-based power control systems. Several important communication-based power control systems are briefly introduced. The deterministic and stochastic methodologies of analyzing the impacts of network-induced delays on the stability of the communication-based power control systems are summarized and compared. A variety of control approaches are reviewed and compared for mitigating the effects of network-induced delays, depending on several design requirements, such as model dependence and design difficulty. The summary and comparison of these control approaches in this survey provide researchers and utilities valuable guidance for designing advanced communication-based power control systems in the future. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the Radiated Field in an Electromagnetic Reverberation Chamber as an Upset-Inducing Stimulus for Digital Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary data analysis for a physical fault injection experiment of a digital system exposed to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) in an electromagnetic reverberation chamber suggests a direct causal relation between the time profile of the field strength amplitude in the chamber and the severity of observed effects at the outputs of the radiated system. This report presents an analysis of the field strength modulation induced by the movement of the field stirrers in the reverberation chamber. The analysis is framed as a characterization of the discrete features of the field strength waveform responsible for the faults experienced by a radiated digital system. The results presented here will serve as a basis to refine the approach for a detailed analysis of HIRF-induced upsets observed during the radiation experiment. This work offers a novel perspective into the use of an electromagnetic reverberation chamber to generate upset-inducing stimuli for the study of fault effects in digital systems.

  11. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers. (paper)

  12. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eMartínez-Hidalgo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation.In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity.

  13. A free radical-generating system induces the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway: a role in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recuero, María; Vicente, María Carmen; Martínez-García, Ana; Ramos, María C; Carmona-Saez, Pedro; Sastre, Isabel; Aldudo, Jesús; Vilella, Elisabet; Frank, Ana; Bullido, María J; Valdivieso, Fernando

    2009-04-01

    Oxidative stress, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), is intimately linked to aging - the best established risk factor for AD. Studies in neuronal cells subjected to oxidative stress, mimicking the situation in AD brains, are therefore of great interest. This paper reports that, in human neuronal cells, oxidative stress induced by the free radical-generating xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X-XOD) system leads to apoptotic cell death. Microarray analyses showed a potent activation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway following reductions in the cell cholesterol synthesis caused by the X-XOD treatment; furthermore, the apoptosis was reduced by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) expression with an interfering RNA. The potential importance of this mechanism in AD was investigated by genetic association, and it was found that HMGCR, a key gene in cholesterol metabolism and among those most strongly upregulated, was associated with AD risk. In summary, this work presents a human cell model prepared to mimic the effect of oxidative stress in neurons that might be useful in clarifying the mechanism involved in free radical-induced neurodegeneration. Gene expression analysis followed by genetic association studies indicates a possible link among oxidative stress, cholesterol metabolism and AD.

  14. [Case of systemic lupus erythematosus occurring after induced abortion and drug eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuhito; Baba, Shunu; Takahashi, Susumu; Itou, Harumasa; Kowada, Kouko; Shikanai, Toshiki; Nakamura, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Kohei; Inoue, Hiroshi; Sawai, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    We describe a19 year-old woman who was diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) after abortion. She had taken anti-convulsants for epilepsy since she was 8 years old. Induced abortion surgery was performed at six weeks in her pregnancy. She showed pyrexia and a general rash 2 days after the abortion. She was introduced to our hospital because the administration of antibiotics was not effective. Since the anti-convulsants had been changed after pregnancy, we returned to those administered before pregnancy and followed her up. Her eruption improved, but she became aware of thirstiness and dry eye. She was diagnosed as Sjögren syndrome by ophthalmologic examination, lip biopsy, and elevation of an anti-SS-A antibody and an anti-SS-B antibody in the serum. Since we could not rule out SLE because of the low concentration of complement activity in blood, we followed her up carefully by checking serum markers of SLE. Protein urine developed after the improvement of the eruption 2 weeks later. Low complement activity was recognized and double stranded (ds)-DNA antibody became positive. In addition to these findings, she had an episode of hypersensitivity to sunlight and was therefore diagnosed as SLE. Since induced abortion and drug eruption might be associated with the onset of SLE, the case is thought to be a valuable from the view point of understanding the mechanism of SLE onset.

  15. High-intensity interval training induces a modest systemic inflammatory response in active, young men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetsloot, Kevin A; John, Casey S; Lawrence, Marcus M; Battista, Rebecca A; Shanely, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine: 1) the extent to which an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases systemic inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and 2) whether 2 weeks of HIIT training alters the inflammatory response. Eight recreationally active males (aged 22±2 years) performed 2 weeks of HIIT on a cycle ergometer (six HIIT sessions at 8–12 intervals; 60-second intervals, 75-second active rest) at a power output equivalent to 100% of their predetermined peak oxygen uptake (VO2max). Serum samples were collected during the first and sixth HIIT sessions at rest and immediately, 15, 30, and 45 minutes post-exercise. An acute session of HIIT induced significant increases in interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 compared with rest. The concentrations of interferon-γ, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, and IL-1β were unaltered with an acute session of HIIT Two weeks of training did not alter the inflammatory response to an acute bout of HIIT exercise. Maximal power achieved during a VO2max test significantly increased 4.6%, despite no improvements in VO2max after 2 weeks of HIIT. These data suggest that HIIT exercise induces a small inflammatory response in young, recreationally active men; however, 2 weeks of HIIT does not alter this response. PMID:24520199

  16. Force-induced bone growth and adaptation: A system theoretical approach to understanding bone mechanotransduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, Solvey; Findeisen, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The modeling, analysis, and design of treatment therapies for bone disorders based on the paradigm of force-induced bone growth and adaptation is a challenging task. Mathematical models provide, in comparison to clinical, medical and biological approaches an structured alternative framework to understand the concurrent effects of the multiple factors involved in bone remodeling. By now, there are few mathematical models describing the appearing complex interactions. However, the resulting models are complex and difficult to analyze, due to the strong nonlinearities appearing in the equations, the wide range of variability of the states, and the uncertainties in parameters. In this work, we focus on analyzing the effects of changes in model structure and parameters/inputs variations on the overall steady state behavior using systems theoretical methods. Based on an briefly reviewed existing model that describes force-induced bone adaptation, the main objective of this work is to analyze the stationary behavior and to identify plausible treatment targets for remodeling related bone disorders. Identifying plausible targets can help in the development of optimal treatments combining both physical activity and drug-medication. Such treatments help to improve/maintain/restore bone strength, which deteriorates under bone disorder conditions, such as estrogen deficiency.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model System for Studying Drug Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard de Boer

    Full Text Available Today HIV-1 infection is recognized as a chronic disease with obligatory lifelong treatment to keep viral titers below detectable levels. The continuous intake of antiretroviral drugs however, leads to severe and even life-threatening side effects, supposedly by the deleterious impact of nucleoside-analogue type compounds on the functioning of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. For detailed investigation of the yet partially understood underlying mechanisms, the availability of a versatile model system is crucial. We therefore set out to develop the use of Caenorhabditis elegans to study drug induced mitochondrial toxicity. Using a combination of molecular-biological and functional assays, combined with a quantitative analysis of mitochondrial network morphology, we conclude that anti-retroviral drugs with similar working mechanisms can be classified into distinct groups based on their effects on mitochondrial morphology and biochemistry. Additionally we show that mitochondrial toxicity of antiretroviral drugs cannot be exclusively attributed to interference with the mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

  18. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Bøgh, I. B.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous......Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a major acute complication in type 1 as well as in type 2 diabetes, particularly during intensive insulin therapy. The brain plays a central role in the counter-regulatory response by eliciting parasympathetic and sympathetic hormone responses to restore...... system glycogen as a glucose reserve. However, during sustained hypoglycaemia, the brain cannot maintain a sufficient glucose influx and, as the cerebral hypoglycaemia becomes severe, electroencephalogram changes, oxidative stress and regional neuronal death ensues. With particular focus on evidence from...

  19. Rat liver arginase system under acetaminophen-induced toxic injury and protein deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Kopylchuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Arginase activity and L-arginine content in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat liver cells under the conditions of toxic injury on the background of protein deprivation was studied. The most significant reduction of arginase activity in liver cells and depletion of L-arginine pool was found in rats with toxic acetaminophen-induced liver injury maintained on the ration balanced by all nutrients as well as in protein deficiency rats. It was concluded that reduction of the arginase activity in the cytosolic fraction of rat liver cells, combined with simultaneous decrease of L-arginine content, may be considered as one of the mechanisms of ornithine cycle disturbance. The decline of activity of mitochondrial isoform of arginase II, for certain, is related with activation of NO-synthase system.

  20. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  1. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Rodney S.

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  2. Assessment of Solvent-Induced Nitrogen Shielding Variations of Triazole Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witanowski, M.; Sicinska, W.; Biedrzycka, Z.; Grabowski, Z.; Webb, G. A.

    High-precision 14N NMR shieldings are reported for all of the possible N-methyl triazoles in a variety of solvents. A large difference is observed in the effects of solvent on the shieldings of the pyrrole-type and pyridine-type nitrogen atoms in such systems. This difference largely arises from solvent-to-solute hydrogen-bonding effects for the latter type of nitrogen atom. For these two types of nitrogen atoms in triazoles, solvent polarity effects induce changes in the shieldings in opposite directions: this is corroborated by shielding calculations using the solvaton model. Solvent-to-solute hydrogen-bonding effects are larger than those due to solvent polarity and permit the assessment of the basicities of nonequivalent nitrogenous sites; these appear to parallel the analogous basicities with respect to protonation.

  3. Statistical Analysis and ETAS Modeling of Seismicity Induced by Production of Geothermal Energy from Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinske, C.; Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate seismicity related to hydrothermal systems in Germany and Italy, focussing on temporal changes of seismicity rates. Our analysis was motivated by numerical simulations The modeling of stress changes caused by the injection and production of fluid revealed that seismicity rates decrease on a long-term perspective which is not observed in the considered case studies. We analyze the waiting time distributions of the seismic events in both time domain (inter event times) and fluid volume domain (inter event volume). We find clear indications that the observed seismicity comprises two components: (1) seismicity that is directly triggered by production and re-injection of fluid, i.e. induced events, and (2) seismicity that is triggered by earthquake interactions, i.e. aftershock triggering. In order to better constrain our numerical simulations using the observed induced seismicity we apply catalog declustering to seperate the two components. We use the magnitude-dependent space-time windowing approach introduced by Gardner and Knopoff (1974) and test several published algorithms to calculate the space-time windows. After declustering, we conclude that the different hydrothermal reservoirs show a comparable seismic response to the circulation of fluid and additional triggering by earthquake interactions. The declustered catalogs contain approximately 50 per cent of the number of events in the original catalogs. We then perform ETAS (Epidemic Type Aftershock; Ogata, 1986, 1988) modeling for two reasons. First, we want to know whether the different reservoirs are also comparable regarding earthquake interaction patterns. Second, if we identify systematic patterns, ETAS modeling can contribute to forecast seismicity during production of geothermal energy. We find that stationary ETAS models cannot accurately capture real seismicity rate changes. One reason for this finding is given by the rate of observed induced events which is not constant over time. Hence

  4. Perturbation-induced emergence of Poisson-like behavior in non-Poisson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, Osman C; Grigolini, Paolo; Paradisi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The response of a system with ON–OFF intermittency to an external harmonic perturbation is discussed. ON–OFF intermittency is described by means of a sequence of random events, i.e., the transitions from the ON to the OFF state and vice versa. The unperturbed waiting times (WTs) between two events are assumed to satisfy a renewal condition, i.e., the WTs are statistically independent random variables. The response of a renewal model with non-Poisson ON–OFF intermittency, associated with non-exponential WT distribution, is analyzed by looking at the changes induced in the WT statistical distribution by the harmonic perturbation. The scaling properties are also studied by means of diffusion entropy analysis. It is found that, in the range of fast and relatively strong perturbation, the non-Poisson system displays a Poisson-like behavior in both WT distribution and scaling. In particular, the histogram of perturbed WTs becomes a sequence of equally spaced peaks, with intensity decaying exponentially in time. Further, the diffusion entropy detects an ordinary scaling (related to normal diffusion) instead of the expected unperturbed anomalous scaling related to the inverse power-law decay. Thus, an analysis based on the WT histogram and/or on scaling methods has to be considered with some care when dealing with perturbed intermittent systems

  5. Feeding induced by cannabinoids is mediated independently of the melanocortin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspha Sinnayah

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, stimulate appetite, and cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R antagonists suppress appetite and promote weight loss. Little is known about how CB1-R antagonists affect the central neurocircuitry, specifically the melanocortin system that regulates energy balance.Here, we show that peripherally administered CB1-R antagonist (AM251 or agonist equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively in A(y , which lack a functional melanocortin system, and wildtype mice, demonstrating that cannabinoid effects on feeding do not require melanocortin circuitry. CB1-R antagonist or agonist administered into the ventral tegmental area (VTA equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively, in both genotypes. In addition, peripheral and central cannabinoid administration similarly induced c-Fos activation in brain sites suggesting mediation via motivational dopaminergic circuitry. Amperometry-detected increases in evoked dopamine (DA release by the CB1-R antagonist in nucleus accumbens slices indicates that AM251 modulates DA release from VTA terminals.Our results demonstrate that the effects of cannabinoids on energy balance are independent of hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry and is primarily driven by the reward system.

  6. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of meteorites as a probe of the early solar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Aglio, M., E-mail: marcella.dellaglio@ba.imip.cnr.it [CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); De Giacomo, A. [CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Chemistry Department, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gaudiuso, R.; De Pascale, O. [CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Longo, S. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, Firenze (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as a technique for gathering data relevant to Solar System geophysics. Two test cases were demonstrated: elemental analysis of chondrules in a chondrite meteorite, and space- resolved analysis of the interface between kamacite and taenite crystals in an octahedrite iron meteorite. In particular most major and minor elements (Fe, Mg, Si, Ti, Al, Cr, Mn, Ca, Fe, Ni, Co) in Sahara 98222 (chondrite) and its chondrules, as well as the profile of Ni content in Toluca (iron meteorite), were determined with the Calibration Free (CF) method. A special attention was devoted to exploring the possibilities offered by variants of the basic technique, such as the use of Fe I Boltzmann distribution as an intensity calibration method of the spectroscopic system, and the use of spatially resolved analysis. - Highlights: • LIBS of meteorites can supply data relevant to the early evolution of solar system. • CF-LIBS was applied to two different test cases. • Chemical identification of chondrules embedded in a chondrite meteorite • Experimental and theoretical profiles of Ni content in an iron meteorite.

  7. Observing Human-induced Linkages between Urbanization and Earth's Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Jin, Menglin

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world s population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters atmospheric composition; impacts components of the water cycle; and modifies the carbon cycle and ecosystems. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-climate system is incomplete. Better understanding of how the Earth s atmosphere-ocean-land-biosphere components interact as a coupled system and the influence of the urban environment on this climate system is critical. The goal of the 2003 AGU Union session Human-induced climate variations on urban areas: From observations to modeling was to bring together scientists from interdisciplinary backgrounds to discuss the data, scientific approaches and recent results on observing and modeling components of the urban environment with the intent of sampling our current stand and discussing future direction on this topic. Herein, a summary and discussion of the observations component of the session are presented.

  8. Systemic provocation in doxycycline induced fixed drug eruption: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Murwaningsih Rosmarini Estri Sih Hananti Niken Indrastuti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruption (FDE is recurrent lesions that upon repeated uptake of causative drug, always appears at the same skin and mucosal site. Determination of causal relationship in drug allergy is very important. In this case report, cases of doxycycline-induced FDE was reported. The subject of the research was a 29-year-old male, referred by dermatologist, with history of reccurent FDE. Physical examination revealed an oval well demarcated patch hyperpigmentation. Patch test was perfomed on previous involved and uninvolved site. The result of the patch test was irrelevant. Retesting patch test gave similar result. Systemic provocation test or drug provocation test (DPT  with doxcycline were done with suspected drug under ambulatory survelance and gave positive result. In this case, the DPT succeeded to identify doxycycline as the causal agent of FDE. The work-up of a suspected drug hypersensitivity includes a detailed clinical history, physical examination, skin tests, and provocation tests. The DPT is recommended to confirm drug’s hypersensitivity reactions. Systemic provocation test is considered as the gold standard for diagnosing FDE. Keywords:   fixed drug eruption - doxycycline - causal relationship - patch test - systemic provocation test

  9. The role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezaei, Sepideh Seyedali; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Hasani, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that serotonin can modulate glutamate and GABA release in central nervous system (CNS). The present study was designed to examine the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chickens. In Experiment 1 intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of MK- 801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) performed followed by serotonin (10 μg). In experiments 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 prior to serotonin injection, chickens received CNQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol), AIDA (mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol), LY341495 (mGluR2 antagonist, 150 nmol), UBP1112 (mGluR3 antagonist, 2 nmol), picrotoxin (GABA A receptor antagonist, 0.5 μg), CGP54626 (GABAB receptor antagonist, 20 ng) respectively. Cumulative food intake was determined at 3 h post injection. The results of this study showed that the hypophagic effect of serotonin was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with MK- 801 and CNQX (p 0.05). Also, the inhibitory effect of serotonin on food intake was amplified by picrotoxin (p 0.05). These results suggest that serotonin as a modulator probably interacts with glutamatergic (via NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors) and GABAergic (via GABAA receptor) systems on feeding behavior in chicken.

  10. Hyperbolic periodic orbits in nongradient systems and small-noise-induced metastable transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Molei

    2018-01-01

    Small noise can induce rare transitions between metastable states, which can be characterized by Maximum Likelihood Paths (MLPs). Nongradient systems contrast gradient systems in that MLP does not have to cross the separatrix at a saddle point, but instead possibly at a point on a hyperbolic periodic orbit. A numerical approach for identifying such unstable periodic orbits is proposed based on String method. In a special class of nongradient systems ('orthogonal-type'), there are provably local MLPs that cross such saddle point or hyperbolic periodic orbit, and the separatrix crossing location determines the associated local maximum of transition rate. In general cases, however, the separatrix crossing may not determine a unique local maximum of the rate, as we numerically observed a counter-example in a sheared 2D-space Allen-Cahn SPDE. It is a reasonable conjecture that there are always local MLPs associated with each attractor on the separatrix, such as saddle point or hyperbolic periodic orbit; our numerical experiments did not disprove so.

  11. Microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Lin, J Y; Lin, Y T

    1998-09-01

    To investigate the microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system, aluminum alloys A356, AA 5052, AA 5083 and AA 6061 were chosen as the test alloys and Cladosporium and several fuel-oil contaminated microbes isolated in Taiwan were used as test organisms. Aluminum alloy AA 5083 in fuel-oil/aqueous system was the most susceptible material for microbial corrosion, then followed by aluminum alloys AA 5052 and A356, and AA 6061 was more resistant to microbial aggression. Mixed culture had high capability of corrosion, then followed by Penicillium sp. AM-F5, Fusarium sp. AM-F1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AM-B5, Ps. fluorescens AM-B9, C. resinae ATCC 22712, Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Candida sp. AM-Y1 and Ps. aeruginosa AM-B11. From energy dispersive spectrometer analysis, aluminum and magnesium contents decreased in the corrosion area, while chlorine and sulfur contents increased. The major organic acid produced in fuel-oil/aqueous system was acetic acid, and the total organic acids content had a positive correlation with the degree of microbial corrosion.

  12. [The auto-focusing remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhen-yu; Pan, Cong-yuan; An, Ning; Du, Xue-wei; Yu, Yun-si; Du, Liang-liang; Wang, Sheng-bo; Wang, Qiu-ping

    2015-02-01

    The present paper presents an auto-focus laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) remote measuring system. This system contains a Schwarzschild telescope, which consists of a convex mirror and a concave mirror. The two spherical mirrors are coaxially placed. The convex mirror is mounted on a motorized linear translation stage. With this motorized linear translation stage, the convex mirror can move along the optical axis to change the spacing between the convex mirror and the concave mirror. Therefore the focal length can be adjusted to focus the laser on samples at different distances and collect the plasma spectra. The advantages of the telescope system include, firstly, the light path of laser focusing and spectra signal collection is the same, which make it easier for mounting and collimation; secondly, the light path of the telescope uses total reflection type, which is fit for the detection in ultra-violate region; finally, the telescope consists of only two spherical mirrors which are relatively easier to manufacture. Within the translation range of the motorized linear translation stage, the focal length of the telescope in this paper can be adjusted from 1.5 to 3.6 m. The diameter of the focusing spot varies from 0.5 to 1.0 mm. Utilizing this telescope system, LIBS experiments were conducted using copper sample. And the characteristic lines of Cu element (Cu I 223.01 nm, Cu I 224.43 nm) obtained are used for the auto focusing. By investigating the relation of the area of spectral lines covered and the spacing between the mirrors, the optimal laser focusing location was obtained. The LIBS experiment results show that the system functions well, fulfilling the demand of remote ablation of sample and LIBS spectral measuring, and the telescope is able to auto-focus the laser on samples at different position to perform remote LIBS experiment.

  13. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J Lee; Kjærgaard, Hanne; Smed, Mette Kiel; Gildengorin, Virginia L; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hetland, Merete Lund; Jewell, Nicholas P; Olsen, Jørn; Jawaheer, Damini

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women with RA. The goal of this study was to identify genes with expression patterns associated with pregnancy, compared to pre-pregnancy as baseline and determine whether those associations are modified by presence of RA. In our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) dataset from 5 healthy women and 20 women with RA, normalized expression levels of 4,710 genes were significantly associated with pregnancy status (pre-pregnancy, first, second and third trimesters) over time, irrespective of presence of RA (False Discovery Rate (FDR)-adjusted p value<0.05). These genes were enriched in pathways spanning multiple systems, as would be expected during pregnancy. A subset of these genes (n = 256) showed greater than two-fold change in expression during pregnancy compared to baseline levels, with distinct temporal trends through pregnancy. Another 98 genes involved in various biological processes including immune regulation exhibited expression patterns that were differentially associated with pregnancy in the presence or absence of RA. Our findings support the hypothesis that the maternal immune system plays an active role during pregnancy, and also provide insight into other systemic changes that occur in the maternal transcriptome during pregnancy compared to the pre-pregnancy state. Only a small proportion of genes modulated by pregnancy were influenced by presence of RA in our data.

  14. Control of electromagnetically induced transparency via a hybrid semiconductor quantum dot-vanadium dioxide nanoparticle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Naser; Hatef, Ali; Nadgaran, Hamid; Keshavarz, Alireza

    2017-07-01

    We numerically investigate the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a hybrid system consisting of a three-level quantum dot (QD) in the vicinity of vanadium dioxide nanoparticle (VO2NP). VO2NP has semiconductor and metallic phases where the transition between the two phases occurs around a critical temperature. When the QD-VO2NP hybrid system interacts with continuous wave laser fields in an infrared regime, it supports a coherent coupling of exciton-polariton and exciton-plasmon polariton in semiconductor and metal phases of VO2NP, respectively. In our calculations a filling fraction factor controls the VO2NP phase transition. A probe and control laser field configuration is studied for the hybrid system to measure the absorption of QD through the filling fraction factor manipulations. We show that for the VO2NP semiconductor phase and proper geometrical configuration, the absorption spectrum profile of the QD represents an EIT with two peaks and a clear minimum. These two peaks merge to one through the VO2NP phase transition to metal. We also show that the absorption spectrum profile is modified by different orientations of the laser fields with the axis of the QD-VO2NP hybrid system. The innovation in comparison to other research in the field is that robust variation in the absorption profile through EIT is due to the phase transition in VO2NP without any structural change in the QD-VO2NP hybrid system. Our results can be employed to design nanothermal sensors, optical nanoswitches, and energy transfer devices.

  15. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Mittal

    Full Text Available Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women with RA. The goal of this study was to identify genes with expression patterns associated with pregnancy, compared to pre-pregnancy as baseline and determine whether those associations are modified by presence of RA.In our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq dataset from 5 healthy women and 20 women with RA, normalized expression levels of 4,710 genes were significantly associated with pregnancy status (pre-pregnancy, first, second and third trimesters over time, irrespective of presence of RA (False Discovery Rate (FDR-adjusted p value<0.05. These genes were enriched in pathways spanning multiple systems, as would be expected during pregnancy. A subset of these genes (n = 256 showed greater than two-fold change in expression during pregnancy compared to baseline levels, with distinct temporal trends through pregnancy. Another 98 genes involved in various biological processes including immune regulation exhibited expression patterns that were differentially associated with pregnancy in the presence or absence of RA.Our findings support the hypothesis that the maternal immune system plays an active role during pregnancy, and also provide insight into other systemic changes that occur in the maternal transcriptome during pregnancy compared to the pre-pregnancy state. Only a small proportion of genes modulated by pregnancy were influenced by presence of RA in our data.

