WorldWideScience

Sample records for system corrosion studies

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of iron corrosion underneath painting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, R.K.; Hajela, B.P.; Sengupta, S.; Srivastava, B.C.; Gupta, K.N.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of pigments on the development of corrosion products between the painting system and metal surface when exposed to marine environments has been discussed. The pigments studied were: red mud zinc chromate, zinc chromate, red oxide zinc phosphate, manganese phosphate barium chromate and basic lead silico chromate. Moessbauer spectroscopy revealed that the upper rust layer in all the cases consisted of γ-Fe 2 O 3 , γ-FeOOH and α-FeOOH. The lower rust layer immediately in contact with the metal surface consisted of an asymmetrical doublet due to γ-FeOOH. (Auth.)

  2. Initial study and verification of a distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for transportation structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    For this study, a novel optical fiber sensing system was developed and tested for the monitoring of corrosion in : transportation systems. The optical fiber sensing system consists of a reference long period fiber gratings (LPFG) sensor : for corrosi...

  3. Corrosion Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  4. Experimental Study of Removing Surface Corrosion Products from Archaeological Iron Objects and Alternating Iron Corrosion Products by Nd:YAG Laser Cleaning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Youn; Cho, Nam Chul [Kongju National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Myoung [IMT co. Ltd, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Eun [National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The corrosion product of archaeological iron objects is supposed to be removed because it causes re-corrosion. So far it is removed by scapel and sand blaster but they depend on the skill and experience of a conservator and the glass-dust of the sand blaster is harmful to humans. Therefore this study applies a laser cleaning system which is used in various industrial cleaning processes, to remove corrosion product from archaeological iron objects. In addition, this work studies the alternation of corrosion product after laser irradiation, which evaluates the reliability of the laser cleaning system. Optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, XRD, Raman have been used to observe and analyse the surface of the objects. The results show the capacity of laser cleaning some corrosion product, but blackening appears with increasing pulses and laser energy, and some corrosion products, goethite and hematite, are partially altered to magnetite. These problems, blackening and alternation of corrosion product, should be solved by further studies which find the optimal laser irradiation condition and use a wetting agent.

  5. Electrolytic corrosion of water pipeline system in the remote distance from stray currents—Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Zakowski​

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Case study of corrosion failure of urban water supply system caused by the harmful effects of stray currents was presented. The failure occurred at a site distant from the sources of these currents namely the tramway and railway traction systems. Diagnosis revealed the stray currents flow to pipeline over a remote distance of 800/1000 m from the point of failure. At the point of failure stray currents flowed from the pipeline to the ground through external insulation defects, causing the process of electrolytic corrosion of the metal. Long distance between the affected section of the pipeline and the sources of stray currents excludes the typical protection against stray currents in the form of electrical polarized drainage. Corrosion protection at this point can be achieved by using the earthing electrodes made of magnesium, which will also provide cathodic current protection as galvanic anode.

  6. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  7. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  8. Lithium-system corrosion/erosion studies for the FMIT project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.

    1983-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment has been studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The liquid lithium test resources and the capabilities of several laboratories were used to study specific concerns associated with the overall objective. Testing conditions ranged from approx. 3700 hours to approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230 0 C to 270 0 C and static lithium at temperatures from 200 0 C to 500 0 C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects of FMIT lithium system materials (largely Type 304 and Type 304L austenitic stainless steels) and candidate materials for major system components

  9. Lithium-system corrosion/erosion studies for the FMIT project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G D [comp.

    1983-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment has been studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The liquid lithium test resources and the capabilities of several laboratories were used to study specific concerns associated with the overall objective. Testing conditions ranged from approx. 3700 hours to approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/C to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects of FMIT lithium system materials (largely Type 304 and Type 304L austenitic stainless steels) and candidate materials for major system components.

  10. A STUDY OF LEAKAGE OF TRACE METALS FROM CORROSION OF THE MUNICIPAL DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R SHA MANSOURI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high portion of lead and copper concentration in municipal drinking water is related to the metallic structure of the distribution system and facets. The corrosive water in pipes and facets cause dissolution of the metals such as Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn into the water. Due to the lack of research work in this area, a study of the trace metals were performed in the drinking water distribution system in Zarin Shahr and Mobareke of Isfahan province. Methods: Based on the united states Environmental protection Agency (USEPA for the cities over than 50,000 population such as Zarin Shahr and Mobareke, 30 water samples from home facets with the minimum 6 hours retention time of water in pipes, were collected. Lead and cadmium concentration were determined using flameless Atomic Absorption. Cupper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese were determined using Atomic Absorption. Results: The average concentration of Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn in water distribution system fo Zarin Shahr were 5.7, 0.1, 80, 3042, 23065 and in Mobareke were 7.83, 0.8,210,3100, 253, 17µg respectively. The cocentration of Pb, Cd and Zn were zero at the beginning of the water samples from the municipal drinking water distribution system for both cities. Conclusion: The study showed that the corrosion by products (such as Pb, Cd and Zn was the results of dissolution of the galvanized pipes and brass facets. Lead concentration in over that 10 percent of the water samples in zarin shahr exceeded the drinking water standard level, which emphasize the evaluation and control of corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

  11. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  12. Studies on corrosion inhibitors for the cooling water system at the Heavy Water Project, Kota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, B.P.; Mehta, C.T.; Abubacker, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Heavy Water Project at Kota uses the water from the Rana Pratap Sagar Lake as coolant in the open recirculation system. In order to find suitable corrosion inhibitors for the above system, a series of laboratory experiments on corrosion inhibitors were carried out using the constructional materials of the cooling water system and a number of proprietary formulations and the results are tabulated. From the data thus generated through various laboratory experiments, the most useful ones have been recommended for application in practice. (author)

  13. EIS study on corrosion and scale processes and their inhibition in cooling system media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin-Cruz, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Quimica, Apdo. Postal 55-534, 09340 Mexico, DF (Mexico) and Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Coordinacion de Ingenieria Molecular, Competencia de Quimica Aplicada, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, CP 07730, DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: jmarin@imp.mx; Cabrera-Sierra, R. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Quimica, Apdo. Postal 55-534, 09340 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas (ESIQIE-IPN), Departamento de Metalurgia, UPALM Zacatenco AP 75-874, CP 07338, DF (Mexico); Pech-Canul, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN, AP 73 Cordemex, CP 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Gonzalez, I. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Quimica, Apdo. Postal 55-534, 09340 Mexico, DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: igm@xanum.uam.mx

    2006-01-20

    A study of the carbon steel/cooling water interface was carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS spectra reveal that a layer of corrosion and scale products forms naturally and evolves with the immersion time modifying the carbon steel/cooling water interface and giving rise to corrosion and scale processes. In addition, the nature of the layer formed on the metal was found to depend on the inhibitor used. It was established that the corrosion inhibitor (hydroxyphosphonoacetic acid (HPA)) chelates with Ca(II) ion generating a layer with resistive properties that provides good protection against corrosion. In contrast, the scale inhibitor (1-hydroxy-ethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP)) is incorporated into the calcium carbonate crystals at the surface, modifying the structure and diminishing scale formation in the surface; this additive additionally inhibited corrosion. These observations were supported by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and corroborate previous studies performed by other techniques on HPA and HEDP. Finally, a synergistic effect was observed between these inhibitors that provides good protection to steel against corrosion and scaling in cooling media.

  14. EIS study on corrosion and scale processes and their inhibition in cooling system media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin-Cruz, J.; Cabrera-Sierra, R.; Pech-Canul, M.A.; Gonzalez, I.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the carbon steel/cooling water interface was carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS spectra reveal that a layer of corrosion and scale products forms naturally and evolves with the immersion time modifying the carbon steel/cooling water interface and giving rise to corrosion and scale processes. In addition, the nature of the layer formed on the metal was found to depend on the inhibitor used. It was established that the corrosion inhibitor (hydroxyphosphonoacetic acid (HPA)) chelates with Ca(II) ion generating a layer with resistive properties that provides good protection against corrosion. In contrast, the scale inhibitor (1-hydroxy-ethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP)) is incorporated into the calcium carbonate crystals at the surface, modifying the structure and diminishing scale formation in the surface; this additive additionally inhibited corrosion. These observations were supported by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and corroborate previous studies performed by other techniques on HPA and HEDP. Finally, a synergistic effect was observed between these inhibitors that provides good protection to steel against corrosion and scaling in cooling media

  15. Pilot study on the corrosion monitoring and control of the crude oil refining system by thin layer activation (TLA) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choochartchaikulkarn, Bodin; Chueinta, Siripone; Santawamaitre, Todsadol

    2001-01-01

    This report represents a pilot study on application of Ta technique for measurement monitoring the corrosion rates occurring in the refinery crude oil overhead crude oil system at the Bangchak Petroleum Co., Ltd. in Thailand during mid 1999 to mid 2000. TLA coupons containing very low activity of 5 6 Co produced by the accelerator was attached to the used electrical resistance probe inserted into production system at the test position. Gamma intensity of 56 Co was routinely monitored at external cladding and corrosion rates calculated in comparison with the non corroded standard after decay correction. From the study, TLA technique provides accurate corrosion rates less than 75 mm/year as compared to the standard Electrical Resistance Probes (ERP) technique. (author)

  16. Study of low cost eco-friendly compounds as corrosion inhibitors for cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooqi, I H; Hussain, A; Saini, P A [AMU, Aligarh (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Quraishi, M A [AMU, Aligarh (India). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-07-01

    Attempts are made to utilize the aqueous extracts of natural compounds, namely cordia latifolia and curcumin, as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in cooling systems, and their inhibition efficiencies are compared with that of Hydroxyethylidene 1-1 diphosphonic acid (HEDP). HEDP is also blended with aqueous extracts of natural compounds so as to improve their inhibition efficiency. The blowdown of the cooling system is also analysed for environmental factors. (author)

  17. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  18. 219-S CORROSION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIVINE, J.R.; PARSONS, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    A minor leak was detected in a drain line for Hood 2B located in the 222-S Laboratory. The line transfers radioactive waste, spent analytical standards, and chemicals used in various analytical procedures. Details are in the report provided by David Comstock, 2B NDE June 2008, work package LAB-WO-07-2012. Including the noted leak, the 222-S Laboratory has experienced two drain line leaks in approximately the last two years of operation. As a consequence, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) requested the support of ChemMet, Ltd., PC (ChemMet) at the Hanford Site 222-S Laboratory. The corrosion expertise from ChemMet was required prior to preparation of a compatibility assessment for the 222-S Laboratory waste transfer system to assure the expected life of the piping system is extended as much as practicable. The system includes piping within the 222-S Laboratory and the 219-S Waste Storage and Transfer Facility and Operations Process. The ChemMet support was required for an assessment by 222-S staff to analyze what improvements to operational activities may be implemented to extend the tank/piping system life. This assessment will include a summary of the various material types, age, and locations throughout the facility. The assessment will also include a discussion of materials that are safe for drain line disposal on a regular basis, materials that are safe for disposal on a case-by-case basis including specific additional requirements such as flushing, neutralization to a specific pH, and materials prohibited from disposal. The assessment shall include adequate information for 222-S Laboratory personnel to make informed decisions in the future disposal of specific material types by discussing types of compatibility of system materials and potential wastes. The assessment is expected to contain some listing of acceptable waste materials but is not anticipated to be a complete or comprehensive list. Finally the assessment will encompass a brief discussion of

  19. Companion Study Guide to Short Course on Geothermal Corrosion and Mitigation in Low Temperature Geothermal Heating Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, II, P F

    1985-04-24

    The economic utilization of geothermal resources with temperatures less than 220 degrees Fahrenheit for purposes other than electric power generation (direct utilization) requires creation of systems with long plant life and minimum operation and maintenance costs. Development of such systems requires careful corrosion engineering if the most cost effective material selections and design choices are to be made. This study guide presents guidelines for materials selection for low-temperature geothermal systems (120 - 200 degrees Fahrenheit), as well as guidance in materials design of heat pump systems for very-lowtemperature geothermal resources (less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit). This guideline is divided into five sections and an Appendix.

  20. A Study of Magnesium-Base Metallic Systems and Development of Principles for Creation of Corrosion-Resistant Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhina, I. Yu.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of 26 alloying elements on the corrosion resistance of high-purity magnesium in a 0.5-n solution of sodium chloride and in a humid atmosphere (0.005 n) is studied. The Mg - Li, Mg - Ag, Mg - Zn, Mg - Cu, Mg - Gd, Mg - Al, Mg - Zr, Mg - Mn and other binary systems, which present interest as a base for commercial or perspective castable magnesium alloys, are studied. The characteristics of corrosion resistance of the binary alloys are analyzed in accordance with the group and period of the Mendeleev's periodic law. The roles of the electrochemical and volume factors and of the factor of the valence of the dissolved element are determined.

  1. Report on the studies on the corrosion behaviour of the constructional materials for the gate cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elayathu, N.S.D.; Balachandra, J.

    1974-01-01

    The gate cooling system of the Trombay R-5 reactor, now under construction, is proposed to be a laminated gate designed to operate with 50 % KBO 2 solution within the temperature limits 30 deg C and 50 deg C. With a view to find suitable constructional materials for the gate, the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel 304 L(ASTM 240-69), lead (ASTM B-29), aluminium (as Boral), neoprene, perspex and carbon steel (ASTM A 302 grade B) has been investigated in 50 % KBO 2 solution at 45 deg C. After definite periods of exposure, their coupons were examined metallographically at different magnifications to assess the nature and extent of sub-surface attack. The results show that out of the materials studied, carbon steel, lead and aluminium are more liable to corrosion in the borate solution and hence their use should be avoided. (M.G.B.)

  2. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  3. Structural, theoretical and corrosion inhibition studies on some transition metal complexes derived from heterocyclic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shraddha Rani; Mourya, Punita; Singh, M. M.; Singh, Vinod P.

    2017-06-01

    A Schiff base, (E)-N‧-((1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-aminobenzohydrazide (Iabh) and its Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized. These compounds have been characterized by different physico-chemical and spectroscopic tools (UV-Vis, IR, NMR and ESI-Mass). The molecular structure of Iabh is determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The ligand Iabh displays E-configuration about the >Cdbnd N- bond. The structure of ligand is stabilized by intra-molecular H-bonding. In all the metal complexes the ligand coordinates through azomethine-N and carbonyl-O resulting a distorted octahedral geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes in which chloride ions occupy axial positions. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes, however, form 4-coordinate distorted square planer and tetrahedral geometry around metal ion, respectively. The structures of the complexes have been satisfactorily modeled by calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent-DFT (TD-DFT). The corrosion inhibition study of the compounds have been performed against mild steel in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at 298 K by using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). They show appreciable corrosion inhibition property.

  4. Protecting solar collector systems from corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The main cause of the reduced life of a solar heating system is corrosion of the exterior parts and the internal components. This report outlines ways of reducing the cost of solar heating by reducing the corrosion in solar heating systems, and hence increasing the system's service life. Mechanisms for corrosion are discussed: these include galvanic corrosion and crevice corrosion. Means of minimizing corrosion at the design stage are then described. Such methods, when designing the solar collector, involve ensuring proper drainage of exterior water; eliminating situations where moisture, dirt and pollutants may collect; preventing condensation inside the collector; using proper gaskets and sealants at appropriate places; and selecting optimum materials and coatings. Interior corrosion can be minimized at the design stage by choosing a good heat transfer fluid and corrosion inhibitor, in the case of systems where liquids are used; ensuring a low enough flow rate to avoid erosion; designing the system to avoid crevices; and avoiding situations where galvanic corrosion could occur. Other procedures are given for minimizing corrosion in the construction and operation of solar heating systems. 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  6. The Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Sodium Nitrite Using an On-line Corrosion Rate Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mal-Yong; Kang, Dae-Jin; Moon, Jeon-Soo

    2015-01-01

    An on-line corrosion rate measurement system was developed using a personal computer, a data acquisition board and program, and a 2-electrode corrosion probe. Reliability of the developed system was confirmed with through comparison test. With this system, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) as a corrosion inhibitor were studied on iron and aluminum brass that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Corrosion rate was measured based on the linear polarization resistance method. The corrosion rates of aluminum brass and iron in 1% NaCl solutions were measured to be 0.290 mm per year (mmpy) and 0.2134 mmpy, respectively. With the addition of 200 ppm of NO 2 - , the corrosion rates decreased to 0.0470 mmpy and 0.0254 mmpy. The addition of NO 2 - caused a decrease in corrosion rates of both aluminum brass and iron, yet the NO 2 - acted as a more effective corrosion inhibitor for iron. than aluminum brass

  7. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  8. Fighting corrosion in air pollution control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that materials is the name of the game for corrosion prevention in air pollution control equipment. Whether the system is already in place, a retrofit, are specified for a new power pant, preventing corrosion is critical, because such deterioration easily undermines reliability. Hence, materials can heavily influence power plant compliance to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, perhaps the most vulnerable area to corrosion, are expected to be the method of choice for sulfur removal in many power plants in the near term. Components of these systems have various degrees of susceptibility to corrosion and related problems

  9. Study on Co-free amorphous material cladding using a laser beam to improve the resistance of primary system parts in NPPs to wear/erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Woo, S. S.; Seo, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    A study on Co-free amorphous material, ARMACOR M, cladding using a laser beam has been performed to improve resistance of the primary system main parts on nuclear power plants to wear/erosion-corrosion. The wear/erosion-corrosion properties of ARMACRO M cladded speciemens were characterized in air at room temperature and 300 .deg. C and in air at room temperature, and compared to those of other hardfacing materials, such as Stellite 6, NOREM 02, Deloro 50, TIG-welde or laer cladded. According to the results, ARMACOR M laser-cladded specimen showed to have the highest resistance to wear/erosion-corrosion

  10. A study on prediction of metal loss by flow-accelerated corrosion in the CANDU NPP secondary piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S. H.; Song, J. S.; Yoon, K. B.; Hwang, K. M.; Jin, T. E.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion(FAC) is a phenomenon that results in metal loss from piping, vessels, and equipment made of carbon steel. FAC occurs only under certain conditions of flow, chemistry, geometry, and material. Unfortunately, those conditions are in much of the high-energy piping in nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. Also, for domestic NPP secondary pipings whose operating time become longer, more evidences of FAC have been reported. The authors are studying on FAC management using CHECWORKS, computer code developed by EPRI. This paper is on the prediction results of metal loss by FAC in the one of CANDU type NPP secondary piping systems

  11. Corrosion studies on PREPP waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    Deformation or Failure Test and Accelerated Corrosion Test procedures were conducted to investigate the effect of formulation variables on the corrosion of oversize waste in Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) concrete waste forms. The Deformation or Failure Test did not indicate substantial waste form swelling from corrosion. The presence or absence of corrosion inhibitor was the most significant factor relative to measured half-cell potentials identified in the Accelerated Corrosion Test. However, corrosion inhibitor was determined to be only marginally beneficial. While this study produced no evidence that corrosion is of sufficient magnitude to produce serious degradation of PREPP waste forms, the need for corrosion rate testing is suggested. 11 references, 4 figures, 8 tables

  12. Amplified OTDR Systems for Multipoint Corrosion Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Jehan F.; Silva, Marcionilo J.; Coêlho, Isnaldo J. S.; Cipriano, Eliel; Martins-Filho, Joaquim F.

    2012-01-01

    We present two configurations of an amplified fiber-optic-based corrosion sensor using the optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) technique as the interrogation method. The sensor system is multipoint, self-referenced, has no moving parts and can measure the corrosion rate several kilometers away from the OTDR equipment. The first OTDR monitoring system employs a remotely pumped in-line EDFA and it is used to evaluate the increase in system reach compared to a non-amplified configuration. The other amplified monitoring system uses an EDFA in booster configuration and we perform corrosion measurements and evaluations of system sensitivity to amplifier gain variations. Our experimental results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions show the advantages of the amplified system in terms of longer system reach with better spatial resolution, and also that the corrosion measurements obtained from our system are not sensitive to 3 dB gain variations. PMID:22737017

  13. Corrosion products in power generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.H.

    1980-06-01

    The important mechanisms of corrosion and corrosion product movement and fouling in the heat transport systems of thermal electric generating stations are reviewed. Oil- and coal-fired boilers are considered, along with nuclear power systems - both direct and indirect cycle. Thus, the fireside and waterside in conventional plants, and the primary coolant and steam-raising circuits in water-cooled reactors, are discussed. Corrosion products in organic- and liquid-metal-cooled reactors also are shown to cause problems if not controlled, while their beneficial effects on the cooling water side of condensers are described. (auth)

  14. Decomposition studies of no-clean solder flux systems in connection with corrosion reliability of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2013-01-01

    with specific soldering process and parameters, while most important factors are the flux chemistry and its decomposition characteristics. Active parts of the flux residue can cause increased water absorption due to their hygroscopic nature and in solution they will increase leakage current and corrosion...... the contaminated PCBA parts to varying humidity and measuring the resulting leakage current. Results revealed a significant influence of flux chemistry including the amount of WOAs, while aggressiveness of the residue seems to vary with content and type of WOAs, and their nature of decomposition....

  15. Current status of studies on nodular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Satoru; Echigoya, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yutaka; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takao; Yamanaka, Tuneyasu.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on nodular corrosion formed on the outer surface of BWR fuel cladding tubes were reviewed. Main factors affecting the corrosion behavior were material and environmental conditions and combined effect. The effects of such material conditions as fabrication process, alloy elements, texture and surface treatment and environmental factors as neutron irradiation, thermo-hydrodynamic, water chemistry, purity of the coolant and contact with foreign metals on the corrosion phenomena were surveyed. Out-of-reactor corrosion test methods and models for the corrosion mechanism were also reviewed. Suppression of the accumulated annealing temperature during tube reduction process improved the nodular corrosion resistance of Zircaloys. Improved resistance for the nodular corrosion was reported for the unirradiated Zircaloys with some additives. Detailed irradiation test under the BWR conditions is needed to confirm the trend. Concerning the environmental factors, boiling on the cladding surface due to heat flux reduces the nodular corrosion susceptibility, while oxidizing radical generated from dissolved oxygen accelerates the corrosion. Concerning corrosion mechanisms, importance of such phenomena as the depleted zone of alloying elements in zirconium matrix, reduction of H + to H 2 in oxide layer, electrochemical property of precipitates, crystallographic anisotropy of oxidation rates were revealed. (author) 59 refs

  16. System for corrosion monitoring in pipeline applying fuzzy logic mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, O. N.; Kolosova, A. L.; Andreeva, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    A list of factors influencing corrosion rate on the external side of underground pipeline is determined. Principles of constructing a corrosion monitoring system are described; the system performance algorithm and program are elaborated. A comparative analysis of methods for calculating corrosion rate is undertaken. Fuzzy logic mathematics is applied to reduce calculations while considering a wider range of corrosion factors.

  17. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 hr. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  18. Long-term corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this activity is to assess the long-term corrosion properties of metallic materials under consideration for fabricating waste package containers. Three classes of metals are to be assessed: corrosion resistant, intermediate corrosion resistant, and corrosion allowance. Corrosion properties to be evaluated are general, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and galvanic corrosion. The performance of these materials will be investigated under conditions that are considered relevant to the potential emplacement site. Testing in four aqueous solutions, and vapor phases above them, and at two temperatures are planned for this activity. (The environmental conditions, test metals, and matrix are described in detail in Section 3.0.) The purpose and objective of this activity is to obtain the kinetic and mechanistic information on degradation of metallic alloys currently being considered for waste package containers. This information will be used to provide assistance to (1) waste package design (metal barrier selection) (E-20-90 to E-20-92), (2) waste package performance assessment activities (SIP-PA-2), (3) model development (E-20-75 to E-20-89). and (4) repository license application

  19. Sensor Systems for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a need of permanently embedded corrosion monitoring devices to monitor the progress of corrosion problems on a new or existing reinforced concrete structures before embarking on repair or rehabilitation of the structures. Numerous devices are available for investigating corrosion problems, because no single technique exists which tells an engineer what he needs to know, namely how much damage there is on a structure now and how rapidly the damage will grow with time. In this investigation the studies on the sensors systems based on the measurements of half cell potential of rebars inside the concrete, resistivity of concrete, corrosion rate of rebars by eddy current measurements and sensing of chloride ions are reported. An integrated system consists of above sensors are fabricated and embedded into concrete. The response from each sensor was acquired and analyzed by NI hardware through LabVIEW software.

  20. Alkali Metal Coolants. Proceedings of the Symposium on Alkali Metal Coolants - Corrosion Studies and System Operating Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-06-15

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 28 November - 2 December 1966. The meeting was attended by 107 participants from 16 countries and two international organizations. Contents: Review papers (2 papers); Corrosion of steels and metal alloys (6 papers); Mass transfer in alkali metal systems, behaviour of carbon (5 papers); Effects of sodium environment on mechanical properties of materials (3 papers); Effect of water leakage into sodium systems (2 papers); Design-and operation of testing apparatus (6 papers); Control, measurements and removal of impurities (13 papers); Corrosion by other alkali metals: NaK, K, Li, Cs (6 papers); Behaviour of fission products (3 papers). Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 6 French and 8 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  1. Alkali Metal Coolants. Proceedings of the Symposium on Alkali Metal Coolants - Corrosion Studies and System Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 28 November - 2 December 1966. The meeting was attended by 107 participants from 16 countries and two international organizations. Contents: Review papers (2 papers); Corrosion of steels and metal alloys (6 papers); Mass transfer in alkali metal systems, behaviour of carbon (5 papers); Effects of sodium environment on mechanical properties of materials (3 papers); Effect of water leakage into sodium systems (2 papers); Design-and operation of testing apparatus (6 papers); Control, measurements and removal of impurities (13 papers); Corrosion by other alkali metals: NaK, K, Li, Cs (6 papers); Behaviour of fission products (3 papers). Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 6 French and 8 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  2. Glove corrosive liquid immersion and permeability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's requirement for protective equipment for personnel working with chemical hazards resulted in a study of gloves used in work with corrosive liquids. Gloves of different materials and weights were tested using ASTM methods, in various corrosive liquids. Results show the best material for gloves used for different lengths of time in the liquids

  3. Corrosion evaluation of service water system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.; Felder, C.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The availability and reliability of the service water system is critical for safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Degradation of the system piping and components has forced utilities to re-evaluate the corrosion behavior of current and alternative system materials, to support assessments of the remaining service life of the service water system, selection of replacement materials, implementation of corrosion protection methods and corrosion monitoring programs, and identification of maintenance and operational constraints consistent with the materials used. TU Electric and Stone and Webster developed a service water materials evaluation program for the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station. Because of the length of exposure and the generic interest in this program by the nuclear power industry, EPRI joined TU to co-sponsor the test program. The program was designed to evaluate the corrosion behavior of current system materials and candidate replacement materials and to determine the operational and design changes which could improve the corrosion performance of the system. Although the test program was designed to be representative of service water system materials and environments targeted to conditions at Comanche Peak, these conditions are typical of and relevant to other fresh water cooled nuclear service water systems. Testing was performed in raw water and water treated with biocide under typical service water operating conditions including continuous flow, intermittent flow, and stagnant conditions. The test program evaluated the 300 Series and 6% molybdenum stainless steels, copper-nickel, titanium, carbon steel, and a formed-in-place nonmetallic pipe lining to determine susceptibility to general, crevice, and microbiologically influenced corrosion and pitting attack. This report presents the results of the test program after 4 years of exposure

  4. Corrosion process studies in a nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, Ruben A.; Lanzani, Liliana A.; Coronel, Pascual; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Semino, Carlos J.

    1999-01-01

    Latest results on corrosion behavior studies on high activity nuclear waste container are reported. Corrosion evaluation on lead base alloys and modeling to predict carbon steel external container cover generalized corrosion, are the main issues of these studies. (author)

  5. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230 0 to 270 0 C and static lithium at temperatures from 200 0 to 500 0 C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system

  7. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshesh, V.; Ravichandran, K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    The system components in a nuclear power station include steel, stainless steel and various alloys such as Monel, Inconel, Stellite etc. Usually water/heavy water used as the coolant flows at high temperatures and pressures. Under such conditions the interaction of system components with the coolant produces a host of corrosion products. The deposition of such products is essential. This report attempts to review the salient features of identification of such corrosion products using Moessbauer spectroscopy. (author)

  8. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...

  9. Feasibility Study on Nano-structured Coatings to Mitigate Flow-accelerated Corrosion in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There have been many efforts to mitigate FAC through the adoption of the advanced and modified water chemistries such as optimized dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this context, nano-particle reinforced electroless nickel plating (NP ENP) could help solve the FAC issues in secondary pipe systems. This does not require modification of water chemistry or structural materials, and hence, its application is reasonable and time-saving compared to previous FAC mitigation techniques. The main parameters of FAC are known as electrochemical reaction at the interface, dissolution of magnetite and ferrous ions due to concentration gradient between carbon steels and water and wear due to a fast-flowing fluid. High-temperature corrosion characteristics of the both coatings have potential as FAC barrier for carbon steel. Feasibility study will be carried out with FAC simulation experiments.

  10. Corrosion of Magnesium in Multimaterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Agnew, Sean

    2017-08-16

    The TMS Magnesium Committee has been actively involved in presenting cutting-edge research and development and the latest trends related to magnesium and its alloys to industry and academia. Topics including magnesium alloy development, applications, mechanism of deformation and corrosion, thermomechanical processing, modelling, etc. have been captured year after year through the Magnesium Technology symposium and conference proceedings at TMS and through special topics in JOM. Every year, based on the unanimous endorsement from the industry and academia, a topic is selected to address the latest developments within this subject in JOM. In continuation with last year’s coverage of Advances and Achievements in In-Situ Analysis of Corrosions and Structure–Property Relationship in Mg Alloys,[1] this year’s topic focuses on the Corrosion of Magnesium in Multimaterial Systems. Magnesium, the lightest of all the structural materials, has garnered much interest in the transportation, electronics packaging, defense equipments and industries alike and are more commonly being incorporated in multimaterial design concepts.[2-4] However, the application of the same is limited due to its highly corrosive nature, and understanding and mitigating the corrosion of magnesium has been a major research challenge.

  11. Corrosion of structural materials for Generation IV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Cabet, C.; Courouau, J.L.; Martinelli, L.; Arnoux, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum aims at developing future generation nuclear energy systems. Six systems have been selected for further consideration: sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). CEA, in the frame of a national program, of EC projects and of the GIF, contributes to the structural materials developments and research programs. Particularly, corrosion studies are being performed in the complex environments of the GEN IV systems. As a matter of fact, structural materials encounter very severe conditions regarding corrosion concerns: high temperatures and possibly aggressive chemical environments. Therefore, the multiple environments considered require also a large diversity of materials. On the other hand, the similar levels of working temperatures as well as neutron spectrum imply also similar families of materials for the various systems. In this paper, status of the research performed in CEA on the corrosion behavior of the structural material in the different environments is presented. The materials studied are either metallic materials as austenitic (or Y, La, Ce doped) and ferrito-martensitic steels, Ni base alloys, ODS steels, or ceramics and composites. In all the environments studied, the scientific approach is identical, the objective being in all cases the understanding of the corrosion processes to establish recommendations on the chemistry control of the coolant and to predict the long term behavior of the materials by the development of corrosion models. (author)

  12. An expert system for microbiologically influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, C.E.; Licina, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a damage mechanism that can cause serious degradation of service water system components. MIC can be particularly insidious since damage can occur very quickly, even in environments otherwise resistant to corrosion. Plant operations or maintenance personnel or system engineers typically do not have sufficient expertise to predict when and where MIC may occur or what methods of treatment are effective. An expert system (MICPro) has been devised which provides a tool for utilities to predict where MIC will occur, which systems or components are most susceptible, how operating parameters may affect vulnerability, and how to implement corrective and preventative measures. The system is designed to be simple to use: required inputs are common system parameters and results are presented as numbers from 1 to 10 indicating the likelihood of damage due to the given input. In this paper the structure and operation of the system is described, and future refinements are discussed

  13. A Moessbauer spectroscopic study of corrosion related reactions in the iron-hydrogen fluoride-water-oxygen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a study of a number of corrosion related reactions in the Fe-HF-H 2 O-O2 system are presented. The primary techniques used were transmission and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectra were recorded at very low γ-photon glancing angles and at normal incidence. Depth profiles of surface layers were obtained by recording spectra at different glancing angles. The initial product which forms when an iron surface is exposed to the vapour of azeotropic hydrofluoric acid was identified as FeF 25 ·47H 2 O. With increasing film thickness, a product, identified as non-stoichiometric Fe 2 F 5 ·7H 2 O, was shown to occur. A thermodynamic analysis of the system is presented which shows FeF 3 ·3H 2 O to be the most stable compound under the experimental conditions used, and suggests a stepwise reaction sequence in which FeF 2 ·4H 2 O forms first, followed by Fe 2 F 5 ·7H 2 O and finally FeF 3 ·3H 2 O. Results obtained in a gravimetric study reveal the rate of reaction of metallic iron with the azeotropic vapour to be controlled by the rate of diffusion of the gaseous species through the product layer. In the case of the reactions with the vapour of higher dilutions of aqueous HF, the chemical reaction between the iron substrate and the gaseous species is rate controlling. 86 refs., 61 figs., 14 tabs

  14. An electrochemical study of the corrosion behavior of primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for 2219-T87 aluminum coated with various primers, including those used for the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the Space Shuttle Transportation System, were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Corrosion potential time, polarization resistance time, electrical resistance time, and corrosion rate time measurements were all investigated. It was found that electrical resistance time and corrosion rate time measurement were most useful for studying the corrosion behavior of painted aluminum. Electrical resistance time determination give useful information concerning the porosity of paint films, while corrosion rate time curves give important information concerning overall corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. In general, the corrosion rate time curves all exhibited at least one peak during the 30 day test period, which was attributed, according to the proposed mechanisms, to the onset of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the beginning of destruction of the protective properties of the paint film.

  15. Corrosion behaviour and biocorrosion of galvanized steel water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, F; Tosar, F; Vitry, V

    2014-06-01

    Galvanized steel tubes are a popular mean for water distribution systems but suffer from corrosion despite their zinc or zinc alloy coatings. First, the quality of hot-dip galvanized (HDG) coatings was studied. Their microstructure, defects, and common types of corrosion were observed. It was shown that many manufactured tubes do not reach European standard (NBN EN 10240), which is the cause of several corrosion problems. The average thickness of zinc layer was found at 41μm against 55μm prescribed by the European standard. However, lack of quality, together with the usual corrosion types known for HDG steel tubes was not sufficient to explain the high corrosion rate (reaching 20μm per year versus 10μm/y for common corrosion types). Electrochemical tests were also performed to understand the corrosion behaviours occurring in galvanized steel tubes. Results have shown that the limiting step was oxygen diffusion, favouring the growth of anaerobic bacteria in steel tubes. EDS analysis was carried out on corroded coatings and has shown the presence of sulphur inside deposits, suggesting the likely bacterial activity. Therefore biocorrosion effects have been investigated. Actually sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) can reduce sulphate contained in water to hydrogen sulphide (H2S), causing the formation of metal sulphides. Although microbial corrosion is well-known in sea water, it is less investigated in supply water. Thus, an experimental water main was kept in operation for 6months. SRB were detected by BART tests in the test water main. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  17. Corrosion characteristics of several thermal spray cermet-coating/alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashary, A.A.; Tucker, R.C. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of a thermal spray multiphase cermet coating can be quite complex. Factors such as porosity and galvanic effects between different phases in the coating and the substrate, as well as the inherent general and localized corrosion resistance of each phase, can play an important role. The present paper describes the corrosion of several cermet-coating/alloy systems as studied by a potentiodynamic cyclic polarization technique. The corrosion of these coating systems was found to be most often dominated by corrosion of the metallic phases in the coating or of the substrate alloy. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  19. Corrosion Compatibility Studies on Inconel-600 in NP Decontamination Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    It is well known that corrosion and contamination process in the primary cooling circuit of nuclear reactors are essentially interrelated: the contaminant isotopes are mostly corrosion products activated in the reactor core, and the contamination takes place on the out-core of Inconel-600 surface. This radionuclide uptake takes place up to the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface. So, it is necessary to remove inner oxide layer as well as outer oxide layer for excellent decontamination effects. The outer oxide layers are composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Ni{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x})(Cr{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and become hard to be decontaminated. Alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP) oxidative phase has been used to dissolve the chromium-rich oxide. A disadvantage of AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, that of NP process is the high corrosion rate for Ni-base alloys. Therefore, for the safe use of oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination, it is necessary to reformulate the NP chemicals for decrease of corrosion rate. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications. To evaluate the general corrosion properties, weight change of NP treated specimens was measured. NP treated specimen surface was observed using optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the evaluation of the localized corrosion. The effect of additives on the corrosion of the specimens was also evaluated. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications

  20. Corrosion Compatibility Studies on Inconel-600 in NP Decontamination Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that corrosion and contamination process in the primary cooling circuit of nuclear reactors are essentially interrelated: the contaminant isotopes are mostly corrosion products activated in the reactor core, and the contamination takes place on the out-core of Inconel-600 surface. This radionuclide uptake takes place up to the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface. So, it is necessary to remove inner oxide layer as well as outer oxide layer for excellent decontamination effects. The outer oxide layers are composed of Fe 3 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 . On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr 2 O 3 , (Ni 1-x Ni x )(Cr 1-y Fe y ) 2 O 4 , and FeCr 2 O 4 . Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and become hard to be decontaminated. Alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP) oxidative phase has been used to dissolve the chromium-rich oxide. A disadvantage of AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, that of NP process is the high corrosion rate for Ni-base alloys. Therefore, for the safe use of oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination, it is necessary to reformulate the NP chemicals for decrease of corrosion rate. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications. To evaluate the general corrosion properties, weight change of NP treated specimens was measured. NP treated specimen surface was observed using optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the evaluation of the localized corrosion. The effect of additives on the corrosion of the specimens was also evaluated. This study describes the corrosion compatibility on Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP decontamination solution for PWR applications. It is revealed that Inconel-600 specimen is more

  1. Electrode polarization studies in hot corrosion systems. Progress report, 1 July 1978--31 May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, O.F.

    1979-02-01

    Work is reported on thermodynamic analysis of gasifier models, equilibrium calculations performed on two and thre phase equilibrium involving components of coal gas, sodium salts, and carbon. Electrode polarization studies in molten sodium carbonate and polarization tests were performed on iron, steel, nickel, and on 304 and 316 stainless steel in molten sodium carbonate under a variety of exploratory environments. Gas/metal reactions studies, initial evaluation studies iron in hydrogen-hydrogen sulfide mixtures, pertaining to a new gravimetric facility are presented. Evaluation was made of reaction kinetics from polarization. A visual regression procedure utilizing interactive computer graphics is described for the fitting of multiparameter, nonlinear equations to experimental curves.

  2. Study of optimal operation management by a monitoring system for corrosion and heat-transfer rate of condensate pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Katsmi; Kominami, Hirohiko; Atsumi, Tetsuro; Nagata, Koji (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Sumitomo Light Metal Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-09-26

    In order to optimize the anticorrosion and antifouling management of aluminum brass condensate pipes, the monitoring system was developed, which could control a corrosion resistance and heat transfer rate during operation. Since a polarization resistance could be used as an index for anticorrosion control, while a heat transmission coefficient or cleanliness factor for heat transfer control, a polarization resistance meter and fouling meter were made as prototype detectors. Fundamental test of a model condenser (simulated by-pass pipe) was performed using a processing system combined with the meters, and monitored data and analytical data of the test were arranged. System performance was ascertained to be preferable by the verification test on a real condenser, however, more compact system was required for practical use because of restriction in by-pass pipe installation. In addition to the monitoring function, a control function for sponge ball cleaning and iron ion injection was also added to keep the specified index value. 13 figs,. 1 tab.

  3. Study of the corrosion products in the primary system of PWR plants as the source of radiation fields build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabant, R. van; Regge, P. de.

    1982-01-01

    In the first part the behaviour of the corrosion products in the primary system of PWR plants is depicted on the basis of a literature review of the field. Water chemistry, corrosion processes and activation of corrosion products are the main topics. In the second part the results of the characterization of corrosion particles in the primary coolant circuit of the Doel 1 and 2 reactors are described, during steady state operation and transient phases. In the third part the possibilities for radiation control at nuclear power plants are outlined. The filtration possibilities for the reactor coolant are explored in detail. (author)

  4. Erosion Corrosion and Protection of Recycle System with Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the corrosion of recycle system with seawater in rights of power plant, the erosion behavior and mechanism of erosion corrosion in this system constructed with several corrosionresistance alloys have been studied and tested in the condition of high speed fluid with a sand particles. Both special protection technologies and results, one designed by high temperature epoxy resin powder coating and another of the associating method of anode protection together with such same coating, have been discussed as well in this case.

  5. Corrosion control for open cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karweer, S.B.; Ramchandran, R.

    2000-01-01

    Frequent stoppage of water circulation due to shut down of the Detritiation Plant in Heavy Water Division, Trombay resulted in considerable algae growth. As polyphosphate is a nutrient to algae growth, studies were directed in the evaluation of a nonpolyphosphate formulation for controlling corrosion and scale formation of carbon-steel, copper and aluminium. A blend of HEDP, polyacrylate, zinc, and benzotriazole was used and the optimum condition was determined. In presence of 25 ppm kw-1002 [proprietary formulation, containing HEDP and polyacrylate], 10 ppm kw-201 [active ingredient benzotriazole] and 2 ppm zinc (as zinc sulphate), the corrosion rate of carbon-steel in Mumbai Municipal Corporation (MMC) water at pH 7.5 ± 0.1 for a period of 31 days was 10.4 x 10 -3 μm/h. When MMC water concentrated to half its original volume was used, the corrosion rate was still 9.74 x 10 -3 μm/h close to the original value without concentration. Hence, this formulation was used for controlling scale and corrosion. The results were satisfactory. (author)

  6. Electrochemical and weight-loss study of carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.J.; Olive, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) will undergo an 18 month refurbishment project beginning in April, 2008. During this time, most of the carbon steel piping in the primary loop will be drained of water and dried. However, some water will remain during the shutdown due to the lack of drains in some lower points in the piping system. As a result, it is necessary to examine the effect of corrosion during the refurbishment. This study examined the effect of several variables on the corrosion rate of clean carbon steel. Specifically, the effect of oxygen in the system and the presence of chloride ions were evaluated. Corrosion rates were determined using both a weight-loss technique and electrochemical methods. The experiment was conducted at room temperature. The corrosion products from the experiment were analyzed using a Raman microscope. The results of the weight-loss measurements show that the corrosion rate of polished carbon steel is independent of both the presence of oxygen and chloride ions. The electrochemical method failed to yield meaningful results due to the lack of clearly interpretable data and the inherent subjectivity in the analysis. Lepidocricite was found to be the main corrosion product using the Raman microscope. (author)

  7. An overview of erosion corrosion models and reliability assessment for corrosion defects in piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srividya, A.; Suresh, H.N.; Verma, A.K.; Gopika, V.; Santosh

    2006-01-01

    Piping systems are part of passive structural elements in power plants. The analysis of the piping systems and their quantification in terms of failure probability is of utmost importance. The piping systems may fail due to various degradation mechanisms like thermal fatigue, erosion-corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and vibration fatigue. On examination of previous results, erosion corrosion was more prevalent and wall thinning is a time dependent phenomenon. The paper is intended to consolidate the work done by various investigators on erosion corrosion in estimating the erosion corrosion rate and reliability predictions. A comparison of various erosion corrosion models is made. The reliability predictions based on remaining strength of corroded pipelines by wall thinning is also attempted. Variables in the limit state functions are modelled using normal distributions and Reliability assessment is carried out using some of the existing failure pressure models. A steady state corrosion rate is assumed to estimate the corrosion defect and First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is used to find the probability of failure associated with corrosion defects over time using the software for Component Reliability evaluation (COMREL). (author)

  8. Pitting corrosion of copper. Further model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxen, C.

    2002-08-01

    The work presented in this report is a continuation and expansion of a previous study. The aim of the work is to provide background information about pitting corrosion of copper for a safety analysis of copper canisters for final deposition of radioactive waste. A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is used to estimate the conditions required for stationary propagation of a localised anodic corrosion process. The model uses equilibrium data for copper and its corrosion products and parameters for the aqueous mass transport of dissolved species. In the present work we have, in the model, used a more extensive set of aqueous and solid compounds and equilibrium data from a different source. The potential dependence of pitting in waters with different compositions is studied in greater detail. More waters have been studied and single parameter variations in the composition of the water have been studied over wider ranges of concentration. The conclusions drawn in the previous study are not contradicted by the present results. However, the combined effect of potential and water composition on the possibility of pitting corrosion is more complex than was realised. In the previous study we found what seemed to be a continuous aggravation of a pitting situation by increasing potentials. The present results indicate that pitting corrosion can take place only over a certain potential range and that there is an upper potential limit for pitting as well as a lower. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the model gives meaningful predictions of the minimum pitting potential also when relatively large errors in the input parameters are allowed for

  9. The corrosion effect on the conduit systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaidi, Naouar; Belattar, Sougratti

    2009-01-01

    The conduits in the buildings require a regular and permanent control, in order to avoid the risks of deterioration caused by the corrosion or the escape of water. In this work, we present a thermal nondestructive testing method of concrete structures containing water conduits, based on numerical modeling in three dimensions. The goal is to study the detectability of these conduits in different situations and to give a thermal characterization of the rust behaviour in the steel conduits. (author)

  10. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  11. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haiya, E-mail: flying850612@126.com; Tian, Yimei, E-mail: ymtian_2000@126.com; Wan, Jianmei, E-mail: 563926510@qq.com; Zhao, Peng, E-mail: zhpeng@tju.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  12. Study of niobium corrosion in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.H. de.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative study of niobium electrochemical behaviour in NaOH and KOH solution, with concentrations between 0,5 and 6,1M is presented. The studies were done through electrochemicals assays, consisting in the corrosion potential and anodic and cathodic polarization curves, complemented by loss of mass experiments. The niobium anodic behaviour in alkaline medium is characterized by passivation occurrence, with a stable film formation. The Na oH solution in alkaline medium are more corrosible to niobium than the KOH solution. The loss of mass assays showed that the corrosion velocit is more dependente of hydroxide concentration in KOH medium than the NaOH medium. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Engineering Task Plan for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of cabinets containing corrosion monitoring equipment on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The new cabinets (one per tank) will be installed adjacent to existing corrosion probes already installed in riser WST-RISER-016 on both tanks. The corrosion monitoring equipment to be installed utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring systems are designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the systems also facilitate the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates

  14. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  15. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  16. Corrosion Reliability of Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Jensen, Stine G.; Møller, Per

    2008-01-01

    environments under applied potential conditions. Studies were carried out using two electrode potentiostatic polarization experiments and measuring the resulting current due to electrolytic migration. The surface morphology of the electrodes before and after migration testing was investigates using SEM and EDS...