  16. The influence of conditioned fear-induced stress on the opioid systems in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewłocka, B; Sumová, A; Lasoń, W

    1990-12-01

    In this study the rats were repeatedly placed in a conditioning box, and 30 min later were subjected to a mild foot-shock. Anticipation of painful stimuli resulted in development of antinociception before a painful stimulus was applied. This conditioned fear-induced antinociception was antagonized by naloxone (1 mg/kg IP), as well as by ipsapirone (10 mg/kg IP), as measured by a tail-flick test. Stressed rats were hypersensitive to the analgesic action of morphine (1 mg/kg SC), but not to the specific kappa agonist U69,593 (0.1 mg/kg SC). In order to determine the involvement of the proopiomelanocortin and prodynorphin systems in stress we measured levels of their represenative peptides beta-endorphin and alpha-neoendorphin using selective RIAs. Biochemical data showed that conditioned stress evoked a marked decrease in the beta-endorphin level in the hypothalamus and both lobes of the pituitary, together with a three-fold increase in the peptide level in the plasma. In contrast, the level of alpha-neoendorphin in the hypothalamus, pituitary and spinal cord remained unchanged. Only in the plasma a decrease in that peptide content was found. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that the spontaneous and K(+)-stimulated release of beta-endorphin from the hypothalamus of rats which had been exposed to a conditioned stimulus was enhanced, whereas the release of alpha-neoendorphin from that tissue was attenuated. These results suggest a major role of the proopiomelanocortin system and, to the lesser extent, of the prodynorphin one in the mechanism of a conditioned fear-induced stress.

  17. Reprogramming of fatty acid and oxylipin synthesis in rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariutto, Martin; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Ongena, Marc; Laloux, Morgan; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; du Jardin, Patrick; Thonart, Philippe; Dommes, Jacques

    2014-03-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BTP1 stimulates induced systemic resistance (ISR) in tomato. A previous work showed that the resistance is associated in leaves with the induction of the first enzyme of the oxylipin pathway, the lipoxygenase (LOX), leading to a faster accumulation of its product, the free 13-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid (13-HPOT), 2 days after Botrytis cinerea inoculation. In the present study, we further investigated the stimulation of the oxylipin pathway: metabolites and enzymes of the pathway were analyzed to understand the fate of the 13-HPOT in ISR. Actually the stimulation began upstream the LOX: free linolenic acid accumulated faster in P. putida BTP1-treated plants than in control. Downstream, the LOX products 13-fatty acid hydroperoxides esterified to galactolipids and phospholipids were more abundant in bacterized plants than in control before infection. These metabolites could constitute a pool that will be used after pathogen attack to produce free fungitoxic metabolites through the action of phospholipase A2, which is enhanced in bacterized plants upon infection. Enzymatic branches which can use as substrate the fatty acid hydroperoxides were differentially regulated in bacterized plants in comparison to control plants, so as to lead to the accumulation of the most fungitoxic compounds against B. cinerea. Our study, which is the first to demonstrate the accumulation of an esterified defense metabolite during rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance, showed that the oxylipin pathway is differentially regulated. It suggests that this allows the plant to prepare to a future infection, and to respond faster and in a more effective way to B. cinerea invasion.

  18. A novel adjustable automated system for inducing chronic intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Polšek

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a chronic, widely underdiagnosed condition characterized by disruption of sleep architecture and intermittent hypoxia due to short cessations of breathing. It is a major independent risk factor for myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure and stroke as well as one of the rare modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's Dementia. Reliable animal disease models are needed to understand the link between sleep apnea and the various clinically linked disorders.An automated system for inducing hypoxia was developed, in which the major improvement was the possibility to efficiently adjust the length and intensity of hypoxia in two different periods. The chamber used a small volume of gas allowing for fast exchanges of different oxygen levels. The mice were kept in their cages adapted with the system on the cage lid. As a proof of principle, they were exposed to a three week period of intermittent hypoxia for 8 hours a day, with 90 s intervals of 5, 7% and 21% oxygen to validate the model. Treated (n = 8 and control mice (no hypoxia, n = 7 were handled in the same manner and their hippocampal brain regions compared by histology.The chamber provided a fast, reliable and precise intermittent hypoxia, without inducing noticeable side effects to the animals. The validation experiment showed that apoptotic neurons in the hippocampus were more numerous in the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia than in the control group, in all tested hippocampal regions (cornu ammonis 1 (CA1 P <0.001; cornu ammonis 3 (CA3 P <0.001; and dentate gyrus (DG P = 0.023. In both, control and hypoxic conditions, there was a significantly higher number of apoptotic neurons in the DG compared to the CA1 and CA3 subfields (P <0.001.The new design of a hypoxic chamber provides a fast, adjustable and reliable model of obstructive sleep apnea, which was validated by apoptosis of hippocampal neurons.

  19. Inducing broadcast coral spawning ex situ: Closed system mesocosm design and husbandry protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craggs, Jamie; Guest, James R; Davis, Michelle; Simmons, Jeremy; Dashti, Ehsan; Sweet, Michael

    2017-12-01

    For many corals, the timing of broadcast spawning correlates strongly with a number of environmental signals (seasonal temperature, lunar, and diel cycles). Robust experimental studies examining the role of these putative cues in triggering spawning have been lacking until recently because it has not been possible to predictably induce spawning in fully closed artificial mesocosms. Here, we present a closed system mesocosm aquarium design that utilizes microprocessor technology to accurately replicate environmental conditions, including photoperiod, seasonal insolation, lunar cycles, and seasonal temperature from Singapore and the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Coupled with appropriate coral husbandry, these mesocosms were successful in inducing, for the first time, broadcast coral spawning in a fully closed artificial ex situ environment. Four Acropora species ( A. hyacinthus , A. tenuis , A. millepora , and A. microclados ) from two geographical locations, kept for over 1 year, completed full gametogenic cycles ex situ. The percentage of colonies developing oocytes varied from ~29% for A. hyacinthus to 100% for A. millepora and A. microclados . Within the Singapore mesocosm, A. hyacinthus exhibited the closest synchronization to wild spawning, with all four gravid colonies releasing gametes in the same lunar month as wild predicted dates. Spawning within the GBR mesocosm commenced at the predicted wild spawn date but extended over a period of 3 months. Gamete release in relation to the time postsunset for A. hyacinthus , A. millep ora, and A. tenuis was consistent with time windows previously described in the wild. Spawn date in relation to full moon, however, was delayed in all species, possibly as a result of external light pollution. The system described here could broaden the number of institutions on a global scale, that can access material for broadcast coral spawning research, providing opportunities for institutions distant from coral

  20. An Ocean Biology-induced Negative Feedback on ENSO in the Tropical Pacific Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R. H.

    2016-02-01

    Biological conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean (e.g., phytoplankton biomass) are strongly regulated by physical changes associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The existence and variation of phytoplankton biomass, in turn, act to modulate the vertical penetration of the incoming sunlight in the upper ocean, presenting an ocean biology-induced heating (OBH) effect on the climate system. Previously, a penetration depth of solar radiation in the upper ocean (Hp) is defined to describe the related bio-climate connections. Parameterized in terms of its relationship with the sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropical Pacific, an empirical model for interannual Hp variability has been derived from remotely sensed ocean color data, which is incorporated into a hybrid coupled model (HCM) to represent OBH effects. In this paper, various HCM experiments are performed to demonstrate the bio-feedback onto ENSO, including a climatological Hp run (in which Hp is prescribed as seasonally varying only), interannual Hp runs (with different intensities of interannually varying OBH effects), and a run in which the sign of the OBH effect is artificially reversed. Significant modulating impacts on interannual variability are found in the HCM, characterized by a negative feedback between ocean biology and the climate system in the tropical Pacific: the stronger the OBH feedback, the weaker the interannual variability. Processes involved in the feedback are analyzed; it is illustrated that the SST is modulated indirectly by ocean dynamical processes induced by OBH. The significance and implication of the OBH effects are discussed for their roles in ENSO variability and model biases in the tropical Pacific.

  1. Vestibular stimulation-induced facilitation of cervical premotoneuronal systems in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Suzuki

    Full Text Available It is unclear how descending inputs from the vestibular system affect the excitability of cervical interneurons in humans. To elucidate this, we investigated the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS on the spatial facilitation of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs induced by combined pyramidal tract and peripheral nerve stimulation. To assess the spatial facilitation, electromyograms were recorded from the biceps brachii muscles (BB of healthy subjects. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS over the contralateral primary motor cortex and electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral ulnar nerve at the wrist were delivered either separately or together, with interstimulus intervals of 10 ms (TMS behind. Anodal/cathodal GVS was randomly delivered with TMS and/or ulnar nerve stimulation. The combination of TMS and ulnar nerve stimulation facilitated BB MEPs significantly more than the algebraic summation of responses induced separately by TMS and ulnar nerve stimulation (i.e., spatial facilitation. MEP facilitation significantly increased when combined stimulation was delivered with GVS (p < 0.01. No significant differences were found between anodal and cathodal GVS. Furthermore, single motor unit recordings showed that the short-latency excitatory peak in peri-stimulus time histograms during combined stimulation increased significantly with GVS. The spatial facilitatory effects of combined stimulation with short interstimulus intervals (i.e., 10 ms indicate that facilitation occurred at the premotoneuronal level in the cervical cord. The present findings therefore suggest that GVS facilitates the cervical interneuron system that integrates inputs from the pyramidal tract and peripheral nerves and excites motoneurons innervating the arm muscles.

  2. Local versus systemic effect of ovulation-inducing factor in the seminal plasma of alpacas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Jaswant

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camelids are induced (reflex ovulators. We have recently documented the presence of an ovulation-inducing factor (OIF in the seminal plasma of alpacas and llamas. The objective was to test the hypothesis that OIF exerts its effect via a systemic rather than a local route and that endometrial curettage will enhance the ovulatory response to intrauterine deposition of seminal plasma in alpacas. Methods Female alpacas were assigned randomly to 6 groups (n = 15 to 17 per group in a 2 × 3 factorial design to test the effect of seminal plasma versus phosphate-buffered saline (PBS given by intramuscular injection, by intrauterine infusion, or by intrauterine infusion after endometrial curettage. Specifically, alpacas in the respective groups were given 1 2 ml of alpaca seminal plasma intramuscularly, 2 2 ml of PBS intramuscularly (negative control group, 3 2 ml of alpaca seminal plasma by intrauterine infusion, 4 2 ml of PBS by intrauterine infusion (negative control group, 5 2 ml of alpaca seminal plasma by intrauterine infusion after endometrial curettage, or 6 2 ml of PBS by intrauterine infusion after endometrial curettage (negative control group. The alpacas were examined by transrectal ultrasonography to detect ovulation and measure follicular and luteal diameters. Results Intramuscular administration of seminal plasma resulted in a higher ovulation rate than intrauterine administration of seminal plasma (93% versus 41%; P Conclusion We conclude that 1 OIF in seminal plasma effects ovulation via a systemic rather than a local route, 2 disruption of the endometrial mucosa by curettage facilitated the absorption of OIF and increased the ovulatory effect of seminal plasma, and 3 ovulation in alpacas is not associated with a physical stimulation of the genital tract, and 4 the alpaca represents an excellent biological model to evaluate the bioactivity of OIF.

  3. LPS-induced systemic inflammation is more severe in P2Y12 null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverani, Elisabetta; Rico, Mario C.; Yaratha, Laxmikausthubha; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2014-01-01

    Thienopyridines are a class of antiplatelet drugs that are metabolized in the liver to several metabolites, of which only one active metabolite can irreversibly antagonize the platelet P2Y12 receptor. Possible effects of these drugs and the role of activated platelets in inflammatory responses have also been investigated in a variety of animal models, demonstrating that thienopyridines could alter inflammation. However, it is not clear whether it is caused only by the P2Y12 antagonism or whether off-target effects of other metabolites also intervene. To address this question, we investigated P2Y12 KO mice during a LPS-induced model of systemic inflammation, and we treated these KO mice with a thienopyridine drug (clopidogrel). Contrary to the reported effects of clopidogrel, numbers of circulating WBCs and plasma levels of cytokines were increased in LPS-exposed KO mice compared with WT in this inflammation model. Moreover, both spleen and bone marrow show an increase in cell content, suggesting a role for P2Y12 in regulation of bone marrow and spleen cellular composition. Finally, the injury was more severe in the lungs of KO mice compared with WT. Interestingly, clopidogrel treatments also exerted protective effects in KO mice, suggesting off-target effects for this drug. In conclusion, the P2Y12 receptor plays an important role during LPS-induced inflammation, and this signaling pathway may be involved in regulating cell content in spleen and bone marrow during LPS systemic inflammation. Furthermore, clopidogrel may have effects that are independent of P2Y12 receptor blockade. PMID:24142066

  4. How respiratory system mechanics may help in minimising ventilator-induced lung injury in ARDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terragni, P P; Rosboch, G L; Lisi, A; Viale, A G; Ranieri, V M

    2003-08-01

    The main supportive therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients is mechanical ventilation. As with any therapy, mechanical ventilation has side-effects, and may induce lung injury (ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI)/ventilator-associated lung injury). The mechanical factors responsible for VILI are thought to be related to tidal recruitment/derecruitment of previously collapsed alveoli and/or pulmonary overdistension. The volume/pressure (V/P) curve of the respiratory system in patients as well as in animal models of acute lung injury (ALI) has a characteristic sigmoid shape, with a lower inflection point (LIP) corresponding to the pressure/end-expiratory volume required to initiate recruitment of collapsed alveoli, and an upper inflection point (UIP) corresponding to the pressure/end inspiratory volume at which alveolar overdistension occurs. "Protective" ventilatory approaches have therefore set out to minimise mechanical injury by using the V/P curve to individualise positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP above the LIP) and tidal volume (by setting end-inspiratory V/P below the UIP) since a large number of experimental studies correlate P/V curves to histological and biological manifestations of VILI and two randomised trials showed that protective ventilatory strategy individually tailored to the P/V curve minimised pulmonary and systemic inflammation and decreased mortality in patients with ALI. However, despite the fact that several studies have: 1) proposed new techniques to perform pressure/volume curves at the bedside, 2) confirmed that the lower inflection point and upper inflection point correspond to computed tomography scan evidence of atelectasis and overdistension, and 3) demonstrated the ability of the pressure/volume curve to estimate alveolar recruitment with positive end-expiratory pressure, no large studies have assessed whether such measurement can be performed in all intensive care units as a monitoring tool to orient

  5. Influence of high carbohydrate versus high fat diet in ozone induced pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic impairment in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model of healthy aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Air pollution has been recently linked to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. It has been postulated that dietary risk factors might exacerbate air pollution-induced metabolic impairment. We have recently reported that ozone exposure induces acute systemic ...

  6. A Drosophila systems model of pentylenetetrazole induced locomotor plasticity responsive to antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rodent kindling induced by PTZ is a widely used model of epileptogenesis and AED testing. Overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms may underlie epileptogenesis and other neuropsychiatric conditions. Besides epilepsy, AEDs are widely used in treating various neuropsychiatric disorders. Mechanisms of AEDs' long term action in these disorders are poorly understood. We describe here a Drosophila systems model of PTZ induced locomotor plasticity that is responsive to AEDs. Results We empirically determined a regime in which seven days of PTZ treatment and seven days of subsequent PTZ discontinuation respectively cause a decrease and an increase in climbing speed of Drosophila adults. Concomitant treatment with NaVP and LEV, not ETH, GBP and VGB, suppressed the development of locomotor deficit at the end of chronic PTZ phase. Concomitant LEV also ameliorated locomotor alteration that develops after PTZ withdrawal. Time series of microarray expression profiles of heads of flies treated with PTZ for 12 hrs (beginning phase, two days (latent phase and seven days (behaviorally expressive phase showed only down-, not up-, regulation of genes; expression of 23, 2439 and 265 genes were downregulated, in that order. GO biological process enrichment analysis showed downregulation of transcription, neuron morphogenesis during differentiation, synaptic transmission, regulation of neurotransmitter levels, neurogenesis, axonogenesis, protein modification, axon guidance, actin filament organization etc. in the latent phase and of glutamate metabolism, cell communication etc. in the expressive phase. Proteomic interactome based analysis provided further directionality to these events. Pathway overrepresentation analysis showed enrichment of Wnt signaling and other associated pathways in genes downregulated by PTZ. Mining of available transcriptomic and proteomic data pertaining to established rodent models of epilepsy and human epileptic

  7. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Junie P; Csiszar, Anna; Mitschelen, Matthew; Lee, Yong Woo; Sonntag, William E

    2012-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia) or 21% oxygen (normoxia) for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  8. Design and experiment of controlled bistable vortex induced vibration energy harvesting systems operating in chaotic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, B. H.; Tjahjowidodo, T.; Zhong, Z.-W.; Wang, Y.; Srikanth, N.

    2018-01-01

    Vortex induced vibration based energy harvesting systems have gained interests in these recent years due to its potential as a low water current energy source. However, the effectiveness of the system is limited only at a certain water current due to the resonance principle that governs the concept. In order to extend the working range, a bistable spring to support the structure is introduced on the system. The improvement on the performance is essentially dependent on the bistable gap as one of the main parameters of the nonlinear spring. A sufficiently large bistable gap will result in a significant performance improvement. Unfortunately, a large bistable gap might also increase a chance of chaotic responses, which in turn will result in diminutive harvested power. To mitigate the problem, an appropriate control structure is required to stabilize the chaotic vibrations of a VIV energy converter with the bistable supporting structure. Based on the nature of the double-well potential energy in a bistable spring, the ideal control structure will attempt to drive the responses to inter-well periodic vibrations in order to maximize the harvested power. In this paper, the OGY control algorithm is designed and implemented to the system. The control strategy is selected since it requires only a small perturbation in a structural parameter to execute the control effort, thus, minimum power is needed to drive the control input. Facilitated by a wake oscillator model, the bistable VIV system is modelled as a 4-dimensional autonomous continuous-time dynamical system. To implement the controller strategy, the system is discretized at a period estimated from the subspace hyperplane intersecting to the chaotic trajectory, whereas the fixed points that correspond to the desired periodic orbits are estimated by the recurrence method. Simultaneously, the Jacobian and sensitivity matrices are estimated by the least square regression method. Based on the defined fixed point and the

  9. Effect of chronic continual- and intermittent hypoxia-induced systemic inflammation on the cardiovascular system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Mei; Yao, Dan; Cai, Xue-Ding; Ding, Cheng; Lin, Qian-Ding; Wang, Liang-Xing; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Present study aimed to investigate the role of NF-κB-dependent inflammation pathways in pathophysiological responses of cardiovascular system in OSAS. Thirty male specific pathogen-free (SPF) Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to normoxia (N) group, continual hypoxia (CH) group, and intermittent hypoxia (IH) group (n = 10) and were exposed to N (21% O2), CH (8% O2), or IH (6-11% O2 for 10 s and 21% O2 for 80 s in every 90 s) for 8 h/day for 35 days. The hemodynamic and pathomorphologic effects of IH and CH exposure were investigated as well as the expression of NF-κB-dependent inflammation factors. Chronic IH or CH significantly increased mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) in rats, while no significant changes occurred in mean carotid arterial pressure (mCAP). The ratio of right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle (LV) + septum (S) was significantly increased by both IH and CH, suggesting RV hypertrophy was induced by IH or CH. Elastic fiber staining showed an irregular pattern of elastic fiber distribution after hypoxia, and aortic tunica media thickness was increased. Both chronic IH and CH upregulated the expressions of transcription factor NF-κB and related pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. The current study expands our understanding that both IH and CH could activate the expression of NF-κB and related inflammatory factors as well as cause pathophysiologic damage to the cardiovascular system in OSAS. All these results provide further support to an emerging hypothesis that activation of NF-κB-dependent inflammation may play a central role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular dysfunction in OSAS.

  10. Chronic Hypergravity Induces Changes in the Dopaminergic Neuronal System in Drosophila Melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelos, Andrew; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Upon atmospheric exitre-entry and during training, astronauts are subjected to temporary periods of hypergravity, which has been implicated in the activation of oxidative stress pathways contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal degeneration. The pathogenesis of Parkinsons disease and other neurodegenerative disorders is associated with oxidative damage to neurons involved in dopamine systems of the brain. Our study aims to examine the effects of a hypergravitational developmental environment on the degeneration of dopaminergic systems in Drosophila melanogaster. Male and female flies (Gal4-UAS transgenic line) were hatched and raised to adulthood in centrifugal hypergravity (97rpm, 3g). The nuclear expression of the reporter, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is driven by the dopaminergic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, allowing for the targeted visualization of dopamine producing neurons. After being raised to adulthood and kept in hypergravity until 18 days of age, flies were dissected and the expression of TH was measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy. TH expression in the fly brains was used to obtain counts of healthy dopaminergic neurons for flies raised in chronic hypergravity and control groups. Dopaminergic neuron expression data were compared with those of previous studies that limited hypergravity exposure to late life in order to determine the flies adaptability to the gravitational environment when raised from hatching through adulthood. Overall, we observed a significant effect of chronic hypergravity exposure contributing to deficits in dopaminergic neuron expression (p 0.003). Flies raised in 3g had on average lower dopaminergic neuron counts (mean 97.7) when compared with flies raised in 1g (mean 122.8). We suspect these lower levels of TH expression are a result of oxidative dopaminergic cell loss in flies raised in hypergravity. In future studies, we hope to further elucidate the mechanism by which hypergravity-induced

  11. Strongly Asymmetric Spectroscopy in Plasmon-Exciton Hybrid Systems due to Interference-Induced Energy Repartitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Si-Jing; Li, Xiaoguang; Nan, Fan; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhou, Li; Xiao, Xudong; Wang, Qu-Quan; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2017-10-01

    Recent intense effort has been devoted to exploring different manifestations of resonant excitations of strongly coupled plasmons and excitons, but so far such studies have been limited to situations where the Fano- or Rabi-type spectra are largely symmetric at zero detuning. Using a newly developed full quantum mechanical model, here we reveal the existence of a highly asymmetric spectroscopic regime for both the Rabi splitting and transparency dip. The asymmetric nature is inherently tied to the non-negligible exciton absorbance and is caused by substantial interference-induced energy repartitioning of the resonance peaks. This theoretical framework can be exploited to reveal the quantum behaviors of the two excitation entities with varying mutual coupling strengths in both linear and nonlinear regimes. We also use prototypical systems of rhodamine molecules strongly coupled with AuAg alloyed nanoparticles and well-devised control experiments to demonstrate the validity and tunability of the energy repartitioning and correlated electronic state occupations, as captured by the variations in the asymmetric spectroscopy and corresponding nonlinear absorption coefficient as a function of the Au:Ag ratio. The present study helps to substantially enrich our microscopic understanding of strongly coupled plasmon-exciton systems.

  12. Generation of transgene-free mouse induced pluripotent stem cells using an excisable lentiviral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, E; Nemes, C; Davis, R P; Ujhelly, O; Klincumhom, N; Polgar, Z; Muenthaisong, S; Pirity, M K; Dinnyes, A

    2014-04-01

    One goal of research using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is to generate patient-specific cells which can be used to obtain multiple types of differentiated cells as disease models. Minimally or non-integrating methods to deliver the reprogramming genes are considered to be the best but they may be inefficient. Lentiviral delivery is currently among the most efficient methods but it integrates transgenes into the genome, which may affect the behavior of the iPSC if integration occurs into an important locus. Here we designed a polycistronic lentiviral construct containing four pluripotency genes with an EGFP selection marker. The cassette was excisable with the Cre-loxP system making possible the removal of the integrated transgenes from the genome. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were reprogrammed using this viral system, rapidly resulting in large number of iPSC colonies. Based on the lowest EGFP expression level, one parental line was chosen for excision. Introduction of the Cre recombinase resulted in transgene-free iPSC subclones. The effect of the transgenes was assessed by comparing the parental iPSC with two of its transgene-free subclones. Both excised and non-excised iPSCs expressed standard pluripotency markers. The subclones obtained after Cre recombination were capable of differentiation in vitro, in contrast to the parental, non-excised cells and formed germ-line competent chimeras in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in a Novel Molten Salt Aerosol System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ammon N; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2017-04-01

    In the pyrochemical separation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), fission product, rare earth, and actinide chlorides accumulate in the molten salt electrolyte over time. Measuring this salt composition in near real-time is advantageous for operational efficiency, material accountability, and nuclear safeguards. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed and demonstrated as a potential analytical approach for molten LiCl-KCl salts. However, all the studies conducted to date have used a static surface approach which can lead to issues with splashing, low repeatability, and poor sample homogeneity. In this initial study, a novel molten salt aerosol approach has been developed and explored to measure the composition of the salt via LIBS. The functionality of the system has been demonstrated as well as a basic optimization of the laser energy and nebulizer gas pressure used. Initial results have shown that this molten salt aerosol-LIBS system has a great potential as an analytical technique for measuring the molten salt electrolyte used in this UNF reprocessing technology.

  14. Catalase prevents maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-β1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

  15. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique.

  16. New, Coupling Loss Induced, Quench Protection System for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Giloux, C; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    Email Print Request Permissions Save to Project A new and promising method for the protection of superconducting high-field magnets is developed and tested on the so-called MQXC quadrupole magnet at the CERN magnet test facility. The method relies on a capacitive discharge system inducing, during a few periods, an oscillation of the transport current in the superconducting cable of the coil. The corresponding fast change of the local magnetic field introduces a high coupling-current loss, which, in turn, causes a fast quench of a large fraction of the coil due to enhanced temperature. Results of measured discharges at various levels of transport current are presented and compared to discharges by quenching the coils using conventional quench heaters and an energy extraction system. The hot-spot temperature in the quenching coil is deduced from the coil voltage and current. The results are compared to simulations carried out using a lumped-element dynamic electro-thermal model of the so-called MQX...

  17. A Novel Inducible Protein Production System and Neomycin Resistance as Selection Marker for Methanosarcina mazei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Mondorf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina mazei is one of the model organisms for the methanogenic order Methanosarcinales whose metabolism has been studied in detail. However, the genetic toolbox is still limited. This study was aimed at widening the scope of utilizable methods in this group of organisms. (i Proteins specific to methanogens are oftentimes difficult to produce in E. coli. However, a protein production system is not available for methanogens. Here we present an inducible system to produce Strep-tagged proteins in Ms. mazei. The promoter p1687, which directs the transcription of methyl transferases that demethylate methylamines, was cloned into plasmid pWM321 and its activity was determined by monitoring β-glucuronidase production. The promoter was inactive during growth on methanol but was rapidly activated when trimethylamine was added to the medium. The gene encoding the β-glucuronidase from E. coli was fused to a Strep-tag and was cloned downstream of the p1687 promoter. The protein was overproduced in Ms. mazei and was purified in an active form by affinity chromatography. (ii Puromycin is currently the only antibiotic used as a selectable marker in Ms. mazei and its relatives. We established neomycin resistance as a second selectable marker by designing a plasmid that confers neomycin resistance in Ms. mazei.

  18. Selective Surface Sintering Using a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jull

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium metal injection molding allows creation of complex metal parts that are lightweight and biocompatible with reduced cost in comparison with machining titanium. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS can be used to create plasma on the surface of a sample to analyze its elemental composition. Repetitive ablation on the same site has been shown to create differences from the original sample. This study investigates the potential of LIBS for selective surface sintering of injection-molded titanium metal. The temperature created throughout the LIBS process on the surface of the injection-molded titanium is high enough to fuse together the titanium particles. Using the ratio of the Ti II 282.81 nm and the C I 247.86 nm lines, the effectiveness of repetitive plasma formation to produce sintering can be monitored during the process. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy on the ablation craters confirms sintering through the reduction in carbon from 20.29 Wt.% to 2.13 Wt.%. Scanning electron microscope images confirm sintering. A conventional LIBS system, with a fixed distance, investigated laser parameters on injection-molded and injection-sintered titanium. To prove the feasibility of using this technique on a production line, a second LIBS system, with an autofocus and 3-axis translation stage, successfully sintered a sample with a nonplanar surface.

  19. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 Induces Systemic Resistance in Tomato Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitti, Antonella; Pellegrini, Elisa; Nali, Cristina; Lovelli, Stella; Sofo, Adriano; Valerio, Maria; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22) to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV. PMID:27777581

  20. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 induces systemic resistance in tomato infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Vitti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22 to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV.

  1. Muscular and systemic correlates of resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cameron J; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Bellamy, Leeann; Parise, Gianni; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2013-01-01

    To determine relationships between post-exercise changes in systemic [testosterone, growth hormone (GH), insulin like grow factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6)], or intramuscular [skeletal muscle androgen receptor (AR) protein content and p70S6K phosphorylation status] factors in a moderately-sized cohort of young men exhibiting divergent resistance training-mediated muscle hypertrophy. Twenty three adult males completed 4 sessions•wk⁻¹ of resistance training for 16 wk. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training period and acutely 1 and 5 h after the first training session. Serum hormones and cytokines were measured immediately, 15, 30 and 60 minutes following the first and last training sessions of the study. Mean fiber area increased by 20% (range: -7 to 80%; Pmuscle fiber hypertrophy; however, the magnitude of the post exercise IL-6 response was correlated with muscle hypertrophy (r=0.48, P=0.019). Post-exercise increases in circulating hormones are not related to hypertrophy following training. Exercise-induced changes in IL-6 correlated with hypertrophy, but the mechanism for the role of IL-6 in hypertrophy is not known. Acute increases, in p70S6K phosphorylation and changes in muscle AR protein content correlated with muscle hypertrophy implicating intramuscular rather than systemic processes in mediating hypertrophy.

  2. A drug release system induced by near infrared laser using alginate microparticles containing melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ah; Yoon, Soon Do; Lee, Chang-Moon

    2017-10-01

    The photothermal effect is used in a new drug release system to control drug delivery in a specific region. Melanin absorbs near-infrared (NIR) light with a high photothermal conversion efficiency, and as a result, an NIR laser can be used to induced drug release from alginate microparticles containing melanin (ALG-Mel microparticles). The temperature of the ALG-Mel microparticle solution at a concentration of 5mg/mL increased to 38.1°C from 26.0°C after irradiation with 808nm NIR at 1.5W/cm 2 for 5min, and this increase in temperature was found to be independent of the ALG-Mel microparticle concentration. After the NIR laser irradiation, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was released from the ALG-Mel microparticles to 87.4±0.5% of the total loaded drug for 24h. Without NIR laser irradiation, 5-FU was released from the ALG-Mel microparticles to 60.8±1.5% of the total loaded drug for 24h. These results indicate that NIR laser irradiation can be used with ALG-Mel microparticles as a drug delivery system for release within a target region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary oligofructose and inulin protect mice from enteric and systemic pathogens and tumor inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddington, Karyl K; Donahoo, Jillian B; Buddington, Randal K

    2002-03-01

    Prebiotics induce changes in the population and metabolic characteristics of the gastrointestinal bacteria, modulate enteric and systemic immune functions, and provide laboratory rodents with resistance to carcinogens that promote colorectal cancer. There is less known about protection from other challenges. Therefore, mice of the B6C3F1 strain were fed for 6 wk a control diet with 100 g/kg cellulose or one of two experimental diets with the cellulose replaced entirely by the nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) oligofructose and inulin. From each diet, 25 mice were challenged by a promoter of colorectal cancer (1,2-dimethylhydrazine), B16F10 tumor cells, the enteric pathogen Candida albicans (enterically), or were infected systemically with Listeria monocytogenes or Salmonella typhimurium. The incidences of aberrant crypt foci in the distal colon after exposure to dimethylhdrazine for mice fed inulin (53%) and oligofructose (54%) were lower than in control mice (76%; P 80% for control mice), but fewer of the mice fed inulin died (60%; P dietary NDO was not elucidated, but the findings are consistent with enhanced immune functions in response to changes in the composition and metabolic characteristics of the bacteria resident in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Eyedrop Vaccination Induced Systemic and Mucosal Immunity against Influenza Virus in Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Yoon

    Full Text Available We investigated eyedrop vaccination (EDV in pre-clinical development for immunological protection against influenza and for potential side effects involving ocular inflammation and the central nervous system (CNS. Live attenuated influenza EDV, CA07 (H1N1, PZ-4 (H1N2 and Uruguay (H3N2, induced both systemic and mucosal virus-specific antibody responses in ferrets. In addition, EDV resulted in a clinically significant protection against viral challenge, and suppression of viral replication in nasal secretion and lung tissue. Regarding safety, we found that administered EDV flow through the tear duct to reach the base of nasal cavity, and thus do not contact the olfactory bulb. All analyses for potential adverse effects due to EDV, including histological and functional examinations, did not reveal significant side effects. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EDV as effective, while being a safe administration route with minimum local side effects, CNS invasion, or visual function disturbance.

  5. Current-induced spin-orbit torques in ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2018-01-29

    Spin-orbit coupling in inversion-asymmetric magnetic crystals and structures has emerged as a powerful tool to generate complex magnetic textures, interconvert charge and spin under applied current, and control magnetization dynamics. Current-induced spin-orbit torques mediate the transfer of angular momentum from the lattice to the spin system, leading to sustained magnetic oscillations or switching of ferromagnetic as well as antiferromagnetic structures. The manipulation of magnetic order, domain walls and skyrmions by spin-orbit torques provides evidence of the microscopic interactions between charge and spin in a variety of materials and opens novel strategies to design spintronic devices with potentially high impact in data storage, nonvolatile logic, and magnonic applications. This paper reviews recent progress in the field of spin-orbitronics, focusing on theoretical models, material properties, and experimental results obtained on bulk noncentrosymmetric conductors and multilayer heterostructures, including metals, semiconductors, and topological insulator systems. Relevant aspects for improving the understanding and optimizing the efficiency of nonequilibrium spin-orbit phenomena in future nanoscale devices are also discussed.

  6. Method: low-cost delivery of the cotton leaf crumple virus-induced gene silencing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuttle John

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously developed a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS vector for cotton from the bipartite geminivirusCotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV. The original CLCrV VIGS vector was designed for biolistic delivery by a gene gun. This prerequisite limited the use of the system to labs with access to biolistic equipment. Here we describe the adaptation of this system for delivery by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We also describe the construction of two low-cost particle inflow guns. Results The biolistic CLCrV vector was transferred into two Agrobacterium binary plasmids. Agroinoculation of the binary plasmids into cotton resulted in silencing and GFP expression comparable to the biolistic vector. Two homemade low-cost gene guns were used to successfully inoculate cotton (G. hirsutum and N. benthamiana with either the CLCrV VIGS vector or the Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV VIGS vector respectively. Conclusions These innovations extend the versatility of CLCrV-based VIGS for analyzing gene function in cotton. The two low-cost gene guns make VIGS experiments affordable for both research and teaching labs by providing a working alternative to expensive commercial gene guns.

  7. Radiation-induced changes of the developing nervous system of amphibians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.

    1986-01-01

    The nervous system of amphibians (Xenopus laevis and Bufo) is of an outstanding sensitivity against irradiation in the early periods of its tissue induction and development. This is descriptively shown by various pathological disturbances. Irradiated series showed a protracted course of development. The brains obtains lower relative weights and diminished absolute lengths although the body weight remained nearly constant. The distribution of pigmentation in the brains of treated animals was changed. This indicated radiation-induced disturbances. Further, the significance of pigmentation pattern for a distinct evaluation of histological effects is also confirmed by a coincidence between the gross visible anomalies of the brain and the number of pigment-sites. Examples of malformation are given by aplasias, hypoplasias, hyperplasias up to cases of cyclopia. In the peripheral nervous system of Xenopus the neuromuscular junctions of the musculus interhyoideus were examined. The majority of neural endplates in the irradiated cases showed a loss of Schwann cells. As a consequence a diffusion of the transmitter acetylcholine in the endplate-region must be suggested. Accordingly, the morphological compensation reaction was seen in a thickening and sprouting. (orig.)

  8. Modern g,d,p,n-induced activation-transmutation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublet, J.Ch.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The European Activation System (EASY) includes as the source of nuclear data the European Activation File (EAF) and as its engine the FISPACT activation-transmutation code. The latest version of the EAF, EAF-2010, contains cross-section data for gamma-, deuteron- and proton-induced reactions in addition to the traditional neutron-induced data. The main reason for the addition of these data to EAF is to enable activation-transmutation calculations to be performed for even more nuclear facilities, including 'accelerator'-driven devices with incident upper energy limit of 60 or 200 MeV. EAF-2010 has benefited from the generation and maintenance of comprehensive activation files in the past and the development of the processing code SAFEPAQ-II and model code TALYS. TALYS is the source for all gamma-, proton- and deuteron-induced data and a fair share of the neutron-induced data. Cross-section validation exercises against both experimental data and systematic, which were started in 1995, enable a comprehensive assessment of the data. Although EAF-2010 is certainly the most-validated activation neutron cross-section library in the world, currently less than 3% of all the reactions can be compared with experimental information, and even then only for a very limited, and not always application-relevant, energy range. As with EAF-2010, -2003, -2005 and -2007 results of integral experiments have been used to correct, adjust and validate data. This can be done using SAFEPAQ II by inputting the measured effective cross-sections. Validation using integral data has been performed by means of direct comparison with measurements of various materials under relevant particle spectra. A tool has recently been developed which is important now that the libraries contain so much TALYS-calculated data. Statistical analysis of cross-sections (SACS) is used to look for trends in the library data for a particular

  9. α-Synuclein-induced myelination deficit defines a novel interventional target for multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettle, Benjamin; Kerman, Bilal E; Valera, Elvira; Gillmann, Clarissa; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Reiprich, Simone; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Reis, André; Wegner, Michael; Bäuerle, Tobias; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Masliah, Eliezer; Gage, Fred H; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare atypical parkinsonian disorder characterized by a rapidly progressing clinical course and at present without any efficient therapy. Neuropathologically, myelin loss and neurodegeneration are associated with α-synuclein accumulation in oligodendrocytes, but underlying pathomechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the impact of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein on the formation of myelin sheaths to define a potential interventional target for MSA. Post-mortem analyses of MSA patients and controls were performed to quantify myelin and oligodendrocyte numbers. As pre-clinical models, we used transgenic MSA mice, a myelinating stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte-neuron co-culture, and primary oligodendrocytes to determine functional consequences of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein overexpression on myelination. We detected myelin loss accompanied by preserved or even increased numbers of oligodendrocytes in post-mortem MSA brains or transgenic mouse forebrains, respectively, indicating an oligodendrocytic dysfunction in myelin formation. Corroborating this observation, overexpression of α-synuclein in primary and stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes severely impaired myelin formation, defining a novel α-synuclein-linked pathomechanism in MSA. We used the pro-myelinating activity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist benztropine to analyze the reversibility of the myelination deficit. Transcriptome profiling of primary pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes demonstrated that benztropine readjusts myelination-related processes such as cholesterol and membrane biogenesis, being compromised by oligodendrocytic α-synuclein. Additionally, benztropine restored the α-synuclein-induced myelination deficit of stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes. Strikingly, benztropine also ameliorated the myelin deficit in transgenic MSA mice, resulting in a prevention of neuronal cell loss. In conclusion, this study defines the α-synuclein-induced

  10. Chronic Water-Pipe Smoke Exposure Induces Injurious Effects to Reproductive System in Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ashique, Mohammed; Shalaby, Asem; Al Kindi, Mohammed A.; Adham, Sirin A.; Karaca, Turan; Beegam, Sumaya; Yuvaraju, Priya; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2017-01-01

    There is a global increase in the popularity of water-pipe tobacco smoking including in Europe and North America. Nevertheless, little is known about the male reproductive effects of water-pipe smoke (WPS), especially after long-term exposure. Here, we assessed effects of WPS exposure (30 min/day) in male mice for 6 months. Control mice were exposed to air-only for the same period of time. Twenty-four hours after the last exposure, testicular histopathology, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and the tyrosine–protein kinase vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) were assessed in testicular homogenates. Moreover, plasma testosterone, estradiol, and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations were also measured. Chronic WPS exposure induced a significant decrease of testosterone and estradiol, and a slight but significant increase of LH. Glutathione reductase, catalase, and ascorbic acid were significantly decreased following WPS exposure. Plasma concentration of leptin was significantly decreased by WPS exposure, whereas that of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 was significantly increased. Histopathological analysis of the testes revealed the presence of a marked reduction in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules with reduced spermatogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy examination showed irregular thickening and wrinkling of the basement membranes with abnormal shapes and structures of the spermatozoa. VEGFR1 was overexpressed in the testis of the mice exposed to WPS and was not detected in the control. The urine concentration of cotinine, the predominant metabolite of nicotine, was significantly increased in the WPS-exposed group compared with the control group. We conclude that chronic exposure to WPS induces damaging effects to the reproductive system in male mice. If this can be confirmed in humans, it would be an additional concern to an already serious public health problem, especially with the increased use of

  11. Methanol extract of Longanae Arillus augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the modification of GABAergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Ma, Hong; Eun, Jae Soon; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hong, Jin-Tae; Lee, Myung-Koo; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2009-03-18

    This experiment was performed to investigate whether methanol extract of Longanae Arillus (MELA) has hypnotic effects and/or enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the GABAergic systems. MELA prolonged sleep time and reduced sleep latency induced by pentobarbital similar to muscimol, a GABAA receptors agonist. MELA also increased sleep rate and sleep time in the combined administration with pentobarbital at the sub-hypnotic dosage and showed synergic effects with muscimol in potentiating sleep onset and enhancing sleep time induced by pentobarbital. However, MELA itself did not induce sleep at higher dose which was used in this experiment. In addition, both of MELA and pentobarbital increased chloride influx in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. MELA increased GABAA receptors gamma-subunit expression and had no effect on the expression of alpha- and beta-subunits, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells, showing different expression of subunits from pentobarbital. In conclusion, MELA itself does not induce sleep, but it augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the modification of GABAergic systems.

  12. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  13. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-01-01

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α 2 -macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic

  14. An adaptive and generalizable closed-loop system for control of medically induced coma and other states of anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiao; Shanechi, Maryam M.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Design of closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems is an important topic, particularly for medically induced coma, which needs to be maintained for long periods. Current CLADs for medically induced coma require a separate offline experiment for model parameter estimation, which causes interruption in treatment and is difficult to perform. Also, CLADs may exhibit bias due to inherent time-variation and non-stationarity, and may have large infusion rate variations at steady state. Finally, current CLADs lack theoretical performance guarantees. We develop the first adaptive CLAD for medically induced coma, which addresses these limitations. Further, we extend our adaptive system to be generalizable to other states of anesthesia. Approach. We designed general parametric pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic and neural observation models with associated guidelines, and derived a novel adaptive controller. We further penalized large steady-state drug infusion rate variations in the controller. We derived theoretical guarantees that the adaptive system has zero steady-state bias. Using simulations that resembled real time-varying and noisy environments, we tested the closed-loop system for control of two different anesthetic states, burst suppression in medically induced coma and unconsciousness in general anesthesia. Main results. In 1200 simulations, the adaptive system achieved precise control of both anesthetic states despite non-stationarity, time-variation, noise, and no initial parameter knowledge. In both cases, the adaptive system performed close to a baseline system that knew the parameters exactly. In contrast, a non-adaptive system resulted in large steady-state bias and error. The adaptive system also resulted in significantly smaller steady-state infusion rate variations compared to prior systems. Significance. These results have significant implications for clinically viable CLAD design for a wide range of anesthetic states, with potential cost

  15. Differential effectiveness of Serratia plymuthica IC1270-induced systemic resistance against hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic leaf pathogens in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höfte Monica M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced resistance is a state of enhanced defensive capacity developed by a plant reacting to specific biotic or chemical stimuli. Over the years, several forms of induced resistance have been characterized, including systemic acquired resistance, which is induced upon localized infection by an avirulent necrotizing pathogen, and induced systemic resistance (ISR, which is elicited by selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria. However, contrary to the relative wealth of information on inducible defense responses in dicotyledoneous plants, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying induced resistance phenomena in cereal crops is still in its infancy. Using a combined cytomolecular and pharmacological approach, we analyzed the host defense mechanisms associated with the establishment of ISR in rice by the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica IC1270. Results In a standardized soil-based assay, root treatment with IC1270 rendered foliar tissues more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, causal agent of the devastating rice blast disease. Analysis of the cytological and biochemical alterations associated with restriction of fungal growth in IC1270-induced plants revealed that IC1270 primes rice for enhanced attacker-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and autofluorescent phenolic compounds in and near epidermal cells displaying dense cytoplasmic granulation. Similar, yet more abundant, phenotypes of hypersensitively dying cells in the vicinity of fungal hyphae were evident in a gene-for-gene interaction with an avirulent M. oryzae strain, suggesting that IC1270-inducible ISR and R protein conditioned effector-triggered immunity (ETI target similar defense mechanisms. Yet, this IC1270-inducible ISR response seems to act as a double-edged sword within the rice defense network as induced plants displayed an increased vulnerability to the necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia

  16. Multispectral imaging system based on laser-induced fluorescence for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Del Franco, M.; Palucci, A.; Pistilli, M.; Spizzichino, V.

    2016-10-01

    The development of portable sensors for fast screening of crime scenes is required to reduce the number of evidences useful to be collected, optimizing time and resources. Laser based spectroscopic techniques are good candidates to this scope due to their capability to operate in field, in remote and rapid way. In this work, the prototype of a multispectral imaging LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) system able to detect evidence of different materials on large very crowded and confusing areas at distances up to some tens of meters will be presented. Data collected as both 2D fluorescence images and LIF spectra are suitable to the identification and the localization of the materials of interest. A reduced scan time, preserving at the same time the accuracy of the results, has been taken into account as a main requirement in the system design. An excimer laser with high energy and repetition rate coupled to a gated high sensitivity ICCD assures very good performances for this purpose. Effort has been devoted to speed up the data processing. The system has been tested in outdoor and indoor real scenarios and some results will be reported. Evidence of the plastics polypropylene (PP) and polyethilene (PE) and polyester have been identified and their localization on the examined scenes has been highlighted through the data processing. By suitable emission bands, the instrument can be used for the rapid detection of other material classes (i.e. textiles, woods, varnishes). The activities of this work have been supported by the EU-FP7 FORLAB project (Forensic Laboratory for in-situ evidence analysis in a post blast scenario).

  17. Phase-slip-induced dissipation in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D; White, M; Pasienski, M; DeMarco, B

    2008-05-01

    Phase-slips control dissipation in many bosonic systems, determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium and the generation of resistance in thin superconducting wires. Technological interest has been largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, such as standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. Although phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors--in solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate their study and application. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation in a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard system, by experimentally studying the transport of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low-velocity regime described by the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model that is unaffected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. The damping rate of atomic motion (the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid) in the confining parabolic potential is well fitted by a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, whereas at higher temperatures a crossover consistent with a transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging. These results clarify the role of phase slips in superfluid systems. They may also be of relevance in understanding the source of metallic phases observed in thin films, or serve as a test bed for theories of bosonic dissipation based upon variants of the Bose-Hubbard model.