  17. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  18. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. On-line corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    ), Electrochemical Noise (EN) and Zero Resistance Ammetry (ZRA). Electrochemical Resistance (ER) has also been used to measure corrosion. The method traditionally only measures corrosion off-line but with newly developed high-sensitive ER technique developed by MetriCorr in Denmark, on-line monitoring is possible...... complicates the chemistry of the environment. Hydrogen sulphide is present in geothermal systems and can be formed as a by-product of sulphate-reducing-bacteria (SRB). The application of electrochemical methods makes on-line monitoring possible. These methods include: Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR....... In order to assess both general corrosion and localized corrosion, it is necessary to apply more than one monitoring technique simultaneously, ZRA or EN for measuring localized corrosion and LPR or ER for measuring general corrosion rate. The advantage of monitoring localized corrosion is indisputable...

  20. Corrosion Studies of Wrought and Cast NASA-23 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion studies were carried out for wrought and cast NASA-23 alloy using electrochemical methods. The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR), and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed. These studies corroborate the findings of stress corrosion studies performed earlier, in that the material is highly resistant to corrosion.

  1. Chemical treatment of zinc surface and its corrosion inhibition studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Department of PG Studies and Research in Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Kuvempu University, ... cations and is mainly used for the corrosion protection of ... provide a greater resistance to corrosion, but when exposed to humid ...

  2. Study on corrosion of metal materials in nitrate molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wei; Yang, Bo; Li, Maodong; Li, Shiping; Xin, Mingliang; Zhang, Shuanghong; Huang, Guojia

    2017-01-01

    High temperature molten salts as a heat transfer heat storage medium has been more widely used in the field of concentrated solar thermal power generation. In the thermal heat storage system, metal material stability and performance at high temperatures are of one major limitation in increasing this operating temperature. In this paper, study on corrosion of 321H, 304, 316L, P91 metal materials in modified solar two molten salts. The corrosion kinetics of 304, 316L, 321H, P91 metal material in the modified solar two molten salts at 450°C, 500°C is also investigated. Under the same condition it was found that 304, 321H corroded at a rate of 40% less than P91. Spallation of corrosion products was observed on P91 steel, while no obvious observed on other kinds of stainless steel. Corrosion rates of 304, 321H, and 316L slowly increased with temperature. Oxidation mechanisms little varied with temperature. Corrosion products of metal materials observed at 450°C, 500°C were primarily Fe oxide and Fe, Cr oxide.

  3. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  4. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunze Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS and stainless steel (SS galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete.

  5. Corrosion-product inventory: the Bruce-B secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Price, J.; Brett, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion inspection and corrosion-product characterization in water and steam systems are important for component and systems maintenance in nuclear power stations. Corrosion products are produced, released and redeposited at various sites in the secondary system. Depending on the alloys used in the condenser and feedwater heaters, particulate iron oxides and hydroxides can account for about 95-99% of the total corrosion-product transport. Where brass or cupro-nickel alloys are present, copper and zinc contribute significantly to the total transport and deposition. Particulates are transported by the feedwater to the steam generators, where they accumulate and can cause a variety of problems, such as loss of heat transfer capability through deposition on boiler tubes, blockage of flow through boiler-tube support plates and accelerated corrosion in crevices, either in deep sludge piles or at blocked tube supports. The influx of oxidized corrosion products may have a particularly adverse effect on the redox environment of steam generator tubing, thereby increasing the probability of localized corrosion and other degradation mechanisms. In this paper, there is a description of a survey of general corrosion deposits in Bruce-B, Units 5-8, which helps to identify the origin, evolution and inventory of corrosion products along the secondary system of Candu reactors

  6. Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. Laboratory studies and recent reports on field applications have reported that EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A two year laboratory study was started at Hanford in 1995 to provide a technical basis for using EN in Hanford nuclear waste tanks. Based on this study, a prototype system was constructed and deployed in DST 241-AZ-101 in August, 1996. Based on the successful demonstration of this prototype for more than a year, a first-generation full-scale system was designed and installed into DST 241-AN-107 in September 1997. This document summarizes the design and operational requirements of the second-generation full-scale system scheduled for deployment into 241-AY-102

  7. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  8. Corrosion Study Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion is a common phenomenon. It is the destructive result of chemical reaction between a metal or metal alloy and its environment. Stainless steel tubing is used at Kennedy Space Center for various supply lines which service the orbiter. The launch pads are also made of stainless steel. The environment at the launch site has very high chloride content due to the proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Also, during a launch, the exhaust products in the solid rocket boosters include concentrated hydrogen chloride. The purpose of this project was to study various alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in corrosive environments similar to the launch sites. This report includes data and analysis of the measurements for 304L, 254SMO and AL-6XN in primarily neutral 3.55% NaCl. One set of data for 304L in neutral 3.55%NaCl + 0.1N HCl is also included.

  9. Mechanical damage and corrosion in the primary system purification cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz, R.A.; Fiorini, R.H.; Semino, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the routine measurements of tritium activity and isotopic content in the exchanger's cooling water, a loss of heavy water was detected. During the decommissioning programmed for October 1986, the equipment was dismantled and the tubes losses were identified through helium fugue tests; subsequently, a 100% inspection of the tubes by atmospheric currents were performed, verifying reductions exceeding 50% of the original width in 70 tubes of the first section at the top plate level. These indications were verified through the study of the two extracted tubes, one of them observing a passing failure where marks appeared at all levels of the support and corrosion plates through splits at the top plates level. The corrosion causes were due to the low cooling flow which results from the primary system's reduction regarding the purification flow design, thus permitting the deposits accumulation. (Author)

  10. Risk Based Corrosion Studies at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.

    2010-01-01

    TYPE I and II (ASTM 285-B) - Experienced stress corrosion cracking (SCC), 2 have been closed; 22 scheduled for closure by 2017, and No active leak sites today. TYPE III (ASTM A516-70 and A537 Class I) - Post-fabrication relief of weld residual stresses, Improved resistance to SCC and brittle fracture, No leakage history, and Receives new waste. The objectives are to utilize statistical methods to reduce conservatism in current chemistry control program; and express nitrite inhibitor limits in terms of pitting risk on waste tank steel. Conclusions are: (1) A statistically designed experimental study has been undertaken to improve the effectiveness of the minimum nitrite concentrations to inhibit pitting corrosion; (2) Mixture/amount model supports that pitting depends on the ratio of aggressive to inhibitive anions, as well as the concentration of each species; (3) Secondary aggressive species, Cl - and SO 4 2- , significantly effect the corrosion response; and (4) Results support the reduction of the chemistry control nitrite inhibitor concentrations in the regime of 0.8-1.0 M nitrate.

  11. Model boiler studies on deposition and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, P.V.; McVey, E.G.

    1977-09-01

    Deposit formation was studied in a model boiler, with sea-water injections to simulate the in-leakage which could occur from sea-water cooled condensers. When All Volatile Treatment (AVT) was used for chemistry control the deposits consisted of the sea-water salts and corrosion products. With sodium phosphate added to the boiler water, the deposits also contained the phosphates derived from the sea-water salts. The deposits were formed in layers of differing compositions. There was no significant corrosion of the Fe-Ni-Cr alloy boiler tube under deposits, either on the open area of the tube or in crevices. However, carbon steel that formed a crevice around the tube was corroded severely when the boiler water did not contain phosphate. The observed corrosion of carbon steel was caused by the presence of acidic, highly concentrated chloride solution produced from the sea-water within the crevice. Results of theoretical calculations of the composition of the concentrated solution are presented. (author)

  12. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  13. Experiences of corrosion and corrosion protection in seawater systems in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1985-01-01

    A summary is given of the experience of the corrosion resistance of pumps, heat exchangers, valves and pipings in different seawater cooling systems in Scandinavia, including power reactor cooling systems in Finland and Sweden. For pumps and heat exchangers the experience has been so extensive that a clear picture of today's standing can be given. Owing to scanty data concerning valves and pipes, the survey of the corrosion in these components is less well supported. Vertically extended centrifugal pumps are the pumps in general use in power plant cooling systems. To counteract corrosion on pump riser and pump casing having an organic surface coating, and on stainless steel shafts and impellers, these components should be provided with internal and external cathodic protection. For tube and plate type heat exchangers, titanium has proved to be the best material choice. Rubber-enclosed carbon steel pipings, or pipings having a thick coating of epoxy plastic, have shown very strong corrosion resistance in power plant seawater cooling systems. Valves in seawater systems have primarily been affected by corrosion due to poorly executed or damaged organic coating on cast iron. Different seawater-resistant bronzes (red bronze, tin bronze and aluminium bronze) are therefore preferable as valve materials

  14. Study on influence of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of pure Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Zhenyao; Ke, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Corrosion products layer is only formed in coastal atmosphere. •In coastal atmosphere, rate controlling step is diffusion process. •In rural atmosphere, rate controlling step is charge transfer process. •Pitting area increases greatly in coastal site, but slightly in rural site. -- Abstract: Effects of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of aluminium in rural and coastal sites were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open-circuit potential (OCP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques after outdoor exposure. In the rural atmosphere, only the compact, adhesive native oxide layer exists, and the rate controlling step is diffusion process, while in the coastal atmosphere, another loose, inadhesive corrosion products layer exists, and a charge transfer process controls the corrosion process. The pitting area in the coastal atmosphere increases over time more obviously than that in the rural atmosphere

  15. Alternating current techniques for corrosion monitoring in water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Weeks, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion in both nuclear and fossil fueled steam generators is generally a consequence of the presence of aggressive impurities introduced into the coolant system through condenser leakage. The impurities concentrate in regions of the steam generator protected from coolant flow, in crevices or under deposited corrosion products and adjacent to heat transfer surfaces. These three factors, the aggressive impurity, crevice type areas and heat transfer surfaces appear to be the requirements for the onset of rapid corrosion. Under conditions where coolant impurities do not concentrate the corrosion rates are low, easily measured and can be accounted for by allowances in the design of the steam generator. Rapid corrosion conditions cannot be designed for and must be suppressed. The condition of the surfaces when rapid corrosion develops must be markedly different from those during normal operation and these changes should be observable using electrochemical techniques. This background formed the basis of a design of a corrosion monitoring device, work on which was initiated at BNL. The basic principles of the technique are described. The object of the work is to develop a corrosion monitoring device which can be operated with PWR steam generator secondary coolant feed water

  16. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs

  17. Grain boundary defects initiation at the outer surface of dissimilar welds: corrosion mechanism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.; Yrieix, B.

    1995-11-01

    Dissimilar welds located on the primary coolant system of the French PWR I plants exhibit grain boundary defects in the true austenitic zones of the first buttering layer. If grain boundaries reach the interface, they can extend to the martensitic band. Those defects are filled with compact oxides. In addition, the ferritic base metal presents some pits along the interface. Nowadays, three mechanisms are proposed to explain the initiation of those defects: stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion and high temperature intergranular oxidation. This paper is dealing with the study of the mechanisms involved in the corrosion phenomenon. Intergranular corrosion tests performed on different materials show that only the first buttering layer, even with some δ ferrite, is sensitized. The results of stress corrosion cracking tests in water solutions show that intergranular cracking is possible on a bulk material representative of the first buttering layer. It is unlikely on actual dissimilar welds where the ferritic base metal protects the first austenitic layer by galvanic coupling. Therefore, the stress corrosion cracking assumption cannot explain the initiation of the defects in aqueous environment. The results of the investigations and of the corrosion studies led to the conclusion that the atmosphere could be the only possible aggressive environment. This conclusion is based on natural atmospheric exposure and accelerated corrosion tests carried out with SO 2 additions in controlled atmosphere. They both induce a severe intergranular corrosion on true sensitized austenitic materials. This corrosion studies cannot conclude definitively on the causes of the defect initiation on field, but they show that the atmospheric corrosion could produce intergranular attacks in the pure austenitic zones of the first buttering layer of the dissimilar welds and that this corrosion is stress assisted. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Corrosion investigation of material combinations in a mobile phone dome-key pad system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Møller, Per

    2007-01-01

    to multiple corrosion problems. In this paper, the corrosion susceptibility of dome (Ag/AISI 202 steel) and key pad system (Au/Ni/Cu) is investigated with an aim to understand the corrosion performance of such multi-material combinations in chloride containing environment. Investigation includes...... microstructural studies, polarization measurements using microelectrochemical technique, salt spray testing, and corrosion morphology analysis. The immersion Au layer on pads showed pores, and rolled bonded silver layer on dome had cracks and kinks. The difference in electrochemical behaviour of the metallic...... layers together with imperfections in the top layer results in severe pitting due to galvanic coupling. However, corrosion performance of the pads was much worse than domes. The results are applicable to a broad spectrum of PCB parts where similar material combinations are employed, especially Au/Ni/Cu....

  19. Corrosion study for a radioactive waste vitrification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    A corrosion monitoring program was setup in a scale demonstration melter system to evaluate the performance of materials selected for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the DOE's Savannah River Site. The system is a 1/10 scale prototypic version of the DWPF. In DWPF, high activity radioactive waste will be vitrified and encapsulated for long term storage. During this study twenty-six different alloys, including DWPF reference materials of construction and alternate higher alloy materials, were subjected to process conditions and environments characteristic of the DWPF except for radioactivity. The materials were exposed to low pH, elevated temperature (to 1200 degree C) environments containing abrasive slurries, molten glass, mercury, halides and sulfides. General corrosion rates, pitting susceptibility and stress corrosion cracking of the materials were investigated. Extensive data were obtained for many of the reference materials. Performance in the Feed Preparation System was very good, whereas coupons from the Quencher Inlet region of the Melter Off-Gas System experienced localized attack

  20. Aqueous corrosion study on U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Titas; Venkatesan, V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun

    2009-01-01

    In low power or research reactor, U-Zr alloy is a potential candidate for dispersion fuel. Moreover, Zirconium has a low thermal-neutron cross section and uranium alloyed with Zr has excellent corrosion resistance and dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In the present study aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Zr alloy samples was studied in autoclave at 200 deg C temperature. Corrosion rate was determined from weight loss with time. (author)

  1. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  2. Control of corrosive bacterial community by bronopol in industrial water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narenkumar, Jayaraman; Ramesh, Nachimuthu; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2018-01-01

    Ten aerobic corrosive bacterial strains were isolated from a cooling tower water system (CWS) which were identified based on the biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Out of them, dominant corrosion-causing bacteria, namely, Bacillus thuringiensis EN2, Terribacillus aidingensis EN3, and Bacillus oleronius EN9, were selected for biocorrosion studies on mild steel 1010 (MS) in a CWS. The biocorrosion behaviour of EN2, EN3, and EN9 strains was studied using immersion test (weight loss method), electrochemical analysis, and surface analysis. To address the corrosion problems, an anti-corrosive study using a biocide, bronopol was also demonstrated. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses of the MS coupons with biofilm developed after exposure to CWS confirmed the accumulation of extracellular polymeric substances and revealed that biofilms was formed as microcolonies, which subsequently cause pitting corrosion. In contrast, the biocide system, no pitting type of corrosion, was observed and weight loss was reduced about 32 ± 2 mg over biotic system (286 ± 2 mg). FTIR results confirmed the adsorption of bronopol on the MS metal surface as protective layer (co-ordination of NH 2 -Fe 3+ ) to prevent the biofilm formation and inhibit the corrosive chemical compounds and thus led to reduction of corrosion rate (10 ± 1 mm/year). Overall, the results from WL, EIS, SEM, XRD, and FTIR concluded that bronopol was identified as effective biocide and corrosion inhibitor which controls the both chemical and biocorrosion of MS in CWS.

  3. Protection against deposits and corrosion in water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, J

    1978-11-01

    Industry generally, including mining and coal preparation, are in the habit of using large amounts of untreated service water. The service water can be softened or treated with hardness stabilisers in order to prevent deposit formation and corrosion. As often as not, deposits of dirt and attack by microorganisma also have to be eliminated. The article puts forward some suggestions for practical assistance in protecting water systems against the dangers of deposits and corrosion.

  4. The study on corrosion resistance of decorative satin nickel plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Wenya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the corrosion resistance of satin nickel plating on conductive plastic.The electrochemical tests were to analyze the corrosion behavior of satin nickel plating with different processes in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results show that,because the satin nickel plating has an organic film on its surface due to process characteristics,the film results in different corrosion resistance.By increasing satin additive dosage,the nickel plating chroma decreases,the microsurface of the plating becomes rough,and the corrosion resistance is followed by decrease.

  5. Corrosion study in molten fluoride salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Rangarajan, S.; Gupta, V.K.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of two alloys viz. Inconel 625 and Inconel 617 were tested in molten fluoride salts of lithium, sodium and potassium (FLiNaK) in the temperature range of 550-750 ℃ in a nickel lined Inconel vessel. Electrochemical polarization (Tafel plot) technique was used for this purpose. For both alloys, the corrosion rate was found to increase sharply beyond 650 ℃ . At 600 ℃ , Inconel 625 showed a decreasing trend in the corrosion rate over a period of 24 hours, probably due to changes in the surface conditions. After fifteen days, re-testing of Inconel 625 in the same melt showed an increase in the corrosion rate. Inconel 625 was found to be more corrosion resistant than Inconel 617. (author)

  6. Electrochemical study of stress corrosion cracking of copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malki, Brahim

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical study of stress corrosion of copper alloys in aqueous environment. Selective dissolution and electrochemical oxidation are two key-points of the stress corrosion of these alloys. The first part of this thesis treats of these aspects applied to Cu-Au alloys. Measurements have been performed using classical electrochemical techniques (in potentio-dynamic, potentio-static and galvano-static modes). The conditions of occurrence of an electrochemical noise is analysed using signal processing techniques. The impact on the behavior of Cu 3 Au are discussed. In the second part, the stress corrosion problem is addressed in the case of surface oxide film formation, in particular for Cu-Zn alloys. We have found useful to extend this study to mechanical stress oxidation mechanisms in the presence of an oscillating potential electrochemical system. The aim is to examine the influence of these new electrochemical conditions (galvano-static mode) on the behavior of stressed brass. Finally, the potential distribution at crack tip is calculated in order to compare the different observations [fr

  7. Reliability and corrosion induced degradation of electronic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapas, V.K.; Varde, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describe the corrosion induced degradation of electronic system failures due to environmental conditions such as humidity, temperature, ionic or organic contaminants, residuals; etc. which can accelerates as electrochemical reaction and causes corrosion of electronic components, Corrosive gases and water vapours from humid condition come into contact with the base metal results in buildup of various chemical reaction products. Ionic contamination responsible for electrochemical reaction, forms soluble complexes with metals, it can degrade the protective oxide film that forms on the positively biased metallization and/or lead to change in the local pH. Deterioration of metal components or electronic circuitry due to electrochemical migration needs to be controlled in order to reduce the corrosion. With explosive increase in demand and miniaturization in electronic system resulted in smaller components, closer spacing and thinner metallic path, it is expected that the corrosion and deterioration of electronic components may become cause or concern. This paper summarises the current understanding of chemistry behind possible causes of corrosion of electronic devices and its failure mechanism. (author)

  8. Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

    2014-08-31

    A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in

  9. Studying the causes for corrosive destruction of water conduits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azamatova, F I; Kulinichev, G P; Porubov, I S

    1979-01-01

    Pipes from different oil and gas production administrations were selected for X-ray and metallographic studies of the cause of corrosive destruction. The chemical composition and mechanical properties of the pipe material are presented in tables. The phase composition of the corrosion products was studied by X-rays. The complex structure of the layer made up of the corrosion products was taken into consideration. The studies were conducted in an X-ray diffraction chamber. The obtained results are presented in a table. The metallographic studies showed that a significant corrosive damage of the materials of water conduits occurs as a result of the development of local corrosion processes, caused by the substantive heterogeneity of the structure of the metal, related to the nonuniform distribution of the pearlite because of carbon liquidation.

  10. Evaluation of corrosion and scaling tendency indices in a drinking water distribution system: a case study of Bandar Abbas city, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Vali; Dindarloo, Kavoos; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Rezaei, Leila

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion and scaling is a major problem in water distribution systems, thus evaluation of water corrosivity properties is a routine test in water networks. To evaluate water stability in the Bandar Abbas water distribution system, the network was divided into 15 clusters and 45 samples were taken. Langelier, Ryznar, Puckorius, Larson-Skold (LS) and Aggressive indices were determined and compared to the marble test. The mean parameters included were pH (7.8 ± 0.1), electrical conductivity (1,083.9 ± 108.7 μS/cm), total dissolved solids (595.7 ± 54.7 mg/L), Cl (203.5 ± 18.7 mg/L), SO₄(174.7 ± 16.0 mg/L), alkalinity (134.5 ± 9.7 mg/L), total hardness (156.5 ± 9.3 mg/L), HCO₃(137.4 ± 13.0 mg/L) and calcium hardness (71.8 ± 4.3 mg/L). According to the Ryznar, Puckorius and Aggressive Indices, all samples were stable; based on the Langelier Index, 73% of samples were slightly corrosive and the rest were scale forming; according to the LS index, all samples were corrosive. Marble test results showed tested water of all 15 clusters tended to scale formation. Water in Bandar Abbas is slightly scale forming. The most appropriate indices for the network conditions are the Aggressive, Puckorius and Ryznar indices that were consistent with the marble test.

  11. Modification and upgradation of corrosion fatigue testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Qamar, R.

    2006-08-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion Fatigue (CF) are important tests which are performed to check the integrity of structural materials operating in different environments, such as nuclear power system, steam and gas turbines, aircraft marine structure, pipelines and bridges. To establish the environmental testing facility on laboratory scale, NMD acquired a computerized (286 Based PC) electromechanical testing machine from M/S CorTest, USA. This machine was commissioned at NMD in 1989. Since then it has been utilized to test and qualify the materials provided by different establishments of PAEC for SCC and CF behavior. However, in October 2004, computer attached to the machine was corrupted and became out of order. Users were handicapped because there was no any alternate system i.e. Manual control tower to operate the machine. Then users approached to Computer Division to investigate the malfunctioning at the computer. Therefore, upon complete checkup of system, it was diagnosed that there was a serious problem in the hard disk and mother board of the computer. Much difficulty was faced in retrieving the application software from the obsolete 286 computer system. Then the basic aim was to replace the old computer with Pentium System. But with Pentium system application software was not working. Since we have already recovered full application software package including source programs, so all the seventeen programs has been thoroughly studied. Four programs had to be modified according to the new hardware. Now the new Pentium system with modified software has been interfaced with the machine. Machine was tested for the both types of above mentioned tests and compared with previous results. The performance of machine was confirmed satisfactory on the new setup. (author)

  12. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J. Castillo [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Hamdani, F. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Creus, J., E-mail: jcreus@univ-lr.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Touzain, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur pour l’Environnement, UMR-CNRS 7356, Université de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Correc, O. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment Nantes, 11 rue Henri Picherit, BP 82341, 44323 Nantes Cedex 03 (France)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Impact of disinfectant treatment on the durability of copper pipes. • Synergy between disinfectant concentration and temperature. • Pitting corrosion of copper associated to the corrosion products formation on copper. - Abstract: In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  13. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav [Department of Materials Engineering, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, tr. 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava - Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  14. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  15. Developing of corrosion and creep property test database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Jun, I.; Kim, J. S.; Ryu, W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion and creep characteristics database systems were constructed using the data produced from corrosion and creep test and designed to hold in common the data and programs of tensile, impact, fatigue characteristics database that was constructed since 2001 and others characteristics databases that will be constructed in future. We can easily get the basic data from the corrosion and creep characteristics database systems when we prepare the new experiment and can produce high quality result by compare the previous test result. The development part must be analysis and design more specific to construct the database and after that, we can offer the best quality to customers various requirements. In this thesis, we describe the procedure about analysis, design and development of the impact and fatigue characteristics database systems developed by internet method using jsp(Java Server pages) tool

  16. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladena Luković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell is difficult to control, the damage can be possibly delayed and controlled by use of a suitable repair material. The lattice fracture model is used in this paper to investigate the performance of strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC in concrete repair systems exposed to ongoing corrosion. Numerical results were verified by experimental tests when SHCC, nonreinforced material (repair mortar, and commercial repair mortar are used as repair materials. In experiments, reinforcement bars (surrounded by a repair material were exposed to accelerated corrosion tests. The influence of the substrate surface preparation, the type of repair material, the interface, and the substrate strength on the resulting damage and failure mode of repair systems are discussed. In general, SHCC repair enables distributed cracking with small crack widths, up to several times smaller compared to repair mortar. Furthermore, more warning signs prior to the final failure are present in the SHCC repair system.

  17. Corrosion Inhibition by Sodium Gluconate-Zn2+-DTPMP System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Manjula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition efficiency of a phosphonic acid, Diethylene Triamine Pentamethylene Phosphonic acid (DTPMP in controlling corrosion of carbon steel immersed in an aqueous solution containing 60 ppm of Cl- has been evaluated by weight loss method in the absence and presence of Zn2+. The formulation consisting of DTPMP and Zn2+ has excellent inhibition efficiency (IE. A synergistic effect is noticed between Zn2+ and DTPMP. Addition of sodium gluconate (SG enhances the IE of Zn2+ and DTPMP system. The DTPMP-Zn2+-SG system function as a mixed inhibitor as revealed by polarization study. AC impedance spectrum, optical and atomic force micrographs reveal the formation of a protective film on the metal surface. FTIR spectra reveal that the protective film consists of Fe2+-DTPMP complex, Fe2+-SG complex and Zn(OH2.

  18. Fretting and Corrosion Damage in Taper Adapter Sleeves for Ceramic Heads: A Retrieval Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Daniel W; Chen, Antonia F; Lee, Gwo-Chin; Klein, Gregg R; Mont, Michael A; Kurtz, Steven M; Cates, Harold E; Kraay, Matthew J; Rimnac, Clare M

    2017-09-01

    During revision surgery with a well-fixed stem, a titanium sleeve can be used in conjunction with a ceramic head to achieve better stress distribution across the taper surface. In vitro testing suggests that corrosion is not a concern in sleeved ceramic heads; however, little is known about the in vivo fretting corrosion of the sleeves. The purpose of this study was to investigate fretting corrosion in sleeved ceramic heads in retrieved total hip arthroplasties. Thirty-seven sleeved ceramic heads were collected during revision. The femoral heads and sleeves were implanted 0.0-3.3 years. The implants were revised predominantly for instability, infection, and loosening. Fifty percent of the retrievals were implanted during a primary surgery. Fretting corrosion was assessed using the Goldberg-Higgs semiquantitative scoring system. Mild-to-moderate fretting corrosion scores (score = 2-3) were observed in 92% of internal tapers, 19% of external tapers, and 78% of the stems. Severe fretting corrosion was observed in 1 stem trunnion that was previously retained during revision surgery and none of the retrieved sleeves. There was no difference in corrosion damage of sleeves used in primary or revision surgery. The fretting corrosion scores in this study were predominantly mild and lower than reported fretting scores of cobalt-chrome heads in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although intended for use in revisions, we found that the short-term in vivo corrosion behavior of the sleeves was similar in both primary and revision surgery applications. From an in vivo corrosion perspective, sleeves are a reasonable solution for restoring the stem taper during revision surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Ontario Hydro studies on copper corrosion under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion rate of copper is generally greater in aerated solutions containing sulphide; also, in the presence of sulphide there is the fear that pitting may occur. Experiments have been carried out to study the corrosion of copper in deaerated groundwater/bentonite slurries with and without added sulphide for exposure periods from two months to one year. The groundwater contains 6500 ppm of chloride and 1000 ppm of sulphate. Tests were also performed in the presence of a 150 rad/h radiation field. In deaerated slurries at 75C the corrosion rate is less than 2 μm/a. With one addition of 10 mg/l sulphide, the rate increases by a factor of ten. With daily sulphide additions to deaerated solutions the corrosion rate initially falls but then rises and stabilizes after 15 days. In aerated solutions the corrosion increases over the first 25 days and then stabilizes. The corrosion rate of copper reached a steady value in 15 to 30 days. Rates are higher in aerated solutions, but the effect of adding sulphide is not so marked in aerated solutions as in unaerated solutions. The highest corrosion rate, less than 150 μm/a, was observed in aerated slurries saturated with sulphide. For deaerated solutions in the absence of sulphide the corrosion rate increases with temperature, but in aerated solutions the rate decreases. For solutions containing added sulphide the influence of temperature is negligible. The effect of a radiation field may be beneficial; in the presence of a radiation field the corrosion rate is less than 20 μm/a. After descaling the coupons showed a high density of irregularly shaped pits both in the presence and absence of sulphide, resulting from intergranular attack. The pitting factor for the highest corrosion rate is around 15

  20. Yucca Mountain engineered barrier system corrosion model (EBSCOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Kessler, J.H.; Apted, M.

    2008-01-01

    A revised engineered barrier system model has been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute to predict the time dependence of the failure of the drip shields and waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The revised model is based on new information on various corrosion processes developed by the US Department of Energy and others and for a 20-mm-thick waste package design with a double closure lid system. As with earlier versions of the corrosion model, the new EBSCOM code produces a best-estimate of the failure times of the various barriers. The model predicts that only 15% of waste packages will fail within a period of 1 million years. The times for the first corrosion failures are 40,000 years, 336,000 years, and 375,000 years for the drip shield, waste package, and combination of drip shield and the associated waste package, respectively

  1. Corrosion of orthodontic brackets in different spices: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, T P

    2014-01-01

    Moist environment in the mouth varies and causes variable amounts of corrosion of dental materials. This is of concern particularly when metallic implants, metallic fillings, orthodontic appliances are placed in the hostile electrolytic environment in the human mouth. Components of diet rich in salt and spices are important factors influencing the corrosion of metallic appliances placed in the oral cavity. To study in vitro corrosion of orthodontic metallic brackets immersed in solutions of salt and spices in artificial saliva. Orthodontic brackets were used for corrosion studies in artificial saliva, salt, and spices using electrochemical technique and surface analysis. Electrochemical studies using different parameters were done in solutions of artificial saliva containing salt and spices. Photomicrographs from the optical microscope were also obtained. RESULTS of corrosion studies have clearly demonstrated that certain spices such as turmeric and coriander are effective in reducing corrosion, whereas salt and red chili have been found to enhance it. Surface analysis of small pits present on the surface of the as-received bracket will initiate corrosion which leads to more pitting.

  2. Data Analysis and reduction in Hanford's corrosion monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    A project to improve the Hanford Site's corrosion monitoring strategy was started in 1995. The project is designed to integrate EN-based corrosion monitoring into the site's corrosion monitoring strategy. In order to monitor multiple tanks, a major focus of this project has been to automate the data collection and analysis process. Data collection and analysis from the early EN corrosion monitoring equipment (241-AZ-101 and 241-AN-107) was primarily performed manually by a trained operator skilled in the analysis of EN data. Thousands of raw data files were collected, manually sorted and stored. Further statistical analysis of these files was performed by manually stripping out data from thousands of raw data files and calculating statistics in a spreadsheet format. Plotting and other graphical display analyses were performed by manually exporting data from the data files or spreadsheet into another plotting or presentation software package. In 1999, an Amulet/PRP system was procured and employed on the 241-AN-102 corrosion monitoring system. A duplicate system was purchased for use on the upcoming 241-AN-105 system. A third system has been procured and will eventually be used to upgrade the 241-AN-107 system. The Amulet software has greatly improved the automation of waste tank EN data analysis. In contrast with previous systems, the Amulet operator no longer has to manually collect, sort, store, and analyze thousands of raw EN data files. Amulet writes all data to a single database. Statistical analysis, uniform corrosion rate, and other derived parameters are automatically calculated in Amulet from the raw data while the raw data are being collected. Other improvements in plotting and presentation make inspection of the data a much quicker and relatively easy task. These and other improvements have greatly improved the speed at which EN data can be analyzed in addition to improving the quality of the final interpretation. The increase in data automation offered

  3. In situ AFM study of pitting corrosion and corrosion under strain on a 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.A.; Cousty, J.; Masson, J-L.; Bataillon, C.

    2004-01-01

    Our study is centred on surface localised corrosion under strain of a standard stainless steel (304L). The interest we take in these corrosion phenomena is led by the general misunderstanding of its primary initiation steps. The goal of this study is to determine precisely the relationships between local geometrical defects (grain boundaries, dislocation lines, etc) or chemical defects (inclusions) with the preferential sites of corrosion on the strained material. By combining three techniques at the same time: Atomic Force Microscopy, an electrochemical cell and a traction plate, we can observe in situ the effect of localised stress and deformation on the sample surface exposed to a corrosive solution. We managed to build an original set-up compatible with all the requirements of these three different techniques. Furthermore, we prepared the surface of our sample as flat as possible to decrease at maximum the topographical noise in order to observe the smallest defect on the surface. By using a colloidal suspension of SiO 2 , we obtained surfaces with a typical corrugation (RMS) of about 1 A for areas of at least 1 μm 2 . Our experimental study has been organised in two primary investigations: - In situ study of the morphology evolution of the surface under a corrosive chloride solution (borate buffer with NaCl salt). The influence of time, NaCl concentration, and potential was investigated; - In situ exploration of a 304L strained surface. It revealed the first stages of the surface plastic evolutions like activation of sliding dislocations, materialized by parallel steps of about 2 nm high in the same grain. The secondary sliding plane systems were also noticeable for higher deformation rates. Recent results concerning in situ AFM observation of corroded surfaces under strain in a chloride media will be presented. (authors)

  4. In situ AFM study of pitting corrosion and corrosion under strain on a 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.A. [CEA de Saclay, DRECAM/SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Cousty, J.; Masson, J-L. [CEA de Saclay, DRECAM/SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Bataillon, C. [CEA de Saclay, DEN/DPC/LECA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    Our study is centred on surface localised corrosion under strain of a standard stainless steel (304L). The interest we take in these corrosion phenomena is led by the general misunderstanding of its primary initiation steps. The goal of this study is to determine precisely the relationships between local geometrical defects (grain boundaries, dislocation lines, etc) or chemical defects (inclusions) with the preferential sites of corrosion on the strained material. By combining three techniques at the same time: Atomic Force Microscopy, an electrochemical cell and a traction plate, we can observe in situ the effect of localised stress and deformation on the sample surface exposed to a corrosive solution. We managed to build an original set-up compatible with all the requirements of these three different techniques. Furthermore, we prepared the surface of our sample as flat as possible to decrease at maximum the topographical noise in order to observe the smallest defect on the surface. By using a colloidal suspension of SiO{sub 2}, we obtained surfaces with a typical corrugation (RMS) of about 1 A for areas of at least 1 {mu}m{sup 2}. Our experimental study has been organised in two primary investigations: - In situ study of the morphology evolution of the surface under a corrosive chloride solution (borate buffer with NaCl salt). The influence of time, NaCl concentration, and potential was investigated; - In situ exploration of a 304L strained surface. It revealed the first stages of the surface plastic evolutions like activation of sliding dislocations, materialized by parallel steps of about 2 nm high in the same grain. The secondary sliding plane systems were also noticeable for higher deformation rates. Recent results concerning in situ AFM observation of corroded surfaces under strain in a chloride media will be presented. (authors)

  5. System for stress corrosion conditions tests on PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Andre Cesar de Jesus

    2007-01-01

    The study of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) involves the consideration and evaluation of the inherent compatibility between a material and the environment under conditions of either applied or residual stress. EAC is a critical problem because equipment, components and structure are subject to the influence of mechanical stress, water environment of different composition, temperature and different material history. Testing for resistance to EAC is one of the most effective ways to determine the interrelationships among this variables on the process of EAC. Up to now, several experimental techniques have been developed worldwide, which address different aspects of environmental caused damage. Constant loading of CT specimens test is a typical example of test, which is used for the estimation of parameters of stress corrosion cracking. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment that is close to the actual operation conditions of assessed component. This paper presents a testing facility for stress corrosion cracking to be installed at CDTN, which was designed and developed at CDTN. The facility is used to carry out constant load tests under simulated PWR environment, where temperature, water pressure and chemistry are controlled, which are considered the most important factors in SCC. Also, the equipment operational conditions, its applications, and restrictions are presented. The system was developed to operate at temperature until 380 degree C and pressure until 180 bar. It consists in a autoclave stuck at a mechanical system, responsible of producing load , a water treatment station, and a data acquisition system. This testing facility allows the evaluation of cracking progress, especially at PWR reactor. (author) operational conditions. (author)

  6. Corrosion Degradation of Coated Aluminum Alloy Systems through Galvanic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) Corrosion  Degradation  of  Coated  Aluminum  Alloy  Systems  through  Galvanic...their  low  density  and  relatively  high  strength.   While  exhibiting  significant  general   corrosion  resistance,  these

  7. Engineering considerations for corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipeline systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, T.G.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Proper corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipelines requires a system review to determine the appropriate monitor locations and types of monitoring techniques. This paper develops and discusses a classification of conditions such as flow regime and gas composition. Also discussed are junction categories which, for corrosion monitoring, need to be considered from two points of view. The first is related to fluid flow in the line and the second is related corrosion inhibitor movement along the pipeline. The appropriate application of the various monitoring techniques such as coupons, hydrogen detectors, electrical resistance probe and linear polarization probes are discussed in relation to flow regime and gas composition. Problems caused by semi-conduction from iron sulfide are considered. Advantages and disadvantages of fluid gathering methods such as pots and flow-through drips are discussed in relation to their reliability as on-line monitoring locations.

  8. Corrosion at system chimneys made of CrNi-steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajonk, Gunther [Institute of Materials Testing of Northrhine-Westfalia, D-44285 Dortmund (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Names like 'chimney' und 'funnel' usually identify flue gas devices made of bricks. Much less known is the fact that chimney elements are still manufactured from alloys. The following article describes the particular demands ruled by legislation on building pro-ducts, just as the consequences resulting from corrosion loads by flue gas condensates. Difficulties caused by manufacturing and construction are primarily discussed. Furthermore a test procedure is introduced that allows to catch and correlate corrosion loads and technical designs systematically to corrosion behaviour and service life of flue gas devices. For the first time a tool for active quality assurance has been given by this test rig allowing to recognize construction errors systematically. This way, manufacturers of system chimneys and flue liners are enabled to optimize their products applications going ahead to the respective requests of the market. (authors)

  9. Study on corrosion of thermal power plant condenser tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Abdolreza Rashidi; Zhaam, Ali Akbar [Niroo Research Institute, end of Poonak Bakhtari blvd., Shahrak Ghods, Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study kinds of corrosion mechanisms in thermal power plant condenser tubes. Condenser is a shell and tube heat exchanger in which cooling water flows through its tubes. While the steam from low pressure turbine passes within condenser tubes, it is condensed by cooling water. The exhausted steam from low pressure turbine is condensed on external surface of condenser tubes and heat is transferred to cooling water which flow into tubes. Tubes composition is usually copper-based alloys, stainless steel or titanium. Annual damages due to corrosion cause much cost for replacement and repairing metallic equipment and installations in electric power industry. Because of existence of different contaminants in water and steam cycle, condenser tubes surfaces are exposed to corrosion. Contaminants like oxygen, carbon dioxide, chloride ion and ammonia in water and steam cycle originate several damages such as pitting and crevice corrosion, erosion, galvanic attack, SCC, condensed corrosion, de-alloying in thermal power plant condenser. The paper first states how corrosion damage takes place in condensers and then introduces types of usual alloys used in condensers and also their corrosion behavior. In continuation, a brief explanation is presented about kinds of condenser failures due to corrosion. Then, causes and locations of different mechanisms of corrosion events on condenser tubes and effects of different parameters such as composition, temperature, chloride and sulfide ion concentration, pH, water velocity and biological precipitation are examined and finally protection methods are indicated. Also some photos of tubes specimens related to power plants are studied and described in each case of mentioned mechanisms. (authors)

  10. The study on corrosion resistance of decorative satin nickel plating

    OpenAIRE

    LU Wenya; CHENG Xianhua

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the corrosion resistance of satin nickel plating on conductive plastic.The electrochemical tests were to analyze the corrosion behavior of satin nickel plating with different processes in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results show that,because the satin nickel plating has an organic film on its surface due to process characteristics,the film results in different corrosion resistance.By increasing satin additive dosage,the nickel plating chroma decreases,the microsurface of the p...

  11. Corrosion and impedance studies on magnesium alloy in oxalate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekry, A.M.; Tammam, Riham H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Corrosion behavior of AZ91E alloy was investigated in 0.1 M Na 2 C 2 O 4 containing different additives as Br - , Cl - or Silicate. → The corrosion rate of 0.1 M oxalate solution containing silicate ion is lower than the blank (0.1 M Na 2 C 2 O 4 ). This was confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. → For the other added ions Br - or Cl - , the corrosion rate is higher than the blank. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of AZ91E alloy was investigated in oxalate solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS). The effect of oxalate concentration was studied, where the corrosion rate increases with increasing oxalate concentration. The effect of added ions (Br - , Cl - or SiO 3 2- ) on the electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloy in 0.1 M Na 2 C 2 O 4 solution at 298 K, was investigated. It was found that the corrosion rate of 0.1 M oxalate solution containing silicate ion is lower than the blank (0.1 M Na 2 C 2 O 4 ). This was confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. However, for the other added ions Br - or Cl - , the corrosion rate is higher than the blank.

  12. Corrosion and impedance studies on magnesium alloy in oxalate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekry, A.M., E-mail: hham4@hotmail.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Gamaa Street, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Tammam, Riham H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Gamaa Street, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Corrosion behavior of AZ91E alloy was investigated in 0.1 M Na{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} containing different additives as Br{sup -}, Cl{sup -} or Silicate. > The corrosion rate of 0.1 M oxalate solution containing silicate ion is lower than the blank (0.1 M Na{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}). This was confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. > For the other added ions Br{sup -} or Cl{sup -}, the corrosion rate is higher than the blank. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of AZ91E alloy was investigated in oxalate solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS). The effect of oxalate concentration was studied, where the corrosion rate increases with increasing oxalate concentration. The effect of added ions (Br{sup -}, Cl{sup -} or SiO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) on the electrochemical behavior of magnesium alloy in 0.1 M Na{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} solution at 298 K, was investigated. It was found that the corrosion rate of 0.1 M oxalate solution containing silicate ion is lower than the blank (0.1 M Na{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}). This was confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. However, for the other added ions Br{sup -} or Cl{sup -}, the corrosion rate is higher than the blank.

  13. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  14. A comparative study of accelerated tests to simulate atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Sergio Luiz de

    2000-01-01

    In this study, specimens coated with five organic coating systems were exposed to accelerated tests for periods up to 2000 hours, and also to weathering for two years and six months. The accelerated tests consisted of the salt spray test, according to ASTM B-117; Prohesion (ASTM G 85-98 annex 5A); Prohesion combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation; 'Prohchuva' a test described by ASTM G 85-98 using a salt spray with composition that simulated the acid rain of Sao Paulo, but one thousand times more concentrated, and 'Prohchuva' combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. The coated specimens were exposed with and without incision to expose the substrate. The onset and progress of corrosion at and of the exposed metallic surface, besides coating degradation, were followed by visual observation, and photographs were taken. The coating systems were classified according to the extent of corrosion protection given to the substrate, using a method based on ASTM standards D-610, D-714, D-1654 and D-3359. The rankings of the coatings obtained from accelerated tests and weathering were compared and contrasted with classification of the same systems obtained from literature, for specimens exposed to an industrial atmosphere. Coating degradation was strongly dependent on the test, and could be attributed to differences in test conditions. The best correlation between accelerated test and weathering was found for the test Prohesion alternated with cycles of exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. (author)

  15. Evaluation of stress corrosion crack growth in BWR piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassir, M.; Sharma, S.; Reich, M.; Chang, M.T.

    1985-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to evaluate the effects of stress intensity factor and environment on the growth behavior of intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel piping systems. Most of the detected cracks are known to be circumferential in shape, and initially started at the inside surface in the heat affected zone near girth welds. These cracks grow both radially in-depth and circumferentially in length and, in extreme cases, may cause leakage in the installation. The propagation of the crack is essentially due to the influence of the following simultaneous factors: (1) the action of applied and residual stress; (2) sensitization of the base metal in the heat affected zone adjacent to girth weld; and (3) the continuous exposure of the material to an aggressive environment of high temperature water containing dissolved oxygen and some levels of impurities. Each of these factors and their effects on the piping systems is discussed in detail in the report. The report also evaluates the time required for hypothetical cracks in BWR pipes to propagate to their critical size. The pertinent times are computed and displayed graphically. Finally, parametric study is performed in order to assess the relative influence and sensitivity of the various input parameters (residual stress, crack growth law, diameter of pipe, initial size of defect, etc.) which have bearing on the growth behavior of the intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel. Cracks in large-diameter as well as in small-diameter pipes are considered and analyzed. 27 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Corrosion Protection Systems and Fatigue Corrosion in Offshore Wind Structures: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth J. Price

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns over reducing CO2 emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels in combination with an increase in worldwide energy demands is leading to increased development of renewable energies such as wind. The installation of offshore wind power structures (OWS is one of the most promising approaches for the production of renewable energy. However, corrosion and fatigue damage in marine and offshore environments are major causes of primary steel strength degradation in OWS. Corrosion can reduce the thickness of structural components which may lead towards fatigue crack initiation and buckling. These failure mechanisms affect tower service life and may result in catastrophic structural failure. Additionally, environmental pollution stemming from corrosion’s by-products is possible. As a result, large financial investments are made yearly for both the prevention and recovery of these drawbacks. The corrosion rate of an OWS is dependent on different characteristics of attack which are influenced by access to oxygen and humidity. Structural degradation can occur due to chemical attack, abrasive action of waves, and microorganism attacks. Inspired by technological and scientific advances in recent years, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the current protective coating system technologies used to protect OWS as well as future perspectives.