  18. Likelihood Estimation of the Systemic Poison-Induced Morbidity in an Adult North Eastern Romanian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Lionte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acute exposure to a systemic poison represents an important segment of medical emergencies. We aimed to estimate the likelihood of systemic poison-induced morbidity in a population admitted in a tertiary referral center from North East Romania, based on the determinant factors. Methodology: This was a prospective observational cohort study on adult poisoned patients. Demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics were recorded in all patients. We analyzed three groups of patients, based on the associated morbidity during hospitalization. We identified significant differences between groups and predictors with significant effects on morbidity using multiple multinomial logistic regressions. ROC analysis proved that a combination of tests could improve diagnostic accuracy of poison-related morbidity. Main findings: Of the 180 patients included, aged 44.7 ± 17.2 years, 51.1% males, 49.4% had no poison-related morbidity, 28.9% developed a mild morbidity, and 21.7% had a severe morbidity, followed by death in 16 patients (8.9%. Multiple complications and deaths were recorded in patients aged 53.4 ± 17.6 years (p .001, with a lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score upon admission and a significantly higher heart rate (101 ± 32 beats/min, p .011. Routine laboratory tests were significantly higher in patients with a recorded morbidity. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that a GCS < 8, a high white blood cells count (WBC, alanine aminotransferase (ALAT, myoglobin, glycemia and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP are strongly predictive for in-hospital severe morbidity. Originality: This is the first Romanian prospective study on adult poisoned patients, which identifies the factors responsible for in-hospital morbidity using logistic regression analyses, with resulting receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Conclusion: In acute intoxication with systemic poisons, we identified several clinical and laboratory variables

  19. An Automated Comparative Observation System for Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Vegetation Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijia Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Detecting sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF offers a new approach for remote sensing photosynthesis. However, to analyse the response characteristics of SIF under different stress states, a long-term time-series comparative observation of vegetation under different stress states must be carried out at the canopy scale, such that the similarities and differences in SIF change law can be summarized under different time scales. A continuous comparative observation system for vegetation canopy SIF is designed in this study. The system, which is based on a high-resolution spectrometer and an optical multiplexer, can achieve comparative observation of multiple targets. To simultaneously measure the commonly used vegetation index and SIF in the O2-A and O2-B atmospheric absorption bands, the following parameters are used: a spectral range of 475.9 to 862.2 nm, a spectral resolution of approximately 0.9 nm, a spectral sampling interval of approximately 0.4 nm, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR can be as high as 1000:1. To obtain data for both the upward radiance of the vegetation canopy and downward irradiance data with a high SNR in relatively short time intervals, the single-step integration time optimization algorithm is proposed. To optimize the extraction accuracy of SIF, the FluorMOD model is used to simulate sets of data according to the spectral resolution, spectral sampling interval and SNR of the spectrometer in this continuous observation system. These data sets are used to determine the best parameters of Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD, Three FLD (3FLD and the spectral fitting method (SFM, and 3FLD and SFM are confirmed to be suitable for extracting SIF from the spectral measurements. This system has been used to observe the SIF values in O2-A and O2-B absorption bands and some commonly used vegetation index from sweet potato and bare land, the result of which shows: (1 the daily variation trend of SIF value of sweet potato leaves is

  20. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Nicole Y L; Both, Stephanie; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain's "reward system", and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in NAcc responsiveness toward reward cues. Results from both animal and human PET studies indicate that the stress hormone cortisol may be crucial in the interaction between stress and dopaminergic actions. In the present study we therefore investigated whether cortisol mediated the effect of stress on DA-related responses to -subliminal-presentation of reward cues using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which is known to reliably enhance cortisol levels. Young healthy males (n = 37) were randomly assigned to the TSST or control condition. After stress induction, brain activation was assessed using fMRI during a backward-masking paradigm in which potentially rewarding (sexual), emotionally negative and neutral stimuli were presented subliminally, masked by pictures of inanimate objects. A region of interest analysis showed that stress decreased activation in the NAcc in response to masked sexual cues (voxel-corrected, pcortisol levels were related to stronger NAcc activation, showing that cortisol acted as a suppressor variable in the negative relation between stress and NAcc activation. The present findings indicate that cortisol is crucially involved in the relation between stress and the responsiveness of the reward system. Although generally stress decreases activation in the NAcc in response to rewarding stimuli, high stress-induced cortisol levels suppress this relation, and are associated with stronger NAcc activation. Individuals with a high cortisol response to stress might on one hand be protected against reductions in reward sensitivity, which has been linked to anhedonia and depression, but they may ultimately be more vulnerable to increased reward

  1. High-precision relocation of induced seismicity in the geothermal system below St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Tobias; Kraft, Toni; Eduard, Kissling; Nicholas, Deichmann; Clinton, John; Wiemer, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    From July to November 2013 a sequence of more than 850 events, of which more than 340 could be located, was triggered in a planned hydrothermal system below the city of St. Gallen in eastern Switzerland. Seismicity initiated on July 14 and the maximum Ml in the sequence was 3.5, comparable in size with the Ml 3.4 event induced by stimulation below Basel in 2006. To improve absolute locations of the sequence, more than 1000 P and S wave arrivals were inverted for hypocenters and 1D velocity structure. Vp of 5.6-5.8 km/s and a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.82-1.9 in the source region indicate a limestone or shale-type composition and a comparison with a lithological model from a 3D seismic model suggests that the seismically active streak (height up to 400 m) is within the Mesozoic layer. To resolve the fine structure of the induced seismicity, we applied waveform cross-correlation and double-difference algorithms. The results image a NE-SW striking lineament, consistent with a left-lateral fault plane derived from first motion polarities and moment tensor inversions. A spatio-temporal analysis of the relocated seismicity shows that, during first acid jobs on July 17, microseismicity propagated towards southwest over the entire future Ml 3.5 rupture plane. The almost vertical focal plane associated with the Ml 3.5 event of July 20 is well imaged by the seismicity. The area of the ruptured fault is approximately 675x400 m. Seismicity images a change in focal depths along strike, which correlates with a kink or bend in the mapped fault system northeast of the Ml 3.5 event. This change might indicate structural differences or a segmentation of the fault. Following the Ml 3.5 event, seismicity propagated along strike to the northeast, in a region without any mapped faults, indicating a continuation of the fault segment. Seismicity on this segment occurred in September and October. A complete rupture of the NE segment would have the potential to produce a magnitude larger than 3

  2. Genome-wide analysis of bacterial determinants of plant growth promotion and induced systemic resistance by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Xu; Etalo, Desalegn W.; van de Mortel, Judith E.; Dekkers, Ester; Nguyen, Linh; Medema, Marnix H; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 (Pf.SS101) promotes growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, enhances greening and lateral root formation, and induces systemic resistance (ISR) against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). Here, targeted and untargeted approaches were adopted to

  3. Caffeine at a Moderate Dose Did Not Affect the Skeletal System of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Folwarczna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes may lead to the development of osteoporosis. Coffee drinking, apart from its health benefits, is taken into consideration as an osteoporosis risk factor. Data from human and animal studies on coffee and caffeine bone effects are inconsistent. The aim of the study was to investigate effects of caffeine at a moderate dose on the skeletal system of rats in two models of experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin. Effects of caffeine administered orally (20 mg/kg aily for four weeks were investigated in three-month-old female Wistar rats, which, two weeks before the start of caffeine administration, received streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally alone or streptozotocin after nicotinamide (230 mg/kg, intraperitoneally. Bone turnover markers, mass, mineral density, histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Streptozotocin induced diabetes, with profound changes in the skeletal system due to increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. Although streptozotocin administered after nicotinamide induced slight increases in glucose levels at the beginning of the experiment only, slight, but significant unfavorable changes in the skeletal system were demonstrated. Administration of caffeine did not affect the investigated skeletal parameters of rats with streptozotocin-induced disorders. In conclusion, caffeine at a moderate dose did not exert a damaging effect on the skeletal system of diabetic rats.

  4. Systemic 5-Bromo-2-Deoxyuridine Induces Conditioned Flavor Aversion and C-Fos in the Visceral Neuraxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Adam; Kwon, Bumsup; Eckel, Lisa A.; Houpt, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is often used in studies of adult neurogenesis and olfactory learning, but it can also have toxic effects on highly proliferative tissue. We found that pairing Kool-Aid flavors with acute systemic injections of BrdU induced strong conditioned flavor aversions. Intermittent injections during Kool-Aid-glucose…

  5. Test systems in drug discovery for hazard identification and risk assessment of human drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Richard J; Betts, Catherine; Blomme, Eric A G; Gerets, Helga H J; Gjervig Jensen, Klaus; Hewitt, Philip G; Juhila, Satu; Labbe, Gilles; Liguori, Michael J; Mesens, Natalie; Ogese, Monday O; Persson, Mikael; Snoeys, Jan; Stevens, James L; Walker, Tracy; Park, B Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The liver is an important target for drug-induced toxicities. Early detection of hepatotoxic drugs requires use of well-characterized test systems, yet current knowledge, gaps and limitations of tests employed remains an important issue for drug development. Areas Covered: The current state of the science, understanding and application of test systems in use for the detection of drug-induced cytotoxicity, mitochondrial toxicity, cholestasis and inflammation is summarized. The test systems highlighted herein cover mostly in vitro and some in vivo models and endpoint measurements used in the assessment of small molecule toxic liabilities. Opportunities for research efforts in areas necessitating the development of specific tests and improved mechanistic understanding are highlighted. Expert Opinion: Use of in vitro test systems for safety optimization will remain a core activity in drug discovery. Substantial inroads have been made with a number of assays established for human Drug-induced Liver Injury. There nevertheless remain significant gaps with a need for improved in vitro tools and novel tests to address specific mechanisms of human Drug-Induced Liver Injury. Progress in these areas will necessitate not only models fit for application, but also mechanistic understanding of how chemical insult on the liver occurs in order to identify translational and quantifiable readouts for decision-making.

  6. Iron-regulated metabolites of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374 : Their role in induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djavaheri, M.

    2007-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r effectively suppresses fusarium wilt in radish by induced systemic resistance (ISR). In radish, WCS374r-mediated ISR depends partly on iron-regulated metabolites. Under iron-limiting conditions, P. fluorescens WCS374r produces

  7. Caffeine at a Moderate Dose Did Not Affect the Skeletal System of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Janas, Aleksandra; Cegieła, Urszula; Pytlik, Maria; Śliwiński, Leszek; Matejczyk, Magdalena; Nowacka, Anna; Rudy, Karolina; Krivošíková, Zora; Štefíková, Kornélia; Gajdoš, Martin

    2017-10-30

    Diabetes may lead to the development of osteoporosis. Coffee drinking, apart from its health benefits, is taken into consideration as an osteoporosis risk factor. Data from human and animal studies on coffee and caffeine bone effects are inconsistent. The aim of the study was to investigate effects of caffeine at a moderate dose on the skeletal system of rats in two models of experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin. Effects of caffeine administered orally (20 mg/kg aily for four weeks) were investigated in three-month-old female Wistar rats, which, two weeks before the start of caffeine administration, received streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) alone or streptozotocin after nicotinamide (230 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Bone turnover markers, mass, mineral density, histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Streptozotocin induced diabetes, with profound changes in the skeletal system due to increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. Although streptozotocin administered after nicotinamide induced slight increases in glucose levels at the beginning of the experiment only, slight, but significant unfavorable changes in the skeletal system were demonstrated. Administration of caffeine did not affect the investigated skeletal parameters of rats with streptozotocin-induced disorders. In conclusion, caffeine at a moderate dose did not exert a damaging effect on the skeletal system of diabetic rats.

  8. Characterization of Radiation Induced Current in RF coils of Linac-MR Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Benjamin Lester

    Real-time MR imaging of the cancer patients undergoing external beam radiation treatment represents the next generation in image guided radiotherapy. However, the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI is exposed to the pulsed radiation of the linear accelerator in the systems where a medical linear accelerator is integrated with the MRI. This thesis is primarily concerned with the instantaneous effect of pulsed radiation on the RF coils, in particular the Radiation Induced Current (RIC). The RIC results from the charge imbalance created by the ejection of Compton electrons from the thin conductors of the RF coils during the pulsed irradiation. This work spans the initial observations of the RIC in real coils, a detailed characterization of the RIC and finally its impact on the MR image. The first part presented the measurements of the instantaneous RIC in two different MRI RF coils. Some basic characterization of the RIC included the isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, the dependence of RIC on linear accelerator dose rate, and the effect of placing wax buildup on the coil to reduce RIC. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence of the RIC amplitude on dose rate was observed. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. In the second part, a buildup method of RIC removal in planar conductors is tested, a Monte Carlo method of RIC calculation in metal conductors is presented and validated, and the Monte Carlo method is used to examine the effects of magnetic fields on both planar conductor and practical cylindrical coil geometries. The buildup method of RIC removal is effective in planar geometries and in cylindrical coil geometries when the coil conductor is in direct contact with the patient. The presence of air gap between the coil and patient makes this method of RIC removal less effective although placing buildup still reduces the RIC

  9. A systemic evaluation of cardiac differentiation from mRNA reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish; Verma, Vinod; Nandihalli, Manasi; Ramachandra, Chrishan J A; Sequiera, Glen L; Sudibyo, Yuliansa; Chung, Yingying; Sun, William; Shim, Winston

    2014-01-01

    Genetically unmodified cardiomyocytes mandated for cardiac regenerative therapy is conceivable by "foot-print free" reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). In this study, we report generation of foot-print free hiPSC through messenger RNA (mRNA) based reprograming. Subsequently, we characterize cardiomyocytes derived from these hiPSC using molecular and electrophysiological methods to characterize their applicability for regenerative medicine. Our results demonstrate that mRNA-iPSCs differentiate ontogenetically into cardiomyocytes with increased expression of early commitment markers of mesoderm, cardiac mesoderm, followed by cardiac specific transcriptional and sarcomeric structural and ion channel genes. Furthermore, these cardiomyocytes stained positively for sarcomeric and ion channel proteins. Based on multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings, these mRNA-hiPSC derived cardiomyocytes responded predictably to various pharmacologically active drugs that target adrenergic, sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The cardiomyocytes responded chronotropically to isoproterenol in a dose dependent manner, inotropic activity of nifidipine decreased spontaneous contractions. Moreover, Sotalol and E-4031 prolonged QT intervals, while TTX reduced sodium influx. Our results for the first time show a systemic evaluation based on molecular, structural and functional properties of cardiomyocytes differentiated from mRNA-iPSC. These results, coupled with feasibility of generating patient-specific iPSCs hold great promise for the development of large-scale generation of clinical grade cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

  10. A systemic evaluation of cardiac differentiation from mRNA reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mehta

    Full Text Available Genetically unmodified cardiomyocytes mandated for cardiac regenerative therapy is conceivable by "foot-print free" reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC. In this study, we report generation of foot-print free hiPSC through messenger RNA (mRNA based reprograming. Subsequently, we characterize cardiomyocytes derived from these hiPSC using molecular and electrophysiological methods to characterize their applicability for regenerative medicine. Our results demonstrate that mRNA-iPSCs differentiate ontogenetically into cardiomyocytes with increased expression of early commitment markers of mesoderm, cardiac mesoderm, followed by cardiac specific transcriptional and sarcomeric structural and ion channel genes. Furthermore, these cardiomyocytes stained positively for sarcomeric and ion channel proteins. Based on multi-electrode array (MEA recordings, these mRNA-hiPSC derived cardiomyocytes responded predictably to various pharmacologically active drugs that target adrenergic, sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The cardiomyocytes responded chronotropically to isoproterenol in a dose dependent manner, inotropic activity of nifidipine decreased spontaneous contractions. Moreover, Sotalol and E-4031 prolonged QT intervals, while TTX reduced sodium influx. Our results for the first time show a systemic evaluation based on molecular, structural and functional properties of cardiomyocytes differentiated from mRNA-iPSC. These results, coupled with feasibility of generating patient-specific iPSCs hold great promise for the development of large-scale generation of clinical grade cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

  11. Chlamydial Type III Secretion System Needle Protein Induces Protective Immunity against Chlamydia muridarum Intravaginal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Koroleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis imposes serious health problems and causes infertility. Because of asymptomatic onset, it often escapes antibiotic treatment. Therefore, vaccines offer a better option for the prevention of unwanted inflammatory sequelae. The existence of serologically distinct serovars of C. trachomatis suggests that a vaccine will need to provide protection against multiple serovars. Chlamydia spp. use a highly conserved type III secretion system (T3SS composed of structural and effector proteins which is an essential virulence factor. In this study, we expressed the T3SS needle protein of Chlamydia muridarum, TC_0037, an ortholog of C. trachomatis CdsF, in a replication-defective adenoviral vector (AdTC_0037 and evaluated its protective efficacy in an intravaginal Chlamydia muridarum model. For better immune responses, we employed a heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol in which mice were intranasally primed with AdTC_0037 and subcutaneously boosted with recombinant TC_0037 and Toll-like receptor 4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A mixed in a squalene nanoscale emulsion. We found that immunization with TC_0037 antigen induced specific humoral and T cell responses, decreased Chlamydia loads in the genital tract, and abrogated pathology of upper genital organs. Together, our results suggest that TC_0037, a highly conserved chlamydial T3SS protein, is a good candidate for inclusion in a Chlamydia vaccine.

  12. Infection with Rhizoctonia solani induces defense genes and systemic resistance in potato sprouts grown without light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, M J; Somervuo, P; Valkonen, J P T

    2008-11-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important soilborne and seedborne fungal pathogen of potato (Solanum tuberosum). The initial infection of sprouts prior to emergence causes lesions and may be lethal to the sprout or sprout tip, which results in initiation and compensatory growth of new sprouts. They emerge successfully and do not suffer significant damage. The mechanism behind this recovery phenomenon is not known. It was hypothesized that infection may induce pathogen defense in sprouts, which was investigated in the present study. Tubers were sprouted in cool and moist conditions in darkness to mimic conditions beneath soil. The basal portion of the sprout was isolated from the apical portion with a soft plastic collar and inoculated with highly virulent R. solani. Induction of defense-related responses was monitored in the apical portion using microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques at 48 and 120 h postinoculation (hpi) and by challenge-inoculation with R. solani in two experiments. Differential expression of 122 and 779 genes, including many well-characterized defense-related genes, was detected at 48 and 120 hpi, respectively. The apical portion of the sprout also expressed resistance which inhibited secondary infection of the sprouts. The observed systemic induction of resistance in sprouts upon infection with virulent R. solani provides novel information about pathogen defense in potato before the plant emerges and becomes photosynthetically active. These results advance our understanding of the little studied subject of pathogen defense in subterranean parts of plants.

  13. Proof-testing strategies induced by dangerous detected failures of safety-instrumented systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yiliu; Rausand, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Some dangerous failures of safety-instrumented systems (SISs) are detected almost immediately by diagnostic self-testing as dangerous detected (DD) failures, whereas other dangerous failures can only be detected by proof-testing, and are therefore called dangerous undetected (DU) failures. Some items may have a DU- and a DD-failure at the same time. After the repair of a DD-failure is completed, the maintenance team has two options: to perform an insert proof test for DU-failure or not. If an insert proof test is performed, it is necessary to decide whether the next scheduled proof test should be postponed or performed at the scheduled time. This paper analyzes the effects of different testing strategies on the safety performance of a single channel of a SIS. The safety performance is analyzed by Petri nets and by approximation formulas and the results obtained by the two approaches are compared. It is shown that insert testing improves the safety performance of the channel, but the feasibility and cost of the strategy may be a hindrance to recommend insert testing. - Highlights: • Identify the tests induced by detected failures. • Model the testing strategies following DD-failures. • Propose analytical formulas for effects of strategies. • Simulate and verify the proposed models.

  14. Mediation by the serotonergic system of U-50,488H-induced antinociception and tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Begonia Yeeman.

    1989-01-01

    The antinociceptive action of U-50,488H, a selective {kappa}-opioid receptor agonist, was attenuated by serotonergic but not by noradrenergic receptor antagonists. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered U-50,488H was antagonized by more than two fold by i.c.v. administered pindolol, methysergide, mianserin, ketanserin, pirenperone or ICS-205,930. A similar degree of antagonism of U-50,488H (i.c.v.) was found after intrathecal (i.t.) treatments with pindolol, methysergide or ICS-205,930 but not with mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone. When U-50,488H and the antagonists were both given i.t., its antinociceptive action was attenuated by pindolol or methysergide, potentiated by mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone and not affected by ICS-205,930. The release of serotonin was further studied directly by using a superfusion system. A naloxone reversible, concentration- and Ca{sup 2+}- dependent enhancement of release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin by U-50,488H was observed in spinal and brain tissues. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of U-50,488H was induced in mice using slow release preparations of U-50,488H. Serotonergic receptor antagonists (pindolol or ketanserin) were co-administered with U-50,488H to test for their effects on the development of tolerance to U-50,488H.

  15. Photovoltaic-Pyroelectric Coupled Effect Induced Electricity for Self-Powered Photodetector System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan; Zhang, Kewei; Yang, Ya

    2017-12-01

    Ferroelectric materials have demonstrated novel photovoltaic effect to scavenge solar energy. However, most of the ferroelectric materials with wide bandgaps (2.7-4 eV) suffer from low power conversion efficiency of less than 0.5% due to absorbing only 8-20% of solar spectrum. Instead of harvesting solar energy, these ferroelectric materials can be well suited for photodetector applications, especially for sensing near-UV irradiations. Here, a ferroelectric BaTiO 3 film-based photodetector is demonstrated that can be operated without using any external power source and a fast sensing of 405 nm light illumination is enabled. As compared with photovoltaic effect, both the responsivity and the specific detectivity of the photodetector can be dramatically enhanced by larger than 260% due to the light-induced photovoltaic-pyroelectric coupled effect. A self-powered photodetector array system can be utilized to achieve spatially resolved light intensity detection by recording the output voltage signals as a mapping figure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy for the speciation of transuranic elements in natural aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Stumpe, R.; Klenze, R.

    1990-08-01

    Laser-induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (LPAS) is a new elegant instrumentation for the chemical speciation of acoustic transuranium (TRU) ions in very dilute concentrations (> 10 -8 mol L -1 ). The paper describes the principle of LPAS and its application to the study of the chemical behaviour of TRU ions in natural aquatic systems, the knowledge of which has become increasingly in demand in connection with the safety analysis of nuclear waste disposal in the geosphere. The first part of the paper describes the principle, instrumentation and characteristics of LPAS in aqueous solution, taking particular examples from our own experience. The theoretical estimation of the speciation sensitivity is demonstrated and the result is compared with experiment. The second part deals with the spectral work in aqueous solution and then with the aplication of LPAS for the speciation of TRU ions in groundwater. Some examples demonstrated are hydrolysis reaction, complexation and colloid generation of the Am 3+ ion. Speciation sensitivities of U, Np, Pu and Am of different oxidation states in a variety of aqueous solutions are summarized. The application is of course open to a broad field of microchemistry in which the conventional spectrophotometric method has difficulty with sensitivity. (orig.)

  17. Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy for the speciation of transuranic elements in natural aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Stumpe, R.; Klenze, R.

    1991-01-01

    Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) is a new elegant instrumentation for the chemical speciation of aquatic transuranium (TRU) ions in very dilute concentrations (>10 -8 mol L -1 ). The paper describes the principle of LPAS and its application to the study of the chemical behaviour of TRU ions in natural aquatic systems, the knowledge of which has become increasingly in demand in connection with the safety analysis of nuclear waste disposal in the geosphere. The first part of the paper describes the principle, instrumentation and characteristics of LPAS in aqueous solution, taking particular examples from our own experience. The theoretical estimation of the speciation sensitivity is demonstrated and the result is compared with experiment. The second part deals with the spectral work in aqueous solution and then with the application of LPAS for the speciation of TRU ions in groundwater. Some examples demonstrated are hydrolysis reaction, complexation and colloid generation of the Am 3+ ion. Speciation sensitivities of U, Np, Pu and Am of different oxidation states in a variety of aqueous solutions are summarized. The application is of course open to a broad field of microchemistry in which the conventional spectrophotometric method has difficulty with sensitivity

  18. Advances in concrete materials for sewer systems affected by microbial induced concrete corrosion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Ukrainczyk, Neven; Koraimann, Günther; Kienesberger, Sabine; Dietzel, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Microbial induced concrete corrosion (MICC) is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms of subsurface infrastructure worldwide, raising the demand for sustainable construction materials in corrosive environments. This review aims to summarize the key research progress acquired during the last decade regarding the understanding of MICC reaction mechanisms and the development of durable materials from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special focus was laid on aspects governing concrete - micoorganisms interaction since being the central process steering biogenic acid corrosion. The insufficient knowledge regarding the latter is proposed as a central reason for insufficient progress in tailored material development for aggressive wastewater systems. To date no cement-based material exists, suitable to withstand the aggressive conditions related to MICC over its entire service life. Research is in particular needed on the impact of physiochemical material parameters on microbial community structure, growth characteristics and limitations within individual concrete speciation. Herein an interdisciplinary approach is presented by combining results from material sciences, microbiology, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to stimulate the development of novel and sustainable materials and mitigation strategies for MICC. For instance, the application of antibacteriostatic agents is introduced as an effective instrument to limit microbial growth on concrete surfaces in aggressive sewer environments. Additionally, geopolymer concretes are introduced as highly resistent in acid environments, thus representing a possible green alternative to conventional cement-based construction materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew [Ann Arbor, MI; Ye, Jing Yong [Ann Arbor, MI; Norris, Theodore B [Dexter, MI; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P [Ann Arbor, MI; Milas, Susanne M [Ann Arbor, MI; Emelianov, Stanislav Y [Ann Arbor, MI; Hollman, Kyle W [Fenton, MI

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  20. Identification of pLG72-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Systemic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maofeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available G72 is a schizophrenia-susceptible gene encoding a polypeptide with 153 amino acids. In 2002, it was originally proposed as an activator of D-amino acid oxidase (DAOA that could enhance the activity of DAAO and subsequently reduce the neurotransmission of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. However, several controversial findings have been reported recently. Due to a number of inconsistent descriptions of pLG72’s biofunctions, this study aims to identify the cellular effects induced by pLG72 in U87 cells using systems biology approaches. The analyses of transcriptomics and biological networks showed that pLG72 might be involved in the induction of oxidative stress. To confirm the in silico prediction, we tested and discovered that overexpression of pLG72 effectively enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS in U87 cells and, furthermore, this induction can be quenched by Tempol, a general ROS scavenger. Therefore, G72-transgenic mice presenting some psychiatric symptoms, along with the pLG72 level being significantly increased in the serum of patients with schizophrenia, have led us to propose that the ROS enhancement in mental diseases may be from the overexpression of pLG72 in brain cells.

  1. Analysis of Pilot-Induced-Oscillation and Pilot Vehicle System Stability Using UAS Flight Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay K. Mandal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a Pilot-Induced Oscillation (PIO and human pilot control characterization study performed using flight data collected with a Remotely Controlled (R/C unmanned research aircraft. The study was carried out on the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. Several existing Category 1 and Category 2 PIO criteria developed for manned aircraft are first surveyed and their effectiveness for predicting the PIO susceptibility for the R/C unmanned aircraft is evaluated using several flight experiments. It was found that the Bandwidth/Pitch rate overshoot and open loop onset point (OLOP criteria prediction results matched flight test observations. However, other criteria failed to provide accurate prediction results. To further characterize the human pilot control behavior during these experiments, a quasi-linear pilot model is used. The parameters of the pilot model estimated using data obtained from flight tests are then used to obtain information about the stability of the Pilot Vehicle System (PVS for Category 1 PIOs occurred during straight and level flights. The batch estimation technique used to estimate the parameters of the quasi-linear pilot model failed to completely capture the compatibility nature of the human pilot. The estimation results however provided valuable insights into the frequency characteristics of the human pilot commands. Additionally, stability analysis of the Category 2 PIOs for elevator actuator rate limiting is carried out using simulations and the results are compared with actual flight results.

  2. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole-Induced Drug Eruption With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, Camila; Persad, Leah; Alikhan, Ali

    2017-10-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe and potentially life threatening adverse drug reaction. To help identify DRESS, several criteria have been established; however, there is still a lack of consensus on diagnosis, and clinical judgment is paramount. Here we describe a 24-year-old female who presented with a cutaneous eruption, fever, lymphadenopathy, eosinophilia, facial edema, and elevated liver enzymes four and a half weeks after a 10-day course of Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). We used both the RegiSCAR and J-SCAR criteria to show the validity of classifying this case as DRESS, we also comment on the only other three cases, published to date, that had been reported as TMP/SMX induced DRESS. DRESS can be a difficult diagnosis due to its diverse symptomatology and delayed presentation - therefore, high suspicion and exclusion of other causes is key. Use of validated diagnostic criteria can aid the clinician in this regard. In the absence of a well-established therapy, early recognition, withdrawal of suspected drug(s), and supportive care play a crucial role in the management of DRESS. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(10):1043-1046..

  3. A simple dental caries detection system using full spectrum of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Cabral, Renata Maciel; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Maldonado, Edison Puig; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objectives: to develop an apparatus for the detection of early caries lesions in enamel using the full extent of the tooth fluorescence spectrum, through the integration of a laser diode, fiber optics, filters and one portable spectrometer connected to a computer, all commercially available; to evaluate the developed device in clinical and laboratory tests, and compare its performance with commercial equipment. Methods: clinical examinations were performed in patients with indication for exodontics of premolars. After examinations, the patients underwent surgery and the teeth were stored individually. The optical measurements were repeated approximately two months after extraction, on the same sites previously examined, then histological analysis was carried out. Results: the spectral detector has presented high specificity and moderate sensitivity when applied to differentiate between healthy and damaged tissues, with no significant differences from the performance of the commercial equipment. The developed device is able to detect initial damages in enamel, with depth of approximately 300 μm. Conclusions: we successfully demonstrated the development of a simple and portable system based in laser-induced fluorescence for caries detection, assembled from common commercial parts. As the spectral detector acquires a complete recording of the spectrum from each tissue, it is possible to use it for monitoring developments of caries lesions.

  4. Serum Neuroinflammatory Disease-Induced Central Nervous System Proteins Predict Clinical Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay Raphael

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need in multiple sclerosis (MS patients to develop biomarkers and laboratory tests to improve early diagnosis, predict clinical relapses, and optimize treatment responses. In healthy individuals, the transport of proteins across the blood–brain barrier (BBB is tightly regulated, whereas, in MS, central nervous system (CNS inflammation results in damage to neuronal tissues, disruption of BBB integrity, and potential release of neuroinflammatory disease-induced CNS proteins (NDICPs into CSF and serum. Therefore, changes in serum NDICP abundance could serve as biomarkers of MS. Here, we sought to determine if changes in serum NDICPs are detectable prior to clinical onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and, therefore, enable prediction of disease onset. Importantly, we show in longitudinal serum specimens from individual mice with EAE that pre-onset expression waves of synapsin-2, glutamine synthetase, enolase-2, and synaptotagmin-1 enable the prediction of clinical disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, we observed differences in serum NDICPs between active and passive immunization in EAE, suggesting hitherto not appreciated differences for disease induction mechanisms. Our studies provide the first evidence for enabling the prediction of clinical disease using serum NDICPs. The results provide proof-of-concept for the development of high-confidence serum NDICP expression waves and protein biomarker candidates for MS.

  5. Resonant two-photon absorption and electromagnetically induced transparency in open ladder-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Han Seb; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2013-03-25

    We have experimentally and theoretically studied resonant two-photon absorption (TPA) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the open ladder-type atomic system of the 5S(1/2) (F = 1)-5P(3/2) (F' = 0, 1, 2)-5D(5/2) (F″ = 1, 2, 3) transitions in (87)Rb atoms. As the coupling laser intensity was increased, the resonant TPA was transformed to EIT for the 5S(1/2) (F = 1)-5P(3/2) (F' = 2)-5D(5/2) (F″ = 3) transition. The transformation of resonant TPA into EIT was numerically calculated for various coupling laser intensities, considering all the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S(1/2)-5P(3/2)-5D(5/2) transition. From the numerical results, the crossover from TPA to EIT could be understood by the decomposition of the spectrum into an EIT component owing to the pure two-photon coherence and a TPA component caused by the mixed term.

  6. Study of Sugar Cane Management Systems in Brazil Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Jader; Villas-Boas, Paulino; Carvalho, Camila; Corá, José Eduardo; Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is the largest producer of cane sugar, consequently, is a leader in the production of bio-ethanol, a clean and renewable energy that fits the model of sustainable economy as discussed and pursued by our society. Our state of São Paulo concentrates 60% of national production, representing a sizeable share in the range of world production. All this economic potential is closely monitored by the scientific community, which develops numerous studies seeking an improvement in production efficiency and reduced environmental impacts caused by the planting. However, the study of soil samples, in plantation areas, demands results about the content and structural forms of organic matter (OM). Also, the soil carbon stocks depend on the type of management. Our goal is to study OM of soil samples from four sugar cane management systems: (i) unburned cane harvest, (ii) preharvest burned, (iii) addition of sugarcane bagasse ash and (iv) addition of residue from the extraction of sucrose, using Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of solid state. All the emission spectra were acquired using the system called LIFS-405, which consists of a diode laser Coherent, model cube with excitation at 405 nm, maximum output power of 50mJ and a mini-spectrometer, Ocean Optics USB2000-high sensitivity, with range of 194-894 nm and a fiber-optic bundle design (six excitation fibers in a circular path and one central fiber the collect the fluorescence). In this work, we will present the preliminary results evolving the humification index (HLIFS) of soil OM and total carbon amount (TC) for the different types of management. HLIFS shows a close correlation with the humification index of humic acid in solution obtained by means 2D conventional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  7. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Veronese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320, as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes.

  8. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, F V; Dode, R S O; Friderichs, M; Thomé, G G; da Silva, D R; Schaefer, P G; Sebben, V C; Nicolella, A R; Barros, E J G

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes.

  9. Potentiation of Morphine-Induced Antinociception by Propranolol: The Involvement of Dopamine and GABA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham A. Afify

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine is a major clinical problem which can be managed by co-administration of another drug. This study investigated the ability of propranolol to potentiate the antinociceptive action of morphine and the possible mechanisms underlying this effect. Antinociception was assessed in three nociceptive tests (thermal, hot plate, (visceral, acetic acid, and (inflammatory, formalin test in mice and quantified by measuring the percent maximum possible effect, the percent inhibition of acetic acid-evoked writhing response, and the area under the curve values of number of flinches for treated mice, respectively. The study revealed that propranolol (0.25–20 mg/Kg, IP administration did not produce analgesia in mice. However, 10 mg/Kg propranolol, enhanced the antinociceptive effect of sub-analgesic doses of morphine (0.2, 1, and 2 mg/Kg, IP in the three nociceptive tests. It also shifted the dose response curve of morphine to the left. The combined effect of propranolol and morphine was attenuated by haloperidol (D2 receptor antagonist, 1.5 mg/Kg, IP, and bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist, 2 mg/Kg, IP. Repeated daily administration of propranolol (10 mg/Kg, IP did not alter the nociceptive responses in the three pain tests, but it significantly potentiated morphine-induced antinociception in the hot plate, acetic acid-evoked writhing, and in the second phase of formalin tests. Together, the data suggest that a cross-talk exists between the opioidergic and adrenergic systems and implicate dopamine and GABA systems in this synergistic effect of morphine-propranolol combination. Propranolol may serve as an adjuvant therapy to potentiate the effect of opioid analgesics.

  10. Development of inducible systems to engineer conditional mutants of essential genes of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneca, Ivo G; Ecobichon, Chantal; Chaput, Catherine; Mathieu, Aurélie; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Colland, Frédéric; Labigne, Agnès; de Reuse, Hilde

    2008-04-01

    The Escherichia coli-Helicobacter pylori shuttle vector pHeL2 was modified to introduce the inducible LacI(q)-pTac system of E. coli, in which the promoters were engineered to be under the control of H. pylori RNA polymerase. The amiE gene promoter of H. pylori was taken to constitutively express the LacI(q) repressor. Expression of the reporter gene lacZ was driven by either pTac (pILL2150) or a modified version of the ureI gene promoter in which one or two LacI-binding sites and/or mutated nucleotides between the ribosomal binding site and the ATG start codon (pILL2153 and pILL2157) were introduced. Promoter activity was evaluated by measuring beta-galactosidase activity. pILL2150 is a tightly regulated expression system suitable for the analysis of genes with low-level expression, while pILL2157 is well adapted for the controlled expression of genes encoding recombinant proteins in H. pylori. To exemplify the usefulness of these tools, we constructed conditional mutants of the putative essential pbp1 and ftsI genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins 1 and 3 of H. pylori, respectively. Both genes were cloned into pILL2150 and introduced in the parental H. pylori strain N6. The chromosomally harbored pbp1 and ftsI genes were then inactivated by replacing them with a nonpolar kanamycin cassette. Inactivation was strictly dependent upon addition of isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactopyranoside. Hence, we were able to construct the first conditional mutants of H. pylori. Finally, we demonstrated that following in vitro methylation of the recombinant plasmids, these could be introduced into a large variety of H. pylori isolates with different genetic backgrounds.

  11. The general dispersion relation of induced streaming instabilities in quantum outflow systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mehdian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript the dispersion relations of streaming instabilities, by using the unique property (neutralized in charge and current by default of plasma shells colliding, have been generalized and studied. This interesting property for interpenetrating beams enables one to find the general dispersion relations without any restrictions used in the previous works in this area. In our previous work [H. Mehdian et al., ApJ. 801, 89 (2015], employing the plasma shell concept and boost frame method, the general dispersion relation for filamentation instability has been derived in the relativistic classical regime. But in this paper, using the above mentioned concepts, the general dispersion relations (for each of streaming instabilities, filamentation, two-stream and multi-stream in the non-relativistic quantum regime have been derived by employing the quantum fluid equations together with Maxwell equations. The derived dispersion relations enable to describe any arbitrary system of interacting two and three beams, justified neutralization condition, by choosing the inertial reference frame embedded on the one of the beams. Furthermore, by the numerical and analytical study of these dispersion relations, many new features of streaming instabilities (E.g. their cut-off wave numbers and growth rates in terms of all involved parameters have been illustrated. The obtained results in this paper can be used to describe many astrophysical systems and laboratory astrophysics setting, such as collision of non-parallel plasma shells over a background plasma or the collision of three neutralized plasma slabs, and justifying the many plasma phenomena such as particle accelerations and induced fields.

  12. Design of the monitoring system at the Sant'Alessio induced riverbank filtration plant (Lucca, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Rudy; Barbagli, Alessio; Borsi, Iacopo; Mazzanti, Giorgio; Picciaia, Daniele; Vienken, Thomas; Bonari, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    In Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) schemes the monitoring system, for both water quality and quantity issues, plays a key role in assuring that a groundwater recharge plant is really managed. Considering induced Riverbank Filtration (RBF) schemes, while the effect of the augmented filtration consists in an improvement of the quality and quantity of the water infiltrating the aquifer, there is in turn the risk for groundwater contamination, as surface water bodies are highly susceptible to contamination. Within the framework of the MARSOL (2014) EU FPVII-ENV-2013 project, an experimental monitoring system has been designed and will be set in place at the Sant'Alessio RBF well field (Lucca, Italy) to demonstrate the sustainability and the benefits of managing induced RBF versus the unmanaged option. The RBF scheme in Sant'Alessio (Borsi et al. 2014) allows abstraction of an overall amount of about 0,5 m3/s groundwater providing drinking water for about 300000 people of the coastal Tuscany. Water is derived by ten vertical wells set along the Serchio River embankments inducing river water filtration into a high yield (10-2m2/s transmissivity) sand and gravel aquifer. Prior to the monitoring system design, a detailed site characterization has been completed taking advantage of previous and new investigations, the latter performed by means of MOSAIC on-site investigation platform (UFZ). A monitoring network has been set in place in the well field area using existing wells. There groundwater head and the main physico-chemical parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity and redox potential) are routinely monitored. Major geochemical compounds along with a large set of emerging pollutants are analysed (in cooperation with IWW Zentrum Wasser, Germany) both in surface-water and ground-water. The experimental monitoring system (including sensors in surface- and ground-water) has been designed focusing on managing abstraction efficiency and safety at

  13. Part I. The role of metabolism in N-methylthiobenzamide-induced pneumotoxicity. Part II. The role of the sympathetic nervous system in methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl-induced pneumotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penney, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Part I. This is an investigation of the role of metabolism in the induction of lung injury by N-methylthiobenzamide (NMTB). N-methylthiobenzamide S-oxide (NMTBSO), a metabolite of NMTB, was prepared and found to produce lung injury that was qualitatively identical to that of NMTB. 1-methyl-1-phenyl-3-benzoylthiourea (MPBTU) protected rodents from lethal doses of either NMTB or NMTBSO. MPBTU also blocked the increases in pulmonary 14 C-thymidine incorporation induced by these compounds. Both NMTB and NMTBSO were found to undergo oxidation when incubated with either lung or liver microsomes and an NADPH-generating system. The in vitro microsomal oxidation of NMTB and NMTBSO was markedly inhibited by addition of MPBTU. These data suggest that oxidation of NMTB is required for the expression of NMTB-induced pneumotoxicity. Part II. Methylcyclopentadienyl Manganese Tricarbonyl (MMT) has been used as an antiknock additive in unleaded gasoline. Rats treated with MMT exhibit severe convulsions accompanied by hemorrhagic pulmonary edema. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible role of neurogenic mechanisms in MMT-induced hemorrhagic pulmonary edema

  14. Pre-Existing Differences and Diet-Induced Alterations in Striatal Dopamine Systems of Obesity-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Nelson, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Interactions between pre-existing differences in mesolimbic function and neuroadaptations induced by consumption of fatty, sugary foods are thought to contribute to human obesity. This study examined basal and cocaine-induced changes in striatal neurotransmitter levels without diet manipulation and D2/D3 dopamine receptor-mediated transmission prior to and after consumption of “junk-foods” in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to determine basal and cocaine-induced changes in neurotransmitter levels in real time with cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Sensitivity to the D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was examined before and after restricted junk-food exposure. Selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats were used. Results Cocaine-induced locomotion was greater in obesity-prone rats versus obesity-resistant rats prior to diet manipulation. Basal and cocaine-induced increases in dopamine and serotonin levels did not differ. Obesity-prone rats were more sensitive to the D2 receptor-mediated effects of quinpirole, and junk-food produced modest alterations in quinpirole sensitivity in obesity-resistant rats. Conclusions These data show that mesolimbic systems differ prior to diet manipulation in susceptible versus resistant rats, and that consumption of fatty, sugary foods produce different neuroadaptations in these populations. These differences may contribute to enhanced food craving and an inability to limit food intake in susceptible individuals. PMID:26847484

  15. HGFA Is an Injury-Regulated Systemic Factor that Induces the Transition of Stem Cells into GAlert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Rodgers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The activation of quiescent stem cells into the cell cycle is a key step in initiating the process of tissue repair. We recently reported that quiescent stem cells can transition into GAlert, a cellular state in which they have an increased functional ability to activate and participate in tissue repair. However, the precise molecular signals that induce GAlert in stem cells have remained elusive. Here, we show that the injury-induced regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF proteolytic processing via the systemic protease, hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA, stimulates GAlert in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs and fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs. We demonstrate that administering active HGFA to animals is sufficient to induce GAlert in stem cells throughout the body and to significantly accelerate the processes of stem cell activation and tissue repair. Our data suggest that factors that induce GAlert will have broad therapeutic applications for regenerative medicine and wound healing. : Rodgers et al. show that HGFA is a systemic protease that is activated by tissue injury and relays a signal to stem cells in non-injured tissues that induces their transition into a primed, “GAlert” state in which they possess an enhanced potential to activate and repair tissue damage. Keywords: satellite cells, muscle stem cells, fibro-adipogenic progenitors, HGFA, HGF, mTORC1, cMet, stem cell quiescence, stem cell activation, GAlert

  16. In vivo characterization of a reporter gene system for imaging hypoxia-induced gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, Sean; Pugachev, Andrei; Sun Xiaorong; Burke, Sean; Claus, Filip; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize a tumor model containing a hypoxia-inducible reporter gene and to demonstrate utility by comparison of reporter gene expression to the uptake and distribution of the hypoxia tracer 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO). Methods: Three tumors derived from the rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT were grown in each of two rats as follows: (1) parental R3327-AT, (2) positive control R3327-AT/PC in which the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion reporter gene was expressed constitutively, (3) R3327-AT/HRE in which the reporter gene was placed under the control of a hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive promoter sequence (HRE). Animals were coadministered a hypoxia-specific marker (pimonidazole) and the reporter gene probe 124 I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ( 124 I-FIAU) 3 h prior to sacrifice. Statistical analysis of the spatial association between 124 I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole fluorescent staining intensity was then performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Utility of this system was demonstrated by assessment of reporter gene expression versus the exogenous hypoxia probe 18 F-FMISO. Two rats, each bearing a single R3327-AT/HRE tumor, were injected with 124 I-FIAU (3 h before sacrifice) and 18 F-FMISO (2 h before sacrifice). Statistical analysis of the spatial association between 18 F-FMISO and 124 I-FIAU on a pixel-by-pixel basis was performed. Results: Correlation coefficients between 124 I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole staining intensity were: 0.11 in R3327-AT tumors, -0.66 in R3327-AT/PC and 0.76 in R3327-AT/HRE, confirming that only in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor was HSV1-tkeGFP gene expression associated with hypoxia. Correlation coefficients between 18 F-FMISO and 124 I-FIAU uptakes in R3327-AT/HRE tumors were r=0.56, demonstrating good spatial correspondence between the two tracers. Conclusions: We have confirmed hypoxia-specific expression of the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion gene in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor model and demonstrated the utility of

  17. Video-game play induces plasticity in the visual system of adults with amblyopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger W Li

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Abnormal visual experience during a sensitive period of development disrupts neuronal circuitry in the visual cortex and results in abnormal spatial vision or amblyopia. Here we examined whether playing video games can induce plasticity in the visual system of adults with amblyopia. Specifically 20 adults with amblyopia (age 15-61 y; visual acuity: 20/25-20/480, with no manifest ocular disease or nystagmus were recruited and allocated into three intervention groups: action videogame group (n = 10, non-action videogame group (n = 3, and crossover control group (n = 7. Our experiments show that playing video games (both action and non-action games for a short period of time (40-80 h, 2 h/d using the amblyopic eye results in a substantial improvement in a wide range of fundamental visual functions, from low-level to high-level, including visual acuity (33%, positional acuity (16%, spatial attention (37%, and stereopsis (54%. Using a cross-over experimental design (first 20 h: occlusion therapy, and the next 40 h: videogame therapy, we can conclude that the improvement cannot be explained simply by eye patching alone. We quantified the limits and the time course of visual plasticity induced by video-game experience. The recovery in visual acuity that we observed is at least 5-fold faster than would be expected from occlusion therapy in childhood amblyopia. We used positional noise and modelling to reveal the neural mechanisms underlying the visual improvements in terms of decreased spatial distortion (7% and increased processing efficiency (33%. Our study had several limitations: small sample size, lack of randomization, and differences in numbers between groups. A large-scale randomized clinical study is needed to confirm the therapeutic value of video-game treatment in clinical situations. Nonetheless, taken as a pilot study, this work suggests that video-game play may provide important principles for treating amblyopia

  18. Video-game play induces plasticity in the visual system of adults with amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Roger W; Ngo, Charlie; Nguyen, Jennie; Levi, Dennis M

    2011-08-01

    Abnormal visual experience during a sensitive period of development disrupts neuronal circuitry in the visual cortex and results in abnormal spatial vision or amblyopia. Here we examined whether playing video games can induce plasticity in the visual system of adults with amblyopia. Specifically 20 adults with amblyopia (age 15-61 y; visual acuity: 20/25-20/480, with no manifest ocular disease or nystagmus) were recruited and allocated into three intervention groups: action videogame group (n = 10), non-action videogame group (n = 3), and crossover control group (n = 7). Our experiments show that playing video games (both action and non-action games) for a short period of time (40-80 h, 2 h/d) using the amblyopic eye results in a substantial improvement in a wide range of fundamental visual functions, from low-level to high-level, including visual acuity (33%), positional acuity (16%), spatial attention (37%), and stereopsis (54%). Using a cross-over experimental design (first 20 h: occlusion therapy, and the next 40 h: videogame therapy), we can conclude that the improvement cannot be explained simply by eye patching alone. We quantified the limits and the time course of visual plasticity induced by video-game experience. The recovery in visual acuity that we observed is at least 5-fold faster than would be expected from occlusion therapy in childhood amblyopia. We used positional noise and modelling to reveal the neural mechanisms underlying the visual improvements in terms of decreased spatial distortion (7%) and increased processing efficiency (33%). Our study had several limitations: small sample size, lack of randomization, and differences in numbers between groups. A large-scale randomized clinical study is needed to confirm the therapeutic value of video-game treatment in clinical situations. Nonetheless, taken as a pilot study, this work suggests that video-game play may provide important principles for treating amblyopia, and perhaps other

  19. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates high-fat-diet-induced hepatic steatosis by reduced systemic inflammatory status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with obesity and considered an inflammatory disease. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH is a major enzyme hydrolyzing epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and attenuates their cardiovascular protective and anti-inflammatory effects. We examined whether sEH inhibition can protect against high-fat (HF-diet-induced fatty liver in mice and the underlying mechanism. Compared with wild-type littermates, sEH-null mice showed lower diet-induced lipid accumulation in liver, as seen by Oil-red O staining and triglycerides levels. We studied the effect of sEH inhibition on diet-induced fatty liver by feeding C57BL/6 mice an HF diet for 8 weeks (short-term or 16 weeks (long-term and administering t-AUCB, a selective sEH inhibitor. sEH inhibition had no effect on the HF-diet-increased body and adipose tissue weight or impaired glucose tolerance but alleviated the diet-induced hepatic steatosis. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sEH in liver increased the level of triglycerides in liver and the hepatic inflammatory response. Surprisingly, the induced expression of sEH in liver occurred only with the long-term but not short-term HF diet, which suggests a secondary effect of HF diet on regulating sEH expression. Furthermore, sEH inhibition attenuated the HF-diet-induced increase in plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their mRNA upregulation in adipose tissue, which was accompanied by increased macrophage infiltration. Therefore, sEH inhibition could alleviate HF-diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which might involve its anti-inflammatory effect in adipose tissue and direct inhibition in liver. sEH may be a therapeutic target for HF-diet-induced hepatic steatosis in inhibiting systemic inflammation.