  17. On-line corrosion monitoring in geothermal district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, S.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    General corrosion rates in the geothermal district heating systems in Iceland are generally low, of the magnitude 1 lm/y. The reason is high pH (9.5), low-conductivity (200 lm/y) and negligible dissolved oxygen. The geothermal hot water is either used directly from source or to heat up cold ground...

  18. Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates

  19. Studies of corrosion resistance of Japanese steels in liquid lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Ono, Hiroshi; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2003-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth has attractive characteristics as a coolant in future fast reactors and Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems (ADS) applications. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in lead-bismuth eutectic is one of key problems in developing nuclear power plants and installations using lead-bismuth coolant. Our experiences with heat exchangers using liquid lead-bismuth and the results of corrosion tests of Japanese steels are reported in this paper. A series of corrosion tests was carried out in collaboration with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE). Test specimens of various Japanese steels were exposed in a non-isothermal forced circulation loop. The influence of maximum temperature and oxygen content in lead bismuth were chosen for study as the primary causes of corrosion in Japanese steels. After the corrosion tests, corrosion behavior was analyzed by visual inspection, measurement of weight loss and metallurgical examination of the microstructure of the corroded zone. The corrosion mechanism in liquid lead bismuth is discussed on the basis of the metallurgical examination of the corroded zone. (author)

  20. Improvement of Corrosion Inhibitors of Primary and Secondary Closed Cooling Water System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Seon; Kim, K. M.; Kim, K. H.

    2010-08-01

    In nuclear power plants, the Closed Cooling Water (CCW) system provide cooling to both safety-related and non-safety-related heat exchange equipment. Various chemicals are used to mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in the CCW systems. In nuclear plants, these inhibitors have included chromates, nitrites, molybdates, hydrazine, and silicate. In the case of the CCW of some domestic nuclear power plants, there is during the overhaul period, a saturation of ion exchange resin caused by an inhibitor which has high conductivity for an increase in radiation exposure and radioactive waste. The objective of this study is to evaluate the corrosion behavior of structural materials with various corrosion inhibitors. In the present study, more than 50 ppm hydrazine concentration is needed to reduce the corrosion rate of carbon steel to satisfy the CCW operational guidelines. However, if hydrazine is continuously injected into the CCW system, the critical concentration of hydrazine will be lower. Hydrazine might be an alternative corrosion inhibitor for nitrite in the CCW system of nuclear power plant

  1. COPPER PITTING CORROSION: A CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  2. Experiencies of corrosion and corrosion protection in seawater-cooling systems in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, S.

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the experience of the corrosion resistance of pumps, heat exchangers, valves, and pipings in different seawater-cooling system. For pumps and heat exchangers the experience has been so extensive that a clear picture of todays status can be given. Owing to more scanty data concerning valves and pipes the survey of the corrosion in these components is less well substantiated. The most common pumps in the cooling systems of power stations are vertically extended shaft pumps. To counteract corrosion on column and casing with organic surface coating and on stainless steel shafts and impellers under shutdown conditions, these should be provided with internal and external cathodic protection. The experience of tin and aluminium bronzes in impellers and shafts in such pumps has been so poor - erosion and cavitaion damage - that a change has usually been made to preferentially ferritic-austenitic Mo-alloyd stainless steels. The combination of stainless steel/Ni-Resist 2 D has been found unsatisfactory owing to the occurrence of galvanic corrosion on the latter material. For heat exchangers, titanium has proved to be far and away the best choice. In the optimal blanket solution for a titanium heat exchangers the tubes are seal-welded to tube sheets of explosion-bonded titanium clad steel. For retubing of old condensers a similar procedure with tubes of high-alloy stainless steel in tube sheets of stainless clad steel is of economic interest. The effect of chlorination of the cooling water, however, remains to be clarified before such a procedure can be unreservedly recommended. Pipings of rubber-lined carbon steel or with thick coatings of solvent-free opoxy resin have shown very good corrosion resistance. Tar-epoxy-resin-coated pipes, however, should usually be provided with internal cathodic protection. Cement-lined carbon steel pipes are used with varying results in the offshore industry. Recently, however, pipes of the high slloy stainless steel

  3. Indoor atmospheric corrosion of historical ferrous alloys. System characterisation, mechanisms and modelling discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of indoor atmospheric corrosion in iron alloys is of primary importance in several fields, including for the conservation of Middle Ages monuments or the long term storage of nuclear waste. In this research, a double approach was developed, combining fine characterisation of corrosion systems and design of experiments to answers specific questions related to mechanisms understanding. Iron indoor atmospheric corrosion was investigated on samples coming from the reinforcing chain of the Amiens cathedral (15. century). In the first stage, the corrosion system has been extensively characterised from the macroscopic to the nano-metric scale. In particular, structural micro-analysis (μ-Raman, μ-XRD, μ-XAS) has been used to locate, identify and quantify the oxidised phases. Rust layers are composed of a matrix of nano-metric goethite, with low quantities of lepidocrocite and akaganeite mostly located in the extern part of the corrosion system. In addition, clear marblings are dispersed in the matrix, which are sometimes connected with the metal core. Although these may contain maghemite, these marblings are generally made of ferri-hydrite/feroxyhite phases. In the second stage, specific experiments have been carried out in an unsaturated marked medium to locate oxygen reduction sites in the rust layers. Several cases were evidenced, depending on the rust layer morphology. In addition, reduction processes of model phases have been studied in situ, using an electrochemical cell coupled with structural characterisation techniques. This combination highlighted the influence of reduction mode and pH on the type of reduced phase formed. From the obtained results, several mechanisms are proposed to explain the long term indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron, including rust layers morphology and phases properties. The different hypotheses have been integrated in a proposed method to diagnosis ancient ferrous systems stability. These hypotheses also

  4. Study on the corrosion assessment of overpack welds-III (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Rieko; Otsuki, Akiyoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Naoki; Yui, Mikazu

    2006-12-01

    There is some possibility that the corrosion resistance of overpack welds is different from that of base metal due to the differences of material properties. In this study, corrosion behavior of welded joint for carbon steel was compared with base metal using the specimens taken from welded joint model fabricated by TIG, MAG and EBW respectively. The corrosion tests were performed for following four items. Passivation behavior and corrosion type. Propagation of general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion under aerobic condition. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. Propagation of general corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement under anaerobic condition. The results of these corrosion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of welded metal by TIG and MAG was inferior to base metal for general corrosion, pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. It was implied that the filler materials used for welding affected the corrosion resistance. No deterioration of corrosion resistance was observed in any corrosion modes for EBW, which does not need filler material. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of welded metal and heat affected zone was lower than that of base metal. (author)

  5. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  6. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650 0 C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop

  7. Erosion corrosion in water-steam systems: Causes and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of a better understanding of erosion corrosion, the physical and chemical principles will be summarized briefly. Then results obtained at KWU in the BENSON test section in tests on test specimens in single-phase flow of fully demineralized water will be presented. The experimental studies provide information about the most important influencing parameters. These include flow rate, fluid temperature and water quality (pH value and oxygen content). In addition, the resistance of various materials is compared, and the resistance of magnetite coatings to erosion corrosion is investigated. Furthermore, tests are presented that will show the extent to which erosion corrosion in power plants can be influenced by chemical measures

  8. Corrosion of similar and dissimilar metal crevices in the engineered barrier system of a potential nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.; Dunn, D.S.; Csontos, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Crevice corrosion is considered possible if the corrosion potential (E corr ) exceeds the repassivation potential for crevice corrosion (E rcrev ). In this study, potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic hold were used to determine the E rcrev of similar and dissimilar metal crevices in the engineered barrier system of the potential Yucca Mountain repository in 0.5 M NaCl, 4 M NaCl, and 4 M MgCl 2 solutions at 95 deg. C. The results were compared with data previously obtained using crevices formed between Alloy 22 and polytetrafluoroethylene. It was observed that, except for Type 316L stainless steel, all other metal-to-metal crevices were less susceptible to crevice corrosion than the corresponding metal-to-polytetrafluoroethylene crevices. Measurements of galvanic coupling were used to evaluate the crevice corrosion propagation behavior in 5 M NaCl solution at 95 deg. C. The crevice specimens were coupled to either an Alloy 22 or a Titanium Grade 7 plate using metal or polytetrafluoroethylene crevice washers. Crevice corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel propagated without repassivation. For all the tests using a polytetrafluoroethylene crevice washer, crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 was initiated at open circuit potential by the addition of CuCl 2 as an oxidant, whereas no crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 was initiated for all the tests using Alloy 22 or Titanium Grade 7 metals as crevice washer. However, crevice corrosion propagation was found to be very limited under such test conditions

  9. Design of multi-function Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-fiction corrosion monitoring system has been designed for installation into DST 241-AN-105 at the Hanford Site in fiscal year 1999. The 241-AN-105 system is the third-generation corrosion monitoring system described by TTP RLO-8-WT-21. Improvements and upgrades from the second-generation system (installed in 241-AN-102) that have been incorporated into the third-generation system include: Gasket seating surfaces utilize O-rings instead of a washer type gasket for improved seal; Probe design contains an equally spaced array of 22 thermocouples; Probe design contains an adjustable verification thermocouple; Probe design contains three ports for pressure/gas sampling; Probe design contains one set of strain gauges to monitor probe flexure if flexure occurs; Probe utilizes an adjustable collar to allow depth adjustment of probe during installation; System is capable of periodically conducting LPR scans; System is housed in a climate controlled enclosure adjacent to the riser containing the probe; System uses wireless Ethernet links to send data to Hanford Local Area Network; System uses commercial remote access software to allow remote command and control; and Above ground wiring uses driven shields to reduce external electrostatic noise in the data. These new design features have transformed what was primarily a second-generation corrosion monitoring system into a multi-function tank monitoring system that adds a great deal of functionality to the probe, provides for a better understanding of the relationship between corrosion and other tank operating parameters, and optimizes the use of the riser that houses the probe in the tank

  10. Development of corrosion condition sensing and monitoring system using radio-frequency identification devices (RFID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.P.; Zheng, W. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2008-05-15

    This study discussed the development of a corrosion sensing and monitoring system for military land vehicles. Radio-frequency identification device (RFID) technology uses radio waves to identify individual masses with RFID tags attached. A corrosion-sensing element was integrated with the RFID technology, which incorporated a galvanic corrosion cell designed to trigger RFID tags. Corrosion severity was then related to the galvanic current. The tag recorded the sensor reading and transmitted the data to an RFID reader. The tags consisted of a microchip and an antenna. A software development kit has also been developed to interface RFID data with existing applications. While it is currently not possible to modify the RFID tags to prevent security risks, further research is being conducted to assemble a data-logger system with corrosion probes to measure humidity, electrical resistance, and linear polarization resistance. Studies will also be conducted to assemble an active tag reader system and investigate potential modifications. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 appendix.

  11. Study of corrosion in aluminium using neutron radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.N.; Alam, M.K.; Saklayen, M.A.; Ahsan, M.H.; Islam, S.M.A.; Zaman, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron radiography technique has been adopted for detection of corrosion in aluminium by filling artificially made holes on aluminium slab with Al(OH) 3 . The contrast between the optical densities of corrosion products and aluminium slab was assessed from the densitometric measurements. Variation of optical density difference with sample thickness has also been studied. The results confirm that approximately 0.039 mm thick corrosion products having diameter 10 mm can easily be detected in 2 cm thick aluminium slab. The linear attenuation coefficient of Al(OH) 3 has been obtained as 0.9447. From the present investigation it is confirmed that film neutron radiography (NR) technique is helpful for investigation of Al(OH) 3 type corrosion product in aluminium. (author)

  12. Component wall thinning and a corrosion-erosion monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, T.; Batt, T.; Roarty, D.

    1989-01-01

    Since a 1986 incident involving failure of a piping elbow due to erosion-corrosion, the electric utility industry has been actively developing technology for implementing long term programs to address corrosion-erosion. This paper describes a typical corrosion-erosion monitoring program, the types of non-destructive examinations (NDE) performed on components, and the extensive NDE data obtained when the program is applied to components in a power plant. To facilitate evaluation of the NDE data on components, an automated NDE data manipulation and data display system is advisable and perhaps necessary due to the large amounts of NDE data typically obtained during a program. Such a comprehensive corrosion-erosion monitoring system (CEMS) needs to be integral with methods for selection of inspection locations and perform NDE data analysis to help in replace, repair, or run decisions. The structure for one CEMS is described which uses IBM PC compatible hardware and a set of software addressing most data evaluation and decision making needs. CEMS features include automated input/output for typical NDE devices, database structuring, graphics outputs including color 2-D or 3-D contour plots of components, trending and predictive evaluations for future inspection planning, EC severity determination, integration of piping isometrics and component properties, and desktop publishing capabilities

  13. Corrosion in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products and biofuels identification, monitoring and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2014-01-01

    This book treats corrosion as it occurs and affects processes in real-world situations, and thus points the way to practical solutions. Topics described include the conditions in which petroleum products are corrosive to metals; corrosion mechanisms of petroleum products; which parts of storage tanks containing crude oils and petroleum products undergo corrosion; dependence of corrosion in tanks on type of petroleum products; aggressiveness of petroleum products to polymeric material; how microorganisms take part in corrosion of tanks and pipes containing petroleum products; which corrosion monitoring methods are used in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products; what corrosion control measures should be chosen; how to choose coatings for inner and outer surfaces of tanks containing petroleum products; and how different additives (oxygenates, aromatic solvents) to petroleum products and biofuels influence metallic and polymeric materials. The book is of interest to corrosion engineers, mat...

  14. Development of a unit suitable for corrosion monitoring in district heating systems. Experiences with the LOCOR-cell test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asbjørn; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    A by-pass unit suitable for placement of a number of different probes for corrosion monitoring has been designed. Also measurements of water parameters are allowed in a side stream from the unit. The project is a part of the Nordic Innovation Fund project KORMOF. The by-pass unit has been installed...... in 6 pressurised circulating heating systems and in one cooling system. 7 different corrosion monitoring methods have been used to study corrosion rates and types in dependency of water chemistry. This paper describes the design of the by-pass unit including water analysis methods. It also describes...... the purpose, background and gained results of one of the used monitoring techniques, the crevice corrosion measurements obtained by the LOCOR-Cell„§. The crevice corrosion cell was developed by FORCE Technology in a previous district heating project financed by Nordic Industrial Fund (1)(2). Results from...

  15. Atomic level characterization in corrosion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Philippe; Maurice, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Atomic level characterization brings fundamental insight into the mechanisms of self-protection against corrosion of metals and alloys by oxide passive films and into how localized corrosion is initiated on passivated metal surfaces. This is illustrated in this overview with selected data obtained at the subnanometre, i.e. atomic or molecular, scale and also at the nanometre scale on single-crystal copper, nickel, chromium and stainless steel surfaces passivated in well-controlled conditions and analysed in situ and/or ex situ by scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A selected example of corrosion modelling by ab initio density functional theory is also presented. The discussed aspects include the surface reconstruction induced by hydroxide adsorption and formation of two-dimensional (hydr)oxide precursors, the atomic structure, orientation and surface hydroxylation of three-dimensional ultrathin oxide passive films, the effect of grain boundaries in polycrystalline passive films acting as preferential sites of passivity breakdown, the differences in local electronic properties measured at grain boundaries of passive films and the role of step edges at the exposed surface of oxide grains on the dissolution of the passive film. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  16. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  17. Treatment Tank Corrosion Studies For The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  18. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxen, C.

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases

  19. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases.

  20. Corrosion control for the Hanford site waste transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    Processing large volumes of spent reactor fuel and other related waste management activities produced radioactive wastes which have been stored in underground high-level waste storage tanks since the 1940s. The effluent waste streams from the processing facilities were stored underground in high-level waste storage tanks. The waste was transferred between storage tanks and from the tanks to waste processing facilities in a complex network of underground piping. The underground waste transfer system consists of process piping, catch tanks, lift tanks, diversion boxes, pump pits, valves, and jumpers. Corrosion of the process piping from contact with the soil is a primary concern. The other transfer system components are made of corrosion-resistant alloys or they are isolated from the underground environment and experience little degradation. Corrosion control of the underground transfer system is necessary to ensure that transfer routes will be available for future waste retrieval, processing,a nd disposal. Today, most waste transfer lines are protected by an active impressed-current cathodic protection (CP) system. The original system has been updated. Energization surveys and a recent base-line survey demonstrate that system operational goals are met

  1. Performace Of Multi-Probe Corrosion Monitoring Systems At The Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carothers, K.D.; Boomer, K.D.; Anda, V.S.; Dahl, M.M.; Edgemon, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

  2. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  3. ASSET, An Information System for Alloy Corrosion in High Temperature Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. C. John; A. D. Pelton; A. L. Young; W. T. Thompson; I. G. Wright

    2001-01-01

    A large database for corrosion data and a corrosion prediction information system for metals and alloys corroding in high-temperature gases have been created. Corrosion data for about 75 commercial alloys, 4600 corrosion data measurements, and six million exposure hours have been compiled into an information system, ASSET. ASSET allows prediction of sound metal thickness losses for metals and alloys corroding by several common corrosion mechanisms at high-temperatures as functions of gas composition, temperature, time, and alloy. This paper presents examples of predicted metal losses of alloys corroding in standard conditions for several corrosion mechanisms expected in high-temperature gases. ASSET also provides a comprehensive capability to analyze the thermochemical interactions between alloys, corrosion products and exposure conditions. Some of the uses of the data compilation and the corrosion prediction feature are illustrated for oxidizing, sulfidizing, sulfidizing/oxidizing , and carburizing conditions

  4. Corrosion and Biofouling of OTEC System Surfaces - Design Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    condition between different areas on a given member can lead to accelerated attack by a differential envirornment cell . These differences can be...resistance. As shown in Figure 1, -. gal- vanic cell is essentially a battery/load system. When the intermetallic resistance, R1 , or the environmental...members of a couple should be maximized when possible. Also, insulating or high resistance F bushings, etc., can reduce or el4 !.minate galvanic corrosion

  5. Study on Corrosion-induced Crack Initiation and Propagation of Sustaining Loaded RCbeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, X. P.; Li, Y.; Yuan, C. B.; Yang, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2018-05-01

    For 13 pieces of reinforced concrete beams with HRB500 steel bars under long-term sustained loads, at time of corrosion-induced initial crack of concrete, and corrosion-induced crack widths of 0.3mm and 1mm, corrosion of steel bars and time-varying behavior of corrosion-induced crack width were studied by the ECWD (Electro-osmosis - constant Current – Wet and Dry cycles) accelerated corrosion method. The results show that when cover thickness was between 30 and 50mm,corrosion rates of steel bars were between 0.8% and 1.7% at time of corrosion-induced crack, and decreased with increasing concrete cover thickness; when corrosion-induced crack width was 0.3mm, the corrosion rate decreased with increasing steel bar diameter, and increased with increasing cover thickness; its corrosion rate varied between 0.98% and 4.54%; when corrosion-induced crack width reached 1mm, corrosion rate of steel bars was between 4% and 4.5%; when corrosion rate of steel bars was within 5%, the maximum and average corrosion-induced crack and corrosion rate of steel bars had a good linear relationship. The calculation model predicting the maximum and average width of corrosion-induced crack is given in this paper.

  6. Digital mapping of corrosion risk in coastal urban areas using remote sensing and structural condition assessment: case study in cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neocleous Kyriacos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is one of the main factors leading to performance deterioration of reinforced concrete buildings; and, hence, periodic structural condition monitoring is required to assess and repair the adverse effects of corrosion. However, this can become a cumbersome and expensive task to undertake for large populations of buildings, scattered in large urban areas. To optimize the use of available resources, appropriate tools are required for the assessment of corrosion risk of reinforced concrete construction. This paper proposes a framework for the production of digital corrosion risk maps for urban areas; Cyprus was used as a case study. This framework explored multi-temporal satellite remote sensing data from the Landsat sensors as well as corrosion risk factors derived from the results of a recently completed research project, entitled “STEELCOR”. This framework was used to develop two corrosion risk scenarios within Geographical Information Systems, and to produce corrosion risk maps for three coastal cities of Cyprus. The thematic maps indicated that, for slight corrosion damage, the distance of reinforced concrete buildings from the coast was more influential than the building age. While, for significant corrosion damage, the maps indicated that the age of RC buildings was more influential than the distance from the coast.

  7. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    , most often at the bellows flange ring. It was discovered that the entire bellows assembly was not all alloy 600 but that alloy 600 bellows had been welded to a stainless steel alloy 316 (SS-316) flange ring. A previous study documents and addresses this problem.1 The fabricators of the valves immediately corrected the problem and began fabricating all wetted parts of the bellows assembly from alloy 600. At the same time, the fabricators began to make alloy C-276 valve bodies and stem tips available for sale. This material is known to be superior to the alloy 400 valve bodies and stem tips of the standard UG valves that had already been installed in the CP. A decision was made to purchase alloy C-276 bodies and stem tips and to change out those alloy 400 components that had already been installed. Due to the enormity of this task (both in terms of time and money), it was desirable to determine the longevity of alloy C-276 vs alloy 400 components in a side-by-side comparison. Also of interest was the question of how long the new (all-alloy 600) bellows would last in comparison with the original alloy 600/SS-316 bellows. A basic HF corrosion test was proposed to compare corrosion rates of several high-alloy materials. Because much of the alloy 400 in the system had been gold plated, some gold-plated alloy 400 coupons were included. Due to time and funding limitations, actual CP variables such as temperature and pressure were not duplicated. Instead, a simple partial-immersion test at ambient temperature was conducted. The purpose of this test was to gain information on the rate of corrosion of different alloys in the CP and to attempt to derive some idea of their expected lifetimes in the operating environment

  8. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    proven to have a finite life due to failure, most often at the bellows flange ring. It was discovered that the entire bellows assembly was not all alloy 600 but that alloy 600 bellows had been welded to a stainless steel alloy 316 (SS-316) flange ring. A previous study documents and addresses this problem.1 The fabricators of the valves immediately corrected the problem and began fabricating all wetted parts of the bellows assembly from alloy 600. At the same time, the fabricators began to make alloy C-276 valve bodies and stem tips available for sale. This material is known to be superior to the alloy 400 valve bodies and stem tips of the standard UG valves that had already been installed in the CP. A decision was made to purchase alloy C-276 bodies and stem tips and to change out those alloy 400 components that had already been installed. Due to the enormity of this task (both in terms of time and money), it was desirable to determine the longevity of alloy C-276 vs alloy 400 components in a side-by-side comparison. Also of interest was the question of how long the new (all-alloy 600) bellows would last in comparison with the original alloy 600/SS-316 bellows. A basic HF corrosion test was proposed to compare corrosion rates of several high-alloy materials. Because much of the alloy 400 in the system had been gold plated, some gold-plated alloy 400 coupons were included. Due to time and funding limitations, actual CP variables such as temperature and pressure were not duplicated. Instead, a simple partial-immersion test at ambient temperature was conducted. The purpose of this test was to gain information on the rate of corrosion of different alloys in the CP and to attempt to derive some idea of their expected lifetimes in the operating environment.

  9. Corrosion in waste-fired boilers: A thermodynamic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becidan, Michael; Sørum, Lars; Frandsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    A twofold study using thermodynamic equilibrium calculations was carried out to study corrosion in MSW incinerators. Corrosion was associated with the amount of alkalis and trace metals gaseous chlorides. Firstly, a two-level factorial experimental design combined with a data analysis were used...... to determine the main and interaction effects for various alkalis and trace metals gaseous chlorides responses. The factors studied were Na, K, S and Cl concentrations. The results provided a picture of the controlling parameters and insight about the processes taking place. Secondly, the efficiency of two...

  10. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  11. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Research Committee on Water Chemistry Standard; Naitoh, Masanori [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Computational Science and Engineering Div.; Uehara, Yasushi; Okada, Hidetoshi [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Hotta, Koji [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (Japan); Ichikawa, Ryoko [Mizuho Information and Research Inst., Inc. (Japan); Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Hotta, Koji; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion behavior of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Down, M.G.; Matlock, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion program consisted of a multi-disciplinary approach utilizing the liquid lithium test resources and capabilities of several laboratories. Specific concerns associated with the overall objective of materials corrosion behavior were evaluated at each laboratory. Testing conditions included: approx. 3700 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230 0 C to 270 0 C and approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at an isothermal temperature of 270 0 C. Principal areas of investigation, to be discussed here briefly, included lithium corrosion effects on the following: (1) types 304 and 304L austenitic stainless steels, which are specified as reference materials for the FMIT lithium system; (2) type 304 stainless steel weldments (w/type 308 stainless steel filler) typical of specified tube and butt welds in the lithium system design; (3) titanium, zirconium and yttrium, which represent potential hot trap getter materials; (4) BNi4 braze alloy, used as a potential attachement method in the plug/seat fabrication of liquid lithium valves; and (5) type 321 stainless steel bellows, typical of bellows used in potential liquid lithium valve designs

  14. Corrosion behavior of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Down, M.G.; Matlock, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion program consisted of a multi-disciplinary approach utilizing the liquid lithium test resources and capabilities of several laboratories. Specific concerns associated with the overall objective of materials corrosion behavior were evaluated at each laboratory. Testing conditions included: approx. 3700 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/C to 270/sup 0/C and approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at an isothermal temperature of 270/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation, to be discussed here briefly, included lithium corrosion effects on the following: (1) types 304 and 304L austenitic stainless steels, which are specified as reference materials for the FMIT lithium system; (2) type 304 stainless steel weldments (w/type 308 stainless steel filler) typical of specified tube and butt welds in the lithium system design; (3) titanium, zirconium and yttrium, which represent potential hot trap getter materials; (4) BNi4 braze alloy, used as a potential attachement method in the plug/seat fabrication of liquid lithium valves; and (5) type 321 stainless steel bellows, typical of bellows used in potential liquid lithium valve designs.

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDY VIA LINEAR POLARIZATION IN PEAS CAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Costa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the corrosion of tinplate can for peas. Firstly, the characterization of canning solution was made. The values of pH, conductivity, Brix, viscosity, density and content of Fe were, respectively, 5.88; 32.6 mS/cm; 6.6%; 3,42cP; 1.026 g/ml; 12.05 mg/kg. The corrosion rate in the cans was determined by linear polarization technique. The electrodes with and without varnish were analyzed in the first and fifth day of the experiment for the 3 parts of the can. The corrosion rate increased significantly when the coating was removed and the body showed a higher corrosion rate, reaching 1.7 mm/year in the absence of varnish. The microstructure of the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. The increase of iron on the surface, evidenced by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS may have contributed to the corrosion in the samples without varnish.

  16. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  17. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  18. Analysis of corrosion product transport in PWR primary system under non-convective condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1992-02-01

    Product TRANsport), which can predict the corrosion product and radioactivity transport within the primary coolant system, and also can be utilized for the computer simulation with actual plant data of currently operating Korean nuclear power plants to predict the transport of the radionuclides. In this study, the following problems will be updated, improved and compared with the already existing codes: 1) development and analysis of recent mechanistic modelling of corrosion product deposition, 2) application and modification due to the temperature kinetic effect, 3) separation of the effect of Fe, Co, Ni and Mn solubility rather than Fe solubility alone, and 4) consideration of Ni activation and recoil process. By applying the above updated and improved mechanisms, the corrosion product behavior in PWR of currently operating Korean unclear power plants has been simulated. In addition, the evaluation of particulate transport, independent solubility data of major radionuclides and acute nodalization were included and extended. Then, with the developed computer code, we have evaluated and analyzed the activity and corrosion product build-up controlled by many parameters such as pH, composition of metal, and auxiliary system performance

  19. Zoning of Isfahan Drinking Water Distribution Network Corrosion Potential in Summer and Autumn of 2011 Using Geographic Information System (GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Setayesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study has been conducted to determine the corrosion potential of water in Isfahan drinking water distribution system in 2011. Eighty samples during summer and fall 2011(40 samples for each season were collected from different parts of the Isfahan drinking water distribution system. The temperature, calcium hardness, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, and pH were measured. Values of Langelier, Ryznar, Corrosiveness, and Puckorius indexes were calculated. Zoning maps were prepared using ArcGIS 9.3 software. The calculated mean values of Langelier, Ryznar, Corrosiveness, and Puckorius indexes in the summer and fall were (-0.52, 8.83, 10.37, 10.84 and (-0.71, 9.27, 10.94, 10.88, respectively. These results indicated that the Isfahan drinking water based on Langelier, Ryznar, and Puckorius indexes had a corrosive tendency and based on aggressiveness index had a moderate corrosivity potential. The corrosiveness of water may be as a basis for gradual deterioration of water distribution and transmission pipeline systems or as a route for contaminant entrance and finally can cause unhealthy impacts. Therefore, remedial measures are necessary to corrosion control of Isfahan drinking water

  20. Effects of disinfectant and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipes in a reclaimed water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Hu, Xuexiang; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-03-15

    The effects of disinfection and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipe in a model reclaimed water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). The corrosion scales formed under different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the bacterial characteristics of biofilm on the surface were determined using several molecular methods. The corrosion scales from the ARs with chlorine included predominantly α-FeOOH and Fe2O3, while CaPO3(OH)·2H2O and α-FeOOH were the predominant phases after chloramines replaced chlorine. Studies of the consumption of chlorine and iron release indicated that the formation of dense oxide layers and biofilm inhibited iron corrosion, causing stable lower chlorine decay. It was verified that iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) such as Sediminibacterium sp., and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) such as Shewanella sp., synergistically interacted with the corrosion product to prevent further corrosion. For the ARs without disinfection, α-FeOOH was the predominant phase at the primary stage, while CaCO3 and α-FeOOH were predominant with increasing time. The mixed corrosion-inducing bacteria, including the IRB Shewanella sp., the IOB Sediminibacterium sp., and the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) Limnobacter thioxidans strain, promoted iron corrosion by synergistic interactions in the primary period, while anaerobic IRB became the predominant corrosion bacteria, preventing further corrosion via the formation of protective layers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron microscopy studies in a high corrosion resistant Ti-Ta-Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mythili, R.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopy has played an important role in the indigenous development of Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb, an α+β alloy, for reprocessing applications. TEM was used to study the Widmanstatten, martensitic, and the omega phase transformations in the system. A wide spectrum of phase transformations could be introduced into the system, by modifying the composition of the β phase and the cooling rate. PEELS was used to understand the corrosion mechanism, by characterizing the passive film after the corrosion reactions

  2. Stray current vs anodic polarization in reinforced mortar: a comparative study on steel corrosion behaviour in both regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Zhipei; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    Stray current arising from direct current electrified traction systems and then circulat-ing in reinforced concrete structures may initiate corrosion or even accelerate existing corrosion processes on embedded reinforcement. Therefore, stray-current induced corrosion of nearby reinforced concrete

  3. Corrosion behaviour of Arc-PVD coatings and hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, K.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve a comprehensive protective effect against corrosion and wear stresses, coating systems are increasingly being developed, in which there is a separation of the tasks of the coating materials regarding the protective effect. On the one hand, pure PVD coating systems are used, on the other hand hybrid coatings are examined, where galvanic processes are combined with PVD technique. The results of experiments introduced in this article were determined on Arc-PVD coatings. By this process, titanium nitride and chromium nitride coatings are both deposited directly on the basic material and are also deposited as combination coatings of Ti/TiN and chemical nickel/TiN. (orig.) [de

  4. Stem Migration and Fretting Corrosion of the Antirotation Pin in the K2/Apex Hip System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael; Edmondson, Mark; Ebert, Jay; Nivbrant, Nils; Kop, Alan; Wood, David; De Steiger, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Many exchangeable neck hip systems have been withdrawn because of fretting corrosion at the neck/stem coupling. Our prospective randomized study evaluating stem stability (Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and clinical outcomes between the K2/Apex hip systems was ceased early because of a withdrawal of the stems which had an unfavorably high early revision rate reported in the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Registry (9.3% at 3 years). At 2 years, there are no clinical differences between the stems. Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis has identified a high proportion of potentially concerning subsidence and retroversion in both groups, more marked in the K2 stem, although mostly in asymptomatic patients. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry has shown similar bone density around the stems. Retrieval analysis of 3 study patients showed fretting corrosion of the antirotation pin and aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion, with no relationship to bearing type or size. Analysis of 7 further nonstudy K2/Apex stems confirmed similar corrosion. This study shows potentially concerning subsidence of both stems and is the first to describe corrosion at the neck-stem interface and a relationship to metal-related pathology. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemical Contributions to Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Alloy 22 in a Continual Flow System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.; Martin, S.; Masterson, B.; Lian, T.

    1998-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) may decrease the functional lifetime of nuclear waste packaging materials in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. Biochemical contributions to corrosion of package materials are being determined in reactors containing crushed repository-site rock with the endogenous microbial community, and candidate waste package materials. These systems are being continually supplied with simulated ground water. Periodically, bulk chemistries are analyzed on the system outflow, and surfacial chemistries are assessed on withdrawn material coupons. Both Fe and Mn dissolved from C1020 coupons under conditions that included the presence of YM microorganisms. Insoluble corrosion products remained in a reduced state at the coupon surface, indicating at least a localized anoxic condition; soluble reduced Mn and Fe were also detected in solution, while precipitated and spalled products were oxidized. Alloy 22 surfaces showed a layer of chrome oxide, almost certainly in the Cr(III) oxidation state, on microcosm-exposed coupons, while no soluble chrome was detected in solution. The results of these studies will be compared to identical testing on systems containing sterilized rock to generate, and ultimately predict, microbial contributions to waste package corrosion chemistries

  6. An X-ray diffraction study of corrosion products from low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    It was found in earlier work a decrease in the corrosion rate from low carbon steel when it was subjected to the action of a combined pollutant concentration (SO 4 ''2-=10''-4 M+Cl=1.5x 10''-3 M). It was also found that large magnetic content of the rust was related to higher corrosion rates. In the present study corrosion products are further analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction to account for composition changes during the corrosion process. it is found that lepidocrocite and goethite are the dominant components for the short-term corrosion in all batches considered while for log-term corrosion lepidocrite and goethite dominates if the corrosion rates is low and magnetite dominates if the corrosion rate is high. The mechanism for decreasing the corrosion rate is related to the inhibition of magnetite production at this particular concentration. (Author) 15 refs

  7. Evaluation of corrosiveness grade of the main pipeline system within the machine-room of the Cen Juragua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho C, J.; Corvo P, F.

    1998-01-01

    It is realized a study of the corrosion process and the products formed over the carbon steel in different points of the machine-room of the Electronuclear plant of Juragua (Cuba) particularly in the pipelines considering the specific characteristics of corrosion under roof which has been less studied. The determination of corrosiveness grade was carried out by gravimetric methods (lost and gain weight) in the different coats of the machine-room not existing a correlation between them in according to results with those ones obtained by Infrared Spectroscopy, in which there is not a correlation between the band intensities (lepidocrocite/ goethite) and the corrosion; however both explain different parts of corrosive process. Also it is realized the corrosion products analysis by chemical methods and by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, obtaining the concentration of the major anions and cations of importance for the corrosion, not existing a meaning correlation between them and the corrosion velocity by what it was determined the absorption isotherms, obtaining as result a microporous structure in the formed oxides which was capable to retain and to absorb water and pollutants which could be this the main cause of corrosion. By analyzing the high concentration of iron and the low concentration of the remainder anions and cations it is possible to make the traditional chemical washes which are less expensive and greater effectiveness. All the obtained results are very important to assure the conditions of the pipelines systems installed at the presence of Government and Foreign organizations which are interested for the protection and conservation measures in the pipelines system. (Author)

  8. Studies of corrosion morphologies by use of experiments and computer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Terje

    1997-12-31

    CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel is frequently encountered in the oil industry. This thesis studies the morphology of corroded metals and the dynamical evolution of corrosion attacks, especially pits and general corroded fronts, experimentally and by computerized simulation. Two experimental systems of carbon steel in CO{sub 2} bearing waters and aluminium in chloride containing electrolytes were used. Fractal geometry was used in analysing the corrosion patterns and found to be a fruitful technique. The position of the corroding fronts was obtained by destructive methods as well as non-destructive ones. To study fragile corrosion product layers or the corrosion process in situ, a grazing angle lighting technique was developed and found superior to other techniques. A computer model was developed that uses Monte Carlo technique to simulate the generation of localized pits and more general corroded front morphologies. A three-dimensional model and two versions of a two-dimensional model were developed. The three-dimensional model was used to provide incremental data of corroded volume and depth as a function of the simulation time. 185 refs., 97 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-02-15

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine {gamma}-rays and calcium {gamma}-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine {gamma}-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples.

  10. Corrosion control when using passively treated abandoned mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Li, Heng; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-09-01

    Passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of abandoned mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloramine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

  11. corrosion problems and their relationship with the environment in the Colombian productive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyave P, Carlos E; Herrera B, Francisco J; Delgado L, Juan; Cuervo T, Joaquin

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a broad study on the corrosion problems in the Colombian industry, it was included an assessment of the effect of the main corrosive environments (atmosphere, soil, salad and drinking water, and chemicals), on materials stability. On the other hand, the impact of the corrosion processes on the environmental constituents (live species, atmosphere, soil, materials, and water) was also assessed. Main conclusions are: Atmosphere is the more extensively corrosive environment, and, all the environmental constituents are affected by corrosion without significant differences

  12. Damage induced by continued corrosion in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luckovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. After the repair, corrosion of the steel might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell depends on many parameters and is difficult to control, the occurrence of

  13. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Šavija, B.; Ye, G.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; van Breugel, K.

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion

  14. Use of electrochemical techniques to study the corrosion of metals in model fluoride melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, S. [EDF R and D, Département MMC, Groupe Chimie et Corrosion, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing Cedex (France); Cabet, C., E-mail: celine.cabet@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cassayre, L.; Chamelot, P. [Université Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Département Procédés Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Delepech, S. [ENSCP, Laboratoire d’Électrochimie, de Chimie des Interface et Modélisation pour l’Energie, UMR 7575, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75232 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Finne, J. [EDF R and D, Département MMC, Groupe Chimie et Corrosion, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing Cedex (France); Massot, L. [Université Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Département Procédés Electrochimiques, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Noel, D. [EDF R and D, Département MMC, Groupe Chimie et Corrosion, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing Cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    Molten fluorides are appealing coolants for innovative nuclear systems but structural alloys may undergo corrosion at high temperature. Because corrosion primarily occurs via electrochemical reactions, electrochemical techniques are ideal for the study of corrosion thermochemistry and kinetics. Examples are given. An electrochemical series was established using voltammetry in LiF–NaF at 1173 K. Stability increases in the following order: Na, Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo/W, Ag, Au. Various alloys were also classified according to their oxidation resistance. A cathodic protection method was developed to curb the intergranular attack of some nickel alloys in molten LiF–CaF{sub 2}–MgF{sub 2}–ZrF{sub 4} containing tellurium vapor at 953 K. Voltammetry and polarization resistance measurement were used to estimate the rate of chromium selective dissolution for nickel base alloys immersed in LiF–NaF at 1073 K and 1173 K.

  15. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  16. Determination of sulfur isotopic composition for the study of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, in anoxic corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grousset, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this project was to develop a methodology based on the study of the sulfur isotopic composition enabling the determination of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, within the corrosion products layers (CPL). Then, the aim was to apply this methodology to real corrosion systems in order to determine the mechanisms of iron sulfides formation. Sulfur isotopic analyses methodologies, adapted to micrometric iron sulfides layers observed in real corrosion systems, were developed in nanoSIMS and ToF-SIMS. The study of iron sulfides formed in anoxic carbonated medium with or without sulphate-reducing bacteria validated the use of these methods for the determination of iron sulfides origin. The application of these methods coupled with the precise characterization of irons sulfides formed in the real corrosion systems show two kind of corrosion pattern. In pattern 1, the iron sulfides are localized in the external part of the CPL. They result from the Fe 2+ migration from the metal surface to areas rich in biotic S 2- . In this pattern, corrosion rates are lower than 20 μm/year for laboratory systems, and lower than 5 μm/year for archaeological objects. In pattern 2, the large presence of conductive phases in the CPL results in the delocalization of electrons, and so a disequilibrium of the charges at the metal's surface. That leads to the migration of biotic S 2- in the CPL till the metal where they precipitate in iron sulphides. This pattern shows high corrosion rates (∼100 μm/an) that might be resulting from the accumulation of bio-corrosion and chloride corrosion mechanisms. (author) [fr

  17. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  18. Multi-secular corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel in anoxic soils: Characterisation of corrosion system on archaeological artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Dillmann, P.; Foy, E.; Saheb, M.; Dillmann, P.; Matthiesen, H.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of materials behaviour used in the nuclear waste storage, the understanding of iron corrosion mechanisms in anoxic environment is of great importance. Information can be obtained using complementary analytical tools. Interactions between burial soil and archaeological artefacts are studied by performing on site soil measurements. Moreover, archaeological artefacts are studied on transverse sections using a combination of microbeam techniques. The specific interest of this project lies in the study of ferrous thick corrosion layers formed in anoxic environment. (authors)

  19. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., increased shutdown radiation, generation of defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, and increased volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behavior is greatly affected by water quality and differs according to the water quality values and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of the key issues that determine corrosion-related problems, but it is not the only issue. Most corrosion-related phenomena, e.g., flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, the ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. (orig.)

  20. Makeup water system performance and impact on PWR steam generator corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Sawocha, S.G.; Smith, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this EPRI-funded project was to assess the possible relation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator corrosion at fresh water sites to makeup water impurity ingress. Makeup water system design, operation and performance reviews were based on site visits, plant design documents, performance records and grab sample analyses. Design features were assessed in terms of their effect on makeup system performance. Attempts were made to correlate the makeup plant source water, system design characteristics, and typical makeup water qualities to steam generator corrosion observations, particularly intergranular attack (IGA). Direct correlations were not made since many variables are involved in the corrosion process and in the case of IGA, the variables have not been clearly established. However, the study did demonstrate that makeup systems can be a significant source of contaminants that are suspected to lead to both IGA and denting. Additionally, it was noted that typical makeup system performance with respect to organic removal was not good. The role of organics in steam generator damage has not been quantified and may deserve further study

  1. Corrosion studies on casing steel in CO2 storage environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Benedictus, T.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of casing steel N80 in brine plus CO2 was studied in autoclave to simulate the CO2 storage environment. The brine solution used in the study contained 130 g/l NaCl, 22.2 g/l CaCl2 and 4 g/l MgCl2. The CO2 was charged in the autoclave at different pressures (60, 80 and 100 bar)

  2. Erosion-Corrosion Management System for secondary circuits of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butter, L.M.; Zeijseink, A.G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Erosion-corrosion in water steam systems is a corrosion mechanism that may develop undetected and results in unexpected damages. It is well known which chemical and physical parameters play an important role and what areas are usually affected. In order to facilitate this monitoring of Erosion-corrosion (EC) progress, KEMA has by order of the European Union Tacis-programme developed an Erosion-Corrosion Management System (ECMS) to improve control on the erosion-corrosion process, by improved data handling and analysis. This ECMS has been installed at the South Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plant (SUNPP) - VVER-1000. In general, it has been determined that the current ECMS helps by controlling the erosion-corrosion progress. The ECMS presents and analyses the results on an appropriate way. The recommendations are valuable. (R.P.)

  3. An Influence Study of Hydrogen Evolution Characteristics on the Negative Strap Corrosion of Lead Acid Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Guobin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative strap corrosion is an important reason for the failure of valve regulated lead acid battery. This paper selected the Pb-Sb alloy material and Pb-Sn alloy material, made an investigation on the negative corrosion resistance and hydrogen evolution of these two alloy materials by scanning electron microscope analysis, metallographic analysis, chemical study and linear sweep voltammetry, and discussed the influence of lead alloy hydrogen evolution on the negative strap corrosion. The results showed that the hydrogen evolution reaction rates of the alloys had an impact on the corrosion areas with the maximum thickness of the alloys and the depth of corrosion layers. Greater hydrogen evolution reaction rate can lead to shorter distance between the corrosion area with the maximum thickness and the liquid level; whereas the greater corrosion layer thickness can bring aggravated risk of negative strap corrosion failure.

  4. The present and future on surface analysis for corrosion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Surface analysis for corrosion study was reviewed. For the study, the in-situ analysis was desired to describe the real feature. Light i.e., electromagnetic wave from gamma rays to infrared light has been used for the in-situ measurement of the corroded surface, although various ideas should be introduced for the study. For the application of the electromagnetic waves, a suitable window material and a suitable distance between the window and specimen surface depending on the properties of the wave must be selected. Electron spectroscopy including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) is not applicable for the in-situ study and, however, it is very available for the corrosion study from the following points; elemental analysis, state analysis of the element, and microscopic analysis. In future, the tip enhance Raman scattering (TERS) for which the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is combined with the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) may be useful for the in-situ corrosion study. (author)

  5. Long-term prediction of corrosion damage in nuclear waste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidekazu Asano; Feron, Damien; Gens, Robert; Padovani, Cristiano; Naoki Taniguchi

    2014-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: The Fifth International Workshop on Long-Term Prediction of Corrosion Damage in Nuclear Waste Systems was held at the Taisetsu Crystal Hall in Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan from October 6 to 10, 2013, following the four previous successful workshops (Cadarache, France, 2001; Nice, France, 2004; Pennsylvania State University, USA, 2007 and Bruges, Belgium, 2010). It was organised by the Japan Society of Corrosion Engineering (JSCE) and supported by the European Federation of Corrosion (EFC): Nuclear Corrosion Working Party (WP4) as of EFC event No.360. Furthermore, it was supported by the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Environment (NUCE) of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) and The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME). Twenty nine (29) oral presentations were distributed among eleven (11) sessions covering a broad range of subjects. Another twenty eight (28) studies were presented at a poster session. A total of sixty seven (67) participants from twelve (12) countries attended the event. The presentations and the following discussion provided contextual information about the state of some national programmes and covered in detail a range of experimental and modelling studies aimed at evaluating the corrosion behaviour of a range of candidate materials and designs for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes considered across the globe. These included modelling studies aimed at evaluating the durability of container designs for high level waste (HLW), spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and intermediate level waste (ILW), experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of copper, carbon steel, and stainless steel in conditions relevant to storage (atmospheric) or disposal (near neutral or alkaline), as well as studies of archaeological artifacts and natural analogues aimed at supporting long-term predictions. Specific sessions were dedicated to microbial induced corrosion (MIC) and to the corrosion properties of

  6. Catalysis of copper corrosion products on chlorine decay and HAA formation in simulated distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Andrews, Susan A

    2012-05-15

    This study investigated the effect of copper corrosion products, including Cu(II), Cu(2)O, CuO and Cu(2)(OH)(2)CO(3), on chlorine degradation, HAA formation, and HAA speciation under controlled experimental conditions. Chlorine decay and HAA formation were significantly enhanced in the presence of copper with the extent of copper catalysis being affected by the solution pH and the concentration of copper corrosion products. Accelerated chlorine decay and increased HAA formation were observed at pH 8.6 in the presence of 1.0 mg/L Cu(II) compared with that observed at pH 6.6 and pH 7.6. Further investigation of chlorine decay in the presence of both Suwannee River NOM and Cu(II) indicated that an increased reactivity of NOM with dissolved and/or solid surface-associated Cu(II), rather than chlorine auto-decomposition, was a primary reason for the observed rapid chlorine decay. Copper corrosion solids [Cu(2)O, CuO, Cu(2)(OH)(2)CO(3)] exhibited catalytic effects on both chlorine decay and HAA formation. Contrary to the results observed when in the absence of copper corrosion products, DCAA formation was consistently predominant over other HAA species in the presence of copper corrosion products, especially at neutral and high pH. This study improves the understanding for water utilities and households regarding chlorine residuals and HAA concentrations in distribution systems, in particular once the water reaches domestic plumbing where copper is widely used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Positive aspects issued from bio corrosion studies: from hydrogen production to biofuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Munoz, L. de

    2007-12-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion or bio corrosion is a problem that generates heavy global economic losses (several billion euros per year). In spite of the progress made on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms, the complexity of the phenomenon has prevented finding definitive solutions to the problem and continues to inspire many research works. The participation in bio corrosion of catalytic mechanisms induced by weak acids was studied in this work. Another objective of the thesis has been to take advantage from catalytic phenomena found in bio corrosion research to apply them in other areas: energy production with biofuel cells or electrochemical hydrogen production in mild conditions. This work has shown that the presence of weak acids and amino acids inside bio-films could play a major role in steel bio corrosion accelerating the phenomenon through the catalysis of the water reduction reaction. The reversibility of this mechanism, discerned and proved here, could explain the corrosion increase when hydrogen is removed (bacterial consumption, agitation...). In addition, phosphates allow the production of hydrogen by electrolysis in mild pH conditions (pH 4.0 - 8.0) with an equal or better performance than those found in alkaline electrolysis. Finally, industrial materials like stainless steel and titanium could be used in the fabrication of enzymatic electrodes for biosensors or microsystems. The use of the glucose oxidase/glucose system in an aqueous fuel cell with a stainless steel cathode, allows the improvement of the cell performance thanks to the production of hydrogen peroxide that is easily reduced. Moreover, the use of materials with micro-structured surfaces like sandblasted steels deserve to be studied in detail to exploit the remarkable reactivity they present compared to smooth electrodes. (author)

  8. Positive aspects issued from bio-corrosion studies: from hydrogen production to biofuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva Munoz, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion or bio-corrosion is a problem that generates heavy global economic losses (several billion euros per year). In spite of the progress made on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms, the complexity of the phenomenon has prevented finding definitive solutions to the problem and continues to inspire many research works. The participation in bio-corrosion of catalytic mechanisms induced by weak acids was studied in this work. Another objective of the thesis has been to take advantage from catalytic phenomena found in bio corrosion research to apply them in other areas: energy production with biofuel cells or electrochemical hydrogen production in mild conditions. This work has shown that the presence of weak acids and amino acids inside bio films could play a major role in steel bio-corrosion accelerating the phenomenon through the catalysis of the water reduction reaction. The reversibility of this mechanism, discerned and proved here, could explain the corrosion increase when hydrogen is removed (bacterial consumption, agitation...). In addition, phosphates allow the production of hydrogen by electrolysis in mild ph conditions (pH 4.0 - 8.0) with an equal or better performance than those found in alkaline electrolysis. Finally, industrial materials like stainless steel and titanium could be used in the fabrication of enzymatic electrodes for biosensors or microsystems. The use of the glucose oxidase / glucose system in an aqueous fuel cell with a stainless steel cathode, allows the improvement of the cell performance thanks to the production of hydrogen peroxide that is easily reduced. Moreover, the use of materials with micro-structured surfaces like sandblasted steels deserve to be studied in detail to exploit the remarkable reactivity they present compared to smooth electrodes. (author) [fr

  9. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  10. Modern techniques for studying biofilm-influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, I.B.

    1998-01-01

    In natural and made-made environments the presence of biofilms on surfaces of metals and their alloys influences electrochemistry at the biofilm/substratum interface, enhancing or inhibiting corrosion reactions. Due to the complexity of the biocorrosion phenomenon a range of techniques is commonly employed to study mechanisms involved. In addition to traditional methods of corrosion investigation such as electrochemical measurements and light and scanning electron microscopy observations coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Modern techniques of surface science proved to be very useful in elucidating biofilm/metal interactions. Recent applications of Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to biocorrosion studies allowed better understanding of the biologically influenced metal deterioration process. The scope and promise of these latter techniques will be discussed and their use illustrated on practical examples. (Author)

  11. Corrosion and Corrosion-Fatigue Behavior of 7075 Aluminum Alloys Studied by In Situ X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, Tyler

    7XXX Aluminum alloys have high strength to weight ratio and low cost. They are used in many critical structural applications including automotive and aerospace components. These applications frequently subject the alloys to static and cyclic loading in service. Additionally, the alloys are often subjected to aggressive corrosive environments such as saltwater spray. These chemical and mechanical exposures have been known to cause premature failure in critical applications. Hence, the microstructural behavior of the alloys under combined chemical attack and mechanical loading must be characterized further. Most studies to date have analyzed the microstructure of the 7XXX alloys using two dimensional (2D) techniques. While 2D studies yield valuable insights about the properties of the alloys, they do not provide sufficiently accurate results because the microstructure is three dimensional and hence its response to external stimuli is also three dimensional (3D). Relevant features of the alloys include the grains, subgrains, intermetallic inclusion particles, and intermetallic precipitate particles. The effects of microstructural features on corrosion pitting and corrosion fatigue of aluminum alloys has primarily been studied using 2D techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) surface analysis along with post-mortem SEM fracture surface analysis to estimate the corrosion pit size and fatigue crack initiation site. These studies often limited the corrosion-fatigue testing to samples in air or specialized solutions, because samples tested in NaCl solution typically have fracture surfaces covered in corrosion product. Recent technological advancements allow observation of the microstructure, corrosion and crack behavior of aluminum alloys in solution in three dimensions over time (4D). In situ synchrotron X-Ray microtomography was used to analyze the corrosion and cracking behavior of the alloy in four dimensions to elucidate crack initiation at corrosion pits

  12. Feasibility Study of Non-Destructive Techniques to Measure Corrosion in SAVY Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Matthew Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Stainless Steel SAVY containers are used to transport and store nuclear material. They are prone to interior corrosion in the presence of certain chemicals and a low-oxygen environment. SAVY containers also have relatively thin walls to reduce their weight, making their structural integrity more vulnerable to the effects of corrosion. A nondestructive evaluation system that finds and monitors corrosion within containers in use would improve safety conditions and preclude hazards. Non-destructive testing can determine whether oxidation or corrosion is occurring inside the SAVY containers, and there are a variety of non-destructive testing methods that may be viable. The feasibility study described will objectively decide which method best fits the requirements of the facility and the problem. To improve efficiency, the containers cannot be opened during the non-destructive examination. The chosen technique should also be user-friendly and relatively quick to apply. It must also meet facility requirements regarding wireless technology and maintenance. A feasibility study is an objective search for a new technology or product to solve a particular problem. First, the design, technical, and facility feasibility requirements are chosen and ranked in order of importance. Then each technology considered is given a score based upon a standard ranking system. The technology with the highest total score is deemed the best fit for a certain application.

  13. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-09-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  14. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  15. Studies on plant extracts as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in air saturated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Daud; Abdul Razak Daud; Zainal Abidin Sidi

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness in inhibiting corrosion by garlic, soya bean, and tobacco extracts and their combinations in air saturated water at ambient temperature were studied by using electrochemical corrosion test. The range of inhibitor concentration studied was from 0.1 to 1.0 g/l. The variations of corrosion potential and corrosion current density was recorded and the results showed that the extracts have inhibitive properties in the corrosion of mild stee. The effectiveness of the inhibitors is in the following order: extract mixture > tobacco > garlic > soya bean extracts. (author)

  16. FEBEX Project Post-mortem Analysis: Corrosion Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madina, V.; Azkarate, I.

    2004-01-01

    The partial dismantling of the FEBEX in situ test was carried out during de summer of 2002, following 5 years of continuous heating. The operation included the demolition of the concrete plug and the removal of the section of the test corresponding to the first heater. A large number of samples from all types of materials have been taken during the dismantling for subsequent analysis. Part of the samples collected were devoted to the analysis of the corrosion processes occurred during the first operational phase of the test. These samples comprised corrosion coupons from different metals installed for that purpose, sensors retrieved during the dismantling that were found severely corroded and bentonite in contact with those sensors. In addition, a corrosion study was performed on the heater extracted and on one section of liner surrounding it. All the analyses were carried out by the Fundacion INASMET (Spain). This report describes, in detail the studies carried out the different materials and the obtained results, as well as the drawn conclusions. (Author)

  17. Corrosion cast study of the canine hepatic veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uršič, M; Vrecl, M; Fazarinc, G

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed description of the distribution, diameters and drainage patterns of hepatic veins on the basis of the corrosion cast analysis in 18 dogs. We classified the hepatic veins in three main groups: the right hepatic veins of the caudate process and right lateral liver lobe, the middle hepatic veins of the right medial and quadrate lobes and the left hepatic veins of both left liver lobes and the papillary process. The corrosion cast study showed that the number of the veins in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and most anatomical textbooks is underestimated. The number of various-sized hepatic veins of the right liver division ranged from 3 to 5 and included 1 to 4 veins from the caudate process and 2 to 4 veins from the right lateral liver lobe. Generally, in all corrosion casts, one middle-sized vein from the right part of the right medial lobe, which emptied separately in the caudal vena cava, was established. The other vein was a large-sized vein from the remainder of the central division, which frequently joined the common left hepatic vein from the left liver lobes. The common left hepatic vein was the largest of all the aforementioned hepatic veins.

  18. FEBEX Project Post-mortem Analysis: Corrosion Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madina, V.; Azkarate, I.

    2004-07-01

    The partial dismantling of the FEBEX in situ test was carried out during de summer of 2002, following 5 years of continuous heating. The operation included the demolition of the concrete plug and the removal of the section of the test corresponding to the first heater. A large number of samples from all types of materials have been taken during the dismantling for subsequent analysis. Part of the samples collected were devoted to the analysis of the corrosion processes occurred during the first operational phase of the test. These samples comprised corrosion coupons from different metals installed for that purpose, sensors retrieved during the dismantling that were found severely corroded and bentonite in contact with those sensors. In addition, a corrosion study was performed on the heater extracted and on one section of liner surrounding it. All the analyses were carried out by the Fundacion INASMET (Spain). This report describes, in detail the studies carried out the different materials and the obtained results, as well as the drawn conclusions. (Author)

  19. Tank vent processing system having a corrosion preventive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Shoichi; Sato, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion of a tank vent processing device by injecting an oxygen gas. Constitution: Oxygen gas and phosphorous at high temperature are poured into a tank vent processing device and amorphous oxide layers optimum to the prevention of external corrosion are formed to the inner surface of the device. Since the corrosion preventive device using the oxygen gas injection can be constituted as a relatively simple device, it is more economical than constituting a relatively large tank vent processing device with corrosion resistant stainless steels. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Smart aircraft fastener evaluation (SAFE) system: a condition-based corrosion detection system for aging aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Seifert, Greg; Paul, Clare A.

    1996-05-01

    The smart aircraft fastener evaluation (SAFE) system is an advanced structural health monitoring effort to detect and characterize corrosion in hidden and inaccessible locations of aircraft structures. Hidden corrosion is the number one logistics problem for the U.S. Air Force, with an estimated maintenance cost of $700M per year in 1990 dollars. The SAFE system incorporates a solid-state electrochemical microsensor and smart sensor electronics in the body of a Hi-Lok aircraft fastener to process and autonomously report corrosion status to aircraft maintenance personnel. The long-term payoff for using SAFE technology will be in predictive maintenance for aging aircraft and rotorcraft systems, fugitive emissions applications such as control valves, chemical pipeline vessels, and industrial boilers. Predictive maintenance capability, service, and repair will replace the current practice of scheduled maintenance to substantially reduce operational costs. A summary of the SAFE concept, laboratory test results, and future field test plans is presented.

  1. Ballast Water Treatment Corrosion Scoping Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    NANPCA Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act NaCl Sodium Chloride NIOZ Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee NISA National...Based Testing Report on the Ecochlor System performed by Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee (NIOZ) (Veldhuis, 2008), ballast water treated...and the Relevant IMO Guideline. Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee (NIOZ). Den Burg: Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research. Volkening

  2. Corrosion studies on HGW-canister materials for marine disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Bland, I.D.; Marsh, G.P.

    1984-07-01

    A combination of mathematical modelling and experimental studies has been used to investigate and assess the long term corrosion behaviour of heat generating waste canister/ overpack materials under conditions relevant to deep ocean disposal. Preliminary operation of the model, using improved electrochemical kinetic data from the experimental programme, has indicated that the general corrosion rate of carbon steel at 90 deg C will be 57 μm yr -1 which is equivalent to a metal loss of 57 mm in 1000 years. This prediction compares favourably with the results from long term tests, which are also in progress, for plain and electron beam welded carbon steel specimens embedded in marine sediment at 90 deg C under active dissolution conditions. Tests with γ-radiation at a dose rate of 1.5 x 10 5 R h -1 have shown that the pH of seawater falls to 3.7 after 5000 hours exposure causing a significant increase in the corrosion rate of carbon steel from 50 to 80 μm yr -1 . Further work is in progress to investigate the mechanism of this acidification and whether it also occurs at the more realistic lower radiation dose rates. (author)

  3. Hot corrosion studies on nickel-based alloys containing silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, T.W.; Simkovich, G.

    1976-01-01

    Alloys of Ni--Cr, Ni--Si and Ni--Cr--Si were oxidized and ''hot corroded'' in pure oxygen at 1000 0 C. In the oxidation experiments it was found that small amounts of either chromium or silicon in nickel increased the oxidation rates in comparison to pure nickel in accord with Wagner's parabolic oxidation theory. At high concentrations of the alloying elements the oxidation rates decreased due to the formation of oxide phases other than nickel oxide in the scale. Hot corrosion experiments were conducted on both binary and ternary alloys by oxidizing samples coated with 1.0 mg/cm 2 of Na 2 SO 4 in oxygen at 1000 0 C. In general it was found that high chromium and high silicon alloys displayed excellent resistance to the hot corrosion process gaining or losing less than 0.5 mg/cm 2 in 1800 min at temperature. Microprobe and x-ray diffraction studies of the alloy and the scale indicate that amorphous SiO 2 probably formed to aid in retarding both the oxidation and the hot corrosion process

  4. A study on corrosive behavior of spring steel by shot-peening process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening on the corrosion was investigated on spring steel immersed in 3.5% NaCl. The immersion test was performed on the two kinds of specimens. Corrosion potential, polarization curve, residual stress and etc. were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated. In case of corrosion potential, shot peened specimen shows more activated negative direction as compared with parent metal. Surface of specimen, which is treated with the shot peened, is placed as more activated state against inner base metal. It can cause the anti-corrosion effect on the base metal

  5. Electrochemical study of corrosion inhibition of stainless steel in phosphoric medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnini, K.; Chtaini, A. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Bio Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Khouili, M.; Elbouadili, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Analytique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of metals represents a terrible waste of both natural resources and money, the failure of some stainless steel resulting from pitting corrosion is some times considered a technological problem, consequently, much effort has been expended in attempting to understand and overcome the corrosion therefore, many stainless steel/ environment combinations have been studied. The use of heterocyclic compounds as inhibitors is one of the most practical methods for protection against corrosion in acidic media. In continuation of our work on development of macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors we report in our study the corrosion inhibiting behaviour of organic compound Methoxy-2-Allyl-4 Phenol (MAP) containing coordinating and conjugation groups, at three forms (natural, polymerized and chemically treated) on the corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid. This study focused on the comparison for corrosion inhibition proprieties of these different applications using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and SEM. The specimen was evaluated to determine change in his corrosion potential and resistance polarization; These MAP products have exhibited corrosion inhibition by maintaining a high resistance polarization (low corrosion rate) in each application. These results reveal that this compound is efficient inhibitor in all forms; the most inhibition efficiency is obtained with polymerized form. To further evaluate the test data, the steel surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, SEM observations of surface treated concrete confirmed presence of inhibitor on the steel surfaces. (authors)

  6. Corrosion studies of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in aqueous lithium bromide solution at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Lopez Nuevalos, S.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of three stainless steels EN 14311, EN 14429 (austenitic stainless steels) and EN 14462 (duplex stainless steel) was studied in a commercial LiBr solution (850 g/l LiBr solution containing chromate as inhibitor) at different temperatures (25, 50, 75 and 85 deg C) by electrochemical methods. Open circuit potentials shifted towards more active values as temperature increased, while corrosion potentials presented the opposite tendency. The most resistant alloys to general corrosion were EN 14429 and EN 14462 because they had the lowest corrosion current for all temperatures. In all the cases corrosion current increases with temperature. Pitting corrosion resistance is improved by the EN 14462, which presented the highest pitting potential, and the lowest passivation current for the whole range of temperatures studied. The duplex alloy also presents the worst repassivation behavior (in terms of the narrowest difference between corrosion potential and pitting potential); it does not repassivate from 50 deg C

  7. Assessment of corrosion in the flue gas cleaning system using on-line monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vendelbo Nielsen, Lars; Berggreen Petersen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Amager unit 1 is a 350 MW multifuel suspension-fired plant commissioned in 2009 to fire biomass (straw and wood pellets). Increasing corrosion problems in the flue gas cleaning system were observed in the gas-gas preheater (GAFO), the booster fan and flue gas ducts. Chlorine containing corrosion ...

  8. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in the service water system of a test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subba Rao, T.; Venugopalan, V.P.; Nair, K.V.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the biofouling and corrosion problems in the service water system of a test reactor. Results of microbiological, electron microscopic and chemical analyses of water and deposit samples indicate the role of bacteria in the corrosion process. The primary role played by iron oxidising bacteria is emphasised. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Simulation of Deposition the Corrosion Waste in a Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peráčková Jana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In water distribution systems can be found particles of rust and other mechanical contaminants. The particles are deposited in locations where the low velocity of water flow. Where a can cause the pitting corrosion. Is a concern in the systems made of galvanized steel pipes. The contribution deals with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of water flow and particles deposition in water distribution system. CFD Simulations were compared with the corrosive deposits in real pipeline. Corrosion is a spontaneous process of destruction of metal material due to electrochemical reactions of metal with the aggressive surrounding. Electrochemical corrosion is caused by the thermodynamic instability of metal and therefore can not be completely suppress, it can only influence the speed of corrosion. The requirement is to keep metal properties during the whole its lifetime. Requested service lifetime the water pipe according to EN 806-2 is 50 years.

  10. Corrosion caused by elevator and spider marks on CRA pipe: Comparison of conventional inserts and a new gripping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant alloys (CRA) are used to reduce corrosion damage to casing and tubing strings and prolong the life span of the well pipe. An analysis of various corrosion mechanisms shows that surface integrity is an important factor in corrosion prevention. Surface damage caused by inappropriate handling or conventional slip markings contribute directly to the development and propagation of corrosion. A newly developed gripping system distributes the load equally onto a large number of small peaks, minimizing the indentation of each single peak. The new gripping system does not damage the surface integrity of the pipe, virtually eliminating the corrosion potential.

  11. A corrosion detection system for buried pipeline (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Gu

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a new corrosion sensor for detecting and monitoring the corrosion of buried pipeline, the electrochemical property of sensors and the correlation of its output to corrosion rate of steel pipe, were evaluated by electrochemical methods in synthetic groundwater, two soils of varying resistivity (5,000 ohm-cm, 10,000 ohm-cm), and synthetic tap water. In this paper, two types of electrochemical probes were used: galvanic cells containing of pipeline steel-copper and pipeline steel-stainless steel (Type 304). The results of EIS measurement indicated that the sensor current was inversely related to sensor resistance, which was governed by the corrosion behavior of cathode. In galvanic corrosion tests, the galvanic current of Cu-CS probe was higher than that of SS-CS probe. The comparison of the sensor output and corrosion rates revealed that a linear relationship was found between the probe current and the corrosion rates. A good linear quantitative relationship was found between the Cu-CS probe current and the corrosion rate of pipeline steel coupons in the soil resistivity of 5,000 ohm-cm, and synthetic tap water. In the case of the soil resistivity of 10,000 ohm-cm, although the SS-CS probe showed a better linear correlation than that of Cu-CS probe, the Cu-CS probe is more suitable than SS-CS probe, due to the high current output

  12. Studies on broad spectrum corrosion resistant oxide coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Corrosion resistant coating materials and their application ... technology demand such corrosion resistant coatings having a ... mill additives used are as follows: China clay, 3⋅0–10⋅0; .... stage involves modification in processing of the deve-.

  13. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: a microscale study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of concrete cracking upon reinforcement corrosion is complex. Cracks allow fast penetration of chlorides, potentially leading to a shorter initiation period of reinforcement corrosion. Structural regulations control acceptable crack width values based on the exposure class of the

  14. The Behavior of Corrosion Products in Sampling Systems under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, Hans-Peter

    1977-08-15

    A high pressure loop has been used to simulate sampling systems employed under BWR conditions. The reliability of the sampling method was studied in a series of six test runs. A variety of parameters that are thought to influence the reliability of the sampling was investigated. These included piping geometry, water oxygen content, flow, temperature and temperature gradients. Amongst other things the results indicate that the loss by deposition of iron containing corrosion products does not exceed 50 %; this figure is only influenced to a minor extent by the above mentioned parameters. The major part of the corrosion products thus deposited is found along the first few meters of the piping and cooler coil. A moderate prolongation of a pipe which is already relatively long should thus be incapable of producing a major influence on the sampling error

  15. Autoradiographic study of corrosion of refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisenenkova, S.B.; Kucheryavyi, M.N.; Bursteva, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the character of the interaction between a container-glass melt consisting of sodium calcium silicate and refractories in various furnace sections using an autoradiographic method. Static tests were conducted on specimens of the following refractories: chrome-aluminum-zircon, Bakor 41, corundum, a high alumina refractory, and a refractory based on tin dioxide. The specimens were activated by calcium 45. Autoradiography and photomicrography indicated that an intrinsic feature of all refractories was that calcium from the melt penetrated the refractories along the weak link; for fused-cast refractories, the glass phase; and for sintered refractories, through the binder and cracks

  16. Study on corrosion products from ear piercing studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogero, Sizue O.; Costa, Isolda; Saiki, Mitiko

    2000-01-01

    In this work instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to analyse elemental composition of commercial gold coated ear piercing substrate and metals present in their corrosion products. The cytotoxic effect was also verified in these corrosion product extracts, probably, due to the lixiviation of Ni present in high quantity in their substrates. The analysis of gold coated ear piercing surfaces by scanning electron microscopy before and after the corrosion test showed coating defects and the occurrence of corrosion process. (author)

  17. Study on Corrosion of Materials by Fluoric Acid and Silicofluoric Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kun You; Kwon, Yeong Soo; Kuk, Myung Ho; Kim, Myun Sup

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion properties of 304 Stainless steel, Cupro-nickel, NiCrMo alloy in hydrofluoric acid and silicofluoric acid has been studied. The corrosion resistance of NiCrMo alloy and Cupro-nickel in hydrofluoric acid or mixed acid of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acid is excellent. Because of lower corrosion resistance of 304 Stainless steel, it would not be used for these corrosion resistant materials. The corrosion activation energy of 304 Stainless steel, Cupro-nickel and NiCrMo alloy in 40% HF solution are 42.7, 58.9 and 89.7 kJ/mol, respectively. By these values, it is assumed that the corrosion rate determining step is the chemical reaction on surface of metals. In the plastics, Teflon and polychloro tetrafluoroethylene are most excellent for corrosion resistance in hydrofluoric acid

  18. Characteristics of iron corrosion scales and water quality variations in drinking water distribution systems of different pipe materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manjie; Liu, Zhaowei; Chen, Yongcan; Hai, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Interaction between old, corroded iron pipe surfaces and bulk water is crucial to the water quality protection in drinking water distribution systems (WDS). Iron released from corrosion products will deteriorate water quality and lead to red water. This study attempted to understand the effects of pipe materials on corrosion scale characteristics and water quality variations in WDS. A more than 20-year-old hybrid pipe section assembled of unlined cast iron pipe (UCIP) and galvanized iron pipe (GIP) was selected to investigate physico-chemical characteristics of corrosion scales and their effects on water quality variations. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze micromorphology and chemical composition of corrosion scales. In bench testing, water quality parameters, such as pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, color, Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ and Zn 2+ , were determined. Scale analysis and bench-scale testing results demonstrated a significant effect of pipe materials on scale characteristics and thereby water quality variations in WDS. Characteristics of corrosion scales sampled from different pipe segments show obvious differences, both in physical and chemical aspects. Corrosion scales were found highly amorphous. Thanks to the protection of zinc coatings, GIP system was identified as the best water quality stability, in spite of high zinc release potential. It is deduced that the complicated composition of corrosion scales and structural break by the weld result in the diminished water quality stability in HP system. Measurement results showed that iron is released mainly in ferric particulate form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel; Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois

    2014-01-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C 4 H 10 + H 2 + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  20. Effects of sulfate on heavy metal release from iron corrosion scales in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    Trace heavy metals accumulated in iron corrosion scales within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) could potentially be released to bulk water and consequently deteriorate the tap water quality. The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate the release of trace heavy metals in DWDS under changing source water conditions. Experimental pipe loops with different iron corrosion scales were set up to simulate the actual DWDS. The effects of sulfate levels on heavy metal release were systemically investigated. Heavy metal releases of Mn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Cr and As could be rapidly triggered by sulfate addition but the releases slowly decreased over time. Heavy metal release was more severe in pipes transporting groundwater (GW) than in pipes transporting surface water (SW). There were strong positive correlations (R 2  > 0.8) between the releases of Fe and Mn, Fe and Ni, Fe and Cu, and Fe and Pb. When switching to higher sulfate water, iron corrosion scales in all pipe loops tended to be more stable (especially in pipes transporting GW), with a larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe 3 O 4 ) and fewer unstable compounds (β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, FeCO 3 and amorphous iron oxides). The main functional iron reducing bacteria (IRB) communities were favorable for the formation of Fe 3 O 4 . The transformation of corrosion scales and the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) accounted for the gradually reduced heavy metal release with time. The higher metal release in pipes transporting GW could be due to increased Fe 6 (OH) 12 CO 3 content under higher sulfate concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  2. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, Frederic; Tamalis, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t 1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β - = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99 Tc ( 99 Tc → 99 Ru + β - ). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the nature of Tc in metallic spent fuel. Computational modeling

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poineau, Frederic [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Tamalis, Dimitri [Florida Memorial Univ., Miami Gardens, FL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The isotope 99Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β⁻ = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99Tc (99Tc → 99Ru + β⁻). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the

  4. Development of corrosion condition sensing and monitoring system using radio-frequency identification devices (RFID) : progress report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.P.; Li, J.; Liu, P.; Bibby, D.; Zheng, W.; Lo, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2008-12-15

    The development of a corrosion severity monitoring system that used radio-frequency identification device (RIFD) technology was discussed. A corrosion monitoring sensor was integrated with a tag modified to partially block the radio frequency signal. The metallic coating caused a frequency shift of the device's reader antenna in order to allow for the accurate characterization of metal coatings. Communications between the tag and the reader were re-established as the corrosion process gradually deteriorated the coating. The method was tested experimentally with 3 RFID systems using both active and passive tags were assembled. A passive tag was covered in aluminum foil. Results of the experiment showed that the metallic coating interfered with RFID signals. A cold-spray technology was used to coat tags with metal alloys. The surface morphology of the coatings was tested to determine optimum coating parameters. Further studies are being conducted to develop software for the technology. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Novel electrochemical approach to study corrosion mechanism of Al-Au wire-bond pad interconnections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elisseeva, O. V.; Bruhn, A.; Cerezo, J.

    2013-01-01

    A gold-aluminium material combination is typically employed as an interconnection for microelectronic devices. One of the reliability risks of such devices is that of corrosion of aluminium bond pads resulting from the galvanic coupling between an aluminium bond pad and a gold wire. The research...... presented in this manuscript focuses on studying bond pad corrosion by selecting an appropriate model system and a dedicated set of electrochemical and analytical experimental tools. Taking into account the complex three-dimensional structure and the small dimensions of Au-Al interconnections (around 50......-100 μm), a dedicated and novel experimental approach was developed. Au-Al covered silicon chips were developed under clean room conditions. Three-dimensional electrodes were mimicked as flat, two-dimensional bond pad model systems, allowing the use of microelectrochemical local probe techniques. Thin...

  6. Environmentally safe system for treatment of bio corrosion of ETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarovičová Katarína

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of microorganisms on building facades are responsible for aesthetic, bio-geophysical and biogeochemical deterioration. The process of cleaning of contaminated facades involves the removal and eradication of micro flora on the surface of insulation using chemical products, killing cells and eliminating all living mass, including organic ingredients. The removal of bio corrosion coating from ETICS structure by means of chemical and preservative substances (biocides is currently the only effective and most used technology. Uncontrolled leaching of the used biocides is unacceptable. Meantime, new technology for environmentally safe maintenance of ETICS is needed. Scientists have been working on replacement the biocides currently used in facades treatment with eco-friendly biocides that have no negative effects on the environment or human beings. While the eco- treatment will be available, safe dewatering of chemicals being leached from the surface of the facade could be provided by e.g. special drain systems adjusted to the building type, use and age. The paper gives an overview of the problem in context of Slovakia and examples of leaching systems designed for new and renovated buildings.

  7. Corrosion of alloys of the niobium--titanium--aluminium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, V.V.; Alekseeva, E.L.; Dontsov, S.N.; Moiseeva, I.S.

    The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of niobium--titanium--aluminum alloys in 20 percent HCl and 40--75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 40 and 100 0 C are considered. Current density vs potential and corrosion rate vs potential potentiostatic curves plotted in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C for the alloys with different titanium contents at a constant content of aluminum and also for alloys with a constant titanium content at different contents of aluminum are given. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of the alloys in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C is an exponential function of the atomic content of the alloying components (Ti, Al) in them; aluminum vitiates the corrosion resistance very strongly

  8. Development of the mitigation method for carbon steel corrosion with ceramics in PWR secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masato; Shibasaki, Osamu; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji

    2012-09-01

    To verify the effect of depositing ceramic (TiO 2 , La 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 ) on carbon steel to mitigate corrosion, corrosion tests were conducted under simulated chemistry conditions in a PWR secondary system. Test specimens (STPT410) were prepared with and without deposited ceramics. The ceramics were deposited on the specimens under high-temperature and high-pressure water conditions. Corrosion tests were conducted under high pH conditions (9.8) with a flow rate of 1.0-4.7 m/s at 185 deg. C for 200 hours. At a flow rate of 1.0 m/s, the amount of corrosion of the specimens with the ceramics was less than half of that of the specimens without the ceramics. As the flow rate increased, the amount of corrosion increased. However, even at a flow rate of 4.7 m/s, the amount of corrosion was reduced by approximately 30% by depositing the ceramics. After the corrosion tests, the surfaces of the specimens were analyzed with SEM and XRD. When the deposited ceramic was TiO 2 , the surface was densely covered with fine particles (less than 1 μm). From XRD analysis, these particles were identified as ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ). We consider that ilmenite may play an important role in mitigating the corrosion of carbon steel. (authors)

  9. Corrosion critique of the 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel for LMFBR steam generation system applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zima, G.E.

    1977-07-01

    The unstabilized ferritic steel of nominal composition, 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo, has been proposed for critical structural assignments in LMFBR powerplants, specifically: the tubing, tubesheet and shell of the evaporator and superheater components. The interest in this steel has been based on a presumably favorable general corrosion property spectrum, acceptable mechanical properties and fabricability, and certain economies associated with the low alloy content. This report is an attempt at a general corrosion assessment for the 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel and an identification of corrosion problem areas potential to this steel from the sodium and water/steam systems of the proposed working environment. There is a considerable area of uncertainty in the sodium-side response of 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel, centered in the loss and redisposition of carbon during long-term exposure to sodium of various impurity backgrounds. It is submitted that present evidence relating to the water/steam-side corrosion behavior of the 2 1 / 4 Cr-1Mo steel, under nominal and conceivable perturbed environmental conditions, constitutes the principal concern for the proposed LMFBR powerplant applications of this steel. It is suggested that this unfavorable corrosion aspect represents an inherent limitation of the low alloy content of this steel, probably largely independent of melting and processing recourses, and it is a sufficient basis to question the incentive for a continuation of the collateral studies of this steel for the proposed LMFBR steam generation system assignments

  10. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion in Copper and Nickel Seawater Piping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Influenced Tipton, D. G. and Kain, R. M. 1980. Effect of temperature onCorosiope in Nuclear Power Plants atudy a Mical Gnuide the resistance to pitting of...Monel alloy 400 in seawater. In:Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants anda Practical ie fr Proceedings of Corrosion 󈨔. Chicago, Illinois: National...Sons Ltd. 441 pp. Quimica . Verink, E.D. and Pourbaix, M. 1971. Use of electrochemical Pope, D. H., Duquette, D. J., Johannes, A. H., and Wayner

  11. Natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors for highly cycled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. [Corrosion Research Lab., Aligarh (India)

    1999-11-01

    Strict environmental legislations have led to the development of green inhibitors in recent years. In continuation of the authors` research work on development of green inhibitors, they have investigated the aqueous extracts of three plants namely: Azadirachta indica, Punica Granatum and Momordica charantia as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 3% NaCl using weight loss and electrochemical methods. All the investigated compounds exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition properties comparable to that of HEDP. Azadirachta showed better scale inhibition effect than HEDP.

  12. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  13. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  14. Investigation of corrosion experienced in a spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, R.D.; Mellinger, G.B.; Miller, F.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Bjorklund, W.J.

    1980-08-01

    After periodic testing of a large-scale spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system over a 2-yr period, sufficient corrosion was noted on various parts of the vitrification system to warrant its disassembly and inspection. A majority of the 316 SS sintered metal filters on the spray calciner were damaged by chemical corrosion and/or high temperature oxidation. Inconel-601 portions of the melter lid were attacked by chlorides and sulfates which volatilized from the molten glass. The refractory blocks, making up the walls of the melter, were attacked by the waste glass. This attack was occurring when operating temperatures were >1200 0 C. The melter floor was protected by a sludge layer and showed no corrosion. Corrosion to the Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal, and no corrosion was noted in the offgas treatment system downstream of the sintered metal filters. It is believed that most of the melter corrosion occurred during one specific operating period when the melter was operated at high temperatures in an attempt to overcome glass foaming behavior. These high temperatures resulted in a significant release of volatile elements from the molten glass, and also created a situation where the glass was very fluid and convective, which increased the corrosion rate of the refractories. Specific corrosion to the calciner components cannot be proven to have occurred during a specific time period, but the mechanisms of attack were all accelerated under the high-temperature conditions that were experienced with the melter. A review of the materials of construction has been made, and it is concluded that with controlled operating conditions and better protection of some materials of construction corrosion of these systems will not cause problems. Other melter systems operating under similar strenuous conditions have shown a service life of 3 yr

  15. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of phase composition on the corrosion properties of alloys of the magnesium-yttrium system in neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoyarskii, V.V.; Petrova, L.M.; Dobatkina, T.V.; Korol'kova, I.G.

    1992-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of phase composition on the corrosive dissolution of binary alloys of the system magnesium-8.2% yttrium. It is shown that the appearance of the intermetallide Mg 24 Y 5 - being the effective cathode - intensifies self-dissolution of the alloy under conditions of anodic galvanostatic polarization

  17. Nuclear risk reduction study. The study of structure corrosion caused by sea salt aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayasu, Fumio

    2008-01-01

    Present all nuclear power plants in Fukui prefecture are located at the bay side of Japan Sea coast. New facilities may be planed to be at ocean side. The sea salt corrosion at the ocean side should be larger than it at the bay side. We have the salt damage experimental yard at Awara sea coast and at Fukui city (about 15km from coast) for the corrosion comparison study between Japan Sea coast and inland. We confirm the amounts of sea salt aerosol vary among the season and year. The weight loss of specimen inside of shelter without filter is higher than both of sheltered with filter and inland specimen. The weight loss of specimen inside of shelter with filter is almost same as it of inland specimen. We confirmed the filter which we used is sufficient capability to prevent corrosion. We confirmed the corrosion rate of both opened specimen and sheltered specimen without filter increased after some periods. (author)

  18. Study on corrosion of carbon steel in DEA aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun Han; Xie, Jia Lin; Zhang, Li

    2018-02-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel in the CO2 capture process using diethanolamine (DEA) aqueous solutions was investigated. The effects of the mass concentrations of DEA, solution temperature and CO2 loading on the corrosion rate of carbon steel were demonstrated. The experimental results provided comprehensive information on the appropriate concentration range of DEA aqueous solutions under which low corrosion of carbon steel can be achieved.

  19. Nondestructive study of corrosion by the analysis of diffused light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogert, Elsa N.; Landau, Monica R.; Marengo, Jose A.; Ruiz Gale, Maria F.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Paiva, Raul D., Jr.; Soga, Diogo; Muramatsu, Mikiya

    1999-07-01

    This work describes the application of mean intensity diffusion analysis to detect and analyze metallic corrosion phenomena. We present some new results in the characterization of the corrosion process using a model based in electroerosion phenomena. Valuable information is provided about surface microrelief changes, which is also useful for numerous engineering applications. The quality of our results supports the idea that this technique can contribute to a better analysis of corrosion processes, in particular in real time.

  20. Corrosion products study of alcohol by Mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, R.; Gil de Larre, M.

    1995-01-01

    Simulated corrosion essays in alcohol is presented and corrosion products of storage tanks (CAPASA) were analyzed. The analysis by Mossbauer absortion and transmission spectroscopy shows the formation of hematite substratum in the rust of the storage tanks of carburetant and burning alcohol. In the sample of corrosion with strong rum shows the formation of lepidocrocite and with destilled water besides of lepidocrocite, magnetite (Fe3 O4) is detected

  1. On LMFBR corrosion. Part II: Consideration of the in-reactor fuel-cladding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Walker, C.T.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1976-05-01

    The scientific and technological aspects of LMFBR cladding corrosion are discussed in detail. Emphasis is placed on the influence of the irradiation environment and the effect of fuel and filler-gas impurities on the corrosion process. These studies are complemented by a concise review of out-of-pile simulation experiments that endeavour to clarify the role of the aggressive fission products cesium, tellurium and iodine. The principal models for cladding corrosion are presented and critically assessed. Areas of uncertainty are exposed and some pertinent experiments are suggested. Consideration is also given to some new observations regarding the role of stress in fuel-cladding reactions and the formation of ferrite in the corrosion zone of the cladding during irradiation. Finally, two technological solutions to the problem of cladding corrosion are proposed. These are based on the use of an oxygen buffer in the fuel and the application of a protective coating to the inner surface of the cladding

  2. Laboratory studies of galvanic corrosion. I. Two-metal couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, F.; Kenkel, J.V.

    1975-01-01

    Galvanic interaction of stainless steel 304L, Ni 270, Cu, Ti--6Al--4V, Sn, 4130 steel, Cd, and Zn has been studied in 3.5 percent NaCl using galvanic current and weight loss measurements in 24-hour tests. Galvanic couples of 4130 steel and one of the Al alloys 1100, 2024, 2219, 6061, and 7075 have also been evaluated in tap water and distilled water. Galvanic current data can be used to assess both the effect of different dissimilar cathode materials as well as the relative susceptibility to galvanic corrosion of anode materials. For 3.5 percent NaCl, it has been found that the effect of the cathode material decreases in the order Cu greater than Ni greater than stainless steel greater than Ti--6Al--4V, while the relative susceptibility of anode materials decreases in the order Sn greater than Zn greater than 4130 steel greater than Cd. An analysis of data in various electrolytes shows that coupling of 4130 steel to Al alloys leads to cathodic protection of the steel in 3.5 percent NaCl, but to accelerated corrosion in tap water and distilled water. (U.S.)

  3. Morphological study of silver corrosion in highly aggressive sulfur environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minzari, Daniel; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2011-01-01

    A silicone coated power module, having silver conducting lines, showed severe corrosion, after prolonged use as part of an electronic device in a pig farm environment, where sulfur containing corrosive gasses are known to exist in high amounts. Permeation of sulfur gasses and humidity through...... the silicone coating to the interface has resulted in three corrosion types namely: uniform corrosion, conductive anodic filament type of Ag2S growth, and silver migration with subsequent formation of sulfur compounds. Detailed morphological investigation of new and corroded power modules was carried out...

  4. Study on Increasing High Temperature pH(t) to Reduce Iron Corrosion Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Man; Hur, Nam Yong; Kim, Waang Bae

    2011-01-01

    The transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products are important elements that affect both the steam generator (SG) integrity and secondary system in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants. Most of iron corrosion products are generated on carbon steel materials due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The several parameters like water chemistry, temperature, hydrodynamic, and steel composition affect FAC. It is well established that the at-temperature pH of the deaerated water system has a first order effect on the FAC rate of carbon steels through nuclear industry researches. In order to reduce transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products, increasing pH(t) tests were applied on secondary system of A, B units. Increasing pH(t) successfully reduced flow accelerated corrosion. The effect of increasing pH(t) to inhibit FAC was identified through the experiment and pH(t) evaluation in this paper

  5. Corrosion and Wear Analysis in Marine Transport Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Urbahs, A; Savkovs, K; Rijkuris, G; Andrejeva, D

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the most common naturally occurring processes studied by thermodynamics, which includes oxidation process, metal disruption, and its chemical and electrochemical effects under environmental influence. Corrosion of metal and equipment accounts for a considerable proportion of total corrosion losses, thus providing the impetus for further investigation and developments related to corrosion protection in order to provide transport systems and industry with corrosion preventiv...

  6. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenbour, Abdellah; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil; Jallouli, El Miloudi; Bachir, Ali Ben

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P 2 O 5 has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content

  7. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenbour, Abdellah [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)]. E-mail: guenbour@fsr.ac.ma; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Jallouli, El Miloudi [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Bachir, Ali Ben [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-12-30

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content.

  8. Statistical Study of Corrosion Types in Constructions in South Region of Rio De Janeiro – Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lacerda da Cruz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most difficult and troubling problems encountered in construction are those caused by corrosive processes. The corrosion processes are constituted by some material degradation, generally metallic material, by means of chemical or electrochemical actions of environment in which the material are and can or cannot be combined with mechanical stress. Corrosion is present in the materials in general. Their deterioration is caused by such physical-chemical interaction between the material and the corrosive environment where it causes major problems in several activities. In order to prevent material losses, anticorrosive techniques are used which include coatings, medium modification techniques, anodic and cathodic protection, and corrosion inhibitors such as the organic compounds use. This article analyses the statistical study of corrosion types in construction in south region of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  9. Real Time Corrosion Monitoring in Lead and Lead-Bismuth Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James F. Stubbins; Alan Bolind; Ziang Chen

    2010-02-25

    The objective of this research program is to develop a real-time, in situ corrosion monitoring technique for flowing liquid Pb and eutectic PbBi (LBE) systems in a temperature range of 400 to 650 C. These conditions are relevant to future liquid metal cooled fast reactor operating parameters. THis program was aligned with the Gen IV Reactor initiative to develp technologies to support the design and opertion of a Pb or LBE-cooled fast reactor. The ability to monitor corrosion for protection of structural components is a high priority issue for the safe and prolonged operation of advanced liquid metal fast reactor systems. In those systems, protective oxide layers are intentionally formed and maintained to limit corrosion rates during operation. This program developed a real time, in situ corrosion monitoring tecnique using impedance spectroscopy (IS) technology.

  10. Drinking water quality assessment and corrosion mitigation in the hospital water supply system of Chacas Village (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Bigoni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rural hospitals in developing countries often lack appropriate water treatments to assure their water needs. In these facilities, due to water different uses and its use with medical equipment, water quality problems can cause very hazardous situations. In particular, corrosion of water distribution systems is a common issue that can cause unwanted changes in water quality and failures of the distribution system’s pipes. These considerations suggest that a complete monitoring program and water treatments to control and guarantee the water quality would be required in each health-care facility. This study assessed the quality of the water at the rural hospital of Chacas (Peru as measured via specific physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. The results show that the chemical and microbiological qualities of the water generally worsen from catchment to the hospital’s taps. Moreover, this work investigated the effects of a dolomite limestone filter installed to adjust the quality of the water distributed at the hospital and thereby mitigate the water’s corrosiveness. Corrosion indices were calculated to provide useful information on the water’s corrosiveness and positive results were obtained in reducing corrosiveness after the installation of the dolomite filter.