  20. Ionomycin-induced calcium influx induces neurite degeneration in mouse neuroblastoma cells: analysis of a time-lapse live cell imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Saki; Nakanishi, Ayumi; Takazawa, Minami; Okihiro, Shunsuke; Urano, Shiro; Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce neuronal cell death. However, the detailed mechanisms of cell death have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we reported neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanisms of neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death using the neuroblastoma N1E-115 cell line and a time-lapse live cell imaging system. Treatment with the calcium ionophore ionomycin induced cell death and neurite degeneration in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with a low concentration of ionomycin immediately produced a significant calcium influx into the intracellular region in N1E-115 cells. After 1-h incubation with ionomycin, the fluorescence emission of MitoSOX TM increased significantly compared to the control. Finally, analysis using a new mitochondrial specific fluorescence dye, MitoPeDPP, indicated that treatment with ionomycin significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid hydroperoxide production in N1E-115 cells. The fluorescence emissions of Fluo-4 AM and MitoPeDPP were detected in the cell soma and neurite regions in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. However, the emissions of neurites were much lower than those of the cell soma. TBARS values of ionomycin-treated cells significantly increased compared to the control. These results indicate that ionomycin induces calcium influx into the intracellular region and reactive oxygen species production in N1E-115 cells. Lipid hydroperoxide production was induced in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. Calcium influx into the intracellular region is a possible activator of neurite degeneration.

  1. Antibiotic inducibility of the MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement of the antibiotic-inducible PA5471 gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Sobel, Mara L; Poole, Keith

    2006-03-01

    The MexXY components of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are encoded by a MexZ repressor-regulated operon that is inducible by antibiotics that target the ribosome. Mutant strains disrupted in a gene, PA5471, were shown to be compromised for drug-inducible mexXY expression and, therefore, MexXY-OprM-mediated antimicrobial resistance. The PA5471 gene was inducible by the same ribosome-targeting agents that induce mexXY expression. Moreover, vector-driven expression of cloned PA5471 was sufficient to promote mexXY expression and MexXY-mediated resistance in the absence of antibiotic exposure, consistent with PA5471 directly or indirectly activating mexXY expression following its own upregulation in response to antibiotics. The requirement for PA5471 for mexXY expression and antimicrobial resistance was, however, obviated in mutants lacking the MexZ repressor of mexXY expression, suggesting that PA5471 directly or indirectly modulates MexZ activity in effecting mexXY expression. While the recruitment of PA5471 and MexXY in response to ribosome disruption by antimicrobials is consistent with their genes playing a role in protecting cells from the adverse consequences of disrupting the translation process, reminiscent of trans-translation, these genes appear to operate independently in their contribution to resistance: mutants defective in trans-translation showed a much more modest (twofold) decrease in resistance to ribosome-targeting agents than those lacking PA5471 or MexXY, and this decrease was observed whether functional PA5471/MexXY was present or not.

  2. Mucosal immunization using proteoliposome and cochleate structures from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B induce mucosal and systemic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Judith Del; Zayas, Caridad; Romeu, Belkis; Acevedo, Reinaldo; González, Elizabeth; Bracho, Gustavo; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Balboa, Julio; Lastre, Miriam

    2009-12-01

    Most pathogens either invade the body or establish infection in mucosal tissues and represent an enormous challenge for vaccine development by the absence of good mucosal adjuvants. A proteoliposome-derived adjuvant from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (AFPL1, Adjuvant Finlay Proteoliposome 1) and its derived cochleate form (Co, AFCo1) contain multiple pathogen-associated molecular patterns as immunopotentiators, and can also serve as delivery systems to elicit a Th1-type immune response. The present studies demonstrate the ability of AFPL1and AFCo1 to induce mucosal and systemic immune responses by different mucosal immunizations routes and significant adjuvant activity for antibody responses of both structures: a microparticle and a nanoparticle with a heterologous antigen. Therefore, we used female mice immunized by intragastric, intravaginal, intranasal or intramuscular routes with both structures alone or incorporated with ovalbumin (OVA). High levels of specific IgG antibody were detected in all sera and in vaginal washes, but specific IgA antibody in external secretions was only detected in mucosally immunized mice. Furthermore, antigen specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were all induced. AFPL1 and AFCo1 are capable of inducing IFN-gamma responses, and chemokine secretions, like MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta. However, AFCo1 is a better alternative to induce immune responses at mucosal level. Even when we use a heterologous antigen, the AFCo1 response was better than with AFPL1 in inducing mucosal and systemic immune responses. These results support the use of AFCo1 as a potent Th1 inducing adjuvant particularly suitable for mucosal immunization.

  3. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  4. Involvement of central serotonergic systems in dextromethorphan-induced behavioural syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, R V; Gaonkar, R K; Jadhav, S A; Thorat, V M; Jadhav, J H; Balsara, J J

    2005-07-01

    Dextromethorphan, a noncompetitive blocker of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor, at 45, 60 and 75 mg/kg, ip doses induced a behavioural syndrome characterised by reciprocal forepaw treading, lateral head-weaving, hind-limb abduction and flat body posture. Such type of behavioural syndrome is induced by 8-hydroxy-2- (di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) by directly stimulating the central postsynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) receptors of the 5-HT1A type. Pretreatment with buspirone (5, 10 mg/kg, ip) and l-propranolol (10, 20 mg/kg, ip) antagonised the behavioural syndrome induced by 8-OH-DPAT and dextromethorphan. Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (100 mg/kg/day x 4 days) antagonised the behavioural syndrome induced by dextromethorphan and dexfenfluramine but had no significant effect on 8-OH-DPAT induced behavioural syndrome. This indicates that dextromethorphan induces the behavioural syndrome by releasing 5-HT from serotonergic neurons with resultant activation of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors by the released 5-HT. Pretreatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, ip) significantly potentiated the behavioural syndrome induced by dextromethorphan and 5-hydroxytryptophan but significantly antagonised dexfenfluramine induced behavioural syndrome. This indicates that dextromethorphan releases 5-HT by a mechanism which differs from that of dexfenfluramine. Dextromethorphan may be releasing 5-HT by blocking the NMDA receptors and thereby counteracting the inhibitory influence of l-glutamate on 5-HT release.

  5. Cross-polarisation discrimination-induced interference in dual-polarised high-capacity satellite communication systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Sarki Karasuwa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The design of spectrally-efficient, high-throughput satellite (HTS systems with capacity approaching one terabit per second requires operating at Ka-band frequencies and above, where there are several gigahertz of allocated radio spectrum, using multiple spot beams with dual orthogonal polarisation mode. At these high frequencies, rain attenuation poses a major obstacle to the design of high-availability satellite links which are needed for the realisation of ubiquitous broadband multimedia communication services including high-speed Internet access at rural and remote locations. Furthermore, depolarisation-induced interference in such systems could have a performance-limiting impact if a co-channel cross-polar signal combines with system noise to drive the carrier-to-noise-plus-interference ratio (CNIR below an acceptable threshold. This paper employs real measurement data to investigate the impact of depolarisation-induced interference on dual-polarised HTS systems for temperate and tropical climatic regions. Scenarios that cause significant system performance degradation are analysed, including the effects of signal frequency, antenna size, and regional rainfall rate. The impact of depolarisation on system performance is quantified by the reductions in the CNIR and link availability of a dual-polarised system when compared with those of a similarly-dimensioned single-polarised system.

  6. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junie P Warrington

    Full Text Available Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia or 21% oxygen (normoxia for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  7. Obestatin controls the ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome systems in glucocorticoid‐induced muscle cell atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid‐Díaz, Tania; Santos‐Zas, Icía; González‐Sánchez, Jessica; Gurriarán‐Rodríguez, Uxía; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Casabiell, Xesús; García‐Caballero, Tomás; Mouly, Vincent; Pazos, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Many pathological states characterized by muscle atrophy are associated with an increase in circulating glucocorticoids and poor patient prognosis, making it an important target for treatment. The development of treatments for glucocorticoid‐induced and wasting disorder‐related skeletal muscle atrophy should be designed based on how the particular transcriptional program is orchestrated and how the balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation is deregulated. Here, we investigated whether the obestatin/GPR39 system, an autocrine/paracrine signaling system acting on myogenesis and with anabolic effects on the skeletal muscle, could protect against glucocorticoid‐induced muscle cell atrophy. Methods In the present study, we have utilized mouse C2C12 myotube cultures to examine whether the obestatin/GPR39 signaling pathways can affect the atrophy induced by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. We have extended these findings to in vitro effects on human atrophy using human KM155C25 myotubes. Results The activation of the obestatin/GPR39 system protects from glucocorticoid‐induced atrophy by regulation of Akt, PKD/PKCμ, CAMKII and AMPK signaling and its downstream targets in the control of protein synthesis, ubiquitin–proteasome system and autophagy–lysosome system in mouse cells. We compared mouse and human myotube cells in their response to glucocorticoid and identified differences in both the triggering of the atrophic program and the response to obestatin stimulation. Notably, we demonstrate that specific patterns of post‐translational modifications of FoxO4 and FoxO1 play a key role in directing FoxO activity in response to obestatin in human myotubes. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the function of the obestatin/GPR39 system in coordinating a variety of pathways involved in the regulation of protein degradation during catabolic conditions. PMID:28675664

  8. Obestatin controls the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome systems in glucocorticoid-induced muscle cell atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid-Díaz, Tania; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Casabiell, Xesús; García-Caballero, Tomás; Mouly, Vincent; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2017-12-01

    Many pathological states characterized by muscle atrophy are associated with an increase in circulating glucocorticoids and poor patient prognosis, making it an important target for treatment. The development of treatments for glucocorticoid-induced and wasting disorder-related skeletal muscle atrophy should be designed based on how the particular transcriptional program is orchestrated and how the balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation is deregulated. Here, we investigated whether the obestatin/GPR39 system, an autocrine/paracrine signaling system acting on myogenesis and with anabolic effects on the skeletal muscle, could protect against glucocorticoid-induced muscle cell atrophy. In the present study, we have utilized mouse C2C12 myotube cultures to examine whether the obestatin/GPR39 signaling pathways can affect the atrophy induced by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. We have extended these findings to in vitro effects on human atrophy using human KM155C25 myotubes. The activation of the obestatin/GPR39 system protects from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy by regulation of Akt, PKD/PKCμ, CAMKII and AMPK signaling and its downstream targets in the control of protein synthesis, ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy-lysosome system in mouse cells. We compared mouse and human myotube cells in their response to glucocorticoid and identified differences in both the triggering of the atrophic program and the response to obestatin stimulation. Notably, we demonstrate that specific patterns of post-translational modifications of FoxO4 and FoxO1 play a key role in directing FoxO activity in response to obestatin in human myotubes. Our findings emphasize the function of the obestatin/GPR39 system in coordinating a variety of pathways involved in the regulation of protein degradation during catabolic conditions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on

  9. Signal-Induced Noise Effects in a Photon Counting System for Stratospheric Ozone Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Signal-induced noise (SIN) is a common effect resulting when a photomultiplier tube (PMT) is saturated, for a brief moment, with a high intensity light pulse. After the laser pulse is sent into the atmosphere a very large light return, from either the near-field or a cloud, causes the PMT to momentarily saturate. The PMT is gated off at this time so no signal is seen at the anode. When the PMT gate is turned on, the far-field light return from the atmosphere is observed. This signal is distorted, however because of the addition of SIN to the received light signal causing a slower than expected decay of the atmospheric signal return. We have characterized SIN responses to varying parameters of the incident light on the PMT. These varied parameters included incident wavelength, PMT voltage, incident intensity, and tube type. We found that only the amplitude of the SIN was effected by varying PMT voltages and light intensities. The amplitude increased linearly as input light intensity increased. Different incident wavelengths at the same intensity did not effect the amplitude or the temporal behavior of the SIN response. Finally, different PMT tubes with similar physical structures exhibited similar SIN responses although with different amplitudes. The different amplitudes can be attributed to the different gains and operating voltages of each tube. These results suggest that SIN is caused by photocathode electron dynamics such as charge accumulation on internal PMT surfaces. These surfaces then emit the electrons slowly resulting in a long decay noise signal. With the SIN responses characterized we can now try to develop a method to reduce or eliminate SIN in DIAL systems.

  10. Milan PM1 induces adverse effects on mice lungs and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Francesca; Sancini, Giulio; Longhin, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a link between inhaled particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with cardiorespiratory diseases. Since the response to PM1 has not yet been deeply investigated, its impact on mice lungs and cardiovascular system is here examined. A repeated exposure to Milan PM1 was performed on BALB/c mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) and the lung parenchyma were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α); macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2); heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p50 subunit (NFκB-p50); inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS); endothelial-selectin (E-selectin)), cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); alkaline phosphatase (ALP); heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70); caspase-8-p18), and a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (cytochrome 1B1 (Cyp1B1)). Heart tissue was tested for HO-1, caspase-8-p18, NFκB-p50, iNOS, E-selectin, and myeloperoxidase (MPO); plasma was screened for markers of platelet activation and clot formation (soluble platelet-selectin (sP-selectin); fibrinogen; plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1)). PM1 triggers inflammation and cytotoxicity in lungs. A similar cytotoxic effect was observed on heart tissues, while plasma analyses suggest blood-endothelium interface activation. These data highlight the importance of lung inflammation in mediating adverse cardiovascular events following increase in ambient PM1 levels, providing evidences of a positive correlation between PM1 exposure and cardiovascular morbidity.

  11. Milan PM1 Induces Adverse Effects on Mice Lungs and Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Farina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested a link between inhaled particulate matter (PM exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with cardiorespiratory diseases. Since the response to PM1 has not yet been deeply investigated, its impact on mice lungs and cardiovascular system is here examined. A repeated exposure to Milan PM1 was performed on BALB/c mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf and the lung parenchyma were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2; heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p50 subunit (NFκB-p50; inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS; endothelial-selectin (E-selectin, cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; alkaline phosphatase (ALP; heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; caspase-8-p18, and a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (cytochrome 1B1 (Cyp1B1. Heart tissue was tested for HO-1, caspase-8-p18, NFκB-p50, iNOS, E-selectin, and myeloperoxidase (MPO; plasma was screened for markers of platelet activation and clot formation (soluble platelet-selectin (sP-selectin; fibrinogen; plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1. PM1 triggers inflammation and cytotoxicity in lungs. A similar cytotoxic effect was observed on heart tissues, while plasma analyses suggest blood-endothelium interface activation. These data highlight the importance of lung inflammation in mediating adverse cardiovascular events following increase in ambient PM1 levels, providing evidences of a positive correlation between PM1 exposure and cardiovascular morbidity.

  12. Chronic Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Blockade May Not Induce Hypotension During Anaesthesia for Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, Guido; Di Salvo, Claudio; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Abramo, Antonio; Fierabracci, Paola; Magno, Silvia; Piaggi, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Santini, Ferruccio

    2016-06-01

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) for the treatment of hypertensive obese patients is steadily increasing. Some studies have reported that the use of these drugs was associated with an increased risk of hypotensive episodes, during general anaesthesia. The number of bariatric procedures is also increasing worldwide, but there is a lack of studies investigating the hypotensive effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers in severely obese patients during general anaesthesia for bariatric surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate hemodynamic changes induced by general anaesthesia in obese patients chronically treated with ACE-I or ARB compared to a control group not treated with antihypertensive therapy. Fourteen obese subjects (mean body mass index (BMI) 47.5 kg/m(2)) treated with ACE-I or ARB and twelve obese (mean BMI 45.7 kg/m2) controls not treated with antihypertensive therapy underwent general anaesthesia to perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored continuously and registered at different time points: T0 before induction, then at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min after induction, and the last time point taken following recovery from anaesthesia. A progressive reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was observed without significant differences between the two groups. A similar trend of heart rate values was observed. In conclusion, our pilot study suggests that RAS blockers may be continued during the perioperative period in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, without increasing the risk of hypotensive episodes.

  13. Drug-induced modification of the system properties associated with spontaneous human electroencephalographic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, David T.; Cadusch, Peter J.; Gray, Marcus; Nathan, Pradeep J.

    2003-11-01

    The benzodiazepine (BZ) class of minor tranquilizers are important modulators of the γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA)/BZ receptor complex that are well known to affect the spectral properties of spontaneous electroencephalographic activity. While it is experimentally well established that the BZs reduce total alpha band (8 13 Hz) power and increase total beta band (13 30 Hz) power, it is unclear what the physiological basis for this effect is. Based on a detailed theory of cortical electrorhythmogenesis it is conjectured that such an effect is explicable in terms of the modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission within locally connected populations of excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons. Motivated by this theory, fixed order autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models were fitted to spontaneous eyes-closed electroencephalograms recorded from subjects before and approximately 2 h after the oral administration of a single 1 mg dose of the BZ alprazolam. Subsequent pole-zero analysis revealed that BZs significantly transform the dominant system pole such that its frequency and damping increase. Comparisons of ARMA derived power spectra with fast Fourier transform derived spectra indicate an enhanced ability to identify benzodiazepine induced electroencephalographic changes. This experimental result is in accord with the theoretical predictions implying that alprazolam enhances inhibition acting on inhibitory neurons more than inhibition acting on excitatory neurons. Further such a result is consistent with reported cortical neuronal distributions of the various GABAA receptor pharmacological subtypes. Therefore physiologically specified fixed order ARMA modeling is expected to become an important tool for the systematic investigation and modeling of a wide range of cortically acting compounds.

  14. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F; Foster, Jane A; Macri, Joseph; Potter, Murray; Huang, Xiaxing; Malinowski, Paul; Jackson, Wendy; Blennerhassett, Patricia; Neufeld, Karen A; Lu, Jun; Khan, Waliul I; Corthesy-Theulaz, Irene; Cherbut, Christine; Bergonzelli, Gabriela E; Collins, Stephen M

    2010-12-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have associated gastrointestinal inflammation and infection with altered behavior. We investigated whether chronic gut inflammation alters behavior and brain biochemistry and examined underlying mechanisms. AKR mice were infected with the noninvasive parasite Trichuris muris and given etanercept, budesonide, or specific probiotics. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy was performed in a subgroup of mice before infection. Gastrointestinal inflammation was assessed by histology and quantification of myeloperoxidase activity. Serum proteins were measured by proteomic analysis, circulating cytokines were measured by fluorescence activated cell sorting array, and serum tryptophan and kynurenine were measured by liquid chromatography. Behavior was assessed using light/dark preference and step-down tests. In situ hybridization was used to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the brain. T muris caused mild to moderate colonic inflammation and anxiety-like behavior that was associated with decreased hippocampal BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA). Circulating tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, as well as the kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, were increased. Proteomic analysis showed altered levels of several proteins related to inflammation and neural function. Administration of etanercept, and to a lesser degree of budesonide, normalized behavior, reduced cytokine and kynurenine levels, but did not influence BDNF expression. The probiotic Bifidobacterium longum normalized behavior and BDNF mRNA but did not affect cytokine or kynurenine levels. Anxiety-like behavior was present in infected mice after vagotomy. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry, which can be normalized by inflammation-dependent and -independent mechanisms, neither of which requires the integrity of the vagus nerve. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  15. Valuing physically and financially-induced flexibility in large-scale water resources systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmant, Amaury; Pina, Jasson; Côté, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    In a world characterized by rapid changes in terms of water demands and supplies, there is a growing and persistent need for institutional reforms that promote cross-sectoral, adaptive management processes and policies. Yet, in many regions throughout the world, the continued expansion of supply-side infrastructure is still perceived as the way to go despite the rising financial, social and environmental costs. This trend is further compounded by the risks posed by climate change; reservoir storage, for example, is still perceived as a key element of climate change adaptation strategies in many countries. There is a growing concern that such strategies may result in a rigidity trap whereby the physical and institutional infrastructure become inflexible and unable to adapt to changes because they are mutually reinforcing each other. However, several authors have recently advocated for adaptive, flexible, management techniques involving a more diversified portfolio of measures whose management is regularly updated as new information about supplies and demands becomes available. Despite being conceptually attractive, such a management approach presents several challenges to policy makers. One of them is the sheer amount of information that must be processed each time a management decision must be taken. To address this issue, we propose an optimization framework that can be used to determine the optimal management of a large portfolio of physical and financial assets using various hydro-climatic information. This optimization framework is illustrated with the management of a power system in Quebec involving various power stations, reservoirs, power and energy contracts as well as hydrologic and climatic data. The results can be used to assess the economic value of the flexibility induced by either the physical assets (power stations and reservoirs) or by the financial ones (contracts), an information we believe is important to highlight the benefits of adaptive

  16. Multiphoton-resonance-induced fluorescence of a strongly driven two-level system under frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiying; Lü, Zhiguo; Luo, JunYan; Zheng, Hang

    2018-03-01

    We study the fluorescence spectrum of a strongly driven two-level system (TLS) with modulated transition frequency, which is a bichromatically driven TLS and has multiple resonance frequencies. We are aiming to provide a reliable description of the fluorescence in a regime that is difficult to tackle with perturbation theory and the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), and illustrate the spectral features of the fluorescence under off- and multiphoton-resonance conditions. To go beyond the RWA, we use a semianalytical counter-rotating-hybridized rotating-wave method that combines a unitary transformation and Floquet theory to calculate the two-mode Floquet states and quasienergies for the bichromatically driven TLS. We then solve the master equation accounting for the spontaneous decay in the bases of the two-mode Floquet states, and derive a physically transparent fluorescence spectrum. In comparison with the numerically exact spectrum from the generalized Floquet-Liouville approach, the present spectrum is found to be applicable in a wide range of the parameters where the RWA and the secular approximation may break down. We find that the counter-rotating (CR) terms of the transverse field omitted in the RWA have non-negligible contributions to the spectrum under certain conditions. Particularly, at the multiphoton resonance the width of which is comparable with the Bloch-Siegert shift, the RWA and non-RWA spectra markedly differ from each other because of the CR-induced shift. We also analyze the symmetry of the spectrum in terms of the transition matrix elements between the two-mode Floquet states. We show that the strict symmetry of the spectrum cannot be expected without the RWA but the almost symmetric spectrum can be obtained at the single-photon resonance that takes the Bloch-Siegert shift into account if the driving is moderately strong and at the multiphoton resonance with a sufficiently weak transverse field.

  17. Dynamic expression of leukocyte innate immune genes in whole blood from horses with lipopolysaccharide-induced acute systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anne Mette L.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In horses, insights into the innate immune processes in acute systemic inflammation are limited even though these processes may be highly important for future diagnostic and therapeutic advances in high-mortality disease conditions as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS...... expressions in blood leukocytes during equine acute LPS-induced systemic inflammation thoroughly characterized a highly regulated and dynamic innate immune response. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of equine systemic inflammation.......) and sepsis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of 31 selected blood leukocyte immune genes in an equine model of acute systemic inflammation to identify significantly regulated genes and to describe their expression dynamics during a 24-h experimental period. Systemic...