  11. Measurement of electrochemical noise for the study of corrosion processes of metallic alloys; Medida de ruido electroquimico para el estudio de rocesoso de corrosion de aleaciones metalicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Amaya, J. M.; Bethencourt, M.; Gonzalez-Rovira, L.; Botana, F. J.

    2009-07-01

    Electrochemical noise (EN) is a technique that allows the estimation of both the rate and the corrosion mechanism of different metallic alloys by means of the measurement and the analysis of the fluctuations of current and voltage. Its main advantage against other electrochemical techniques is that during the measurement process, the corrosive systems under study are not instrumentally disturbed, and therefore, the systems are kept at their natural corrosion potential. Two steps are necessary to use this technique: measurement and analysis of the EN signals. In this paper, the most important concepts related only to the measurement of EN are revised. The parameters most employed in the literature to analyse the EN signals will be described in another paper. In the present article, the experimental devices normally used to measure EN signals are firstly analysed. Subsequently, the most important properties of the EN signals are studied. Finally, the external sources of instrumental noise that can affect to the EN signals are described. (Author) 65 refs.

  12. Duct corrosion in the ventilating air conditioning system for Main Control Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Takashi; Minami, Akiko; Fukuba, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Higashidori Nuclear Power Station, start-of-operation in December 2005, is a relatively new plant. We decided to get original data of air duct condition to determine maintenance policy of air duct, because planned maintenance of air duct has never been done and the corrosion of air duct has occurred in other plant. In January 2014, we found a corrosion-hole at the downstream of the inlet damper in the ventilating air conditioning system for Main Control Room (MCR). We supposed that the cause of rapid corrosion is related to the characteristic environment of this site. (author)

  13. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  14. Study of corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film using the wire beam electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zaijian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jia; Peng, Xin; Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Penghui; Wang, Haijie; Gao, Congjie

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film with various thickness was investigated by the wire beam electrode (WBE) method. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel increased significantly under thin seawater film than it was immersed in seawater. The current variation under seawater film indicated that the thickness of diffusion layer of oxygen was about 500 μm, and the maximal current appeared around 40 μm, at which corrosion rate transited from cathodic control to anodic control. The results suggest that WBE method is helpful to study the corrosion process under thin electrolyte film

  15. Study of Plant Cordia Dichotoma as Green Corrosion Inhibitor for Mild Steel in Different Acid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Khandelwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion inhibition of mild steel using extracts of Cordia dichotoma in different acid media was investigated by mass loss and thermometric methods. The experiments were carried out at 299±0.2 K in presence of different concentrations of dry fruit, leaves and stem extracts of Cordia dichotoma. The results reveal that the alcoholic extracts of Cordia dichotoma is a better corrosion inhibitor than that of toxic chemicals. The fruit extract is more potent than leaves and stem extracts to inhibit the corrosion rate. The study seeks to investigate the possibility of using extracts of Cordia dichotoma as a green corrosion inhibitor for mild steel.

  16. Electrochemical Anti-corrosion System of Iron Tower Based on Solar Power Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the serious problem of the corrosion of the transmission tower in the coastal area or in the harsh industrial area, a kind of electro-chemical anti-corrosion system based on solar power is designed. The system consists of a solar power module and an electrochemical anti-corrosion module: The solar power module consists of a solar panel, a photovoltaic controller, a accumulator and a constant potentiometer. The Electrochemical anti-corrosion modules include an anode block and an anode bed and reference electrode. The photovoltaic energy technology and forced current cathodic protection technology are used in the system, to achieve the effective protection of the tower anti-corrosion. Solar power supply to the nearest, solve the long-distance transmission loss and the high installation costs, form a simple structure, stable operation, low cost, clean and environmental protection, long service life of anti-corrosion system, with good economic efficiency and social benefits. It is of great significance to ensure the safe operation of the tower, maintain the normal operation of the power grid, and even promotes the optimization and upgrading of the industrial structure, save energy and reduces emissions, improve the safe and stable operation of the power system and the economic benefits, etc.

  17. Monitoring corrosion and chemistry phenomena in supercritical aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Liu, C.; Kriksunov, L.; Medina, E.; Villa, J.; Bueno, J.

    1994-01-01

    The in situ monitoring of the chemistry and electrochemistry of aqueous heat transport fluids in thermal (nuclear and fossil) power plants is now considered essential if adequate assessment and close control of corrosion and mass transfer phenomena are to be achieved. Because of the elevated temperatures and pressures involved. new sensor technologies are required that are able to measure key parameters under plant operating conditions for extended periods of time. In this paper, the authors outline a research and development program that is designed to develop practical sensors for use in thermal power plants. The current emphasis is on sensors for measuring corrosion potential, pH, the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen, and the electrochemical noise generated by corrosion processes at temperatures ranging from ∼250 C to 500 C. The program is currently at the laboratory stage, but testing of prototype sensors in a coal-fired supercritical power plant in Spain will begin shortly

  18. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  19. Corrosion mechanisms of zirconium alloys - study of the initial oxidation kinetics and of the mechanical behaviour of the metal/oxide system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, M.

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear fuel claddings are made of zirconium alloys. The conditions of use lead the cladding oxidize outside. The so-formed layers behaves like a thermal barrier and prevents from using oxidized claddings with an oxide thickness larger than 100 μm. The oxidation kinetic is approximately cubic for oxide thicknesses smaller than about 2μm, linear beyond. A kinetic model has been proposed which estimates the post-transition growth rate from the kinetic parameters of the pre-transition state and morphological features of post-transition layers. This work aims at providing the necessary elements to validate this model and studying the layers around the kinetic transition, in order to determine whether the oxidation mechanisms before and after the transition are similar. Thicknesses of the 50 - 500 nm range of the oxide layers are measured by an optical method; pre-transition kinetics are thus precisely determined. The effect of the composition, the thermal treatment and the presence of oxygen in solid solution is studied. The morphological and crystallographic study of the layers show that they exhibit a lot of similarities before and after the kinetic transition. The results concerning the kinetic aspects and the morphology of the post-transition layers point out that the proposed model leads to realistic post-transition growth rates. Furthermore, the kinetic transition corresponds to the appearance of cracks in the oxide layer. The mechanical behaviour of the metal/oxide system has been modelled at different scales. When the specific behaviours of the metal and the oxide are taken into account together with the interface geometry, radial stresses appear, which are high enough to locally open cracks. The appearance and localization of cracks depend on both the interface geometry and the stress distribution in the metal/oxide system. (author)

  20. Research on corrosion mechanism of suspension insulator steel foot of direct current system and measures for corrosion inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Yang, Yueguang; Su, Guolei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hourong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    There are increasingly serious electrocorrosion phenomena on insulator hardware caused by direct current transmission due to the wide-range popularization of extra high voltage direct current transmission engineering in our country. Steel foot corrosion is the main corrosion for insulators on positive polarity side of transmission lines. On one hand, the corrosion leads to the tapering off of steel foot diameter, having a direct influence on mechanical property of insulators; on the other hand, in condition of corrosion on steel foot wrapped in porcelain ware, the volume of the corrosion product is at least 50% more than that of the original steel foot, leading to bursting of porcelain ware, threatening safe operation of transmission lines. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the phenomenon and propose feasible measures for corrosion inhibition. Starting with the corrosion mechanism, this article proposes two measures for corrosion inhibition, and verifies the inhibition effect in laboratory conditions, providing reference for application in engineering.

  1. Radiochemical studies on corrosion products of oral biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madbouly, H.A.Abdallah

    1998-01-01

    The work given in this thesis deals with a radioactive tracer study of the sorption of the corrosion products of dental amalgams and antimony on human teeth, porcelain and acrylic materials, used as dental restorative material. Sorption was investigated in presence of water and liquids commonly intaken by man; namely tea with or without sugar, soluble coffee ( Nescaffee) with or without sugar and/or milk, red tea (karkadeh or hibiscus) with or without sugar and chicken soup. The radioactive isotopes of Ag, Sn, Zn (amalgam components) and antimony were prepared by their irradiation in the nuclear reactor; 110m Ag, 113 Sn, 65 Zn and 124 Sb were thereby produced. The percent uptake of each studied element was evaluated from the depletion of radioactivity of the corresponding radioactive tracer in the given medium containing a tooth (human or artificial)

  2. Moessbauer effect study on the corrosion of an oil refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Costa, M.I. Jr.; Kunrath, J.I.; Moro, J.T.; Englert, G.; Comparsi, L.U.; Mueller, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    Metallic coupons are placed in strategical points of an oil refining plant in order to control the amount of corrosion produced by amine stripping of H 2 S from liquefied oil and combustible gases. This paper reports some of the results obtained by CEMS and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy for the corrosion products formed on such coupons. (orig.)

  3. The study of epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins as corrosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion resistance of two commonly used protective coatings (epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins) in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria has been assessed. The coatings on low carbon steel were subjected to varying conditions of pH, temperature and exposure time and the corrosion rates calculated. At a pH of 2, 3, 4, ...

  4. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The corrosion inhibition effect of fluconazole (FLU) was investigated on steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Weight loss measurements and atomic force microscope analysis were utilized to investigate the corrosion inhibition properties and film formation behaviour of FLU. Quantum chemical approach was also ...

  5. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The corrosion inhibition effect of fluconazole (FLU) was investigated on steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Weight loss measurements and atomic force microscope analysis were utilized to investigate the corrosion inhibition properties and film formation behaviour of FLU. Quantum chemical approach was also used to ...

  6. Corrosion Analysis of TiCN Coated Al-7075 Alloy for Marine Applications: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, M. K.; Ganesha Prasad, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion is one of the most important marine difficulties that cause long term problems, occurring in ships and submarines surrounded by a corrosive environment when coupled with chemical, temperature and stress related conditions. Corrosion of marine parts could lead to severe disasters. Coatings and heat treatment in a very effective way could be used to protect the aluminium parts against corrosion. The present case study focuses on the corrosion and microstructural properties of TiCN coatings fabricated on Al-7075 aluminium alloy substrate by using Physical Vapour Deposition technique. Corrosion properties of specimen's heat treated at 500 °C at durations of 1, 4, 8 and 12 h were tested through salt spray test. According to D-1193, ASTM standard, corrosion resistance of coated and heat treated Al-7075 samples were investigated in solution kept at 95 °F with a pH of 6.5-7.2, with 5 sections of NaCl to 95 sections of type IV water. The specimen's heat treated for 1 h showed positive corrosion resistance, while the specimens treated for longer durations had the opposite effect. The microstructures of the salt spray tested coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction tests were conducted on specimens to determine the atomic and molecular structure of the surface crystals and the unit cell dimensions. The corrosion mechanisms of the coated specimens under the heat treated conditions have been explored.

  7. Study on metal material corrosion behavior of packaging of cement solidified form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhouguo; Lin Meiqiong; Fan Xianhua

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of A3 carbon steel is studied by the specimens that are exposed to atmosphere, embedded in cement solidified form or immersed in corrosion liquid. The corrosion rate is determined by mass change of the specimens. In order to compare the corrosion resistant performance of various coatings, the specimens painted with various material such as epoxide resin, propionic acid resin, propane ether resin and Ti-white paint are tested. The results of the tests show that corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel is less than 10 -3 mm·a -1 in the atmosphere and the cement solidified from, less than 0.1 mm·a -1 in the corrosion liquids, and pH value in the corrosion liquids also affect the corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel. The corrosion resistant performance of Ti-white paint is better than that of other paints. So, A3 carbon steel as packaging material can meet the requirements during storage

  8. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Amaya, C. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Aperador, W. [Universidad Militar Nueva Granada Bogota D.C (Colombia); Gomez, M.E. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Centro de Excelencia en Nuevos Materiales, CENM, Calle 13 100-00 Edificio 320, espacio 1026, Cali (Colombia)

    2011-07-29

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period ({Lambda}), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings ({approx} 3 {mu}m). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with ({Lambda}) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm{sup 2} and 7.59 . 10{sup -4} mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl{sup -} ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  9. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, J.C.; Amaya, C.; Cabrera, G.; Esteve, J.; Aperador, W.; Gomez, M.E.; Prieto, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period (Λ), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings (∼ 3 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm 2 and 7.59 . 10 -4 mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl - ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  10. Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Henning; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Gregory, David

    2005-01-01

    Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems.......Long term corrosion of iron at the water logged site Nydam in Denmark; studies of enviroment, archaeological artefacts, and modern analogues, Prediction of long term corrosion behaviour in nuclear waste systems....

  11. Laboratory study of reinforcement protection with corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, D.; Mihalache, M.; Mogosan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete is a durable material and its performance as part of the containment function in NPPs has been good. However, experience shows that degradation of the reinforced concrete structures caused by the corrosion of the reinforcing steel represents more than 80% of all damages in the world. Much effort has been made to develop a corrosion inhibition process to prolong the life of existing structures and minimize corrosion damages in new structures. Migrating Corrosion Inhibitor technology was developed to protect the embedded steel rebar/concrete structure. These inhibitors can be incorporated as an admixture or can be surface impregnated on existing concrete structures. The effectiveness of two inhibitors (ethanolamine and diethanolamine) mixed in the reinforced concrete was evaluated by gravimetric measurements. The corrosion behavior of the steel rebar and the inhibiting effects of the amino alcohol chemistry in an aggressive environment were monitored using electrochemical measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations. (authors)

  12. Study of corrosion resistance of AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel for application as a biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rogerio Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are ferromagnetic materials. This property does not allow their use in orthopedic prosthesis. Nevertheless, in some specific applications, this characteristic is very useful, such as, for fixing dental and facial prostheses by using magnetic attachments. In this study, the corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity of the AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel, with low nickel content, extra-low interstitial levels (C and N) and Ti and Nb stabilizers, were investigated for magnetic dental attachments application. The ISO 5832-1 (ASTM F-139) austenitic stainless steel and a commercial universal keeper for dental attachment (Neo-magnet System) were evaluated for comparison reasons. The first stainless steel is the most used metallic material for prostheses, and the second one, is a ferromagnetic keeper for dental prostheses (NeoM). In vitro cytotoxicity analysis was performed by the red neutral incorporation method. The results showed that the AISI 444 stainless steel is non cytotoxic. The corrosion resistance was studied by anodic polarization methods and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in a saline phosphate buffered solution (PBS) at 37 °C. The electronic properties of the passive film formed on AISI 444 SS were evaluated by the Mott-Schottky approach. All tested materials showed passivity in the PBS medium and the passive oxide film presented a duplex nature. The highest susceptibility to pitting corrosion was associated to the NeoM SS. This steel was also associated to the highest dopant concentration. The comparatively low levels of chromium (nearly 12.5%) and molybdenum (0.3%) of NeoM relatively to the other studied stainless steels are the probable cause of its lower corrosion resistance. The NeoM chemical composition does not match that of the SUS444 standards. The AISI 444 SS pitting resistance was equivalent to the ISO 5832-1 pointing out that it is a potential candidate for replacement of commercial ferromagnetic alloys used

  13. Design considerations of fission and corrosion product in primary system of MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Akagane, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    General influence of fission and corrosion products in primary system on MONJU plant design is reviewed. Various research and development works are now in progress to decrease the generation rate, to remove the products more effectively and to develop the methods of evaluation the behaviour of radioactive products. The inventory and distribution of fission and corrosion products in the primary circuit of MONJU are given. The radiation levels on the primary components are estimated to be several roentgens per hour. (author)

  14. A study on corrosion resistance of the Ti-10Mo experimental alloy after different processing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.P.R.; Santana, F.A.; Rosa, L.A.A.; Cursino, S.A.; Codaro, E.N.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the microstructure and corrosion resistance of the experimental Ti-10Mo (wt.%) alloy as-cast and treated. These alloys were divided into three groups for analysis: as-cast, after solution heat treatment at 1000 deg. C in argon atmosphere and remelting in centrifugal machine (investment casting). The microstructure formed from each condition was studied using optical microscopy. Corrosion behavior of titanium-molybdenum alloys in fluoridated physiological serum (0.15 M NaCl+0.03 M NaF [pH=6]) was studied and compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In all electrodes systems, similar electrochemical response was obtained. In naturally aerated physiological serum, the corrosion rate is mainly controlled by dissolution process of a complex passive film. This film appears to be formed by titanium species with different oxidation states. Experimental Ti-10Mo alloy exhibit the lowest passive current densities, in particular, samples after heat treatment

  15. Theoretical studies of three triazole derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Lei; Zhu, Shanhong; Zhang, Shengtao; He, Qiao; Li, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three triazole derivatives as corrosion inhibitors were theoretically investigated. • Quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. • Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach has been used. • Theoretical conclusions are validated by the consistency with experimental findings. - Abstract: Corrosion inhibitive performance of 4-chloro-acetophenone-O-1′-(1′.3′.4′-triazolyl)-metheneoxime (CATM), 4-fluoro-acetophenone-O-1′-(1′.3′.4′-triazolyl)-metheneoxime (FATM), and 3,4-dichloro-acetophenone-O-1′-(1′.3′.4′-triazolyl)-metheneoxime (DATM) during the acidic corrosion of mild steel surface was investigated using density functional theory (DFT). Quantum chemical parameters such as the highest occupied molecular orbital energy (E HOMO ), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (E LUMO ), energy gap (ΔE), Mulliken charges, hardness (ξ), dipole moment (μ), and the fraction of electrons transferred (ΔN), were calculated. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach has been used, and a composite index of above-mentioned descriptors was performed to characterize the inhibition performance of the studied molecules. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulation studies were applied to search for the best configurational space of iron/triazole derivative system

  16. Contribution to the study of uranium dioxide aqueous corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion of uranium dioxide by a synthetical ground water has been studied in order to understand the behaviour of nuclear fuels in the hypothesis of a direct storage. An original leaching unit has been carried out in order to control the parameters occurring in the oxidation-dissolution of the uranium dioxide and to condition the leachate (in particular the temperature and the partial pressure of the carbon dioxide). A ground water in equilibrium with the geological enveloping site has been reconstituted from data acquired on the site. The influence of two parameters has been followed: the carbon dioxide carbon pressure and the redox potential. Each experiment has been carried out at 96 C during one month and the time-history of the solutions and of the solids has been studied. In oxidizing conditions, the uranium concentration in solution has been controlled by an U(VI) complex (one oxide, one hydroxide or a carbonate). The possibility of a control by an U(IV) complex (as coffinite, uraninite or uraninite B) has been confirmed in the case of reducing leaching. An original interpretation of the Rutherford backscattering spectra has allowed to describe the decomposition of the samples in a succession of layers of different densities. A very good agreement between the analyses of the solids and those of the solutions has been obtained in the experiments occurring in reducing conditions. Complementary leaching involving solutions containing stable isotopes (deuterium, O 18 ) have revealed the formation of an hydrated layer and the contribution of grain boundaries to the corrosion phenomenon of uranium dioxide. The results of the current hydro-geochemistry study on the uranium Oklo deposit prove the realism of the experiments that have been carried out in the laboratory. (O.M.)

  17. Study on transition behavior of corrosion related environment near disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Kato, O.; Wada, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Disposal vessels are desired to stand for a certain period of time to stabilize radioactive wastes containing heat-generating substances. Besides, in case of wastes containing irradiated metal, which is a source of long-lived 14 C, long-term capability to enclose such long-life species is desired to the vessels. Since endurance of vessels is very affected by surrounding environment, evaluation of long-term environmental transition is important. In this study, we focused on the behavior of red-ox conditions and pH by reactive transport modeling in order to obtain fundamental knowledge about long-term transition of corrosion-related environment around metal vessels or metal-containing radioactive wastes. A two-dimensional reactive transport simulation was applied to a modeled repository site with engineering barrier system including cement and bentonite, etc., in consideration of following chemical models: - The metal corrosion rate was modeled to consider its effect on red-ox conditions. - The corrosion rate of carbon steel was modeled as kinetic reaction rate of production of ferrous ion and electrons as a function of pH and oxygen concentration, based on the experimental results observed under highly-controlled reducing conditions (1). - Formation of corrosion products was modeled by solubility products of iron oxides, such as magnetite, according to analytical results by in-situ XPS (2). - Cement composition and its reaction with groundwater were modeled by chemical equilibrium of primary and secondary minerals, for example, calcium silicates with several C/S ratios to consider the long-term transition of pH with cement degradations. According to the simulation results, the variation of red-ox conditions and pH around the disposal vessels has been estimated. Main component of cement composition slowly changes to calcium silicate having lower C/S ratios, resulting in decrease of pH. Although it depends on the bentonite efficiency

  18. Corrosion studies of a chromium steel in imitated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Meisel, W.

    2002-01-01

    A series of in-door experiments was performed to get some insight into the corrosion behavior of a commercial alloy Fe-12% Cr (3CR12) exposed to imitated seawater. Applying different analytical methods, the main corrosion process was found to be the formation of flakes on the surface which, peel off after they have reached a certain size. Some Cr is dissolved in the solution, its relative concentration with respect to Fe is higher than in the bulk material. The flakes consist mainly of mixed oxihydroxides of the type FeOOH containing some Cr and Mg. The oxidic layer on the interface is very thin, behaves essentially stationary with a slight growth of about 0.05 nm/day. It consists of Cr oxide with some inclusions of Fe and Mg and is not of a chromite type. Immediately below this oxidic layer, the metallic substrate exhibits a thin layer depleted in Cr and behaving like α-Fe (bcc). As compared with stainless steel, potentiostatic current vs. time records at anodic potentials below the pitting potential indicate a very different stability of the surface films for 3CR12. The kinetics of the passive layer formation on 3CR12 was found to follow a parabolic law initially and to change later (after 10...100 seconds in deaerated solution and even earlier in aerated solution) to a linear law. After some time, pitting corrosion and/or cracks due to internal stresses play the dominant role. Cr does not form a protective oxidic layer. The surface morphology of samples exposed at -200 mV for 20 and 80 minutes has been studied by scanning electron microscopy and scanning Auger microprobe. The results reflect the competing formation of oxidic layers and pitting, the participation of Cr in the dissolution process. It is also suggested that Mg, which is a component of the solution was incorporated into the rust and some Mg was also found on the metallic surface. (author)

  19. In-Vitro Corrosion Studies of Bioabsorbable Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, P.; Munroe, N.

    Magnesium alloys have inspired a significant amount of attention from researchers all over the world for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications due to their light weight, mechanical integrity and degradation behavior. In this investigation, cast manufactured binary, ternary and quaternary magnesium alloys were studied for their degradation behavior by potentiodynamic polarization tests in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS) and PBS containing amino acids (cysteine, C and tryptophan, W) at 37 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were performed to determine the charge transfer resistance and immersion tests were performed to assess corrosion rate and hydrogen evolution from the alloys. Furthermore, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the alloys were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  20. Corrosion resistance of grouted post-tensioning systems : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The increased popularity of post-tensioned bridge construction in the United States has led to concerns about corrosion and its impact on the life cycle of these bridges. Although the vast majority of post-tensioned bridges in the United States have ...

  1. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  2. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron, Fe 2+ , has been shown to reduce UO 2 2+ to UO 2(s) [1], and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals [2]. Of particular interest is magnetite, a potential corrosion product that has been shown to remove TcO 4 - from solution [3]. Furthermore, if Fe 2+ minerals, rather than fully oxidized minerals such as goethite, are produced during corrosion, then locally reducing conditions may be present. High electron availability leads to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO 4 - , NpO 2 + , and UO 2 2+ and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Finally, because the molar volume of iron material increases during corrosion due to oxygen and water incorporation, pore space may be significantly reduced over long time periods. The more water is occluded, the bulkier the corrosion products, and the less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this paper is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package steel corrosion products and their effects on local redox state, radionuclide transport, and porosity

  3. Corrosion studies on retrievable spent fuel containers: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludemann, W.D.; Abrego, L.; McCright, R.D.

    1978-12-01

    Spent fuel canisters stored in halite (NaCl) deposits (salt beds) are subject to a severely corrosive environment when the hot brine inclusions, rich in calcium and magnesium chlorides, migrate to the canister. Since no data base exists on corrosion in halite brines, a survey was made of the corrosion resistance of potential canister materials in other concentrated brine environments. Corrosion-resistant metals include Ta, Ti Code 12, TiPd Alloy, Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, and Fe-base 29-4 Alloy. Although carbon steels have cost and availability advantages, they suffer from excessive corrosion rates in brines. Corrosion-resistant nonmetals include carbon, Teflon-type fluorocarbons, epoxide coatings, and polymer cements. While these materials are not suitable for constructing the canister, they could be used as a protective coating on a carbon steel canister. On the basis of this survey, we recommend a coated carbon steel canister, used with cathodic protection. It is important to start a test program to gather a data base on the corrosion of materials in halite brines and to verify the suitability of canister materials

  4. Chloride corrosion in biomass-fired boilers – Fe-O-Cl system thermodynamic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarczyk Robert

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of chloride-induced corrosion in the Fe-O-Cl system. The ranges of the metallic, oxide and chloride phase stability are determined within the temperature range T = 750-1000 K. Based on the parametric equations the equilibrium concentration of gaseous phase determined by Deacon reaction are presented. The effect of H2O concentration in the gaseous phase on high-temperature corrosion process and gaseous NaCl influence on NaFeO2 formation in the passive oxide scale layer (FeO/Fe3O4/Fe2O3 are discussed as well. The results are correlated with available in the literature laboratory experimental data and industrial corrosion process observations. Presented thermodynamic analysis is compared with assumptions of “active oxidation” model. The results may be used for experimental research prediction and a corrosion prevention in the industry.

  5. Corrosion studies on HGW-canister materials for marine disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Bland, I.D.; Smith, S.; Marsh, G.P.

    1986-03-01

    Results are presented from theoretical and experimental work undertaken to investigate and assess the general corrosion behaviour of carbon steel canister/overpacks for heat generating nuclear waste under marine disposal conditions. The mean general corrosion rates of carbon steels, determined experimentally by polarisation resistance measurements on specimens in on-going immersion tests, are between 65-124 μm yr -1 at 90 0 C and 5-25 μm yr -1 at 25 0 C and are tending to increase with time. Anomalously high corrosion rates are being indicated by similar tests at 50 0 C. It is not clear what reliance should be placed on the polarisation resistance results, however, and therefore no conclusion will be drawn until the tests are dismantled and inspected in the 1985/86 programme. Tests with γ-radiation on forged carbon steel specimens immersed in deaerated seawater at 90 0 C show that this causes an acceleration of corrosion rate at the three dose rates down to at least 300 R h -1 . Deep ocean sediment from GME also accelerates the corrosion rate of carbon steel in deaerated seawater both with and without γ-radiation. The effect diminishes with continued exposure and is thought to be due to the presence of either an additional so far unidentified oxidising agent or some component which reduces the corrosion protection afforded by the build up of a corrosion product layer. Acquisition of improved electrochemical kinetic data for the mathematical model is now complete, and the model has been run for temperatures of 25 and 90 0 C, where it predicts steady corrosion rates of 19.3 and 180 μm/yr. The model has shown that the rate of attack is not influenced greatly by the depth of sediment, and that the component of corrosion caused by radiation is of the order of 7 mm over 1000 years. (author)

  6. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system...... with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO2 corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models...... and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also fitted to experimental data produced and shown in chapter 8 for SLE in the Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O system. The application of the above model is shown in chapter 9. Here the thermodynamic correction factors are calculated. These show how the diffusion...

  7. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, I; Buluc, G; Florea, R M; Carcea, I; Soare, V

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO 3 -3%HF, 10%H 2 SO 4 , 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale. (paper)

  8. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  9. Preliminary study on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in Horonobe groundwater environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kogawa, Noritaka; Maeda, Kazuto

    2006-08-01

    It is necessary to understand the corrosion behavior of candidate overpack materials to plan the in-situ engineered barrier test at underground laboratory constructing at Horonobe and to design the overpacks suitable to Horonobe environment. The preliminary corrosion tests of carbon steel which is a candidate material for overpacks were carried out using artificial groundwater and actual groundwater sampled at Horonobe. As the results of anodic polarization experiments, the anodic polarization curves of carbon steel in buffer material were active dissolution type, and the corrosion type of carbon steel in Horonobe groundwater environment was expected to be general corrosion. The results of immersion test under air equilibrium condition showed that the degrees of corrosion localization were not exceeded the data obtained in previous studies. The trend of corrosion rates in buffer material under anaerobic condition were similar to the data obtained in previous studies. Based on the experimental results, it was confirmed that the corrosion assessment model and assumed corrosion rate in second progress report (H12 report) can be applied to the assessment for Horonobe groundwater condition. (author)

  10. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF URANIUM METAL CORROSION MECHANISM AND KINETICS IN WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudanova, Natalya; Maslennikov, Alexander; Peretroukhine, Vladimir F.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2006-01-01

    During long-term underwater storage of low burn-up uranium metal fuel, a corrosion product sludge forms containing uranium metal grains, uranium dioxide, uranates and, in some cases, uranium peroxide. Literature data on the corrosion of non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys do not allow unequivocal prediction of the paragenesis of irradiated uranium in water. The goal of the present work conducted under the program 'CORROSION OF IRRADIATED URANIUM ALLOYS FUEL IN WATER' is to study the corrosion of uranium and uranium alloys and the paragenesis of the corrosion products during long-term underwater storage of uranium alloy fuel irradiated at the Hanford Site. The elucidation of the physico-chemical nature of the corrosion of irradiated uranium alloys in comparison with non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys is one of the most important aspects of this work. Electrochemical methods are being used to study uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics. The present part of work aims to examine and revise, where appropriate, the understanding of uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics in water

  11. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  12. Electrochemical characterization of corrosion in materials of grounding systems, simulating conditions of synthetic soils with characteristics of local soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.

    2017-12-01

    The integrity of structures buried in earthing becomes relevant when analysing maintenance and replacement costs of these systems, as the deterioration is mainly due to two factors, namely: the failures caused in the electrical systems, which are due to the system. Failure in earthing due to corrosion at the interface cause an alteration in the structure of the component material and generates an undesirable resistivity that cause malfunction in this type of protection systems. Two local soils were chosen that were categorized as sandy loam and clay loam type, whose chemical characteristics were simulated by means of an electrolyte corresponding to the amount of ions present determined by a soil characterization based on the CICE (effective cation exchange coefficient), which allows us to deduce the percentage of chloride and sulphate ions present for the different levels established in the experimental matrix. The interaction of these soils with grounding electrodes is a complex problem involving many factors to consider. In this study, the rates and corrosion currents of the different soils on two types of electrodes, one copper and the other AISI 304 stainless steel, were approximated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectra. Considerably higher speeds were determined for copper-type electrodes when compared to those based on steel. However, from the Nyquist diagrams, it was noted that copper electrodes have better electrical performance than steel ones. The soil with the highest ionic activity turned out to be the sandy loam. The clay loam soil presents a tendency to water retention and this may be the reason for the different behaviour with respect to ionic mobility. The diffusion control in the steel seems to alter the ionic mobility because its corrosion rates proved to be very similar regardless of the type of soil chemistry. In general, corrosion rates fell since tenths of a millimetre every year to

  13. Study of biofuels corrosiveness; Estudo da corrosividade de biocombustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Rafaela da Conceicao; Branco, Lucas da Paz Nogueira; Guimaraes, Maria Jose de Oliveria Cavalcanti; Seidl, Peter Rudolf [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    The replacement of crude oil derivatives with biofuels is part of an energy strategy, in which efficiency and conservation should play a leading role. The renewable nature of biodiesel is based in the fact that it is derived from raw materials from agricultural activities, instead of petroleum. Thinking about the increasingly production of biodiesel and its storage to make the proper mixtures, the corrosion of biodiesel tanks can occur over time. The copper corrosion test is used as the standard method for biodiesel corrosivity, however it is designed for diesel fuel from petroleum. Petrodiesel contains sulfur, which attacks the copper alloys. Since biodiesel is free of this element, it should be characterized in a different way. This work intends to analyze existing methodologies in order to evaluate the corrosivity of biodiesel. A literature search was performed in Web of Science database, selecting keywords for a comprehensive search. For the final analysis, a selection of papers classified according to publication year, country and main subject covered was used. Research on biofuels corrosivity is recent and major countries where published (USA, Malaysia and Brazil) which have advantages in terms of size and production of oil seeds. Biodiesel is more corrosive than petroleum diesel, but there is no sufficient evidences as to verify if the level of corrosion found in biodiesel is within acceptable limits for automotive components. Ferrous alloys are more resistant to biodiesel attack than non-ferrous alloys. Among non-ferrous alloys, copper and lead alloys are the most vulnerable, followed by aluminum. It is necessary to develop appropriate methodologies to determine and characterize the corrosivity of biodiesel on engine parts and alloys used in its manufacture and storage. (author)

  14. Study of corrosive-erosive wear behaviour of Al6061/albite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Krishna, M.; Murthy, H.N. Narasimha; Tarachandra, R.; Satyamoorthy, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation analyses the influence of dispersed alumina particles on the wear behaviour of the Al/albite composites in a corrosive environment. The composites were prepared by modified pressure die-casting technique. The corrosive-erosive wear experiments were carried out on a proprietary corrosion-erosion wear tester to study the wear characteristics of the composites. The slurry was made up of water and alumina (size: 90-150 μm, proportion: 0-30 wt.%), while H 2 SO 4 (0.01, 0.1 and 1N) was added to create the corrosive conditions. Experiments were arranged to test the relationships among the corrosive-erosive wear rate, concentrations of H 2 SO 4 and alumina in the slurry, weight percent of albite in the composite, erosion speed and distance. Wear rate varies marginally at low speeds but sharply increases at higher speeds. The corrosive wear rate logarithmically increased with the increasing concentration of the corrosive medium. The effect of abrasive particles and corrosion medium on the wear behaviour of the composite is explained experimentally, theoretically and using scanning electron microscopy

  15. Study on tea leaves extract as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, A. B.; Suryanto; Haider, F. I.

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitor from extraction of plant has been considered as the most preferable and most chosen technique to prevent corrosion of metal in acidic medium because of the environmental friendly factor. In this study, black tea leaves extraction was tested as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 0.1M of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with the absence and presence of corrosion inhibitor. The efficiency and effectiveness of black tea as corrosion inhibitor was tested by using corrosion weight loss measurement experiment was carried out with varies parameters which with different concentration of black tea extract solution. The extraction of black tea solution was done by using aqueous solvent method. The FT-IR result shows that black tea extract containing compounds such as catechin, caffeine and tannins that act as anti-corrosive reagents and responsible to enhance the effectiveness of black tea extract as corrosion inhibitor by forming the hydrophobic thin film through absorption process. As a result of weight loss measurement, it shows that loss in weight of mild steel reduces as the concentration of inhibitor increases. The surface analysis was done on the mild steel samples by using SEM.

  16. Study for determination of industrial water corrosivity in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing Mills during 2005-2006 Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, D; Miranzadeh, M B; Motlagh, A Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    This research was carried out in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing mills (KFSGM) for evaluation of water corrosivity during 2005-2006. A total of 18 samples were taken from various points of the water supply system for testing the specific parameters and calculation Langelier Index (LI), Ryznar Index (RI) and Pukorious Index (PI). This research showed that in raw water (sand filter effluent) LI were positive as well as RI and PI were lower than 7 which means that mentioned water is not corrosive. Also LI in treated water by reverse osmosis process was negative and RI and PI were higher than 7, so, this water has corrosive properties. Finally, calculated indexes indicate that according to LI, conditioned water is not corrosive but based on RI and P. this water tend to corrosivity which this findings is compatible with literature review statement. So it is recommended that, for water conditioning addition of preservative chemicals to be continued but at the same time another alternatives such as pH adjustment, air stripping and deoxygenating, control of carbonate concentration and split flow treatment should be studied.

  17. Inhibition of corrosion of carbon steel by heptane sulphonic acid – Zn2+ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. MARY ANBARAS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in dam water by sodium heptane sulphonate (SHS and zinc ion system was investigated using weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Results of weight loss method indicated that inhibition efficiency (IE increased as the inhibitor concentration increased. A synergistic effect existed between SHS and Zn2+. The influence of sodium potassium tartrate (SPT on the IE of the SHS-Zn2+ system was evaluated. As the immersion period increased, the IE decreased. Polarization study revealed that SHS-Zn2+ system functioned as a cathodic inhibitor. AC impedance spectra revealed that a protective film was formed on the metal surface. The nature of the metal surface was analyzed by FTIR spectra, SEM and AFM analyses.

  18. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  19. 3D study of intermetallics and their effect on the corrosion morphology of rheocast aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingo, B.; Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Matykina, E.; Skeldon, P.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of heat treatment T6.1 on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour of rheocast aluminium alloy A356 is investigated on the basis of 2D/3D characterization techniques and electrochemical and SKPFM measurements. Heat treatment strengthens the α-Al matrix, modifies the intermetallic particles and spheroidizes eutectic Si. These changes do not modify significantly the corrosion behaviour of the alloy. 3D SEM-Tomography clearly shows that the corrosion advances in the shape of narrow paths between closely spaced intermetallics without a major influence of eutectic Si. - Highlights: • T6.1 spheroidizes Si, strengthens the matrix and modifies the intermetallics. • Electrochemical behaviour of untreated and heat-treated alloys is similar. • 3D SEM-Tomography provides additional information on the corrosion morphology. • Corrosion advances as paths between intermetallics with little influence of Si.

  20. Study on the hot corrosion behavior of a cast Ni-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Guo, J.T.; Zhang, J.; Yuan, C.; Zhou, L.Z.; Hu, Z.Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China). Inst. of Metal Research

    2010-07-01

    Hot corrosion behavior of Nickel-base cast superalloy K447 in 90% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 10% NaCl melting salt at 850 C and 900 C was studied. The hot corrosion kinetic of the alloy follows parabolic rate law under the experimental conditions. The external layer is mainly Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale which is protective to the alloy, the intermediate layer is the Ti-rich phase, and the internal layer is mainly the international oxides and sulfides. With increased corrosion time and temperature, the oxide scales are gradually dissolved in the molten salt and then precipitate as a thick and non-protective scale. Chlorides cause the formation of volatile species, which makes the oxide scale disintegrate and break off. The corrosion kinetics and morphology examinations tend to support the basic dissolution model for hot corrosion mechanisms. (orig.)

  1. Studies of localized corrosion in welded aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Nunes, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in welded samples of 2219-T87 Al alloy (2319 filler), 2090 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers), and 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers) has been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique. The weld beads are cathodic in all cases, leading to reduced anode/cathode ratios. A reduction in anode/cathode ratio leads to an increase in the corrosion rates of the welded metals, in agreement with results obtained in previous electrochemical and stress corrosion studies involving the overall corrosion rates of welded samples. The cathodic weld beads are bordered on both sides by strong anodic regions, with high propensity for corrosion.

  2. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  3. Investigations into the corrosion resistance of copper aluminium alloys. Effect of phosphorus as corrosion resistant third alloying element in the ternary system CuAl20P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allwardt, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of phosphorus on the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes is studied in detail in this work. A literature review showed that there are a lot of things known about the microstructure and the mechanical properties of Al-bronzes. In spite of their corrosion resistance the corrosion properties and the structure of the protective oxide films of Al-bronzes were seldom a matter of interest. Systematic studies of the influence of different alloying elements on the oxide film and the corrosion properties are rare. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes, made by alloying particular elements. The high corrosion resistance of the new alloy CuAl 20 P 1 was the reason to investigate the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion properties of Al-bronzes in more detail. A systematic study of the microstructure and the corrosion properties of Cu, CuP x , CuAl 20 and CuAl 20 P x offers an insight into the effect of aluminium and phosphorus on the formation of the oxide film on Al-bronzes. It was found that there exists a critical amount of 1 at.-% of phosphorus. Above and below this amount the corrosion resistance becomes worse. This behaviour could be explained by XPS-and electrochemical measurements. Although there are still some questions about the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes, this work has produced some important results, which in the future may be helpful to develop new high corrosion resistant Al-bronzes more efficiently: - on clean surface Al-bronze, the oxidation of Al and Cu takes place simultaneously, - Al promotes the formation of Cu 2 O but impedes the formation of Cu(II)-oxide/-hydride in neutral solutions, - P impedes the formation of Cu 2 O and as a consequence promotes the formation of aluminium oxide. This results in a higher amount of Al in the oxide film on the surface of the alloy, which leads to a better corrosion resistance. (author) figs., tabs., 106 refs

  4. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  5. Prediction on corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system based on optimized grey theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Jiang Wei

    2007-01-01

    For the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, the pre- diction error from the grey theory is greater, so a new method, optimized grey theory was presented in the paper. A comparison among predicted results from present and other methods was carried out, and it is seem that optimized grey theory is correct and effective for the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, and it provides a fundamental basis for the maintenance of pipe in nuclear power system. (authors)

  6. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-situ and real-time electrochemical monitoring of flow-induced corrosion of Mg alloy is designed in a vascular bioreactor. • Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products is analyzed. • Flow accelerates mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. • Flow increases not only the thickness of uniform corrosion product layer, but the removal rate of localized corrosion products. • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provide a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. - Abstract: An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  7. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  8. Simulation study on insoluble granular corrosion products deposited in PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xu; Zhou Tao; Ru Xiaolong; Lin Daping; Fang Xiaolu

    2014-01-01

    In the operation of reactor, such as fuel rods, reactor vessel internals etc. will be affected by corrosion erosion of high pressure coolant. It will produce many insoluble corrosion products. The FLUENT software is adopted to simulate insoluble granular corrosion products deposit distribution in the reactor core. The fluid phase uses the standard model to predict the flow field in the channel and forecast turbulence variation in the near-wall region. The insoluble granular corrosion products use DPM (Discrete Phase Model) to track the trajectory of the particles. The discrete phase model in FLUENT follows the Euler-Lagrange approach. The fluid phase is treated as a continuum by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, while the dispersed phase is solved by tracking a large number of particles through the calculated flow field. Through the study found, Corrosion products particles form high concentration area near the symmetry, and the entrance section of the corrosion products particles concentration is higher than export section. Corrosion products particles deposition attached on large area for the entrance of the cladding, this will change the core neutron flux distribution and the thermal conductivity of cladding material, and cause core axial offset anomaly (AOA). Corrosion products particles dot deposit in the outlet of cladding, which can lead to pitting phenomenon in a sheath. Pitting area will cause deterioration of heat transfer, destroy the cladding integrity. In view of the law of corrosion products deposition and corrosion characteristics of components in the reactor core. this paper proposes regular targeted local cleanup and other mitigation measures. (authors)

  9. Erosion corrosion in power plant piping systems - Calculation code for predicting wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastner, W.; Erve, M.; Henzel, N.; Stellwag, B.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive experimental and theoretical investigations have been performed to develop a calculation code for wall thinning due to erosion corrosion in power plant piping systems. The so-called WATHEC code can be applied to single-phase water flow as well as to two-phase water/steam flow. Only input data which are available to the operator of the plant are taken into consideration. Together with a continuously updated erosion corrosion data base the calculation code forms one element of a weak point analysis for power plant piping systems which can be applied to minimize material loss due to erosion corrosion, reduce non-destructive testing and curtail monitoring programs for piping systems, recommend life-extending measures. (author). 12 refs, 17 figs

  10. Corrosion Inhibition in the Secondary Cooling System of ETRR-2, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.H.; Gad, M.M.A.; Abdel-Karim, R.; Abdel-Salam, O.F.

    2003-01-01

    The second Egyptian research reactor (ETRR-2) is a light water type of 22 MW thermal power. Proper cooling water treatment is necessary to set the water chemical characteristics within a specified window to avoid or minimize corrosion problems, scale formation, fouling, and microbiological contamination. Selection of a proper and economic corrosion inhibitor is of great importance. This selection depends, among other factors, on the availability as well as cost. The corrosion behaviour of water of ETRR-2 site and its inhibition by different inhibitors was studied in a special test rig designed for this purpose. Sodium salts of polyphosphate, phosphate, molybdate, and tungstate were used to treat and qualify the cooling water. Results showed that the corrosion resistance of the test material depends on both type and concentration of the applied inhibitor. Using 30-ppm tungstate, molybdate, and phosphate (as anodic inhibitors) reduced the corrosion rate, and inhibitor efficiencies of about 97% 86%, and 68% were achieved respectively. Accordingly, sodium tungstate could be ranked as the best anodic inhibitor used followed by molybdate. Sodium phosphate could be ranked as the least efficient one. Adding the same concentration of sodium polyphosphate (as a cathodic inhibitor) yields almost the same inhibition efficiency as tungstate type. However, at higher concentration(40 ppm), an inhibition efficiency of 100% was obtained, Which corresponds to almost zero-corrosion rate

  11. Studies on the Corrosion Resistance of Laser-Welded Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łyczkowska K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the electrochemical corrosion tests of Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 laser-welded superalloys. The studies were conducted in order to assess the resistance to general and pitting corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that Inconel 600 possesses good corrosion resistance, however Inconel 625 is characterized by a greater resistance to general and also to pitting corrosion of the weld as well as the base metal.

  12. Health evaluation of drinking water regarding to scaling and corrosion potential using corrosion indexes in Noorabad city, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ghodratolah Shams Khorramabadi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Result obtained from studied indexes showed that the drinking water in Noorabad is corrosive and so the water quality in water supply system should be monitored continuously. The best applicable practices for decreasing water corrosion in water supply system are including continuous control of pH, chlorination mechanism and the use of corrosion resistant pipelines and facilities.

  13. Microbiologically induced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Biological attack is a problem that can affect all metallic materials in a variety of environments and systems. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, backflushing, organic coating, or thermal shock. The objective is to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, corrosion of power plant components by micro-organisms (bacteria) has been identified even in very clean systems. A system's first exposure to microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) occurs during its first exposure to an aqueous environment, such as during hydrotest or wet layup. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. This paper discusses various methods of diagnosing, monitoring, and controlling MIC in a variety of systems, as well as indicates areas where further study is needed

  14. Electrochemical corrosion study of Mg–Al–Zn–Mn alloy in aqueous ethylene glycol containing chloride ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Medhashree

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays most of the automobiles use magnesium alloys in the components of the engine coolant systems. These engine coolants used are mainly composed of aqueous ethylene glycol along with some inhibitors. Generally the engine coolants are contaminated by environmental anions like chlorides, which would enhance the rate of corrosion of the alloys used in the coolant system. In the present study, the corrosion behavior of Mg–Al–Zn–Mn alloy in 30% (v/v aqueous ethylene glycol containing chloride anions at neutral pH was investigated. Electrochemical techniques, such as potentiodynamic polarization method, cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS were used to study the corrosion behavior of Mg–Al–Zn–Mn alloy. The surface morphology, microstructure and surface composition of the alloy were studied by using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM, optical microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray (EDX analysis, respectively. Electrochemical investigations show that the rate of corrosion increases with the increase in chloride ion concentration and also with the increase in medium temperature.

  15. Investigation of some green compounds as corrosion and scale inhibitors for cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. (Aligarh Muslim Univ. (India))

    1999-05-01

    The performance of an open-recirculating cooling system, an important component in most industries, is affected by corrosion and scale formation. Numerous additives have been used in the past for the control of corrosion and scale formation. Effects of the naturally occurring compounds azadirachta indica (leaves), punica granatum (shell), and momordica charantia (fruits), on corrosion of mild steel in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) were assessed using weight loss, electrochemical polarization, and impedance techniques. Extracts of the compounds exhibited excellent inhibition efficiencies comparable to that of hydroxyethylidine diphosphonic acid (HEDP), the most preferred cooling water inhibitor. The compounds were found effective under static and flowing conditions. Extracts were quite effective in retarding formation of scales, and the maximum antiscaling efficiency was exhibited by the extract of azadirachta indica (98%). The blowdown of the cooling system possessed color and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Concentrations of these parameters were reduced by an adsorption process using activated carbon as an adsorbent.

  16. A theoretical study of carbohydrates as corrosion inhibitors of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Salim M.; Ali, Nozha M. [Libyan Academy for Graduate Studies, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Chemistry Dept.; Ali-Shattle, Elbashir E. [Tripoli Univ. (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Chemistry Dept.

    2013-08-15

    The inhibitive effect of fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose against the iron corrosion is investigated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31 G level (d) to search the relation between the molecular structure and corrosion inhibition. The electronic properties such as the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the energy of lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO), the energy gap (LUMO-HOMO), quantum chemical parameters such as hardness, softness, the fraction of the electron transferred, and the electrophilicity index are reported. The inhibition efficiency of the investigated carbohydrates follows the trend: maltose < sucrose < lactose < fructose < glucose. (orig.)

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies of benzoxazines corrosion inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi Kadhim

    Full Text Available 2-Methyl-4H-benzo[d][1,3]oxazin-4-one (BZ1 and 3-amino-2-methylquinazolin-4(3H-one (BZ2 were evaluated for their corrosion inhibition properties on mild steel (MS in hydrochloric acid solution by weight loss technique and scanning electron microscopy. Results show the inhibition efficiency values depend on the amount of nitrogen in the inhibitor, the inhibitor concentration and the inhibitor molecular weight with maximum inhibition efficiency of 89% and 65% for BZ2 and BZ1 at highest concentration of the compounds. Keywords: Methylquinazoline, Benzoxazines, Corrosion, Inhibitors

  18. Test installation for studying erosion-corrosion of metals for coal washing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, G. R.; Dingley, W.; Wiles, C. T.

    1979-02-15

    A test installation was constructed for investigating erosion-corrosion of metals by coal-water slurries. Erosion-corrosion tests of mild steel panels were conducted using slurries of alundum, quartz, washed coal and coal refuse. Wear rates were found to depend on type of abrasive, particle size and water conductivity and were reduced by cathodic protection and inhibitors. Cathodic protection of mild steel in coal slurries containing sulphate ion reduced wear by 90% and 86% for stationary and rotating panels, respectively. This study has demonstrated that the successful application of corrosion control techniques would reduce metal wastage in coal washing plants. The test installation is considered suitable for developing the techniques.

  19. Stainless Steel Corrosion Studies Final Report: FY17 End of-Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Milenski, Helen Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Destiny [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-08

    Two materials are being considered in applications requiring their contact against stainless steel surfaces. These materials include the solvent methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and the polymer neoprene (polychloroprene). There is concern that contact of these materials with stainless steel substrates may lead to corrosion. To address these concerns we have undertaken corrosion studies under conditions expected to be more aggressive than in intended applications. These conditions include elevated temperature and humidity, and submersion and suspension in solvent vapors, in an attempt to accelerate any potential deleterious interactions. Corrosion rates below 0.1 mpy have historically been deemed INSIGNIFICANT from a WR Production standpoint; corresponding guidelines for non-production applications are lacking.

  20. Study on applying technology of utilizing long-term materials for corrosion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, Young Kyu; Baek, Soo Gon; Lee, Jong Sub [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Won Suk [Inha University (Korea, Republic of); Song, Rhyo Seong [Hankuk Aviation, University (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nowadays, as the pollution in seawater is escalating rapidly because of fast industrialization, corrosion rate and repairing frequency of seawater facilities in power plant are increasing. In addition, new construction is restricted with narrow limits due to the deterioration of social condition, asking for extension of facility life and repairing frequency. The objectives of this study are to select the appropriate new high corrosion resistance materials and apply them in the field, to make the corrosion data base in accordance with their usage conditions and to predict the remaining life and optimum repairing period by predicting the life of facilities. (author). 77 refs., 54 figs.

  1. A Study on the Corrosion and Wear Behavior of Electrodeposited Ni-W-P Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung Bin; Wu, Meng Yen

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the tribocorrosion of electroplated Ni-W-P alloy coating (3.9 to 4.3 at. pct W and 13.1 to 14.7 at. pct P) on a cylindrical copper substrate was investigated using a block-on-ring tester. The wear and corrosion performance of the coating and their synergic effect were measured at different overpotentials. Under simple immersion corrosion conditions with an increasing overpotential from open-circuit potential to +400 mVSCE, the surface of the coating initially showed no obvious corrosion, eventually developing pitting holes that subsequently enlarged and showing the spreading of cracks. The corrosion products were a mixture of NiO, WO3, and phosphate, and the corroded surface was P-rich, porous, and less crystalline than the pristine coating. Corrosion and mechanical wear had little influence on tribocorrosion at low overpotential values. However, the synergic effect drastically became stronger at high overpotentials. The surface was full of large pitting holes and grooves. The weight loss due to the corrosion component increased linearly with the overpotential but was limited in comparison with the wear component, which was the main cause of weight loss. On the other hand, the friction coefficient first increased and then decreased with an increase in overpotential. Both the surface morphology of the corroded coating and the thickness of the corrosion oxide play important roles in this friction characteristic.

  2. Study crevice corrosion alloys C-22 and 625 by electrochemical noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungaro, María L.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2013-01-01

    C-22 and 625 alloys are two of the Ni –Cr-Mo alloys considered as candidate materials to form the corrosion resistance engineered barriers for nuclear waste repositories. The corrosion resistance of these alloys is remarkable in a wide variety of environments. Despite of their resistance these alloys are susceptible to crevice corrosion in a certain aggressive environments. This work presents the use of electrochemical noise technique to study crevice corrosion susceptibility of alloys C-22 and 625 in 1M NaCl acidic solutions at 60ºC and 90ºC. Asymmetrical electrodes and a complementary platinum electrode were used to assess the influence of cathodic reaction in crevice process. The obtained records were analyzed directly and through statistical parameters. The potential drop and the simultaneous increment of the current records indicated the occurrence of crevice corrosion. The alternative use of a platinum electrode resulted in higher currents and higher potentials and reduced the induction time to crevice formation. The reason for this behavior is that platinum surface allows faster cathodic reactions than C-22 and 625 alloys. The standard deviation of the current records was responsive to the crevice corrosion intensity. C-22 alloy had better crevice corrosion performance than 625 alloy. (author)

  3. 40 CFR 141.81 - Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment steps to small, medium-size and large water systems. 141.81 Section 141.81 Protection of... WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.81 Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps...). (ii) A report explaining the test methods used by the water system to evaluate the corrosion control...

  4. Comparative corrosion study of Ag–Pd and Co–Cr alloys used in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    composition of the passive layers, their thickness and the degree of .... Aerated corrosion media were used in the present study ... are near from that of pure Ag. The alloys are more active ..... pean Social Fund and the Romanian Government.

  5. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  6. Corrosion and deposition behaviour of 60Co and 54Mn in the SNR mockup loop for the primary sodium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Reichel, H.

    1976-01-01

    The SNR corrosion mockup loop, simulating the SNR primary system is described. The influence of hydraulic conditions and temperature on the deposition behaviour is studied. γ-spectroscopy measurements at the pipe-work and removable samples allowed to determine the distribution of radioactive corrosion products in the loop and by-pass system. The release rate of Mn 54 could be reduced by a factor of 3 by decreasing the cold trap temperature from 165 0 C to 105 0 C while the Co 60 release rate could be reduced by a factor of 14, respectively. High temperature loop sections (873K) representing 13% of the loop surface absorbed 50-60% of the released Co 60 and only 8 - 18% of the Mn 54. The cold trap absorbed not more than 1% of the Co 60 and 10% of the Mn 54 inventory. (author)

  7. Review: Results of studying atmospheric corrosion in Vietnam 1995–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thi Hong Lien, Pham Thy San and Hoang Lam Hong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam is situated in the wet tropical zone; thus, atmospheric conditions are characterized by high temperatures and a long time of wetness (TOW. In addition, the salt air coming in from the sea causes a high chloride concentration in coastal areas. Furthermore, Vietnam is a developing country, which means that air pollution is increasing with the development of industry. These factors result in significant damage to materials by atmospheric corrosion. In this report, the results of a recent study on the corrosion of carbon steel and zinc-galvanized steel at 6–8 testing sites in Vietnam over 10 recent years (1995–2005 are focused on as well as the effects of environmental factors on atmospheric corrosion. The results showed that the corrosion of carbon steel is dominated by TOW, whereas zinc-galvanized-steel corrosion strongly depends on the chloride ion concentration in the air. The corrosion losses of both carbon- and zinc-galvanized steel fit the power model well with high correlation coefficients. In addition, the characteristics of the Vietnamese climate are introduced in the form of distribution maps of temperature (T, relative humidity (RH, total rainfall and TOW. A relationship between TOW, T and RH was found that enabled the calculation of TOW from T and RH data, which are available at meteorological stations. Finally, atmospheric corrosivity is determined on the basis of data on TOW, Cl− and SO2 concentrations, and the carbon steel corrosion rate. It is shown that in Vietnam, TOW is so long that the corrosion rate of carbon steel is in the C3 category; nevertheless, Cl− and SO2 concentrations in the atmosphere are not high.

  8. Experimental Study of Laser - enhanced 5A03 Aluminum Alloy and Its Stress Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guicheng; Chen, Jing; Pang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Based on the study of improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy for ship, this paper mainly studied the tensile test, surface morphology and residual stress under laser shock, high temperature and stress corrosion. It is found that the residual compressive stress and the grain refinement on the surface of the material during the heat strengthening process increase the breaking strength of the sample in the stress corrosion environment. Appropriate high temperature maintenance helps to enhance the effect of deformation strengthening. In the 300°C environment insulation, due to recrystallization of the material, the performance decreased significantly. This study provides an experimental basis for effectively improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy.

  9. Effect of radiolysis on long-term corrosion system formed on low-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badet, H.

    2013-01-01

    In France, for nuclear waste management, it is planned to build a storage device with a barrier system composed of steel container. Corrosion is evaluated for the safety of anoxic storage over the long term. With radiation, water radiolysis generates oxidizing and reducing species that can change the corrosion. Three aspects are developed in this thesis. The first concerns iron coupon samples experimented in carbonate deaerated water and subjected to gamma irradiation. It is shown that irradiation can increase corrosion rates within the parameters of dose. Identified crystalline phases are little changed with irradiation. Solution chemistry shows a decrease in pH with dose related to iron. Organic species are identified. The second axis is archaeological analogues irradiation with an old corrosion products layer. Structural analysis verified the phase stability with radiolysis, only the newly formed products changes. The third axis is a kinetic simulation approach. It checks the pH drop under irradiation. Taken together, these results allow us to provide new data for the anoxic corrosion under irradiation. (author) [fr

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Pipeline Carbon Steel under Different Iron Oxide Deposits in the District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Sang Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of pipeline steel covered by iron oxides (α-FeOOH; Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 was investigated in simulated district heating water. In potentiodynamic polarization tests; the corrosion rate of pipeline steel is increased under the iron oxide but the increaseing rate is different due to the differnet chemical reactions of the covered iron oxides. Pitting corrosion was only observed on the α-FeOOH-covered specimen; which is caused by the crevice corrosion under the α-FeOOH. From Mott-Schottky and X-ray diffraction results; the surface reaction and oxide layer were dependent on the kind of iron oxides. The iron oxides deposit increases the failure risk of the pipeline and localized corrosion can be occurred under the α-FeOOH-covered region of the pipeline. Thus, prevention methods for the iron oxide deposit in the district pipeline system such as filtering or periodic chemical cleaning are needed.

  11. Development of metallic system multi-composite materials for compound environment and corrosion monitoring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    1996-01-01

    For the structural materials used for the pressure boundary of nuclear power plants and others, the long term durability over several decades under the compound environment, in which the action of radiation and the corrosion and erosion in the environment of use are superposed, is demanded. To its controlling factors, the secular change of materials due to irradiation ageing and the chemical and physical properties of extreme compound environment are related complicatedly. In the first period of this research, the development of the corrosion-resistant alloys with the most excellent adaptability to environments was carried out by the combination of new alloy design and alloy manufacturing technology. In the second period, in order to heighten the adaptability as the pressure boundary materials between different compound environments, the creation of metallic system multi-composite materials has been advanced. Also corrosion monitoring technique is being developed. The stainless steel for water-cooled reactors, the wear and corrosion-resistant superalloy for reactor core, the corrosion-resistant alloy and the metallic refractory material for reprocessing nitric acid reaction vessels are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Corrosion Studies of Platinum Nano-Particles for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Signe Sarah

    The main focus of the present thesis is on corrosion and prevention of corrosion of platinum particles supported on carbon. This is important for instance in connection with start up and shutdown of fuel cells. The degradation mechanism of platinum particles supported on carbon has been character......The main focus of the present thesis is on corrosion and prevention of corrosion of platinum particles supported on carbon. This is important for instance in connection with start up and shutdown of fuel cells. The degradation mechanism of platinum particles supported on carbon has been...... characterized during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) condition using identical location (IL) transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A TEM grid was used as the working electrode in an electrochemical setup allowing a direct correlation between the electrochemical response and the TEM analysis. The main results...... thirds and one monolayer of gold on platinum supported on carbon were synthesized by an inverse micelle method. The results obtained appear independent of the gold coverage. It has been shown that the electrochemical active surface areas of the platinum and platinum gold particles synthesized...

  13. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C

    1996-11-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits on copper is described. The model is used to predict the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The criteria used for immunity against pitting is that the volume of the cuprous oxide formed at the site of the metal oxidation at the bottom of a corrosion pit must be smaller than the volume of the oxidised metal. Equal volumes would give a complete coverage of the metal in a pit by adherent cuprous oxide and propagation would not be possible. For potentials where copper is not immune to pitting an estimate of the maximum growth rate is given. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution at the bottom a corrosion pit. Precipitation of oxides as well as of basic salts of copper is considered. A total of 26 aqueous species are considered in waters with compositions ranging from those of tap waters to that of sea water. Calculations are made for the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. 38 refs, 60 figs, 17 tabs

  14. The study of henna leaves extract as green corrosion inhibitor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaudhari H.G and Vashi R.T

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... Mild steel is widely used as constitutional material in many ... in produced water and was reported as a several concern in corrosion of mild steel pipeline in oil and .... Where R is gas constant and T is absolute temperature.

  15. Mechanistic studies of carbon steel corrosion inhibition by cashew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenoxide, R-Ar-O- ions from the CNSL inhibitor were found to be responsible for the reduction of the corrosion rate of the carbon steel. Also, it was observed that the surface charge of the carbon steel electrodes was positive with respect to the solutions containing CNSL inhibitor. It is likely that the mechanism of the ...

  16. COPPER PITTING CORROSION AND PINHOLE LEAKS: A CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localized corrosion, or "pitting", of copper drinking water pipe continues is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack leads to pinhole leaks that can potentially lead to water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs for the homeowners, as well as th...

  17. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  18. An expert system for corrosion rate monitoring and diagnosis in the heating circuits of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducelli, C.; Conte, E.; Federico, A.G.; Tripi, A.; Ronchetti, C.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation field of out of core components of a water reactor primary plant depends on corrosion product equilibria. The computer programs that try to simulate the behaviour of the corrosion products and the radiation build up didn't provide good results, especially in describing several different plants with the same program. In order to obtain better results the authors decided to use a different approach, building an expert system, which performs on-line corrosion rate monitoring by means of a number of probes connected to an automatic corrosimeter, evaluates expected corrosion rate values and behaviours, and, if there are discrepancies, performs a diagnosis, providing suggestions to overcome the difficulty. (author)

  19. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  20. Study of the uniform corrosion of non alloy and stainless steels: combined utilization of acoustic emission and electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaubert, Lionel

    2004-01-01

    In chemical and petrochemical industry, uniform corrosion induces important economic and security disappointments. The mechanisms of this damaging corrosion mode are well understood, but methods for on-line detection are badly missing. Acoustic emission technique presents, to palliate this lack, potentialities that have been studied in an instrumented laboratory loop allowing the simulation of industrial uniform corrosion conditions. In acidic media, acoustic activity is related to the hydrogen evolution resulting from proton reduction; it is therefore well correlated to the damage severity. In neutral aerated media, the deposit formation of corrosion products is not very emissive. Yet, a specific study of frequency parameters allows detection of corrosion evolution, but in that case, the quantification of corrosion rate remains difficult. A subsidiary study confirms the technique applicability in the case of 'acidic' corrosion, even in very noisy conditions. (author) [fr

  1. Case studies of corrosion of mixed waste and transuranic waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents three case studies of corrosion of waste drums at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Corrosion was not anticipated by the waste generators, but occurred because of subtle chemical or physical mechanisms. In one case, drums of a cemented transuranic (TRU) sludge experienced general and pitting corrosion. In the second instance, a chemical from a commercial paint stripper migrated from its primary containment drums to chemically attack overpack drums made of mild carbon steel. In the third case, drums of mixed low level waste (MLLW) soil corroded drum packaging even though the waste appeared to be dry when it was placed in the drums. These case studies are jointly discussed as ''lessons learned'' to enhance awareness of subtle mechanisms that can contribute to the corrosion of radioactive waste drums during interim storage

  2. Pitting corrosion behaviour study of aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Merino, S.; Lopez, M. D.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the SiCp proportion on the pitting corrosion of A3xx.x/SiC/xxp composites was studies by means of potenciodinamic polarization and double cyclic polarization in saline environment at 25 degree centigrade A360/SiC/xxp matrix does not contain copper, whereas the A380/SiC/xxp matric contains 1,39-1,44 wt %Cu. The kinetic study was carried out by gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by low angle XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion is due to nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 -3H 2 O on the material surface. The corrosion increases with the reinforcement proportion, chloride concentration and copper content. (Author) 10 refs

  3. Corrosion studies on selected metallic materials for application in nuclear waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Fiehn, B.; Gago, J.A.; Azkarate, I.

    1994-03-01

    In previous corrosion studies, carbon steels and the alloy Ti 99.8-Pd were identified as promising materials for heat-generating nuclear waste containers acting as a radionuclide barrier in a rock-salt repository. To characterize the long-term corrosion behaviour of these materials in more detail, a research programme including laboratory-scale and in-situ corrosion studies has been undertaken jointly by KfK and ENRESA/INASMET. In the period under review, gamma irradiation corrosion studies of up to about 6 months at 10 Gy/h and stress corrosion cracking studies at slow strain rates (10 -4 -10 -7 s -1 ) were performed on three preselected carbon steels in disposal relevant brines (NaCl-rich, MgCl 2 -rich) at 90 C and 150 C (TStE 355, TStE 460, 15 MnNi 6.3). Moreover, results were obtained from long-term in-situ corrosion studies (maximum test duration 9 years) conducted on carbon steel, Ti 99.8-Pd, Hastelloy C4, Ni-resist D4, and Si-cast iron in boreholes in the Asse salt mine. (orig./MM) [de

  4. Corrosion risks with polyethylene pipes in district cooling systems; Korrosionsrisker vid anvaendning av polyetenroer i fjaerrkylesystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinka, Tor-Gunnar; Almquist, Joergen; Gubner, Rolf [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Field exposures of carbon steel and stainless steel test cylinders have been made in the district cooling system at Affaersverken Energi AB, Karlskrona, Sweden, as well as determinations of the amount of dissolved oxygen in the district cooling water. In the district cooling system tubes of polyethylene, carbon steel and stainless steel SS 2343 according to Swedish standard SS 14 23 43 are used. Karlskrona's drinking water, without deaeration, is used in the district cooling system. The polyethylene tubes with pressure number PN 10 are placed underground. The content of dissolved oxygen was very low in Karlskrona both before and after a period of 19 days with elevated oxygen content. During these 19 days the content of dissolved oxygen in the system increased without any apparent cause. The highest recorded oxygen content was 3.4 mg O{sub 2}/l. There are no obvious explanations for the increase of oxygen in the system. However, transport of oxygen into the system through the polyethylene tubes can be excluded as the source of the entering oxygen. The corrosion rate that was determined for freely exposed carbon steel in the district heating water in Karlskrona was low, 5 {mu}m/year. The corrosion attack was of a uniform nature (general corrosion) and there were no local corrosion attacks on the carbon steel cylinders. On connecting the carbon steel with stainless steel SS 23 43 with an area ratio of 1:1 the corrosion rate of the carbon steel increased by 2-3 times as compared to free exposure without electrical connection. On the stainless steel SS 2343 there was no corrosion damage either on the freely exposed stainless steel or on stainless steel that was connected to carbon steel. There were no signs of pitting corrosion or crevice corrosion on the stainless steel cylinders. The main corrosion risk for carbon steel at an elevated content of dissolved oxygen is bimetallic corrosion (galvanic corrosion) between carbon steel and copper and copper alloys, or

  5. The Use of AC-DC-AC Methods in Assessing Corrosion Resistance Performance of Coating Systems for Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Robert C.; Upadhyay, Vinod; Wang, Yar-Ming; Battocchi, Dante

    The potential utility of AC-DC-AC electrochemical methods in comparative measures of corrosion-resisting coating system performance for magnesium alloys under consideration for the USAMP "Magnesium Front End Research and Development" project was previously shown in this forum [1]. Additional studies of this approach using statistically-designed experiments have been conducted with focus on alloy types, pretreatment, topcoat material and topcoat thickness as the variables. Additionally, sample coupons made for these designed experiments were also subjected to a typical automotive cyclic corrosion test cycle (SAE J2334) as well as ASTM B117 for comparison of relative performance. Results of these studies are presented along with advantages and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  6. Developing a program to identify and track corrosion in nuclear plant raw water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spires PE, G.V.; Pickles PE, S.B.

    2001-01-01

    Findings derived from a comprehensive plant performance survey at Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) nuclear units convinced management that it would be prudent to expand the ongoing power piping Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) induced wall thinning base-lining and tracking program to encompass the raw cooling water systems as well. Such systems are subject to a distinctly different class of pipe wall thinning (PWT) mechanisms than the FAC that degrades high-energy power piping. This paper describes the PWT corrosion assessment and tracking program that has been developed and is currently being implemented by OPG for the raw cooling water (i.e., Service Water) systems within it's nuclear generating stations. Interim databases are used prior to initial inspection rounds to catalogue the prospective locations. For each piping system being surveyed, these interim databases include physical coordinates for the candidate locations, the type and wall thickness of the components comprising each location, ranking indications and recommended NDE methodologies as a function of the anticipated corrosion mechanisms. Rationales for assessing corrosion susceptibility and ranking prospective inspection sites are expounded by way of notations built into the database. (authors)

  7. Magnesium and its alloys as degradable biomaterials : Corrosion studies using potentiodynamic and EIS electrochemical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Wolf Dieter; Nascimento, Maria Lucia; Zeddies, Miriam; Córsico, Mariana; Gassa, Liliana Mabel; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica Alicia

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium is potentially useful for orthopaedic and cardiovascular applications. However, the corrosion rate of this metal is so high that its degradation occurs before the end of the healing process. In industrial media the behaviour of several magnesium alloys have been probed to be better than magnesium performance. However, the information related to their corrosion behaviour in biological media is insufficient. The aim of this work is to study the influence of the components of organic f...

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES FOR CORROSION INHIBITION OF MILD STEEL BY CHRYSOPHYLLUM ALBIDUM EXTRACT

    OpenAIRE

    Akoma Chigozie S.; Osarolube Eziaku; Abumere O. E.

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of mild steel in carbonated drinks produced by Nigerian Breweries (Fanta, Sprite and Coke) was studied in the presence and absence of an eco-friendly inhibitor, Chrysophyllum albidum using Potentiodynamic polarization technique at 25 °C. Results showed that Chrysophyllum albidum reduced the current density (icorr), which in turn means that the corrosion rate was reduced significantly. The inhibition efficiency was found to be 93%, 78.6% and 87.5% for Fanta, Sprite and C...

  9. Review and Study of Physics Driven Pitting Corrosion Modeling in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    aluminum subjected to pitting corrosion under fatigue conditions ”, Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 46, No. 4, pp. 1253-1259 Wei, R.P. (2001) “A model for...and material microstructure applied to corrosion and fatigue of aluminum and steel alloys”, Engineering Fracture Mechanics , Vol. 76, pp. 695-708 Wei...Fatigue Behavior of Aluminum Alloy 7075 -T6: Modeling and Experimental Studies", Materials Science and Engineering: A, vol. 297, Issue: 1-2, 15, pp. 223

  10. Microbially influenced corrosion: studies on enterobacteria isolated from seawater environment and influence of toxic metals on bacterial biofilm and bio-corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermond-Tilly, D.; Pineau, S.; Dupont-Morral, I. [Corrodys, 50 - Equeurdreville (France); Janvier, M.; Grimont, P.A.D. [Institut Pasteur, Unite BBPE, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    of microbial clusters and the increase production of the EPS by bacteria (Fang et al., 2002). This study was conducted to test the corrosive activity of Citrobacter freundii, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella planticola on carbon steel coupons and the influence of a toxic metal Cr(III) found in polluted marine environment) on these bacteria and the EPS production of the biofilm formed on carbon steel by appropriate in vitro experiments. (authors)

  11. A mini-catalogue of metal corrosion products studied by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, M.; Smith, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text.The extensive development of physical methods of analysis since the beginning of this century has revolutionised the classical observation techniques most frequently used by the archaeologist. Raman Microscopy (RM) appears to be one of the most promising tools due to the many advantages that it offers: e.g. non-destructive, in situ, micro-analysis. RM is being applied to many archaeological fields as well as to industrial or environmental sectors. In relation with parallel studies made on the identification of corrosion products on archaeological materials, and according to the principal condition for the RM characterisation of an unknown product being the comparison of its Raman spectrum with known standard spectra, the essential aim of this study is to build a mini-catalogue of standard corrosion products susceptible to be found on metallic objects; these could be from archaeological as well as from modern contexts. However, it is noted that the identification of a corrosion product may suggest either an urgent intervention from the restoration team (in the case of active corrosion products), or a stabilisation of the corrosion layer if this is considered to be a protective layer. All the standard samples are natural minerals coming from the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris (France) and correspond to the corrosion products most frequently found on metals such copper, zinc, lead or tin. These samples have been analyzed by RM and also confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction analysis. This catalogue, including more than 30 standard species corresponding to the most common metal corrosion products, is very useful for the different studies in progress in collaboration with different archaeological metal restoration teams. The near future will probably see a mobile Raman Microprobe (MRM) equipped with many different mini-catalogues on the site of a corroded mettalic bridge, a corroded canalisation or under the sea to rapidly identify the different

  12. Studies on corrosion protection of laser hybrid welded AISI 316 by laser remelting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L welds. Welding and laser treatment parameters were varied. General corrosion behaviour of the weld and laser treated surface was characterised using a gel visualization test. The local electrochemistry of the weld and laser......Unlike in autogenous laser welding, hybrid laser welding of stainless steel could introduce grain boundary carbides due to low cooling rates. Formation of grain boundary carbides leads to reduced corrosion properties. Studies have initially been carried out on hybrid laser welding and subsequent...... treated surface was investigated using a novel micro electrochemical technique with a tip resolution of ~1 mm. Results show that hybrid laser welding of 316L has increased corrosion susceptibility probably as a result of grain boundary carbide formation. However a suitable post laser treatment could...

  13. Study of a Triazole Derivative as Corrosion Inhibitor for Mild Steel in Phosphoric Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion inhibition by a triazole derivative (PAMT on mild steel in phosphoric acid (H3PO4 solution has been investigated by weight loss and polarization methods. The experimental results reveal that the compound has a significant inhibiting effect on the corrosion of steel in H3PO4 solution. It also shows good corrosion inhibition at higher concentration of H3PO4. Potentiodynamic polarization studies have shown that the compound acts as a mixed-type inhibitor retarding the anodic and cathodic corrosion reactions with predominant effect on the cathodic reaction. The values of inhibition efficiency obtained from weight loss and polarization measurements are in good agreement. The adsorption of this compound is found to obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Some kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as apparent activation energy, frequency factor, and adsorption free energy have been calculated and discussed.

  14. Magnesium and its alloys as degradable biomaterials: corrosion studies using potentiodynamic and EIS electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Dieter Müller

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is potentially useful for orthopaedic and cardiovascular applications. However, the corrosion rate of this metal is so high that its degradation occurs before the end of the healing process. In industrial media the behaviour of several magnesium alloys have been probed to be better than magnesium performance. However, the information related to their corrosion behaviour in biological media is insufficient. The aim of this work is to study the influence of the components of organic fluids on the corrosion behaviour of Mg and AZ31 and LAE442 alloys using potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and EIS techniques. Results showed localized attack in chloride containing media. The breakdown potential decreased when chloride concentration increased. The potential range of the passivation region was extended in the presence of albumin. EIS measurements showed that the corrosion behaviour of the AZ31 was very different from that of LAE442 alloy in chloride solutions.

  15. Corrosion studies on materials of construction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion studies on specimens of commercial Type 304L stainless steel (SS), nuclear grade type 304L SS, extra low-carbon nitric acid grade (NAG) Uranus-16 SS, NAG Uranus-65 SS, Ti, Ti-5% Ta, Ti-0.25% Pd, Zircaloy-2, weldments of Ti and of Ti-5% Ta, and surface-modified (thermally oxidised and anodised) Ti were carried out to assess their corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. The results indicated that Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta, Uranus-16 SS and Uranus-65 SS have excellent corrosion resistance in boiling nitric acid solution. Specimens of Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta and thermally-oxidised Ti showed excellent corrosion resistance also in a simulated uranium-containing reprocessing medium in a concentrated nitric acid solution. SEM and XRD analyses were carried out on the tested specimens to examine the scale morphology and phases present on the surface. (orig.)

  16. In-Plant Corrosion Study of Steels in Distillery Effluent Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A. K.

    2015-05-01

    The present study deals with corrosion and performance of steels observed in an effluent treatment plant (ETP) of a distillery. For this purpose, the metal coupons were exposed in primary (untreated effluent) and secondary tank (anaerobic treatment effluent) of the ETP. The extent of attack has been correlated with the composition of the effluent with the help of laboratory immersion and electrochemical tests. Untreated distillery effluent found to be more corrosive than the anaerobic-treated effluents and is assigned due to chloride, phosphate, calcium, nitrate, and nitrite ions, which enhances corrosivity at acidic pH. Mild steel showed highest uniform and localized corrosion followed by stainless steels 304L and 316L and lowest in case of duplex 2205.

  17. Atomistic studies of cation transport in tetragonal ZrO2 during zirconium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is a significant degradation mechanism of these alloys. During corrosion, the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously, it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cations is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO 2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO 2 . The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration of Zr interstitials at a grain boundary is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  18. Studies of corrosion in metallic container for storage of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azkarate, I.; Madina, V.; Insausti, M.

    1999-01-01

    The metallic container is one of the most important barriers that, along with engineered and natural barriers, will isolate high level nuclear waste in saline and granite geological formations from the geosphere. However, general and localized corrosion modes such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC), pitting, crevice corrosion and hydrogen damage can be active under disposal conditions, so the corrosion behaviour of the metal container material must be carefully studied. Several metals and their alloys have been proposed for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers including carbon steels, stainless steels, titanium and titanium alloys and copper and copper-base alloys. Carbon steels and copper alloys are considered for the two rock formations, titanium is considered for salt environments and the stainless steel only in the case of a granite formation. (Author)

  19. Water quality analysis and its relation to the scaling and corrosion tendency in an open water cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Halimah Abdul Ghani; Masitah Alias

    2008-01-01

    The problem of scaling and corrosion are common phenomena in a water cooling system especially the open cooling system. This study was carried out in Temenggor dam with an objective to check the water quality at the intake and tailrace of the hydro power plant. In-situ measurement and laboratory analysis on the water samples were carried out. Seven parameters were measured in-situ for example temperature, pH, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), total dissolved solid (TDS), turbidity, and chlorine concentration. The water samples were collected using water sampler at three locations near the intake area at surface, and at the interval of one meter up to three meter depth. Two locations at the tailrace also were collected in the same pattern. These samples were brought back to the laboratory in UiTM, Shah Alam for further analysis. Laboratory analysis includes alkalinity, Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and Fe 2+ concentrations, and total suspended solid (TSS). From the results, the LSI, RSI and PSI were calculated to predict the scaling and corrosion tendency. The index shows strong tendency for corrosion to take place in the cooling system as the related factors supported it. (author)

  20. Scoping calculation of nuclides migration in engineering barrier system for effect of volume expansion due to overpack corrosion and intrusion of the buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshita, Takashi; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Ohi, Takao; Nakajima, Kunihiko

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel overpack leads to a volume expansion since the specific gravity of corrosion products is smaller than carbon steel. The buffer material is compressed due to the corrosive swelling, reducing its thickness and porosity. On the other hand, buffer material may be extruded into fractures of the surrounding rock and this may lead to a deterioration of the planned functions of the buffer, including retardation of nuclides migration and colloid filtration. In this study, the sensitivity analyses for the effect of volume expansion and intrusion of the buffer material on nuclide migration in the engineering barrier system are carried out. The sensitivity analyses were performed on the decrease in the thickness of the buffer material in the radial direction caused by the corrosive swelling, and the change in the porosity and dry density of the buffer caused by both compacting due to corrosive swelling and intrusion of buffer material. As results, it was found the maximum release rates of relatively shorter half-life nuclides from the outside of the buffer material decreased for taking into account of a volume expansion due to overpack corrosion. On the other hand, the maximum release rates increased when the intrusion of buffer material was also taking into account. It was, however, the maximum release rates of longer half-life nuclides, such as Cs-137 and Np-237, were insensitive to the change of buffer material thickness, and porosity and dry density of buffer. (author)

  1. PIPELINE CORROSION CONTROL IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion in pipelines is one of the major challenges faced by oil and gas industries all over the world. This has made corrosion control or management a major factor to consider before setting up any industry that will transport products via pipelines. In this study the types of corrosion found on system 2A pipeline were; ...

  2. Modelling fireside corrosion of heat exchangers in co-fired pulverised fuel power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, N.J. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre; Fry, A.T. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    As a result of concerns about the effects of CO{sub 2} emissions on the global environment, there is increasing pressure to reduce such emissions from power generation systems. The use of biomass co-firing with coal in conventional pulverised fuel power stations has provided the most immediate route to introduce a class of fuel that is regarded as both sustainable and carbon neutral. In the future it is anticipated that increased levels of biomass will need to be used in such systems to achieve the desired CO{sub 2} emission targets. However there are concerns over the risk of fireside corrosion damage to the various heat exchangers and boiler walls used in such systems. Future pulverised fuel power systems will need to be designed to cope with the effects of using a wide range of coal-biomass mixes. However, such systems will also need to use much higher heat exchanger operating temperatures to increase their conversion efficiencies and counter the effects of the CO{sub 2} capture technologies that will need to be used in them. Higher operating temperatures will also increase the risk of fireside corrosion damage to the critical heat exchangers. This paper reports work that has been carried out to develop quantitative corrosion models for heat exchangers in pulverised fuel power systems. These developments have been particularly targeted at producing models that enable the evaluation of the effects of using different coal-biomass mixtures and of increasing heat exchanger operating conditions. Models have been produced that have been targeted at operating conditions and materials used in (a) superheaters/reheaters and (b) waterwalls. Data used in the development of these models has been produced from full scale and pilot scale plants in the UK using a wide range of coal and biomass mixtures, as well as from carefully targeted series of laboratory corrosion tests. Mechanistic and neural network based models have been investigated during this development process to

  3. Flow velocity effect on the corrosion/erosion in water injection systems; Efecto de la velocidad de flujo en la corrosion/erosion en sistemas de inyeccion de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, C.; Mendez, J. [PDVSA Exploracion y reduccion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Instalaciones, Torres Petroleras EX-MRV, Torre Lama, Piso No. 6, Zulia, Apartado 4013, Venezuela (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The main causes of fails at water injection lines on the secondary petroleum recovery systems are related with corrosion/erosion problems which are influenced by the flow velocity, the presence of dissolved oxygen, solids in the medium and the microorganisms proliferation. So too, this corrosion process promotes the suspended solids generation which affects the water quality injected, causing wells tamponage and loss of injectivity, with the consequent decrease in the crude production. This situation has been impacted in meaning order at the production processes of an exploration enterprise which utilizes the Maracaibo lake as water resource for their injection by pattern projects. Stating that, it was developed a study for determining in experimental order the effect of flow velocity on the corrosion/erosion process joined to the presence of dissolved oxygen which allows to determine the optimum range of the said working velocity for the water injection systems. This range is defined by critical velocities of bio layers deposition and erosion. They were realized simulation pilot tests of the corrosion standard variables, concentration of dissolved oxygen and fluid velocity in the injection systems with filtered and non filtered water. For the development of these tests it was constructed a device which allows to install and expose cylindrical manometers of carbon steel according to predetermined conditions which was obtained the necessary information to make correlations the results of these variables. Additionally, they were determined the mathematical models that adjusts to dynamical behavior of the corrosion/erosion process, finding the optimum range of the flow velocity for the control of this process, being necessary to utilize the following techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray dispersion analysis (EDX) for encourage the surface studies. They were effected morphological analysis of the surfaces studies and the values were determined of

  4. The research on corrosion condition and anticorrosion methods of SEP system pipelines in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Cao Feng; Wang Jianjun

    2010-01-01

    SEP system in Qinshan nuclear power plant phase II provides drinking water and firefight water for nuclear island, conventional island, inner and outer of BOP structures. Many corrosion perforations in the SEP pipeline were found during operation. This article analysis the corrosion reasons and presents some reasonable treatment and surveillance methods. (authors)

  5. Studies of corrosion in metallic container for storage of high level radioactive wastes; Estudios de corrosion de materiales metalicos para capsulas de almacenamiento de residuos de alta actividad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azkarate, I; Madina, V; Insausti, M

    1999-11-01

    The metallic container is one of the most important barriers that, along with engineered and natural barriers, will isolate high level nuclear waste in saline and granite geological formations from the geosphere. However, general and localized corrosion modes such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC), pitting, crevice corrosion and hydrogen damage can be active under disposal conditions, so the corrosion behaviour of the metal container material must be carefully studied. Several metals and their alloys have been proposed for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers including carbon steels, stainless steels, titanium and titanium alloys and copper and copper-base alloys. Carbon steels and copper alloys are considered for the two rock formations, titanium is considered for salt environments and the stainless steel only in the case of a granite formation. (Author)

  6. Resistance of Cementitious Binders to Chloride Induced Corrosion of Embedded Steel by Electrochemical and Microstructural Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ha Won; Ann, Ki Yong; Kim, Tae Sang

    2009-01-01

    The high alkaline property in the concrete pore solution protects the embedded steel in concrete from corrosion due to aggressive ions attack. However, a continuous supply of those ions, in particular, chlorides altogether with a pH fall in electrochemical reaction on the steel surface eventually depassivate the steel to corrode. To mitigate chloride-induced corrosion in concrete structures, finely grained mineral admixtures, for example, pulverized fuel ash (PFA), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) and silica fume (SF) have been often advised to replace ordinary Portland cement (OPC) partially as binder. A consistent assessment of those partial replacements has been rarely performed with respect to the resistance of each binder to corrosion, although the studies for each binder were extensively looked into in a way of measuring the corrosion rate, influence of microstructure or chemistry of chlorides ions with cement hydrations. The paper studies the behavior of steel corrosion, chloride transport, pore structure and buffering capacity of those cementitious binders. The corrosion rate of steel in mortars of OPC, 30% PFA, 60% GGBS and 10% SF respectively, with chloride in cast ranging from 0.0 to 3.0% by weight of binder was measured at 7, 28 and 150 days to determine the chloride threshold level and the rate of corrosion propagation, using the anodic polarization technique. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also applied to cement pastes of each binder at 7 and 28 days to ensure the development of pore structure. Finally, the release rate of bound chlorides (I.e. buffering capacity) was measured at 150 days. The chloride threshold level was determined assuming that the corrosion rate is beyond 1-2 mA/m 3 at corrosion and the order of the level was OPC > 10% SF > 60% GGBS > 30% PFA. Mercury intrusion porosimetry showed that 10% SF paste produced the most dense pore structure, followed by 60% GGBS, 30% PFA and OPC pastes, respectively. It was found that OPC

  7. Inhibition study of additives towards the corrosion of ferrous metal in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M.A.; Sazzad, B.S.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • TBA doped biodiesel exhibits fairly good corrosion inhibition efficiency. • TBA forms nitrogen-containing layer on metal surface and protects the corrosion. • Materials exposed to TBA doped biodiesel show less surface roughness. - Abstract: Some efforts have already been given by other researchers to characterize the corrosion behavior of different metals in biodiesel. However, there is very limited information on its remedial measure. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of tert-butylamine (TBA), benzotriazole (BTA), butylate-dhydroxytoluene (BHT), and pyrogallol (PY) on the corrosion of cast iron (CI) and low carbon steel (LCS) through an immersion test in palm biodiesel (B100) at 300 K. Result shows that TBA-doped biodiesel exhibits fairly good corrosion-inhibiting properties for materials exposed to B100. Inhibition efficiency of TBA is found to be 86.54% and 86.71% for CI and LCS, respectively which is far better than other tested additives in this study. The high inhibition efficiency could be attributed to the dominant physical adsorption of N-containing compound which creates a protective layer over the metal surface and prevents corrosion.

  8. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. PMID:28626241

  9. The Development of an In-Situ TEM Technique for Studying Corrosion Behavior as Applied to Zirconium-Based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Wayne

    Zirconium-based alloys are a commonly used material for nuclear fuel rod cladding, due to its low neutron cross section and good corrosion properties. However, corrosion is still a limiting factor in fuel rod lifespan, which restricts burn up levels, and thus efficiency, that can be achieved. While long-term corrosion behavior has been studied through both reactor and autoclave samples, the oxide nucleation and growth behavior has not been extensively studied. This work develops a new technique to study the initial stages of corrosion in zirconium-based alloys and the microstructural effects on this process by developing an environmental cell system for the TEM. Nanoscale oxidation parameters are developed, as is a new FIB technique to support this method. Precession diffraction is used in conjunction with in-situ TEM to observe the initial stages of corrosion in these alloys, and oxide thickness is estimated using low-loss EELS. In addition, the stress stabilization of tetragonal ZrO 2 is explored in the context of sample preparation for TEM. It was found that in-situ environmental TEM using an environmental cell replicates the oxidation behavior observed in autoclaved samples in both oxide structure and phases. Utilizing this technique, it was shown that cracking of the oxide layer in zirconium-based alloys is related to oxide relaxation, and not thermal changes. The effect of secondary phase particles on oxidation behavior did not present significant results, however a new method for studying initial oxidation rates using low-loss EELS was developed.

  10. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  11. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  12. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, it has been attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build-up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: The origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters; the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pins deposits (activation); the release and transport of cobalt-60; the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarized. 90 refs, figs and tabs

  13. A Study on Microstructure Change and Pitting Corrosion Resistance of Ferritic Stainless Steel Weldment According to Nb Contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Shin, Yong-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Hae-Woo [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Riong [Kangwon National University, ChunCheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Ho [Silla University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This paper identified the effects of Nb on microstructure. Also, it has studied on uniform and pitting corrosion resistance in a ferritic stainless steel weld metal of the automobile exhaust system. We fabricated 3 flux cored wires designed with 0-1.0 wt% Nb and performed Flux Cored Arc Welding. We observed the microstructure with the SEM/EDS and EBSD. To evaluate the uniform and pitting corrosion resistance, we performed a potentiodynamic polarization test in 0.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 M NaCl. As a result of the tests, we found that as the amount of addition of Nb rose, the amount of Cr-carbide fell. The microstructure became more refined. The specimen with 1.0%Nb added had the highest uniform and pitting corrosion resistance. After the pitting corrosion test, a pit was formed at the grain boundary that has no addition of Nb. In addition, in the specimen with added Nb, pits were formed at the inclusions.

  14. Study on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Mg-Zn-Ca Alloy Wire for Biomaterial Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maobo; Xu, Guangquan; Liu, Debao; Zhao, Yue; Ning, Baoqun; Chen, Minfang

    2018-03-01

    Due to their excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, magnesium alloy wires have attracted much attention for biomaterial applications including orthopedic K-wires and sutures in wound closure. In this study, Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy wires were prepared by cold drawing combined with proper intermediate annealing process. Microstructures, texture, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy wire in a simulated body fluid were investigated. The results showed that the secondary phase and average grain size of the Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy were refined in comparison with the as-extruded alloy and a strong (0002)//DD basal fiber texture system was formed after multi-pass cold drawing. After the annealing, most of the basal planes were tilted to the drawing direction (DD) by about 35°, presenting the characteristics of random texture, and the texture intensity decreased. The as-annealed wire shows good mechanical properties with the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS) and elongation of 253 ± 8.5 MPa, 212 ± 11.3 MPa and 9.2 ± 0.9%, respectively. Electrochemical and hydrogen evolution measurements showed that the corrosion resistance of the Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy wire was improved after the annealing. The immersion test indicated that the Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca wire exhibited uniform corrosion behavior during the initial period of immersion, but then exhibited local corrosion behavior.