  18. The influence of sterol metabolism upon radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila melanogaster in the yeast-drosophila system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitsij, V.V.; Luchnikova, E.M.; Inge-Vechtomov, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of sterol metabolism upon induced Drosophila melanogaster mutagenesis in an ecology-genetic yeast-drosophila system has been studied. The sterol deficit in fly organism has been created for account of using as food substrate for fremales of biomass of saccharomyces cerevisiae living cells of 9-2-PZ12 train with nyssup(r1) locus mutation which blocks the ergosterol synthesis. It has been found that the Drosophila females content on mutant yeast increases the frequency of losses and non discrepancy of X-chromosomes induced by X-radiation (1000 R). Addition into yeast biomass of 0.1 % cholesterol solution in 10 %-ethanol reduces the oocytes resistance to X-radiation up to control level. Possible hormonal and membrane mechanisms of increasing radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in organism resistance to damaging factors are discussed

  19. Drug-induced gingival hyperplasia: a retrospective study using spontaneous reporting system databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatahira, Haruna; Abe, Junko; Hane, Yuuki; Matsui, Toshinobu; Sasaoka, Sayaka; Motooka, Yumi; Hasegawa, Shiori; Fukuda, Akiho; Naganuma, Misa; Ohmori, Tomofumi; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival hyperplasia (DIGH) causes problems with chewing, aesthetics, and pronunciation, and leads to the deterioration of the patient's quality of life (QOL). Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of DIGH using spontaneous reporting system (SRS) databases. We analyzed reports of DIGH from SRS databases and calculated the reporting odds ratios (RORs) of suspected drugs (immunosuppressants, calcium channel blockers, and anticonvulsants). The SRS databases used were the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. With the data, we evaluated the time-to-onset profile and the hazard type using the Weibull shape parameter (WSP). Furthermore, we used the association rule mining technique to discover undetected relationships such as possible risk factors. The FAERS contained 5,821,716 reports. The RORs (95% confidence interval: CI) for cyclosporine, everolimus, sirolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, amlodipine, nifedipine, carbamazepine, clobazam, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, topiramate, and valproic acid, were 39.4 (95% CI: 30.3-51.2), 4.2 (1.7-10.0), 6.6 (2.5-17.7), 13.1 (7.2-23.2), 94.8 (80.0-112.9), 57.9 (35.7-94.0), 15.1 (10.3-22.3), 65.4 (33.8-126.7), 6.5 (3.6-11.8), 19.7 (8.8-44.0), 65.4 (52.4-82.9), 56.5 (21.1-151.7), 2.9 (1.1-7.7), and 17.5 (12.6-24.4), respectively. The JADER database contained 430,587 reports. The median time-to-onset of gingival hyperplasia values for immunosuppressants, calcium channel blockers, and anticonvulsants use were 71, 262, and 37 days, respectively. Furthermore, the 95% CI of the WSP β for anticonvulsants was over and excluded 1, which meant that they were wear-out failure type. Our results suggest that DIGH monitoring of patients administered immunosuppressants, calcium channel blockers, or anticonvulsants is important. We demonstrated the potential risk of DIGH following the long

  20. Role of Prefrontal Serotonergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Encounter-Induced Hyperactivity in Methamphetamine-Sensitized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tatsunori; Ago, Yukio; Umehara, Chiaki; Imoto, Emina; Hasebe, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2017-05-01

    Isolation-reared mice show social encounter-induced hyperactivity with activation of prefrontal serotonergic and dopaminergic systems, but it is not known whether this stress response is observed in other pathological conditions. Here we examined whether the social encounter stimulation induces abnormal behavior during withdrawal in chronic methamphetamine-treated mice. To induce methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization, male mice were injected with methamphetamine (1 mg/kg) once daily for 7 days. The encounter with an intruder elicited hyperactivity 24 h after the last injection of methamphetamine in methamphetamine-sensitized mice. This response was observed even as long as 2 weeks after withdrawal of methamphetamine. The encounter increased c-Fos expression in the prefrontal cortex, dorsal raphe nucleus and ventral tegmental area in methamphetamine-sensitized mice, while it did not in control mice. Furthermore, the encounter increased extracellular serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine, but not noradrenaline, levels in the prefrontal cortex in methamphetamine-sensitized mice. Local injection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine and 6-hydroxydopamine into the prefrontal cortex attenuated encounter-induced hyperactivity in methamphetamine-sensitized mice and it markedly decreased prefrontal 5-HT and dopamine levels, respectively. Pharmacological analysis showed that the encounter-induced hyperactivity is mediated by dopamine D1 receptors and 5-HT2A receptors and attenuated by anxiolytics and antidepressants such as diazepam, osemozotan and selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors. The effect of paroxetine was blocked by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist azasetron. The present study shows that psychological stress elicits hyperactivity with activation of prefrontal 5-HT and dopamine systems in methamphetamine-dependent mice and suggests that the abnormal behavior is associated with anxiety and depression. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  1. A novel in vivo inducible expression system in Edwardsiella tarda for potential application in bacterial polyvalence vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Guan, Lingyu; Yan, Yijian; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant bacterial vector vaccine is an attractive vaccination strategy to induce the immune response to a carried protective antigen, and the main concern of bacterial vector vaccine is to establish a stable antigen expression system in vector bacteria. Edwardsiella tarda is an important facultative intracellular pathogen of both animals and humans, and its attenuated derivates are excellent bacterial vectors for use in recombinant vaccine design. In this study, we design an in vivo inducible expression system in E. tarda and establish potential recombinant E. tarda vector vaccines. With wild type strain E. tarda EIB202 as a vector, 53 different bacteria-originated promoters were examined for iron-responsive transcription in vitro, and the promoters P(dps) and P(yncE) showed high transcription activity. The transcription profiles in vivo of two promoters were further assayed, and P(dps) revealed an enhanced in vivo inducible transcription in macrophage, larvae and adult zebra fish. The gapA34 gene, encoding the protective antigen GAPDH from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila LSA34, was introduced into the P(dps)-based protein expression system, and transformed into attenuated E. tarda strains. The resultant recombinant vector vaccine WED/pUTDgap was evaluated in turbot (Scophtalmus maximus). Over 60% of the vaccinated fish survived under the challenge with A. hydrophila LSA34 and E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the P(dps)-based antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine application. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aburto, Andrés [Program of M.Sc., Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Barría, Agustín [School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Cárdenas, Areli [Ph.D. Program, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D. [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Burgos, Maria E. [Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Ardiles, Leopoldo, E-mail: leopoldoardiles@gmail.com [Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  3. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  4. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  5. The involvement of central nervous system histamine receptors in psychological stress-induced exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Masuda, Chiaki; Iwami, Shunya; Sato, Miki; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Kawano, Tasuku; Ohkawara, Yuichi; Sakurada, Shinobu; Takayanagi, Motoaki; Ohno, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Psychological stress is one of the major risk factors for asthma exacerbation. Although histamine in the brain acts as an excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter associated with psychological stress, the contribution of brain histamine to psychological stress-induced exacerbation of asthma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of histamine receptors in the CNS on stress induced asthma aggravation. We monitored the numbers of inflammatory cells and interleukin (IL)-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine, mucus secretion in airway epithelial cells, and antigen-specific IgE contents in sera in a murine model of stress-induced asthma treated with epinastine (an H1R antagonist), thioperamide (an H3/4R antagonist), or solvent. All indicators of stress-induced asthma exacerbation were significantly reduced in stressed mice treated with epinastine compared with those treated with solvent, whereas treatment with thioperamide did not reduce the numbers of inflammatory cells in the stressed mice. These results suggest that H1R, but not H3/4R, may be involved in stress-induced asthma exacerbations in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Normal mitogen-induced suppression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) response and its deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrington, R.J.; Rutherford, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    A low-frequency suppressor-cell population in normal peripheral blood inhibits the B-cell CESS response to IL-6, following pokeweed mitogen stimulation. The suppression of IL-6 responsiveness is radiation sensitive, directed against CESS targets and not mediated by inhibition of IL-6 production, and associated with nonspecific cytotoxic activity against CESS targets. The generation of these cytolytic cells is also radiation sensitive. A correlation was found between PWM-induced cytotoxicity against CESS and the suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production. But cytotoxicity toward CESS targets is not responsible for this suppression because IL-2 induces equivalent or greater nonspecific cytotoxicity against CESS in the total absence of suppression of CESS-derived IgG production and suppression is also induced by mitogen-activated PBL separated from CESS targets by a cell-impermeable membrane. This suppression was not mediated by TNF alpha/beta or IFN-gamma. In systemic lupus erythematosus, suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production is impaired in patients with active disease (29.2 +/- 13.7%) compared to patients with inactive disease (70 +/- 19.5%) or normal controls (82.8 +/- 9.2%). There is also a defect in mitogen-induced nonspecific cytotoxicity in active SLE (specific lysis 15.1 +/- 3.5%, compared to 34 +/- 4% in normals). Pokeweed mitogen-activated PBL can therefore normally induce suppression of B-cell IL-6 responses and this response is deficient in lupus

  7. PELATIHAN MIRROR NEURON SYSTEM SAMA DENGAN PELATIHAN CONSTRAINT INDUCED MOVEMENT THERAPY DALAM MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN FUNGSIONAL ANGGOTA GERAK ATAS PASIEN STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul chalik meidian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an interruption of blood vasculature system in the brain that causes suddenly neurological dysfunction, resulted in clinically brain tissue damage in a relatively long time period, decreased physical mobility and functional ability impaired of upper limb. The purpose of this study is to know an increasing in upper limb functional ability among stroke patients after mirror neuron system exercise and constraint induced movement therapy exercise and to know the comparison of both exercise. This study uses an experimental research with pre-test and post-test control group design. Number of samples of the first group is 13 patients given mirror neuron system exercise for 30-60 minutes , while the second group 13 patients were given constraint induced movement therapy exercise for 30-60 minutes. The research was conducted in 2 month period time. Each patient is taught a variety of upper limb functional ability in accordance with the operational concept guidance and patients were asked to repeat the exercise independently at home as directed. Measuring test of upper limb functional ability is using the wolf motor function test instruments. The result is an increase the upper limb functional ability of 21.7% in the mirror neuron system exercise group and proved a significant difference (p<0.05 and an increase in the upper limb functional ability of 17.1% in the constraint induced movement therapy exercise group and proved a significant difference (p<0.05 while the difference of increasing of upper limb functional ability of the two groups showed no significant difference (p>0,05. It was concluded that the mirror neuron system exercise is similar with constraint induced movement therapy exercise in increasing the upper limb functional ability among stroke patients.

  8. Vacuum-induced quantum memory in an opto-electromechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li-Guo; Wang, Zhong-Yang; Wu, Shi-Chao; Gong, Shang-Qing; Ma, Hong-Yang; Jing, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We propose a scheme to implement electrically controlled quantum memory based on vacuum-induced transparency (VIT) in a high-Q tunable cavity, which is capacitively coupled to a mechanically variable capacitor by a charged mechanical cavity mirror as an interface. We analyze the changes of the cavity photons arising from vacuum-induced-Raman process and discuss VIT in an atomic ensemble trapped in the cavity. By slowly adjusting the voltage on the capacitor, the VIT can be adiabatically switched on or off, meanwhile, the transfer between the probe photon state and the atomic spin state can be electrically and adiabatically modulated. Therefore, we demonstrate a vacuum-induced quantum memory by electrically manipulating the mechanical mirror of the cavity based on electromagnetically induced transparency mechanism.

  9. Radiation-induced changes in rat endocrine system and their correction by means of adaptogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesina, M.Yu.; Arkhipov, N.P.; Karpenko, N.A.; Bogdanova, T.I.; Kozuritsky, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Endocrine status of experimental animals under chronic influence of both external and internal irradiation in low doses was researched in this work. The influence of adaptation medication preparation (biopolymer Spiruline - BS) on studied indexes is also evaluated. Application of preparation with adaptation-inducing properties - the biopolymer Spiruline for experimental animals at the early irradiation stage partially or completely prevents the development of radiation-induced damages

  10. Exercise attenuates dexamethasone-induced hypertension through an improvement of baroreflex activity independently of the renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Paula B; Dionísio, Thiago J; Duchatsch, Francine; Herrera, Naiara A; Duarte, Josiane O; Santos, Carlos F; Crestani, Carlos C; Amaral, Sandra L

    2017-12-01

    Dexamethasone-induced hypertension may be caused by baroreflex alterations or renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exacerbation. Aerobic training has been recommended for hypertension treatment, but the mechanisms responsible for reduction of arterial pressure (AP) in dexamethasone (DEX) treated rats are still inconclusive.This study evaluated whether mechanisms responsible for training-induced attenuation of hypertension involve changes in autonomic nervous system and in RAS components. Rats underwent aerobic training protocol on treadmill or were kept sedentary for 8 weeks. Additionally, animals were treated with DEX during the last 10 days of exercise. Body weight (BW), AP and baroreflex activity were analyzed. Tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SOL) and left ventricle (LV) were collected for evaluation of RAS components gene expression and protein levels. Dexamethasone decreased BW (20%), caused TA atrophy (16%) and increased systolic AP (SAP, 16%) as well as decreased baroreflex activity. Training attenuated SAP increase and improved baroreflex activity, although it did not prevent DEX-induced BW reduction and muscle atrophy. Neither DEX nor training caused expressive changes in RAS components. In conclusion, exercise training was effective in attenuating hypertension induced by DEX and this response may be mediated by a better autonomic balance through an improvement of baroreflex activity rather than changes in RAS components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF SEMI-QUANTITATIVE ANALYTICAL SYSTEM FOR METAL NANOPARTICLE INK USING LASER-INDUCED BREAKDOWN SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Ikezawa, S.; Wakamatsu, M.; Ueda, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the semi-quantitative analysis of metal nanoparticle ink using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS can be used to obtain information about the density and chemical composition of silver particles or copper particles, even ultrafine particles. Metal particles have been attracting much attention because of their increased use in new micro-nano technologies. In this work, LIBS was used as a fine metal particle measurement system for nanometallic materials used ...

  12. Modeling of kinetics of the inducible protein complexes of the SOS system in bacteria E. coli which realize TLS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model describing kinetics of the inducible genes of the protein complexes, formed during SOS response in bacteria Escherichia coli is developed. Within the bounds of developed approaches the auxiliary mathematical model describing changes in concentrations of the dimers, which are the components of final protein complexes, is developed. The solutions of both models are based on the experimental data concerning expression of the basic genes of the SOS system in bacteria Escherichia coli

  13. Resolution of methylphenidate osmotic release oral system-induced hair loss in two siblings after dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Ulku Akyol; Ercan, Eyup Sabri

    2017-11-01

    This report describes the cases of two siblings who experienced hair loss after treatment with methylphenidate (MPH) osmotic release oral system (OROS). Hair loss was resolved after discontinuation of the drug, but the children re-initiated treatment, after which hair loss again occurred, but they continued the treatment. After dose escalation, the hair loss resolved. This is the first report to describe resolution of OROS-MPH-induced hair loss after dose escalation. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. A three-component gene expression system and its application for inducible flavonoid overproduction in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yue; Cao, Cong-Mei; Vikram, Meenu; Park, Sunghun; Kim, Hye Jin; Hong, Jong Chan; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Koiwa, Hisashi

    2011-03-08

    Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool to study and engineer genes whose overexpression could be detrimental for the host organisms. However, only limited systems have been adopted in plant biotechnology. We have developed an osmotically inducible system using three components of plant origin, RD29a (Responsive to Dehydration 29A) promoter, CBF3 (C-repeat Binding Factor 3) transcription factor and cpl1-2 (CTD phosphatase-like 1) mutation. The osmotic stress responsible RD29a promoter contains the CBF3 binding sites and thus RD29A-CBF3 feedforward cassette enhances induction of RD29a promoter under stress. The cpl1-2 mutation in a host repressor CPL1 promotes stress responsible RD29a promoter expression. The efficacy of this system was tested using PAP1 (Production of Anthocyanin Pigment 1) transgene, a model transcription factor that regulates the anthocyanin pathway in Arabidopsis. While transgenic plants with only one or two of three components did not reproducibly accumulate anthocyanin pigments above the control level, transgenic cpl1 plants containing homozygous RD29a-PAP1 and RD29a-CBF3 transgenes produced 30-fold higher level of total anthocyanins than control plants upon cold treatment. Growth retardation and phytochemical production of transgenic plants were minimum under normal conditions. The flavonoid profile in cold-induced transgenic plants was determined by LC/MS/MS, which resembled that of previously reported pap1-D plants but enriched for kaempferol derivatives. These results establish the functionality of the inducible three-component gene expression system in plant metabolic engineering. Furthermore, we show that PAP1 and environmental signals synergistically regulate the flavonoid pathway to produce a unique flavonoid blend that has not been produced by PAP1 overexpression or cold treatment alone.

  15. A three-component gene expression system and its application for inducible flavonoid overproduction in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Feng

    Full Text Available Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool to study and engineer genes whose overexpression could be detrimental for the host organisms. However, only limited systems have been adopted in plant biotechnology. We have developed an osmotically inducible system using three components of plant origin, RD29a (Responsive to Dehydration 29A promoter, CBF3 (C-repeat Binding Factor 3 transcription factor and cpl1-2 (CTD phosphatase-like 1 mutation. The osmotic stress responsible RD29a promoter contains the CBF3 binding sites and thus RD29A-CBF3 feedforward cassette enhances induction of RD29a promoter under stress. The cpl1-2 mutation in a host repressor CPL1 promotes stress responsible RD29a promoter expression. The efficacy of this system was tested using PAP1 (Production of Anthocyanin Pigment 1 transgene, a model transcription factor that regulates the anthocyanin pathway in Arabidopsis. While transgenic plants with only one or two of three components did not reproducibly accumulate anthocyanin pigments above the control level, transgenic cpl1 plants containing homozygous RD29a-PAP1 and RD29a-CBF3 transgenes produced 30-fold higher level of total anthocyanins than control plants upon cold treatment. Growth retardation and phytochemical production of transgenic plants were minimum under normal conditions. The flavonoid profile in cold-induced transgenic plants was determined by LC/MS/MS, which resembled that of previously reported pap1-D plants but enriched for kaempferol derivatives. These results establish the functionality of the inducible three-component gene expression system in plant metabolic engineering. Furthermore, we show that PAP1 and environmental signals synergistically regulate the flavonoid pathway to produce a unique flavonoid blend that has not been produced by PAP1 overexpression or cold treatment alone.

  16. High-throughput screening system to identify small molecules that induce internalization and degradation of HER2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Masayuki; Asanuma, Daisuke; Namiki, Shigeyuki; Kumagai, Kazuo; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hirose, Kenzo

    2014-10-17

    Overexpression of growth factor receptors in cancers, e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in ovarian and breast cancers, is associated with aggressiveness. A possible strategy to treat cancers that overexpress those receptors is blockade of receptor signaling by inducing receptor internalization and degradation. In this study, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) system to identify small molecules that induce HER2 internalization by employing our recently developed acidic-pH-activatable probe in combination with protein labeling technology. Our HTS system enabled facile and reliable quantification of HER2 internalization with a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 44.6. As proof of concept, we used the system to screen a ∼155,000 small-molecule library and identified three hits that induced HER2 internalization and degradation via at least two distinct mechanisms. This HTS platform should be adaptable to other disease-related receptors in addition to HER2.

  17. The role of the sympathetic nervous system in radiation-induced apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuu, Mutsumi; Shichijo; Kazuko; Nakamura, Yasuko; Ikeda, Yuji; Naito, Shinji; Ito, Masahiro; Okaichi, Kumio; Sekine, Ichiro

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the sympathetic nervous system on radiation-induced apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells, apoptosis levels were compared in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), animals which are a genetic hyperfunction model of the sympathetic nervous system, and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). SHR and WKY were exposed to whole body X-ray irradiation at doses from 0.5 to 2 Gy. The apoptotic index in jejunal crypt cells was significantly greater in SHR than in WKY at each time point after irradiation and at each dose. WKY and SHR were treated with reserpine to induce sympathetic dysfunction, and were subsequently exposed to irradiation. Reserpine administration to SHR or WKY resulted in a significant suppression of apoptosis. p53 accumulation was detected in the jejunum in both WKY and SHR after irradiation by Western blotting analysis. There were no significant differences in the levels of p53 accumulation in irradiated intestine between WKY and SHR. These findings suggested that hyperfunction of the sympathetic nervous system is involved in the mechanism of high susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis of the jejunal crypt cells. (author)

  18. A new pharmacological role for donepezil: attenuation of morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in rat central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioids is a pharmacological phenomenon that occurs after their prolonged administration. It has been shown that morphine-induced tolerance is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system and neuroprotective agents which prevented apoptosis signaling could attenuate tolerance to the analgesic effects. On the other hand donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. Therefore in this study, the effect of systemic administration of donepezil on morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord was evaluated. Various groups of rats received morphine (ip) and different doses of donepezil (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg/day). Nociception was assessed using tail flick apparatus. Tail flick latency was recorded when the rat shook its tail. For apoptosis assay other groups of rats received the above treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Results The results showed that administration of donepezil (0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg, ip) delayed the morphine tolerance for 9, 12 and 17 days, respectively. Furthermore pretreatment injection of donepezil attenuated the number of apoptotic cells in the cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord compared to the control group. Conclusion In conclusion, we found that systemic administration of donepezil attenuated morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord. PMID:24455992

  19. Two pathways act in an additive rather than obligatorily synergistic fashion to induce systemic acquired resistance and PR gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Allan D

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local infection with necrotizing pathogens induces whole plant immunity to secondary challenge. Pathogenesis-related genes are induced in parallel with this systemic acquired resistance response and thought to be co-regulated. The hypothesis of co-regulation has been challenged by induction of Arabidopsis PR-1 but not systemic acquired resistance in npr1 mutant plants responding to Pseudomonas syringae carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2. However, experiments with ndr1 mutant plants have revealed major differences between avirulence genes. The ndr1-1 mutation prevents hypersensitive cell death, systemic acquired resistance and PR-1 induction elicited by bacteria carrying avrRpt2. This mutation does not prevent these responses to bacteria carrying avrB. Results Systemic acquired resistance, PR-1 induction and PR-5 induction were assessed in comparisons of npr1-2 and ndr1-1 mutant plants, double mutant plants, and wild-type plants. Systemic acquired resistance was displayed by all four plant lines in response to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria carrying avrB. PR-1 induction was partially impaired by either single mutation in response to either bacterial strain, but only fully impaired in the double mutant in response to avrRpt2. PR-5 induction was not fully impaired in any of the mutants in response to either avirulence gene. Conclusion Two pathways act additively, rather than in an obligatorily synergistic fashion, to induce systemic acquired resistance, PR-1 and PR-5. One of these pathways is NPR1-independent and depends on signals associated with hypersensitive cell death. The other pathway is dependent on salicylic acid accumulation and acts through NPR1. At least two other pathways also contribute additively to PR-5 induction.

  20. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  1. Evidence for a role of orexin/hypocretin system in vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3, 3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL on the orexin-A (OXA labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.. The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v. on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48 and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  2. Alcohol--Induced Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complex Coacervate Systems: Characterization and Applications in Enzyme and Protein Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati Moshtaghin, Mahboubeh

    The focus of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of the newly discovered surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervate (SPCC) systems induced by fluoroalcohol/acid as well as short chain aliphatic alcohol; and to elucidate their applications in extraction and enrichment of proteins and enzyme. We have discovered that fluoroalcohols and --acids induce complex coacervation and phase separation in the aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged anionic polyelectrolytes; specifically, sodium salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) over a broad range of concentrations of mole fractions of the oppositely charged amphiphiles. Accordingly, these new classes of coacervators will significantly broaden the scope and facilitate engineering of new coacervate phases. Toward these goals, we have inspected the formation of surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervates in the presence of fluoroalcohols namely hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, the extent of coacervation as a function of concentrations the system components, and charge ratios of the oppositely charged amphiphiles has been investigated. Polyelectrolytes are considered to be milder reagents, as compared to surfactants, regarding proteins denaturation. This highlights the importance of a detailed investigation of the efficiency of our coacervate systems for extraction and preconcentration of proteins and enzymes, especially, when the biological activity of the extracted proteins needs to be maintained based on the objectives mentioned above, the results of the investigations have been organized in four chapters. In Chapter II, the phase behavior of the FA-SPCC will be investigated. The objective is to examine the phase behavior and phase properties with respect to the extent of coacervation in different solution conditions. In particular, the effects of different solution variables such as concentration

  3. Apnea induced by respiratory syncytial virus infection is not associated with viral invasion of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Daniella Levy; Yarden-Bilavsky, Havatzelet; Mendelson, Ella; Yuhas, Yael; Ashkenazi, Shai; Nahum, Elhanan; Berent, Eva; Hindiyeh, Musa; Bilavsky, Efraim

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to study whether direct central nervous system invasion is responsible for the neurologic manifestations seen in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Cerebrospinal fluid from infants with RSV infection was tested for the detection of the following respiratory RNA viruses: RSV, influenza A and B, pandemic influenza H1N1, Parainfluenza-3, human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, parechovirus and enterovirus. All children tested negative for the presence of viral material in the cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the notion that the mechanism of RSV-induced neurologic manifestations, including apnea, is not direct central nervous system invasion.