  15. Electrochemical Study about Microorganisms Induced Corrosion in Inconel

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez-Sánchez, G.; Tiburcio, C. Gaona; Almeraya-Calderón, F.M.; Martínez-Villafañe, A.

    2005-01-01

    Inconel 600 has been designed to heat resistance. It is used in the chemistry industry, food industry and, of course, in the production of electric energy, among others. The goal of this project was to decrease the costs in the equipments and pipes deterioration by prolonging their lifetime, controlling and preventing their deterioration by means of appropriated and programmed maintenance, but above all knowing the mechanism and kinetic of corrosion that affects them. We used polarization cur...

  16. Prevention for possible microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in RHLWE flush water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.C.; Jenkins, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    This report is in response to the request to provide a recommendation for the prevention of possible microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) for the RHLWE (Replacement High-Level Waste Evaporator) flush water (FW) system. The recent occurrences of MIC at DWPF prompted HLWE to evaluate the possibility of MIC occurring in this 304L stainless steel RHLWE flush water system. Concern was heightened by the fact that the well water used and the other conditions at H-Tank Farm are similar to those at DWPF. However, only one known leak has occurred in the existing 304L evaporator flush water systems in either tank farm (in 1H system), and no MIC Corrosion has been confirmed in the tank farm area. The design of the RHLWE flush water system (completed long before the occurrence of MIC at DWPF) was modeled after the existing evaporator flush water systems and did not specifically include MIC prevention considerations. Therefore, MIC prevention was not specifically considered during the design phase of this flush water system. The system is presently being installed. After an extensive evaluation, a task team concluded that the best biocide to prevent the occurrence of MIC would be NaOH at fairly low concentration. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is optimal in this application, because of its effectiveness, low cost, and familiarity to the Operations personnel (see Appendix A). However, it is the opinion of the task group that application should be withheld until MIC corrosion is demonstrated in the system

  17. Corrosion studies of titanium in borated water for TPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.; Cole, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion testing was performed to demonstrate the compatibility of the titanium vacuum vessel with borated water. Borated water is proposed to fill the annulus of the double wall vacuum vessel to provide effective radiation shielding. Borating the water with 110 grams of boric acid per liter is sufficient to reduce the nuclear heating in the Toroidal Field Coil set and limit the activation of components external to the vacuum vessel. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed. Results of the CERT tests confirm that stress corrosion cracking is not significant for Ti-6Al4V or Ti-3AI-2.5V. Welded and unwelded specimens were tested in air and in borated water at 150 degree C. Strength, elongation, and time to failure were nearly identical for all test conditions, and all the samples exhibited ductile failure. Potentiodynamic tests on Ti-6A1-4V and Ti in borated water as a function of temperature showed low corrosion rates over a wide passive potential range. Further, this passivity appeared stable to anodic potentials substantially greater than those expected from MHD effects

  18. Alkali chloride induced corrosion of superheaters under biomass firing conditions: Improved insights from laboratory scale studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    One of the major operational challenges experienced by power plants firing biomass is the high corrosion rate of superheaters. This limits the outlet steam temperature of the superheaters and consequently, the efficiency of the power plants. The high corrosion rates have been attributed to the fo......One of the major operational challenges experienced by power plants firing biomass is the high corrosion rate of superheaters. This limits the outlet steam temperature of the superheaters and consequently, the efficiency of the power plants. The high corrosion rates have been attributed......, [1–3]). However, complete understanding of the corrosion mechanism under biomass-firing conditions has not yet been achieved. This is attributed partly to the complex nature of the corrosion process since there are many species produced from fuel combustion which can interact with one another...... and the steel surface. Many studies have focused on specific parameters such as, deposit composition (KCl, K2SO4, K2CO3, etc.) or gas species such as HCl, SO2, H2O [4–6], however, more research is necessary to understand the interaction of deposits and gas mixtures with each other and metallic superheater...

  19. Corrosion Mechanism and Bond-Strength Study on Galvanized Steel in Concrete Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M.; Pokorny, P.; Stoulil, J. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Zinc coating on carbon steels give the higher corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments and in carbonated concrete. However, hydrogen evolution accompanies the corrosion of zinc in the initial activity in fresh concrete, which can lead to the formation of a porous structure at the reinforcement -concrete interface, which can potentially reduce the bond-strength of the reinforcement with concrete. The present study examines the mechanism of the corrosion of hot-dip galvanized steel in detail, as in the model pore solutions and real concrete. Calcium ion plays an important role in the corrosion mechanism, as it prevents the formation of passive layers on zinc at an elevated alkalinity. The corrosion rate of galvanized steel decreases in accordance with the exposure time; however, the reason for this is not the zinc transition into passivity, but the consumption of the less corrosion-resistant phases of hot-dip galvanizing in the concrete environment. The results on the electrochemical tests have been confirmed by the bond-strength test for the reinforcement of concrete and by evaluating the porosity of the cement adjacent to the reinforcement.

  20. [Study on corrosion resistance of three non-noble porcelain alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhikai; Xu, Sheng; Li, Wei; Teng, Jin; Li, Ning

    2011-10-01

    To study the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Co-Cr, Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be based porcelain alloys in NaCl solution. Five samples of each alloy were made respectively, electric polarization curve of each alloy was obtained using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Self-corrosion potential (E(corr)), self-corrosion current density (I(corr), passive region and transpassivation potential were tested. Microstructure and constituent was examined using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Co-Cr alloy possessed the most desirable corrosion resistance because of its integrated, homogeneous and compact passive film. The poor compactness of Ni-Cr alloy's passive film decreased its corrosion resistance. Ni-Cr-Be alloy exhibited the worst corrosion resistance due to the Cr and Mo depleted Ni-Be eutectic phases in the alloy. Taking biological security into consideration, it is necessary to avoid the application of porcelain alloys with Be element. Co-Cr alloy with better biocompatibility possesses much broader prospect in the field of dental restoration.

  1. Corrosion-fatigue studies of the Zr-based Vitreloy 105 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton Jr, Joe A.; Morrison, M.L.; Buchanan, R.A.; Liaw, Peter K.; Green, B.A.; Wang, G.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the stress-life behavior of the Vitreloy 105 BMG alloy in the four-point bending configuration in a 0.6 M. NaCl electrolyte. At high stress amplitudes, the corrosion-fatigue life was similar to the fatigue lives observed in air. The environment became increasingly detrimental with decreases in stress, and the corrosion-fatigue endurance limit decreased to about 50 MPa, an 88% decrease relative to testing in air. Similar to the tests conducted in air, oxide particles were found on the fracture surfaces but did not appear to significantly affect the corrosion-fatigue lives. However, wear and the resultant corrosion at the outer loading pins resulted in crack initiation in most of the samples. Thus, these results are considered conservative estimates of the corrosion-fatigue behavior of this BMG alloy. Monitoring of the samples and the open-circuit potentials revealed that the onset of significant crack growth occurred at an average of 92% of the total fatigue life. The mechanism of corrosion-fatigue degradation was found to be anodic dissolution

  2. Control of corrosion and aggression in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, R E; Morrison, I; Wentzel, M C

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion and/or aggression are common problems arising in pipelines transporting terrestrial waters. The kinetics and severity of such events depend on both the quality of the water being transported and the material properties of the pipeline. Irrespective of the nature of the problem, its solution (or at least its minimisation) is strongly linked to control of pH, calcium concentration and carbonate chemistry of the water (stabilisation). However, application of such chemistry to water treatment problems is complex and time consuming. Various numerical, graphical and computer techniques have been developed to address this, but these are either of insufficient accuracy, too time consuming or lacking in generality. In this paper algorithms are presented for solving a broad spectrum of problems related to control of mineral precipitation/aggression, pH and chemical dosing in water treatment. These have been incorporated into a computer software package, STASOFT, which offers the requisite framework for use in water treatment. Various stabilisation problems pertinent to water supply are addressed.

  3. Shadow corrosion phenomenon. An out-of-pile study on electrochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nadine

    2017-04-28

    The focus of the present thesis was the study of the enhanced corrosion phenomenon named ''Shadow Corrosion''. Within the context of researching based on the corrosion mechanism as well as the influencing parameters and driving forces, which cause or even intensify the corrosion, a variety of electrochemical characterization and surface analysis techniques were used. The first part of this thesis gives a short introduction with the definition of the term Shadow Corrosion and of the specific type called ''Enhanced Spacer Shadow Corrosion'' (ESSC). This is followed by a description of the involved materials being Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Chapter 2 introduces the background knowledge including fundamentals about environ-mental conditions under which Shadow Corrosion occurs as well as the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Furthermore, the state of the art about the Shadow Corrosion mechanism is presented and a description of the influencing effects on the enhanced corrosion phenomenon, like galvanic corrosion, water radiolysis, and photo-effect, is given. Further information and parameters on the part of AREVA GmbH concerning water impurities and a used coating layer on Inconel 718 are listed, which are of interest for the issue concerning the phenomenon Shadow Corrosion. The last part of this chapter contains the experimental conditions and parameters for the laboratory experiments with focus on water chemistry, specimen geometry, and UV-light exposure for photoexcitation and water radiolysis. Three different working hypotheses of this thesis are described in chapter 3. One hypothesis regarding the Shadow Corrosion Phenomenon is based on a galvanic corrosion mechanism between Zircaloy and Inconel 718. In addition, it is supposed that the galvanic corrosion could be influenced by the deposition of silver on Zircaloy and Inconel 718 in the form of an increased galvanic current. A further assumption is that the

  4. Shadow corrosion phenomenon. An out-of-pile study on electrochemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    The focus of the present thesis was the study of the enhanced corrosion phenomenon named ''Shadow Corrosion''. Within the context of researching based on the corrosion mechanism as well as the influencing parameters and driving forces, which cause or even intensify the corrosion, a variety of electrochemical characterization and surface analysis techniques were used. The first part of this thesis gives a short introduction with the definition of the term Shadow Corrosion and of the specific type called ''Enhanced Spacer Shadow Corrosion'' (ESSC). This is followed by a description of the involved materials being Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Chapter 2 introduces the background knowledge including fundamentals about environ-mental conditions under which Shadow Corrosion occurs as well as the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Furthermore, the state of the art about the Shadow Corrosion mechanism is presented and a description of the influencing effects on the enhanced corrosion phenomenon, like galvanic corrosion, water radiolysis, and photo-effect, is given. Further information and parameters on the part of AREVA GmbH concerning water impurities and a used coating layer on Inconel 718 are listed, which are of interest for the issue concerning the phenomenon Shadow Corrosion. The last part of this chapter contains the experimental conditions and parameters for the laboratory experiments with focus on water chemistry, specimen geometry, and UV-light exposure for photoexcitation and water radiolysis. Three different working hypotheses of this thesis are described in chapter 3. One hypothesis regarding the Shadow Corrosion Phenomenon is based on a galvanic corrosion mechanism between Zircaloy and Inconel 718. In addition, it is supposed that the galvanic corrosion could be influenced by the deposition of silver on Zircaloy and Inconel 718 in the form of an increased galvanic current. A further assumption is that the galvanic current could be decreased by a Cr

  5. Experimental study on dew point corrosion characteristics of the heating surface in a 65 t/h biomass-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yungang; Ma, Haidong; Liang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Heng; Zhao, Qinxin; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dew point corrosion and ash deposit tests in a biomass-fired boiler were performed. • The XRD, XRF and SEM methods were used to analyze corrosion samples. • The deposits were made up of ash deposit layer, coupling layer and corrosion layer. • The metal matrix simultaneously confronted chlorine corrosion and oxygen corrosion. - Abstract: The dew point corrosion characteristics of the heating surface in a 65 t/h biomass-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler were experimentally studied. The cross-sectional morphology and composition of the ash deposition were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), respectively. The results showed that the test tube surface was covered by ash deposit layer, coupling layer and corrosion layer. The ash deposit layer and the coupling layer were prone to spall off together. The coupling layer consists of partial ash and corrosion products. The corrosion layer was mainly composed of chlorides (FeCl_3, FeCl_2, and FeOCl) and oxides (FeOOH, Fe_2O_3). With the increase of the tube wall temperature, the corrosion depth decreased dramatically and the dew point corrosion was alleviated efficiently. The metal matrix simultaneously suffered from chlorine corrosion and oxygen corrosion. As the tube wall temperature was above water dew point, the main corrosion mode was oxygen corrosion. As the tube wall temperature was below water dew point, the main corrosion mode was chlorine corrosion.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  7. Anodizing of aluminum with improved corrosion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, P.; Khan, I.U.

    2010-01-01

    Anodizing of aluminum was studied in sulphuric/oxalic/boric acid electroiyte system. The corrosion resistance of the anodic oxide coating of aluminum was determined by potentiodynamic polarization test and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology before and after corrosion test. It was found that the oxide coating obtained by this method showed better corrosion resistance with no significant difference in surface morphology. (author)

  8. Long term corrosion of iron and non alloy or low alloy steels in clay soils. Physico-chemical characterisation and electrochemical study of archaeological analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    Archaeological objects of Gallo-Roman and Merovingian time, and from a battlefield of World War 1, were studied to better understand long term corrosion phenomena of iron in clay soils. This study is part of the French national program about nuclear waste deep repository, conducted by the ANDRA (French national Agency for Radioactive Waste Management). Iron archaeological analogues make a valuable contribution to the specifying of containers for long lived and high level wastes (HLWs), because they provide access to the considered time scale. The experimental issue is divided into two major parts: - a physico-chemical characterisation of corrosion products, by Raman spectroscopy; - an electrochemical study of the behaviour of the different corrosion layers. Although the metallic material is different between ancient artefacts (ferrite) and 1914-1918 remains (hypo-eutectoid steels), the same stable phases are identified in their corrosion products: mainly iron oxides and oxi-hydroxides. From a macroscopic point of view, these products are staggered into two layers: an internal one, and an external one, which contains soil markers. Under the microscope, a complex composite structure appears. Goethite a-FeOOH, which was identified on each object, is frequently in contact with the metal core. The average corrosion rate in the burial environment, deduced from the layers thickness, highlights a significant slowdown of corrosion after the first burial time, about one century. The electrochemical study showed the predominant role of transport phenomena in the pores of corrosion layers. The behaviour of the metal - internal layer system is well explained by a model of porous electrode (De Levie theory). Despite its porosity, the internal layer is protective, as it leads to a significant decrease of the corrosion rate (about ten time). (author) [fr

  9. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    prepared with certain fly ashes exhibited signs of expansion along with cracking and spalling, while GPC prepared with specific class F fly ash showed superior resistance to thermal shock. Microstructural analysis revealed that the resistance of GPC at elevated temperatures was dependent on the type of fly ash used, its particle size distribution, formation of zeolitic phases such as sodalite, analcime and nepheline, and the overall pore structure of the geopolymer concrete. The work indicates that the chemical composition and particle size distribution of the fly ash, type of fly ash (Class C & F) and the geopolymerization process that took place a vital role in the performance of geopolymer concretes in high temperature applications. Microbial Induced Corrosion: Corrosion is a major form of deterioration in concrete structures. According to a report published by the U.S. FHWA 2002, the cost of corrosion in water and wastewater conveyance, and storage and treatment facilities in the U.S. is about $138 billions. A main form of corrosion in wastewater collection systems is Microbial Induced Corrosion (MIC). However, the conditions present in industrial or municipal wastewater pipes, or storage facility are induced by the production of sulfuric acid by biological processes, which cannot be fully mimicked by simple acid corrosion. The present study intends to provide similar conditions inside pipe specimens that mimic a true sewer atmosphere. The experimental setup consisted of three 12" diameter and 30" long concrete pipe specimens, 2 specimens were coated with different formulations of GPC while the third was a control. Both ends of each pipe specimen were sealed to prevent hydrogen sulfide gas from escaping. One pipe was coated with GPC that had a biocide agent entrained. Another pipe specimen was coated with OPC and the 3rd pipe was used as a control and was not coated. Parameters measured can be divided into three groups: general environmental parameters like pH and

  10. Evaluation of corrosion attack of chimney liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahetová M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The case study of chimney liner corrosion addresses three specific cases of damage of chimney systems from of stainless steels. These systems were used for flue of gas arising from the combustion of brown coal in small automatic boilers, which are used for heating. Detailed analyzes implied that the cause of devastating corrosion of the steel AISI 316 and 304 steel (CSN 17349, 17241 was particularly high content of halides (chlorides and fluorides, which caused a severe pitting corrosion, which led up to the perforation of the liner material. Simultaneous reduction of the thickness of the used sheets was due to by the general corrosion, which was caused by the sulfur in the solid fuel. The condensation then led to acid environment and therefore the corrosion below the dew point of the sulfuric acid has occurred. All is documented by metallographic analysis and microanalysis of the corrosion products.

  11. Studying titanium-molybdenum-zirconium alloys of increased corrosion resistance in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Kazarin, V.I.; Mikheev, V.S.; Goncharenko, B.A.; Sigalovskaya, T.M.; Kalyanova, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    New promising Ti-Mo-Nb-Zr system alloys, possessing good workability and a high corrosion resistance in non-oxidizing solutions of acids, have been developed. The alloys may be recommended as structural materials for equipment operating in severely agressive acid media, such as hydrochloric, sulphuric and phosphoric acids. The corrosion resistance of alloys of the above system in solutions of H 2 SO 4 , HCl and H 3 PO 4 acids may be maximized by increasing the overall alloying to 42% (keeping the ratio of the alloying components Mo/Nb/Zr=4/1/1 unchanged), while retaining sufficiently good plasticity and workability

  12. Development of Flow Accelerated Corrosion Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Min Bum; Choi, Won Yeol; Lee, Jong Chan; Lim, Dong Seok; Kwon, Byung Il; Ku, Hee Kwon; Kim, Jong Uk [FNC Tech, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology is necessary for prevent this kind of accidents. This study deals with development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology through platinum injection and developed of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology by imitating water chemical condition in PWR secondary system in practice. In addition, in order to get reliability of water chemical simulator in PWR secondary system, analyzed and compared with test result through CFD analysis. This study composed test device that can simulate water chemical environment in PWR secondary system, in order to develop flow accelerated corrosion reduction , and evaluated the ratio of corrosion in water chemical environment in PWR secondary system. In conclusion, corrosion ratio of low alloy steel material that includes more Cr and Mo was lower. And the results were confirmed to be the maximum corrosion rate in the case that replicate the 90 elbow. Additionally, inserted Pt nano particle for developing flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction technology, the test results, it was confirmed for about 80% of the flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction than before input.

  13. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System For Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Joseph; Curran, Jerome; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem facing Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other Government Agencies, and the general public. These problems include KSC launch support structures, highway bridge infrastructure, and building structures such as condominium balconies. Due to these problems, the development of a Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System would be a breakthrough technology having great commercial value for the following industries: Transportation, Infrastructure, Marine Infrastructure, Civil Engineering, and the Construction Industry. This sacrificial coating system consists of a paint matrix that may include metallic components, conducting agents, and moisture attractors. Similar systems have been used in the past with varying degrees of success. These systems have no proven history of effectiveness over the long term. In addition, these types of systems have had limited success overcoming the initial resistance between the concrete/coating interface. The coating developed at KSC incorporates methods proven to overcome the barriers that previous systems could not achieve. Successful development and continued optimization of this breakthrough system would produce great interest in NASA/KSC for corrosion engineering technology and problem solutions. Commercial patents on this technology would enhance KSC's ability to attract industry partners for similar corrosion control applications.

  14. Boundary element inverse analysis for rebar corrosion detection: Study on the 2004 tsunami-affected structure in Aceh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fonna

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of rebar/reinforcing-steel corrosion for the 2004 tsunami-affected reinforced concrete (RC buildings in Aceh was conducted using half-cell potential mapping technique. However, the results only show qualitative meaning as corrosion risk rather than the corrosion itself, such as the size and location of corrosion. In this study, boundary element inverse analysis was proposed to be performed to detect rebar corrosion of the 2004 tsunami-affected structure in Aceh, using several electrical potential measurement data on the concrete surface. One RC structure in Peukan Bada, an area heavily damaged by the tsunami, was selected for the study. In 2004 the structure was submerged more than 5 m by the tsunami. Boundary element inverse analysis was developed by combining the boundary element method (BEM and particle swarm optimization (PSO. The corrosion was detected by evaluating measured and calculated electrical potential data. The measured and calculated electrical potential on the concrete surface was obtained by using a half-cell potential meter and by performing BEM, respectively. The solution candidates were evaluated by employing PSO. Simulation results show that boundary element inverse analysis successfully detected the size and location of corrosion for the case study. Compared with the actual corrosion, the error of simulation result was less than 5%. Hence, it shows that boundary element inverse analysis is very promising for further development to detect rebar corrosion. Keywords: Inverse analysis, Boundary element method, PSO, Corrosion, Reinforced concrete

  15. Thermodynamic stability of oxides in the Ni-Cr-Fe system and stress corrosion crack growth kinetics of alloy 600 in primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, D.; Cassagne, T.; Daret, J.; Santarini, G.; Mazille, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the study of stress corrosion of alloy-600, a thermodynamical study of stoichiometric simple and mixed oxides of Ni-Cr-Fe system has been performed. This theoretical work shows that the oxidation of alloy-600 is dependent on temperature and on the quantity of dissolved hydrogen

  16. Corrosion of metals exposed to 25% magnesium chloride solution and tensile stress: Field and laboratory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemicals for snow and ice control operations is a common practice for improving the safety and mobility of roadways in cold climate, but brings significant concerns over their risks including the corrosive effects on transportation infrastructure and motor vehicles. The vast majority of existing studies and methods to test the deicer corrosivity have been restricted to laboratory environments and unstressed metals, which may not reliably simulate actual service conditions. As such, we report a case study in which stainless steel SS 304 (unstressed and externally tensile stressed, aluminum (Al 1100 and low carbon steel (C1010 coupons were exposed to 25% MgCl2 under field conditions for six weeks. A new corrosion test-bed was developed in Montana to accelerate the field exposure to this deicer. To further investigate the observed effect of tensile stress on the corrosion of stainless steel, SS 304 (unstressed and externally stressed coupons were exposed to 25% MgCl2 solution under the laboratory conditions. The C 1010 exhibited the highest percentage of rust area and suffered the most weight loss as a result of field exposure and MgCl2 sprays. In terms of ultimate tensile strength, the Al 1100 coupons saw the greatest reduction and the unstressed and externally stressed SS 304 coupons saw the least. The ability of MgCl2 to penetrate deep into the matrix of aluminum alloy poses great risk to such structural material. Tensile stressed SS 304 suffered more corrosion than unstressed SS 304 in both the field and laboratory conditions. Results from this case study may shed new light on the deicer corrosion issue and help develop improved field testing methods to evaluate the deicer corrosivity to metals in service.

  17. Study of the Susceptibility of Oxygen-Free Phosphorous Doped Copper to Corrosion in Simulated Groundwater in the Presence of Chloride and Sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Ivan; Lamas, Claudia; Werme, Lars; Oversby, Virginia

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen free high conductivity copper, doped with phosphorus (Cu OFP) has been chosen as the material for the fabrication of high level nuclear waste containers in Sweden. This material will be the corrosion barrier for spent fuel in the environment of a deep geological repository in granitic rock. The service life of this container is expected to exceed 1,000,000 years. During this time, which includes several glaciations, water of different compositions, including high concentration of chloride ions, will contact the copper surface. This work reports a study of the susceptibility of Cu OFP to corrosion when chloride ions are present, in deionized water (DW) and in synthetic groundwater (SGW). The techniques used were electrochemical methods such as corrosion potential evolution and Tafel curves. The system was studied with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). We also used as characterization techniques Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The main conclusions are that copper is more susceptible to corrosion at high chloride ion concentration. When the chloride concentration is low, it is possible to form copper chloride crystals, but at the highest concentration, copper chloride complexes are formed, leaving the copper surface without deposits. When the chloride concentration is low ( -5 M), copper corrosion in the presence of chloride is controlled by diffusional processes, while at higher concentrations corrosion is controlled by charge transfer processes. (authors)

  18. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Study of the corrosion fatigue resistance of steel grades for automotive suspension springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougin, J. [Ascometal CREAS, BP70045, F-57301 Hagondange Cedex (France); Mostacchi, A. [Ascometal Developpement, BP17, F-38570 Le Cheylas (France); Hersart, Y. [Allevard Rejna Autosuspensions CRDT, 201 Rue de Sin-le-Noble, BP629, F-59506 Douai Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to reduce the total weight of vehicles for ecological and economical reasons, the car makers use down-sizing for several components of the cars. Concerning helical suspension springs, the size of the bar diameter and the number of spring coils are decreased, leading to an increase of the stress level applied on the spring. In this respect, steels with high mechanical properties are required, to achieve a good fatigue resistance of the springs. The corrosion resistance is also important for this application. Indeed, during service, the protective coating applied on the springs can be scratched by gravels, and bare underlying metal can be put in contact with the atmosphere, including humidity, drops of rain but also de-icing salts. Generally speaking, an increase of mechanical properties decreases the corrosion fatigue resistance of the steels. In this respect, a compromise needs to be found, that is why the study of corrosion fatigue resistance is very important. In order to study the corrosion fatigue resistance of spring steels, an original device and test procedure have been set up. Torsional fatigue on specimens is used to simulate the stress applied on each spring coil. The stress levels are chosen to be representative of the actual inservice loads. The specimens are shot-peened and coated in a same way as the actual springs. Scratching of the painting is performed, giving rise to small areas of bare metal. Three types of tests are performed: fatigue in air (taken as the reference level), fatigue on specimens which have been corroded previously (test similar to the spring-makers practice) and coupled corrosion fatigue. The mechanisms involved in corrosion fatigue have been studied. For all the specimens, crack initiated on corrosion pits. For the specimens corroded prior fatigue testing, the corrosion pits can be quite severe. In this case, these pits act as a surface defect which increases locally the stress concentration and accelerates the crack

  20. Review of lithium iron-base alloy corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.; Morris, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive literature search was conducted on the compatibility of ferrous alloys with lithium, with the emphasis on austenitic stainless steels. The information is summarized and is divided into two sections. The first section gives a brief summary and the second is an annotated bibliography. Comparisons of results are complicated by differences in lithium purity, alloy composition, alloy treatment, flow rates, and lithium handling procedures. For long-term application, austenitic stainless steels appear to be limited to about 500 0 C. While corrosion can probably not be decreased to zero, a considerable reduction to tolerable and predictable amounts appears possible

  1. General and crevice corrosion study of the in-wall shielding materials for ITER vacuum vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K. S.; Pathak, H. A.; Dayal, R. K.; Bafna, V. K.; Kimihiro, Ioki; Barabash, V.

    2012-11-01

    Vacuum vessel In-Wall Shield (IWS) will be inserted between the inner and outer shells of the ITER vacuum vessel. The behaviour of IWS in the vacuum vessel especially concerning the susceptibility to crevice of shielding block assemblies could cause rapid and extensive corrosion attacks. Even galvanic corrosion may be due to different metals in same electrolyte. IWS blocks are not accessible until life of the machine after closing of vacuum vessel. Hence, it is necessary to study the susceptibility of IWS materials to general corrosion and crevice corrosion under operations of ITER vacuum vessel. Corrosion properties of IWS materials were studied by using (i) Immersion technique and (ii) Electro-chemical Polarization techniques. All the sample materials were subjected to a series of examinations before and after immersion test, like Loss/Gain weight measurement, SEM analysis, and Optical stereo microscopy, measurement of surface profile and hardness of materials. After immersion test, SS 304B4 and SS 304B7 showed slight weight gain which indicate oxide layer formation on the surface of coupons. The SS 430 material showed negligible weight loss which indicates mild general corrosion effect. On visual observation with SEM and Metallography, all material showed pitting corrosion attack. All sample materials were subjected to series of measurements like Open Circuit potential, Cyclic polarization, Pitting potential, protection potential, Critical anodic current and SEM examination. All materials show pitting loop in OC2 operating condition. However, its absence in OC1 operating condition clearly indicates the activity of chloride ion to penetrate oxide layer on the sample surface, at higher temperature. The critical pitting temperature of all samples remains between 100° and 200°C.

  2. A Study on Accelerated Corrosion Test by Combined Deteriorating Action of Salt Damage and Freeze-Thaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Soon; So, Byung-Tak [Sangmyung University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the accelerated corrosion test by combined deteriorating action of salt damage and freeze-thaw was investigated. freeze-thaw cycle is one method for corrosion testing; corrosion initiation time was measured in four types of concrete samples, i.e., two samples mixed with fly ash (FA) and blast furnace slag (BS), and the other two samples having two water/cement ratio (W/C = 0.6, 0.35) without admixture (OPC60 and OPC35). The corrosion of rebar embedded in concrete occurred most quickly at the 30th freeze-thaw cycle. Moreover, a corrosion monitoring method with a half-cell potential measurement and relative dynamic elastic modulus derived from resonant frequency measures was conducted simultaneously. The results indicated that the corrosion of rebar occurred when the relative dynamic elastic modulus was less than 60%. Therefore, dynamic elastic modulus can be used to detect corrosion of steel bar. The results of the accelerated corrosion test exhibited significant difference according to corrosion periods combined with each test condition. Consequently, the OPC60 showed the lowest corrosion resistance among the samples.

  3. A Fundamental study of remedial technology development to prevent stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Gyu; Lee, Chang Soon [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    Most of the PWR Steam generators with tubes in Alloy 600 alloy are affected by Stress Corrosion Cracking, such as PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) and ODSCC(Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking). This study was undertaken to establish the background for remedial technology development to prevent SCC. in the report are included the following topics: (1) General: (i) water chemistry related factors, (ii) Pourbaix(Potential-pH) Diagram, (iii) polarization plot, (iv) corrosion mode of Alloy 600, 690, and 800, (v) IGA/SCC growth rate, (vi) material suspetibility of IGA/SCC, (vii) carbon solubility of Alloy 600 (2) Microstructures of Alloy 600 MA, Alloy 600 TT, Alloy 600 SEN Alloy 690 TT(Optical, SEM, and TEM) (3) Influencing factors for PWSCC initiation rate of Alloy 600: (i) microstructure, (ii) water chemistry(B, Li), (iii) temperature, (iv) plastic deformation, (v) stress relief annealing (4) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) water chemistry(B, Li), (ii) Scott Model, (iii) intergranular carbide, (iv) temperature, (v) hold time (5) Laboratory conditions for ODSCC initiation rate: 1% NaOH, 316 deg C; 1% NaOH, 343 deg C; 50% NaOH, 288 deg C; 10% NaOH, 302 deg C; 10% NaOH, 316 deg C; 50% NaOH, 343 deg C (6) Sludge effects for ODSCC initiation rate: CuO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (7) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) Caustic concentration effect, (ii) carbonate addition effect (8) Sulfate corrosion: (i) sulfate ratio and pH effect, (ii) wastage rate of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (9) Crevice corrosion: (i) experimental setup for crevice corrosion, (ii) organic effect, (iii) (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + NaOH) effect (10) Remedial measures for SCC: (i) Inhibitors, (ii) ZnO effect. (author). 30 refs., 174 figs., 51 tabs.

  4. Study on the corrosion assessment of overpack welds-II (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroyuki; Otsuki, Akiyoshi; Asano, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu; Yui, Mikazu

    2006-06-01

    The corrosion resistance at the overpack welds is possible to be inferior to that at base metal, so that it has been concerned that a short-term failure of overpack may occur due to the corrosion penetration at the welds. In this study, corrosion mechanisms specific to the welds were extracted for carbon steel which is one of the candidate materials for overpacks. And then the corrosion experiments for welded carbon steel were planed to evaluate long-term integrity of overpack welds. Based on this plan, electrochemical tests for welded carbon steel using the samples welded by EBW and TIG were carried out, and the corrosion behavior of welded zone was compared with that of base metal. The results of anodic polarization tests in 0.01M and 0.1M carbonate aqueous solutions for base metal, heat affected zone and welded metal showed that; As for EBW, the anodic polarization curves were not affected by welding although the metallurgical structures vary with base metal, heat affected zone and welded metal. As for TIG, the current density of welded metal was larger than that of base metal and of heat affected zone, and local dissolution with immediate in current density was observed in 0.01M-pH10 carbonate aqueous solution. As shown in these results, it is expected that the corrosion resistance at the welds by EBW will be equal to that at base metal. As for TIG, however, it was indicated that the corrosion resistance is possible to be lower than base metal. (author)

  5. Comparative study of the microbiological corrosion among an AISI 304L and an API X65

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Luna C, P.; Carapia M, L.; Gonzalez F, E.

    2004-01-01

    Metallic samples of AISI 304L sensitized and API X65, were subjected to the action of an inoculated media with reductive sulphate microorganisms (SBR), carrying out electrochemical evaluations by means of the techniques of Polarization Resistance (RP), Tafel extrapolation (ET) and Electrochemical Noise (RE). The generated information was complemented with the analysis and diagnostic of the present damage in the surfaces exposed in both metals. The used electrochemical techniques allow to determine the corrosion velocities associated to each system, establishing that the uniform corrosion is not affected by the effect of the microorganisms; however, electrochemical noise, evidenced the formation of stings associated to the presence of bacteria. (Author)

  6. Study of chelating agent as a surface modifier for retarding corrosion attack on ferrous metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Zaifol Samsu; Azali Muhamad; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Saari Ripin; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2010-01-01

    A different concentration of chelating agents in electrolyte of 3.5 % NaCl was applied to bare ferrous metal and tested for their effectiveness as a corrosion retardant. The performance of the samples was measured using corrosion measurement system. The results indicated that the contribution of chelating agent was expediting the reduction of the passive film. The anodic behavior was clearly found to be influenced by the concentration of the chelating agent. It was also found that some of the corrosion was apparently converted to protective layer over a period of time. Excessive moisture caused breakdown of film by removing the unreacted chelating agent and causing regrowth of the existing rust. (author)

  7. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  8. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal from groundwater by Fe0-H2O system with bio-amended iron corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao; Wu, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A one-pot bio-iron system was established to investigate synergetic abiotic and biotic effects between iron and microorganisms on Cr(VI) removal. More diverse iron corrosion and reactive solids, such as green rusts, lepidocrocite and magnetite were found in the bio-iron system than...... transfer on the solid phase. The results also showed that the reduction of Cr(VI) by microorganisms was insignificant, indicating the adsorption/co-precipitation of Cr by iron oxides on iron surface was responsible for the overall Cr(VI) removal. Our study demonstrated that the bio-amended iron corrosion...... in the Fe0-H2O system, leading to 4.3 times higher Cr(VI) removal efficiency in the bio-iron system than in the Fe0-H2O system. The cycling experiment also showed that the Cr(VI) removal capacity of Fe0 in the bio-iron system was 12.4 times higher than that in the Fe0-H2O system. A 62 days of life...

  9. TANK 241-AN-102 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM PROJECT LESSONS LEARNED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAYLOR T; HAGENSEN A; KIRCH NW

    2008-01-01

    During 2007 and 2008, a new Multi-Probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) was designed and fabricated for use in double-shell tank 241-AN-102. The system was successfully installed in the tank on May 1, 2008. The 241-AN-102 MPCMS consists of one 'fixed' in-tank probe containing primary and secondary reference electrodes, tank material electrodes, Electrical Resistance (ER) sensors, and stressed and unstressed corrosion coupons. In addition to the fixed probe, the 241-AN-102 MPCMS also contains four standalone coupon racks, or 'removable' probes. Each rack contains stressed and unstressed coupons made of American Society of Testing and Materials A537 CL1 steel, heat-treated to closely match the chemical and mechanical characteristics of the 241-AN-102 tank wall. These coupon racks can be removed periodically to facilitate examination of the attached coupons for corrosion damage. Along the way to successful system deployment and operation, the system design, fabrication, and testing activities presented a number of challenges. This document discusses these challenges and lessons learned, which when applied to future efforts, should improve overall project efficiency

  10. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  11. Study of sulphate-reducing bacteria corrosion in the weld joint for API X-70 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J. E.; Patino-Carachure, C.; Alfonso, I.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Rosas, G.

    2012-11-01

    The corrosion behavior originated by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was studied in two regions of welded API X-70 steel pipeline. The studies were focused on base material (BM) and heat affected zone (HAZ), from the internal region of the pipe. SRB were extracted from oil and grown in a Postgate medium. Corrosion was evaluated at 60 degree centigrade for times between 5 and 64 days. Potentiodynamic polarization curves, obtained by electrochemical techniques, indicated surface activation at short times. Structural and morphological characterizations were carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). H{sub 2}S concentration and pH were also measured. Results showed an important increase in the corrosion damage up to 20 days, influenced by the SRB activity, which lead to a maximum of H{sub 2}S (pH minimum). It was found a localized corrosion attack in the HAZ in a higher quantity compared to BM; and the formation of a thin film on the steel surface, originated by corrosion products and bacterial activity. (Author) 15 refs.

  12. Integrated analytical methodologies for the study of corrosion processes in archaeological bronzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberghina, Maria Francesca; Barraco, Rosita; Brai, Maria; Schillaci, Tiziano, E-mail: tschillaci@unipa.it; Tranchina, Luigi

    2011-02-15

    The investigations on structure and micro-chemical composition of archaeological metal alloys are needed in archaeometry. The aim of this study is devoted both to acquire information about their provenance and production technology, and to improve our understanding about the corrosion processes. In this paper we present the study of the corrosion phenomena of bronze samples, laboratory-made according to binary, ternary and quaternary alloys typical of Roman archaeometallurgical production through an integrated methodology based on the use of non or micro invasive physical techniques. Among the analysed samples, two were artificially aged through burial in the archaeological site of Tharros, along the west coast of Sardinia (Italy). The corrosion products, typical of the bronzes in archaeological sites near the sea, have been characterized by non invasive and micro-destructive measurements. In particular, the corrosion patinas were examined through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis, X-ray fluorescence and laser ablation spectroscopy. The use of integrated technologies allowed us to determine both the elemental composition and surface morphology of the patina, highlighting the correlation between patina nature and chemical composition of the burial context. Moreover, data obtained by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy along the depth profile on the samples, have yielded information about the stratigraphic layers of corrosion products and their growth. Finally, the depth profiles allowed us to verify both the chemical elements constituting the patina, the metal ions constituting the alloy and the occurrence of migration phenomena from bulk to the surface.

  13. Integrated analytical methodologies for the study of corrosion processes in archaeological bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberghina, Maria Francesca; Barraco, Rosita; Brai, Maria; Schillaci, Tiziano; Tranchina, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The investigations on structure and micro-chemical composition of archaeological metal alloys are needed in archaeometry. The aim of this study is devoted both to acquire information about their provenance and production technology, and to improve our understanding about the corrosion processes. In this paper we present the study of the corrosion phenomena of bronze samples, laboratory-made according to binary, ternary and quaternary alloys typical of Roman archaeometallurgical production through an integrated methodology based on the use of non or micro invasive physical techniques. Among the analysed samples, two were artificially aged through burial in the archaeological site of Tharros, along the west coast of Sardinia (Italy). The corrosion products, typical of the bronzes in archaeological sites near the sea, have been characterized by non invasive and micro-destructive measurements. In particular, the corrosion patinas were examined through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis, X-ray fluorescence and laser ablation spectroscopy. The use of integrated technologies allowed us to determine both the elemental composition and surface morphology of the patina, highlighting the correlation between patina nature and chemical composition of the burial context. Moreover, data obtained by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy along the depth profile on the samples, have yielded information about the stratigraphic layers of corrosion products and their growth. Finally, the depth profiles allowed us to verify both the chemical elements constituting the patina, the metal ions constituting the alloy and the occurrence of migration phenomena from bulk to the surface.

  14. Corrosion Characteristics of Nano-structured Coatings for the Application in Secondary Piping System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Coating surface using less corrosive metal is one of methods that reduce electrochemical corrosion. And metal oxide like a TiO{sub 2} is studied because it is stable, insoluble when coating is exposed severe environment. Several coating technics are used for better corrosion resistance. Pysical vapor deposition(PVD), chemical vapor deposition(CVD), thermal spray, electroplating, electroless etc. But thermal spray coating makes thermal stress to substrates because its temperature are more than 3000K. And powder's deformation can occur. And CVD makes decarburization near interface between surface and coating layer. In addition, CVD and PVD needs vacuum chamber. Electroplating is chemical reaction at surface, but it needs electric power. On the other hands, electroless plating dosen't needs electric power and it's temperature is low than thermal spray. Also the pipe dipping into the chemically solution can proceed coating easily. To reduce FAC, we have experiment about corrosion resistance of electroless Ni-P coated carbon steel in room temperature. And it has possibility of reducing corrosion and addition of TiO{sub 2} nano particles in Ni-P coating layer makes having better corrosion resistance. And results give us a possibility that electroless Ni-P coating added TiO{sub 2} nano particle can have better corrosion resistance compared carbon steel. So it needs study about high temperature corrosion experiment of electroless Ni-P coating added TiO{sub 2} nano particle.

  15. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Nitinol 60 for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation of Nitinol 60 was performed because this alloy is considered a candidate bearing material for the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), specifically in the Urine Processing Assembly of the International Space Station. An SCC evaluation that preceded this one during the 2013-2014 timeframe included various alloys: Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, titanium (Ti) commercially pure (CP), Ti 6Al-4V, extra-low interstitial (ELI) Ti 6Al-4V, and Cronidur 30. In that evaluation, most specimens were exposed for a year. The results of that evaluation were published in NASA/TM-2015-218206, entitled "Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System,"1 available at the NASA Scientific and Technical Information program web page: http://www.sti.nasa.gov. Nitinol 60 was added to the test program in 2014.

  16. Corrosion in the off-gas system of a radioactive-waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, C.F.; Peters, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion in a low-level radioactive-waste incinerator off-gas system at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant is discussed. Severe corrosive attack and failure of an alloy 600 part exposed to high-temperature (>1000 0 C) gases was observed. Rapid attack of carbon steel components, and cracking of austenitic stainless steel parts also occurred at locations where lower gas temperatures and periodic condensate exposure occurred. Investigation showed HCl, SO 2 , SO 3 and phosphorus-oxides were present and contributed to the failures. Mechanisms of high-temperature failure include alloy separation and reactions with phosphorus. Coupons placed in the exhaust stream have provided information for selection of future materials of construction for system components. Several nickel- and iron-base alloys, and a stainless steel with an aluminum-diffusion coating were investigated

  17. A Plan to Develop and Demonstrate Electrochemical Noise Based Corrosion Monitoring Systems in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes changes that need to be made to the site's authorization basis and technical concerns that need to be resolved before proceduralized use of Electrochemical Noise based corrosion monitoring systems is fully possible at the Hanford Site

  18. Potentiodynamic polarization study of the corrosion behavior of palladium-silver dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Desheng; Brantley, William A; Frankel, Gerald S; Heshmati, Reza H; Johnston, William M

    2018-04-01

    Although palladium-silver alloys have been marketed for over 3 decades for metal-ceramic restorations, understanding of the corrosion behavior of current alloys is incomplete; this understanding is critical for evaluating biocompatibility and clinical performance. The purpose of this in vitro study was to characterize the corrosion behavior of 3 representative Pd-Ag alloys in simulated body fluid and oral environments and to compare them with a high-noble Au-Pd alloy. The study obtained values of important electrochemical corrosion parameters, with clinical relevance, for the rational selection of casting alloys. The room temperature in vitro corrosion characteristics of the 3 Pd-Ag alloys and the high-noble Au-Pd alloy were evaluated in 0.9% NaCl, 0.09% NaCl, and Fusayama solutions. After simulated porcelain firing heat treatment, 5 specimens of each alloy were immersed in the electrolytes for 24 hours. For each specimen, the open-circuit potential (OCP) was first recorded, and linear polarization was then performed from -20 mV to +20 mV (versus OCP) at a rate of 0.125 mV/s. Cyclic polarization was subsequently performed on 3 specimens of each alloy from -300 mV to +1000 mV and back to -300 mV (versus OCP) at a scanning rate of 1 mV/s. The differences in OCP and corrosion resistance parameters (zero-current potential and polarization resistance) among alloys and electrolyte combinations were compared with the 2-factor ANOVA (maximum-likelihood method) with post hoc Tukey adjustments (α=.05). The 24-hour OCPs and polarization resistance values of the 3 Pd-Ag alloys and the Au-Pd alloy were not significantly different (P=.233 and P=.211, respectively) for the same electrolyte, but significant differences were found for corrosion test results in different electrolytes (Palloy and electrolyte (P=.249 and P=.713, respectively). The 3 Pd-Ag silver alloys appeared to be resistant to chloride ion corrosion, and passivation and de-alloying were identified for these

  19. Monitoring wear and corrosion in industrial machines and systems: A radiation tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, I.O.; Zatolokin, B.V.

    1994-01-01

    Industrial equipment and machines, transport systems, nuclear and conventional power plants, pipelines, and other materials is substantially influenced by degradation processes such as wear and corrosion. For safety and economic reasons, appropriately monitoring the damage could prevent dangerous accidents. When the surfaces of machine parts under investigation are not easy to reach or are concealed by overlying structures, nuclear methods have become powerful tools for examination. They include X-ray radiography, neutron radiography, and a technique known as thin layer activation (TLA)

  20. Electrochemical Study of Welded AISI 304 and 904L Stainless Steel in Seawater in View of Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richárd Székely

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of welds in AISI 304 and AISI 904L stainless steels carried out in seawater model solution in the temperature range 5-35°C and the standard of corrosion testing of welds was followed. The corrosion rate and corrosion attack characteristics were determined for welds of the examined steels with several type of treatment. The aim of this work was to compare the steels based on their resistance against the corrosion in terms of pitting potential (Epit and repassivation potential (Erepass. Seawater is an electrochemically aggressive medium, which can initiate localised corrosion in welded stainless steels. Different electrochemical and testing methods were used, including cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, pH measuring and penetration tests.

  1. Fundamental Studies of the Role of Grain Boundaries on Uniform Corrosion of Advanced Nuclear Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Mitra; Motta, Arthur; Marquis, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal is to develop fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in stable oxide growth. To understand the process of oxide layer destabilization, it is necessary to observe the early stages of corrosion. During conventional studies in which a sample is exposed and examined after removal from the autoclave, the destabilization process will normally have already taken place, and is only examined post facto. To capture the instants of oxide destabilization, it is necessary to observe it in situ; however, significant questions always arise as to the influence of the corrosion geometry and conditions on the corrosion process. Thus, a combination of post facto examinations and in situ studies is proposed, which also combines state-of-the-art characterization techniques to derive a complete understanding of the destabilization process and the role of grain boundaries.

  2. Fundamental Studies of the Role of Grain Boundaries on Uniform Corrosion of Advanced Nuclear Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Mitra [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Marquis, Emmanuelle [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-05-20

    The main objective of this proposal is to develop fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in stable oxide growth. To understand the process of oxide layer destabilization, it is necessary to observe the early stages of corrosion. During conventional studies in which a sample is exposed and examined after removal from the autoclave, the destabilization process will normally have already taken place, and is only examined post facto. To capture the instants of oxide destabilization, it is necessary to observe it in situ; however, significant questions always arise as to the influence of the corrosion geometry and conditions on the corrosion process. Thus, a combination of post facto examinations and in situ studies is proposed, which also combines state-of-the-art characterization techniques to derive a complete understanding of the destabilization process and the role of grain boundaries.

  3. Study of corrosion of aluminium alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water, пart one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of corrosion of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water of the spent fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor at VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences has been examined in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" since 2002. The study presented in this paper comprises activities on determination and monitoring of chemical parameters and radio activity of water and sludge in the RA spent fuel storage pool and results of the initial study of corrosion effects obtained by visual examinations of surfaces of various coupons made of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity of the test racks exposed to the pool water for a period from six months to six years.

  4. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  5. The study on intergranular corrosion of sensitized Alloy 600 using DL-EPR and Huey method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. G.; Lee, H. R.; Kim, H. P.; Ryu, W. S.; Rhee, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion(IGC) of sensitized Alloy 600 has been studied with double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation(DL-EPR) and Huey tests. Corrosion of solution annealed Ni-XCr-10Fe(X=6∼15) alloys was also evaluated with DL-EPR and Huey methods to simulate corrosion of Cr-depleted grain boundary region of Alloy 600. Cr concentration of Cr-depleted grain boundary region of Alloy 600. Cr concentration profile across grain boundary was measured with TEM. In the range of the Cr concentration from 6 to 8%, corrosion rates of solution annealed Ni-XCr-10Fe(X=6∼15) alloys were much higher in Huey test than those in DL-EPR. But in the range of the Cr concentration from 12 to 15%, the trend was reversed. The width of IGC crack of Alloy 600 was higher in DL-EPR test than in Huey test in agreement with corrosion of solution annealed Ni-XCr-10Fe alloys. Width of IGC produced by DL-EPR test was almost uniform and wide while that produced by Huey test was sharp and marrow. These results suggest that IGC in DL-EPR test conforms to uniform dissolution model and IGC in Huey test conforms to Cr concentration dependent dissolution model

  6. A mechanistic study of the uniform corrosion of copper in compacted clay-sand soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litke, C.D.; Ryan, S.R.; King, F.

    1992-08-01

    The results of a study of the mechanism of uniform corrosion of copper under simulated nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions are presented. Evidence is given that suggests that the rate-controlling process is the transport of copper corrosion products away from the corroding surface. In the experiments described here, the copper diffused through a column of compacted clay-sand buffer. The properties of the buffer material, especially its ability to sorb copper species, are significant in determining the rate of uniform corrosion of copper. The evidence that copper diffusion is rate-controlling stems from the effect of γ-radiation on the tests. In the presence of γ-radiation, copper diffused farther along the column of compacted buffer material than in the unirradiated tests, but the corrosion rate was lower. These two effects can be best explained in terms of a slow copper-diffusion process. Irradiation is thought to reduce the extent of sorption of copper by the clay component of the buffer. This results in a more mobile copper species and a smaller interfacial flux of copper (i.e., a lower corrosion rate)

  7. Electrochemical Impedance and Polarization Corrosion Studies of Tantalum Surface Modified by DC Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Sowa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tantalum has recently become an actively researched biomaterial for the bone reconstruction applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance and successful clinical records. However, a bare Ta surface is not capable of directly bonding to the bone upon implantation and requires some method of bioactivation. In this study, this was realized by direct current (DC plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO. Susceptibility to corrosion is a major factor determining the service-life of an implant. Therefore, herein, the corrosion resistance of the PEO coatings on Ta was investigated in Ringer’s solution. The coatings were formed by galvanostatic anodization up to 200, 300 and 400 V, after which the treatment was conducted potentiostatically until the total process time amounted to 5 min. Three solutions containing Ca(H2PO22, Ca(HCOO2 and Mg(CH3COO2 were used in the treatment. For the corrosion characterization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were chosen. The coatings showed the best corrosion resistance at voltages low enough so that the intensive sparking was absent, which resulted in the formation of thin films. The impedance data were fitted to the equivalent electrical circuits with two time constants, namely R(Q[R(QR] and R(Q[R(Q[RW

  8. Study of the formation and transport of corrosion products in PWR primary circuit simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Camp, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The formation, migration and deposition of corrosion products in PWR primary circuits are studied in out-of-reactor loops. The aim of these studies is to limit the build-up of the radiation fields impinging on out-of-flux walls and to reduce the danger of rapid corrosion of fuel cans, taking into account the tougher conditions imposed on current trends in the operation of such industrial plants. Four simulator loops and their respective possibilities and research methods are described. (author)

  9. Studies on corrosion of mild steel by water using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, A.N.; Tripathi, R.P.; Jangid, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion of mild steel as a result of interaction with various types of local natural water samples and distilled water is studied with the help of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The data are supplemented with the studies on IR and magnetic properties as and when required. Distilled water and potable water behave in almost similar fashion wherein ferrihydrite and FeOOH are observed to be the precursors of magnetite, the end corrosion product. In case of brakish water, the additional species, viz., FeCl 2 , βFeOOH and an intermediate possibly FeOCl are accounted, and possible mechanisms are suggested. (author)

  10. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Foundation of Postgraduate Study on Corrosion and Protection of Materials at the Faculty of Technology, University of Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez, S.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The first postgraduate study at the Department for Chemical Technology of the Faculty of Technology (nowadays: Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology of the University of Zagreb concerning the field "Corrosion and Protection of Materials" was founded in the academic year of 1960/61 on the initiative of academician Miroslav Karšulin. The study comprised three semesters and finished by defending a master's thesis. During two decades, 19 generations of attendants were registered and 108 of them reached the scientific degree of MSc. In this period, several new postgraduate studies were introduced that were indispensable, but provoked organizational difficulties. Therefore, in 1980 reorganization took place by merging all postgraduate studies into "Engineering Chemistry" with 11 sections. Thus, the postgraduate study "Corrosion and Protection of Materials" transformed into the section "Structural Materials and Corrosion Control". After the establishment of the "Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology" from the Department for Chemical Technology of the Faculty of Technology in 1992, the "Chemical Engineering" section of former postgraduate study "Engineering Chemistry" separated as an autonomous study that also enabled receiving the Master's degree in the field of "Corrosion and Protection of Materials" by choice of adequate optional courses. At the beginning of the new millennium, changes of curricula in accordance with the Bologna process of reforms took place at the Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology as well as in the entire system of high educationin Croatia. All postgraduate studies leading to MSc degree were eliminated in 2003. Simultaneously, doctoral and specialists postgraduate studies were introduced. Doctoral studies lasting three years lead to PhD degree. Today, the knowledge from the field of corrosion and material protection is mainly included into programs of actual doctoral studies "Engineering Chemistry

  11. Corrosion study of resorbable Ca60Mg15Zn25 bulk metallic glasses in physiological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Babilas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion activity of amorphous plates of Ca60Mg15Zn25 alloy was investigated. The biocompatible elements were selected for the alloy composition. The electrochemical corrosion and immersion tests were carried out in a multi-electrolyte fluid and Ringer's solution. Better corrosion behavior was observed for the samples tested in a multi-electrolyte fluid despite the active dissolution of Ca and Mg in Ringer's solution. The experimental results indicated that reducing concentration of NaCl from 8.6 g/dm3 for Ringer's solution to 5.75 g/dm3 caused the decrease of the corrosion rate. The volume of the hydrogen evolved after 480 min in Ringer's solution (40.1 ml/cm2 was higher in comparison with that obtained in a multi-electrolyte fluid (24.4 ml/cm2. The values of open-circuit potential (EOCP for the Ca60Mg15Zn25 glass after 1 h incubation in Ringer's solution and a multi-electrolyte fluid were determined to be −1553 and −1536 mV vs. a saturated calomel electrode (SCE. The electrochemical measurements indicated a shift of the corrosion current density (jcorr from 1062 μA/cm2 for the sample tested in Ringer's solution to 788 μA/cm2 for the specimen immersed in a multi-electrolyte fluid. The corrosion products analysis was conducted by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The corrosion products were identified to be CaCO3, Mg(OH2, CaO, MgO and ZnO. The mechanism of corrosion process was proposed and described based on the microscopic observations. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR also indicated that Ca(OH2, CaCO3, Zn(OH2 and Ca(Zn(OH32·2H2O mainly formed on the surface of the studied alloy. Keywords: Ca-based metallic glasses, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Corrosion resistance, Hydrogen evaluation

  12. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  13. Injection of nano-particles in mitigating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) damage in the secondary system of nuclear power plants (NPPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Dong Seok; Ku, Hee Kwon; Cho, Jae Seon

    2015-01-01

    NPPs produces electric energy through phase transition of water. According to this, a piping, which is flow path, integrity is essential for safety functions. Erosion, FAC and fittings are corrosion failure mechanism by increasing service life. Especially, there are 10-kilometers of piping in secondary systems. It needs to estimate FAC and apply periodic management. Iron oxides produced by FAC cause power reduction and Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) will be occurred through the continued piping wall thinning. In this study, corrosion rate of pipe materials with carbon steel(SA106.Gr.B) and low-alloy steel (SA335.P22) was evaluated for pipe configuration and dissolved oxygen concentration on 150 °C, pH 9.5∼10.0 and flow velocity of 5m/s. Temperature of 150°C is well known that causes high FAC rate and pH consider a NPPs in-service condition. Further corrosion rate test was performed to develop FAC reduction technology through Pt-nanoparticle injection. In this study, corrosion rate is evaluated by weight depletion method. The results of material impact assessment show that corrosion rate of carbon steel is more higher than that of low-alloy steel because of Cr content. And also, the results of pipe configuration test show that case with 90° elbow had maximum wall thinning than with 180° horizontal pipe. The dissolved oxygen concentration test shows that low oxygen condition, ≤5 ppb, had high corrosion rate compared to normal condition and the corrosion rate decreased 50% at Pt-nanoparticle injection test on maximum corrosion rate condition compared to maximum wall thinning condition without Pt-nanoparticle injection. In this study, samples provided by each test case had analyzed through SEM-EDX (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). Behavior evaluation for oxide film was performed and Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) was measured for electrochemistry evaluation. To apply Pt-nanoparticle injection technology on nuclear

  14. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management: A Comprehensive Information System (ASSET 2). Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Randy C. [Shell Global Solutions, Houston, TX (United States); Young, Arthur L. [Humberside Solutions, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pelton, Arthur D. [CRCT, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Thompson, William T. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada); Wright, Ian G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-10-10

    The research sponsored by this project has greatly expanded the ASSET corrosion prediction software system to produce a world-class technology to assess and predict engineering corrosion of metals and alloys corroding by exposure to hot gases. The effort included corrosion data compilation from numerous industrial sources and data generation at Shell Oak Ridge National Laboratory and several other companies for selected conditions. These data were organized into groupings representing various combinations of commercially available alloys and corrosion by various mechanisms after acceptance via a critical screening process to ensure the data were for alloys and conditions, which were adequately well defined, and of sufficient repeatability. ASSET is the largest and most capable, publicly-available technology in the field of corrosion assessment and prediction for alloys corroding by high temperature processes in chemical plants, hydrogen production, energy conversion processes, petroleum refining, power generation, fuels production and pulp/paper processes. The problems addressed by ASSET are: determination of the likely dominant corrosion mechanism based upon information available to the chemical engineers designing and/or operating various processes and prediction of engineering metal losses and lifetimes of commercial alloys used to build structural components. These assessments consider exposure conditions (metal temperatures, gas compositions and pressures), alloy compositions and exposure times. Results of the assessments are determination of the likely dominant corrosion mechanism and prediction of the loss of metal/alloy thickness as a function of time, temperature, gas composition and gas pressure. The uses of these corrosion mechanism assessments and metal loss predictions are that the degradation of processing equipment can be managed for the first time in a way which supports efforts to reduce energy consumption, ensure structural integrity of equipment

  15. A study on the corrosion characteristics of lead-bismuth liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tak, Nam Il; Park, Won S.; Han, Seok Jung; Jeong, Won Seok

    1999-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic has been adopted as a coolant and spallation target material of HYPER (Hybrid Power Extraction Reactor), an accelerator driven subcritical transmutation system. The contents and scope of the present study are to implement systematic survey and analyses of available results on the corrosion characteristics of Pb-Bi liquid metal which are considered to be the most important among Pb-Bi coolant technologies and to provide fundamental bases for future research efforts. Major parameters affecting the corrosion of structural materials in liquid metals are temperature, flow velocity, contents of impurities in coolant, compositions of structural materials, and so forth. It was already known that for traditional commercial austenitic steels of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti type and 12%Cr ferritic steels, the operating temperatures of Pb-Bi coolant cannot be raised above 400 dg C and 450 dg C, respectively. However, extensive researches have been performed to protect structural materials under higher operating temperature such as the development of various kinds of coating methods for steels and the investigations of coolant inhibition by different chemical elements. The available experimental results show that the effective methods to improve the performance of structural materials in Pb-Bi coolant are the development of suitable steel alloys, the creation of oxide type coatings, and the control of oxygen inhibition. According to the recently presented research results of URRS, utilization of these methods makes it possible to raise the operating temperature limit to 620-650 dg C. It provides the possibility of usage of Pb-Bi coolant for the transmutation system, HYPER some day. (Author). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 15 figs

  16. A study on the corrosion characteristics of lead-bismuth liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Nam Il; Park, Won S.; Han, Seok Jung; Jeong, Won Seok

    1999-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic has been adopted as a coolant and spallation target material of HYPER (Hybrid Power Extraction Reactor), an accelerator driven subcritical transmutation system. The contents and scope of the present study are to implement systematic survey and analyses of available results on the corrosion characteristics of Pb-Bi liquid metal which are considered to be the most important among Pb-Bi coolant technologies and to provide fundamental bases for future research efforts. Major parameters affecting the corrosion of structural materials in liquid metals are temperature, flow velocity, contents of impurities in coolant, compositions of structural materials, and so forth. It was already known that for traditional commercial austenitic steels of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti type and 12%Cr ferritic steels, the operating temperatures of Pb-Bi coolant cannot be raised above 400 dg C and 450 dg C, respectively. However, extensive researches have been performed to protect structural materials under higher operating temperature such as the development of various kinds of coating methods for steels and the investigations of coolant inhibition by different chemical elements. The available experimental results show that the effective methods to improve the performance of structural materials in Pb-Bi coolant are the development of suitable steel alloys, the creation of oxide type coatings, and the control of oxygen inhibition. According to the recently presented research results of URRS, utilization of these methods makes it possible to raise the operating temperature limit to 620-650 dg C. It provides the possibility of usage of Pb-Bi coolant for the transmutation system, HYPER some day. (Author). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 15 figs.

  17. Study on mitigation of stress corrosion cracking by peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeguchi, Takaharu; Tsutsumi, Kazuya; Toyoda, Masahiko; Ohta, Takahiro; Okabe, Taketoshi; Sato, Tomonobu

    2010-01-01

    In order to verify stability of residual stress improvement effect of peeing for mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in components of PWR plant, relaxation behavior of residual stress induced by water jet peening (WJP) and ultrasonic shot peening (USP) on surface of alloy 600 and its weld metal was investigated under various thermal aging and stress condition considered for actual plant operation. In the case of thermal aging at 320-380degC, surface residual stress relaxation was observed at the early stage of thermal aging, but no significant stress relaxation was observed after that. Applied stress below yield stress does not significantly affect stress relaxation behavior of surface residual stress. Furthermore, it was confirmed that cyclic stress does not accelerate stress relaxation. (author)

  18. Moessbauer study of corrosion induced by acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshed, M.; Hussain, N.; Siddiqui, M.; Anwar-ul-Islam, M.; Rehman, S.; Butt, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    Strictly speaking acid rain refers to wet precipitation of pollutants S0/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ and NO/sub x/HNO/sub 3/ which have dissolved in cloud and rain droplets to from sulphuric and nitric acids. Acid rain has seriously damaged pine and spruce forests in Canada, USA and Europe. In these areas it has caused damage to buildings, reduced fish population due to acidification of lakes and rivers, and affected health of human beings as a result of poor water quality. The corrosion products formed in a simulated acid rain environment have been identified with transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy using a /sup 57/Co source. They were found to be gamma-FeOOH, alpha-FeOOH, gamma-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and a phase with unfamiliar parameters which seems to be amorphous in nature and can be considered as an intermediate phase. (author)

  19. Synthesis and study of the mechanisms of action of biodegradable additives for corrosion and scale inhibition in industrial cooling water systems; Mise au point et etude des mecanismes d'action d'additifs biodegradables pour l'inhibition du pouvoir entartrant et corrosif des eaux de refroidissement industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estievenart, C.

    2003-11-01

    Industrial cooling water systems undergo more and more environmental constraints. The recycling of water increases the risks of scale deposition and corrosion. The use of chemical additives to inhibit these phenomena is necessary. Poly-aspartates are proposed as green multi-functional inhibitors. Polymers of different characteristics have been synthesized by different ways. Their efficiency towards scale deposition and corrosion is determined by electrochemical techniques in different test conditions (composition of the test water, temperature, flow rate, concentration of additive...). Their biodegradability is also evaluated. These poly-aspartates inhibit both nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals, but also corrosion. Their efficiency depends on the characteristics of the polymers and their way of synthesis. The morphology of scale and corrosion deposits is modified in the presence of poly-aspartate. The mechanism of action of poly-aspartates combines adsorption, dispersion, complexation with both iron and calcium ions and insertion in the crystal lattice. (author)

  20. Synthesis and study of the mechanisms of action of biodegradable additives for corrosion and scale inhibition in industrial cooling water systems; Mise au point et etude des mecanismes d'action d'additifs biodegradables pour l'inhibition du pouvoir entartrant et corrosif des eaux de refroidissement industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estievenart, C

    2003-11-01

    Industrial cooling water systems undergo more and more environmental constraints. The recycling of water increases the risks of scale deposition and corrosion. The use of chemical additives to inhibit these phenomena is necessary. Poly-aspartates are proposed as green multi-functional inhibitors. Polymers of different characteristics have been synthesized by different ways. Their efficiency towards scale deposition and corrosion is determined by electrochemical techniques in different test conditions (composition of the test water, temperature, flow rate, concentration of additive...). Their biodegradability is also evaluated. These poly-aspartates inhibit both nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals, but also corrosion. Their efficiency depends on the characteristics of the polymers and their way of synthesis. The morphology of scale and corrosion deposits is modified in the presence of poly-aspartate. The mechanism of action of poly-aspartates combines adsorption, dispersion, complexation with both iron and calcium ions and insertion in the crystal lattice. (author)

  1. A novel high-strength and highly corrosive biodegradable Fe-Pd alloy: Structural, mechanical and in vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Msallamová, Šárka; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-10-01

    Recently, iron-based materials have been considered as candidates for the fabrication of biodegradable load-bearing implants. Alloying with palladium has been found to be a suitable approach to enhance the insufficient corrosion rate of iron-based alloys. In this work, we have extensively compared the microstructure, the mechanical and corrosion properties, and the cytotoxicity of an FePd2 (wt%) alloy prepared by three different routes - casting, mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering (SPS), and mechanical alloying and the space holder technique (SHT). The properties of the FePd2 (wt%) were compared with pure Fe prepared in the same processes. The preparation route significantly influenced the material properties. Materials prepared by SPS possessed the highest values of mechanical properties (CYS~750-850MPa) and higher corrosion rates than the casted materials. Materials prepared by SHT contained approximately 60% porosity; therefore, their mechanical properties reached the lowest values, and they had the highest corrosion rates, approximately 0.7-1.2mm/a. Highly porous FePd2 was tested in vitro according to the ISO 10993-5 standard using L929 cells, and two-fold diluted extracts showed acceptable cytocompatibility. In general, alloying with Pd enhanced both mechanical properties and corrosion rates and did not decrease the cytocompatibility of the studied materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of dry scroll vacuum pumping system for efficient pumping of corrosive gas at medium vacuum range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, I.; Chandresh, B.G.; Guha, K.C.; Sarkar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dry vacuum pumping systems attracts many applications because of its inherent capability of corrosion free pumping. It becomes a common trait of application in Thermo Nuclear Fusion, Semi conductor, Isotope separation industries etc. Thermo nuclear fusion requires a train of specially sealed roots pump backed by suitable capacity dry screw or reciprocating pump. Similarly corrosive fluoride gas pumping requires hermetically sealed specially designed dry scroll vacuum pump. Plant emergency operation however involves train of specially sealed roots pump backed with scroll pump for faster evacuation. In our attempt an indigenously designed scroll pump and associated system are designed to pump corrosive gases in a way to confine the corrosion product within the system. In order to execute the design, a numerical code for low pressure application is developed

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Surface-Treated Implant Ti-6Al-4V by Electrochemical Polarization and Impedance Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subir; Yadav, Kasturi

    2011-04-01

    Implant materials for orthopedic and heart surgical services demand a better corrosion resistance material than the presently used titanium alloys, where protective oxide layer breaks down on a prolonged stay in aqueous physiological human body, giving rise to localized corrosion of pitting, crevice, and fretting corrosion. A few surface treatments on Ti alloy, in the form of anodization, passivation, and thermal oxidation, followed by soaking in Hank solution have been found to be very effective in bringing down the corrosion rate as well as producing high corrosion resistance surface film as reflected from electrochemical polarization, cyclic polarization, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The XRD study revealed the presence of various types of oxides along with anatase and rutile on the surface, giving rise to high corrosion resistance film. While surface treatment of passivation and thermal oxidation could reduce the corrosion rate by 1/5th, anodization in 0.3 M phosphoric acid at 16 V versus stainless steel cathode drastically brought down the corrosion rate by less than ten times. The mechanism of corrosion behavior and formation of different surface films is better understood from the determination of EIS parameters derived from the best-fit equivalent circuit.

  4. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  5. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  6. Study on Mitigation Method of Solder Corrosion for Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hee Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of 62Sn36Pb2Ag solder connections poses serious difficulties for outdoor-exposed photovoltaic (PV modules, as connection degradation contributes to the increase in series resistance (RS of PV modules. In this study, we investigated a corrosion mitigation method based on the corrosion mechanism. The effect of added sacrificial metal on the reliability of PV modules was evaluated using the oxidation-reduction (redox reaction under damp heat (DH conditions. Experimental results after exposure to DH show that the main reason for the decrease in power was a drop in the module’s fill factor. This drop was attributed to the increase of RS. The drop in output power of the PV module without added sacrificial metal is greater than that of the sample with sacrificial metal. Electroluminescence and current-voltage mapping analysis also show that the PV module with sacrificial metal experienced less degradation than the sample without sacrificial metal.

  7. Study on fracture and stress corrosion cracking behavior of casing sour service materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequera, C.; Gordon, H.

    2003-01-01

    Present work describes sulphide stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness tests performed to high strength sour service materials of T-95, C-100 and C-110 oil well tubular grades. P-110 was considered as a reference case, since it is one of the high strength materials included in specification 5CT of American Petroleum Institute, API. Sulphide stress corrosion cracking, impact and fracture toughness values obtained in the tests show that there is a correspondence among them. A decreasing classification order was established, namely C-100, T-95, C-110 and P-110. Special grades steels studied demonstrated a better behavior in the evaluated properties than the reference case material grade: P-110. Results obtained indicate that a higher sulphide stress corrosion cracking resistance is related to a higher toughness. The fracture toughness results evidence the hydrogen influence on reducing the toughness values. (author)

  8. Quantitative Study on Corrosion of Steel Strands Based on Self-Magnetic Flux Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runchuan Xia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a new computing method to quantitatively and non-destructively determine the corrosion of steel strands by analyzing the self-magnetic flux leakage (SMFL signals from them. The magnetic dipole model and three growth models (Logistic model, Exponential model, and Linear model were proposed to theoretically analyze the characteristic value of SMFL. Then, the experimental study on the corrosion detection by the magnetic sensor was carried out. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and signal collection method were also introduced. The results show that the Logistic Growth model is verified as the optimal model for calculating the magnetic field with good fitting effects. Combined with the experimental data analysis, the amplitudes of the calculated values (BxL(x,z curves agree with the measured values in general. This method provides significant application prospects for the evaluation of the corrosion and the residual bearing capacity of steel strand.

  9. Laboratory Study of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw-fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel

    1997-01-01

    The components contributing to corrosion, HCl(g)SO2(g), KCl and K2SO4 were studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C material temperature and 600/800C flue gas temperature at time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of ash...... deposits in air was examined at 525C-700C. Finally exposures were undertaken combining the aforementioned aggressive gas environment with the ash deposits. Thus the corrosion potential of individual components were evaluated and also whether they had a synergistic, antagonistic or additive effect on one...... another to influence the overall corrosion rate....

  10. Study of vanadium-based chemical conversion coating on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.H.; Ger, M.D.; Hwu, W.H.; Sung, Y.; Liu, Y.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, magnesium alloy (AZ61) was immersed in vanadium containing bath with various conditions, such as the vanadium concentration, immersion time and bath temperature. The results indicate that increase of both vanadium concentration and immersion time produces a thicker conversion layer. However, when immersion time is too long, it will worsen the corrosion resistance due to the increasing of the crack density. The experimental parameter of bath temperature has no significant effect on corrosion resistance. Our results demonstrated that the better corrosion resistance coating can be obtained when the samples are submitted to an immersion in the conversion bath containing NaVO 3 with concentration of 30 g l -1 for 10 min at 80 deg. C. The presented conversion treatment has its potential to replace the chrome-based conversion coating treatment

  11. Corrosion studies on Cu-Ni alloys and ferritic steel in salt water for desalination service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibad, P.R.; Balachandra, J.

    1975-01-01

    Corrosion studies on In 838 and In 848 alloys in 3% NaCl solution, synthetic sea water and in 3% NaCl at pH3 and pH10 indicate that the latter alloy is more corrosion resistant than the former at room (28 0 C), and boiling temperature (101 0 C) and at 125 0 C. Ferritic steel is unaffected in boiling synthetic sea water. In boiling 3% NaCl solution at pH3 and pH10, (the pH values adjusted at room temperature) increase in the rate of corrosion of ferritic steel compared to that at room temperature has been observed. A fair correlation between polarization characteristics and dissolution rates in these solutions is seen for all these materials. (author)

  12. Corrosion in the Flue Gas Cleaning System of a Biomass-Fired Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Olesen, R. E.; Gensmann, P.

    2017-01-01

    After only a few years operation, corrosiondamage was observed in the flue gas cleaning system of abiomass power plant. The corrosion was on the lower partof the gas/gas heat exchanger fabricated from A242weathering steel, where UNS S31600 bolts were used toattach sealing strips to the rotor. Thick...... iron oxides (up to5 mm) had formed on the weathering steel, and theseoxides also contained chlorine and sulfur. In this area of theheat exchanger, weathering steel has not had the optimalwet/dry cycles required to achieve a protective oxide. Dueto the thick growing oxide on the rotor, the UNS S31600......bolts were under stress and this together with the presenceof accumulated chlorine between the sealing strips andbolts resulted in stress corrosion cracking and rupture. Inaddition, Zn-K-Cl deposits were agglomerated in the ductafter the DeNOx unit. Zn was also a constituent of corrosionproducts...

  13. Ultrasonic Measurement of Erosion/corrosion Rates in Industrial Piping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A. N.; Safavi, V.; Honarvar, F.

    2011-06-01

    Industrial piping systems that carry aggressive corrosion or erosion agents may suffer from a gradual wall thickness reduction that eventually threatens pipe integrity. Thinning rates could be estimated from the very small change in wall thickness values measured by conventional ultrasound over a time span of at least a few months. However, measurements performed over shorter time spans would yield no useful information—minor signal distortions originating from grain noise and ultrasonic equipment imperfections prevent a meaningful estimate of the minuscule reduction in echo travel time. Using a Model-Based Estimation (MBE) technique, a signal processing scheme has been developed that enables the echo signals from the pipe wall to be separated from the noise. This was implemented in a laboratory experimental program, featuring accelerated erosion/corrosion on the inner wall of a test pipe. The result was a reduction in the uncertainty in the wall thinning rate by a factor of four. This improvement enables a more rapid response by system operators to a change in plant conditions that could pose a pipe integrity problem. It also enables a rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of new corrosion inhibiting agents under plant operating conditions.

  14. PPM-based System for Guided Waves Communication Through Corrosion Resistant Multi-wire Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trane, G.; Mijarez, R.; Guevara, R.; Pascacio, D.

    Novel wireless communication channels are a necessity in applications surrounded by harsh environments, for instance down-hole oil reservoirs. Traditional radio frequency (RF) communication schemes are not capable of transmitting signals through metal enclosures surrounded by corrosive gases and liquids. As an alternative to RF, a pulse position modulation (PPM) guided waves communication system has been developed and evaluated using a corrosion resistant 4H18 multi-wire cable, commonly used to descend electronic gauges in down-hole oil applications, as the communication medium. The system consists of a transmitter and a receiver that utilizes a PZT crystal, for electrical/mechanical coupling, attached to each extreme of the multi-wire cable. The modulator is based on a microcontroller, which transmits60 kHz guided wave pulses, and the demodulator is based on a commercial digital signal processor (DSP) module that performs real time DSP algorithms. Experimental results are presented, which were obtained using a 1m corrosion resistant 4H18multi-wire cable, commonly used with downhole electronic gauges in the oil sector. Although there was significant dispersion and multiple mode excitations of the transmitted guided wave energy pulses, the results show that data rates on the order of 500 bits per second are readily available employing PPM and simple communications techniques.

  15. A comparative study of leaves extracts for corrosion inhibition effect on aluminium alloy in alkaline medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Chaubey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the comparative inhibition study of some plants leaves extract namely Cannabis sativa (CS, Rauwolfia serpentina (RS, Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Annona squamosa (AS and Adhatoda vasica (AV on the corrosion of aluminium alloy (AA in 1 M NaOH. The corrosion tests were performance by using gravimetric, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance (LPR techniques. RS showed maximum inhibition efficiency (η%, 97% at 0.2 g L−1. Potentiodynamic polarization curves justified that all the inhibitors are mixed-type. Surface morphology of AA is carried by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM.

  16. Study of scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking for steam generator tubes and scratch control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, F.; Xu, X.; Liu, X.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces field cases for scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking (SISCC) of steam generator tubes in PWR and current studies in laboratories. According to analysis result of broke tubes, scratches caused intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) with outburst. The effect of microstructure for nickel-base alloys, residual stresses caused by scratching process and water chemistry on SISCC and possible mechanism of SISCC are discussed. The result shows that scratch-induced microstructure evolution contributes to SISCC significantly. The causes of scratches during steam generator tubing manufacturing and installation process are stated and improved reliability with scratch control is highlighted for steam generator tubes in newly built nuclear power plants. (author)

  17. Study of scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking for steam generator tubes and scratch control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, F.; Xu, X.; Liu, X. [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai (China); Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Research, Shenyang (China)

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces field cases for scratch-induced stress corrosion cracking (SISCC) of steam generator tubes in PWR and current studies in laboratories. According to analysis result of broke tubes, scratches caused intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) with outburst. The effect of microstructure for nickel-base alloys, residual stresses caused by scratching process and water chemistry on SISCC and possible mechanism of SISCC are discussed. The result shows that scratch-induced microstructure evolution contributes to SISCC significantly. The causes of scratches during steam generator tubing manufacturing and installation process are stated and improved reliability with scratch control is highlighted for steam generator tubes in newly built nuclear power plants. (author)

  18. Thermometric Study of Inhibition of Aluminium Corrosion in Hydrochloric Acid Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Al Gaber, A.S. [امينة سلطان الجابر; Seliman, S. A.; Mourad, M.

    1997-01-01

    The use of 6- amino - 4- (4-phenyl)-l,4- dihydro -3- methylpyrano [2,3- c] pyrazole -5- carbonitrile and some related compounds as corrosion inhibitors for aluminium in 2 M HCl solution was studied by the thermometric method. The results indicate that the additives reduce the corrosion rate via weak adsorption through the cationic oxygen of the pyran ring. They act as mixed inhibitors and their adsorption was found to obey Frumkin's isotherm. The inhibition efficiency of the additives is rela...

  19. Study of alloy 600'S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes

  20. Study of alloy 600 (NC15Fe) stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Richard

    1993-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies: hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author) [fr

  1. Effect of elevated lithium on the waterside corrosion of zircaloy-4: Experimental and predictive studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecheur, D.; Giordano, A.; Picard, E.; Billot, P.; Thomazet, J.

    1997-01-01

    Lithium and boron content in the coolant are known to influence the oxidation behaviour of the fuel cladding. Since new PWR operating conditions could consist in an increase of the lithium and the boron concentration in the coolant early in the cycle, a specific study has been conducted to analyze and to predict the effect of such new water chemistry conditions on the oxidation kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 material. Experimental studies have been performed in out-of-pile loop tests, under one and two phase flow heat transfer in various water chemistry conditions (0≤Li≤350 ppm, 0≤B≤1000 ppm, 0≤K≤56 ppm). A simulation of the effect of elevated lithium on the corrosion has been made using the semi-empirical COCHISE corrosion code. Under one phase flow heat transfer conditions, the addition of lithium hydroxide in the coolant increases the oxidation rate, essentially in the post-transition regime for low lithium levels (≤ 75 ppm) and immediately in the pre-transition phase for very high lithium level (350 ppm). Under two phase flow heat transfer, an enhancement of the corrosion is observed in the area of the rod submitted to boiling. Based on the out-of-pile loop test performed in presence of KOH instead of LiOH, such an enhancement of the corrosion appears to be due to a lithium enrichment in the oxide layer induced by boiling and not to a pH effect. The simulation of the increase of lithium content in the coolant from 2.2 to 3.5 ppm leads to an enhancement in corrosion rates which becomes only significant at high burn up. This predictive result of elevated lithium effect on corrosion is then compared with oxidation data derived from reactors operating under an elevated lithium regime. (author). 14 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Effect of elevated lithium on the waterside corrosion of zircaloy-4: Experimental and predictive studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecheur, D; Giordano, A; Picard, E; Billot, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Thomazet, J [FRAMATOME, Nuclear Fuel Div., Lyon (France)

    1997-02-01

    Lithium and boron content in the coolant are known to influence the oxidation behaviour of the fuel cladding. Since new PWR operating conditions could consist in an increase of the lithium and the boron concentration in the coolant early in the cycle, a specific study has been conducted to analyze and to predict the effect of such new water chemistry conditions on the oxidation kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 material. Experimental studies have been performed in out-of-pile loop tests, under one and two phase flow heat transfer in various water chemistry conditions (0{<=}Li{<=}350 ppm, 0{<=}B{<=}1000 ppm, 0{<=}K{<=}56 ppm). A simulation of the effect of elevated lithium on the corrosion has been made using the semi-empirical COCHISE corrosion code. Under one phase flow heat transfer conditions, the addition of lithium hydroxide in the coolant increases the oxidation rate, essentially in the post-transition regime for low lithium levels ({<=} 75 ppm) and immediately in the pre-transition phase for very high lithium level (350 ppm). Under two phase flow heat transfer, an enhancement of the corrosion is observed in the area of the rod submitted to boiling. Based on the out-of-pile loop test performed in presence of KOH instead of LiOH, such an enhancement of the corrosion appears to be due to a lithium enrichment in the oxide layer induced by boiling and not to a pH effect. The simulation of the increase of lithium content in the coolant from 2.2 to 3.5 ppm leads to an enhancement in corrosion rates which becomes only significant at high burn up. This predictive result of elevated lithium effect on corrosion is then compared with oxidation data derived from reactors operating under an elevated lithium regime. (author). 14 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  3. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  4. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters; Fragilisation et processus anodiques en corrosion sous contrainte: etude des parametres micro-mecaniques influents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnes, J.Ph

    2006-11-15

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Fe{sub 2} copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl{sub 2} solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  5. Electrochemical noise based corrosion monitoring: FY 2001 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGAR, C.

    2001-01-01

    Underground storage tanks made of mild steel are used to contain radioactive waste generated by plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Corrosion of the walls of these tanks is a major issue. Corrosion monitoring and control are currently provided at the Hanford Site through a waste chemistry sampling and analysis program. In this process, tank waste is sampled, analyzed and compared to a selection of laboratory exposures of coupons in simulated waste. Tank wall corrosion is inferred by matching measured tank chemistries to the results of the laboratory simulant testing. This method is expensive, time consuming, and does not yield real-time data. Corrosion can be monitored through coupon exposure studies and a variety of electrochemical techniques. A small number of these techniques have been tried at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex to determine the corrosivity of nuclear waste stored in underground tanks [1]. Coupon exposure programs, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and electrical resistance techniques have all been tried with limited degrees of success. These techniques are most effective for monitoring uniform corrosion, but are not well suited for early detection of localized forms of corrosion such as pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Pitting and SCC have been identified as the most likely modes of corrosion failure for Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST'S) [2-3]. Over the last 20 years, a new corrosion monitoring system has shown promise in detecting localized corrosion and measuring uniform corrosion rates in process industries [4-20]. The system measures electrochemical noise (EN) generated by corrosion. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems monitor and record fluctuations in current and voltage over time from electrodes immersed in an environment of interest. Laboratory studies and field

  6. Corrosion and cathodic protection of buried pipes: study, simulation and application of solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoun, Brahim; Serir, Lazhar; Niboucha, Karima

    2006-01-01

    Cathodic protection is intensively used on steel pipes in petroleum and gas industries. It is a technique used to prevent corrosion which transforms the whole pipe into a cathode of a corrosion cell. Two types of cathodic protection systems are usually used: 1) the galvanic protection systems which use galvanic anodes, also called sacrificial anodes being electrochemically more electronegative than the structure to be protected and 2) the imposed current systems, which through a current generator will deliver a direct current from the anode to the structure to be protected. The aim of this work is to design a cathodic protection system of a pipe by imposed current with auxiliary electric solar energy. (O.M.)

  7. Corrosion inhibition measures in primary cooling water system during refurbishment of Cirus, re-commissioning and subsequent operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, K.K.; Ramesh, N.; Sharma, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Cirus is a 40 MWth, heavy water moderated, demineralized light water cooled, natural uranium fuelled research reactor. Reactor was commissioned in year 1960 and operated satisfactorily till 1990. After that availability factor started decreasing mainly due to equipment outage exhibiting signs of ageing. Based upon systematic ageing studies and assessment of condition of systems, structures and components, a refurbishment plan including safety upgrades was drawn up. Reactor was shut down in October 1997 for execution of jobs. After completion of refurbishment jobs reactor was started back in October 2002 and power operation was achieved in 2003. Primary cooling water (PCW) system consists of re-circulating pumps, heat exchangers, expansion tank, piping, valves, emergency storage reservoir (Ball Tank) and other components. Normally the fission heat from fuel is removed by re-circulating coolant in closed loop and transferred to seawater via heat exchangers. In case of outage of pumps, shut down cooling is provided by flow of water from Ball Tank under gravity to the underground dump tanks. The dissolved oxygen is maintained below 2 ppm and pH is maintained neutral to minimize corrosion of fuel cladding (Aluminum). This paper highlights the experience gained during segmentation of primary cooling water pipelines for pressure testing, measures taken to corrosion inhibition of primary cooling water lines to permit execution of refurbishment jobs, inspections and actions taken to repair/replace the corroded PCW pipe line segments, observations regarding corrosion related failures, re-commissioning of the system after refurbishment, assessment for safe reactor operation and experience during power operation. (author)

  8. Design for Corrosion Control of Potable Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    systems in buildings are due to poor design and installation procedures. Also, due to inexperience, the cost of instal- lation of plas; tic piping is often...potential, favorable anode-to-cathode area relacion - ships, large distances between anodes and cathodes, and high resistivity in the metallic current...resulting from a galvanic cell caused by a thermal gradient. 67 - mind Thermoplastic -- Capable of being repeatedly softened 1, y heating and hardened

  9. Advances in concrete materials for sewer systems affected by microbial induced concrete corrosion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Ukrainczyk, Neven; Koraimann, Günther; Kienesberger, Sabine; Dietzel, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Microbial induced concrete corrosion (MICC) is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms of subsurface infrastructure worldwide, raising the demand for sustainable construction materials in corrosive environments. This review aims to summarize the key research progress acquired during the last decade regarding the understanding of MICC reaction mechanisms and the development of durable materials from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special focus was laid on aspects governing concrete - micoorganisms interaction since being the central process steering biogenic acid corrosion. The insufficient knowledge regarding the latter is proposed as a central reason for insufficient progress in tailored material development for aggressive wastewater systems. To date no cement-based material exists, suitable to withstand the aggressive conditions related to MICC over its entire service life. Research is in particular needed on the impact of physiochemical material parameters on microbial community structure, growth characteristics and limitations within individual concrete speciation. Herein an interdisciplinary approach is presented by combining results from material sciences, microbiology, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to stimulate the development of novel and sustainable materials and mitigation strategies for MICC. For instance, the application of antibacteriostatic agents is introduced as an effective instrument to limit microbial growth on concrete surfaces in aggressive sewer environments. Additionally, geopolymer concretes are introduced as highly resistent in acid environments, thus representing a possible green alternative to conventional cement-based construction materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Strontium concentrations in corrosion products from residential drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Luxton, Todd P; Scheckel, Kirk G; Maynard, J Barry

    2013-05-21

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) will require some U.S. drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) to monitor nonradioactive strontium (Sr(2+)) in drinking water in 2013. Iron corrosion products from four DWDS were examined to assess the potential for Sr(2+) binding and release. Average Sr(2+) concentrations in the outermost layer of the corrosion products ranged from 3 to 54 mg kg(-1) and the Sr(2+) drinking water concentrations were all ≤0.3 mg L(-1). Micro-X-ray adsorption near edge structure spectroscopy and linear combination fitting determined that Sr(2+) was principally associated with CaCO3. Sr(2+) was also detected as a surface complex associated with α-FeOOH. Iron particulates deposited on a filter inside a home had an average Sr(2+) concentration of 40.3 mg kg(-1) and the associated drinking water at a tap was 210 μg L(-1). The data suggest that elevated Sr(2+) concentrations may be associated with iron corrosion products that, if disturbed, could increase Sr(2+) concentrations above the 0.3 μg L(-1) US EPA reporting threshold. Disassociation of very small particulates could result in drinking water Sr(2+) concentrations that exceed the US EPA health reference limit (4.20 mg kg(-1) body weight).

  11. Metal alloys for the new generation of compressors at hydrogen stations: Parametric study of corrosion behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2017-01-01

    , consequently, significantly reduce the final cost of hydrogen production. The correct choice of ionic liquid and construction materials is critical for avoiding significant corrosion problems. Hence, the objective of this study is to evaluate the compatibility of various austenitic stainless steels and nickel...

  12. Studies on yttrium oxide coatings for corrosion protection against molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Y.; Bhandari, Subhankar; Pragatheeswaran; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Das, A.K.; Kumar, Jay; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Yttrium oxide is resistant to corrosion by molten uranium and its alloys. Yttrium oxide is recommended as a protective oxide layer on graphite and metal components used for melting and processing uranium and its alloys. This paper presents studies on the efficacy of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings for barrier applications against molten uranium

  13. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Peter (ed.) [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (GB)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    A general impression from literature studies, presentations by workshop participants and the informal hearing with SKB is that there is in general a strong basis for the handling of copper corrosion in safety assessment. Work has been ongoing in the area for many decades and there appears to be a consensus on several key aspects of corrosion, such as the existence of a threshold potential for localised corrosion. This is of key importance for the assessment of corrosion under repository conditions. Localised corrosion has to be evaluated for the initial oxygenated phase. There is a need to demonstrate that the corrosion profile in reality will be similar to those of small scale experiments, i.e. roughening without real pitting. There is also a need to develop a better and more transparent basis for assessing how much oxygen can be available during the early oxygenated phase. Regarding stress corrosion cracking, there is a need for a consistent and possibly more detailed explanation either why it can be completely disregarded, or accounted for by probabilistic methods. Copper is normally assumed to be resistant to corrosion in oxygen free environments. However, this is not correct for the extremely long time period of one million years covered by SKB's safety assessment. Copper will react with sulphide by reduction of water. This reaction is the basis for SKB's performance assessment model for copper corrosion. The key aspect of this model is the availability of sulphide. SKB may need to address in more detail the availability of sulphide from the groundwater and the buffer bentonite and its speciation and solubility behaviour. However, the most sensitive assumption in SKB's modelling appears to be the assumption of zero microbial activity in the buffer throughout the assessment time scale of 10{sup 6} years. A detailed justification of this assumption is needed and possibly also 'what-if' calculations to illustrate consequences if this

  15. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Peter

    2006-03-01

    A general impression from literature studies, presentations by workshop participants and the informal hearing with SKB is that there is in general a strong basis for the handling of copper corrosion in safety assessment. Work has been ongoing in the area for many decades and there appears to be a consensus on several key aspects of corrosion, such as the existence of a threshold potential for localised corrosion. This is of key importance for the asse