  4. Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks by a cell-free system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shuji; Ikeda, Shogo; Tsutui, Ken; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    1990-01-01

    Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks of DNA was studied in vitro using an exonuclease purified from mouse ascites sarcoma (SR-C3H/He) cells. X-ray-dose-dependent unscheduled DNA synthesis was primed by the exonuclease. Repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in pUC19 plasmid DNA was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis after incubating the damaged DNA with the exonuclease, DNA polymerase (Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I or DNA polymerase β purified from SR-C3H/He cells), four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, ATP and DNA ligase (T4 DNA ligase or DNA ligase I purified from calf thymus). The present results suggested that the exonuclease is involved in the initiation of repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in removing 3' ends of X-ray-damaged DNA. (author)

  5. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  6. Characterization of radiation-induced apoptosis in developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M.R.; Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Sanjurjo, J.

    2000-01-01

    Prenatal exposures to ionizing radiation may cause a variety of effects on Central Nervous System (CNS) including microcephaly, severe mental retardation and lower intelligence tests score. The highest risks occur between 8 and 15 week of gestational age, simultaneously with the greatest neuroblastic proliferation and migration to cerebral cortex. It has been shown that radiation induce apoptosis in CNS, primarily in neonatal or early postnatal brain. At the same time, programmed cell death plays an important role in normal development of embrionic tissues, especially in the neuronal system. The purpose of the present study was the characterization and quantification of the apoptosis, the effectivity of different neuroprotectors, and the involvement of the caspase-3 in the programmed cellular death in our model. Evidence for apoptotic like features included: apoptotic nuclei observed by conventional and fluorescent staining, analysis of DNA fragmentation in agarosa gels and flow cytometric quantification. To gain an insight about the neuroprotective effect of different modulators of neuroprotection, it has been tested: Protein synthesis inhibitor, Compounds capable of reducing the effect of oxidative stress, Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and glutamate receptor antagonists. Cerebrocortical micromass cultures were prepared from fetuses of Wistar rats removed between 15 and 19 embronic day (ED) and 5 postnatal day (PN). Irradiation was performed two hours after seeding, with a Co60 source and a fast beam of the research reactor RA1 with a neutron-gamma field. Conventional staining was performed with May Grunwald Giemsa. Fluorescent staining consisted in a mixture of Propidium iodide (IP), fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and Hoescht 33342. Analysis of DNA fragmentation was carried out on 1,8% agarosa gel stained with ethidium bromide, visualized and photographed by UV illumination. Caspase-3 activation was performed using ApoAlert TM Kit. The quantification of

  7. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects Are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Desinia B.; Snow, Samantha J.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Richards, Judy E.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2016-01-01

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats underwent bilateral adrenal demedullation (DEMED), total bilateral adrenalectomy (ADREX), or sham surgery (SHAM). After a 4 day recovery, rats were exposed to air or ozone (1 ppm), 4 h/day for 1 or 2 days and responses assessed immediately postexposure. Circulating adrenaline levels dropped to nearly zero in DEMED and ADREX rats relative to SHAM. Corticosterone tended to be low in DEMED rats and dropped to nearly zero in ADREX rats. Adrenalectomy in air-exposed rats caused modest changes in metabolites and lung toxicity parameters. Ozone-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance were markedly attenuated in DEMED rats with nearly complete reversal in ADREX rats. Ozone increased circulating epinephrine and corticosterone in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Free fatty acids (P = .15) and branched-chain amino acids increased after ozone exposure in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Lung minute volume was not affected by surgery or ozone but ozone-induced labored breathing was less pronounced in ADREX rats. Ozone-induced increases in lung protein leakage and neutrophilic inflammation were markedly reduced in DEMED and ADREX rats (ADREX > DEMED). Ozone-mediated decreases in circulating white blood cells in SHAM were not observed in DEMED and ADREX rats. We demonstrate that ozone-induced peripheral metabolic effects and lung injury/inflammation are mediated through adrenal-derived stress hormones likely via the activation of stress response pathway. PMID:26732886

  8. An Optically-Coupled System for Quantitative Monitoring of MRI-Induced RF Currents into Long Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically-coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed LED transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions. PMID:19758855

  9. Evaluation of a laser-induced fluorescence system for uranium analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.E.

    1980-05-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence method for total uranium analysis of industrial process waters, waste waters, and leachates has been evaluated as a possible alternative for the normal, sodium fluoride and lithium fluoride, flame-fusion fluorescence method currently employed. Since the lower reporting limit of the laser fluorometer is on the order of 0.05 ..mu..g/L, samples for normal analysis can usually be diluted from 100 to 1000 fold which virtually eliminates interferences from quenching substances. Also, since the uranium determination is done in aqueous solution, laser-induced fluorescence entirely eliminates the need for organic extraction and the subsequent fusion process.

  10. Chemical activity induces dynamical force with global structure in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Okada, Koichi; Nomura, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2009-07-01

    We found a rotating global structure induced by the dynamical force of local chemical activity in a thin solution layer of excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction coupled with diffusion. The surface flow and deformation associated with chemical spiral waves (wavelength about 1 mm) represents a global unidirectional structure and a global tilt in the entire Petri dish (100 mm in diameter), respectively. For these observations, we scanned the condition of hierarchal pattern selection. From this result, the bromomalonic acid has an important role to induce the rotating global structure. An interaction between a reaction-diffusion process and a surface-tension-driven effect leads to such hierarchal pattern with different scales.

  11. Feed-induced Dystonias in Children With Severe Central Nervous System Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordekar, Santosh R; Velayudhan, Manjula; Campbell, David I

    2017-09-01

    Dystonias can arise from any painful stimuli in neurologically disabled children. Classically, feed-induced dystonias from mediastinal pain due to severe gastroesophageal reflux disease are described as Sandifer spasm. We report a case series of 12 severely neurologically impaired children with enteral feed-induced dystonias. Intestinal dysmotility was demonstrated in several. Improvements are seen with jejunal feeds or gut rest with total parenteral nutrition. Use of parenteral nutrition in children with severe neurodisability requires thorough discussion with patient groups and commissioners to give clinicians guidelines to standardize care.

  12. Physiological mechanisms of vascular response induced by shear stress and effect of exercise in systemic and placental circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván eRodríguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Physiological vascular function regulation is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the main risk factors of cardiovascular pathology, where the imbalance between the synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is common in the development of vascular disorders in systemic and placental circulation. In the placenta, an organ without autonomic innervations, the local control of vascular tone is critical for maintenance of fetal growth and mechanisms that underlie shear stress response induced by blood flow are essential during pregnancy. In this field, shear stress induced by moderate exercise is one of the most important mechanisms to improve vascular function through nitric oxide (NO synthesis and stimulation of mechanical response of endothelial cells triggered by ion channels, caveolae, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, among others. The demand for oxygen and nutrients by tissues and organs, especially in placentation and pregnancy, determines blood flow parameters and physiological adaptations of vascular beds for covering metabolic requirements. In this regard, moderate exercise versus sedentarism shows potential benefits for improving vascular function associated with the enhancement of molecular mechanisms induced by shear stress. In this review, we collect evidence about molecular bases of physiological response to shear stress in order to highlight the relevance of moderate exercise-training for vascular health in adult and fetal life.

  13. Analysis of Disturbance Source Inducing by The Variable Speed Wind Turbine System Forced Power Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Jin; Hu, Weihao; Wang, Xiaoru

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of forced low frequency oscillations is to analyze the disturbance source and the origin of forced oscillations. In this paper, the origin of low-frequency periodical oscillations induced by wind turbines’ mechanical power is investigated and the mechanism is studied of fluctuating...

  14. Heat-inducible Cre-lox system for marker excision in transgenic rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study assessed the efficacy of a heat-inducible cre gene for conditional removal of the marker gene from a rice genome via Cre-lox recombination. A cre gene controlled by the soybean heat-shock promoter was introduced into the rice genome along with the recombination target (lox) construct. Cre-mediated ...

  15. Silicon induced systemic defense responses in perennial ryegrass against Magnaporthe oryzae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable integrated disease management for gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass may involve use of plant defense elicitors with compatible traditional fungicides to reduce disease incidence and severity. Silicon (Si) is a potential inducer or modulator of plant defenses against different pathogen...

  16. Piplartine induces genotoxicity in eukaryotic but not in prokaryotic model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Daniel P; Vasconcellos, Marne C; Machado, Miriana S; Villela, Izabel V; Rosa, Renato M; Moura, Dinara J; Pessoa, Cláudia; Moraes, Manoel O; Silveira, Edilberto R; Lima, Mary Anne S; Aquino, Nayara C; Henriques, João Antonio P; Saffi, Jenifer; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V

    2009-01-01

    Piplartine {5,6-dihydro-1-[(2E)-1-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-2-propen-1-yl]-2(1H)-pyridinone} is an alkamide present in Piper species that exhibits promising anticancer properties. It was previously shown that piplartine is mutagenic in yeast and cultured mammalian cells. This study was performed to increase the knowledge on the mutagenic potential of piplartine using the Salmonella/microsome assay, V79 cell micronucleus and chromosome aberration assays, and mouse bone-marrow micronucleus tests. Piplartine was isolated from the roots of Piper tuberculatum. This extracted compound was unable to induce a mutagenic response in any Salmonella typhimurium strain either in the presence or absence of metabolic activation. Piplartine showed mutagenic effects in V79 cells, as there was an increased frequency of aberrant cells and micronuclei formation. In addition, piplartine administered at 50mg/kg did not induce micronucleus formation in vivo, but a dose of 100mg/kg induced an increase in the levels of micronucleus polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs). Overall, these results provide further support that piplartine induces in vivo and in vitro mutagenicity in eukaryotic models.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency in systems with degenerate autoionizing levels in Λ-configuration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dinh, T.B.; Leoński, W.; Long, V.C.; Peřina ml., Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 3 (2013), s. 471-484 ISSN 0078-5466 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) * lambda configuration * autoionizing states * double Fano profile Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.643, year: 2013

  18. The role of the endocrine system in feeding-induced tissue-specific circadian entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Miho; Murakami, Mariko; Node, Koichi; Matsumura, Ritsuko; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-07-24

    The circadian clock is entrained to environmental cycles by external cue-mediated phase adjustment. Although the light input pathway has been well defined, the mechanism of feeding-induced phase resetting remains unclear. The tissue-specific sensitivity of peripheral entrainment to feeding suggests the involvement of multiple pathways, including humoral and neuronal signals. Previous in vitro studies with cultured cells indicate that endocrine factors may function as entrainment cues for peripheral clocks. However, blood-borne factors that are well characterized in actual feeding-induced resetting have yet to be identified. Here, we report that insulin may be involved in feeding-induced tissue-type-dependent entrainment in vivo. In ex vivo culture experiments, insulin-induced phase shift in peripheral clocks was dependent on tissue type, which was consistent with tissue-specific insulin sensitivity, and peripheral entrainment in insulin-sensitive tissues involved PI3K- and MAPK-mediated signaling pathways. These results suggest that insulin may be an immediate early factor in feeding-mediated tissue-specific entrainment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Injury-Induced Type I IFN Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    IFNs signal through a receptor (IFNAR), which involves activation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF)9, leading to the induction of IFN-stimulated genes including IRF7, that in turn enhances the induction of type I IFN. Axonal transection induced upregulation of IRF7 and IRF9 in hippocampus. Induction...

  20. Radiation-induced loss studies in Er-doped fiber amplifier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsos, William C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiation-induced loss in erbium-doped fiber and fiber-based components used in optical amplifiers at 1.5 micrometer has been studied under electron and gamma irradiation up to total doses of 100 krad(Si). Radiation sources used to simulate the natural space environment were a Van de Graaff generator for 1.5 MeV electrons, and Cobalt-60 for 1.17 and 1.33 MeV photons. Induced-loss and 60-hour anneal were measured in Er-doped fiber while simultaneously illuminated with 0.7 W of 980-nm pump, and 1 mW of 1550-nm signal light in an operating amplifier configuration. Initial induced loss from electron irradiation was found to decrease under intense photoillumination to 0.010 dB/m-krad at 980 nm and .007 dB/m- krad at 1550 nm, versus 0.017 dB/m-krad and 0.008 dB/m-krad respectively when unilluminated, and showed a more rapid anneal in some tested fibers. Individual components of an optical isolator were tested for gamma-irradiation sensitivity. A 1 degree change in polarization rotation angle was found in a garnet-film Faraday rotator after exposure, and the GRIN lens showed an initial induced loss of 0.5 dB that annealed to 0.1 dB after 2 weeks under conditions of 1 mW, 1550-nm photoillumination.

  1. Effects of translational symmetry breaking induced by the boundaries in a driven diffusive system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Leung, Kwan-tai

    1991-01-01

    We study the effects of the boundary conditions in a driven diffusive lattice-gas model which is known to display kinetic phase transitions. We find, in the case of attractive interaction, that a boundary-condition-induced symmetry breaking of the translational invariance, along the direction...

  2. Evaluation of Azathioprine-Induced Cytotoxicity in an In Vitro Rat Hepatocyte System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Maruf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Azathioprine (AZA is widely used in clinical practice for preventing graft rejection in organ transplantations and various autoimmune and dermatological diseases with documented unpredictable hepatotoxicity. The potential molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of AZA towards isolated rat hepatocytes were investigated in this study using “Accelerated Cytotoxicity Mechanism Screening” techniques. The concentration of AZA required to cause 50% cytotoxicity in 2 hrs at 37°C was found to be 400 μM. A significant increase in AZA-induced cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation was observed when glutathione- (GSH- depleted hepatocytes were used. The addition of N-acetylcysteine decreased cytotoxicity and ROS formation. Xanthine oxidase inhibition by allopurinol decreased AZA-induced cytotoxicity, ROS, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 formation and increased % mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Addition of N-acetylcysteine and allopurinol together caused nearly complete cytoprotection against AZA-induced hepatocyte death. TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, a known ROS scavenger and a superoxide dismutase mimic, and antioxidants, like DPPD (N,N′-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine, Trolox (a water soluble vitamin E analogue, and mesna (2-mercaptoethanesulfonate, also decreased hepatocyte death and ROS formation. Results from this study suggest that AZA-induced cytotoxicity in isolated rat hepatocytes may be partly due to ROS formation and GSH depletion that resulted in oxidative stress and mitochondrial injury.

  3. Effect of plasmapheresis on the immune system in endotoxin-induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Schmidt, R; Broechner, A C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that plasmapheresis is most effective when applied early in Gram-negative sepsis. We therefore studied the effect of early plasmapheresis on immunity in experimental Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced sepsis. METHODS: 20 pigs received 30 microg/kg of E. coli...

  4. S100A4 amplifies TGF-β-induced fibroblast activation in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomcik, Michal; Palumbo-Zerr, Katrin; Zerr, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    the expression of S100A4 to stimulate the release of collagen in SSc fibroblasts and induce fibrosis. Since S100A4 is essentially required for the pro-fibrotic effects of TGF-β and neutralising antibodies against S100A4 are currently evaluated, S100A4 might be a candidate for novel antifibrotic therapies....

  5. Both central and peripheral auditory systems are involved in salicylate-induced tinnitus in rats: a behavioral study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanyin Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to establish a low dose salicylate-induced tinnitus rat model and to investigate whether central or peripheral auditory system is involved in tinnitus. METHODS: Lick suppression ratio (R, lick count and lick latency of conditioned rats in salicylate group (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneally and saline group were first compared. Bilateral auditory nerves were ablated in unconditioned rats and lick count and lick latency were compared before and after ablation. The ablation was then performed in conditioned rats and lick count and lick latency were compared between salicylate group and saline group and between ablated and unablated salicylate groups. RESULTS: Both the R value and the lick count in salicylate group were significantly higher than those in saline group and lick latency in salicylate group was significantly shorter than that in saline group. No significant changes were observed in lick count and lick latency before and after ablation. After ablation, lick count and lick latency in salicylate group were significantly higher and shorter respectively than those in saline group, but they were significantly lower and longer respectively than those in unablated salicylate group. CONCLUSION: A low dose of salicylate (120 mg/kg can induce tinnitus in rats and both central and peripheral auditory systems participate in the generation of salicylate-induced tinnitus.

  6. Both central and peripheral auditory systems are involved in salicylate-induced tinnitus in rats: a behavioral study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanyin; Feng, Lining; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yongzhu; Chang, Haifeng; Cui, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a low dose salicylate-induced tinnitus rat model and to investigate whether central or peripheral auditory system is involved in tinnitus. Lick suppression ratio (R), lick count and lick latency of conditioned rats in salicylate group (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and saline group were first compared. Bilateral auditory nerves were ablated in unconditioned rats and lick count and lick latency were compared before and after ablation. The ablation was then performed in conditioned rats and lick count and lick latency were compared between salicylate group and saline group and between ablated and unablated salicylate groups. Both the R value and the lick count in salicylate group were significantly higher than those in saline group and lick latency in salicylate group was significantly shorter than that in saline group. No significant changes were observed in lick count and lick latency before and after ablation. After ablation, lick count and lick latency in salicylate group were significantly higher and shorter respectively than those in saline group, but they were significantly lower and longer respectively than those in unablated salicylate group. A low dose of salicylate (120 mg/kg) can induce tinnitus in rats and both central and peripheral auditory systems participate in the generation of salicylate-induced tinnitus.

  7. Both Central and Peripheral Auditory Systems Are Involved in Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus in Rats: A Behavioral Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yongzhu; Chang, Haifeng; Cui, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to establish a low dose salicylate-induced tinnitus rat model and to investigate whether central or peripheral auditory system is involved in tinnitus. Methods Lick suppression ratio (R), lick count and lick latency of conditioned rats in salicylate group (120 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and saline group were first compared. Bilateral auditory nerves were ablated in unconditioned rats and lick count and lick latency were compared before and after ablation. The ablation was then performed in conditioned rats and lick count and lick latency were compared between salicylate group and saline group and between ablated and unablated salicylate groups. Results Both the R value and the lick count in salicylate group were significantly higher than those in saline group and lick latency in salicylate group was significantly shorter than that in saline group. No significant changes were observed in lick count and lick latency before and after ablation. After ablation, lick count and lick latency in salicylate group were significantly higher and shorter respectively than those in saline group, but they were significantly lower and longer respectively than those in unablated salicylate group. Conclusion A low dose of salicylate (120 mg/kg) can induce tinnitus in rats and both central and peripheral auditory systems participate in the generation of salicylate-induced tinnitus. PMID:25269067

  8. Evaluation of the induced electric field and compliance procedure for a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2013-11-07

    In this study, an induced electric field in a human body is evaluated for the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system for charging an electrical vehicle. The magnetic field from the wireless power transfer system is modelled computationally, and its effectiveness is confirmed by comparison with the field measured in a previous study. The induced electric field in a human standing around the vehicle is smaller than the allowable limit prescribed in international guidelines, although the magnetic field strength in the human body is locally higher than the allowable external field strength. Correlation between the external magnetic field and the induced electric field is confirmed to be reasonable at least in the standing posture, which is the case discussed in the international standard. Based on this finding, we discussed and confirmed the applicability of a three-point magnetic field measurement at heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m for safety compliance.

  9. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommes Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR.

  10. The role of amino acids on the development of radiation-induced damage of central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamatodani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kouichi; Nohara, Kyoko; Moriyasu, Saeko; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Radiation impairs some functions of the central nervous system, which is one of the radiation-resistant tissues in the body. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy-ions on the release of glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, in the hypothalamus of rats measured by in vivo brain microdialysis. Total body and head, but not abdominal, heavy-ion (carbon) irradiation induced a significant increase in glutamate levels to approximately 150% of the basal level at 1.5 h of the irradiation, and the release gradually increased during the observation period. Furthermore, heavy-ion-induced glutamate release was suppressed by pretreatment with the dexamethasone. These results suggested that the central pathways (i.e. the neuronal damage of the brain or inflammatory cytokines which were produced in the brain) are involved in the development of high-LET radiation-induced glutamate release. (author)

  11. Radiation-induced systemic and local bone tumors: Two types of late effects with possible different origins?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.A.; Luz, A.; Linzner, U.

    1994-01-01

    Bone sarcomas may be induced throughout the skeleton (systemic) in mice by relatively low internal α-particle doses that are distributed over the whole skeleton. The induction of local (periosteal) bone sarcomas after paratibial deposition of insoluble radiocolloids required much higher doses, and in addition high energies of emitted particles. Paratibial deposition of α-particle-emitting radiocolloids of 227 Th and 228 Th resulted in formation of both local and systemic bone sarcomas. The latter were most probably induced by the released radium daughters of the thorium isotopes and were distributed about the skeleton. Paratibial injections with β-particle emitters 144 Ce+ 144 Pr (29 kBq per mouse) showed an incidence of local bone sarcomas of more than 80%. An estimation of the local effective doses led to values of more than 1000 Gy for the β-particle emitter 144 Ce and around 150 Gy for the thorium isotopes. Thus induction of local bone sarcomas required doses considerably greater than those needed for systemic bone sarcomas. The local induction of bone sarcomas has been reported for high-energy β particles using similar high doses of 144 Ce+ 144 Pr in rats and for external 90 Sr+ 90 Y irradiation in mice. We conclude that the processes involved in the induction of local and systemic bone sarcomas by radiation may be quite different. 35 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP.

  13. Radiation-induced systemic and local bone tumors: two types of late effects with possible different origins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W A; Luz, A; Linzner, U

    1994-06-01

    Bone sarcomas may be induced throughout the skeleton (systemic) in mice by relatively low internal alpha-particle doses that are distributed over the whole skeleton. The induction of local (periosteal) bone sarcomas after paratibial deposition of insoluble radiocolloids required much higher doses, and in addition high energies of emitted particles. Paratibial deposition of alpha-particle-emitting radiocolloids of 227Th and 228Th resulted in formation of both local and systemic bone sarcomas. The latter were most probably induced by the released radium daughters of the thorium isotopes and were distributed about the skeleton. Paratibial injections with beta-particle emitters 144Ce+ 144Pr (29 kBq per mouse) showed an incidence of local bone sarcomas of more than 80%. An estimation of the local effective doses led to values of more than 1000 Gy for the beta-particle emitter 144Ce and around 150 Gy for the thorium isotopes. Thus induction of local bone sarcomas required doses considerably greater than those needed for systemic bone sarcomas. The local induction of bone sarcomas has been reported for high-energy beta particles using similar high doses of 144Ce+ 144Pr in rats and for external 90Sr+ 90Y irradiation in mice. We conclude that the processes involved in the induction of local and systemic bone sarcomas by radiation may be quite different.

  14. Enhanced both in vitro and in vivo kinetics by SLNs induced transdermal system of furosemide: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannam, Revathi; Yallamalli, Indira Muzib

    2017-11-28

    Furosemide is a potent diuretic agent used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. Variable dosage regimen and poor pharmacokinetic parameters has led to the development of transdermal drug delivery system. A patent on suitability of multi-lamellar structures for excellent transdermal delivery (US 0367475A1) has encouraged us to formulate the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) induced transdermal systems of furosemide to enhance the kinetic properties without incorporating any penetration enhancer and rate limiting polymers. SLNs were prepared by hot homogenization and ultra-sonication method; optimization was done basing on entrapment efficiency and particle size. Optimized SLNs were incorporated in to transdermal patches by solvent casting method. In-vitro and in-vivo studies were carried out for characterization of transdermal patches. SLNs of F9 (GMS: Span 60: Pluronic F 68 in 6:2.5:0.2) were optimized for incorporating in to transdermal system (entrapment efficiency 94.5±0.045%, particle size 69.6±1.48 nm and in-vitro release 94.38±1.02%). Transdermal patches were formulated using combinations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers to study the diffusion kinetics. Formulation FS1 (HPMC 4 parts) was optimized for further studies (in-vitro release 98.11±1.21% with flux of 58.726±0.023 µg/cm2/h) and no significant